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Sample records for rasmus grip jan-gunnar

  1. GRIPPING TOOL

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, R.J.

    1961-12-12

    A self-actuated gripping tool is described for transferring fuel elements and the like into reactors and other inaccessible locations. The tool will grasp or release the load only when properly positioned for this purpose. In addition, the load cannot be released except when unsupported by the tool, so that jarring or contact will not bring about accidental release of the load. The gripping members or jaws of the device are cam-actuated by an axially slidable shaft which has two lockable positions. A spring urges the shaft into one position and a solenoid is provided to overcome the spring and move it into the other position. The weight of the tool operates a sleeve to lock the shaft in its existing position. Only when the cable supporting the tool is slack is the device capable of being actuated either to grasp or release its load. (AEC)

  2. Wire Test Grip Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Wire-testing issues, such as the gripping strains imposed on the wire, play a critical role in obtaining clean data. In a standard test frame fitted with flat wedge grips, the gripping action alone creates stresses on the wire specimen that cause the wire to fail at the grip location. A new test frame, which is outfitted with a vacuum chamber, negated the use of any conventional commercially available wire test fixtures, as only 7 in. (17.8 cm) existed between the grip faces. An innovative grip fixture was designed to test thin gauge wire for a variety of applications in an existing Instron test frame outfitted with a vacuum chamber.

  3. NASA GRIP Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA is getting a GRIP on hurricanes in 2010. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment will help us better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurric...

  4. Grip Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    A researcher with the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment works aboard the NASA DC-8 during a flight over the Gulf of Mexico, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010. GRIP is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. Grips for Lightweight Tensile Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, William G., Jr.; Gibson, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    Set of grips developed for tensile testing of lightweight composite materials. Double-wedge design substantially increases gripping force and reduces slippage. Specimen held by grips made of hardened wedges. Assembly screwed into load cell in tensile-testing machine.

  6. Timelapse: GRIPS Assembly

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The GRIPS team integrated and tested their balloon payload at NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas, July 18-Aug. 28, 2015. After putting the finishing touches on the payl...

  7. NASA Hurricane Mission - GRIP

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This is an overview of NASA's hurricane research campaign called Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The six-week mission was conducted in coordination with NOAA and the National Sc...

  8. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    The NASA DC-8 airplane sits on the tarmac, Monday, Aug. 16, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. , as preparations continue for its part in the GRIP experiment. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  9. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-14

    The NASA DC-8 airplane sits on the tarmac, Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. , as preparations continue for its part in the GRIP experiment. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  10. Bi-stem gripping apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Fred G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to devices which grip cylindrical structures and more particularly to a device which has three arcuate gripping members having frictional surfaces for gripping and compressing a bi-stem. The bi-stem gripping apparatus is constructed having a pair of side gripping members, and an intermediate gripping member disposed between them. Sheets of a gum stock silicone rubber with frictional gripping surfaces are bonded to the inner region of the gripping members and provide frictional engagement between the bi-stem and the apparatus. A latch secures the gripping apparatus to a bi-stem, and removable handles are attached, allowing an astronaut to pull the bi-stem from its cassette. A tethering ring on the outside of the gripping apparatus provides a convenient point to which a lanyard may be attached.

  11. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    Errol Korn, lower left, explains the dropsonde experiment to Janel Thomas, a University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) graduate student, seated, as Bob Pasken, standing left, and Jeff Halverson, a GRIP project scientist from UMBC, look on inside NASA's DC-8 airplane, at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers) To read more about the GRIP Mission go here NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  12. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-14

    Jeffrey Beyon, left, and Paul Joseph Petzar, right, from NASA's Langley Research Center, work with DAWN Air Data Acquisition and Processing software aboard NASA's DC-8 research aircraft, Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010, in support of the GRIP experiment at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  13. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-14

    Jeffrey Beyon, lower right, and Paul Joseph Petzar, right, researchers from NASA's Langley Research Center, speak with Ramesh Kakar right, of the NASA Earth Science Division as they work with DAWN Air Data Acquisition and Processing software aboard NASA's DC-8 research aircraft, Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010, in support of the GRIP experiment at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  14. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-14

    Errol Korn, lower left, explains the dropsonde experiment to Janel Thomas, a University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) graduate student, seated, as Bob Pasken, standing left, and Jeff Halverson, a GRIP project scientist from UMBC, look on inside NASA's DC-8 airplane, at Fort Lauderdale International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  15. Norms for hand grip strength.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, D G; Pearn, J; Barnes, A; Young, C M; Kehoe, M; Newman, J

    1984-01-01

    Norms for hand grip strength of healthy children are presented. Sex and age specific centiles for age 5 to 18 years have been determined using a portable strain gauge dynamometer with an accuracy of 0.5 N. The test group comprised 1417 healthy, urban school children from a middle class suburb of Brisbane. Mean maximum grip strength (of four tests, two with each hand) and mean peak grip strength (best of four tests) were recorded. Mean values of peak grip strength were 10 to 15% higher than the average maximum grip in all age groups. At all ages girls had a reduced grip strength compared with boys and although boys manifested a continual, approximately linear increase in grip strength through all age groups, girls manifested an approximately linear increase up to 13 years after which mean hand grip usually remained constant. By the age of 18 years boys had a mean grip strength some 60% higher than girls. Correlations with height and weight are also presented. "Handedness' influenced grip strength and was most noticeable in children aged over 10 years. The clinical use of hand grip strength centiles for the early indication of neurological and muscular disorders and for following the natural history of neuromuscular disease is discussed. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6732276

  16. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    A researcher points out the trajectory of a weather pattern on a computer monitor during a flight aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010, over the Gulf of Mexico. Sceintists and researchers flew Tuesday to study weather as part of the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  17. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    Errol Korn, seated left, deploys a dropsonde experiment over the Gulf of Mexico during a flight aboard the NASA DC-8 as Janel Thomas, a University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) graduate student, and Bob Pasken, look on , Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  18. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    Cloud formations are seen through the window of NASA DC-8 aircraft during a flight, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010, over the Gulf of Mexico where researchers were studying weather patterns as part of trhe Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  19. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    Syed Ismail, from the Langley Research Center, principal investigator for the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) is seen aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Monday, August 16, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  20. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-29

    The eye of Hurricane Earl in the Atlantic Ocean is seen from NASA’s DC-8 research aircraft, Monday, Aug. 30, 2010. This flight through the eyewall caught Earl just as it was intensifying from a Category 2 to a Category 4 hurricane. The flights are part of the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, a NASA Earth science field experiment being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. (NASA/Jane Peterson)

  1. A new manual power grip.

    PubMed

    Dawson, N M; Felle, P; O'Donovan, D K

    1998-01-01

    A manual power grip for holding a cylindrical object using a relaxed index finger is described and analysed. In a group of 21 young adult students it provided greater grip strength than the conventional oblique power grip. It allowed a significant increase in the range of adduction-abduction at the wrist. In recent years it appears to have been empirically used by a number of top class racquet players and is the basis of the modern assault rifle grip. A new design of strain gauge dynamometer, in the shape of a cylinder, which permits the testing of a number of grip types and wrist positions is described. Standard grip testing protocol is used with this device which also allows the concomitant use of a goniometer for the assessment of wrist mobility.

  2. GRIPPING DEVICE FOR CYLINDRICAL OBJECTS

    DOEpatents

    Pilger, J.P.

    1964-01-21

    A gripping device is designed for fragile cylindrical objects such as for drawing thin-walled tubes. The gripping is done by multiple jaw members held in position by two sets of slots, one defined by keystone-shaped extensions of the outer shell of the device and the other in a movable sleeve held slidably by the extensions. Forward movement oi the sleeve advances the jaws, thereby exerting a controlled, radial pressure on the object being gripped. (AEC)

  3. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-17

    Michael Kavaya, of the NASA Langley Research Center, a Principal Investigator for the DAWN experiment, looks over data with Jeffrey Beyon during a flight of the NASA DC-8, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico. The DAWN experiment, also known as the Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar, is one of many experiments supporting the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  4. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    Simone Tanelli, a researcher from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, talks about the Airbrorne Precipitation Radar (APR-2) aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Monday, Aug.16, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The APR-2, a dual frequency weather radar, is just one of the experiments supporting the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) mission, a NASA Earth science field experiment that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-15

    Susan Kool, a researcher from the Langley Research Center, works on monitoring the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Monday, Aug. 16, 2010, at Fort Lauderdale Hollywood International Airport in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. LASE probes the atmosphere using lasers and is part of the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment is a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  6. GRIP Experiment 2010

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-08-16

    An unidentified researcher looks over the wiring connecting the Airbrorne Precipitation Radar (APR-2) during a flight aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft, Tuesday, Aug. 17, 2010, over the Gulf of Mexico. Scientists taking part in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, a NASA Earth science field experiment in 2010 that is being conducted to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes, flew out over a weather pattern Tuesday to begin their research. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  7. Estimation of grip force using the Grip-ball dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Chkeir, Aly; Jaber, Rana; Hewson, David J; Duchêne, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The Grip-ball is an innovative device that has been designed to measure grip strength. The Grip-ball consists of an airtight ball that contains a pressure sensor and Bluetooth communication system. The Grip-ball can be inflated to different initial pressures, with data available continuously in real time. The aim of this study was to build a model to predict the force applied to the Grip-ball dynamometer based only on the pressure measured by the Grip-ball and its initial pressure. Forces ranging from 2 to 70 kg were applied to a hybrid version of the device for 10 different initial pressures, ranging from atmospheric pressure of 100 kPa through to 190 kPa. A model was constructed to predict applied force, with force as a function of the initial pressure and the pressure measured. The error of the model was calculated as 1.29 kg across all initial pressures and forces applied. The results of the study are comparable with the errors observed for the gold standard in grip force measurement, the Jamar dynamometer. The best results for force prediction were obtained over the range in which frailty is typically detected. The Grip-ball will now be tested using a large population in order to establish clinical norms.

  8. Computing Gravity's Strongest Grip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2008-04-01

    Gravitational physics is entering a new era, one driven by observation, that will begin once gravitational wave interferometers such as LIGO make their first detections. The gravitational waves are produced during violent events such as the merger of two black holes. The detection of these waves or ripples in the fabric of spacetime is a formidable undertaking, requiring innovative engineering, powerful data analysis tools and careful theoretical modeling. In support of this theoretical modeling, recent breakthroughs in numerical relativity have lead to the development of computational tools that allow us to explore where and how gravitational wave observations can constrain or inform our understanding of gravity and astrophysical phenomena. I will review these latest developments, focusing on binary black hole simulations and the role these simulations play in our new understanding of physics and astronomy where gravity exhibits its strongest grip on our spacetime.

  9. Conformal gripping device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a conformal gripping device. In an embodiment of the present invention a conformal gripper device may be disclosed comprising a frame that includes an array of movable pins. The device may also include a roller locking and unlocking system within the frame. The system may comprise a pair of locking rollers for each row of gripper pins to facilitate locking and unlocking the array of gripper pins on a column-by-column basis. The system may also include a striker element that may force the locking rollers to roll along an angled roll surface to facilitate unlocking of the array of pins on a column-by-column basis. The system may further include an electromagnetic actuator or solenoid and permanent magnets to facilitate movement of the striker element and the locking rollers.

  10. The Grip of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondhalekar, Prabhakar

    2001-09-01

    Gravity is one of the most inexplicable forces of nature, controlling everything, from the expansion of the Universe to the ebb and flow of ocean tides. The search for the laws of motion and gravitation began more than two thousand years ago, a quest that Prabhakar Gondhalekar recounts in The Grip of Gravity. Beginning with Aristotle and concluding with Planck, Gondhalekar outlines a 'genealogy' of gravity and lucidly explains how previous explanations have shaped the most recent development in the field, string theory. In this work, physicist and astronomer Gondhalekar describes experiments, both planned and proposed, and clearly explains natural phenomena like ocean tides, seasons, ice ages, the formation of planets, stars, and exotic objects like black holes and neutron stars, which are all controlled by gravity. Including anecdotes and thumb-nail sketches of the personalities involved, The Grip of Gravity provides an introduction to the foundation of modern physics and shows how the current developments in string theory may lead to a new and radical interpretation of gravity. Prabhakar Gondhalekar is an Honorary Fellow in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College, London. Until his retirement in 1998, he was the head of the Space Astronomy Group at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where he had been a researcher for 18 years. His research has included a number of topics in galactic and extragalactic astronomy, with his major work focusing on the interstellar medium and active galactic nuclei. Gondhalekar has been awarded Royal Society, Leverhulme Trust, and NATO Research Fellowships to do research in universities in the United States and Israel.

  11. Mechanical hand for gripping objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K. H.; Johnston, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    End effector serves as "hand" for remote manipulator spacecraft system to grasp objects of various sizes. Device has built in flexible wrist joint "cartilage" for increased gripping force without significant strain on mechanical connections.

  12. Precision grip and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fellows, S J; Noth, J; Schwarz, M

    1998-09-01

    In order to investigate sensorimotor processing and force development in Parkinson's disease, 16 patients, four patients with hemiparkinsonism and 12 age-matched normal subjects were assessed during lifting and holding of an object in a precision grip between thumb and forefinger, or holding the object in this grip at a fixed height above a table. In the former case, object loading could be changed between lifts without warning. In the latter case, unexpected step load changes to the object were applied to the object with a torque motor. All procedures could be applied with or without visual control of the hand and the object. Normal subjects lifted an unpredictable load employing the grip force parameters used in the preceding lift. If a load change was encountered, the parameters became adapted to the new conditions during the lift, modulating grip forces to match the loading. Parkinsonian patients retained this strategy and the ability to regulate grip forces according to load. Under all conditions, however, parkinsonian subjects developed abnormally high grip forces in both the lift and the hold phase, although the ratio of these forces remained normal. Lifting height was normal in parkinsonian subjects, but the duration of the lifting task was significantly prolonged, due to a marked slowing in the rate of grip force development in the lead-up to object lift-off and to prolongation of the movement phase. Forewarning of object loading, with or without visual control, did not reduce timing deficits or improve the rate of grip force development. However, it did allow parkinsonian subjects to reduce the safety margin significantly. Responses to step load changes imposed during holding without visual control showed minor abnormalities in the parkinsonian patients: onset latencies and EMG activity in the first dorsal interosseus and thenar muscles were normal up to 140 ms after displacement. Subsequent EMG activity in the first dorsal interosseus remained largely

  13. Robot Hand Grips Cylinders Securely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Jaws and linkage accommodate various sizes. Robot hand includes two pairs of parallel jaws that grasp rods, pipes, tubes, struts, and other long, heavy cylindrical objects. Hand features compact rotary drive and butterfly configuration simplifying approach and gripping maneuvers of robot. Parallelogram linkages maintain alignment of each jaw with other jaws. One bar of each linkage connected to one of two concentric, counterrotating shafts; rotation of shafts moves jaws in each pair toward or away from each other to grasp or release workpiece. Each jaw includes rigid gripping pad lined with rubber to give firm grip and to prevent damage to workpiece. Inner cylindrical surface (corner) of each jaw tapers off to flat sides. Enables jaw to grasp workpieces with diameters larger than or equal to twice the corner radius.

  14. Robot Hand Grips Cylinders Securely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Jaws and linkage accommodate various sizes. Robot hand includes two pairs of parallel jaws that grasp rods, pipes, tubes, struts, and other long, heavy cylindrical objects. Hand features compact rotary drive and butterfly configuration simplifying approach and gripping maneuvers of robot. Parallelogram linkages maintain alignment of each jaw with other jaws. One bar of each linkage connected to one of two concentric, counterrotating shafts; rotation of shafts moves jaws in each pair toward or away from each other to grasp or release workpiece. Each jaw includes rigid gripping pad lined with rubber to give firm grip and to prevent damage to workpiece. Inner cylindrical surface (corner) of each jaw tapers off to flat sides. Enables jaw to grasp workpieces with diameters larger than or equal to twice the corner radius.

  15. Well casing grip assurance system

    SciTech Connect

    Mosing, D.E.; Webre, C.M.

    1987-06-30

    An apparatus is described for assuring that at least one of the elevator or the spider of well casing installation apparatus is fully closed in gripping connection about a well casing before the other of the elevator or the spider may be released from fully closed gripping connection about the well casing, the continuation comprising: (a) two-position elevator valve means connected to admit fluid pressure and to optionally direct it to open and close the elevator; (b) two-position spider valve means connected to admit fluid pressure into the spider and to optionally direct the fluid pressure to open and to close the spider; (c) two-position spider position valve means connected to the elevator valve means. The spider position valve means is mechanically connected for passing the fluid pressure to the elevator valve means only when the spider is fully closed into gripping position; and (d) two-position elevator position valve means connected to the spider valve means. The elevator position valve is mechanically connected to the elevator for passing fluid pressure to the spider valve when the elevator is fully closed into gripping position.

  16. Gripping System For Mechanical Testing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, Rebecca A.; Nathal, Michael V.

    1994-01-01

    Specimens held without slippage, even at high temperatures. Improved gripping system designed to securely hold ends of specimen of composite material during creep or tensile test. Each grip includes pair of wedges having sharply corrugated gripping surfaces. Wedges held between two plates containing cavities sloped to accommodate wedges. Two such grips (one for each end) holds specimen in furnace connected to tensile test machine for creep measurements.

  17. Influence of psychological factors on grip strength.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jeffrey; Ring, David

    2008-12-01

    Grip strength is widely used to assess upper-extremity function. Although grip strength is a quantitative measure of function, grip strength is a reflection of both physical impairment as well as subjective, psychological factors. We investigated the determinants of grip strength with the hypothesis that psychological factors are associated with diminished grip strength. One hundred thirty-four patients with an isolated, discrete upper-extremity condition had grip strength measurements, and, as part of one of several prospective clinical studies, during the same visit they completed 2 or more of the following surveys: the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale, Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale, and Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Univariate and multivariable statistical analysis sought determinants of absolute grip strength and grip strength as a percentage of the opposite, uninvolved limb. Determinants of absolute grip strength included gender and grip strength of the uninvolved limb. The association between CES-D score and absolute grip strength was near significant but very weak. Multivariable regression analysis produced a best-fit model that retained grip strength of the uninvolved limb and CES-D scores. When grip strength of the involved limb was evaluated as a percentage of grip strength of the uninvolved limb, CES-D score was a weak but significant predictor, and patients recovering from a fracture of the distal radius had weaker grip strength than did patients with nontraumatic conditions. Depression scores were minimally associated with diminished grip strength. Psychological factors appear to affect disability (patient-reported health status) more than they affect performance-based measures of function. Prognostic II.

  18. Evaluation of pliers' grip spans in the maximum gripping task and sub-maximum cutting task.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Min; Kong, Yong-Ku

    2016-12-01

    A total of 25 males participated to investigate the effects of the grip spans of pliers on the total grip force, individual finger forces and muscle activities in the maximum gripping task and wire-cutting tasks. In the maximum gripping task, results showed that the 50-mm grip span had significantly higher total grip strength than the other grip spans. In the cutting task, the 50-mm grip span also showed significantly higher grip strength than the 65-mm and 80-mm grip spans, whereas the muscle activities showed a higher value at 80-mm grip span. The ratios of cutting force to maximum grip strength were also investigated. Ratios of 30.3%, 31.3% and 41.3% were obtained by grip spans of 50-mm, 65-mm, and 80-mm, respectively. Thus, the 50-mm grip span for pliers might be recommended to provide maximum exertion in gripping tasks, as well as lower maximum-cutting force ratios in the cutting tasks.

  19. Reference Values of Grip Strength, Prevalence of Low Grip Strength, and Factors Affecting Grip Strength Values in Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruby; Ong, Sherlin; Cheung, Osbert; Leung, Jason; Woo, Jean

    2017-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to update the reference values of grip strength, to estimate the prevalence of low grip strength, and to examine the impact of different aspects of measurement protocol on grip strength values in Chinese adults. A cross-sectional survey of Chinese men (n = 714) and women (n = 4014) aged 18-102 years was undertaken in different community settings in Hong Kong. Grip strength was measured with a digital dynamometer (TKK 5401 Grip-D; Takei, Niigata, Japan). Low grip strength was defined as grip strength 2 standard deviations or more below the mean for young adults. The effects of measurement protocol on grip strength values were examined in a subsample of 45 men and women with repeated measures of grip strength taken with a hydraulic dynamometer (Baseline; Fabrication Enterprises Inc, Irvington, NY), using pair t-tests, intraclass correlation coefficient, and Bland and Altman plots. Grip strength was greater among men than among women (P < .001) and the rate of decline differed between sexes (P < .001). The prevalence of low grip strength also increased with age, reaching a rate of 16.5% in men and 20.6% in women aged 65+. Although the TKK digital dynamometer gave higher grip strength values than the Baseline hydraulic dynamometer (P < .001), the degree of agreement between the 2 dynamometers was satisfactory. Higher grip strength values were also observed when the measurement was performed with the elbow extended in a standing position, compared with that with the elbow flexed at 90° in a sitting position, using the same dynamometer (P < .05). This study updated the reference values of grip strength and estimated the prevalence of low grip strength among Chinese adults spanning a wide age range. These findings might be useful for risk estimation and evaluation of interventions. However, grip strength measurements should be interpreted with caution, as grip strength values can be affected by type of dynamometer used

  20. Motor cortical function and the precision grip.

    PubMed

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Menon, Parvathi; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-12-01

    While task-dependent changes in motor cortical outputs have been previously reported, the issue of whether such changes are specific for complex hand tasks remains unresolved. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cortical inhibitory tone and cortical output were greater during precision grip and power grip. Motor cortex excitability was undertaken by using the transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking technique in 15 healthy subjects. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) responses were recorded over the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), with the hand in the following positions: (1) rest, (2) precision grip and (3) power grip. The MEP amplitude (MEP amplitude REST 23.6 ± 3.3%; MEP amplitude PRECISION GRIP 35.2 ± 5.6%; MEP amplitude POWER GRIP 19.6 ± 3.4%, F = 2.4, P < 0.001) and stimulus-response gradient (SLOPEREST 0.06 ± 0.01; SLOPEPRCISION GRIP 0.15 ± 0.04; SLOPE POWER GRIP 0.07 ± 0.01, P < 0.05) were significantly increased during precision grip. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was significantly reduced during the precision grip (SICI REST 15.0 ± 2.3%; SICI PRECISION GRIP 9.7 ± 1.5%, SICI POWER GRIP 15.9 ± 2.7%, F = 2.6, P < 0.05). The present study suggests that changes in motor cortex excitability are specific for precision grip, with functional coupling of descending corticospinal pathways controlling thumb and finger movements potentially forming the basis of these cortical changes.

  1. Examinations of factors influencing toe grip strength

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yousuke; Murata, Jun; Miyazaki, Junya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the relationship between toe grip strength and its associated factors by focusing on factors that were suggested to have a relationship with toe grip strength in previous studies, aiming to clarify the factors influencing the toe grip strength of healthy women. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve healthy young women were selected for this study. Their toe grip strength, angular changes in their ankle joint during toe grip, maximum voluntary contraction activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and tibialis anterior muscles, and the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscles were measured using electromyography. Their toe curl ability, foot-arch height ratio, and weight were also measured. [Results] Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the predictors of toe grip strength in the resulting model were foot-arch height ratio and the percentage of integrated electromyography (%IEMG) of the tibialis anterior muscle, as the dependent variables. This reveals that women whose tibialis anterior muscle %IEMG values and foot-arch height ratio are high have greater %IEMG values have greater toe grip strength. [Conclusion] These findings suggest a significant relationship between foot-arch height ratio and toe grip strength, with a reciprocal interaction. These findings further indicate that the risk of falls by the elderly could be decreased if toe grip strength were enhanced, by increasing the height of a low foot-arch with the help of an inserted insole. PMID:27942134

  2. Examinations of factors influencing toe grip strength.

    PubMed

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yousuke; Murata, Jun; Miyazaki, Junya

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the relationship between toe grip strength and its associated factors by focusing on factors that were suggested to have a relationship with toe grip strength in previous studies, aiming to clarify the factors influencing the toe grip strength of healthy women. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve healthy young women were selected for this study. Their toe grip strength, angular changes in their ankle joint during toe grip, maximum voluntary contraction activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and tibialis anterior muscles, and the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscles were measured using electromyography. Their toe curl ability, foot-arch height ratio, and weight were also measured. [Results] Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the predictors of toe grip strength in the resulting model were foot-arch height ratio and the percentage of integrated electromyography (%IEMG) of the tibialis anterior muscle, as the dependent variables. This reveals that women whose tibialis anterior muscle %IEMG values and foot-arch height ratio are high have greater %IEMG values have greater toe grip strength. [Conclusion] These findings suggest a significant relationship between foot-arch height ratio and toe grip strength, with a reciprocal interaction. These findings further indicate that the risk of falls by the elderly could be decreased if toe grip strength were enhanced, by increasing the height of a low foot-arch with the help of an inserted insole.

  3. Sugar proximity and human grip strength.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, A F; Hill, T V

    1988-12-01

    In a double-blind experiment with 90 undergraduate students the hypothesis was tested that proximity to sugar reduces human grip strength. An earlier study indicated that sugar proximity does indeed significantly reduce human grip strength. When additional controls were added to this design to reduce random sampling error, the hypothesis was not supported.

  4. The Effect of Wrist Position on Grip Endurance and Grip Strength.

    PubMed

    Lee, Julia-Ann; Sechachalam, Sreedharan

    2016-10-01

    Studies on grip endurance are scant even though it is an important topic with practical implications. This study compares the effect of wrist position, in the flexion-extension plane, on grip endurance and grip strength. Grip strength and grip endurance were quantified bilaterally at 6 different wrist positions (unrestrained, 45°, 30°, and 15° extension, 0° and 30° flexion) in 38 healthy right-handed individuals. Our results show that wrist orthosis significantly reduced grip strength across all positions and the maximum grip strength in the position with an orthosis occurred at 15° and 30° extension for the dominant hand and 15°, 30°, and 45° extension for the nondominant hand. Hand dominance and sex did not significantly affect grip endurance. Using a wrist orthosis did not significantly reduce grip endurance at 45° and 30° extension. At a position of 30° of wrist extension, maximal grip strength is achieved without significantly compromising grip endurance. This has clinical implications for decisions regarding the optimal position for orthosis and radiocarpal joint arthrodesis. This study would aid both surgeons and therapists in facilitating discussion with patients regarding the various therapeutic options in managing wrist pathologies. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MEMS microgrippers with thin gripping tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Brandon K.; Zhang, Yong; Perovic, Doug D.; Sun, Yu

    2011-10-01

    Gripping small objects requires tool tips of comparable dimensions. Current methods for miniaturizing an MEMS tool entirely down to sub-micrometer in dimensions, however, come with significant tradeoffs in device performance. This paper presents a microfabrication approach to selectively miniaturize gripping tips only to sub-micrometers in thickness. The process involves using the thin buried SiO2 layer of a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer to form gripping tips, and using the thick device silicon layer to construct high-aspect-ratio structures for structural, sensing, and actuation functions. The microgrippers with thin gripping tips (i.e. finger-nail-like) were experimentally characterized and applied to gripping 100 nm gold spheres inside a scanning electron microscope.

  6. Task Dependency of Grip Stiffness—A Study of Human Grip Force and Grip Stiffness Dependency during Two Different Tasks with Same Grip Forces

    PubMed Central

    Höppner, Hannes; McIntyre, Joseph; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a) grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b) grasp and hold this manipulandum of which we varied the weight between trials in a more natural task. Both situations led to grip forces in comparable ranges. As the measured grip stiffness is the result of muscle and tendon properties, and since muscle/tendon stiffness increases more-or-less linearly as a function of muscle force, we found, as might be predicted, a linear relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. However, the measured stiffness ranges and the increase of stiffness with grip force varied significantly between the two tasks. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between regression slope and mean stiffness for the force task which we ascribe to a force stiffness curve going through the origin. Based on a biomechanical model, we attributed the difference between both tasks to changes in wrist configuration, rather than to changes in cocontraction. In a new set of experiments where we prevent the wrist from moving by fixing it and resting it on a pedestal, we found subjects exhibiting similar stiffness/force characteristics in both tasks. PMID:24324643

  7. Task dependency of grip stiffness--a study of human grip force and grip stiffness dependency during two different tasks with same grip forces.

    PubMed

    Höppner, Hannes; McIntyre, Joseph; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a) grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b) grasp and hold this manipulandum of which we varied the weight between trials in a more natural task. Both situations led to grip forces in comparable ranges. As the measured grip stiffness is the result of muscle and tendon properties, and since muscle/tendon stiffness increases more-or-less linearly as a function of muscle force, we found, as might be predicted, a linear relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. However, the measured stiffness ranges and the increase of stiffness with grip force varied significantly between the two tasks. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between regression slope and mean stiffness for the force task which we ascribe to a force stiffness curve going through the origin. Based on a biomechanical model, we attributed the difference between both tasks to changes in wrist configuration, rather than to changes in cocontraction. In a new set of experiments where we prevent the wrist from moving by fixing it and resting it on a pedestal, we found subjects exhibiting similar stiffness/force characteristics in both tasks.

  8. GRIPs (Group Investigation Problems) for Introductory Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas A.

    2006-12-01

    GRIPs lie somewhere between homework problems and simple labs: they are open-ended questions that require a mixture of problem-solving skills and hands-on experimentation to solve practical puzzles involving simple physical objects. In this talk, I will describe three GRIPs that I developed for a first-semester introductory calculus-based physics course based on the "Six Ideas That Shaped Physics" text. I will discuss the design of the three GRIPs we used this past fall, our experience in working with students on these problems, and students' response as reported on course evaluations.

  9. Heroin Epidemic Expands Its Grip on America

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164350.html Heroin Epidemic Expands Its Grip on America Use of the narcotic grew ... people transition from painkillers to heroin, Martins explained. It is also related to availability, lower cost and ...

  10. NASA Gets 'GRIP' on Hurricane Formation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's GRIP 2010 hurricane mission is in full force. During this year's Atlantic hurricane season, researchers using powerful instruments onboard three aircraft will be able to "see"" below the clo...

  11. Helical grip for the cable cars of San Francisco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peyran, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A helical cable car grip to minimize high maintenance costs of San Francisco's cable car operation is presented. The grip establishes a rolling contact between the cable and grip to reduce sliding friction and associated cable wear. The design, development, and testing of the helical cable car grip are described.

  12. Design and validation of the Grip-ball for measurement of hand grip strength.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Rana; Hewson, David J; Duchêne, Jacques

    2012-11-01

    The Grip-ball is a new dynamometer used to evaluate grip strength, as well as for use in home-based rehabilitation of the hand and forearm. The Grip-ball consists of pressure and temperature sensors and an electronic wireless communication system contained in an airtight ball. That can be inflated to different pressures. The device has advantages over standard dynamometers in that it looks like a simple ball, and can wirelessly communicate via Bluetooth to any compatible receiver, thus have potential to be used for clinical assessment and rehabilitation in a remote setting. The reliability and reproducibility of the device were assessed for the pressure sensor itself, as well as the relationship between the force applied and the pressure measured by the Grip-ball. The initial validation was performed using the pressure sensor without the ball in order to confirm the accuracy of the sensor used. A second validation study was conducted using the Grip-ball rather than just its sensor to examine the relationship between the pressure measured inside the ball and force applied. The results showed that there is a very good correlation (r=0.997, p<0.05) between the pressure measured by the Grip-ball sensor and that measured by a Vigorimeter, thus confirming the reliability of the sensor used in the Grip-ball. A quadratic regression equation was calculated in order to predict the force applied based on the pressure measured inside the ball, and the initial pressure to which the ball was inflated (R(2)=0.97, standard error 10.9N). Such a finding compares favourably with the variability inherent in Jamar recordings, thus indicating that the Grip-ball could be used to assess grip force. An industrial version of the Grip-ball, which is currently under development, will be able to be used for the entire range of grip force in the population.

  13. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Dickerson, Russell; Schoeberl, Mark; Bloom, Hal; Gordley, Larry; McHugh, Martin; Thompson, Anne; Burrows, John; Zeng, Ning; Marshall, Tom; Fish, Chad; Kim, Jhoon; Park, Rokjin; Warner, Juying; Bhartia, Pawan; Kollonige, Debra

    2013-04-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  14. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gordley, L. L.; McHugh, M. J.; Thompson, A. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Zeng, N.; Marshall, B. T.; Fish, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Kim, J.; Park, R.; Warner, J. X.; Bhartia, P. K.; Kollonige, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century - for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  15. [Grip strength changes in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy].

    PubMed

    Tomás, Maria Teresa; Santa-Clara, Helena; Monteiro, Estela; Carolino, Elizabete; Freire, António; Barroso, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Familial amiloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autossomical and dominant neurodegenerative disease related with systemic deposition of amyloid fibre mainly on peripheral nervous system. Clinically, is translated by an autonomous sensitive-motor polyneuropathy with beginning nearly always in foot, involving subsequently the hands. Until now, the unique available treatment for FAP disease is liver transplantation requiring medication that negatively affect muscle metabolism and force production mechanism. To our knowledge there are no quantitative characterizations of peak force in FAP patients or any comparison with healthy people. This knowledge will be extremely important to verify clinical and functional evolution of this disease and eventually prescribe an effective rehabilitation program. The purpose of this study was to analyse and compare levels of hand grip strength (peak force and endurance) in FAP patients with (FAPTx) or without (FAPNTx) a liver transplant with a group of healthy people (GC). The total sample of individuals where two hundred and six, assigned in 3 groups: 59 patients PAFNTx (23 males, 36 female; age 35 ± 8 years); 90 patients PAFTx (53 males, 37 females; age 34 ± 8 years) e 62 healthy persons (GC) (30 males, 32 females; age 33 ± 9 years). Grip strength was assessed by a portable grip dynamometer E-link (Biometrics Ltd, UK). All measurements were taken on standardized positions with standardized orders. The value noted to peak force was classified according to American College of Sports Medicine norms for grip strength. The 3 groups are differents (p < 0,05) for weigth, body mass index (BMI) and grip strength in both hands and endurance for left hand. Negative correlations between age and grip strength were found for PAFNTx and PAFTx but not for GC. According to our results FAP patients have lower values for grip strength in both hands than healthy subjects and consequently a worse classification in ACSM norms. Most patients present

  16. 23. POWELLTYPE CAR THROUGH GRIP REMOVAL DOOR: View looking through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. POWELL-TYPE CAR THROUGH GRIP REMOVAL DOOR: View looking through grip removal door into interior of a Powell-type cable car. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  17. Grip strength norms for elderly women.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Patrick; Bohannon, Richard; Pescatello, Linda; Marschke, Lisa; Hasson, Scott; Murphy, Mary

    2004-12-01

    As part of community health screenings, the grip strength of 113 independently ambulatory women (M age=75.2 +/- 7.3 yr.) was measured. Norms derived from the measurements are presented and compared with (a) norms reported for similar procedures about 20 years ago and (b) values for disabled women.

  18. In the Grip of the Scorpion Claw

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-09-21

    Gripped in the claw of the constellation Scorpius sits the reflection nebula DG 129, a cloud of gas and dust that reflects light from nearby, bright stars. This infrared view of the nebula was captured by NASA Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer.

  19. Tool Would Grip Round Electrical Connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarata, Terrence L.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed version of commercially available tool makes it easier to mate and demate round, bayonet-mount, multipin electrical connectors in densely populated connector panels without removing adjacent connectors. Inner surface of cylindrical shell smooth with tapered lip gripping knurled outer ring on connector.

  20. Effect of elbow flexion, forearm rotation and upper arm abduction on MVC grip and grip endurance time.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Mohd; Khan, Abid Ali

    2012-01-01

    This experiment was designed to know the effect of upper limb postural deviations on grip strength and grip endurance time. A full factorial design of experiment, i.e., 3 (0°, 45°, 90° abduction angles of upper arm) × 3 (45°, 90°, 135° angles of elbow flexion) × 3 (0°, -60° prone, +60° supine angles of forearm rotation) was used to find the effect of 27 combinations of postures on maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) grip strength and grip endurance time. The results showed that none of the main factors were significant on MVC grip, although there was a change in MVC grip. Grip endurance time significantly decreased with an increase in upper arm abduction. Also, grip endurance significantly increased with the elbow flexion angle and decreased with forearm rotation from neutral. These data will help designers and engineers to improve the workplace and tools to reduce the risk of injuries.

  1. Variability of Grip Kinetics during Adult Signature Writing

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Bassma; Thalanki Anantha, Nayanashri; Chan, Jennifer; Chau, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Grip kinetics and their variation are emerging as important considerations in the clinical assessment of handwriting pathologies, fine motor rehabilitation, biometrics, forensics and ergonomic pen design. This study evaluated the intra- and inter-participant variability of grip shape kinetics in adults during signature writing. Twenty (20) adult participants wrote on a digitizing tablet using an instrumented pen that measured the forces exerted on its barrel. Signature samples were collected over 10 days, 3 times a day, to capture temporal variations in grip shape kinetics. A kinetic topography (i.e., grip shape image) was derived per signature by time-averaging the measured force at each of 32 locations around the pen barrel. The normalized cross correlations (NCC) of grip shape images were calculated within- and between-participants. Several classification algorithms were implemented to gauge the error rate of participant discrimination based on grip shape kinetics. Four different grip shapes emerged and several participants made grip adjustments (change in grip shape or grip height) or rotated the pen during writing. Nonetheless, intra-participant variation in grip kinetics was generally much smaller than inter-participant force variations. Using the entire grip shape images as a 32-dimensional input feature vector, a K-nearest neighbor classifier achieved an error rate of % in discriminating among participants. These results indicate that writers had unique grip shape kinetics that were repeatable over time but distinct from those of other participants. The topographic analysis of grip kinetics may inform the development of personalized interventions or customizable grips in clinical and industrial applications, respectively. PMID:23658812

  2. Variability of grip kinetics during adult signature writing.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Bassma; Thalanki Anantha, Nayanashri; Chan, Jennifer; Chau, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Grip kinetics and their variation are emerging as important considerations in the clinical assessment of handwriting pathologies, fine motor rehabilitation, biometrics, forensics and ergonomic pen design. This study evaluated the intra- and inter-participant variability of grip shape kinetics in adults during signature writing. Twenty (20) adult participants wrote on a digitizing tablet using an instrumented pen that measured the forces exerted on its barrel. Signature samples were collected over 10 days, 3 times a day, to capture temporal variations in grip shape kinetics. A kinetic topography (i.e., grip shape image) was derived per signature by time-averaging the measured force at each of 32 locations around the pen barrel. The normalized cross correlations (NCC) of grip shape images were calculated within- and between-participants. Several classification algorithms were implemented to gauge the error rate of participant discrimination based on grip shape kinetics. Four different grip shapes emerged and several participants made grip adjustments (change in grip shape or grip height) or rotated the pen during writing. Nonetheless, intra-participant variation in grip kinetics was generally much smaller than inter-participant force variations. Using the entire grip shape images as a 32-dimensional input feature vector, a K-nearest neighbor classifier achieved an error rate of 1.2±0.4% in discriminating among participants. These results indicate that writers had unique grip shape kinetics that were repeatable over time but distinct from those of other participants. The topographic analysis of grip kinetics may inform the development of personalized interventions or customizable grips in clinical and industrial applications, respectively.

  3. Kinetics of crimp and slope grip in rock climbing.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Andreas; Hudek, Robert

    2011-05-01

    The aim was to investigate differences of the kinetics of the crimp and the slope grip used in rock climbing. Nine cadaver fingers were prepared and fixated with the proximal phalanx in a frame. The superficial (FDS) and deep (FDP) flexor tendons were loaded selectively and together with 40 N in the crimp grip (PIP joint flexed 90°/DIP joint hyperextended) and the slope grip position (<25° flexed/50° flexed respectively). Five different grip sizes were tested and the flexion force which was generated to the grip was measured. In the crimp grip the FDP generated more flexion force in small sized holds whereas the FDS generated more force in the larger holds. During the slope grip the FDP was more effective than the FDS. While both tendons were loaded, the flexion force was always greater during crimp grip compared with the slope grip. The FDP seems to be most important for very small holds using the crimp grip but also during slope grip holds whereas the FDS is more important for larger flat holds.

  4. The influence of wrist posture, grip type, and grip force on median nerve shape and cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Jeffrey C; Leonardis, Joshua; Lipps, David B; Gates, Deanna H

    2017-05-01

    During grasping, the median nerve undergoes mechanical stress in the carpal tunnel which may contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome. This study investigated the effects of wrist posture, grip type, and grip force on the shape and cross-sectional area of the median nerve. Ultrasound examination was used to obtain cross-sectional images of the dominant wrist of 16 healthy subjects (8 male) at the proximal carpal tunnel during grasping. The cross-sectional area, circularity, and axis lengths of the median nerve were assessed in 27 different conditions (3 postures × 3 grip types × 3 force levels). There were no significant changes in median nerve cross-sectional area (P > 0.05). There were significant interactions across posture, grip type, and grip force affecting nerve circularity and axis lengths. When the wrist was flexed, increasing grip force caused the median nerve to shorten in the mediolateral direction and lengthen in the anteroposterior direction (P < 0.04), becoming more circular. These effects were significant during four finger pinch grip and chuck grip (P < 0.05) but not key grip (P > 0.07). With the wrist extended, the nerve became more flattened (less circular) as grip force increased during four finger pinch grip and chuck grip (P < 0.04) but not key grip (P > 0.3). Circularity was lower during the four finger pinch compared to chuck or key grip (P < 0.03). The findings suggest that grip type and wrist posture significantly alter the shape of the median nerve. Clin. Anat. 30:470-478, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Status of The SPARC-GRIPS Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Kodera, Kunihiko; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The GCM-Reality Intercomparison Project for the Symbolic Processing Algorithmic Research Computer (SPARC) is an initiative designed to provide a comprehensive assessment of our ability to model the present-day climate and the impacts of different physical perturbations. This poster will show the different scientific experiments being conducted in the general purpose rocket instrumentation and payload system (GRIPS) and include some summaries of the results. The three concurrent aspects of GRIPS are: (1) studies of the climate and transient features simulated by the models; (2) examinations of different parametrizations and their impacts on the model climate; (3) studies of the impact of physical perturbations, such as solar forcing, volcanic aerosols and ozone change. Sample results from a number of these areas will be presented, with discussion of their implications for our ability to model the climate of the present and future atmosphere.

  6. Risky Business: Get a Grip On It

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cober, P.

    This paper focuses on the use of requirements as an efficient and effective way to get a grip on the risks of your software. It references on the good practices that are used in the pharmaceutical industry. It is, like the space industry, confronted with very high risks. The cost when anything goes wrong is tremendously, not only for the company itself but also the intangible cost if human health is at stake. Therefore both industries are severely regulated through several official bodies.

  7. Effect of grip strength and grip strengthening exercises on instantaneous bat velocity of collegiate baseball players.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shawn S; Lyons, Brian C; Mayo, Jerry J

    2004-05-01

    Bat velocity is considered to be an important factor for successful hitting. The relationship between grip strength and bat velocity has not been conclusively established. The purposes of this study were to determine the relationship of grip strength to bat velocity and to ascertain whether the performance of resistance training exercises designed to specifically target the forearms and grip would significantly alter bat velocity. The subjects for this study were 23 male members (mean +/- SD, age = 19.7 +/- 1.3 years, height = 182.5 +/- 5.9 cm, weight = 85.4 +/- 15.5 kg, experience = 14.4 +/- 1.7 years) of a varsity baseball team at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II school. The Jamar hand dynamometer was used to test grip strength, and the SETPRO Rookie was used to measure instantaneous bat velocity at the point of contact with the ball. Subjects were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. For 6 weeks, both groups participated in their usual baseball practice sessions, but the experimental group also performed extra forearm and grip strengthening exercises, whereas the control group did not. Pretest and posttest correlations between grip strength and bat velocity revealed no significant relationship between grip strength and bat velocity (pretest r = 0.054, p = 0.807; posttest r = 0.315, p = 0.145). A dependent t-test performed on all subjects revealed that a significant (p = 0.001) increase in bat velocity did occur over the course of the study. A covariate analysis, employing pretest bat velocity as the covariate, revealed no significant difference (p = 0.795) in posttest bat velocity scores between the experimental and control groups. Thus, increases in bat velocity occurred, but the differences were similar for both the experimental and control groups. The findings of this study suggest that grip strength and bat velocity are not significantly related, and that the allocation of time and energy for added training

  8. Development of an integrated digital hand grip dynamometer and norm of hand grip strength.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ho; Chen, Chih-Hao; Huang, Tung-Sun; Tai, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    This study designs and fabricates a novel integrated digital hand grip dynamometer and analyzes collected grip strength data. The dynamometer directly stores collected data in a computer, unlike those on the market that cannot directly store information. A strain gauge load cell is used as a force sensor. The dynamometer is designed to maximize ergonomics. Excitation voltage of the load cell is 5 V, and a 9 V battery supplies power to its circuit. The signal receiver is National Instruments (NI) data acquisition (DAQ) card that transmits signals to the computer. The operation system is designed using LabView. This study assesses the correlation between variables of collected data. The correlation coefficients for height, weight and palm length were 0.793, 0.609 and 0.715, respectively, indicating that variables were moderately to strongly correlate with grip strength.

  9. Impact of silicone prosthesis on hand function, grip power and grip-force tracking ability after finger amputation.

    PubMed

    Kuret, Zala; Burger, Helena; Vidmar, Gaj; Maver, Tomaz

    2016-12-01

    Literature mostly describes the cosmetic role of prostheses for finger amputation. The impact on hand function has not been systematically explored. Our aim was to describe the impact of silicone finger prostheses on hand function and gripping ability. Prospective descriptive cross-sectional study. We included 42 adult patients with partial or complete single- or multiple-digit amputation of one hand. We evaluated hand function of the injured hand without and with the prosthesis with the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure, and grip power and tracking ability with a grip-force tracking system. Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure grip index scores were slightly higher when using the prosthesis as compared to not using it (though not reaching the minimum real difference reported in the literature), except for lateral grip. Grip power was not significantly affected by prosthesis use for power grip and lateral grip and slightly diminished for tip grip. Tracking errors only differed with respect to the signal type but not with respect to using the prosthesis. A minimum improvement of hand function can be expected at best with silicone prostheses for finger amputation, accompanied by a slight decrease in tip grip power. Based on our results, an evidence-based explanation can be given to patients after finger amputation regarding the functional benefits that can be expected from a silicone prosthesis. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  10. Systems and Methods for Gravity-Independent Gripping and Drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron (Inventor); Frost, Matthew A. (Inventor); Thatte, Nitish (Inventor); King, Jonathan P. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for gravity independent gripping and drilling are described. The gripping device can also comprise a drill or sampling devices for drilling and/or sampling in microgravity environments, or on vertical or inverted surfaces in environments where gravity is present. A robotic system can be connected with the gripping and drilling devices via an ankle interface adapted to distribute the forces realized from the robotic system.

  11. Microspine Gripping Mechanism for Asteroid Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Ezekiel G.; Berg, Andrew B.; Willig, Andrew; Parness, Aaron; Frey, Tim; Howell, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper details the development and early testing of a compliant suspension for a microspine gripper device for asteroid capture or micro-gravity percussive drilling. The microspine gripper architecture is reviewed, and a proposed microspine suspension design is presented and discussed. Prototyping methods are discussed, as well as testing methods and results. A path forward is identified from the results of the testing completed thus far. Key findings include: the microspine concept has been established as a valid architecture and the compliant suspension exhibits the desired stiffness characteristics for good gripping behavior. These developments will aid in developing the capability to grasp irregularly shaped boulders in micro-gravity.

  12. Grip strength and forearm circumference in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Anakwe, R E; Huntley, J S; McEachan, J E

    2007-04-01

    Two hundred and fifty subjects were recruited. Age, sex, hand preference and anthropometric measurements were recorded for each subject. Grip strength was measured using a Jamar hydraulic dynamometer. Multiple regression analyses were performed. One hundred and seventy two subjects were men and 78 were women. Twenty-six subjects were left hand dominant. Hand grip strength was greatest for the 35 to 44 year old group for both sexes. Grip strength was consistently greater for men than women. Contralateral grip strength predicted maximum grip strength for both sexes. Forearm circumference predicted maximum hand grip strength for men. Although there was a large range of forearm circumferences in the population, there was little difference between sides for each subject (100% less than 2 cm). The demonstrated relationships between: (i) contralateral grip strengths and (ii) grip strength and forearm circumference lead us to suggest that for certain pathologies, a difference in forearm circumference greater than 2 cm may lend credence to a measurement of diminished grip strength.

  13. Optimization of the levels of grip force, stroke rotation, frequency and grip span for a torqueing task.

    PubMed

    Bano, Farheen; Mallick, Zulqernian; Ali Khan, Abid

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of grip force, frequency, stroke rotation and grip-span on discomfort and obtain best posture for hand tool users. Fifteen male participants volunteered in this study. Participants performed combined gripping with torqueing exertions for 5 min for two levels of frequency (10 and 20 exertions/min) at two levels of grip force (50 and 70 N), two levels of stroke rotation (30(○) and 60(○)) and three levels of grip-span (4.7, 6 and 7.3 cm). Therefore, a 2×2×2×3 full factorial design was used. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that frequency, stroke rotation and grip-span were significant on discomfort score. Minimum discomfort and comfortable posture was found to be 90 N grip force with 10 exertions/min for 60° stroke rotation at 6-cm grip-span. The grip force, frequency and stroke rotation were found significant on EMG activity of forearm muscles using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The extensor muscles were found more activated than flexor muscles during the given task.

  14. ALTERED PHALANX FORCE DIRECTION DURING POWER GRIP FOLLOWING STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Leah R.

    2015-01-01

    Many stroke survivors with severe impairment can grasp only with a power grip. Yet, little knowledge is available on altered power grip after stroke, other than reduced power grip strength. This study characterized stroke survivors’ static power grip during 100% and 50% maximum grip. Each phalanx force’s angular deviation from the normal direction and its contribution to total normal force was compared for 11 stroke survivors and 11 age-matched controls. Muscle activities and skin coefficient of friction (COF) were additionally compared for another 20 stroke and 13 age-matched control subjects. The main finding was that stroke survivors gripped with a 34% greater phalanx force angular deviation of 19±2° compared to controls of 14±1° (p<.05). Stroke survivors’ phalanx force angular deviation was closer to the 23° threshold of slippage between the phalanx and grip surface, which may explain increased likelihood of object dropping in stroke survivors. In addition, this altered phalanx force direction decreases normal grip force by tilting the force vector, indicating a partial role of phalanx force angular deviation in reduced grip strength post stroke. Greater phalanx force angular deviation may biomechanically result from more severe underactivation of stroke survivors’ first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscles compared to their flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) or somatosensory deficit. While stroke survivors’ maximum power grip strength was approximately half of the controls’, the distribution of their remaining strength over the fingers and phalanges did not differ, indicating evenly distributed grip force reduction over the entire hand. PMID:25795079

  15. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cable clamps and grips. 18.40 Section 18.40... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable (trailing) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided to...

  16. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cable clamps and grips. 18.40 Section 18.40... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable (trailing) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided to...

  17. 21. UNDERSIDE OF EPPELSHEIMER BOTTOM GRIP: Photocopy of 1905 photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. UNDERSIDE OF EPPELSHEIMER BOTTOM GRIP: Photocopy of 1905 photograph showing the underside of an Eppelsheimer bottom grip. The position of the cable between the jaws is clearly evident. Photograph taken at the Washington and Mason Street powerhouse. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cable clamps and grips. 18.40 Section 18.40... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable (trailing) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided to...

  19. Personality and Grip Strength Relationships Between Monozygous and Dizygous Twins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, A. Craig; And Others

    The purposes of this study were a) to investigate the relationship between grip strength and the measures of age, height, weight, and the personality traits revealed by the Comrey Personality and Attitude Factor Scales and b) to assess the influence of heredity on height, weight, and grip strength. Fifty-eight pairs of twins (MZ, 30 and DZ, 28)…

  20. Normative data on functional grip strength of elderly in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Mat Jais, Ita Suzana; Chan, Kai Li; Loke, Mun Kitt Austin; Abdul Rahim, Saleem; Tay, Shian Chao

    2017-02-21

    Cross-sectional study for clinical measurement. Most daily tasks require individuals to exert grip strength with torque, which can be challenging for elderly as their strength diminishes with age. We postulate that to assess the functional capacity of an individual, it is important to evaluate the functional grip strength instead of the maximal static grip strength. The objective of this cross-sectional study is to establish normative data for the functional grip strength of elderly aged 60 years and older in the Singapore population. In this study, 233 healthy subjects aged 60 years and older were recruited. Using a custom-made hand strength measurement device, the following measurements were recorded: grip strength at neutral position, grip strength with resistive pronation torque, and grip strength with resistive supination torque. Grip strengths measured for both genders decreased by 13% and 16% for males and females respectively, when pronation torque was exerted, and with supination torque, the strength decreased by 18% and 17% for males and females respectively. Normative data for the elderly population in Singapore had been established. The findings from this study can complement the existing ergonomic hand data in designing better assistive tools to improve the independent living of elderly. NA. Copyright © 2016 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Preserved grip selection planning in chronic unilateral upper extremity amputees

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Scott H.

    2016-01-01

    Upper limb amputees receive no proprioceptive or visual sensory feedback about their absent hand. In this study, we asked whether chronic amputees nevertheless retain the ability to accurately plan gripping movements. Fourteen patients and matched controls performed two grip selection tasks: overt grip selection (OGS), in which they used their intact hand to grasp an object that appeared in different orientations using the most natural (under- or overhand) precision grip, and prospective grip selection (PGS), in which they selected the most natural grip for either hand without moving. We evaluated planning accuracy by comparing concordance between grip preferences expressed in PGS vs. OGS for the intact hand and PGS vs. the inverse of OGS responses for the affected hand. Overall, amputees showed no deficits in the accuracy of grip selection planning based on either hand and a consistent preference for less awkward hand postures. We found no evidence for a speed-accuracy tradeoff. Furthermore, selection accuracy did not depend on phantom mobility, phantom limb pain, time since amputation, or the residual limb’s shoulder posture. Our findings demonstrate that unilateral upper limb amputees retain the ability to plan movements based on the biomechanics of their affected hand even many years after limb loss. This unimpaired representation may stem from persistent higher-level activity-independent internal representations or may be sustained by sensory feedback from the intact hand. PMID:21863261

  2. Alterations in grip strength during male sexual arousal.

    PubMed

    Jiao, C; Turman, B; Weerakoon, P; Knight, P

    2006-01-01

    Although it is known that alterations in grip strength occur under a number of conditions, little is known about relationships between grip strength and sexual arousal. This relationship was investigated in 30 healthy heterosexual males, who viewed both erotic and nonerotic videos. A questionnaire was used to assess the extent of sexual arousal. The grip strengths of both hands were measured with a five-position (P1-P5) dynamometer, before and after watching the videos. After watching the erotic video, there was a statistically significant reduction in grip strength for the P2 position, with nonsignificant overall reductions in grip strength for all other positions tested. No such effect was observed in control tests. The results indicate that during sexual arousal, the neural system is likely to reduce the output to muscles not directly related to sexual function, presumably to enhance the physiological responses of sexual arousal.

  3. Self-selected duty cycle times for grip force, wrist flexion postures and three grip types.

    PubMed

    Finneran, Aoife; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Performance and health issues are common in industry. On-the-job productivity gains related to good design, which could help justify ergonomics intervention, are often not considered. More quantitative data are needed to model the discomfort/productivity relationship for upper limb activity in simulated repetitive assembly type work. Eighteen participants completed an experiment, simulating a repetitive upper limb task with force, posture and grip type recorded as independent variables. Duty cycle time and discomfort were recorded as dependent variables. Participants performed 18 experiment combinations (block designed around force); each treatment lasted 35 min, including breaks. Analysis indicated a significant two-way interaction between posture and grip type. Results from this experiment were used to model the effect of these variables on operator discomfort and performance.

  4. Pistol grip power tool handle and trigger size effects on grip exertions and operator preference.

    PubMed

    Oh, S; Radwin, R G

    1993-09-01

    Finger and palmar forces were measured during actual pneumatic nutrunner operation using a strain gauge dynamometer. Eighteen student subjects were assigned to one of three categories based on hand length. Two triggers and four handle spans were presented randomly. Handle span affected maximal and submaximal grip force. As span increased from 4 cm to 7 cm, average peak finger force increased 24%, peak palmar force increased 22%, and average finger and palmar tool-holding forces increased 20%. When an extended trigger was used, average peak finger force decreased 9%, peak palmar force decreased 8%, finger tool-holding force decreased 65%, and palmar tool-holding force decreased 48%. Hand size affected grip strength (MVC), grip force, and exertion level (force/MVC). Holding exertion level was maximum for large-handed subjects using a 4-cm handle and for small-handed subjects using a 7-cm handle. Subjective handle span preference increased as hand size increased. A similar experiment was performed using 11 factory workers.

  5. Effects of bat grip on baseball hitting kinematics.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Fleisig, Glenn S; DeRenne, Coop; Taylor, Marcus K; Moorman, Claude T; Imamura, Rodney; Barakatt, Edward; Andrews, James R

    2009-08-01

    A motion system collected 120-Hz data from 14 baseball adult hitters using normal and choke-up bat grips. Six swings were digitized for each hitter, and temporal and kinematic parameters were calculated. Compared with a normal grip, the choke-up grip resulted in 1) less time during stride phase and swing; 2) the upper torso more opened at lead foot contact; 3) the pelvis more closed and less bat linear velocity at bat-ball contact; 4) less range of motion of the upper torso and pelvis during swing; 5) greater elbow flexion at lead foot contact; and 6) greater peak right elbow extension angular velocity. The decreased time during the stride phase when using a choke-up grip implies that hitters quicken their stride when they choke up. Less swing time duration and less upper torso and pelvis rotation range of motion using the choke-up grip supports the belief of many coaches and players that using a choke-up grip results in a "quicker" swing. However, the belief that using a choke-up grip leads to a faster moving bat was not supported by the results of this study.

  6. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination.

    PubMed

    Vermillion, Billy C; Lum, Peter S; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-10-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio).

  7. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Billy C.; Lum, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio). PMID:26289460

  8. Predicting maximal grip strength using hand circumference.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Hewson, David J; Duchêne, Jacques; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the correlations between anthropometric data and maximal grip strength (MGS) in order to establish a simple model to predict "normal" MGS. Randomized bilateral measurement of MGS was performed on a homogeneous population of 100 subjects. MGS was measured according to a standardized protocol with three dynamometers (Jamar, Myogrip and Martin Vigorimeter) for both dominant and non-dominant sides. Several anthropometric data were also measured: height; weight; hand, wrist and forearm circumference; hand and palm length. Among these data, hand circumference had the strongest correlation with MGS for all three dynamometers and for both hands (0.789 and 0.782 for Jamar; 0.829 and 0.824 for Myogrip; 0.663 and 0.730 for Vigorimeter). In addition, the only anthropometric variable systematically selected by a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was also hand circumference. Based on this parameter alone, a predictive regression model presented good results (r(2) = 0.624 for Jamar; r(2) = 0.683 for Myogrip and r(2) = 0.473 for Vigorimeter; all adjusted r(2)). Moreover a single equation was predictive of MGS for both men and women and for both non-dominant and dominant hands. "Normal" MGS can be predicted using hand circumference alone.

  9. Basal Ganglia Mechanisms Underlying Precision Grip Force Control

    PubMed Central

    Prodoehl, Janey; Corcos, Daniel M.; Vaillancourt, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The classic grasping network has been well studied but thus far the focus has been on cortical regions in the control of grasping. Sub-cortically, specific nuclei of the basal ganglia have been shown to be important in different aspects of precision grip force control but these findings have not been well integrated. In this review we outline the evidence to support the hypothesis that key basal ganglia nuclei are involved in parameterizing specific properties of precision grip force. We review literature from different areas of human and animal work that converges to build a case for basal ganglia involvement in the control of precision gripping. Following on from literature showing anatomical connectivity between the basal ganglia nuclei and key nodes in the cortical grasping network, we suggest a conceptual framework for how the basal ganglia could function within the grasping network, particularly as it relates to the control of precision grip force. PMID:19428499

  10. Subcortical control of precision grip after human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bunday, Karen L; Tazoe, Toshiki; Rothwell, John C; Perez, Monica A

    2014-05-21

    The motor cortex and the corticospinal system contribute to the control of a precision grip between the thumb and index finger. The involvement of subcortical pathways during human precision grip remains unclear. Using noninvasive cortical and cervicomedullary stimulation, we examined motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and the activity in intracortical and subcortical pathways targeting an intrinsic hand muscle when grasping a small (6 mm) cylinder between the thumb and index finger and during index finger abduction in uninjured humans and in patients with subcortical damage due to incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). We demonstrate that cortical and cervicomedullary MEP size was reduced during precision grip compared with index finger abduction in uninjured humans, but was unchanged in SCI patients. Regardless of whether cortical and cervicomedullary stimulation was used, suppression of the MEP was only evident 1-3 ms after its onset. Long-term (∼5 years) use of the GABAb receptor agonist baclofen by SCI patients reduced MEP size during precision grip to similar levels as uninjured humans. Index finger sensory function correlated with MEP size during precision grip in SCI patients. Intracortical inhibition decreased during precision grip and spinal motoneuron excitability remained unchanged in all groups. Our results demonstrate that the control of precision grip in humans involves premotoneuronal subcortical mechanisms, likely disynaptic or polysynaptic spinal pathways that are lacking after SCI and restored by long-term use of baclofen. We propose that spinal GABAb-ergic interneuronal circuits, which are sensitive to baclofen, are part of the subcortical premotoneuronal network shaping corticospinal output during human precision grip.

  11. Subcortical Control of Precision Grip after Human Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bunday, Karen L.; Tazoe, Toshiki; Rothwell, John C.

    2014-01-01

    The motor cortex and the corticospinal system contribute to the control of a precision grip between the thumb and index finger. The involvement of subcortical pathways during human precision grip remains unclear. Using noninvasive cortical and cervicomedullary stimulation, we examined motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and the activity in intracortical and subcortical pathways targeting an intrinsic hand muscle when grasping a small (6 mm) cylinder between the thumb and index finger and during index finger abduction in uninjured humans and in patients with subcortical damage due to incomplete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). We demonstrate that cortical and cervicomedullary MEP size was reduced during precision grip compared with index finger abduction in uninjured humans, but was unchanged in SCI patients. Regardless of whether cortical and cervicomedullary stimulation was used, suppression of the MEP was only evident 1–3 ms after its onset. Long-term (∼5 years) use of the GABAb receptor agonist baclofen by SCI patients reduced MEP size during precision grip to similar levels as uninjured humans. Index finger sensory function correlated with MEP size during precision grip in SCI patients. Intracortical inhibition decreased during precision grip and spinal motoneuron excitability remained unchanged in all groups. Our results demonstrate that the control of precision grip in humans involves premotoneuronal subcortical mechanisms, likely disynaptic or polysynaptic spinal pathways that are lacking after SCI and restored by long-term use of baclofen. We propose that spinal GABAb-ergic interneuronal circuits, which are sensitive to baclofen, are part of the subcortical premotoneuronal network shaping corticospinal output during human precision grip. PMID:24849366

  12. Effect of Lateral Epicondylosis on Grip Force Development

    PubMed Central

    Chourasia, Amrish O.; Buhr, Kevin A.; Rabago, David P.; Kijowski, Richard; Irwin, Curtis B.; Sesto, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction While it is well known that grip strength is adversely affected by lateral epicondylosis (LE), the effect of LE on rapid grip force generation is unclear. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of LE on the ability to rapidly generate grip force. Methods Twenty-eight participants with LE (13 unilateral and 15 bilateral LE) and 13 healthy controls participated in this study. A Multi-Axis Profile dynamometer was used to evaluate grip strength and rapid grip force generation. The ability to rapidly produce force is comprised of the electromechanical delay and rate of force development. Electromechanical delay is defined as the time between the onset of electrical activity and the onset of muscle force production. The Patient Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE) questionnaire was used to assess pain and functional disability. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate tendon degeneration. Results LE-injured upper extremities had lower rate of force development (−50 lbs/sec, CI [−17, −84]) and less grip strength (−7.8 lbs, CI [−3.3, −12.4]) than non-injured extremities. Participants in the LE group had a longer electromechanical delay (+59%, CI [29,97]) than controls. Peak rate of force development had a higher correlation (r=0.56)(p<0.05) with PRTEE function than grip strength (r=0.47) (p<0.05) and electromechanical delay (r=0.30)(p>0.05) for participants with LE. Conclusion In addition to a reduction in grip strength, those with LE had a reduction in rate of force development and an increase in electromechanical delay. Collectively, these changes may contribute to an increase in reaction time, which may affect risk for recurrent symptoms. These findings suggest that therapists may need to address both strength and rapid force development deficits in patients with LE. PMID:22137195

  13. Overlapping representations for grip type and reach direction.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Sara; Strnad, Lukas; Caramazza, Alfonso; Lingnau, Angelika

    2014-07-01

    To grasp an object, we need to move the arm toward it and assume the appropriate hand configuration. While previous studies suggested dorsomedial and dorsolateral pathways in the brain specialized respectively for the transport and grip components, more recent studies cast doubt on such a clear-cut distinction. It is unclear, however, to which degree neuronal populations selective for the two components overlap, and if so, to which degree they interact. Here, we used multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to investigate the representation of three center-out movements (touch, pincer grip, whole-hand grip) performed in five reach directions. We found selectivity exclusively for reach direction in posterior and rostral superior parietal lobes (SPLp, SPLr), supplementary motor area (SMA), and the superior portion of dorsal premotor cortex (PMDs). Instead, we found selectivity for both grip type and reach direction in the inferior portion of dorsal premotor cortex (PMDi), ventral premotor cortex (PMv), anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS), primary motor (M1), somatosensory (S1) cortices and the anterior superior parietal lobe (SPLa). Within these regions, PMv, M1, aIPS and SPLa showed weak interactions between the transport and grip components. Our results suggest that human PMDi and S1 contain both grip- and reach-direction selective neuronal populations that retain their functional independence, whereas this information might be combined at the level of PMv, M1, aIPS, and SPLa.

  14. Effect of Syllable Articulation on Precision and Power Grip Performance

    PubMed Central

    Vainio, Lari; Schulman, Mirjam; Tiippana, Kaisa; Vainio, Martti

    2013-01-01

    The present study was motivated by a theory, which proposes that speech includes articulatory gestures that are connected to particular hand actions. We hypothesized that certain articulatory gestures would be more associated with the precision grip than with the power grip, and vice versa. In the study, the participants pronounced a syllable and performed simultaneously a precision or power grip that was theorized to be either congruent or incongruent with the syllable. Relatively fast precision grip responses were associated with articulatory gestures in which the tip of the tongue contacted the alveolar ridge ([te]) or the aperture of the vocal tract remained small ([hi]), as well as gestures that required lip protrusion ([pu]). In contrast, relatively fast power grip responses were associated with gestures that were produced by moving the back of the tongue against the velum ([ke]) or in which the aperture of the vocal tract remained large ([hα]). In addition to demonstrating that certain articulatory gestures are systematically connected to different grip types, the study may shed some light on discussion concerning sound symbolism and evolution of speech. PMID:23326381

  15. Subtle grip force estimation from EMG and muscle stiffness--relationship between muscle character frequency and grip force.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Masahiro; Seki, Masatoshi; Kawamura, Kazuya; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    A number of upper limb amputees experience difficulty in picking up a food bowl during a meal, because grip force estimation using EMG currently does not provide sufficient accuracy for this task. In this paper, we propose a grip force estimation system that allows amputees to pick up a bowl with a prosthetic hand by using the properties of muscle stiffness in addition to EMG. We have chosen a tray holding task to evaluate the proposed system. A weight is dropped on the tray and the subjects are expected to control the tray's attitude during the task. Actual grip force, EMG, and muscle stiffness are measured, and the actual measured grip force is compared with the estimated grip force for evaluation. As a result, the proposed algorithm is found to be able to estimate grip force with an error of just 18[N], which is 30% smaller than in the method that uses only EMG. From the result that the response time estimated by proposed system is even less than a human's mechanical reaction time, the effectiveness of the proposed method has been validated.

  16. Association of grip strength with cardiovascular risk markers.

    PubMed

    Gubelmann, Cédric; Vollenweider, Peter; Marques-Vidal, Pedro

    2017-03-01

    Background Mechanisms underlying the association between grip strength and cardiovascular mortality are poorly understood. We aimed to assess the association of grip strength with a panel of cardiovascular risk markers. Design The study was based on a cross-sectional analysis of 3468 adults aged 50-75 years (1891 women) from a population-based sample in Lausanne, Switzerland. Methods Grip strength was measured using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. Cardiovascular risk markers included anthropometry, blood pressure, lipids, glucose, adiposity, inflammatory and other metabolic markers. Results In both genders, grip strength was negatively associated with fat mass (Pearson correlation coefficient: women: -0.170, men: -0.198), systolic blood pressure (women: -0.096, men: -0.074), fasting glucose (women: -0.048, men: -0.071), log-transformed leptin (women: -0.074, men: -0.065), log-transformed high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (women: -0.101, men: -0.079) and log-transformed homocysteine (women: -0.109, men: -0.060). In men, grip strength was also positively associated with diastolic blood pressure (0.068), total (0.106) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (0.082), and negatively associated with interleukin-6 (-0.071); in women, grip strength was negatively associated with triglycerides (-0.064) and uric acid (-0.059). After multivariate adjustment, grip strength was negatively associated with waist circumference (change per 5 kg increase in grip strength: -0.82 cm in women and -0.77 cm in men), fat mass (-0.56% in women; -0.27% in men) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-6.8% in women; -3.2% in men) in both genders, and with body mass index (0.22 kg/m(2)) and leptin (-2.7%) in men. Conclusion Grip strength shows only moderate associations with cardiovascular risk markers. The effect of muscle strength as measured by grip strength on cardiovascular disease does not seem to be mediated by cardiovascular risk markers.

  17. The influence of the crimp and slope grip position on the finger pulley system.

    PubMed

    Schöffl, I; Oppelt, K; Jüngert, J; Schweizer, A; Neuhuber, W; Schöffl, V

    2009-09-18

    In this study the influence of the grip position (crimp grip vs. slope grip position) on the pulley system of the finger was investigated. For this purpose 21 cadaver finger (11 hands, 10 donors) were fixed into an isokinetic loading device. Nine fingers were loaded in the slope grip position and 12 fingers in the crimp grip position. The forces in the flexor tendons and at the fingertip were recorded. A rupture of the A4 pulley occurred most often in the crimp grip position (50%) but did not occur in the slope grip position, in which alternative events were the most common (67%). The forces in the deep flexor tendon (FDP) (slope grip: 371 N, crimp grip: 348 N) and at the fingertip (slope grip: 105 N, crimp grip: 161 N) were not significantly different between the 2 finger positions, but the forces acting on the pulleys were higher in the crimp grip position (A2 pulley: 287 N, A4 pulley: 226 N) than in the slope grip position (A2 pulley: 121 N, A4 pulley: 103 N). The crimp grip position may be the main cause for A4 pulley ruptures but the slope grip position may be hazardous for other injuries as the forces recorded in the flexor tendons and at the fingertip were comparable at the occurrence of a terminal event.

  18. Grip forces exerted against stationary held objects during gravity changes.

    PubMed

    Hermsdörfer, J; Marquardt, C; Philipp, J; Zierdt, A; Nowak, D; Glasauer, S; Mai, N

    1999-05-01

    In the present study, grip forces exerted against a stationary held object were recorded during parabolic flights. Such flight maneuvers induce changes of gravity with two periods of hypergravity, associated with a doubling of normal terrestrial gravity, and a 20 s period of microgravity. Accordingly, the object's weight changed from being twice as heavy as normally experienced and weightless. Grip-force recordings demonstrated that force control was seriously disturbed only during the first experience of hyper- and microgravity, with the grip forces being exceedingly high and yielding irregular fluctuations. Thereafter, however, grip force traces were smooth, the force level was scaled to the object's weight under normal and high-G conditions, and the grip force changed in parallel with the weight during the transitions between hyper- and microgravity. In addition, during weightlessness, when virtually no force was necessary to stabilize the object, a low force was established, which obviously represented a reasonable safety margin for preventing possible perturbations. Thus, all relevant aspects of grip-force control observed under normal gravity conditions were preserved during gravity changes induced by parabolic flights. Hence, grip-force control mechanisms were able to cope with hyper- and microgravity, either by incorporating relevant receptor signals, such as those originating from cutaneous mechanoreceptors, or by adequately including perceived gravity signals into control programs. However, the adaptation to the uncommon gravity conditions was not complete following the first experience; finer tuning of the control system to both hyper- and microgravity continued over the measurement interval, presumably with a longer observation period being necessary before a stable performance can be reached.

  19. Allometric Grip Strength Norms for Children of Hawaiian Lineage.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Morgan H; Romine, Rebecca K; Stickley, Christopher D; Morgan, Charles F; Resnick, Portia B; Hetzler, Ronald K

    2017-10-01

    Kocher, MH, Romine, RK, Stickley, CD, Morgan, CF, Resnick, PB, and Hetzler, RK. Allometric grip strength norms for children of Hawaiian lineage. J Strength Cond Res 31(10): 2794-2807, 2017-The purpose of the study was to determine allometric exponents for scaling grip strength in children that effectively control for body mass (BM) and stature (Ht) and to develop normative grip strength data for Hawaiian children. One thousand, four hundred thirty-seven students (754 boys) from a rural community in Hawaii participated in this 5-year study, resulting in 2,567 data points. Handgrip strength, BM, and Ht were collected every year. Multiple log-linear regression was used to determine allometric exponents for BM and Ht. Appropriateness of the allometric model was assessed through regression diagnostics, including normality of residuals and homoscedasticity. Allometrically scaled, ratio-scaled, and unscaled grip strength were then correlated with BM and Ht to examine the effectiveness of the procedure in controlling for body size. Allometric exponents for BM and Ht were calculated separately for each age group of boys and girls to satisfy the common exponent and group difference principles described by Vanderburgh. Unscaled grip strength had moderate to strong positive correlations with BM and Ht (p ≤ 0.05 for all) for all age groups. Ratio-scaled handgrip strength had significant moderate to strong negative correlations with BM (p ≤ 0.05 for all) and, to a lesser extent, Ht (p ≤ 0.05 for 8- to 12-year-old boys; p ≤ 0.05 for 8- to 12- and 14-year-old girls). Correlations between allometrically scaled handgrip strength and BM and Ht were not significant and approached zero. This study was the first to allometrically scale handgrip strength for BM and Ht in Hawaiian children. Allometric scaling applied to grip strength provides a useful expression of grip strength free of the confounding influence of body size.

  20. Pistol-grip Syringe holder (Cameco syringe pistol) in fine needle aspiration Biopsy: any advantages over the use of direct finger grip?

    PubMed

    Mayun, A A; Nggada, H A; Abdulazzez, J O; Musa, A B; Pindiga, U H; Khalil, M I

    2013-06-01

    The study seeks to determine the advantages of using the pistol-grip syringe holder in the performance of FNAB over the use of direct finger grip method. The skin is cleaned with gauze soaked in methylated spirit and the lump is located and firmly held between the thumb and fore finger of the free hand. The syringe is held by the out side of the barrel or by pistol-grip, and the needle tip pushed into the lesion. The plunger is partially retracted, creating a negative pressure. The cutting edge of the needle tip frees the cells inside the lesion which are sucked into the fine bore of the needle. The contents of the needle are then emptied on a microscopic slide and thinly smeared. The slides are then fixed in alcohol and later stained. These were examined under the microscope and a comparison between the aspirations using pistol-grip and direct finger grip was made. A total of 266 cases of FNABs were carried out from 1st January to 31st December, 2008. There were 89 breast cases out of which 42 (47%) had pistol-grip method and 47 (53%) had direct finger grip method; 74 thyroid cases out of which 28 (38%) were pistol-grip and 46 (62%) were direct finger grip cases; 56 cases of lymph node FNABs of which 18(32%) and 38 (68%) had pistol-grip and direct finger grip methods respectively. There were 23 cases of salivary gland FNABs having 8 (35%) and 15 (65%) as pistol-grip and direct finger grip methods respectively. Marked cellularity was observed in the majority of cases using both methods of FNABs. This study has shown that the use of pistol-grip syringe holder in the performance of FNABs has no significant advantage compared to the direct finger grip method.

  1. Effect of toothbrush grip on plaque removal during manual toothbrushing in children.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sarika; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Jain, Amit A; Munshi, Autar K

    2012-01-01

    Toothbrushing is fundamental to oral hygiene. Children differ in manual dexterity and their grip on toothbrushes. We videotaped toothbrushing sessions and observed the grip type, duration of brushing, and brushing technique used among 100 children aged 8-12 years. We then investigated the association between grip type and plaque removal, using plaque scores obtained at various time points. We further examined the effect on plaque scores of standardizing both brushing technique and duration among the same participants. The most common grip was the distal oblique, followed by the oblique; the spoon and precision grips were rare, and no child used a power grip. Mean brushing duration for most children was 1.43 ± 0.85 min, and the most common brushing technique was horizontal scrubbing. We conclude that grip preference is inherent and that the distal oblique grip was better than the oblique grip in removing plaque.

  2. GRIP Collaboration Portal: Information Management for a Hurricane Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, H.; Kulkarni, A.; Garrett, M.; Smith, T.; Goodman, H. M.

    2010-12-01

    NASA’s Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, carried out in August and September of 2010, was a complex operation, involving three aircraft and their crews based at different airports, a dozen instrument teams, mission scientists, weather forecasters, project coordinators and a variety of other participants. In addition, GRIP was coordinated with concurrent airborne missions: NOAA’s IFEX and then NSF-funded PREDICT. The GRIP Collaboration Portal was developed to facilitate communication within and between the different teams and serve as an information repository for the field campaign, providing a single access point for project documents, plans, weather forecasts, flight reports and quicklook data. The portal was developed using the Drupal open source content management framework. This presentation will cover both technology and participation issues. Specific examples include: Drupal’s large and diverse open source developer community is an advantage in that we were able to reuse many modules rather than develop capabilities from scratch, but integrating multiple modules developed by many people adds to the overall complexity of the site. Many of the communication capabilities provided by the site, such as discussion forums and blogs, were not used. Participants were diligent about posting necessary documents, but the favored communication method remained email. Drupal's developer-friendly nature allowed for quick development of the customized functionality needed to accommodate the rapidly changing requirements of GRIP experiment. DC-8 Overflight of Hurricane Earl during GRIP Mission

  3. GRIP1 is required for homeostatic regulation of AMPAR trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Han L.; Queenan, Bridget N.; Huganir, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic plasticity is a negative feedback mechanism that stabilizes neurons during periods of perturbed activity. The best-studied form of homeostatic plasticity in the central nervous system is the scaling of excitatory synapses. Postsynaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) can be inserted into synapses to compensate for neuronal inactivity or removed to compensate for hyperactivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the homeostatic regulation of AMPARs remain elusive. Here, we show that the expression of GRIP1, a multi-PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/discs large/zona occludens) domain AMPAR-binding protein, is bidirectionally altered by neuronal activity. Furthermore, we observe a subcellular redistribution of GRIP1 and a change in the binding of GRIP1 to GluA2 during synaptic scaling. Using a combination of biochemical, genetic, and electrophysiological methods, we find that loss of GRIP1 blocks the accumulation of surface AMPARs and the scaling up of synaptic strength that occur in response to chronic activity blockade. Collectively, our data point to an essential role of GRIP1-mediated AMPAR trafficking during inactivity-induced synaptic scaling. PMID:26216979

  4. Biometric verification based on grip-pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldhuis, Raymond N.; Bazen, Asker M.; Kauffman, Joost A.; Hartel, Pieter

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a user-verification system for a smart gun, which is based on grip-pattern recognition. An existing pressure sensor consisting of an array of 44 × 44 piezoresistive elements is used to measure the grip pattern. An interface has been developed to acquire pressure images from the sensor. The values of the pixels in the pressure-pattern images are used as inputs for a verification algorithm, which is currently implemented in software on a PC. The verification algorithm is based on a likelihoodratio classifier for Gaussian probability densities. First results indicate that it is feasible to use grip-pattern recognition for biometric verification.

  5. Assessment of Gel-Coated Delayed Self-Gripping Mesh

    PubMed Central

    Gutman, Mordechai; Lebedyev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mesh hernia repair is one of the most frequently performed procedures in general surgery. Recently, use of the self-gripping mesh demonstrated a beneficial effect on postoperative pain in inguinal hernia repairs. However, in intra-abdominal placement, the use of this novel mesh requires greater laparoscopic skill and dexterity because of the mesh's tendency to fold and adhere to itself and to any surrounding tissues. We hypothesized that gel-like coverage of a self-gripping mesh with a water-soluble film would allow delaying the immediate surface adhesion of the mesh to the tissue, which may allow greater freedom and ease in mesh placement for laparoscopic surgeons. Methods: In this ex vivo animal study, gel-coated self-gripping mesh (ProGrip) was compared with a control uncoated mesh in bovine and porcine tissue specimens and assessed for dislodgement shear forces before and after dissolving of the gel. Results: Gel coating of the mesh reduced preperitoneal dislodgement forces in a porcine abdominal wall specimen by 81% (8.05 ± 0.66 vs 1.53 ± 0.82 N, P < .01). Dissolving the gel markedly increased the anchoring forces (10.62 ± 3.70 vs 1.53 ± 0.82 N, P < .0001), and after dissolving the gel, the mesh shear dislodgement forces were similar and noninferior to the control mesh (8.05 ± 0.66 vs 10.62 ± 3.70 N, P = NS). Conclusions: We believe that water-soluble gel coating does not impair the adhesive features of the self-gripping mesh and may simplify its use in open and laparoscopic procedures by allowing controlled activation of the self-gripping mechanism. PMID:25516704

  6. Grip force and muscle activity differences due to glove type.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Kimberly; Splittstoesser, Riley; Maronitis, Anthony; Marras, William S

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different types and sizes of gloves on external grip force and muscle activity. Twenty-one male and seven female volunteers served as subjects. Each subject performed two maximum voluntary grip contractions while wearing each of the 10 glove types. Results indicated significant differences in the effects of different glove types on the peak force, ratio of peak force to normalized flexor muscle EMG activity, and the ratio of peak force to coactivity.

  7. Comparison of toe grip strength and muscle activities during maximal toe grip strength exertion according to the presence/absence of an ankle immobilization belt.

    PubMed

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yousuke; Murata, Jun; Miyazaki, Junya

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare toe grip strength and muscle activity during toe grip strength exertion according to the presence/absence of an ankle immobilization belt and to examine the relationship between the differences in muscle activity and toe grip strength. [Subjects] The Subjects were 13 healthy young women. [Methods] We measured toe grip strength and muscle activity during toe grip strength exertion in the presence and absence of an ankle immobilization belt using electromyography. Activity in the following leg muscles was recorded: rectus femoris, biceps femoris, medial head of the gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior. We then calculated the percent integrated electromyography during toe gripping. [Results] Toe grip strength and percent integrated electromyography of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle were significantly higher with ankle belt immobilization compared with without ankle belt immobilization. In addition, in the presence of ankle belt immobilization, the percent integrated electromyography of the tibialis anterior muscle and medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated a positive correlation with toe grip strength (r = 0.75 and r = 0.65, respectively). [Conclusion] These findings suggest that greater toe grip strength could be exerted in the presence of ankle belt immobilization. The measured values reflect the percent integrated electromyography of the crural muscles. Therefore, it was shown that toe grip strength should be measured in the presence of an immobilization belt.

  8. Two-handed grip on a mobile phone affords greater thumb motor performance, decreased variability, and a more extended thumb posture than a one-handed grip.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, Matthieu B; Asakawa, Deanna S; Jindrich, Devin L; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2016-01-01

    Holding a mobile computing device with two hands may affect thumb motor performance, joint postures, and device stability compared to holding the device and tapping the touchscreen with the thumb of the holding hand. We tested the hypotheses that holding a touchscreen mobile phone with two hands lead to increased thumb motor performance, different thumb postures, and decreased device movement relative to using one hand. Ten right-handed participants completed reciprocal thumb tapping tasks between emulated keys on a smartphone in either a one- (portrait) or two-handed (landscape) grip configuration. Effective index of performance measured from Fitts' Law was 9% greater (p < 0.001), movement time 7% faster (p < 0.001), and taps were 4% more precise (p < 0.016) for the two-handed grip. Tapping with a two-handed grip involved significantly different wrist and thumb postures than a one-handed grip. Variability of the computing device's movement was 36-63% lower for the two-handed grip compared to the one-handed grip condition (p < 0.001). The support for our hypotheses suggests that a two-handed grip results in increased performance and more extended wrist and thumb postures than a single-handed grip. Device designs that allow two-handed grips may afford increased performance relative to a one-handed grip. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Marta; Wiliński, Wojciech; Struzik, Artur; Rokita, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 – 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed. PMID:26834881

  10. Grip strength at four years in relation to birth weight

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, R.; Macdonald-Wallis, C.; Kapasi, T.; Sayer, A. A.; Robinson, S.; Godfrey, K.; Cooper, C.; Harvey, N.; Inskip, H.

    2013-01-01

    Consistent positive relationships have been found between birth weight and grip strength in adults but evidence in children is limited. In a prospective general population birth cohort (Southampton Women’s Survey) grip strength and anthropometry (height and weight) were measured in 968 children at age 4 years. Mean (standard deviation (S.D.)) birth weight was 3.48 (0.52) kg. Birth weight, adjusted for sex and gestational age, was positively associated with grip strength (β = 0.22 kg/S.D. increase in adjusted birth weight; 95% CI 0.11, 0.34). The relationship was attenuated after adjustment for current height and weight such that it became non-significant (β = 0.03 kg/S.D. increase in adjusted birth weight; 95% CI −0.08, 0.14), suggesting that body size may be on the causal pathway. Early influences on muscle development appear to impact on grip strength in children as well as adults. PMID:24294479

  11. Wearable flex sensor system for multiple badminton player grip identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Alvin; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Tomari, Mohd Razali Bin Md; Sek, Tee Kian; Suberi, Anis Azwani Muhd

    2017-09-01

    This paper focuses on the development of a wearable sensor system to identify the different types of badminton grip that is used by a player during training. Badminton movements and strokes are fast and dynamic, where most of the involved movement are difficult to identify with the naked eye. Also, the usage of high processing optometric motion capture system is expensive and causes computational burden. Therefore, this paper suggests the development of a sensorized glove using flex sensor to measure a badminton player's finger flexion angle. The proposed Hand Monitoring Module (HMM) is connected to a personal computer through Bluetooth to enable wireless data transmission. The usability and feasibility of the HMM to identify different grip types were examined through a series of experiments, where the system exhibited 70% detection ability for the five different grip type. The outcome plays a major role in training players to use the proper grips for a badminton stroke to achieve a more powerful and accurate stroke execution.

  12. Soft shape-adaptive gripping device made from artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburg, E.; Vunder, V.; Johanson, U.; Kaasik, F.; Aabloo, A.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a multifunctional four-finger gripper for soft robotics, suitable for performing delicate manipulation tasks. The gripping device is comprised of separately driven gripping and lifting mechanisms, both made from a separate single piece of smart material - ionic capacitive laminate (ICL) also known as artificial muscle. Compared to other similar devices the relatively high force output of the ICL material allows one to construct a device able to grab and lift objects exceeding multiple times its own weight. Due to flexible design of ICL grips, the device is able to adapt the complex shapes of different objects and allows grasping single or multiple objects simultaneously without damage. The performance of the gripper is evaluated in two different configurations: a) the ultimate grasping strength of the gripping hand; and b) the maximum lifting force of the lifting actuator. The ICL is composed of three main layers: a porous membrane consisting of non-ionic polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene) (PVdF-HFP), ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethane-sulfonate (EMITFS), and a reinforcing layer of woven fiberglass cloth. Both sides of the membrane are coated with a carbonaceous electrode. The electrodes are additionally covered with thin gold layers, serving as current collectors. Device made of this material operates silently, requires low driving voltage (<3 V), and is suitable for performing tasks in open air environment.

  13. Get a Grip! A Middle School Engineering Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Suzanne A.; Harrell, Deborah A.; Valente, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    Investigating the field of engineering offers the opportunity for interdisciplinary, hands-on, inquiry-based units that integrate real-world applications. However, many K-12 students are not exposed to engineering until they enter college. Get a Grip! is a problem-based unit that places middle school students in the role of engineers who are…

  14. Grip force vectors for varying handle diameters and hand sizes.

    PubMed

    Edgren, Cally S; Radwin, Robert G; Irwin, Curtis B

    2004-01-01

    Grip force was measured along two orthogonal axes and vector summed. Sixty-one participants recruited from a manufacturing facility (29 men and 32 women) grasped instrumented cylinders (2.54, 3.81, 5.08, 6.35, and 7.62 cm diameter) using a maximal voluntary power grip. Two orthogonal force measurements relative to the third metacarpal were resolved into a magnitude and corresponding angle. On average, magnitude increased 34.8 N as handle diameter increased from 2.54 cm to 3.81 cm, and then monotonically declined 103.8 N as the handle diameter increased to 7.62 cm. The average direction monotonically decreased from 59.2 degrees to 37.7 degrees as handle diameter decreased from the largest to the smallest. When the diameter was smallest, the greatest force component, Fx (168.6 N), was in the direction where the fingertips opposed the palm. Conversely, when the diameter was largest, the smallest component, Fx (77.7 N), was in the same direction. These values are averaged for the left and right hand. The angle for the largest diameter increased with increasing hand size. These relationships should be useful for the design of handles that require gripping in specific directions, such as for hand tools and controls. Actual or potential applications of this research include the design of handles that require gripping in specific directions, such as for hand tools and controls, that reduce effort, and that prevent fatigue and overexertion.

  15. Body-scaled transitions in human grip configurations.

    PubMed

    Cesari, P; Newell, K M

    2000-10-01

    This article reports two experiments that were set up to examine the preferred human grip configuration used to displace cubes that varied in length (Lc), mass (Mc), and density (ML3). In particular, the authors sought to provide a more precise test of a dimensional relation between the object and the hand that had previously been shown to predict the grip configuration used to transport an object from one location to another. The experiments examined 2 grip transitions (from 3 digits to 4 digits and from 1 hand to 2 hands) within 2 sets of object conditions. In Experiment 1, cubes with a low density and a small increment in size (1 mm) were used, whereas in Experiment 2, cubes with 2 fixed sizes and small increments in mass were used. The results showed that the body-scaled equation K = logLc + (logMc/a + bMh + cLh), where Mh and Lh are the anthropometric measures of the hand mass and length and a, b, and c are empirical constants, is the body-scaled information that predicts the grip configurations used to displace objects.

  16. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cable clamps and grips. 18.40 Section 18.40 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design...

  17. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cable clamps and grips. 18.40 Section 18.40 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Construction and Design...

  18. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Marta; Wiliński, Wojciech; Struzik, Artur; Rokita, Andrzej

    2015-11-22

    Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 - 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed.

  19. Get a Grip! A Middle School Engineering Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Suzanne A.; Harrell, Deborah A.; Valente, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    Investigating the field of engineering offers the opportunity for interdisciplinary, hands-on, inquiry-based units that integrate real-world applications. However, many K-12 students are not exposed to engineering until they enter college. Get a Grip! is a problem-based unit that places middle school students in the role of engineers who are…

  20. Sternal wire-grip: a new device in the surgical armamentarium †

    PubMed Central

    Izzat, Mohammad Bashar

    2012-01-01

    We describe a new wire-grip that enhances the surgeon's grip on sternal wires and facilitates their tightening with minimal risk of slips. This wire-grip should protect against operating room personnel injury during sternal re-approximation. PMID:22207695

  1. Anticipatory modulation of precision grip force with variations in limb velocity of a curvilinear movement.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Douglas L; Sherwood, David E; Noteboom, J Timothy

    2002-03-01

    The authors examined the relationship between peak velocity of a discrete horizontal elbow flexion movement in which the hand path was curvilinear and premovement modulation of precision grip force. The velocity of the movements of 7 participants was varied from maximal velocity to a velocity that required several seconds to reach a target. An object instrumented with force transducers for the forefinger and thumb measured precision grip force. There was a positively accelerating quadratic relationship between grip force change before movement and peak velocity of the ensuing limb movement. On some low-velocity trials, premovement grip force modulation reflected a net decrease. In contrast, high-velocity trials were preceded by net increases in grip force. Using cluster analysis, the authors classified grip forces in low-velocity movements as an empirically distinct set of entities from grip forces in high-velocity movements. The cluster of high-value grip forces suggested an anticipatory strategy that allowed participants a large safety margin in grip force to avoid object slip on movement initiation. The cluster of low-value grip forces at movement initiation suggested a second anticipatory strategy in which participants changed grip force very little, perhaps to increase the ability of proprioceptors in the hand to sense force changes. Those findings suggest that modulation of grip force before initiation of movements in which the hand path is curvilinear may be governed by two distinct velocity-dependent anticipatory strategies.

  2. [Simulated Total Wrist Fusion and its Influence on Hand Grip Function].

    PubMed

    Gülke, J; Schöll, H; Kapapa, T; Geyer, T; Mentzel, M; Wachter, N J

    2016-08-01

    Wrist fusion is still a common treatment for patients with advanced stage arthritis. Since patients are often intimidated by the functional limitations, we intended to evaluate the influence of the lack of wrist motion in different positions on the dynamic grip function and the grip strength of the hand. We simulated wrist fusion in 20° extension and 20° flexion and evaluated the following grip types: fist closure, 2 different power grips, pinch grip and precision grip. A TUB sensor glove was used, which allowed us to dynamically record the range of motion (ROM) of the finger joints as well as grip strength. Nineteen healthy subjects participated and all types of grips were performed using a standardised protocol with and without simulated wrist fusion. Lack of wrist motion in 20° extension had no relevant effect on the fingers' ROM, grip speed or strength. Simulated fusion in 20° flexion also had no influence on ROM or grip speed, rejecting our hypothesis that a tenodesis effect of the extensors in flexion would decrease ROM in the finger joints and grip speed. However, we were able to show a significant decrease of grip strength in flexion compared with extension or healthy wrists. The decrease averaged between 23 and 42% of healthy values, depending on the grip type. There was no change in strength distribution among the fingers. We didn't find any impact of lack of wrist motion on finger movement during forceful hand grip at normal speed. However, a significant loss of grip strength in flexed position of the wrist joint should be considered in patients with an indication for bilateral wrist fusion. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. The DEKA hand: A multifunction prosthetic terminal device-patterns of grip usage at home.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Acluche, Frantzy; Borgia, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    Research is needed to understand how upper limb prosthesis users take advantage of multiple grip options. To quantify usage of DEKA hand grip patterns during home use and compare patterns of usage at home to test sessions. Observational study design. Data were collected from 21 subjects. Engineering data on grip were downloaded at various intervals. Proportion of time in each grip was calculated for the first 4 weeks of home use, later months, and test sessions (testing use) and compared statistically across intervals. Exploratory analyses compared grip proportion by DEKA Arm level and prior prosthesis use. Three most commonly used grips during home use were power, pinch open, and lateral pinch. There were no significant differences between grip use during the first month and later months. Power grip was used 55% of the time at home and 23% of the time in testing use. Pinch closed, lateral, and chuck grip were used less at home than in tests. Comparisons were by configuration level and prosthetic use and no significant differences were found. Patterns of DEKA hand grip usage differed between home and test environments, suggesting that users relied on fewer grip patterns at home. Clinical relevance These findings have implications for prosthetic training with multi-articulating terminal devices.

  4. Effects of grip force on skin conductance measured from a handheld device.

    PubMed

    Tartz, Robert; Vartak, Aniket; King, Jay; Fowles, Don

    2015-01-01

    Skin conductance (SC) reflects stimulus significance and can be measured by integrating electrodes directly onto a smartphone housing such that they are naturally contacted when gripped. However, grip artifacts naturally arise during operation since grip forces can vary. We explored the effects of grip force on SC to determine feasibility and to draw guidelines on artifact mitigation. For this purpose, a prototype was built with integrated SC electrodes with colocated force sensors, and data was collected from 24 participants gripping the prototype across different grip force conditions. Our analysis showed that static forces greater than 2.0 N were associated with significant SC distortion, and artifacts induced from dynamic grip forces were buffered if the SC level was at least 1.1 microsiemens. Our findings are relevant for future applications of SC sensing on smartphones, which may enable interesting and highly contextual user experiences. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  5. Tire grip identification based on strain information: Theory and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcaterra, A.; Roveri, N.

    2013-12-01

    A novel technique for the identification of the tire-road grip conditions is presented. This is based on the use of strain information inside the tire, from which relevant characteristics of the tire-road contact can be extracted also through a factor named area slip ratio. This process forms the basis of a technology for grip identification that requires a new model of the tire dynamics. The model permits to determine closed form analytical relationships between the measured strain and the area slip ratio. On this basis, a procedure that can extract the contact kinematic parameter from the time history of the internal strain of the rolling tire is presented. Numerical simulations offer the chance to validate the identification algorithm.

  6. [The evaluation of the Artem grip in its function assessment].

    PubMed

    Aveque, C; Mugnier, C; Jeay, F; Moutet, F

    1994-01-01

    The aim of our study is to assess the Artem pincers efficiency, which is both a new grip strength instrument and a hand reeducation instrument. It is original through its pleasant good looking and it offers many different programs of use. This study was carried out involving 60 healthy subjects. We compared the Artem system with two other measurement instruments of reference (Jamar for grip strength and Pinch-Gauge for pinch strength). With this Artem system we also studied two other originals tests: 1) Evolution of hand and finger strength within 15 seconds. 2) Tiredness test. Our measurements demonstrated good high correlation and high reliability between reference instruments and Artem system dealing with strength measurements. We can't conclude about the two original program's statistics, but it would probably be interesting to compare these with a group of patients in course of reeducation.

  7. Coordination of Fingertip Forces During Precision Grip in Premanifest Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ashwini K.; Gordon, Andrew M.; Marder, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    Precision grip control is important for accurate object manipulation and requires coordination between horizontal (grip) and vertical (load) fingertip forces. Manifest Huntington’s disease (HD) subjects demonstrate excessive and highly variable grip force and delayed coordination between grip and load forces. Because the onset of these impairments is unknown, we examined precision grip control in premanifest HD (pre-HD) subjects. Fifteen pre-HD and 15 age- and sex-matched controls performed the precision grip task in a seated position. Subjects grasped and lifted an object instrumented with a force transducer that measured horizontal grip and vertical load forces. Outcomes were preload time, loading time, maximum grip force, mean static grip force, and variability for all measures. We compared outcomes across groups and correlated grip measures with the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale and predicted age of onset. Variability of maximum grip force (P < .0001) and variability of static grip force (P < .00001) were higher for pre-HD subjects. Preload time (P < .007) and variability of preload time (P < .006) were higher in pre-HD subjects. No differences were seen in loading time across groups. Variability of static grip force (r2 = 0.23) and variability of preload time (r2 = 0.59) increased with predicted onset and were correlated with tests of cognitive function. Our results indicate that pre-HD patients have poor regulation of the transition between reach and grasp and higher variability in force application and temporal coordination during the precision grip task. Force and temporal variability may be good markers of disease severity because they were correlated with predicted onset of disease. PMID:21394785

  8. Rare gripping object in electrocution: Cadaveric spasm at its best.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Mohit; Behera, C; Bodwal, Jatin; Dikshit, P C

    2017-01-01

    Cadaveric spasm causes instantaneous rigor without preceding post-mortem flaccidity. The precise pathophysiological basis of this phenomenon is still unknown. We report a case of accidental electrocution where the deceased was found dead with a metallic water supply pipe of a motor booster pump firmly gripped in his hand. In this report, we review the literature and consider the mechanisms that may cause this phenomenon.

  9. NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Kakar, Ramesh; Zipser, Edward; Heymsfield, Gerald; Albers, Cerese; Brown, Shannon; Durden, Stephen; Guimond, Stephen; Halverson, Jeffery; Heymsfield, Andrew; hide

    2013-01-01

    In August–September 2010, NASA, NOAA, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) conducted separate but closely coordinated hurricane field campaigns, bringing to bear a combined seven aircraft with both new and mature observing technologies. NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment, the subject of this article, along with NOAA's Intensity Forecasting Experiment (IFEX) and NSF's Pre-Depression Investigation of Cloud-Systems in the Tropics (PREDICT) experiment, obtained unprecedented observations of the formation and intensification of tropical cyclones. The major goal of GRIP was to better understand the physical processes that control hurricane formation and intensity change, specifically the relative roles of environmental and inner-core processes. A key focus of GRIP was the application of new technologies to address this important scientific goal, including the first ever use of the unmanned Global Hawk aircraft for hurricane science operations. NASA and NOAA conducted coordinated flights to thoroughly sample the rapid intensification (RI) of Hurricanes Earl and Karl. The tri-agency aircraft teamed up to perform coordinated flights for the genesis of Hurricane Karl and Tropical Storm Matthew and the non-redevelopment of the remnants of Tropical Storm Gaston. The combined GRIP–IFEX–PREDICT datasets, along with remote sensing data from a variety of satellite platforms [Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), Aqua, Terra, CloudSat, and Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO)], will contribute to advancing understanding of hurricane formation and intensification. This article summarizes the GRIP experiment, the missions flown, and some preliminary findings.

  10. Effects of hyperthyroidism on hand grip strength and function.

    PubMed

    Erkol İnal, Esra; Çarlı, Alparslan Bayram; Çanak, Sultan; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Köroğlu, Banu Kale; Savaş, Serpil

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a pathologic condition in which the body is exposed to excessive amounts of circulating thyroid hormones. Skeletal muscle is one of the major target organs of thyroid hormones. We evaluated hand grip strength and function in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. Fifty-one patients newly diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and 44 healthy controls participated in this study. Age, height, weight, and dominant hand of all participants were recorded. The diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was confirmed by clinical examination and laboratory tests. Hand grip strength was tested at the dominant hand with a Jamar hand dynamometer. The grooved pegboard test (PGT) was used to evaluate hand dexterity. The Duruöz Hand Index (DHI) was used to assess hand function. No significant differences were found in terms of clinical and demographic findings between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls (p > 0.05). Significant differences were found between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls regarding PGT and DHI scores (p < 0.05). Hyperthyroidism seemed to affect hand dexterity and function more than hand grip strength and seemed to be associated with reduced physical function more than muscle strength. This may also indicate that patients with hyperthyroidism should be evaluated by multidisplinary modalities.

  11. Low Grip Strength and Prediabetes in Normal-Weight Adults.

    PubMed

    Mainous, Arch G; Tanner, Rebecca J; Anton, Stephen D; Jo, Ara

    2016-01-01

    Detection of prediabetes is an important step in diabetes prevention in primary care. Risk stratification of healthy-weight individuals for detection of prediabetes is necessary to avoid missed opportunities for diabetes prevention. Using data from the 2011 to 2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we studied the relationship between combined handgrip strength, a proxy for lean muscle mass, and prediabetes among adults aged ≥20 years without diagnosed or undiagnosed diabetes who had a healthy body mass index (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2); unweighted n = 1340, weighted n = 58,360,690). Prediabetes was defined as having a glycohemoglobin level between 5.7% and 6.4%. Of the healthy-weight adults, 20.5% had prediabetes. Combined mean grip strength was lower for individuals with prediabetes than those with normoglycemia in the full sample (63.8 vs 70.9 kg; P = .004). Similar results were seen among both men (87.9 vs 82.1 kg; P = .03) and women (51.8 vs 56.5 kg; P = .001) in subgroup analysis. Grip strength is associated with prediabetes among healthy-weight US adults. Grip strength may have utility as an indicator for screening healthy-weight individuals for prediabetes. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  12. Grip control in children before, during, and after impulsive loading.

    PubMed

    Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2010-01-01

    The manipulation of small objects requires continuous contributions from both predictive and reactive mechanisms. The authors aimed to study the development of predictive and reactive mechanisms used by children from 6 to 14 years of age to manage impulsive loading. The load of a handheld object was increased rapidly by the drop of a weight hung on the object. The drop was triggered either by the child (predictive condition) or by the examiner (reactive condition). Regardless of the condition, the control strategy was refined with age. Younger children were unable to adapt their grip force (GF) to the friction of their fingers, whereas the older children provided GF that was well adapted to their variable coefficient of friction, thereby producing a secure grip. This reflected either an inadequate amount of force or an inability to integrate cutaneous information from the fingers in younger children. Additionally, a modulation with age for both predictive and reactive mechanisms was observed. All together, the better predictive abilities and the more secure grip exhibited by older children allow decreased slipping and improved performance in an impulsive loading task.

  13. An investigation of the cortical control of forepaw gripping after cervical hemisection injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Strong, Melissa K; Blanco, Jennifer E; Anderson, Kim D; Lewandowski, Gail; Lewandoski, Gail; Steward, Oswald

    2009-05-01

    Previous studies in mice have demonstrated that forepaw gripping ability, as measured by a grip strength meter (GSM), is dependent on the contralateral sensorimotor cortex, but this dependency changes after hemisection injury at cervical level 4 (C4). Initially, the mouse fails to grip with the forepaw ipsilateral to the hemisection but gripping recovers. Additionally, a mouse's gripping by the contralateral paw becomes independent of the sensorimotor cortex, indicating a reorganization of cortical control of gripping function (Blanco, J.E., Anderson, K.D., Steward, O. 2007. Recovery of forepaw gripping ability and reorganization of cortical motor control following cervical spinal cord injuries in mice. Exp. Neurol. 203, 333-348.). Here we explore whether a similar reorganization occurs after cervical hemisection injuries in rats. We show that as in mice, unilateral lesions of the sensorimotor cortex impair rats' griping by the contralateral paw. We also confirm from previous studies that cervical hemisections impair rats' griping by the ipsilateral paw. In contrast to mice, however there is minimal recovery of gripping after complete lateral hemisections and secondary lesions of the sensorimotor cortex continue to impair rats' gripping by the contralateral paw. Thus, forelimb gripping ability as measured by the GSM is dependent on the contralateral sensorimotor cortex in rats even after a cervical hemisection.

  14. Standardized grip strength as an outcome measure in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, C; Gaffney, K; Mukhtyar, C

    2013-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer progressive loss of hand function and have weaker hand grip than the healthy population. In this study we aimed to validate hand grip strength standardized by age and gender (z score) against currently accepted clinical measures of disease activity. Electronic records of patients with a diagnosis of RA seen between April 2007 and December 2011 were screened for the documentation of tender and swollen joint counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP), along with patient global activity score and grip strength. Bilateral grip strengths were converted to z scores on the basis of previously published age- and gender-corrected normative data for grip strength. The z scores were then correlated against components of disease activity scores. Ninety patients diagnosed with RA had been seen 602 times within 2 years of diagnosis. Hand grip data were available for 204 visits. There was a statistically significant inverse correlation between grip strength z scores and the tested variables. The sensitivity and specificity of a hand grip z score of -1.5 for predicting remission were, respectively, 70% and 76% for the right hand and 82% and 69% for the left hand. Hand grip testing and subsequent conversion to z scores corrected for age and gender correlate with disease activity in early RA. We have shown that the grip strength z scores can discriminate between various disease states, and the strength seems to return to near normative data when the disease is in remission.

  15. Delayed grip relaxation and altered modulation of intracortical inhibition with aging

    PubMed Central

    Motawar, Binal; Stinear, James W.; Lauer, Abigail W.; Ramakrishnan, V. Viswanathan; Seo, Na Jin

    2015-01-01

    Grip relaxation is a voluntary action that requires an increase in short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) in healthy young adults, rather than a simple termination of excitatory drive. The way aging affects this voluntary inhibitory action and timing of grip relaxation is currently unknown. The objective of this study was to examine aging-related delays in grip relaxation and SICI modulation for the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) muscle during grip relaxation. The main finding was that young adults increased SICI to relax their grips, whereas older adults did not increase SICI with a prolonged grip relaxation time (p<0.05 for both SICI modulation and grip relaxation time). A secondary experiment showed that both young and older adults did not change H reflex excitability during grip relaxation. Our data suggest that grip relaxation is mediated by increased cortical inhibitory output in young adults, and aging-related impairment in increasing cortical inhibitory output may hamper timely cessation of muscle activity. Our data also suggest a lesser role of the spinal circuits in grip muscle relaxation. This knowledge may contribute to understanding of aging-related movement deterioration and development of interventions for improving modulation of SICI to improve muscle relaxation and movement coordination. PMID:26686531

  16. Monitoring 6-Month Trajectory of Grip Strength Improves the Prediction of Long-Term Change in Grip Strength in Disabled Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Guralnik, Jack M.; Beamer, Brock A.; Fried, Linda P.; Chaves, Paulo H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study aims to assess the degree and heterogeneity of decline in grip strength in the short term (6 months) and the clinical relevance of short-term decline to long-term decline (2.5 years) in grip strength in disabled older women. Methods. Eighty-four community-dwelling disabled women aged 65 years or older were evaluated on a weekly basis over 6 months, followed by an additional five semi-annual visits for a total follow-up of 3 years. The study outcome is maximum isometric handgrip strength in the nondominant hand. Linear random effects models were used to characterize population- as well as individual-level change in grip strength over time. Results. In the weekly assessments over the initial 6 months, individual-level short-term change in grip strength was detectable (mean = −0.12kg/month; p = .06), heterogeneous (range: −2.03±0.95kg/month), and independent of absolute grip strength at baseline (mean = 18.4kg). Additionally, among women with grip strength greater than 16.7kg at baseline, the long-term rate of decline in grip strength was accelerated by 0.15kg/year (p = .014) for every 0.5 standard deviation (0.25kg/month) increase in the short-term rate of decline. The baseline absolute grip strength, however, was not significantly associated with the long-term rate of decline (correlation = −0.36, p = .105). Conclusions. Our findings suggest that short-term change in grip strength is detectable and meaningful for disabled older women and it is the individual’s past trajectory of grip strength relative to her current strength level, not her current absolute strength per se, that is important for predicting future strength decline. PMID:25167868

  17. Effects of Sensory Deficit on Phalanx Force Deviation During Power Grip Post Stroke.

    PubMed

    Enders, Leah R; Seo, Na Jin

    2017-01-01

    The effect of sensory deficits on power grip force from individual phalanges was examined. The authors found that stroke survivors with sensory deficits (determined by the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test) gripped with phalanx force directed more tangential to the object surface, than those without, although both groups had similar motor deficits (Chedoke-McMaster and Fugl-Meyer), grip strength, and skin friction. Altered grip force direction elevates risk of finger slippage against the object thus grip loss/object dropping, hindering activities of daily living. Altered grip force direction was associated with altered muscle activation patterns. In summary, the motor impairment level alone may not describe hand motor control in detail. Information about sensory deficits helps elucidate patients' hand motor control with functional relevance.

  18. Control of Precision Grip Force in Lifting and Holding of Low-Mass Objects

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Daisuke; Kadota, Koji; Ito, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the control of grip force when manipulating an object with an extremely small mass using a precision grip, although some related information has been provided by studies conducted in an unusual microgravity environment. Grip-load force coordination was examined while healthy adults (N = 17) held a moveable instrumented apparatus with its mass changed between 6 g and 200 g in 14 steps, with its grip surface set as either sandpaper or rayon. Additional measurements of grip-force-dependent finger-surface contact area and finger skin indentation, as well as a test of weight discrimination, were also performed. For each surface condition, the static grip force was modulated in parallel with load force while holding the object of a mass above 30 g. For objects with mass smaller than 30 g, on the other hand, the parallel relationship was changed, resulting in a progressive increase in grip-to-load force (GF/LF) ratio. The rayon had a higher GF/LF force ratio across all mass levels. The proportion of safety margin in the static grip force and normalized moment-to-moment variability of the static grip force were also elevated towards the lower end of the object mass for both surfaces. These findings indicate that the strategy of grip force control for holding objects with an extremely small mass differs from that with a mass above 30 g. The data for the contact area, skin indentation, and weight discrimination suggest that a decreased level of cutaneous feedback signals from the finger pads could have played some role in a cost function in efficient grip force control with low-mass objects. The elevated grip force variability associated with signal-dependent and internal noises, and anticipated inertial force on the held object due to acceleration of the arm and hand, could also have contributed to the cost function. PMID:26376484

  19. Quantifying Soldier Shooting Performance of the M4 Carbine with and without a Vertical Grip

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying Soldier Shooting Performance of the M4 Carbine with and without a Vertical Grip by Samson V Ortega Jr, William H Harper, and...21005-5425 ARL-TR-7173 January 2015 Quantifying Soldier Shooting Performance of the M4 Carbine with and without a Vertical Grip...Quantifying Soldier Shooting Performance of the M4 Carbine with and without a Vertical Grip 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  20. Control of Precision Grip Force in Lifting and Holding of Low-Mass Objects.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Yuichi; Kimura, Daisuke; Kadota, Koji; Ito, Taro; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the control of grip force when manipulating an object with an extremely small mass using a precision grip, although some related information has been provided by studies conducted in an unusual microgravity environment. Grip-load force coordination was examined while healthy adults (N = 17) held a moveable instrumented apparatus with its mass changed between 6 g and 200 g in 14 steps, with its grip surface set as either sandpaper or rayon. Additional measurements of grip-force-dependent finger-surface contact area and finger skin indentation, as well as a test of weight discrimination, were also performed. For each surface condition, the static grip force was modulated in parallel with load force while holding the object of a mass above 30 g. For objects with mass smaller than 30 g, on the other hand, the parallel relationship was changed, resulting in a progressive increase in grip-to-load force (GF/LF) ratio. The rayon had a higher GF/LF force ratio across all mass levels. The proportion of safety margin in the static grip force and normalized moment-to-moment variability of the static grip force were also elevated towards the lower end of the object mass for both surfaces. These findings indicate that the strategy of grip force control for holding objects with an extremely small mass differs from that with a mass above 30 g. The data for the contact area, skin indentation, and weight discrimination suggest that a decreased level of cutaneous feedback signals from the finger pads could have played some role in a cost function in efficient grip force control with low-mass objects. The elevated grip force variability associated with signal-dependent and internal noises, and anticipated inertial force on the held object due to acceleration of the arm and hand, could also have contributed to the cost function.

  1. A review of compression glove modifications to enhance functional grip: a case series.

    PubMed

    Dewey, William Scott; Richard, Reg L; Hedman, Travis L; Chapman, Ted T; Quick, Charles D; Holcomb, John B; Wolf, Steve E

    2007-01-01

    A common complaint among patients with burns is their inability to grasp items while wearing compression gloves. Recent technological innovations permit the addition of grip-enhancing material to garment fabric. The purpose of this case series was to describe the course of development of compression gloves with enhanced grip modifications. Five different types of grip modifications were made during a period of 18 months. Five subjects who were prescribed compression gloves tested each type of glove. The gloves were fabricated with grip-enhancing material on the palmar surface in five ways: 1) rectangular rubber tabs; 2) honeycomb pattern silicone; 3) wave-like pattern silicone; 4) line pattern silicone beads; 5) line pattern silicone beads embedded into the fabric. Each glove was evaluated on a three-point Likert scale (0 = poor, 1 = moderate, 2 = good) for grip-enhancing qualities and durability. All five subjects reported similar experiences with each glove type: 1) the rectangular rubber tabs demonstrated poor grip and moderate durability; 2) the honeycomb pattern provided good grip but poor durability; 3) the wave pattern had good grip and moderate durability; 4) the silicone beads adhered to the fabric had moderate grip but poor durability; 5) the silicone beads embedded into the fabric had moderate grip and good durability. The wave pattern provided the best gripping capability and silicone embedded into the fabric demonstrated the best durability. A wave-like pattern silicone material embedded into the fabric seems to provide the best combination of grip and durability to enhance activities of daily living performance.

  2. Grip strength in healthy caucasian adults: reference values.

    PubMed

    Günther, Christian M; Bürger, Alexander; Rickert, Markus; Crispin, Alexander; Schulz, Christoph U

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to update reference data of handgrip strength for healthy adults of both genders spanning a wide age range and to analyze possible factors of influence. Intraindividual and interindividual variations of grip strength and their relation to several anthropometric factors were analyzed in a standardized manner for 769 healthy adults (women, n = 403; men, n = 366) aged between 20 years and 95 years. Measurements were done in neutral position of arm, forearm, and wrist on setting II of a Baseline digital hydraulic dynamometer (NexGen Ergonomics Inc. Quebec, Canada). Mean strength was about 41% less in women (right 29 kg; left 27 kg) than in men (right 49 kg; left 47 kg) resulting in a ratio of left to right hand slightly above .95 in both genders. During the course of life, hand strength develops comparably in both genders peaking at 35 years of age and decreasing continuously further on. Anthropometric variables such as forearm circumference and length, hand size, or body mass showed a positive correlation with grip strength. Body mass index, type of work, and hand dominance showed only a partial positive correlation or no correlation with grip strength. Gender and age, followed by parameters representing body length and obesity, were observed to have the highest predictive value for handgrip strength and were therefore entered into the generation of prediction equations. We recommend side adjustment of measured values for intraindividual comparison and inclusion of information regarding anthropometric characteristics, as well as using gender- and age-adjusted reference values, whereas hand dominance can be neglected. The regression equations we generated might prove to be useful for clinicians or for those who use normative values within software to provide more accurate predictions of strength scores for specific applications.

  3. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael J; Johnson, Simon A; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-03-06

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick-slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function.

  4. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  5. Simulation of thinning with a single-grip harvester

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, L. )

    1999-02-01

    A simulation model of a single-grip harvester was constructed to evaluate different silvicultural treatments and to compare different machine concepts with a minimum of confounding factors. The model simulates machine movement, boom movement, felling, delimbing, and cross-cutting in stands where both size and position of each tree are known. To validate the model, model output was compared with data from recent time studies. Effects on harvester productivity of three harvesting intensities (extraction of 30, 40, and 50% of the basal area when thinning from below) and four distances between machine positions were studied. Productivity increased when harvesting intensity and with distance between machine positions.

  6. Event-Related Brain Potentials for Goal-Related Power Grips

    PubMed Central

    Westerholz, Jan; Schack, Thomas; Koester, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown that neurophysiological activation during action planning depends on the orientation to initial or final action goals for precision grips. However, the neural signature for a distinct class of grasping, power grips, is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to differentiate between cerebral activity, by means of event-related potentials (ERPs), and its temporal organization during power grips executed with an emphasis on either the initial or final parts of movement sequences. In a grasp and transportation task, visual cues emphasized either the grip (the immediate goal) or the target location (the final goal). ERPs differed between immediate and final goal-cued conditions, suggesting different means of operation dependent on goal-relatedness. Differences in mean amplitude occurred earlier for power grips than for recently reported precision grips time-locked to grasping over parieto-occipital areas. Time-locked to final object placement, differences occurred within a similar time window for power and precision grips over frontal areas. These results suggest that a parieto-frontal network of activation is of crucial importance for grasp planning and execution. Our results indicate that power grip preparation and execution for goal-related actions are controlled by similar neural mechanisms as have been observed during precision grips, but with a distinct temporal pattern. PMID:23844211

  7. Biomechanical analysis of flexor digitorum profundus and superficialis in grip-strength generation.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Robert A; Kozin, Scott H; Mirarchi, Adam; Holland, Burt; Porter, Scott

    2007-09-01

    Grip strength is generated through extrinsic flexor tendon and intrinsic muscle actuation. In the study reported here, we analyzed the grip-generating properties of the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendons during grip-strength generation. In vivo gripping was reproduced in 11 cadaveric forearms through pneumatic tensioning of flexor tendons. A Jamar dynamometer (TEC, Clifton, NJ) was positioned in the hand at varying degrees of angulation measured between the Jamar compression axis and the second metacarpal. Maximum gripping strength during isolated FDP and FDS tensioning generated maximum compressive forces at different angles (P < .0001). The isolated FDP showed continued increased grip strength with larger angles and was most effective when the dynamometer handle was in contact with the distal phalanx. The isolated FDS was most effective at smaller angles when the handle made contact with the middle phalanx. The isolated FDS shows an initial increase in grip strength as the contact point moves toward the middle phalanx (P < .01) and then a tendency for grip strength to decline as the contact point moves over the distal phalanx (P < .01). The FDP and FDS tendons demonstrate unique abilities to generate compression on a dynamometer. This knowledge is important to consider when evaluating grip strength in patients who have injured the extrinsic finger flexors.

  8. Precision-grip force changes in the anatomical and prosthetic limb during predictable load increases.

    PubMed

    Weeks, D L; Wallace, S A; Noteboom, J T

    2000-06-01

    This study examined precision-grip force applied to an instrumented test object held aloft while the weight of the object was predictably varied by transporting and placing loads (50, 100, or 200 g) atop the test object. Transport of the loads was performed either by the subject or the experimenter. Grip force was examined in four non-amputee control subjects and in the anatomical and prosthetic hand of a subject with a prosthetic device. As subjects transported the load, anticipatory grip-force changes occurred in the anatomical hands and prosthetic hand, which were scaled in relation to the load. When the experimenter transported the load to the anatomical hands of control subjects or the prosthetic user, anticipatory increases in grip force occurred that also were scaled in relation to load. However, when the experimenter transported the load to the prosthetic hand, anticipatory grip-force adjustments were absent. During the phase in which the load was being assumed by the postural hand, grip forces in the anatomical hands and prosthetic hand were further scaled to load demands. Ability to adapt grip force in the prosthetic hand during this phase suggested that the subject was utilizing sensory information from the residual limb to adjust grip force. Thus, while anticipatory changes precede the process of adaptation to load changes, actual sensory consequences resulting from added weight remain necessary to fully adapt grip force to load demands, even for the prosthetic user.

  9. Effects of hand grip exercise on shoulder joint internal rotation and external rotation peak torque.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Rour; Jong-Soon Kim, Laurentius

    2016-08-10

    The goal of this study is to analyze the effects of hand grip training on shoulder joint internal rotation (IR)/external rotation (ER) peak torque for healthy people. The research was conducted on 23 healthy adults in their 20 s-30 s who volunteered to participate in the experiment. Hand grip power test was performed on both hands of the research subjects before/after the test to study changes in hand grip power. Isokinetic machine was used to measure the concentric IRPT (internal rotation peak torque) and concentric ERPT (external rotation peak torque) at the velocity of 60°/sec, 90°/sec, and 180°/sec before/after the test. Hand grip training was performed daily on the subject's right hand only for four weeks according to exercise program. Finally, hand grip power of both hands and the maximum torque values of shoulder joint IR/ER were measured before/after the test and analyzed. There was a statistically significant difference in the hand grip power of the right hand, which was subject to hand grip training, after the experiment. Also, statistically significant difference for shoulder ERPT was found at 60°/sec. Hand grip training has a positive effect on shoulder joint IRPT/ERPT and therefore can help strengthen muscles around the shoulder without using weight on the shoulder. Consequently, hand grip training would help maintain strengthen the muscles around the shoulder in the early phase of rehabilitation process after shoulder surgery.

  10. Contribution of the Cerebellum in Cue-Dependent Force Changes During an Isometric Precision Grip Task.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Dieter F; Schmid, Barbara C; Meindl, Tobias; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P

    2016-08-01

    The "raspberry task" represents a precision grip task that requires continuous adjustment of grip forces and pull forces. During this task, subjects use a specialised grip rod and have to increase the pull force linearly while the rod is locked. The positions of the fingers are unrestrained and freely selectable. From the finger positions and the geometry of the grip rod, a physical lever was derived which is a comprehensive measurement of the subject's grip behaviour. In this study, the involvement of the cerebellum in establishing cued force changes (CFC) was examined. The auditory stimulus was associated with a motor behaviour that has to be readjusted during an ongoing movement that already started. Moreover, cerebellar involvement on grip behaviour was examined. The results show that patients presenting with degenerating cerebellar disease (CBL) were able to elicit CFC and were additionally able to optimise grip behaviour by minimising the lever. Comparison of the results of CBL with a control group of healthy subjects showed, however, that the CFC incidence was significantly lower and the reduction of the lever was less in CBL. Hence, the cerebellum is involved not only in the classical conditioning of reflexes but also in the association of sensory stimuli with complex changes in motor behaviour. Furthermore, the cerebellum is involved in the optimisation of grip behaviour during ongoing movements. Recent studies lead to the assumption that the cerebello-reticulo-spinal pathway might be important for the reduced optimisation of grip behaviour in CBL.

  11. Comparison of Infant Car Seat grip orientations and lift strategies.

    PubMed

    Clamann, Michael; Zhu, Biwen; Beaver, Leah; Taylor, Kinley; Kaber, David

    2012-07-01

    The rear-facing Infant Car Seat (ICS) is designed to meet federal requirements for transporting children less than 1 year old. Typical use includes transfer in and out of a vehicle, which is shown to be a difficult lift. Despite the frequency of this lift, manufacturers provide little guidance for users. Review of relevant literature suggested an ICS featuring an angled handle, promoting a neutral wrist posture, would increase grip stability and decrease lifting effort. Popular press suggested a foot-in-car stance for the ICS lift would do the same. An experiment was conducted in which wrist deviations from neutral posture were recorded along with lifting muscle activation levels (multiple flexor muscles and biceps brachii) and overall perceived exertion for straight versus a new bent handle design and conventional stance versus foot-in-car. Foot position was examined to test the recommendations in the popular press. Surprisingly, wrist deviation was not significantly affected by the new bent handle design (due to compensatory behavior with the straight handle) but was related to foot placement (p=0.04). Results revealed the bent handle to significantly reduce flexor activation compared with the straight handle (p=0.0003); however, the level of biceps activation increased. Biceps activation also significantly increased for foot-in-car stance (p=0.035) but not flexor activation. In general, the bent handle enabled the user to lift the ICS with a steadier grip and less effort.

  12. Grip Forces During Object Manipulation: Experiment, Mathematical Model & Validation

    PubMed Central

    Slota, Gregory P.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    When people transport handheld objects, they change the grip force with the object movement. Circular movement patterns were tested within three planes at two different rates (1.0, 1.5 Hz), and two diameters (20, 40 cm). Subjects performed the task reasonably well, matching frequencies and dynamic ranges of accelerations within expectations. A mathematical model was designed to predict the applied normal forces from kinematic data. The model is based on two hypotheses: (a) the grip force changes during movements along complex trajectories can be represented as the sum of effects of two basic commands associated with the parallel and orthogonal manipulation, respectively; (b) different central commands are sent to the thumb and virtual finger (Vf- four fingers combined). The model predicted the actual normal forces with a total variance accounted for of better than 98%. The effects of the two components of acceleration—along the normal axis and the resultant acceleration within the shear plane—on the digit normal forces are additive. PMID:21735245

  13. Vitamin D status is associated with grip strength in centenarians.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Alyson; Johnson, Mary Ann; Hausman, Dorothy B; Cress, M Elaine; Houston, Denise K; Davey, Adam; Poon, Leonard W

    2014-01-01

    Low serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) have been associated with poor physical function in older adults, but few, if any, studies have examined this relationship in the very old. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine this relationship in the very old. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were obtained from 194 centenarians and near centenarians (98 years and older). The associations between 25(OH)D concentrations and measures of physical function were evaluated with unadjusted and adjusted regression models. We found that 35% of centenarians had 25(OH)D concentrations less than 50 nmol/L. Adjusted mean grip strength was lower for centenarians with 25(OH)D concentrations less than 75 nmol/L than for centenarians with higher concentrations (P<0.05). However, there were no differences in the Georgia Centenarian Study (GCS) Composite Scale, a global measure of physical function, between those with higher and lower 25(OH)D concentrations. We conclude that low 25(OH)D concentrations are associated with poor grip strength, but not GCS Composite Scale, in the very old. Considering the high burden of poor physical function in older adults, understanding the relationship between vitamin D and different measures of physical function, including strength, becomes increasingly important.

  14. Precision Grip Control while Walking Down a Stair Step

    PubMed Central

    Ebner-Karestinos, Daniela; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Bleyenheuft, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the internal model regulating grip force (GF)/load force (LF) coordination during a brisk load increase is preserved when the lower extremities produce a perturbation during a single step-down task. We observed the coordination of the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF), GF and LF while holding a handheld object during a single step-down task. The 3 forces (vGRF, GF and LF) decreased during the start of the task. While the subject was descending, LF and GF became dissociated from vGRF and increased in value, probably to anticipate the first foot contact. Coordination of LF and GF was maintained until the maximal vGRF (knee extension). LF peaked in the same time window as vGRF, whereas GF peaked about 70 ms later. This desynchronization, which was previously observed in direct load increase on a handheld object, was interpreted to be a predictive action to ensure the smooth management of the brisk increase in load induced by the lower extremities. Incidentally, in this group, kinematic and dynamic differences were observed between men and women, which may highlight a gender-specific strategy to perform the step-down task. In conclusion, these results suggest that the internal model of precision grip is able to integrate a brisk load change, whatever its origin, and regulate the forces to provide an ideal GF to dampen a brisk load increase and secure the object. PMID:27802343

  15. Are annual layers preserved in NorthGRIP Eemian ice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, E.; Bigler, M.; Nielsen, M. E.; Steffensen, J. P.; Svensson, A.

    2009-04-01

    A newly developed setup for continuous flow analysis (CFA) of ice cores in Copenhagen is optimized for high resolution analysis of four components: Soluble sodium (mainly deriving from sea salt), soluble ammonium (related to biological processes and biomass burning events), insoluble dust particles (basically transported from Asian deserts to Greenland), and the electrolytic melt water conductivity (which is a bulk signal for all ionic constituents). Furthermore, we are for the first time implementing a flow cytometer to obtain high quality dust concentration and size distribution profiles based on individual dust particle measurements. Preliminary measurements show that the setup is able to resolve annual layers of 1 cm thickness. Ice flow models predict that annual layers in the Eemian section of the Greenland NorthGRIP ice core (130-115 ka BP) have a thickness of around 1 cm. However, the visual stratigraphy of the ice core indicates that the annual layering in the Eemian section may be disturbed by micro folds and rapid crystal growth. In this case study we will measure the impurity content of an Eemian segment of the NorthGRIP ice core with the new CFA setup. This will allow for a comparison to well-known impurity levels of the Holocene in both Greenland and Antarctic ice and we will attempt to determine if annual layers are still present in the ice.

  16. Grip pressure measurements during activities of daily life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Joe; Young, Carolyn; Popa, Dan; Bugnariu, Nicoleta; Patterson, Rita

    2014-06-01

    Research has expanded human-machine communication methods past direct programming and standard hand- held joystick control. Individual force sensors have been used as a simple means of providing environmental information to a robot and research has shown that more advanced sensitive skins can be viable input devices. These touch sensitive surfaces allow for additional modes of interaction between machines in open, undefined environments. These interactions include object detection for navigation and safety but can also be used for recognition of users command gestures by their machine partner. Key to successful implementation of these gestures is the understanding of varied strategies used for communication and interaction and the development of performance limits. Data of dominant hand grip forces was collected using a Tekscan Grip VersaTek Pressure Measurement System during opening of a door. Analysis of data from 10 male and female subjects is presented. The results of qualitative and quantitative analysis of these data show variability in hand configurations between users. Average data over the cohort is reported. These data will be used in future work to provide human metrology constraints and limits for use in simulation and design of new, physical human-robot interaction systems.

  17. Influence of central set on anticipatory and triggered grip-force adjustments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winstein, C. J.; Horak, F. B.; Fisher, B. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of predictability of load magnitude on anticipatory and triggered grip-force adjustments were studied as nine normal subjects used a precision grip to lift, hold, and replace an instrumented test object. Experience with a predictable stimulus has been shown to enhance magnitude scaling of triggered postural responses to different amplitudes of perturbations. However, this phenomenon, known as a central-set effect, has not been tested systematically for grip-force responses in the hand. In our study, predictability was manipulated by applying load perturbations of different magnitudes to the test object under conditions in which the upcoming load magnitude was presented repeatedly or under conditions in which the load magnitudes were presented randomly, each with two different pre-load grip conditions (unconstrained and constrained). In constrained conditions, initial grip forces were maintained near the minimum level necessary to prevent pre-loaded object slippage, while in unconstrained conditions, no initial grip force restrictions were imposed. The effect of predictable (blocked) and unpredictable (random) load presentations on scaling of anticipatory and triggered grip responses was tested by comparing the slopes of linear regressions between the imposed load and grip response magnitude. Anticipatory and triggered grip force responses were scaled to load magnitude in all conditions. However, regardless of pre-load grip force constraint, the gains (slopes) of grip responses relative to load magnitudes were greater when the magnitude of the upcoming load was predictable than when the load increase was unpredictable. In addition, a central-set effect was evidenced by the fewer number of drop trials in the predictable relative to unpredictable load conditions. Pre-load grip forces showed the greatest set effects. However, grip responses showed larger set effects, based on prediction, when pre-load grip force was constrained to lower levels. These

  18. Comparative study of millennials' (age 20-34 years) grip and lateral pinch with the norms.

    PubMed

    Fain, Elizabeth; Weatherford, Cara

    Cross-sectional research design. Clinical practice continues to use normative data for grip and pinch measurements that were established in 1985. There is no updated norms despite different hand usage patterns in today's society. Measuring and comparing grip and pinch strengths with normative data is a valid method to determine hand function. This research was implemented to compare the grip and pinch measurements obtained from healthy millennials to the established norms and to describe hand usage patterns for millennials. Grip and lateral pinch measurements were obtained from a sample of 237 healthy millennials (ages 20-34 years). Strength scores were statistically lower that older normative data in all millennial grip strengths, with the exception of the women in the age group of 30-34 years. Specifically, this statistically significant trend was observed in all male grip strengths, as well as in women in the age group of 20-24 years (bilateral grip) and 25-29 years (right grip). However, the lateral pinch data reflected was similar to the older norms with variances of 0.5-1 kg. Current data reflect statistically significant differences from the norms for all male grip measurements, as well as for women in the age group of 20-24 years (bilateral grip) and 25-29 years (right grip). No statistical significance was observed in the independent-sample t tests for the lateral pinch in men of all age groups. Statistical significance was noted for lateral pinch for female age groups for the left hand (20-24 years) and for bilateral lateral pinches (30-34 years). IV. Copyright © 2016 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Getting a Grip on Numbers: Numerical Magnitude Priming in Object Grasping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindemann, Oliver; Abolafia, Juan M.; Girardi, Giovanna; Bekkering, Harold

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the functional connection between numerical cognition and action planning, the authors required participants to perform different grasping responses depending on the parity status of Arabic digits. The results show that precision grip actions were initiated faster in response to small numbers, whereas power grips were initiated…

  20. Grip force and force sharing in two different manipulation tasks with bottles.

    PubMed

    Cepriá-Bernal, Javier; Pérez-González, Antonio; Mora, Marta C; Sancho-Bru, Joaquín L

    2016-09-23

    Grip force and force sharing during two activities of daily living were analysed experimentally in 10 right-handed subjects. Four different bottles, filled to two different levels, were manipulated for two tasks: transporting and pouring. Each test subject's hand was instrumented with eight thin wearable force sensors. The grip force and force sharing were significantly different for each bottle model. Increasing the filling level resulted in an increase in grip force, but the ratio of grip force to load force was higher for lighter loads. The task influenced the force sharing but not the mean grip force. The contributions of the thumb and ring finger were higher in the pouring task, whereas the contributions of the palm and the index finger were higher in the transport task. Mean force sharing among fingers was 30% for index, 29% for middle, 22% for ring and 19% for little finger. Practitioner Summary: We analysed grip force and force sharing in two manipulation tasks with bottles: transporting and pouring. The objective was to understand the effects of the bottle features, filling level and task on the contribution of different areas of the hand to the grip force. Force sharing was different for each task and the bottles features affected to both grip force and force sharing.

  1. Quantitative grip strength assessment as a means of evaluating muscle relaxation in mice.

    PubMed

    Nevins, M E; Nash, S A; Beardsley, P M

    1993-01-01

    The effects of various centrally acting drugs and some peripherally acting agents on the forelimb grip strength of CD-1 mice were explored. Forelimb grip strength was assessed by use of a strain gauge to measure the lateral pull force, in grams, exerted by mice as an index of muscle relaxation. The muscle relaxants, diazepam, midazolam, baclofen, methocarbamol, dantrolene sodium and the neuromuscular blocking agents, succinylcholine and pancuronium bromide, dose-dependently reduced forelimb grip strength. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7), which has also been shown to have muscle relaxant effects, also reduced grip strength. Pentobarbital, ethanol, phencyclidine, ketamine and chlorpromazine reduced grip strength at doses which produced behavioral impairments. Lithium chloride, a toxic compound used to induce taste aversions, and clonidine, at doses which affect blood pressure, body temperature and locomotor activity, did not affect grip strength. In addition, stimulant doses of amphetamine and caffeine, but not of morphine, increased grip strength in a dose-dependent manner. These results extend previous findings and suggest that this forelimb grip strength procedure may be a useful screening test for the identification of the potential muscle relaxant properties of drugs.

  2. Glove attributes and their contribution to force decrement and increased effort in power grip.

    PubMed

    Willms, Kirsten; Wells, Richard; Carnahan, Heather

    2009-12-01

    To determine the contribution of the loss of tactile sensitivity, glove flexibility, glove thickness, and changes in finger geometry to force decrement and increased effort during gloved power grip. Gloved work has been shown to increase the effort required to perform manual tasks. A battery of maximal and submaximal gripping tasks was performed while grip force and surface electromyography of seven forearm muscles were recorded. Participants performed power grips while wearing three different thicknesses of rubber gloves (differing only in thickness; maximum 3.1 mm), wearing interdigital spacers between the fingers (matched to the glove thicknesses), and with a bare hand. Decreases in maximum grip force compared with the bare hand were observed for the thickest glove (-31.0 +/- 6.8%, p < .05) and for the thickest interdigital spacers (-9.7 +/- 5.9%, p < .05). Participants increased their grip force with increasing glove thickness for a submaximal object-lifting task (p < .01). To maintain an unloaded grip posture and to create a fixed submaximal force, participants increased muscle activation (p < .05) for all muscles with increasing glove thickness. Decreases in maximal grip force and increased effort in submaximal tasks could be attributed to a combination of reduced tactile sensitivity, the effort to bend the gloves, and interdigital separation. Although the values obtained are specific to the rubber gloves tested, the results give insights into factors important in the design and selection of gloves.

  3. The Effect of Handedness on Grip Strength in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppewal, Alyt; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Grip strength is an important predictor of several health outcomes in the general older population. Grip strength assessment is feasible and reliable in older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), which makes it a valuable measurement for application in this population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of handedness on…

  4. Age-Related and Sex-Related Differences in Hand and Pinch Grip Strength in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puh, Urska

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify age-related changes in hand grip strength and three types of pinch grip strength (key pinch, tip pinch, and palmar pinch) among male and female participants. The study included 199 healthy participants (100 females, 99 males) aged 20-79 years, who were divided into four age groups. The Baseline Hydraulic…

  5. The Effect of Handedness on Grip Strength in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppewal, Alyt; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Grip strength is an important predictor of several health outcomes in the general older population. Grip strength assessment is feasible and reliable in older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), which makes it a valuable measurement for application in this population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of handedness on…

  6. Impairments in precision grip correlate with functional measures in adult hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Michelle N; Hillier, Susan L; Ridding, Michael C; Miles, Timothy S

    2006-07-01

    Analysis of a precision grip-lift task provides measures to assess functional disability of the hand, but the correlation between these measures and accepted tests of motor function in stroke patients has not been established. Seventeen subacute stroke patients were studied to compare parameters of a precision grip-lift task between the affected and unaffected side, and to correlate them with function. Functional impairment was assessed with the Action Research Arm Test and the Fugl-Meyer assessment, as well as grip strength and maximal finger-tapping speed. The grip force (GF) and load force (LF) were recorded as patients lifted a custom-built manipulandum. All measures were recorded on two separate occasions, at least 1 week apart. There was good reproducibility between testing sessions for the grip-lift and functional measures. The affected hand gripped the manipulandum for longer prior to lift-off than the unaffected hand, and the normal close temporal coupling between the rate of change of GF and LF during the lift was disrupted. These two measures correlated more highly with the ARAT than the FMA and, when combined with measures of grip strength and tapping speed, explained 71% of the variance of the ARAT. The grip-lift task is a sensitive measure of impaired dexterity following stroke and provides measures which correlate well with a commonly applied functional assessment scale. This task may be used clinically to detect changes in the hemiplegic upper limb during rehabilitation and recovery.

  7. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS): measurement of the carbon gases from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M.; Dickerson, R.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M.; Fish, C.; Bloom, H.

    2013-09-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases remain highly uncertain [IPCC1] making quantitative predictions of atmospheric composition and their impacts. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) is a multi-purpose instrument designed to reduce uncertainty associated with atmospheric radiative forcing. GRIPS will measure will measure greenhouse gases and aerosols - two of the most important elements in the earth's radiation budget. GRIPS will observe carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), - the carbon gases, nitrous oxide (N2O), water vapor and aerosols with unprecedented precision through the atmosphere. The GRIPS instrument uses gas filter correlation radiometry (GFCR) to detect reflected and thermal IR radiation to detect the gases and the reflected solar radiation in the visible and short-wave infrared bands for aerosols. GRIPS is designed to have sensitivity down to the Earth's surface at ~2-8km nadir resolution. GRIPS can resolve CO2, CO, and CH4 anomalies in the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere to quantify lofting, diurnal variations and longrange transport. With repeated measurements throughout the day GRIPS can maximize the number of cloud free measurements determining biogenic and anthropogenic sources, sinks, and fluxes. GRIPS is highly complementary to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, OCO-2, the geostationary Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and other existing and planned missions.

  8. I forgot when I lost my grip-strong associations between cognition and grip strength in level of performance and change across time in relation to impending death.

    PubMed

    Praetorius Björk, Marcus; Johansson, Boo; Hassing, Linda B

    2016-02-01

    An association between level of cognitive function and grip strength is well established, whereas evidence for longitudinal associations of change in the 2 functions is still unclear. We examined associations between cognition and grip strength in levels of performance and in longitudinal change in late life in a population-based sample, aged ≥80 years at baseline, followed until death. The sample consisted of 449 nondemented individuals drawn from the OCTO-Twin Study. A test battery assessing 6 cognitive domains and grip strength was administered at 5 occasions with measurements intervals of 2 years. We fitted time to death bivariate growth curve models, adjusted for age, education, and sex which resulted in associations between grip strength and cognition in both levels of performance (across all cognitive domains) and rates of change (in 4 of 6 domains). These results show that cognition and grip strength change conjointly in later life and that the association between cognition and grip strength is stronger before death than earlier in life.

  9. Hand grip strength in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Moa; Kang, Hyung Koo; Song, Pamela; Park, Hye Kyeong; Jung, Hoon; Lee, Sung-Soon; Koo, Hyeon-Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    Hand grip strength (HGS) is a simple way of predicting the risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in the general population. However, the practical significance of grip strength in patients with COPD is uncertain. The aim of this study was to compare HGS between subjects with and without COPD and to evaluate its clinical relevance in patients with COPD by using a national survey. Data were collected from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The study included 421 adults with COPD and 2,542 controls who completed questionnaires, spirometry, and a HGS test. HGS was compared between subjects with and without COPD, and the association between grip strength, lung function, and quality of life (QoL) was evaluated. The mean HGS was 33.3±9.1 kg in the COPD group and 29.9±9.5 kg in the non-COPD group; adjusted HGS was 30.9±0.33 kg and 30.9±0.11 kg, respectively (P=0.99). HGS was not related to forced vital capacity (β=0.04, P=0.70) or forced expiratory volume in 1 second (β=0.11, P=0.24) in multivariable analysis. HGS was independently associated with the EQ-5D index, but the relationship was stronger in the COPD group (β=0.30, P<0.001) than in the non-COPD group (β=0.21, P<0.001). The results were similar for each component of the EQ-5D, including mobility (β=-0.25, P<0.001), daily activity (β=-0.19, P=0.01), pain/discomfort (β=-0.32, P<0.001), and anxiety/depression (β=-0.16, P=0.01). HGS was not different between subjects with and without COPD, but was associated with QoL - including mobility, daily activity, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression - in patients with COPD. The HGS test could be used as a marker of QoL in patients with COPD and could assist risk stratification in clinical practice.

  10. Hand grip strength in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Moa; Kang, Hyung Koo; Song, Pamela; Park, Hye Kyeong; Jung, Hoon; Lee, Sung-Soon; Koo, Hyeon-Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Hand grip strength (HGS) is a simple way of predicting the risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in the general population. However, the practical significance of grip strength in patients with COPD is uncertain. The aim of this study was to compare HGS between subjects with and without COPD and to evaluate its clinical relevance in patients with COPD by using a national survey. Methods Data were collected from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The study included 421 adults with COPD and 2,542 controls who completed questionnaires, spirometry, and a HGS test. HGS was compared between subjects with and without COPD, and the association between grip strength, lung function, and quality of life (QoL) was evaluated. Results The mean HGS was 33.3±9.1 kg in the COPD group and 29.9±9.5 kg in the non-COPD group; adjusted HGS was 30.9±0.33 kg and 30.9±0.11 kg, respectively (P=0.99). HGS was not related to forced vital capacity (β=0.04, P=0.70) or forced expiratory volume in 1 second (β=0.11, P=0.24) in multivariable analysis. HGS was independently associated with the EQ-5D index, but the relationship was stronger in the COPD group (β=0.30, P<0.001) than in the non-COPD group (β=0.21, P<0.001). The results were similar for each component of the EQ-5D, including mobility (β=−0.25, P<0.001), daily activity (β=−0.19, P=0.01), pain/discomfort (β=−0.32, P<0.001), and anxiety/depression (β=−0.16, P=0.01). Conclusion HGS was not different between subjects with and without COPD, but was associated with QoL – including mobility, daily activity, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression – in patients with COPD. The HGS test could be used as a marker of QoL in patients with COPD and could assist risk stratification in clinical practice. PMID:28848339

  11. Decoding gripping force based on local field potentials recorded from subthalamic nucleus in humans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2016-11-18

    The basal ganglia are known to be involved in the planning, execution and control of gripping force and movement vigour. Here we aim to define the nature of the basal ganglia control signal for force and to decode gripping force based on local field potential (LFP) activities recorded from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. We found that STN LFP activities in the gamma (55-90 Hz) and beta (13-30m Hz) bands were most informative about gripping force, and that a first order dynamic linear model with these STN LFP features as inputs can be used to decode the temporal profile of gripping force. Our results enhance the understanding of how the basal ganglia control gripping force, and also suggest that deep brain LFPs could potentially be used to decode movement parameters related to force and movement vigour for the development of advanced human-machine interfaces.

  12. Accuracy of the Borg CR10 scale for estimating grip forces associated with hand tool tasks.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; Lin, Jia-Hua; Dempsey, Patrick G; Casey, Jeffrey S

    2010-05-01

    The gripping of tools is required by many industrial operations, and an important aspect of exposure assessment is determining the grip force output of operators. Ratings of perceived exertion can provide an indirect measure of grip force; however, reports in the literature of the use of Borg CR10 scale ratings as a surrogate measure of grip force have been mixed. During a laboratory study with 16 participants, power grip forces were measured directly during three hand tool task simulations: (1) a screwdriver task, (2) a ratchet task, and (3) a lift and carry task, each performed at four force/load levels. Borg scale ratings reported following each trial were compared with mean, peak, and integrated grip forces for the respective trials. Pearson correlations conducted on an individual basis were greatest for the screwdriver task, r approximately 0.9. Correlations for integrated grip force were generally better than for mean or peak force. Correlations were also performed on data pooled for all participants, simulating a cross-sectional sampling approach. Correlations made with pooled data were weaker than when conducted on an individual basis, ranging from r = 0.26 for peak grip force for the lift and carry task, to r = 0.79 for the screwdriver task. When the pooled data were normalized to individual maximum voluntary grip exertions, correlation generally improved but not to the level of the "individually scaled" data. Based on these findings, a protocol is proposed that could improve the strength of correlations between direct measures of grip force and ratings of perceived exertion. Differences in strength of correlation between task simulations are discussed with respect to differences observed in force distributions about the handle for the three tasks.

  13. Effects of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome on Dexterous Manipulation Are Grip Type-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Johnston, Jamie A.; Ross, Mark A.; Sanniec, Kyle; Gleason, Elizabeth A.; Dueck, Amylou C.; Santello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) impairs sensation of a subset of digits. Although the effects of CTS on manipulation performed with CTS-affected digits have been studied using precision grip tasks, the extent to which CTS affects multi-digit force coordination has only recently been studied. Whole-hand manipulation studies have shown that CTS patients retain the ability to modulate multi-digit forces to object mass, mass distribution, and texture. However, CTS results in sensorimotor deficits relative to healthy controls, including significantly larger grip force and lower ability to balance the torques generated by the digits. Here we investigated the effects of CTS on multi-digit force modulation to object weight when manipulating an object with a variable number of fingers. We hypothesized that CTS patients would be able to modulate digit forces to object weight. However, as different grip types involve the exclusive use of CTS-affected digits (‘uniform’ grips) or a combination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits (‘mixed’ grips), we addressed the question of whether ‘mixed’ grips would reduce or worsen CTS-induced force coordination deficits. The former scenario would be due to adding digits with intact tactile feedback, whereas the latter scenario might occur due to a potentially greater challenge for the central nervous system of integrating ‘noisy’ and intact tactile feedback. CTS patients learned multi-digit force modulation to object weight regardless of grip type. Although controls exerted the same total grip force across all grip types, patients exerted significantly larger grip force than controls but only for manipulations with four and five digits. Importantly, this effect was due to CTS patients’ inability to change the finger force distribution when adding the ring and little fingers. These findings suggest that CTS primarily challenges sensorimotor integration processes for dexterous manipulation underlying the coordination of CTS

  14. Effects of carpal tunnel syndrome on dexterous manipulation are grip type-dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Johnston, Jamie A; Ross, Mark A; Sanniec, Kyle; Gleason, Elizabeth A; Dueck, Amylou C; Santello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) impairs sensation of a subset of digits. Although the effects of CTS on manipulation performed with CTS-affected digits have been studied using precision grip tasks, the extent to which CTS affects multi-digit force coordination has only recently been studied. Whole-hand manipulation studies have shown that CTS patients retain the ability to modulate multi-digit forces to object mass, mass distribution, and texture. However, CTS results in sensorimotor deficits relative to healthy controls, including significantly larger grip force and lower ability to balance the torques generated by the digits. Here we investigated the effects of CTS on multi-digit force modulation to object weight when manipulating an object with a variable number of fingers. We hypothesized that CTS patients would be able to modulate digit forces to object weight. However, as different grip types involve the exclusive use of CTS-affected digits ('uniform' grips) or a combination of CTS-affected and non-affected digits ('mixed' grips), we addressed the question of whether 'mixed' grips would reduce or worsen CTS-induced force coordination deficits. The former scenario would be due to adding digits with intact tactile feedback, whereas the latter scenario might occur due to a potentially greater challenge for the central nervous system of integrating 'noisy' and intact tactile feedback. CTS patients learned multi-digit force modulation to object weight regardless of grip type. Although controls exerted the same total grip force across all grip types, patients exerted significantly larger grip force than controls but only for manipulations with four and five digits. Importantly, this effect was due to CTS patients' inability to change the finger force distribution when adding the ring and little fingers. These findings suggest that CTS primarily challenges sensorimotor integration processes for dexterous manipulation underlying the coordination of CTS-affected and non

  15. Tracking Decrement as a Result of Grip Holding Endurance.

    PubMed

    Bloswick, D S; Ellis, N C

    1974-01-01

    This study explores the feasibility of using the static strength and endurance relationships suggested by Rohmert in 1960 to predict pursuit tracking performance, Ten male subjects are tested on a pursuit rotor before and after being subjected to specific levels of loading on a grip holding device. The loading corresponded to specific levels of each subject's maximum endurance as determined from Rohmert's strength and endurance equation. The hypotheses are: (a) predetermined schedules of strength expenditure cause a systematic decrement in tracking efficiency; and (b) the process of recovering efficiency is dependent upon the expenditure schedules. Resulting data support these hypotheses, suggesting that tracking efficiency can be reliably predicted using some of the strength and endurance relationships postulated by Rohmert.

  16. NBL Pistol Grip Tool for Underwater Training of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liszka, Michael; Ashmore, Matthew; Behnke, Mark; Smith, Walter; Waterman, Tod

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a lightweight, functional mockup of the Pistol Grip Tool for use during underwater astronaut training. Previous training tools have caused shoulder injuries. This new version is more than 50 percent lighter [in water, weight is 2.4 lb (=1.1 kg)], and can operate for a six-hour training session after 30 minutes of prep for submersion. Innovations in the design include the use of lightweight materials (aluminum and Delrin(Registered TradeMark)), creating a thinner housing, and the optimization of internal space with the removal of as much excess material as possible. This reduces tool weight and maximizes buoyancy. Another innovation for this tool is the application of a vacuum that seats the Orings in place and has shown to be reliable in allowing underwater usage for up to six hours.

  17. Revised normative values for grip strength with the Jamar dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Peters, Martine J H; van Nes, Sonja I; Vanhoutte, Els K; Bakkers, Mayienne; van Doorn, Pieter A; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Faber, Catharina G

    2011-03-01

    The Jamar dynamometer has been widely used in various chronic illnesses and has demonstrated its strength as a potential prognostic indicator. Various stratified normative values have been published using different methodologies, leading to conflicting results. No study used statistical techniques considering the non-Gaussian distribution of the obtained grip strength (GS) values. Jamar GS was assessed in 720 healthy participants, subdivided into seven age decade groups consisting of at least 50 men and 50 women each. Normative values (median and fifth values) were calculated using quantile regressions with restricted cubic spline functions on age. Possible confounding personal factors (hand dominance, length, weight, hobby, and job categorization) were examined. Clinically applicable revised normative values for the Jamar dynamometer, stratified for age and gender, are presented. Hand dominance had no influence. Other personal factors only minimally influenced final values. This study provides revised normative GS values for the Jamar dynamometer.

  18. Butterfly survival on an isolated island by improved grip.

    PubMed

    Duplouy, Anne; Hanski, Ilkka

    2013-04-23

    On small isolated islands, natural selection is expected to reduce the dispersal capacity of organisms, as short distances do not require a high rate of dispersal, which might lead to accidental emigration from the population. In addition, individuals foregoing the high cost of maintaining flight capacity may instead allocate resources to other functions. However, in butterflies and many other insects, flight is necessary not only for dispersal but also for most other activities. A weakly flying individual would probably do worse and have an elevated rather than reduced probability of accidental emigration. Here, we report results consistent with the hypothesis that a butterfly population on an isolated island, instead of having lost its flight capacity, has evolved better grip to resist the force of wind and to avoid being blown off the island. Our study suggests that local adaptation has occurred in this population in spite of its very small size (Ne ∼ 100), complete isolation, low genetic variation and high genetic load.

  19. The laboratory station for tyres grip testing on different surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, K.; Grabowik, C.; Janik, W.; Ćwikła, G.; Skowera, M.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the conception of the device for tyre grip testing in the laboratory conditions. The main purpose is to provide a device working in confined spaces, which enables rapid changes of the tested samples of the road surfaces. Among the key assumptions the minimization of the device dimensions and the relative ease of transportation and mobility - the ability to quick assemble and disassemble were also assumed. The main components of the projected workstation includes: the replaceable platform for mounting samples of a road surface, the roller conveyor, the drive of the platform, the wheel mounting assembly and the axial force measuring system. At the design the station a morphological structure method has been used, particular elements have been optimized individually.

  20. Invisible grasps: Grip interference in anosognosia for hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Piedimonte, Alessandro; Garbarini, Francesca; Rabuffetti, Marco; Pia, Lorenzo; Montesano, Angelo; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Berti, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Previous findings suggest that, in anosognosic patients, their illusory motor experience is based on a "normal" motor intention and planning for the paralyzed limbs. However, these studies involved proximal muscles (shoulder) that can be mediated by the ipsilateral (intact) cortex more than distal muscles (fingers). In the present study, we asked whether, in anosognosic patients, the spared motor intention for the paralyzed limb can go as far as to influence kinematic parameters of distal movements. Six hemiplegic patients (1 with and 5 without anosognosia) were required to reach and grasp with both hands targets of the same or different size, attached to a plinth. Maximum grip aperture of the right (intact) hand was recorded using an infrared motion capture system. All patients were evaluated with a specific battery for anosognosia and different neurpsychological test. In the patient affected by anosognosia for hemiplegia, the grip aperture of the healthy hand was influenced by the intended (but not executed) movement of the plegic hand when the patient was trying to reach to grasp targets of different size, F(2, 14) = 11.87, p < .001. Patients affected by hemiplegia (without anosognosia) didn't show any interference effect between the plegic and healthy hand even when they were asked to reach to grasp targets of different size. Our results confirm the hypothesis that a spared intention-programming system within the contralateral (damaged) cortex can go as far as to influence distal kinematic parameters of the healthy hand of patients affected by anosognosia for hemiplegia. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Hinge action versus grip in translocation by RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Nedialkov, Yuri A; Opron, Kristopher; Caudill, Hailey L; Assaf, Fadi; Anderson, Amanda J; Cukier, Robert I; Wei, Guowei; Burton, Zachary F

    2017-08-30

    Based on molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, a conformational mechanism is posited for forward translocation by RNA polymerase (RNAP). In a simulation of a ternary elongation complex, the clamp and downstream cleft were observed to close. Hinges within the bridge helix and trigger loop supported generation of translocation force against the RNA-DNA hybrid resulting in opening of the furthest upstream i-8 RNA-DNA bp, establishing conditions for RNAP sliding. The β flap tip helix and the most N-terminal β' Zn finger engage the RNA, indicating a path of RNA threading out of the exit channel. Because the β flap tip connects to the RNAP active site through the β subunit double-Ψ-β-barrel and the associated sandwich barrel hybrid motif (also called the flap domain), the RNAP active site is coupled to the RNA exit channel and to the translocation of RNA-DNA. Using an exonuclease III assay to monitor translocation of RNAP elongation complexes, we show that K(+) and Mg(2+) and also an RNA 3'-OH or a 3'-H2 affect RNAP sliding. Because RNAP grip to template suggests a sticky translocation mechanism, and because grip is enhanced by increasing K(+) and Mg(2+)concentration, biochemical assays are consistent with a conformational change that drives forward translocation as observed in simulations. Mutational analysis of the bridge helix indicates that 778-GARKGL-783 (Escherichia coli numbering) is a homeostatic hinge that undergoes multiple bends to compensate for complex conformational dynamics during phosphodiester bond formation and translocation.

  2. Monitoring 6-month trajectory of grip strength improves the prediction of long-term change in grip strength in disabled older women.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qian-Li; Guralnik, Jack M; Beamer, Brock A; Fried, Linda P; Chaves, Paulo H M

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to assess the degree and heterogeneity of decline in grip strength in the short term (6 months) and the clinical relevance of short-term decline to long-term decline (2.5 years) in grip strength in disabled older women. Eighty-four community-dwelling disabled women aged 65 years or older were evaluated on a weekly basis over 6 months, followed by an additional five semi-annual visits for a total follow-up of 3 years. The study outcome is maximum isometric handgrip strength in the nondominant hand. Linear random effects models were used to characterize population- as well as individual-level change in grip strength over time. In the weekly assessments over the initial 6 months, individual-level short-term change in grip strength was detectable (mean = -0.12 kg/month; p = .06), heterogeneous (range: -2.03 ± 0.95 kg/month), and independent of absolute grip strength at baseline (mean = 18.4 kg). Additionally, among women with grip strength greater than 16.7 kg at baseline, the long-term rate of decline in grip strength was accelerated by 0.15 kg/year (p = .014) for every 0.5 standard deviation (0.25 kg/month) increase in the short-term rate of decline. The baseline absolute grip strength, however, was not significantly associated with the long-term rate of decline (correlation = -0.36, p = .105). Our findings suggest that short-term change in grip strength is detectable and meaningful for disabled older women and it is the individual's past trajectory of grip strength relative to her current strength level, not her current absolute strength per se, that is important for predicting future strength decline. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Grip Strength and Its Relationship to Police Recruit Task Performance and Injury Risk: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Orr, Robin; Pope, Rodney; Stierli, Michael; Hinton, Benjamin

    2017-08-21

    Suitable grip strength is a police occupational requirement. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between grip strength, task performance and injury risk in a police population. Retrospective data of police recruits (n = 169) who had undergone basic recruit training were provided, including handgrip strength results, occupational task performance measures (consisting of police task simulations [SIM], tactical options [TACOPS] and marksmanship assessments) and injury records. Left hand grip strength (41.91 ± 8.29 kg) measures showed a stronger correlation than right hand grip strength (42.15 ± 8.53 kg) with all outcome measures. Recruits whose grip strength scores were lower were significantly more susceptible to failing the TACOPS occupational task assessment than those with greater grip strength scores, with significant (p ≤ 0.003) weak to moderate, positive correlations found between grip strength and TACOPS performance. A significant (p < 0.0001) correlation was found between grip strength, most notably of the left hand, and marksmanship performance, with those performing better in marksmanship having higher grip strength. Left hand grip strength was significantly associated with injury risk (r = -0.181, p = 0.018) but right hand grip strength was not. A positive association exists between handgrip strength and police recruit task performance (notably TACOPS and marksmanship) with recruits who scored poorly on grip strength being at greatest risk of occupational assessment task failure.

  4. Grip Strength and Its Relationship to Police Recruit Task Performance and Injury Risk: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Stierli, Michael; Hinton, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Suitable grip strength is a police occupational requirement. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between grip strength, task performance and injury risk in a police population. Retrospective data of police recruits (n = 169) who had undergone basic recruit training were provided, including handgrip strength results, occupational task performance measures (consisting of police task simulations [SIM], tactical options [TACOPS] and marksmanship assessments) and injury records. Left hand grip strength (41.91 ± 8.29 kg) measures showed a stronger correlation than right hand grip strength (42.15 ± 8.53 kg) with all outcome measures. Recruits whose grip strength scores were lower were significantly more susceptible to failing the TACOPS occupational task assessment than those with greater grip strength scores, with significant (p ≤ 0.003) weak to moderate, positive correlations found between grip strength and TACOPS performance. A significant (p < 0.0001) correlation was found between grip strength, most notably of the left hand, and marksmanship performance, with those performing better in marksmanship having higher grip strength. Left hand grip strength was significantly associated with injury risk (r = −0.181, p = 0.018) but right hand grip strength was not. A positive association exists between handgrip strength and police recruit task performance (notably TACOPS and marksmanship) with recruits who scored poorly on grip strength being at greatest risk of occupational assessment task failure. PMID:28825688

  5. Support-specific modulation of grip force in individuals with hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Aruin, Alexander S

    2005-04-01

    To investigate whether use of auxiliary sensory input will result in modulated grip force. Case-control study. Free-standing acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Six people with unilateral hemiparesis due to unilateral stroke and 6 control subjects without neurologic disorders. Seated subjects lifted and transported the same object under 3 different conditions: with no support, with the target arm positioned on a freely moving skateboard, and with a finger from the subject's contralateral hand lightly touching the wrist of the target arm. Peak grip force and temporal coupling between the grip force and lift-off of the object. All subjects were able to better regulate grip force when provided with additional sensory input. Light finger touch resulted in decreased grip force, as did skateboard use ( P <.05). Subjects with hemiparesis showed 2 times longer latency between grip-force application and lift-off of the object ( P <.05). Statistically significant grip-force reduction was noted with both support aids. These findings could have implications in clinical and rehabilitative areas.

  6. A Pilot Investigation of the Graduated Recovery Intervention Program (GRIP) for First Episode Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Penn, David L.; Uzenoff, Sarah R.; Perkins, Diana; Mueser, Kim T.; Hamer, Robert; Waldheter, Evan; Saade, Sylvia; Cook, Liz

    2010-01-01

    The Graduated Recovery Intervention Program (GRIP) is a new individual cognitive-behavioral therapy program designed to facilitate functional recovery in people who have experienced an initial episode of psychosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and tolerability of the GRIP intervention, and to compare the effectiveness of GRIP versus treatment as usual (TAU) for improving specific clinical and psychosocial outcomes. Forty-six individuals with first episode psychosis were randomized to GRIP + TAU or TAU alone. Primary outcomes focused on social and role functioning, and quality of life. Secondary outcomes included psychotic symptoms, depression, substance use, social support, attitudes toward medications, well-being, and hospitalizations. The results indicate that GRIP was well-tolerated, as evidenced by good attendance and low drop-out rates, and well-received (based on positive feedback from participants). Although the majority of mixed-model analyses were not statistically significant, examination of within-group changes and effect sizes suggest an advantage for GRIP over TAU in improving functional outcomes. These advantages and the fact that the GRIP intervention demonstrated feasibility and tolerability suggest that this intervention is worthy of further investigation. PMID:20817484

  7. Effect of hold depth and grip technique on maximal finger forces in rock climbing.

    PubMed

    Amca, Arif Mithat; Vigouroux, Laurent; Aritan, Serdar; Berton, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how the commonly used climbing-specific grip techniques and hold depths influence the finger force capacities. Ten advanced climbers performed maximal voluntary force on four different hold depths (from 1 to 4 cm) and in two force directions (antero-posterior and vertical) using three grip techniques (slope, half crimp and full crimp). A specially designed platform instrumented with a 6-degrees-of-freedom (DoF) force/torque sensor was used to record force values. Results showed that the maximal vertical forces differed significantly according to the hold depth and the grip technique (ranged from 350.8 N to 575.7 N). The maximal vertical forces increased according to the hold depth but the form of this increase differed depending on grip technique. These results seemed to be more associated with finger-hold contact/interaction than with internal biomechanical factors. Similar results were revealed for antero-posterior forces (ranged from 69.9 N to 138.0 N) but, it was additionally noted that climbers have different hand-forearm posture strategies with slope and crimp grip techniques when applying antero-posterior forces. This point is important as it could influence the body position adopted during climbing according to the chosen grip technique. For trainers and designers, a polynomial regression model was proposed in order to predict the mean maximal force based on hold depth and adopted grip technique.

  8. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm.

  9. The effects of acute cortical somatosensory deafferentation on grip force control

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Andrew G.; Attiah, Mark A.; Berman, Jeffrey I.; Chen, H. Isaac; Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Van der Spiegel, Jan; Lucas, Timothy H.

    2015-01-01

    Grip force control involves mechanisms to adjust to unpredictable and predictable changes in loads during manual manipulation. Somatosensory feedback is critical not just to reactive, feedback control but also to updating the internal representations needed for proactive, feedforward control. The role of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in these control strategies is not well established. Here we investigated grip force control in a rare case of acute central deafferentation following resection of S1. The subject had complete loss of somatosensation in the right arm without any deficit in muscle strength or reflexes. In the first task, the subject was asked to maintain a constant grip force with and without visual feedback. The subject was able to attain the target force with visual feedback but not maintain that force for more than a few seconds after visual feedback was removed. In the second task, the subject was asked to grip and move an instrumented object. The induced acceleration-dependent loads were countered by adjustments in grip force. Both amplitude and timing of the grip force modulation were not affected by deafferentation. The dissociation of these effects demonstrates the differential contribution of S1 to the mechanisms of grip force control. PMID:26587914

  10. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm. PMID:27313372

  11. Relationship between lung function and grip strength in older hospitalized patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sarah J; Allen, Stephen C; Roberts, Helen C

    2017-01-01

    Older people with reduced respiratory muscle strength may be misclassified as having COPD on the basis of spirometric results. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between lung function and grip strength in older hospitalized patients without known airways disease. Patients in acute medical wards were recruited who were aged ≥70 years; no history, symptoms, or signs of respiratory disease; Mini Mental State Examination ≥24; willing and able to consent to participate; and able to perform hand grip and forced spirometry. Data including lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], FEV1/FVC, peak expiratory flow rate [PEFR], and slow vital capacity [SVC]), grip strength, age, weight, and height were recorded. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and linear regression unadjusted and adjusted (for age, height, and weight). A total of 50 patients (20 men) were recruited. Stronger grip strength in men was significantly associated with greater FEV1, but this was attenuated by adjustment for age, height, and weight. Significant positive associations were found in women between grip strength and both PEFR and SVC, both of which remained robust to adjustment. The association between grip strength and PEFR and SVC may reflect stronger patients generating higher intrathoracic pressure at the start of spirometry and pushing harder against thoracic cage recoil at end-expiration. Conversely, patients with weaker grip strength had lower PEFR and SVC. These patients may be misclassified as having COPD on the basis of spirometric results.

  12. The effects of player grip on the dynamic behaviour of a tennis racket.

    PubMed

    Chadefaux, Delphine; Rao, Guillaume; Le Carrou, Jean-Loïc; Berton, Eric; Vigouroux, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this article is to characterise the extent to which the dynamic behaviour of a tennis racket is dependent on its mechanical characteristics and the modulation of the player's grip force. This problem is addressed through steps involving both experiment and modelling. The first step was a free boundary condition modal analysis on five commercial rackets. Operational modal analyses were carried out under "slight", "medium" and "strong" grip force conditions. Modal frequencies and damping factors were then obtained using a high-resolution method. Results indicated that the dynamic behaviour of a racket is not only determined by its mechanical characteristics, but is also highly dependent on the player's grip force. Depending on the grip force intensity, the first two bending modes and the first torsional mode frequencies respectively decreased and increased while damping factors increased. The second step considered the design of a phenomenological hand-gripped racket model. This model is fruitful in that it easily predicts the potential variations in a racket's dynamic behaviour according to the player's grip force. These results provide a new perspective on the player/racket interaction optimisation by revealing how grip force can drive racket dynamic behaviour, and hence underlining the necessity of taking the player into account in the racket design process.

  13. Measurement of Hand/Handrim Grip Forces in Two Different One Arm Drive Wheelchairs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to explore the total and regional grip forces in the hand when propelling two different manual one arm drive wheelchairs: the Neater Uni-wheelchair (NUW) and a foot steered Action3 wheelchair. Methods. 17 nondisabled users were randomly assigned to each wheelchair to drive around an indoor obstacle course. The Grip, a multiple sensor system taking continuous measurement of handgrip force, was attached to the propelling hand. Total grip force in each region of the hand and total grip force across the whole hand were calculated per user per wheelchair. Results. The Action3 with foot steering only generated significantly greater total grip force in straight running compared to the NUW and also in the fingers and thumb in straight running. Conclusions. The results suggest that the Action3 with foot steering generated greater grip forces which may infer a greater potential for repetitive strain injury in the upper limb. Further work is required to explore whether the difference in grip force is of clinical significance in a disabled population. PMID:25045684

  14. Using Hand Grip Force as a Correlate of Longitudinal Acceleration Comfort for Rapid Transit Trains.

    PubMed

    Guo, Beiyuan; Gan, Weide; Fang, Weining

    2015-07-02

    Longitudinal acceleration comfort is one of the essential metrics used to evaluate the ride comfort of train. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of using hand grip force as a correlate of longitudinal acceleration comfort of rapid transit trains. In the paper, a motion simulation system was set up and a two-stage experiment was designed to investigate the role of the grip force on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains. The results of the experiment show that the incremental grip force was linearly correlated with the longitudinal acceleration value, while the incremental grip force had no correlation with the direction of the longitudinal acceleration vector. The results also show that the effects of incremental grip force and acceleration duration on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains were significant. Based on multiple regression analysis, a step function model was established to predict the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains using the incremental grip force and the acceleration duration. The feasibility and practicably of the model was verified by a field test. Furthermore, a comparative analysis shows that the motion simulation system and the grip force based model were valid to support the laboratory studies on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains.

  15. Memory for fingertip forces: passive hand muscle vibration interferes with predictive grip force scaling.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Dennis A; Rosenkranz, Karin; Hermsdörfer, Joachim; Rothwell, John

    2004-06-01

    When subjects repetitively lift an object, the grip force they select is influenced by the mechanical object properties of the preceding lift. Similar effects on grip force scaling are observed whether the subsequent lift is performed with the same hand or the hand contralateral to the preceding lift. Here we demonstrate that passive vibration of the hand muscles involved in the generation of grip force in the interval between two blocks of lifting trials interferes with predictive grip force scaling. Following ten trials in which subjects lifted an object with constant mechanical properties with the dominant hand, muscle vibration was given to the first interosseus and adductor pollicis muscles of the dominant hand during a 10-min rest period. Compared with the last lift preceding vibration, peak rates of grip force increase and peak grip forces were scaled too high during the first lift following vibration whether the lift was made with the dominant or non-dominant hand. Subjects scaled grip force accurately to the object properties within three lifts following vibration. If subjects rested for 10 min after the first ten trials and received no vibration, then there was no significant difference in the peak grip force or its rate of increase between the last lift preceding rest and the first lift following it. We suggest that vibration impairs the memory processes responsible for predictive grip force scaling. Our data are consistent with the recent suggestion that these memory processes are neither specific for a certain motor action nor do they reflect internal representations of mechanical object properties.

  16. Kinetic measurements of hand motor impairments after mild to moderate stroke using grip control tasks.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu; Ma, Le; Yan, Tiebin; Liu, Huihua; Wei, Xijun; Song, Rong

    2014-05-11

    The aim of this study is to investigate quantitative outcome measurements of hand motor performance for subjects after mild to moderate stroke using grip control tasks and characterize abnormal flexion synergy of upper extremities after stroke. A customized dynamometer with force sensors was used to measure grip force and calculate rotation torque during the sub-maximal grip control tasks. The paretic and nonpartic sides of eleven subjects after stroke and the dominant sides of ten healthy persons were tested. Their maximal voluntary grip force was measured and used to set sub-maximal grip control tasks at three different target force levels. Force control ability was characterized by the maximal grip force, mean force percentage, coefficient of variation (CV), target deviation ratio (TDR), and rotation torque ratio (RTR). The motor impairments of subjects after stroke were also evaluated using the Fugl-Meyer assessment for upper extremity (FMA-UE) and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Maximal grip force of the paretic side was significantly reduced as compared to the nonparetic side and the healthy group, while the difference of maximal grip force between the nonparetic side and the healthy group was not significant. TDR and RTR increased for all three groups with increasing target force level. There were significant differences of CV, TDR and RTR between the paretic side and the healthy group at all the force levels. CV, TDR and RTR showed significant negative correlations with FMA-UE and WMFT at 50% of maximum grip force. This study designed a customized dynamometer together with an innovative measurement, RTR, to investigate the hand motor performance of subjects after mild to moderate stroke during force control tasks. And stroke-induced abnormal flexion synergy of wrist and finger muscles could be characterized by RTR. This study also identified a set of kinetic parameters which can be applied to quantitatively assess the hand motor function of subjects after

  17. Hand-grip strength cut points to screen older persons at risk for mobility limitation.

    PubMed

    Sallinen, Janne; Stenholm, Sari; Rantanen, Taina; Heliövaara, Markku; Sainio, Päivi; Koskinen, Seppo

    2010-09-01

    To determine optimal hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation in older people and to study whether these cut points differ according to body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional analysis of data. Data collected in the Finnish population-based Health 2000 Survey. One thousand eighty-four men and 1,562 women aged 55 and older with complete data on anthropometry, hand-grip strength and self-reported mobility. Mobility limitation was defined as difficulty walking 0.5 km or climbing stairs. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to estimate hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation. The overall hand-grip strength cut points for likelihood of mobility limitation were 37 kg (sensitivity 62%; specificity 76%) for men and 21 kg (sensitivity 67%; specificity 73%) for women. The effect of the interaction between hand-grip strength and BMI on mobility limitation was significant in men (P=.02), but no such interaction was observed in women (P=.16). In men, the most-optimal cutoff points were 33 kg (sensitivity 73%; specificity 79%) for normal-weight men, 39 kg (sensitivity 67%; specificity 71%) for overweight men, and 40 kg (sensitivity 57%; specificity 68%) for obese men. In women, BMI-specific hand-grip strength cutoff values was not markedly more accurate than the overall cutoff value. The hand-grip strength test is a useful tool to identify persons at risk of mobility limitation. In men, hand-grip strength cut points for mobility increased with BMI, whereas in women, only one hand-grip strength threshold was identified. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Temporary threshold shift of vibratory sensation induced by a vibrating handle and its gripping force.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, K; Taoda, K; Yamashita, H; Watanabe, S

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the effect of the force with which a vibrating handle is gripped on the temporary threshold shift of vibratory sensation (TTSv) induced by hand-arm vibration. Six healthy subjects gripped a handle vibrating with a 1.3 octave-band vibration, with a central frequency of 200 Hz and an intensity of 39.2 m/s2. Exposure was for 1 min and 10 min, respectively. Gripping forces for the 1-min exposure were 5 N, 10 N, 40 N and 80 N, respectively, with 0 N push-pull force. Gripping forces for the 10-min exposure were the same as for the 1-min exposure but omitting 80 N. The vibratory sensation threshold at 125 Hz was measured before and after exposure of an exposed fingertip to vibration. The differences measured determine TTSv.t at time t. TTSv.t determines TTSv.0, that is, the temporary threshold shift of vibratory sensation immediately after exposure to vibration according to the estimate made on the basis of the preceding study. The same experimental conditions were repeated 3 times on different days in a soundproof and thermoregulated room. Our findings show that TTSv increases significantly with increasing gripping force. We also determined the quantitative relationships between TTSv.0 and gripping force as described by the equation TTSv.0 = exp(kf x F + Cf). where kt and Cf are constants and F is gripping force. This study revealed the importance of ergonomic design in reducing the force with which a vibrating handle is gripped to prevent an adverse effect of local vibration. The equation devised may help in the quantitative assessment of the effect of reduced gripping force.

  19. Immediate and Delayed Effects of Forearm Kinesio Taping on Grip Strength

    PubMed Central

    Kouhzad Mohammadi, Hosein; Khademi Kalantari, Khosro; Naeimi, Sedighe Sadat; Pouretezad, Mohammad; Shokri, Esmaeil; Tafazoli, Mojdeh; Dastjerdi, Mahboobeh; Kardooni, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the fundamental role of gripping in most upper limb activities, grip strength promotion is a chief goal in the treatment of patients with upper limb musculoskeletal disorders. Kinesio taping is a novel and effective therapeutic technique believed to facilitate muscle contraction through stimulating mechanoreceptors and increasing the sensory feedback around the taped region. Objectives: The present study aimed to identify the best region (flexor, extensor and flexor/extensor regions) and time (immediate, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 hours) of forearm Kinesio taping to obtain the maximum improvement in grip strength. Materials and Methods: In this longitudinal study, 40 healthy men and women (the mean age of 22.3 ± 2.19 years) were selected among students of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran by simple, nonrandom sampling method. A dynamometer was used to measure grip strength immediately and every 30 minutes during the two hours after I-shaped application of tape (with 50% stretch) to the flexor, extensor, and flexor/extensor forearm muscles. Results: Grip strength was significantly increased in various muscle groups for males (P = 0.002) and females (P = 0.000) of the forearm and at different intervals for males (P = 0.000) and females (P = 0.000). Moreover, in both men and women, tape application to the extensor region provided greater grip strength compared to taping of the flexor and flexor/extensor regions (P = 0.000 for both). Furthermore, the maximum increase in grip strength were 0.5 (10.8% increase, P = 0.001) and 1.5 h (23.9% increase, P = 0.000) after taping in males and females, respectively. Conclusions: Taping the extensor region of forearm is recommended to achieve higher grip strength. Although grip strength increased at a slower pace in females than males, the final values were higher in women. PMID:25389492

  20. Grip strength impairments among older adults receiving physical therapy in a home-care setting.

    PubMed

    Bohannon, Richard W

    2010-12-01

    A hand-grip dynamometer was used to assess the magnitude and prevalence of grip strength impairments among 41 home-care patients with diverse diagnoses (e.g., stroke, cancer, fracture, osteoarthritis). Based on published reference values, patients (as a whole) were weaker than normal for age and sex. The prevalence of weakness was 85.4% on one or the other side and 70.7% on both sides. Considering the prognostic importance of grip strength, this study emphasized the potential value of its measurement in a home-care population.

  1. Anticipatory grip force between 1 and 3g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Olivier; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Hermsdorfer, Joachim; Lefevre, Philippe

    One remarkable capacity of utilizing common tools appropriately as soon as we grasp them relies on the ability to determine in advance the grip force (GF) required to handle them in relation to their mechanical properties and the surrounding environment. This anticipatory strategy avoids the uncompressible delays in the feedback system. The predictive control of GF is made possible because the nervous system can learn, store and then select the internal representations of the dynamics of innumerable objects, known as internal models. Beside this flexibility, the nervous system's ability to learn different task dynamics is often limited in classical robotic experiments The environment itself can be profoundly modified in altered gravity or centrifugation. The few studies that investigated motor adaptation in such contexts did not consider the interaction between gravitational phases and even less the transitions across environments. Here, we tested subject's abilities to adapt to levels of gravitational fields generated by a human centrifuge. In Experiment 1, seven subjects performed 4 lifting trials in each gravitational phase (1 to 2.5g and then 2.5 to 1g by steps of 0.5g) with a 0.12 kg instrumented object. In Experiment 2, six subjects performed vertical oscillations of the object during transitions between 1 and 3g (0.5g steps, ascending and descending phases, profile repeated twice). We continuously measured GF, load force (LF) and ambient gravity. We hypothesized that participants were able to predictively adjust GF to the new environment. In Experiment 1, participants adjusted their GF proportionally to gravity and decreased GF across trials within a given gravitational environment. Preload phases decreased over time from 300ms to 50ms irrespective of gravity. We quantified the abilities of participants to switch across environments by subtracting GF recorded in the last trial in the current gravity level from GF during the first trial in the new environment

  2. JPL Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, P. Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.; Turk, Francis J.; Shen, Tsae-Pyng J.; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.; Licata, Stephen J.; Poulsen, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observations can play a very important role in airborne field campaigns, since they provide a comprehensive description of the environment that is essential for the experiment design, flight planning, and post-experiment scientific data analysis. In the past, it has been difficult to fully utilize data from multiple NASA satellites due to the large data volume, the complexity of accessing NASA s data in near-real-time (NRT), as well as the lack of software tools to interact with multi-sensor information. The JPL GRIP Portal is a Web portal that serves a comprehensive set of NRT observation data sets from NASA and NOAA satellites describing the atmospheric and oceanic environments related to the genesis and intensification of the tropical storms in the North Atlantic Ocean. Together with the model forecast data from four major global atmospheric models, this portal provides a useful tool for the scientists and forecasters in planning and monitoring the NASA GRIP field campaign during the 2010 Atlantic Ocean hurricane season. This portal uses the Google Earth plug-in to visualize various types of data sets, such as 2D maps, wind vectors, streamlines, 3D data sets presented at series of vertical cross-sections or pointwise vertical profiles, and hurricane best tracks and forecast tracks. Additionally, it allows users to overlap multiple data sets, change the opacity of each image layer, generate animations on the fly with selected data sets, and compare the observation data with the model forecast using two independent calendars. The portal also provides the capability to identify the geographic location of any point of interest. In addition to supporting the airborne mission planning, the NRT data and portal will serve as a very rich source of information during the post-field campaign analysis stage of the airborne experiment. By including a diverse set of satellite observations and model forecasts, it provides a good spatial and temporal context for the

  3. A continuous measure of fingertip friction during precision grip.

    PubMed

    André, Thibaut; Lefèvre, Philippe; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2009-05-15

    When humans manipulate an object, the minimal grip force (GF) required to avoid slipping depends on the frictional properties between the fingers and the object. As a consequence, fingertip skin friction plays a critical role during object manipulation. Here, the effects of the normal force and moisture content on the skin's static coefficient of friction (CF) for human fingertips were studied. Ten subjects were asked to pinch an object with a given normal force. Slippage of the object on the fingertips was generated for different ranges of normal force using a linear translation stage. The exerted forces and moisture of the fingertips were then measured, and the static coefficient of friction was calculated as the ratio between the tangential force and normal force at slippage. These results demonstrate that the effects of the normal force and moisture content on the CF exhibit a complex interaction. For a given moisture condition, the CF varies as a power function of the normal force; in contrast, for a given normal force, the CF is described by a "bell-shaped" function of moisture. A global expression of the CF as a function of the normal force and moisture content is derived, and a method is proposed for a continuous measure of the CF. This new method shall be of particular interest in investigating dexterous manipulation.

  4. Tactile afferents encode grip safety before slip for different frictions.

    PubMed

    Khamis, Heba A; Redmond, Stephen J; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2014-01-01

    Adjustments to frictional forces are crucial to maintain a safe grip during precision object handling in both humans and robotic manipulators. The aim of this work was to investigate whether a population of human tactile afferents can provide information about the current tangential/normal force ratio expressed as the percentage of the critical load capacity - the tangential/normal force ratio at which the object would slip. A smooth stimulation surface was tested on the fingertip under three frictional conditions, with a 4 N normal force and a tangential force generated by motion in the ulnar or distal direction at a fixed speed. During stimulation, the responses of 29 afferents (12 SA-I, 2 SA-II, 12 FA-I, 3 FA-II) were recorded. A multiple regression model was trained and tested using cross-validation to estimate the percentage of the critical load capacity in real-time as the tangential force increased. The features for the model were the number of spikes from each afferent in windows of fixed length (50, 100 or 200 ms) around points spanning the range from 50% to 100% of the critical load capacity, in 5% increments. The mean regression estimate error was less than 1% of the critical load capacity with a standard deviation between 5% and 10%. A larger number of afferents is expected to improve the estimate error. This work is important for understanding human dexterous manipulation and inspiring improvements in robotic grippers and prostheses.

  5. Gripping during climbing of arboreal snakes may be safe but not economical

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, Greg; Jayne, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    On the steep surfaces that are common in arboreal environments, many types of animals without claws or adhesive structures must use muscular force to generate sufficient normal force to prevent slipping and climb successfully. Unlike many limbed arboreal animals that have discrete gripping regions on the feet, the elongate bodies of snakes allow for considerable modulation of both the size and orientation of the gripping region. We quantified the gripping forces of snakes climbing a vertical cylinder to determine the extent to which their force production favoured economy or safety. Our sample included four boid species and one colubrid. Nearly all of the gripping forces that we observed for each snake exceeded our estimate of the minimum required, and snakes commonly produced more than three times the normal force required to support their body weight. This suggests that a large safety factor to avoid slipping and falling is more important than locomotor economy. PMID:25142200

  6. Similar motion of a hand-held object may trigger nonsimilar grip force adjustments.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fan; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2007-01-01

    The tight coupling between load (L) and grip (G) forces during voluntary manipulation of a hand-held object is well established. The current study is to examine grip-load force coupling when motion of the hand with an object was either self-generated (voluntary) or externally generated. Subjects performed similar cyclic movements of different loads at various frequencies with three types of manipulations: 1) voluntary oscillation, 2) oscillating the right arm via the pulley system by the left leg (self-driven oscillation), and 3) oscillating the arm via the pulley system by another person (other-driven oscillation). During the self-generated movements: 1) the grip forces were larger and 2) grip-load force modulation was more pronounced than in the externally generated movements. The G-L adjustments are not completely determined by the mechanics of object motion; nonmechanical factors related to movement performance, for instance perceptual factors, may affect the G-L coupling.

  7. Grip strength in mice with joint inflammation: A rheumatology function test sensitive to pain and analgesia.

    PubMed

    Montilla-García, Ángeles; Tejada, Miguel Á; Perazzoli, Gloria; Entrena, José M; Portillo-Salido, Enrique; Fernández-Segura, Eduardo; Cañizares, Francisco J; Cobos, Enrique J

    2017-10-01

    Grip strength deficit is a measure of pain-induced functional disability in rheumatic disease. We tested whether this parameter and tactile allodynia, the standard pain measure in preclinical studies, show parallels in their response to analgesics and basic mechanisms. Mice with periarticular injections of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the ankles showed periarticular immune infiltration and synovial membrane alterations, together with pronounced grip strength deficits and tactile allodynia measured with von Frey hairs. However, inflammation-induced tactile allodynia lasted longer than grip strength alterations, and therefore did not drive the functional deficits. Oral administration of the opioid drugs oxycodone (1-8 mg/kg) and tramadol (10-80 mg/kg) induced a better recovery of grip strength than acetaminophen (40-320 mg/kg) or the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs ibuprofen (10-80 mg/kg) or celecoxib (40-160 mg/kg); these results are consistent with their analgesic efficacy in humans. Functional impairment was generally a more sensitive indicator of drug-induced analgesia than tactile allodynia, as drug doses that attenuated grip strength deficits showed little or no effect on von Frey thresholds. Finally, ruthenium red (a nonselective TRP antagonist) or the in vivo ablation of TRPV1-expressing neurons with resiniferatoxin abolished tactile allodynia without altering grip strength deficits, indicating that the neurobiology of tactile allodynia and grip strength deficits differ. In conclusion, grip strength deficits are due to a distinct type of pain that reflects an important aspect of the human pain experience, and therefore merits further exploration in preclinical studies to improve the translation of new analgesics from bench to bedside. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of grip force, stroke rotation and frequency on discomfort for a torqueing tasks.

    PubMed

    Bano, Farheen; Mallick, Zulqernian; Khan, Abid Ali

    2015-08-08

    Occupational tasks involve awkward upper limb postures, especially movement of forearm with repetitive combined gripping and torqueing exertions, which may lead to development of WMSDs. From the literature survey it was observed that there was a lack of studies focussed on the combined effect of torque and grip exertions on forearm discomfort. The present study was to investigate the effects of grip force, stroke rotation and frequency of exertions on discomfort and Electromyography (EMG) activities of the forearm muscles in a repetitive torqueing task. Twenty-seven male participants volunteered in this study. The participants performed repetitive exertions for a 5 minutes duration for each combination of the different levels of stroke rotation, grip force and frequency of exertions. Three levels of stroke rotation, three levels of grip force and three levels of frequency of exertion were chosen as independent variables. Therefore a 3 × 3 customized factorial design was used for the experiment for each level of grip force. Hence, the study was divided into three groups on the basis of grip force (50N, 70N and 90N). The ANOVA showed that stroke rotation and frequency of exertion were significant on discomfort. Further Students Newmann test (SNK) revealed that discomfort was increased with increasing stroke rotation and frequency of exertion. The multivariate analysis of variances (MANOVA) performed on EMG data instead of ANOVA because EMG activities of five muscles simultaneously were recorded. The Results found that extensor muscles were more fatigued in torqueing with gripping task. It was found that stroke rotation for the torqueing tasks must be kept below 45°. It was concluded that it is important to control stroke rotation to improve performance of repetitive torqueing activity.

  9. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on grip force control in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    John, Liane; Küper, Michael; Hulst, Thomas; Timmann, Dagmar; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The control of grip forces when moving a hand held object is impaired in patients with cerebellar degeneration. We asked the question whether after-effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to the lateral cerebellum or M1 improved grip force control in cerebellar patients. Grip force control while holding an object during cyclic arm movements was assessed in patients with pure cerebellar degeneration (n = 14, mean age 50.2 years ± SD 8.8 years) and age- and sex-matched control participants (n = 14, mean age 50.7 years ± SD 9.8 years). All subjects were tested before and after application of tDCS (2 mA, 22 min) in a within-subject design. Each subject received anodal tDCS applied to the cerebellum, anodal tDCS applied to M1 or sham-stimulation with a break of 1 week between the three experimental sessions. There were no clear after-effects of tDCS on grip force control neither in control participants nor in cerebellar patients. Cerebellar patients showed typical impairments with higher grip forces, a higher variability of movements. In the present study, deficits in grip force control were neither improved by tDCS applied over the cerebellum nor M1 in cerebellar degeneration.

  10. Fractal dimensions of pacing and grip force in drawing and handwriting production.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, David N; Chau, Tom

    2008-01-01

    We performed a repeated measures experiment to show that the pacing of a cyclic, ballistic drawing task has a fractal dimension. We also estimated the dimensionality of the force used to grip the drawing implement. Finally, we present an analysis of pediatric data to show that grip force has a fractal dimension in an actual handwriting task. In our experiment, subjects drew circles of varying sizes and at varying rates on a digitizing tablet, using a pen instrumented to measure radial force applied to its barrel. Subjects also drew circles in synchrony with a metronome. We found strong evidence for fractal scaling of both drawing period and grip force in the circle-drawing study. The dimensionality ranged from fractal Gaussian noise (fGn) to fractal Brownian motion, with Hurst coefficients clustering around the value for 1/f noise. When the subjects were required to synchronize their drawing with a metronome, the Hurst coefficient for the drawing period decreased, while the coefficient for grip force did not. This result indicates that independent processes control the variations in pacing and grip force. Grip force in the handwriting study also displayed fractal properties, with Hurst coefficients in the range of correlated fGn. We draw parallels between our handwriting measurements and studies of human gait.

  11. Age-associated changes in hand grip and quadriceps muscle strength ratios in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Dinesh; Wilson, Keely; Martin, Helen J; Allen, Robert; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Stokes, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Muscle strength may decline with age differentially in the upper and lower limbs. This information is difficult to capture through a single measure. The present study therefore aimed to characterize the relative changes in handgrip and lower limb muscle strength with aging by expressing them as a ratio. Thirty-eight healthy volunteers aged 20-82 years performed maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of quadriceps and handgrip using a custom-built transducer and a Jamar dynamometer respectively. The grip-quadriceps ratios for young adults was similar in males and females (0.75); indicating knee extensor force exceeded grip force by approximately 25%. Ratios were increased in older adults (p=0.05), and strength of the two muscle groups was approximately equal (1.1). Pearson's correlation coefficients for grip against quadriceps strength were r=0.63 (young males), r=0.83 (young females), r=0.35 (older males) and r=0.05 (older females). The ratio used demonstrated clear differences between the age groups. The reduced muscle strength with increasing age was expected, but the higher grip/quadriceps strength ratios quantify a greater loss of quadriceps than grip strength with aging. It remains to be investigated whether the relatively greater rate of decline in quadriceps strength seen in healthy older people is more exaggerated in those who are frail, which would have implications for using grip strength as a physical marker of lower limb strength and function in those at risk of immobility and falls.

  12. Differences in grip force control between young and late middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lianrong; Li, Kunyang; Wang, Qian; Chen, Wenhui; Song, Rong; Liu, Guanzheng

    2017-08-22

    Grip force control is a crucial function for human to guarantee the quality of life. To examine the effects of age on grip force control, 10 young adults and 11 late middle-aged adults participated in visually guided tracking tasks using different target force levels (25, 50, and 75% of the subject's maximal grip force). Multiple measures were used to evaluate the tracking performance during force rising phase and force maintenance phase. The measurements include the rise time, fuzzy entropy, mean force percentage, coefficient of variation, and target deviation ratio. The results show that the maximal grip force was significantly lower in the late middle-aged adults than in the young adults. The time of rising phase was systematically longer among late middle-aged adults. The fuzzy entropy is a useful indicator for quantitating the force variability of the grip force signal at higher force levels. These results suggest that the late middle-aged adults applied a compensatory strategy that allow allows for sufficient time to reach the required grip force and reduce the impact of the early and subtle degenerative changes in hand motor function.

  13. The effects of grip width on sticking region in bench press.

    PubMed

    Gomo, Olav; Van Den Tillaar, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of the sticking region by examining how three different grip widths affect the sticking region in powerlifters' bench press performance. It was hypothesised that the sticking region would occur at the same joint angle of the elbow and shoulder independent of grip width, indicating a poor mechanical region for vertical force production at these joint angles. Twelve male experienced powerlifters (age 27.7 ± 8.8 years, mass 91.9 ± 15.4 kg) were tested in one repetition maximum (1-RM) bench press with a narrow, medium and wide grip. Joint kinematics, timing, bar position and velocity were measured with a 3D motion capture system. All participants showed a clear sticking region with all three grip widths, but this sticking region was not found to occur at the same joint angles in all three grip widths, thereby rejecting the hypothesis that the sticking region would occur at the same joint angle of the elbow and shoulder independent of grip width. It is suggested that, due to the differences in moment arm of the barbell about the elbow joint in the sticking region, there still might be a poor mechanical region for total force production that is joint angle-specific.

  14. Control of grip force and vertical posture while holding an object and being perturbed.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Lee, Yun-Ju; Aruin, Alexander S

    2016-11-01

    We investigated motor control perspectives of coordinating maintenance of posture and application of grip force when holding an object and being perturbed. Ten subjects stood on the force platform holding an instrumented object in their dominant hand and were exposed to an external perturbation applied to their shoulders. Task demands were manipulated by positioning a slippery cap on top of the instrumented object. Grip force applied to the object, the object acceleration and the center of pressure (COP) were recorded and analyzed during the time intervals typical for the anticipatory (APA) and compensatory (CPA) components of postural control. Onsets of grip force were seen before the onsets of the COP displacement and initiation of movements of the handheld object during the APA phase of postural control, while the onsets of maximum grip force preceded the maximum COP displacement during the CPA phase. When the task demands increased by holding a handheld object with the slippery cap, subjects tended to generate grip force earlier and of a smaller magnitude; also, the COP displacement in the APA phase was smaller as compared to holding a handheld object only. The outcome provides a foundation for future studies of maintenance of vertical posture in people with impairments of balance and grip force control when holding an object and being perturbed.

  15. [Isometric grip strength and social gerontological research: results and analytic potentials of SHARE and SOEP].

    PubMed

    Hank, K; Jürges, H; Schupp, J; Wagner, G G

    2009-04-01

    This paper shows that the measurement of hand grip strength provides a non-invasive and reliable objective health indicator for social science research and is easy to collect in general population surveys. Grip strength is not only a useful complement of self-reported indicators of health, but it also exhibits a considerable predictive power with regard to a number of further relevant variables for social gerontological research, such as mortality risks. New data from the 2004 Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) and the 2006 wave of the German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) allow insightful methodological and very first substantive cross-sectional analyses of grip strength in Germany. The focus of the present study is on the analysis of individuals aged 50 or older. The experience of both surveys when measuring grip strength is consistently positive, particularly with regard to the respondents' feedback. Major determinants of isometric grip strength are - beyond the individual's gender - age, body size and weight. A multivariate analysis also provides evidence for a clear positive association between various health indicators and grip strength.

  16. A comparison of the high and low backspin backhand drives in tennis using different grips.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B; Christmass, M

    1995-04-01

    Three-dimensional, high-speed cinematography was used to compare backspin backhand techniques of high performance players hitting low (5.4 cm below hip height) and high (41.6 cm above hip height) bouncing balls using their preferred method of holding the racket (eastern backhand or continental grip: hand generally on top of the handle) and non-preferred ('behind the handle') grip. The Direct Linear Transformation method was used for three-dimensional space reconstruction from two-dimensional images recorded from laterally placed phase-locked cameras operating at 200 Hz. The only significant differences (P < 0.05) caused by the change in grip were that the ball was impacted further in front of the body when using the non-preferred grip, and a lower peak racket-shoulder speed was recorded for a high bouncing ball when using the non-preferred grip. Irrespective of the type of grip, the players significantly modified (P < 0.01) their technique to hit a high bouncing ball by adopting a more upright trunk, more rotated shoulder alignment (racket shoulder pointing more towards opponent), a larger front knee angle and a more abducted upper arm. Hitting a high ball was also characterized by a less inclined approach trajectory of the racket, a more vertical racket-face and a different speed profile for the segments of the upper limb and racket.

  17. Hold, grasp, clutch or grab: consumer grip choices during food container opening.

    PubMed

    Rowson, J; Yoxall, A

    2011-07-01

    Society is ageing and sadly that ageing leads to a host of issues, not least a society in which the majority are likely to have some loss of strength and dexterity. This can lead to complications in undertaking everyday tasks such as using transport, bathing or even handling and opening food. Packaging has to provide a multitude of services; to protect and preserve the product, to provide information to the consumer and not least to allow access to the contents. This access to packaging--or 'openability'--has become a significant issue for designers and manufacturers with the change in demographics as described above. Understanding the choices consumers make in how they manipulate packaging can help designers produce packaging that is more able to meet the requirements of modern society. Studies previously undertaken by the authors showed that consumers did use different grips when opening packaging and that certain grips were theoretically more comfortable and stronger than others. This paper outlines a further study whereby consumers were asked to apply the most common grips to a specially designed torque measuring device. Details were taken about the consumers: age, gender, occupation, hand size, plus their preferred grip choice for packaging of this type. The study showed that typically women chose a grip that maximised their opportunity of opening the closure and that this grip choice was more limited than that available for men. This has implications for inclusive design of many everyday products.

  18. Effects of EVA gloves on grip strength and fatigue under low temperature and low pressure.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yinsheng; Ding, Li; Liu, Heqing; Li, Yan; Li, Deyu; Wang, Li

    2016-03-01

    To study the effects of wearing extravehicular activity (EVA) gloves on grip strength and fatigue in low temperature, low pressure and mixing of two factors (low temperature and low pressure). The maximum grip strength and fatigue tests were performed with 10 healthy male subjects wearing gloves in a variety of simulated environments. The data was analysed using the normalization method. The results showed that wearing gloves significantly affected the maximum grip strength and fatigue. Pressure (29.6, 39.2 kPa) had more influence on the maximum grip compared with control group while low temperatures (-50, -90, -110 °C) had no influence on grip but affected fatigue dramatically. The results also showed that the maximum grip strength and fatigue were influenced significantly in a compound environment. Space environment remarkably reduced strength and endurance of the astronauts. However, the effects brought by the compound environment cannot be understood as the superimposition of low temperature and pressure effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Posture, flexibility and grip strength in horse riders.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Sarah Jane; Baxter, Joanna; Broom, Louise; Rossell, Laura-Ann; Sinclair, Jonathan; Clayton, Hilary M

    2014-09-29

    Since the ability to train the horse to be ambidextrous is considered highly desirable, rider asymmetry is recognized as a negative trait. Acquired postural and functional asymmetry can originate from numerous anatomical regions, so it is difficult to suggest if any is developed due to riding. The aim of this study was therefore to assess symmetry of posture, strength and flexibility in a large population of riders and to determine whether typical traits exist due to riding. 127 right handed riders from the UK and USA were categorized according to years riding (in 20 year increments) and their competition level (using affiliated test levels). Leg length, grip strength and spinal posture were measured and recorded by a physiotherapist. Standing and sitting posture and trunk flexibility were measured with 3-D motion capture technology. Right-left differences were explored in relation to years riding and rider competitive experience. Significant anatomical asymmetry was found for the difference in standing acromion process height for a competition level (-0.07±1.50 cm Intro/Prelim; 0.02±1.31 cm Novice; 0.43±1.27 cm Elementary+; p=0.048) and for sitting iliac crest height for years riding (-0.23±1.36 cm Intro/Prelim; 0.01±1.50 cm Novice; 0.86±0.41 cm Elementary+; p=0.021). For functional asymmetry, a significant interaction was found for lateral bending ROM for years riding x competition level (p=0.047). The demands on dressage riders competing at higher levels may predispose these riders to a higher risk of developing asymmetry and potentially chronic back pain rather than improving their symmetry.

  20. Posture, Flexibility and Grip Strength in Horse Riders

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Sarah Jane; Baxter, Joanna; Broom, Louise; Rossell, Laura-Ann; Sinclair, Jonathan; Clayton, Hilary M

    2014-01-01

    Since the ability to train the horse to be ambidextrous is considered highly desirable, rider asymmetry is recognized as a negative trait. Acquired postural and functional asymmetry can originate from numerous anatomical regions, so it is difficult to suggest if any is developed due to riding. The aim of this study was therefore to assess symmetry of posture, strength and flexibility in a large population of riders and to determine whether typical traits exist due to riding. 127 right handed riders from the UK and USA were categorized according to years riding (in 20 year increments) and their competition level (using affiliated test levels). Leg length, grip strength and spinal posture were measured and recorded by a physiotherapist. Standing and sitting posture and trunk flexibility were measured with 3-D motion capture technology. Right-left differences were explored in relation to years riding and rider competitive experience. Significant anatomical asymmetry was found for the difference in standing acromion process height for a competition level (−0.07±1.50 cm Intro/Prelim; 0.02±1.31 cm Novice; 0.43±1.27 cm Elementary+; p=0.048) and for sitting iliac crest height for years riding (−0.23±1.36 cm Intro/Prelim; 0.01±1.50 cm Novice; 0.86±0.41 cm Elementary+; p=0.021). For functional asymmetry, a significant interaction was found for lateral bending ROM for years riding x competition level (p=0.047). The demands on dressage riders competing at higher levels may predispose these riders to a higher risk of developing asymmetry and potentially chronic back pain rather than improving their symmetry. PMID:25414745

  1. Longitudinal assessment of grip strength using bulb dynamometer in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pizzato, Tatiana M.; Baptista, Cyntia R. J. A.; Souza, Mariana A.; Benedicto, Michelle M. B.; Martinez, Edson Z.; Mattiello-Sverzut, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Grip strength is used to infer functional status in several pathological conditions, and the hand dynamometer has been used to estimate performance in other areas. However, this relationship is controversial in neuromuscular diseases and studies with the bulb dynamometer comparing healthy children and children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) are limited. OBJECTIVE: The evolution of grip strength and the magnitude of weakness were examined in boys with DMD compared to healthy boys. The functional data of the DMD boys were correlated with grip strength. METHOD: Grip strength was recorded in 18 ambulant boys with DMD (Duchenne Group, DG) aged 4 to 13 years (mean 7.4±2.1) and 150 healthy volunteers (Control Group, CG) age-matched using a bulb dynamometer (North Coast- NC70154). The follow-up of the DG was 6 to 33 months (3-12 sessions), and functional performance was verified using the Vignos scale. RESULTS: There was no difference between grip strength obtained by the dominant and non-dominant side for both groups. Grip strength increased in the CG with chronological age while the DG remained stable or decreased. The comparison between groups showed significant difference in grip strength, with CG values higher than DG values (confidence interval of 95%). In summary, there was an increment in the differences between the groups with increasing age. Participants with 24 months or more of follow-up showed a progression of weakness as well as maintained Vignos scores. CONCLUSIONS: The amplitude of weakness increased with age in the DG. The bulb dynamometer detected the progression of muscular weakness. Functional performance remained virtually unchanged in spite of the increase in weakness. PMID:25003277

  2. Inertial torque during reaching directly impacts grip-force adaptation to weightless objects.

    PubMed

    Giard, T; Crevecoeur, F; McIntyre, J; Thonnard, J-L; Lefèvre, P

    2015-11-01

    A hallmark of movement control expressed by healthy humans is the ability to gradually improve motor performance through learning. In the context of object manipulation, previous work has shown that the presence of a torque load has a direct impact on grip-force control, characterized by a significantly slower grip-force adjustment across lifting movements. The origin of this slower adaptation rate remains unclear. On the one hand, information about tangential constraints during stationary holding may be difficult to extract in the presence of a torque. On the other hand, inertial torque experienced during movement may also potentially disrupt the grip-force adjustments, as the dynamical constraints clearly differ from the situation when no torque load is present. To address the influence of inertial torque loads, we instructed healthy adults to perform visually guided reaching movements in weightlessness while holding an unbalanced object relative to the grip axis. Weightlessness offered the possibility to remove gravitational constraints and isolate the effect of movement-related feedback on grip force adjustments. Grip-force adaptation rates were compared with a control group who manipulated a balanced object without any torque load and also in weightlessness. Our results clearly show that grip-force adaptation in the presence of a torque load is significantly slower, which suggests that the presence of torque loads experienced during movement may alter our internal estimates of how much force is required to hold an unbalanced object stable. This observation may explain why grasping objects around the expected location of the center of mass is such an important component of planning and control of manipulation tasks.

  3. Grip Strength as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes in Healthy Weight Adults.

    PubMed

    Mainous, Arch G; Tanner, Rebecca J; Anton, Stephen D; Jo, Ara

    2015-12-01

    Muscle strength may play a role in cardiometabolic disease. We examined the relationship between hand grip strength and diabetes and hypertension in a sample of healthy weight adults. In 2015, we analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011-2012 for adults aged ≥20 years with healthy BMIs (between 18.5 and <25) and no history of cardiovascular disease (unweighted n=1,467; weighted n=61,587,139). Hand grip strength was assessed with a dynamometer. Diabetes was based on hemoglobin A1c level and reported diabetes diagnosis. Hypertension was based on measured blood pressure and reported hypertension diagnosis. Individuals with undiagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes had lower grip strength (51.9 vs 69.8, p=0.0001), as did individuals with diagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes (61.7 vs 69.8, p=0.008). Mean grip strength was lower among individuals with undiagnosed hypertension compared with individuals without hypertension (63.5 vs 71.5, p=0.008) as well as among individuals with diagnosed hypertension compared with those without hypertension (60.8 vs 71.5, p<0.0001). In adjusted analyses controlling for age, sex, race, smoking status, and first-degree relative with disease, mean grip strength was lower for undiagnosed diabetes (β=-10.02, p<0.0001) and diagnosed diabetes (β=-8.21, p=0.03) compared with individuals without diabetes. In adjusted analyses, grip strength was lower among individuals with undiagnosed hypertension (β=-6.6, p=0.004) and diagnosed hypertension (β=-4.27, p=0.04) compared with individuals without hypertension. Among healthy weight adults, combined grip strength is lower in individuals with diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and hypertension. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Grip Strength as a Marker of Hypertension and Diabetes in Healthy Weight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mainous, Arch G.; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Anton, Stephen D.; Jo, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Muscle strength may play a role in cardiometabolic disease. We examined the relationship between hand grip strength and diabetes and hypertension in a sample of healthy weight adults. Methods In 2015, we analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2012 for adults aged ≥20 years with healthy BMIs (between 18.5 and <25 kg/m2) and no history of cardiovascular disease (unweighted n=1,469; weighted n=61,672,082). Hand grip strength was assessed with a dynamometer. Diabetes was based on hemoglobin A1c level and reported diabetes diagnosis. Hypertension was based on measured blood pressure and reported hypertension diagnosis. Results Individuals with undiagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes had lower grip strength (51.9 vs 69.8, p=0.0001), as well as among individuals with diagnosed diabetes compared with individuals without diabetes (61.7 vs 69.8, p=0.008). Mean grip strength was lower among individuals with undiagnosed hypertension compared with individuals without hypertension (63.5 vs 71.5, p=0.008) as well as among individuals with diagnosed hypertension compared with those without hypertension (60.8 vs 71.5, p<0.0001). In adjusted analyses controlling for age, sex, race, smoking status, and first-degree relative with disease, mean grip strength was lower for undiagnosed diabetes (β= −10.02, p<0.0001) and diagnosed diabetes (β= −8.21, p=0.03) compared with individuals without diabetes. In adjusted analyses, grip strength was lower among individuals with undiagnosed hypertension (β= −6.6, p=0.004) and diagnosed hypertension (β= −4.27, p=0.04) compared with individuals without hypertension. Conclusions Among healthy weight adults, combined grip strength is lower in individuals with diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26232901

  5. Effects of bat composition, grip firmness, and impact location on postimpact ball velocity.

    PubMed

    Weyrich, A S; Messier, S P; Ruhmann, B S; Berry, M J

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of bat composition (aluminum and wooden), impact location [center of percussion (COP), center of gravity (COG), and end of the bat (E)], and grip firmness [tight (T) and no tension (NT)] on postimpact ball velocity. With the bats placed alternately in NT and T conditions, baseballs were delivered at a speed of 27.1 m.s-1 from a pitching machine positioned 1.5 m from the bat. High-speed photography (400 fps) was performed using a Locam camera positioned 7.54 m from and perpendicular to the principal plane of ball movement. A three-way ANCOVA revealed significant (P less than 0.01) differences in postimpact ball velocity between the three impact locations, with the COP yielding the greatest values, followed by the COG and E. Moreover, there was a significant (P less than 0.01) grip vs bat interaction. A simple-effects procedure revealed the following results: 1) the T grip produced greater (P less than 0.01) velocities than the NT grip across the aluminum (Al) bat; 2) there was no difference (P greater than 0.01) between the T and NT grips across the wooden (W) bat; 3) the W bat produced greater (P less than 0.01) velocities than the Al bat across the NT grip; and 4) there was no difference (P greater than 0.01) between the Al and W bats across the T grip.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Despite Early Improvement, Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Still Have Impaired Grip Force 5 Years after Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rydholm, Maria; Book, Christina; Wikström, Ingegerd; Jacobsson, Lennart; Turesson, Carl

    2017-07-10

    Objective measures of function are important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate grip strength in patients with early RA. An inception cohort of 225 patients with early RA was followed according to a structured protocol. Average and peak grip force values (Grippit; AB Detektor, Gothenburg, Sweden) of the dominant hand were evaluated and compared to the expected, based on age- and sex-specific reference values from the literature. Separate analyses were performed for those with limited self-reported disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI) ≤ 0.5) and clinical remission (DAS28<2.6). The mean baseline average grip force was significantly lower than the corresponding expected values (105 N vs 266 N; p<0.001). Observed average and peak grip force values were significantly reduced compared to the expected in women as well as in men over time and at all time points. The average grip force improved significantly from inclusion to the 12 month visit [age-corrected mean change: 34 N; 95% confidence interval 26-43]. At 5 years, the average grip force was still lower than expected overall (mean 139 N vs 244 N; p<0.001), and also among those with HAQ-DI ≤ 0.5, and those in clinical remission. Grip strength improved in early RA, in particular during the first year. It was still significantly impaired 5 years after diagnosis, even among those with limited self-reported disability and those in clinical remission. This suggests that further efforts to improve hand function are important in early RA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Note: investigation on the influences of gripping methods on elastic modulus by a miniature tensile device and in situ verification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Z C; Zhao, H W; Wang, K T; Zhou, X Q; Hu, X L; Lu, S; Cheng, H B

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, by gripping the specimen on various positions, including the gripping section, stress concentration transition section, and gauge length section, theoretical analysis on the influences of gripping methods on tensile elastic modulus calculation was investigated with a group of equations. Then, an image-based displacement measurement system was implemented, and the experimental verification via in situ tensile testing was carried out to verify the feasibility of the theoretical analysis by a miniature tensile device integrated with a metallographic microscope. The stress-strain curves of 2026 aluminum alloy were also obtained by gripping the specimens on various positions to illustrate the influences of gripping methods. The influence of gripping methods on elongation measurement was also investigated. This paper showed a modular calculation method of elastic modulus for the tensile testing of typical plate specimens.

  8. Threshold position control of arm movement with anticipatory increase in grip force.

    PubMed

    Pilon, Jean-François; De Serres, Sophie J; Feldman, Anatol G

    2007-07-01

    The grip force holding an object between fingers usually increases before or simultaneously with arm movement thus preventing the object from sliding. We experimentally analyzed and simulated this anticipatory behavior based on the following notions. (1) To move the arm to a new position, the nervous system shifts the threshold position at which arm muscles begin to be recruited. Deviated from their activation thresholds, arm muscles generate activity and forces that tend to minimize this deviation by bringing the arm to a new position. (2) To produce a grip force, with or without arm motion, the nervous system changes the threshold configuration of the hand. This process defines a threshold (referent) aperture (R(a)) of appropriate fingers. The actual aperture (Q(a)) is constrained by the size of the object held between the fingers whereas, in referent position R(a), the fingers virtually penetrate the object. Deviated by the object from their thresholds of activation, hand muscles generate activity and grip forces in proportion to the gap between the Q(a) and R(a). Thus, grip force emerges since the object prevents the fingers from reaching the referent position. (3) From previous experiences, the system knows that objects tend to slide off the fingers when arm movements are made and, to prevent sliding, it starts narrowing the referent aperture simultaneously with or somewhat before the onset of changes in the referent arm position. (4) The interaction between the fingers and the object is accomplished via the elastic pads on the tips of fingers. The pads are compressed not only due to the grip force but also due to the tangential inertial force ("load") acting from the object on the pads along the arm trajectory. Compressed by the load force, the pads move back and forth in the gap between the finger bones and object, thus inevitably changing the normal component of the grip force, in synchrony with and in proportion to the load force. Based on these notions

  9. Similar motion of a handheld object may trigger non-similar grip force adjustments

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fan; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2007-01-01

    The tight coupling between load (L) and grip (G) forces during voluntary manipulation of a hand-held object is well established. The current study is to examine grip-load force coupling when motion of the hand with an object was either self-generated (voluntary) or externally generated. Subjects performed similar cyclic movements of different loads at various frequencies with three types of manipulation: (a) voluntary oscillation, (b) oscillating the right arm via the pulley system by the left leg (self-driven oscillation), (c) oscillating the arm via the pulley system by another person (other-driven oscillation). During the self-generated movements: (a) the grip forces were larger and (b) grip-load force modulation was more pronounced than in the externally generated movements. The G-L adjustments are not completely determined by the mechanics of object motion; non-mechanical factors related to movement performance, for instance perceptual factors, may affect the G-L coupling. Potentially the results of study can be used to provide hand therapists with another way for administering the Rapid Exchange Gripping Test. PMID:17954351

  10. Grip pressure distributions and associated variability in golf: a two-club comparison.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Sean M; Broker, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Teaching and playing professionals offer multiple theories concerning the manner in which forces should be applied to the handle of the club during the golf swing. This study extends recent research concerning grip pressures and forces in golf, with the purpose of exploring the similarities and differences between force profiles for a 7-iron and driver swung by proficient golfers. A secondary purpose was to further analyze the way that golfers use grip forces to manipulate the club. Grip forces were measured on eight low handicap golfers (USGA indexes 0 to 7) swinging their own 7-irons and drivers. In total, lead-hand and trail-hand grip forces were isolated as well as anatomically specific forces within the hands. Force profile variability across multiple swings for each golfer and between golfers characterized consistencies and important differences. Correlations between 7-iron and driver force profiles characterized force 'signatures.' The data highlight large fluctuations in grip forces during the swing. Marked differences between participants were observed, involving force magnitudes and phasing. Dominant forces arose primarily from the lead hand, specifically the last three fingers. Force profiles were highly repeatable across swings for a golfer (standard deviations < 7% of total force) and force profile correlations between 7-iron and driver for a golfer were remarkably high (r2 = 0.86). Notably, within swing force variability was greatest during club acceleration, but dramatically decreased at impact.

  11. Grip type and task goal modify reach-to-grasp performance in post-stroke hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Sydney Y.; DeJong, Stacey L.; Cherry, Kendra M.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether grip type and/or task goal influenced reaching and grasping performance in post-stroke hemiparesis. Sixteen adults with post-stroke hemiparesis and twelve healthy adults reached to and grasped a cylindrical object using one of two grip types (3-finger or palmar) to achieve one of two task goals (hold or lift). Performance of the stroke group was characteristic of hemiparetic limb movement during reach-to-grasp, with more curved handpaths and slower velocities compared to the control group. These effects were present regardless of grip type or task goal. Other measures of reaching (reach time and reach velocity at object contact) and grasping (peak thumb-index finger aperture during the reach and peak grip force during the grasp) were differentially affected by grip type, task goal, or both, despite the presence of hemiparesis, providing new evidence that changes in motor patterns after stroke may occur to compensate for stroke-related motor impairment. PMID:22357103

  12. Effects of Taping on Pain, Grip Strength and Wrist Extension Force in Patients with Tennis Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Shamsoddini, Alireza; Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background Tennis elbow (TE) is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow. Objectives This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT) on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow. Patients and Methods Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years) with tennis elbow of their dominant arm participated in this study. Outcome measures were assessment of pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow, grip strength and wrist extension force before and five to ten minutes after application of elbow tape on the affected and unaffected arms. A Visual Analog Scale was used to assess pain. A dynamometer and a hand-held dynamometer were used for evaluation of grip strength and wrist extension force, respectively. Results Among the variables, significant differences were found in wrist extension forces between effected and unaffected arms (P = 0.02). Changes in grip strength showed statically significant improvements in the affected arm compared to the unaffected arm (P = 0.03). Also, in assessment of pain at the lateral epicondyle, the mean change between affected and unaffected arms was significant, with P = 0.001. Conclusions The taping technique, as applied in this study demonstrates an impressive effect on wrist extension force and grip strength of patients with TE. Elbow taping also reduces pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow in these patients. PMID:24350156

  13. Evaluation protocols of hand grip strength in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Ana Paula; Iop, Rodrigo da Rosa; Borges Júnior, Noé Gomes; Domenech, Susana Cristina; Gevaerd, Monique da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Hand grip strength is a useful measurement for individuals with rheumatoid arthritis, since this disease is often associated with functional anomalies of the hands and a consequent reduction in muscular strength. Thus, the standardization of the test protocol is important in relation to make reproducible and reliable studies. The aim of this systematic review was to verify the parameters associated with the measurement of the hand grip strength in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis. The review was carried out according to the recommendations of PRISMA, based on the databases of the Web of Science and the Journals Website of the Brazilian governmental agency CAPES. The following inclusion criteria were established: articles whose themes involved dynamometry to measure the hand grip in adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis, published in English between 1990 and 2012. The articles were selected by two independent reviewers. Initially, 628 articles were identified, and in the final review only 40 were included in the qualitative synthesis, that is, those in which the main tool used to evaluate the hand grip strength was the Jamar®. In relation to the hand grip strength parameters feedback type, hand dominance, repetitions, contraction intensity, acquisition time and rest period many data are imprecise and were not detailed in the method description. It is clear that there is a need for the standardization of a protocol which establishes the type of dynamometer and the parameters to be evaluated and also takes into consideration the clinical conditions of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Sex Differences in Fear of Falling among Older Adults with Low Grip Strength

    PubMed Central

    LIM, Eunju

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fear of falling is not only a risk factor for falls, but it is also an important clinical predictor of functional decline in older adults. This study identified sex differences in fear of falling and related factors in older adults with low grip strength. Methods: The data of 902 older adults from the 2012 Korean National Survey, conducted as a research project by the Korea Employment Information Service, were analyzed. Grip strength, activities of daily living, cognitive function, depressive symptoms, and fear of falling were assessed. Multiple regression analysis was performed by a simultaneous data entry method. Results: Fear of falling was greater in older women with low grip strength than in their male equivalents (P<0.001). Regression analysis showed that age, fall experience within the previous 2 yr, activities of daily living, and depressive symptoms collectively accounted for 15.3% (P<0.001) of the variance among men. Meanwhile, age, fall experience within the previous 2 yr, grip strength, activities of daily living, and depressive symptoms collectively accounted for 13.4% (P<0.001) of the variance among women. Conclusion: Thus, the predictors of fear of falling differ between older men and women with low grip strength. Therefore, sex differences must be considered when developing intervention strategies for reducing fear of falling in this demographic. PMID:27398329

  15. Decoding gripping force based on local field potentials recorded from subthalamic nucleus in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The basal ganglia are known to be involved in the planning, execution and control of gripping force and movement vigour. Here we aim to define the nature of the basal ganglia control signal for force and to decode gripping force based on local field potential (LFP) activities recorded from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. We found that STN LFP activities in the gamma (55–90 Hz) and beta (13–30m Hz) bands were most informative about gripping force, and that a first order dynamic linear model with these STN LFP features as inputs can be used to decode the temporal profile of gripping force. Our results enhance the understanding of how the basal ganglia control gripping force, and also suggest that deep brain LFPs could potentially be used to decode movement parameters related to force and movement vigour for the development of advanced human-machine interfaces. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19089.001 PMID:27855780

  16. Slip detection and grip adjustment using optical tracking in prosthetic hands.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Luke; Singhal, Girish; Kaliki, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    We have designed a closed loop control system that adjusts the grasping force of a prosthetic hand based on the amount of object slip detected by an optical tracking sensor. The system was designed for the i-Limb (a multi-fingered prosthetic hand from Touch Bionics Inc.) and is comprised of an optical sensor embedded inside a silicone prosthetic glove and a control algorithm. In a proof of concept study to demonstrate the effectiveness of optical tracking in slip sensing, we record slip rate while increasing the weight held in the grasp of the hand and compare two cases: grip adjustment on and grip adjustment off. The average slip rate was found to be 0.314 slips/(s · oz) without grip adjustment and 0.0411 slips/(s · oz) with grip adjustment. This paper discusses the advantages of the optical approach in slip detection and presents the experiment and results utilizing the optical sensor and grip control algorithm.

  17. Influence of dynamic hand-grip exercise on acetone in gas emanating from human skin.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kenji; Funada, Toshiaki; Kikuchi, Maasa; Ohkuwa, Tetsuo; Itoh, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Tsuda, Takao

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of dynamic hand-grip exercise on skin-gas acetone concentration. The subjects for this experiment were seven healthy males. In the first experiment, to ascertain the reproducibility of the results for the skin-gas acetone concentration test, the skin gas was collected four times from one subject. In the second experiment, all subjects performed three different types of exercise (Exercises I-III) for a duration of 60 s. Exercise I was performed at 10 kg with one contraction every 3 s. Exercise II was 30 kg with one contraction every 3 s. Exercise III was 10 kg with one contraction per second. Acetone concentration was analyzed by gas chromatography. In the first experiment, reasonable reproducibility was obtained in measurements of skin-gas acetone concentration during the hand-grip exercise. In the second experiment, acetone concentration in skin gas during hand-grip exercise II was significantly higher than the basal level. Although skin-gas acetone levels increased in all subjects during exercises I and III, a significant difference was not found. No significant difference was found in skin-gas acetone concentration during dynamic hand-grip exercise among exercises I, II, and III. This study confirmed that skin-gas acetone levels increase during dynamic hand-grip exercise.

  18. The effects of low-dose caffeine on perceived pain during a grip to exhaustion task.

    PubMed

    Bellar, David; Kamimori, Gary H; Glickman, Ellen L

    2011-05-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject experiment examined the effects of low-dose caffeine on pain reported during an exhaustive grip task. The grip task consisted of holding a metal block attached to standard Olympic weight plates with the arm at the side until the participants could no longer maintain their grip. Apparently healthy recreationally trained college-aged adults (men, n = 5; women, n = 5) were given either a piece of Stay Alert™ gum that delivered 85% of the effective dose of 100 mg of caffeine in 5 minutes or an identical placebo gum that contained no caffeine. Subsequently, pain perception and ratings of perceived exertion were recorded during an exhaustive grip task every 15 seconds and the overall time to exhaustion. No significant difference was found in time to exhaustion between treatments. A significant main effect of treatment for reported pain (p < 0.001, Φ = 0.377) was observed. Thus, in a population of recreationally trained college-aged adults, low-dose caffeine may attenuate the individual's perception of pain during a grip to exhaustion task.

  19. Clinical measures of handgrip limitation relate to impaired pinch grip force control after stroke.

    PubMed

    Blennerhassett, Jannette M; Carey, Leeanne M; Matyas, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    This study examined whether clinical measures of handgrip limitation relate to laboratory measures of grip force impairment during a pinch grip, lift, and hold task post-stroke. Handgrip ability in 45 people with stroke who had residual grip ability was examined relative to 45 age-matched healthy adults. The clinical tests included items from a) the Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test; b) the Motor Assessment Scale; c) the Functional Independence Measure (FIM); and d) a custom-designed survey about hand-use in daily life. The laboratory test was summarized by principal components: 1) Pre-Lift Delay and 2) Grip Force Dyscontrol. For the stroke group, a moderate to strong correlation was found between Pre-Lift Delay and each clinical measure of handgrip limitation (rs=0.70-0.85) except the FIM (rs=0.38-0.49). In contrast, Grip Force Dyscontrol was not associated with handgrip limitation on any of the clinical tests (rs=-0.08 to 0.18).

  20. Proposed technique for inguinal hernia repair with self-gripping mesh: avoiding fixation to undesired structures.

    PubMed

    Porrero, J L; Cano-Valderrama, O; Castillo, M J; Alonso, M T

    2015-10-01

    Self-gripping meshes have been developed to avoid fixing sutures during inguinal hernia repair. Operative time is shorter when using a self-gripping mesh than with conventional Lichtenstein repair. However, these meshes can be difficult to handle because they fix to undesired structures. The aim of this report is to describe a new technique to avoid this problem. Inguinal hernia dissection is made as usual. Once dissection is finished, a Parietex ProGrip(®) (Covidien, Dublin, Ireland) flat sheet mesh is cut depending on the size needed. A small split is made between the lower and medium third of the mesh to mark where the split for the spermatic cord will be. Using this mark, the upper third of the mesh is folded over the medium third, hiding the microgrips that make this a self-gripping mesh. In this way, only the lower third of the mesh has the microgrips exposed and the mesh can be fixed to the pubic bone and inguinal ligament without fixation to undesired structures. Once the lower third of the mesh is fixed, the split for the spermatic cord is completed and the upper part of the mesh is passed below the spermatic cord. Then, the mesh is unfolded to expose the microgrips again and the medium and upper third of the mesh are descended to its final position. This proposed technique for inguinal hernia repair with self-gripping mesh makes the surgery easier, avoiding mesh fixation to undesired structures.

  1. The effect of upper extremity fatigue on grip strength and passing accuracy in junior basketball players.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Taghread

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is an unavoidable part of a basketball game, which may affect an athlete's performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of upper extremity fatigue on grip strength and passing accuracy in basketball, and ascertain if the effects of different fatigue protocols on grip strength and passing accuracy are the same. Twenty-four juniors under 18 years old (age: 16.75 ± 0.62 years; body height: 184.5 ± 3.31 cm; body mass: 77.25 ± 3.22 kg) volunteered to participate in the study, and were divided into two groups. After a warm-up, both groups performed the basketball passing test and grip strength was recorded for each group under three different testing conditions: rest, 70% and 90% exercise intensity. The protocol used for the first group was the chest press, and for the second group the wrist curls. Results show that after the upper extremity fatigue protocol all parameters of the study (grip strength and passing accuracy) showed a significant decrease, and there was no significant difference between both groups regarding grip strength and passing accuracy. The study suggested that in order to avoid upper extremity fatigue, basketball trainers and coaches need to include upper extremity conditioning exercises into their training sessions.

  2. The influence of golf shaft stiffness on grip and clubhead kinematics.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Sasho J; Boucher, Daniel E

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of shaft stiffness on grip and clubhead kinematics. Two driver shafts with disparate levels of stiffness, but very similar inertial properties, were tested by 33 golfers representing a range of abilities. Shaft deflection data as well as grip and clubhead kinematics were collected from 14 swings, with each shaft, for each golfer using an optical motion capture system. The more flexible shaft (R-Flex) demonstrated a higher contribution to clubhead speed from shaft deflection dynamics (P < .001), but was also associated with significantly less grip angular velocity at impact (P = .001), resulting in no significant difference in clubhead speed (P = .14). However, at the individual level, half of the participants demonstrated a significant difference in clubhead speed between shafts. The more flexible shaft was also associated with significantly different magnitudes of head rotation relative to the grip. More specifically, both bend loft (P < .001) and bend lie (P < .001) were greater for the R-Flex shaft, while bend close (P = .017) was greater for the stiffer (X-Flex) shaft. However, changes in grip orientation resulted in no significant differences in face orientation, between the shafts, at impact.

  3. Two cases of firearm grip impressions on the hands of suicide victims.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Christopher K; Peterson, Brian L

    2012-03-01

    Many factors are used to help distinguish firearm suicides from homicides and accidents, including range of fire, location of entrance defects, wound path trajectory, backspatter (blowback), and gunshot residue. Specifically, authors have discussed examination of the hands for backspatter, gunshot residue, cylinder gap effects, iron staining, and trauma as means of supporting a person having held a firearm while committing suicide. Here, we discuss 2 cases where suicidal gunshot wounds were accompanied by unique firearm grip impressions on the hands of the decedents. In 1 case, a "negative"[ impression of a grip pattern was left in a decedent's hand and in another case a grip pattern was left on the decedent's hand in dried blood. Such impressions can be used to provide support for establishing suicide as the manner of death.

  4. Annual Layering at 78 kyr BP in the NorthGRIP Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, A.; Johnsen, S. J.; Bigler, M.; Röthlisberger, R.; Ruth, U.; Bizet, B.; Iversen, P.

    2005-12-01

    Pronounced laminated layering is observed in the Visual Stratigraphy (VS) of the NorthGRIP ice core (75.1N; 42.3W) throughout the last glacial period. In the cold Greenland Isotopic Stadial 21 at around 2580 m depth, where the ice has an age of approximately 78 kyr, the layer thickness is estimated to be just below 1 cm. In order to verify that the observed layers are annual, we have carried out measurements of electrolytical conductivity and dust concentration at mm resolution in 2 meters of that ice. Together with the VS profile we apply those data to perform a dating, that results in a mean annual layer thickness of 0.8 cm, which is in good accordance with the modelled NorthGRIP time scale 'ss09sea'. This result makes us confident that the stratigraphic dating of the NorthGRIP ice core can be extended back to at least 80 kyr BP.

  5. Involuntary contralateral upper extremity muscle activation pattern during unilateral pinch grip following stroke.

    PubMed

    Seo, Na Jin

    2013-01-01

    Repeated measures design. Mirror activity refers to emergence of motion not only in the intended, but also in the contralateral limb. To characterize post-stroke mirror activities across multiple muscles during unilateral pinch. Chronic stroke survivors performed unilateral pinch grip using the paretic and nonparetic hand, while four muscles' EMGs were recorded for both hands. During the paretic hand grip, the relaxed nonparetic hand showed mirror activity that was more pronounced for the intrinsic (FDI and thenar eminence) than extrinsic muscles (FDS and EDC). During the nonparetic hand grip, mirror activity in the paretic hand was suppressed for the intrinsic than extrinsic muscles. Chronic stroke survivors' relaxed hand did not mirror the task hand's muscle activation pattern, but displayed altered muscle activation patterns depending on muscles and sides, possibly mediated by disturbed interhemispheric inhibition and relative reliance on corticospinal tracts among muscles. N/A. Copyright © 2013 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimating thumb–index finger precision grip and manipulation potential in extant and fossil primates

    PubMed Central

    Feix, Thomas; Kivell, Tracy L.; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Primates, and particularly humans, are characterized by superior manual dexterity compared with other mammals. However, drawing the biomechanical link between hand morphology/behaviour and functional capabilities in non-human primates and fossil taxa has been challenging. We present a kinematic model of thumb–index precision grip and manipulative movement based on bony hand morphology in a broad sample of extant primates and fossil hominins. The model reveals that both joint mobility and digit proportions (scaled to hand size) are critical for determining precision grip and manipulation potential, but that having either a long thumb or great joint mobility alone does not necessarily yield high precision manipulation. The results suggest even the oldest available fossil hominins may have shared comparable precision grip manipulation with modern humans. In particular, the predicted human-like precision manipulation of Australopithecus afarensis, approximately one million years before the first stone tools, supports controversial archaeological evidence of tool-use in this taxon. PMID:25878134

  7. Prognostic value of grip strength: findings from the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study.

    PubMed

    Leong, Darryl P; Teo, Koon K; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; Avezum, Alvaro; Orlandini, Andres; Seron, Pamela; Ahmed, Suad H; Rosengren, Annika; Kelishadi, Roya; Rahman, Omar; Swaminathan, Sumathi; Iqbal, Romaina; Gupta, Rajeev; Lear, Scott A; Oguz, Aytekin; Yusoff, Khalid; Zatonska, Katarzyna; Chifamba, Jephat; Igumbor, Ehimario; Mohan, Viswanathan; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Gu, Hongqiu; Li, Wei; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-07-18

    Reduced muscular strength, as measured by grip strength, has been associated with an increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Grip strength is appealing as a simple, quick, and inexpensive means of stratifying an individual's risk of cardiovascular death. However, the prognostic value of grip strength with respect to the number and range of populations and confounders is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the independent prognostic importance of grip strength measurement in socioculturally and economically diverse countries. The Prospective Urban-Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study is a large, longitudinal population study done in 17 countries of varying incomes and sociocultural settings. We enrolled an unbiased sample of households, which were eligible if at least one household member was aged 35-70 years and if household members intended to stay at that address for another 4 years. Participants were assessed for grip strength, measured using a Jamar dynamometer. During a median follow-up of 4.0 years (IQR 2.9-5.1), we assessed all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, non-cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, cancer, pneumonia, hospital admission for pneumonia or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), hospital admission for any respiratory disease (including COPD, asthma, tuberculosis, and pneumonia), injury due to fall, and fracture. Study outcomes were adjudicated using source documents by a local investigator, and a subset were adjudicated centrally. Between January, 2003, and December, 2009, a total of 142,861 participants were enrolled in the PURE study, of whom 139,691 with known vital status were included in the analysis. During a median follow-up of 4.0 years (IQR 2.9-5.1), 3379 (2%) of 139,691 participants died. After adjustment, the association between grip strength and each outcome, with the exceptions of cancer and hospital admission due to respiratory illness, was similar across country

  8. Estimating thumb-index finger precision grip and manipulation potential in extant and fossil primates.

    PubMed

    Feix, Thomas; Kivell, Tracy L; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-05-06

    Primates, and particularly humans, are characterized by superior manual dexterity compared with other mammals. However, drawing the biomechanical link between hand morphology/behaviour and functional capabilities in non-human primates and fossil taxa has been challenging. We present a kinematic model of thumb-index precision grip and manipulative movement based on bony hand morphology in a broad sample of extant primates and fossil hominins. The model reveals that both joint mobility and digit proportions (scaled to hand size) are critical for determining precision grip and manipulation potential, but that having either a long thumb or great joint mobility alone does not necessarily yield high precision manipulation. The results suggest even the oldest available fossil hominins may have shared comparable precision grip manipulation with modern humans. In particular, the predicted human-like precision manipulation of Australopithecus afarensis, approximately one million years before the first stone tools, supports controversial archaeological evidence of tool-use in this taxon.

  9. Menstrual cyclicity of finger joint size and grip strength in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rudge, S R; Kowanko, I C; Drury, P L

    1983-01-01

    Daily measurements of finger joint size, grip strength, and body weight have been made throughout 2 complete menstrual cycles in 7 female patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 6 healthy female controls. Sine wave analysis showed significant individual cyclical rhythms (p less than 0.05) for finger joint size (5 patients, 4 controls), nude weight (5 patients, 3 controls), and grip strength (4 patients, 3 controls). In addition analysis of group data, on the assumption of a 28-day cycle, showed a significant cycle for grip strength in the rheumatoid patients, with a nadir at 28 days. In the normal subjects much of the cyclical variation in finger joint size could be explained by changes in weight (median 49.5%), but this was not so in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (median 2.8%). These findings suggest the existence of a cyclical variation in disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:6882039

  10. Relationship Between Grip and Pinch Strength and Activities of Daily Living in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Hyun; Seo, Kyung Mook; Kim, Don-Kyu; Shin, Hyun Iee; Shin, Hye Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between grip and pinch strength and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients. Methods Medical records of 577 stroke patients from January 2010 to February 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' grip and pinch strength of both hemiplegic and non-hemiplegic hands and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) score were collected. These patients were divided into three groups: group A (onset duration: ≤3 months), group B (onset duration: >3 months and <2 years), and group C (onset duration: ≥2 years). The correlation between grip and pinch strength and the K-MBI score was analyzed. Results In group A (95 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of both hands in patients with right hemiplegia. Significant (p<0.05) correlation between the K-MBI score and the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand was shown in patients with left hemiplegia. In group B (69 patients) and group C (73 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand. Conclusion Stroke patients in subacute stage mainly performed activities of daily living using their dominant hand. However, independence in ADL was associated with the strength of the affected dominant hand. For stroke patients in chronic and late chronic stages, their hand power of the affected hand was associated with independence in ADL regardless whether the dominant hand was affected. PMID:26605173

  11. Weight-specific anticipatory coding of grip force in human dorsal premotor cortex.

    PubMed

    van Nuenen, Bart F L; Kuhtz-Buschbeck, Johann; Schulz, Christian; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2012-04-11

    The dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) uses prior sensory information for motor preparation. Here, we used a conditioning-and-map approach in 11 healthy male humans (mean age 27 years) to further clarify the role of PMd in anticipatory motor control. We transiently disrupted neuronal processing in PMd, using either continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) at 80% (inhibitory cTBS) or 30% (sham cTBS) of active motor threshold. The conditioning effects of cTBS on preparatory brain activity were assessed with functional MRI, while participants lifted a light or heavy weight in response to a go-cue (S2). An additional pre-cue (S1) correctly predicted the weight in 75% of the trials. Participants were asked to use this prior information to prepare for the lift. In the sham condition, grip force showed a consistent undershoot, if the S1 incorrectly prompted the preparation of a light lift. Likewise, an S1 that falsely announced a heavy weight produced a consistent overshoot in grip force. In trials with incorrect S1, preparatory activity in left PMd during the S1-S2 delay period predicted grip force undershoot but not overshoot. Real cTBS selectively abolished this undershoot in grip force. Furthermore, preparatory S1-S2 activity in left PMd no longer predicted the individual undershoot after real cTBS. Our results provide converging evidence for a causal involvement of PMd in anticipatory downscaling but not upscaling of grip force, suggesting an inhibitory role of PMd in anticipatory grip force control during object lifting.

  12. Anticipatory scaling of grip forces when lifting objects of everyday life.

    PubMed

    Hermsdörfer, Joachim; Li, Yong; Randerath, Jennifer; Goldenberg, Georg; Eidenmüller, Sandra

    2011-07-01

    The ability to predict and anticipate the mechanical demands of the environment promotes smooth and skillful motor actions. Thus, the finger forces produced to grasp and lift an object are scaled to the physical properties such as weight. While grip force scaling is well established for neutral objects, only few studies analyzed objects known from daily routine and none studied grip forces. In the present study, eleven healthy subjects each lifted twelve objects of everyday life that encompassed a wide range of weights. The finger pads were covered with force sensors that enabled the measurement of grip force. A scale registered load forces. In a control experiment, the objects were wrapped into paper to prevent recognition by the subjects. Data from the first lift of each object confirmed that object weight was anticipated by adequately scaled forces. The maximum grip force rate during the force increase phase emerged as the most reliable measure to verify that weight was actually predicted and to characterize the precision of this prediction, while other force measures were scaled to object weight also when object identity was not known. Variability and linearity of the grip force-weight relationship improved for time points reached after liftoff, suggesting that sensory information refined the force adjustment. The same mechanism seemed to be involved with unrecognizable objects, though a lower precision was reached. Repeated lifting of the same object within a second and third presentation block did not improve the precision of the grip force scaling. Either practice was too variable or the motor system does not prioritize the optimization of the internal representation when objects are highly familiar.

  13. Clinical effectiveness of grip strength in predicting ambulation of elderly inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Beseler, MR; Rubio, C; Duarte, E; Hervás, D; Guevara, MC; Giner-Pascual, M; Viosca, E

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessing the clinical effectiveness of measuring grip strength as a prognostic tool in recovering ambulation in bed-confined frail elderly patients. Methods A prospective study was carried out with 50 elderly inpatients (mean age: 81.6 years old). Manual muscle test was used for checking strength of hip flexor muscles, hip abductor muscles and knee extensor muscles. Grip strength was assessed by hydraulic dynamometer. Walking ability was assessed by functional ambulation categories and Functional Classification of Sagunto Hospital Ambulation. Existence of cognitive impairment (Short Portable Mental Status of Pfeiffer) and comorbidity (abbreviated Charlson index) were considered to be confounding variables. Statistical analysis Simple comparisons and mixed models of multiple ordinal regression. Results The sample presented generalized weakness in scapular (mean 4.22) and pelvic (mean 3.82) muscle. Mean hand grip values were similar: 11.98 kg right hand; 11.70 kg left hand. The patients had lost walking ability. After treatment, there was a statistically significant for scapular waist strength (P=0.001), pelvic waist strength (P=0.005) and walking ability (P=0.001). A statistically significant relationship in the regression analysis was found between the grip (right and left hands) and walking ability post-treatment (P=0.009; odds ratio 1.14 and P=0.0014 odds ratio 1.113 for each walking scale). The confounding variables showed no statistical significance in the results. Conclusion Grip strength is associated with walking ability in hospitalized frail elderly. Grip strength assessment by hydraulic dynamometry is useful in patients with poor collaboration. Walking ability training in frail elderly inpatients is useful. PMID:25395842

  14. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Danielle Christine; Thomas, Scott Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip (HG) exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP) among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT) HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets) and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex) of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm) that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep research is a novel HG exercise strategy with enhanced accessibility by being easy to understand and simple to execute. The long-term training effectiveness of MINT as an exercise

  15. Does visually induced self-motion affect grip force when holding an object?

    PubMed

    Bringoux, Lionel; Lepecq, Jean-Claude; Danion, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    Accurate control of grip force during object manipulation is necessary to prevent the object from slipping, especially to compensate for the action of gravitational and inertial forces resulting from hand/object motion. The goal of the current study was to assess whether the control of grip force was influenced by visually induced self-motion (i.e., vection), which would normally be accompanied by changes in object load. The main task involved holding a 400-g object between the thumb and the index finger while being seated within a virtual immersive environment that simulated the vertical motion of an elevator across floors. Different visual motions were tested, including oscillatory (0.21 Hz) and constant-speed displacements of the virtual scene. Different arm-loading conditions were also tested: with or without the hand-held object and with or without oscillatory arm motion (0.9 Hz). At the perceptual level, ratings from participants showed that both oscillatory and constant-speed motion of the elevator rapidly induced a long-lasting sensation of self-motion. At the sensorimotor level, vection compellingness altered arm movement control. Spectral analyses revealed that arm motion was entrained by the oscillatory motion of the elevator. However, we found no evidence that grip force used to hold the object was visually affected. Specifically, spectral analyses revealed no component in grip force that would mirror the virtual change in object load associated with the oscillatory motion of the elevator, thereby allowing the grip-to-load force coupling to remain unaffected. Altogether, our findings show that the neural mechanisms underlying vection interfere with arm movement control but do not interfere with the delicate modulation of grip force. More generally, those results provide evidence that the strength of the coupling between the sensorimotor system and the perceptual level can be modulated depending on the effector.

  16. Grip-force modulation in multi-finger prehension during wrist flexion and extension

    PubMed Central

    Ambike, Satyajit S.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    Extrinsic digit muscles contribute to both fingertip forces and wrist movements (FDP and FPL – flexion, EDC - extension). Hence it is expected that finger forces depend on the wrist movement and position. We investigated the relation between grip force and wrist kinematics to examine whether and how the force: (1) scales with wrist flexion-extension (FE) angle; (2) can be predicted from accelerations induced during FE movement. In one experiment subjects naturally held an instrumented handle using a prismatic grasp and performed very slow FE movements. In another experiment, the same movement was performed cyclically at three prescribed frequencies. In quasistatic conditions, the grip force remained constant over the majority of the wrist range of motion. During the cyclic movements, the grip force changed. The changes were described with a linear regression model that represents the thumb and virtual finger (VF = four fingers combined) normal forces as the sum of the effects of the object’s tangential and radial accelerations and an object-weight-dependent constant term. The model explained 99% of the variability in the data. The independence of the grip force from wrist position agrees with the theory that that the thumb and VF forces are controlled with two neural variables that encode referent coordinates for each digit while accounting for changes in the position dependence of muscle forces, rather than a single neural variable like referent aperture. The results of the cyclical movement study extend the principle of superposition (some complex actions can be decomposed into independently controlled elemental actions) for a motor task involving simultaneous grip force exertion and wrist motion with significant length changes of the grip-force producing muscles. PMID:23625077

  17. Grip-force modulation in multi-finger prehension during wrist flexion and extension.

    PubMed

    Ambike, Satyajit S; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2013-06-01

    Extrinsic digit muscles contribute to both fingertip forces and wrist movements (FDP and FPL-flexion, EDC-extension). Hence, it is expected that finger forces depend on the wrist movement and position. We investigated the relation between grip force and wrist kinematics to examine whether and how the force (1) scales with wrist flexion-extension (FE) angle and (2) can be predicted from accelerations induced during FE movement. In one experiment, subjects naturally held an instrumented handle using a prismatic grasp and performed very slow FE movements. In another experiment, the same movement was performed cyclically at three prescribed frequencies. In quasistatic conditions, the grip force remained constant over the majority of the wrist range of motion. During the cyclic movements, the grip force changed. The changes were described with a linear regression model that represents the thumb and virtual finger (VF = four fingers combined) normal forces as the sum of the effects of the object's tangential and radial accelerations and an object-weight-dependent constant term. The model explained 99 % of the variability in the data. The independence of the grip force from wrist position agrees with the theory that the thumb and VF forces are controlled with two neural variables that encode referent coordinates for each digit while accounting for changes in the position dependence of muscle forces, rather than a single neural variable like referent aperture. The results of the cyclical movement study extend the principle of superposition (some complex actions can be decomposed into independently controlled elemental actions) for a motor task involving simultaneous grip-force exertion and wrist motion with significant length changes of the grip-force-producing muscles.

  18. Extraction of time and frequency features from grip force rates during dexterous manipulation.

    PubMed

    Mojtahedi, Keivan; Fu, Qiushi; Santello, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The time course of grip force from object contact to onset of manipulation has been extensively studied to gain insight into the underlying control mechanisms. Of particular interest to the motor neuroscience and clinical communities is the phenomenon of bell-shaped grip force rate (GFR) that has been interpreted as indicative of feedforward force control. However, this feature has not been assessed quantitatively. Furthermore, the time course of grip force may contain additional features that could provide insight into sensorimotor control processes. In this study, we addressed these questions by validating and applying two computational approaches to extract features from GFR in humans: 1) fitting a Gaussian function to GFR and quantifying the goodness of the fit [root-mean-square error, (RMSE)]; and 2) continuous wavelet transform (CWT), where we assessed the correlation of the GFR signal with a Mexican Hat function. Experiment 1 consisted of a classic pseudorandomized presentation of object mass (light or heavy), where grip forces developed to lift a mass heavier than expected are known to exhibit corrective responses. For Experiment 2, we applied our two techniques to analyze grip force exerted for manipulating an inverted T-shaped object whose center of mass was changed across blocks of consecutive trials. For both experiments, subjects were asked to grasp the object at either predetermined or self-selected grasp locations ("constrained" and "unconstrained" task, respectively). Experiment 1 successfully validated the use of RMSE and CWT as they correctly distinguished trials with versus without force corrective responses. RMSE and CWT also revealed that grip force is characterized by more feedback-driven corrections when grasping at self-selected contact points. Future work will examine the application of our analytical approaches to a broader range of tasks, e.g., assessment of recovery of sensorimotor function following clinical intervention, interlimb

  19. Predicting hand function in older adults: evaluations of grip strength, arm curl strength, and manual dexterity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chiung-Ju; Marie, Deana; Fredrick, Aaron; Bertram, Jessica; Utley, Kristen; Fess, Elaine Ewing

    2017-08-01

    Hand function is critical for independence in activities of daily living for older adults. The purpose of this study was to examine how grip strength, arm curl strength, and manual dexterous coordination contributed to time-based versus self-report assessment of hand function in community-dwelling older adults. Adults aged ≥60 years without low vision or neurological disorders were recruited. Purdue Pegboard Test, Jamar hand dynamometer, 30-second arm curl test, Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test, and the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument were administered to assess manual dexterous coordination, grip strength, arm curl strength, time-based hand function, and self-report of hand function, respectively. Eighty-four adults (mean age = 72 years) completed the study. Hierarchical multiple regressions show that older adults with better arm curl strength (β = -.25, p < .01) and manual dexterous coordination (β = -.52, p < .01) performed better on the time-based hand function test. In comparison, older adults with better grip strength (β = .40, p < .01), arm curl strength (β = .23, p < .05), and manual dexterous coordination (β = .23, p < .05) were associated with better self-report of upper extremity function. The relationship between grip strength and hand function may be test-specific. Grip strength becomes a significant factor when the test requires grip strength to successfully complete the test tasks. Arm curl strength independently contributed to hand function in both time-based and self-report assessments, indicating that strength of extrinsic muscles of the hand are essential for hand function.

  20. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Danielle Christine; Thomas, Scott Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip (HG) exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP) among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT) HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets) and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex) of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm) that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep research is a novel HG exercise strategy with enhanced accessibility by being easy to understand and simple to execute. The long-term training effectiveness of MINT as an exercise

  1. The determination of the operating range of a twin-grip control yoke through biomechanical means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaertner, K. P.

    1978-01-01

    A twin-grip control yoke was designed as an ergonomic case study that allows dual axis control inputs, both axes being rotational. Inputs are effected by rotating the grips. How the handles were designed with respect to their shape and size and how the angular range of the control yoke in both rotational axes was evaluated. The control yoke which requires two-hand operation was tested to determine its operating range. The intention of this investigation was to find out the optimal form of the control yoke and the maximum permissible range in both rotating axes. In these experiments controls had no spring resistance.

  2. Association between floating toe and toe grip strength in school age children: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka, Seishiro; Matsubara, Keisuke; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Matsushita, Tomofumi; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the association between floating toe and toe grip strength. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 635 Japanese children aged 9–11 years participated in this study. Floating toe was evaluated using footprint images, while toe grip strength was measured using a toe grip dynamometer. All 1,270 feet were classified into a floating toe group and a normal toe group according to visual evaluation of the footprint images. Intergroup differences in toe grip strength were analyzed using the unpaired t-test and logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, and Rohrer Index. [Results] There were 512 feet (40.3%) in the floating toe group. Mean toe grip strength of the feet with floating toe was significantly lower than that of normal feet (floating toe group, 12.9 ± 3.7 kg; normal toe group, 13.6 ± 4.1 kg). In addition, lower toe grip strength was associated with floating toe on logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, gender, and Rohrer Index (odds ratio, 0.954; 95% confidence interval, 0.925–0.984). [Conclusion] This study revealed that lower toe grip strength was significantly associated with floating toe. Therefore, increasing toe grip strength may play a role in preventing floating toe in school age children. PMID:27630423

  3. Association between floating toe and toe grip strength in school age children: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Seishiro; Matsubara, Keisuke; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Matsushita, Tomofumi; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the association between floating toe and toe grip strength. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 635 Japanese children aged 9-11 years participated in this study. Floating toe was evaluated using footprint images, while toe grip strength was measured using a toe grip dynamometer. All 1,270 feet were classified into a floating toe group and a normal toe group according to visual evaluation of the footprint images. Intergroup differences in toe grip strength were analyzed using the unpaired t-test and logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, and Rohrer Index. [Results] There were 512 feet (40.3%) in the floating toe group. Mean toe grip strength of the feet with floating toe was significantly lower than that of normal feet (floating toe group, 12.9 ± 3.7 kg; normal toe group, 13.6 ± 4.1 kg). In addition, lower toe grip strength was associated with floating toe on logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, gender, and Rohrer Index (odds ratio, 0.954; 95% confidence interval, 0.925-0.984). [Conclusion] This study revealed that lower toe grip strength was significantly associated with floating toe. Therefore, increasing toe grip strength may play a role in preventing floating toe in school age children.

  4. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Melanie A; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2015-07-07

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up.

  5. The Effect of Priming With Questionnaire Content on Grip Strength in Patients With Hand and Upper Extremity Illness.

    PubMed

    Özkan, Sezai; Claessen, Femke M A P; Eberlin, Kyle R; Lee, Sang-Gil P; Ring, David C; Vranceanu, Ana-Maria

    2017-09-01

    Grip strength is a performance-based measure of upper extremity function that might be influenced by priming (the influence of a response to a stimulus by exposure to another stimulus). This study addressed the influence of questionnaire content on performance measurements such as grip strength between patients who complete the standard Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) compared with patients who complete a positively adjusted PCS. Between June 2015 and August 2015, we enrolled 122 patients who presented to 3 hand surgeons at 3 outpatient offices. They were randomized to 2 groups: the control group, which completed the PCS, and the intervention group, which completed a positively phrased version of the PCS. Before and after completion of the questionnaire, we measured each patient's grip strength 3 times by alternating between hands. Two patients were excluded after participation. We calculated both the preintervention and postintervention mean and maximum grip strengths. There was no significant difference between groups on mean or maximum grip strength before completion of the questionnaires. There was a greater improvement in mean grip strength of both hands in the intervention group compared with the PCS group. This improvement was statistically significant in the affected hand. The maximum grip strength showed a statistically significant greater improvement in both hands in the positive PCS group compared with the control group. Positive priming through a questionnaire leads to an increase in mean and maximum grip strength when compared with the standard questionnaire that uses negative terms rather than positive.

  6. The Association of Levels of and Decline in Grip Strength in Old Age with Trajectories of Life Course Occupational Position.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Hannes; Fritzell, Johan; Hoffmann, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    The study of the influence of life course occupational position (OP) on health in old age demands analysis of time patterns in both OP and health. We study associations between life course time patterns of OP and decline in grip strength in old age. We analyze 5 waves from the Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe (n = 5108, ages 65-90). We use a pattern-mixture latent growth model to predict the level and decline in grip strength in old age by trajectory of life course OP. We extend and generalize the structured regression approach to establish the explanatory power of different life course models for both the level and decline of grip strength. Grip strength declined linearly by 0.70 kg (95% CI -0.74;-0.66) for men and 0.42 kg (95% CI -0.45;-0.39) for women per year. The level of men's grip strength can best be explained by a critical period during midlife, with those exposed to low OP during this period having 1.67 kg (95% CI -2.33;-1.00) less grip strength. These differences remain constant over age. For women, no association between OP and levels of or decline in grip strength was found. Men's OP in midlife seems to be a critical period for the level of grip strength in old age. Inequalities remain constant over age. The integration of the structured regression approach and latent growth modelling offers new possibilities for life course epidemiology.

  7. Descriptive analysis of the developmental progression of grip position for pencil and crayon control in nondysfunctional children.

    PubMed

    Schneck, C M; Henderson, A

    1990-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the developmental progression in pencil and crayon grip. The subjects were 320 nondysfunctional children aged 3.0 to 6.11 years, with 20 boys and 20 girls at each 6-month age interval. On the basis of a review of the literature, developmental pencil and crayon grips were defined for the study, and the type of grips each child used to perform a drawing task and a coloring task were recorded. Many children at each age level used mature pencil grips. A developmental progression, however, was shown by the percentage change of children at each age level who used mature grips. Forty-eight percent of the youngest group used mature grips, compared with 90% of the oldest children. Two pencil grips-dynamic and lateral tripod-appear to be common in older children. Differences in the developmental progression of pencil grip were noted between boys and girls and between a drawing task and a coloring task.

  8. Does grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke reflect the strength of other ipsilateral muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Jumpei; Nishiyama, Toru; Matsushima, Yoshimasa

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Grip strength is used as an indicator of overall body muscular strength. However, most studies on grip strength have been performed in healthy people, and no study has evaluated it in the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine if grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke correlates with the strength of other ipsilateral musculature. [Subjects and Methods] The maximal strengths of the muscles on the unaffected side of 31 patients with hemiparetic stroke were measured, and correlation coefficients were calculated. [Results] The results revealed significant positive correlations between grip strength on the unaffected side and the strength of the other ipsilateral muscle groups, with relatively high correlations being observed for the upper extremity muscle groups. [Conclusion] This suggests that grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke can be used as a simple way to estimate overall strength on that side. PMID:28210040

  9. Does grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke reflect the strength of other ipsilateral muscles?

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jumpei; Nishiyama, Toru; Matsushima, Yoshimasa

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Grip strength is used as an indicator of overall body muscular strength. However, most studies on grip strength have been performed in healthy people, and no study has evaluated it in the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke. The purpose of this study was to determine if grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke correlates with the strength of other ipsilateral musculature. [Subjects and Methods] The maximal strengths of the muscles on the unaffected side of 31 patients with hemiparetic stroke were measured, and correlation coefficients were calculated. [Results] The results revealed significant positive correlations between grip strength on the unaffected side and the strength of the other ipsilateral muscle groups, with relatively high correlations being observed for the upper extremity muscle groups. [Conclusion] This suggests that grip strength on the unaffected side of patients with hemiparetic stroke can be used as a simple way to estimate overall strength on that side.

  10. Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Sara M.; Wright, Daniel J.; Day, Felix R.; Trajanoska, Katerina; Joshi, Peter K.; Morris, John A.; Matteini, Amy M.; Garton, Fleur C.; Grarup, Niels; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mangino, Massimo; Liu, Jun; Demirkan, Ayse; Lek, Monkol; Xu, Liwen; Wang, Guan; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Lotta, Luca A.; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Rivas, Manuel A.; White, Tom; Loh, Po-Ru; Aadahl, Mette; Amin, Najaf; Attia, John R.; Austin, Krista; Benyamin, Beben; Brage, Søren; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Cięszczyk, Paweł; Derave, Wim; Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik; Eynon, Nir; Linneberg, Allan; Lucia, Alejandro; Massidda, Myosotis; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Miyachi, Motohiko; Murakami, Haruka; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pandey, Ashutosh; Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Rajpal, Deepak K.; Sale, Craig; Schnurr, Theresia M.; Sessa, Francesco; Shrine, Nick; Tobin, Martin D.; Varley, Ian; Wain, Louise V.; Wray, Naomi R.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Pedersen, Oluf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiel, Douglas P.; Oei, Ling; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Leong, Aaron; Ahmad, Omar S.; Laurin, Charles; Mokry, Lauren E.; Ross, Stephanie; Elks, Cathy E.; Bowden, Jack; Warrington, Nicole M.; Murray, Anna; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Estrada, Karol; Bis, Joshua C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Demissie, Serkalem; Enneman, Anke W.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Kähönen, Mika; Kammerer, Candace; Lacroix, Andrea Z.; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching-Ti; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; Mägi, Reedik; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Moayyeri, Alireza; Nielson, Carrie M.; Sham, Pack Chung; Siggeirsdotir, Kristin; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Stefansson, Kari; Trompet, Stella; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van der Velde, Nathalie; Viikari, Jorma; Xiao, Su-Mei; Zhao, Jing Hua; Evans, Daniel S.; Cummings, Steven R.; Cauley, Jane; Duncan, Emma L.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; Esko, Tonu; Gudnason, Vilmundar; Harris, Tamara B.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Jukema, J Wouter; Ikram, Arfan M. A.; Karasik, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Lips, Paul; Luben, Robert; Metspalu, Andres; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Minster, Ryan L.; Orwoll, Erick; Oei, Edwin; Psaty, Bruce M.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Ralston, Stuart W.; Ridker, Paul M.; Robbins, John A.; Smith, Albert V.; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Tranah, Gregory J.; Thorstensdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Zmuda, Joseph; Zillikens, M Carola; Ntzani, Evangelia E.; Evangelou, Evangelos; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Evans, David M.; Ohlsson, Claes; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Fuku, Noriyuki; Franks, Paul W.; North, Kathryn N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Mather, Karen A.; Hansen, Torben; Hansson, Ola; Spector, Tim; Murabito, Joanne M.; Richards, J. Brent; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Langenberg, Claudia; Perry, John R. B.; Wareham, Nick J.; Scott, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Hand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of 195,180 individuals and identify 16 loci associated with grip strength (P<5 × 10−8) in combined analyses. A number of these loci contain genes implicated in structure and function of skeletal muscle fibres (ACTG1), neuronal maintenance and signal transduction (PEX14, TGFA, SYT1), or monogenic syndromes with involvement of psychomotor impairment (PEX14, LRPPRC and KANSL1). Mendelian randomization analyses are consistent with a causal effect of higher genetically predicted grip strength on lower fracture risk. In conclusion, our findings provide new biological insight into the mechanistic underpinnings of grip strength and the causal role of muscular strength in age-related morbidities and mortality.

  11. Finger-attachment device for the feedback of gripping and pulling force in a manipulating system for brain tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Chinbe, Hiroyuki; Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2017-07-10

    Development and evaluation of an effective attachment device for a bilateral brain tumor resection robotic surgery system based on the sensory performance of the human index finger in order to precisely detect gripping- and pulling-force feedback. First, a basic test was conducted to investigate the performance of the human index finger in the gripping- and pulling-force feedback system. Based on the test result, a new finger-attachment device was designed and constructed. Then, discrimination tests were conducted to assess the pulling force and the feedback on the hardness of the gripped material. The results of the basic test show the application of pulling force on the side surface of the finger has an advantage to distinguish the pulling force when the gripping force is applied on the finger-touching surface. Based on this result, a finger-attachment device that applies a gripping force on the finger surface and pulling force on the side surface of the finger was developed. By conducting a discrimination test to assess the hardness of the gripped material, an operator can distinguish whether the gripped material is harder or softer than a normal brain tissue. This will help in confirming whether the gripped material is a tumor. By conducting a discrimination test to assess the pulling force, an operator can distinguish the pulling-force resistance when attempting to pull off the soft material. Pulling-force feedback may help avoid the breaking of blood pipes when they are trapped in the gripper or attached to the gripped tissue. The finger-attachment device that was developed for detecting gripping- and pulling-force feedback may play an important role in the development of future neurosurgery robotic systems for precise and safe resection of brain tumors.

  12. Automated pressure map segmentation for quantifying phalangeal kinetics during cylindrical gripping

    PubMed Central

    Sinsel, Erik W.; Gloekler, Daniel S.; Wimer, Bryan M.; Warren, Christopher M.; Wu, John Z.; Buczek, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    Inverse dynamics models used to investigate musculoskeletal disorders associated with handle gripping require accurate phalangeal kinetics. Cylindrical handles wrapped with pressure film grids have been used in studies of gripping kinetics. We present a method fusing six degree-of-freedom hand kinematics and a kinematic calibration of a cylinder-wrapped pressure film. Phalanges are modeled as conic frusta and projected onto the pressure grid, automatically segmenting the pressure map into regions of interest (ROIs). To demonstrate the method, segmented pressure maps are presented from two subjects with substantially different hand length and body mass, gripping cylinders 50 and 70 mm in diameter. For each ROI, surface-normal force vectors were summed to create a reaction force vector and center of pressure location. Phalangeal force magnitudes for a data sample were similar to that reported in previous studies. To evaluate our method, a surrogate was designed for each handle such that when modeled as a phalanx it would generate a ROI around the cells under its supports; the classification F-score was above 0.95 for both handles. Both the human subject results and the surrogate evaluation suggest that the approach can be used to automatically segment the pressure map for quantifying phalangeal kinetics of the fingers during cylindrical gripping. PMID:26709291

  13. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512—Typical...

  14. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512—Typical...

  15. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512—Typical...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512—Typical...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512—Typical...

  18. Experimental study on the grip and hold strength for stanchions and handrails in buses.

    PubMed

    Uetake, Teruo; Shimoda, Masahiro

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effective use of stanchions and handrails in buses. We constructed experimental equipment resembling bus stanchions and handrails and examined the grip and hold strength exerted when used. The total number of subjects was 80: 30 elderly and 19 young males, and 22 elderly and 9 young females. The experimental equipment comprised four parts: a handle part to imitate safety devices in buses such as stanchions, handrails, and straps, which was pulled by a winch at a constant speed; and a load cell wired with an analyzing processor, which output the strength exerted. The handle part was designed to measure grip and hold strengths against pulling forces in three directions, that is, forward, in the direction of the back of the hand, and in the direction of the palm. The subjects were asked to grasp the handle part against a pulling force. The maximum grip and hold strengths were recorded and analyzed. The strengths when pulled forward were the largest independent of the sex and age of the subjects. The results indicate that standing bus passengers should grip the fixtures, such as a stanchion, with their right hand when they are standing on the right side in a bus facing the windows.

  19. Automated pressure map segmentation for quantifying phalangeal kinetics during cylindrical gripping.

    PubMed

    Sinsel, Erik W; Gloekler, Daniel S; Wimer, Bryan M; Warren, Christopher M; Wu, John Z; Buczek, Frank L

    2016-02-01

    Inverse dynamics models used to investigate musculoskeletal disorders associated with handle gripping require accurate phalangeal kinetics. Cylindrical handles wrapped with pressure film grids have been used in studies of gripping kinetics. We present a method fusing six degree-of-freedom hand kinematics and a kinematic calibration of a cylinder-wrapped pressure film. Phalanges are modeled as conic frusta and projected onto the pressure grid, automatically segmenting the pressure map into regions of interest (ROIs). To demonstrate the method, segmented pressure maps are presented from two subjects with substantially different hand length and body mass, gripping cylinders 50 and 70 mm in diameter. For each ROI, surface-normal force vectors were summed to create a reaction force vector and center of pressure location. Phalangeal force magnitudes for a data sample were similar to that reported in previous studies. To evaluate our method, a surrogate was designed for each handle such that when modeled as a phalanx it would generate a ROI around the cells under its supports; the classification F-score was above 0.95 for both handles. Both the human subject results and the surrogate evaluation suggest that the approach can be used to automatically segment the pressure map for quantifying phalangeal kinetics of the fingers during cylindrical gripping.

  20. Facilitation of corticospinal tract excitability by transcranial direct current stimulation combined with voluntary grip exercise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gi-Wook; Ko, Myoung-Hwan

    2013-08-26

    Previous studies have established that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a powerful technique for the deliberate manipulation of the activity of human cerebral cortex. Moreover, it has also been shown that the non-exhausted voluntary motor exercise increases the excitability of corticospinal tract. We conducted this study to define the facilitation effect following anodal tDCS combined with the voluntary grip exercise as compared with single use of tDCS or voluntary grip exercise. Our result showed that the combination of anodal tDCS with voluntary grip exercise produced a 2-fold increase in the amplitude of MEP as compared with single use of anodal tDCS or voluntary grip exercise. In conclusion, our result could indicate that the treatment outcomes of brain and neurorehabilitation using tDCS would be better when tDCS is combined with the appropriate method of voluntary exercise as compared with single use of tDCS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormal capacity for grip force control in patients with congenital insensitivity to pain.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Noritaka; Abe, Masaki O; Iwaya, Tsutomu; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP), which is an extremely rare sensory neuropathy, is defined as the absence of normal responses to noxious stimuli. Although motor function is not directly impaired in CIP patients, it is likely that the sensory deficit affects the motor control system. In order to characterize motor capacity in CIP patients, we here measured grip force and acceleration of a held object in 12 patients with CIP and 12 age-matched able-bodied subjects. The results demonstrated that the grip force during the object grasp-lift-holding task was significantly greater, less reproducibility and greater fluctuation in the acceleration of the object in CIP patients than in normal subjects. Moreover, some patients showed absence of temporal coupling between the grip and load force, suggesting that anticipatory modulation of the grip force was at least partly impaired. As far as the authors know, this is the first study to characterize motor control ability in patients with CIP. The observed abnormal motor capacity can be at least partly attributed to a lack of sensory inputs mediated by Aδ and unmyelinated C-, specifically C-tactile, fibers. The present results may provide information useful for the prevention of secondary injury and education for patients during the developmental stage.

  2. Gripping during climbing of arboreal snakes may be safe but not economical.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Greg; Jayne, Bruce C

    2014-08-01

    On the steep surfaces that are common in arboreal environments, many types of animals without claws or adhesive structures must use muscular force to generate sufficient normal force to prevent slipping and climb successfully. Unlike many limbed arboreal animals that have discrete gripping regions on the feet, the elongate bodies of snakes allow for considerable modulation of both the size and orientation of the gripping region. We quantified the gripping forces of snakes climbing a vertical cylinder to determine the extent to which their force production favoured economy or safety. Our sample included four boid species and one colubrid. Nearly all of the gripping forces that we observed for each snake exceeded our estimate of the minimum required, and snakes commonly produced more than three times the normal force required to support their body weight. This suggests that a large safety factor to avoid slipping and falling is more important than locomotor economy. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. An automatic approach and grip method of micro-particle in 3D space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Juan; Wu, Wenrong; Bi, Lie

    2017-03-01

    Micro-particle is hard to be observed as small scale and hard to be gripped as micro-force from substrate, an automatic approach and grip method of micro-particle in the guide of microscopic vision systems is proposed in the paper to grip micro-particle. First, the micro-gripper driven by electrostatic force is introduced and forces in gripping process are analyzed. Second, a micro-assembly robot composed of two microscopic vision systems is established to monitor micro-operation process and to operate micro-particle. Image features of micro-particle and micro-gripper end-effector are extracted by image feature extraction method to calculate relative position of micro-particle and micro-gripper in image space. Last, a movement control strategy in 3D space based on image Jacobian matrix is studied to control micro-gripper approach and align with micro-particle. Experimental results verified the effectiveness of proposed methods.

  4. Grip Force Control Is Dependent on Task Constraints in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Sui-Heung; Lo, Sing Kai; Chow, Susanna; Cheing, Gladys L.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive grip force (GF) is often found in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). However, their GF control may vary when task constraints are imposed upon their motor performance. This study aimed to investigate how their GF control changes in response to task demands, and to examine their tactile sensitivity. Twenty-one…

  5. How Predictive Is Grip Force Control in the Complete Absence of Somatosensory Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Dennis A.; Glasauer, Stefan; Hermsdorfer, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    Grip force control relies on accurate internal models of the dynamics of our motor system and the external objects we manipulate. Internal models are not fixed entities, but rather are trained and updated by sensory experience. Sensory feedback signals relevant object properties and mechanical events, e.g. at the skin-object interface, to modify…

  6. An association of dominant hand grip strength with some anthropometric variables in Indian collegiate population.

    PubMed

    Koley, Shyamal; Singh, Arvinder Pal

    2009-03-01

    The present study deals with the correlations of dominant hand grip strength and 12 anthropometric variables, namely, height, weight, BMI, upper arm length, forearm length, total arm length, hand breadth, hand length, upper arm circumference, forearm circumference, biceps skinfold and triceps skinfold in randomly selected 303 unrelated, normal, healthy students (151 males and 152 females) aged 18-25 years of Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, Punjab, India. The findings of the present study indicate a strong association of dominant right hand grip strength with all the anthropometric variables, except biceps skinfold in male students and with height (r = 0.200), weight (r = 0.275), BMI (p = 0.217), total arm length (p = 0.218) and upper arm circumference (r = 0.199) in female students. Statistically significant positive correlations were also found between dominant left hand grip strength and height (r = 0.275), weight (p = 0.537), BMI (p = 0.472), hand breadth (p = 0.464), upper arm circumference (r = 0.570), forearm circumference (p = 0.464) and triceps skinfold (p = 0.343) only in male students, but no such association was found between grip strength of left hand dominant female students with any of the twelve anthropometric variables. It may be concluded that hand dominance, especially of the right hand, has some close association with the anthropometric variables related to upper extremities.

  7. How Predictive Is Grip Force Control in the Complete Absence of Somatosensory Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Dennis A.; Glasauer, Stefan; Hermsdorfer, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    Grip force control relies on accurate internal models of the dynamics of our motor system and the external objects we manipulate. Internal models are not fixed entities, but rather are trained and updated by sensory experience. Sensory feedback signals relevant object properties and mechanical events, e.g. at the skin-object interface, to modify…

  8. The Effects of Unit Exercises on the Hand Grip Strength of Arm Wrestlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonca, Sezer S.; Engin, Çelikel B.; Serdar, Yücel A.; Mustafa, Karadag; Yüksel, Savucu

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the change in the hand grip strength of the male arm wrestlers before and after a unit of exercise. The participants of the research consist of sportsmen (n=16) of Firat University arm wrestling team in 18-25 age group. Within the scope of the research, all of the tests and measurements (age, length, body…

  9. Resultant tennis ball velocity as a function of off-center impact and grip firmness.

    PubMed

    Grabiner, M D; Groppel, J L; Campbell, K R

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between resistance to rotation about the longitudinal axis of a tennis racquet and post-impact ball velocity following off-center hits was investigated. Two conditions simulating the extremes of grip firmness (zero vs maximal) were compared. Tennis balls were released manually from a platform onto the racquet face from a height of 5.75 m and impacted at 10.62 m . s-1. Forty-one trials were filmed at 175 frames . s-1 and were digitized electronically. Results were subjected to a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) using transverse and longitudinal distances between the point of impact and the geometric center of the racquet face as covariates. MANCOVA results indicated no significant differences between post-impact ball velocity for the two conditions. Therefore, it was concluded that previously reported concepts regarding striking mass and grip rigidity are no longer tenable and that the influence of grip firmness in activities in which hand-held implements are used is important only in terms of post-impact implement control. Potential adverse physiological/anatomical effects related to over-gripping are suggested.

  10. Tennis: the influence of grip tightness on reaction impulse and rebound velocity.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B C

    1982-01-01

    The effect of grip firmness between a tennis racket and a mobile hitting arm on post-impact ball velocity and reaction impulse have been investigated. A pneumatically driven racket-arm was triggered by a stimulus from a photoelectric cell positioned at the exit nozzle of a ball machine so that impact occurred with the racket perpendicular to the path of the ball. Tennis balls were fired to strike each horizontally positioned racket at four locations: the geometric center of the strings, 5 cm from the center towards the distal end, 5 cm closer to the shaft from the center, and 5 cm above the center. The average horizontal velocity of the ball, both before and after impact, was determined by using stroboscope photography. Reaction impulse (the integral of the force recorded following impact over a period of 50 ms), collected using Kistler force transducers, was photographed from a storage oscilloscope and measured over the 50 ms with a digitizer. A non-significant increase in rebound coefficient and reaction impulse in the direction of the hit were recorded for central impacts with an increase in grip tension. The largest rebound coefficients, and therefore the rebounds with the highest velocity, occurred at the center of the strings with a tight grip. Decreases in rebound coefficients and increases in reaction impulses were recorded for off-center impacts when compared to the central impacts. Significant increases in rebound coefficients were recorded for an increase in grip pressure for off-center impacts.

  11. Precision Grip in Congenital and Acquired Hemiparesis: Similarities in Impairments and Implications for Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with congenital and acquired hemiparesis incur long-term functional deficits, among which the loss of prehension that may impact their functional independence. Identifying, understanding, and comparing the underlying mechanisms of prehension impairments represent an opportunity to better adapt neurorehabilitation. Objective: The present review aims to provide a better understanding of precision grip deficits in congenital and acquired hemiparesis and to determine whether the severity and type of fine motor control impairments depend on whether or not the lesions are congenital or acquired in adulthood. Methods: Using combinations of the following key words: fingertip force, grip force, precision grip, cerebral palsy, stroke, PubMed, and Scopus databases were used to search studies from 1984 to 2013. Results: Individuals with both congenital and acquired hemiparesis were able to some extent to use anticipatory motor control in precision grip tasks, even if this control was impaired in the paretic hand. In both congenital and acquired hemiparesis, the ability to plan efficient anticipatory motor control when the less-affected hand is used provides a possibility to remediate impairments in anticipatory motor control of the paretic hand. Conclusion: Surprisingly, we observed very few differences between the results of studies in children with congenital hemiplegia and stroke patients. We suggest that the underlying specific strategies of neurorehabilitation developed for each one could benefit the other. PMID:25071502

  12. Grip Force Control Is Dependent on Task Constraints in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Sui-Heung; Lo, Sing Kai; Chow, Susanna; Cheing, Gladys L.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive grip force (GF) is often found in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). However, their GF control may vary when task constraints are imposed upon their motor performance. This study aimed to investigate how their GF control changes in response to task demands, and to examine their tactile sensitivity. Twenty-one…

  13. Calpain-GRIP Signaling in Nucleus Accumbens Core Mediates the Reconsolidation of Drug Reward Memory.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jie; Li, Jia-Li; Han, Ying; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Xue, Yan-Xue; Zhang, Yàn; Zhang, Yán; Zhang, Li-Bo; Chen, Man-Li; Lu, Lin; Shi, Jie

    2017-09-13

    Exposure to drug-paired cues causes drug memories to be in a destabilized state and interfering with memory reconsolidation can inhibit relapse. Calpain, a calcium-dependent neutral cysteine protease, is involved in synaptic plasticity and the formation of long-term fear memory. However, the role of calpain in the reconsolidation of drug reward memory is still unknown. In the present study, using a conditioned place preference (CPP) model, we found that exposure to drug-paired contextual stimuli induced the activation of calpain and decreased the expression of glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core, but not shell, of male rats. Infusions of calpain inhibitors in the NAc core immediately after retrieval disrupted the reconsolidation of cocaine/morphine cue memory and blocked retrieval-induced calpain activation and GRIP1 degradation. The suppressive effect of calpain inhibitors on the expression of drug-induced CPP lasted for at least 14 d. The inhibition of calpain without retrieval 6 h after retrieval or after exposure to an unpaired context had no effects on the expression of reward memory. Calpain inhibition after retrieval also decreased cocaine seeking in a self-administration model and this effect did not recover spontaneously after 28 d. Moreover, the knock-down of GRIP1 expression in the NAc core by lentivirus-mediated short-hairpin RNA blocked disruption of the reconsolidation of drug cue memories that was induced by calpain inhibitor treatment. These results suggest that calpain activity in the NAc core is crucial for the reconsolidation of drug reward memory via the regulation of GRIP1 expression.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Calpain plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and long-term memory consolidation, however, its role in the reconsolidation of drug cue memory remains unknown. Using conditioned place preference and self-administration procedures, we found that exposure to drug-paired cues induced the

  14. Measurement error in grip and pinch force measurements in patients with hand injuries.

    PubMed

    Schreuders, Ton A R; Roebroeck, Marij E; Goumans, Janine; van Nieuwenhuijzen, Johan F; Stijnen, Theo H; Stam, Henk J

    2003-09-01

    There is limited documentation of measurement error of grip and pinch force evaluation methods. The purposes of this study were (1) to determine indexes of measurement error for intraexaminer and interexaminer measurements of grip and pinch force in patients with hand injuries and (2) to investigate whether the measurement error differs between measurements of the injured and noninjured hands and between experienced and inexperienced examiners. The subjects were a consecutive sample of 33 patients with hand injuries who were seen in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine of Erasmus MC-University Medical Center Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Repeated measurements were taken of grip and pinch force, with a short break of 2 to 3 minutes between sessions. For the grip force in 2 handle positions (distance between handles of 4.6 and 7.2 cm, respectively), tip pinch (with the index finger on top and the thumb below, with the other fingers flexed) and key pinch force (with the thumb on top and the radial side of the index finger below) data were obtained on both hands of the subjects by an experienced examiner and an inexperienced examiner. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), standard errors of measurement (SEMs), and associated smallest detectable differences (SDDs) were calculated and compared with data from previous studies. The reliability of the measurements was expressed by ICCs between .82 and .97. For grip force measurements (in the second handle position) by the experienced examiner, an SDD of 61 N was found. For tip pinch and key pinch, these values were 12 N and 11 N, respectively. For measurements by the inexperienced examiner, SDDs of 56 N for grip force and 13 N and 18 N for tip pinch and key pinch were found. Based on the SEMs and SDDs, in individual patients only relatively large differences in grip and pinch force measurements can be adequately detected between consecutive measurements. Measurement error did not differ between injured and

  15. Earthquakes and Ice Cores Point to Wet Feet at the NorthGRIP Deep Drill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl-Jensen, D.; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Gundestrup, N. S.

    2001-12-01

    A seismic broadband station was placed at the NorthGRIP deep drill site (75N, 42W) on the Greenland Ice Cap for the summer 2000. During the 2 month acquisition period 15 earthquakes with sufficient quality for Receiver Function analysis aimed at crust and mantle structure under NorthGRIP were recorded. The models are consistent with the presence of a thin sedimentary layer at the base of the ice. The seismic velocities in the sediments are lower than in the ice, indicating wet sediments. The results from the deep drilling program reveal high basal temperatures at the base of the 3080 m thick ice at NorthGRIP. The measured temperatures and the observed layer thickness' in the ice core indicate that there is basal melting of the order of 5 mm /yr. and that the geothermal heatflow is of the order of 100 mW/m2 (REF), much higher than expected. A detailed radio echo mapping of the bedrock show that NorthGRIP is located in a large, flat-bottomed valley, suggesting that the sediments observed are lacustrine. The thin layer of sediments cannot account for the unexpected high heatflow causing equally unexpected basal melting. The geology is presumed to be Precambrian. Heatflow determined in a similar way at the GRIP deep drill site (73N, 38W) is 51 mW/ m2 (Dahl-Jensen et al, 1998), more in line with expected values. Magnetic anomaly data do not indicate any volcanic structures, which could help explain the high heatflow. Gravity anomaly data show that NorthGRIP is located at the edge of marked gravity discontinuity. The cause of the discontinuity is not known, but "edge effects" could be speculated upon to be the cause of the high heatflow. D. Dahl-Jensen, N. Gundestrup, H. Miller, O. Watanabe, S.J. Johnsen, J.P. Steffensen, H.B. Clausen, A. Svensson, L.B. Larsen in press: The NorthGRIP drilling program. Annals of Glaciology, vol 35 D. Dahl-Jensen, K Mosegaard, N. Grundestrup, G.D. Clow, S.J. Johnson and N. Balling 1998: Past Temperatures Directly from the Greenland Ice

  16. Relation between hand grip strength, respiratory muscle strength and spirometric measures in male nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Asli; Ozkaya, Hilal; Tufan, Fatih; Akpinar, Timur Selçuk; Akin, Sibel; Bahat, Zumrut; Kaya, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Erten, Nilgün; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2014-09-01

    Adverse-outcomes related to sarcopenia are mostly mentioned as physical disability. As the other skeletal muscles, respiratory muscles may also be affected by sarcopenia. Respiratory muscle strength is known to affect pulmonary functions. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relations between extremity muscle strength, respiratory muscle strengths and spirometric measures in a group of male nursing home residents. Among a total of 104 male residents, residents with obstructive measures were excluded and final study population was composed of 62 residents. Mean age was 70.5 ± 6.7 years, body mass index: 27.7 ± 5.3 kg/m2 and dominant hand grip strength: 29.7 ± 6.5 kg. Hand grip strength was positively correlated with maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) (r = 0.35, p < 0.01 and r = 0.26, p < 0.05, respectively). In regression analysis, the only factor related to MIP was hand grip strength; among spirometric measures only parameter significantly related to grip strength was peak cough flow (PCF). The association of PCF with grip strength disappeared when MIP alone or "MIP and MEP" were included in the regression analysis. In the latter case, PCF was significantly associated only with MIP. We found peripheric muscle strength be associated with MIP and PCF but not with MEP or any other spirometric parameters. The relation between peripheral muscle strength and PCF was mediated by MIP. Our findings suggest that sarcopenia may affect inspiratory muscle strength earlier or more than the expiratory muscle strength. Sarcopenia may cause decrease in PCF in the elderly, which may stand for some common adverse respiratory complications.

  17. Enhanced independence: experiences after regaining grip function in people with tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Wangdell, Johanna; Carlsson, Gunnel; Fridén, Jan

    2013-01-01

    To explore how surgical reconstruction of grip affects everyday life for patients with tetraplegia, with special emphasis on patients perspective of their perceived changes. Qualitative method. Eleven people (aged 22-73) with tetraplegia who had undergone surgical reconstruction to restore grip function. Qualitative interviews were conducted 7-17 months after surgery and analysed using Grounded theory. The core concept describing the participants experienced gains after grip reconstructive surgery was "enhanced independence". It was associated with changes in both practical and psychological aspects of independence. Practical aspects identified were: "perform more activities", "smoother everyday life", "renewed ability to participate in social activities", "less dependence on assistance" and "less restricted by physical environment". Psychological aspects of independence included "regained privacy", "increased manageability", "regained identity", "recapture a part of the body" and "share positive experiences with relatives and friends". Encompassing all categories was the concept "self-efficacy in hand control". It was seen as a result included in the enhanced independency core but also as an important factor for the development of all the other categories. Participants in this study experienced enhanced independence after grip reconstructive surgery and rehabilitation. The enhanced independence included both practical and physical aspects and it influenced all domains using the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health model; body function and structure, activities, participation, personal factors and environmental factors. Implications for Rehabilitation Patients with tetraplegia experience grip reconstruction as a useful intervention, an enhanced independence, related to their improved hand control. The increased hand control impacted not only physical aspects but also practical and psychological aspects. It also influenced social and

  18. Analysis of the statistical methods used to detect submaximal effort with the five-rung grip strength test.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, Orit; Gutierrez, Zeida; Kokendofer, Emily

    2005-01-01

    Controversy exists in the literature concerning the ability of the five-rung grip test to identify submaximal effort. The purpose of this study was to analyze four methods commonly used to evaluate the shape of the curve generated by maximal versus submaximal efforts. Thirty hand therapy patients performed the five-rung grip test maximally and submaximally with both their injured and uninjured hands. Grip strength scores were recorded at each of the five-rung positions. Next, four methods were used to analyze the data 1) visual analysis, 2) analysis of variance, 3) normalization, and 4) calculation of the standard deviation across the five strength scores. Analysis by all methods demonstrated that there were no differences between the injured hand exerting maximal effort and the uninjured hand exerting submaximal effort. In all four methods, the five-rung grip strength test was unable to distinguish between the injured hand exerting maximal effort and the uninjured hand exerting submaximal effort. The results suggest that the five-rung grip strength test should not be used to determine sincerity of effort in people with hand injuries, and that the shape of the curve generated by the five-rung grip strength test may not be related to level of effort but rather to the amount of force generated by the gripping hand.

  19. Grip strength reference values for Canadians aged 6 to 79: Canadian Health Measures Survey, 2007 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Wong, Suzy L

    2016-10-19

    Grip strength is a measure of overall muscular strength and has been associated with disability, morbidity and mortality. Normative data are used to interpret an individual's grip strength measurements, but Canadian reference values are not available for a wide age range. The data pertain to 11,108 respondents aged 6 to 79 to the 2007-to-2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey, whose right-hand and left-hand grip strength were measured with a handgrip dynamometer. Quantile regression was used to develop reference equations for males and females for maximum, right-hand and left-hand grip strength for selected percentiles as a function of age, height and weight. Reference values for grip strength increased through childhood and adolescence, peaked around age 40, and then declined. Reference values were higher for males than for females; differences between the sexes were smaller during childhood than in adolescence and adulthood. Differences between reference values for maximum, right-hand and left-hand grip strength varied by age and sex. Based on a large, healthy, nationally representative sample, reference equations were developed for grip strength of Canadians from childhood to older adulthood. These equations can be used to determine the reference values that correspond to an individual of a given age, sex, height and weight.

  20. The development and validation of equations to predict grip force in the workplace: contributions of muscle activity and posture.

    PubMed

    Keir, Peter J; Mogk, Jeremy P M

    2005-08-15

    The inherent difficulty of measuring forces on the hand in ergonomic workplace assessments has led to the need for equations to predict grip force. A family of equations was developed, and validated, for the prediction of grip force using forearm electromyography (six finger and wrist muscles) as well as posture of the wrist (flexed, neutral and extended) and forearm (pronated, neutral, supinated). Inclusion of muscle activity was necessary to explain over 85% of the grip force variance and was further improved with wrist posture but not forearm posture. Posture itself had little predictive power without muscle activity (<1%). Nominal wrist posture improved predictive power more than the measured wrist angle. Inclusion of baseline muscle activity, the activity required to simply hold the grip dynamometer, greatly improved grip force predictions, especially at low force levels. While the complete model using six muscles and posture was the most accurate, the detailed validation and error analysis revealed that equations based on fewer components often resulted in a negligible reduction in predictive strength. Error was typically less than 10% under 50% of maximal grip force and around 15% over 50% of maximal grip force. This study presents detailed error analyses to both improve upon previous studies and to allow an educated decision to be made on which muscles to monitor depending on expected force levels, costs and error deemed acceptable by the potential user.

  1. An electromyographic study of the effect of hand grip sizes on forearm muscle activity and golf performance.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Hunter, Henry H; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike Chris

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the differences in surface electromyography (EMG) activity of two forearm muscles in the lead and trail arm at specific phases of the golf swing using a 7-iron with three different grip sizes among amateur and professional golfers. Fifteen right-handed male golfers performed five golf swings using golf clubs with three different grip sizes. Surface EMG was used to measure muscle activity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) on both forearms. There were no significant differences in forearm muscle activity when using the three golf grips within the group of 15 golfers (p > 0.05). When using the undersize grip, club head speed significantly increased (p = 0.044). During the backswing and downswing phases, amateurs produced significantly greater forearm muscle activity with all three grip sizes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, forearm muscle activity is not affected by grip sizes. However, club head speed increases when using undersize grips.

  2. Selective Linear-Regression Model for hand posture discrimination and grip force estimation using surface electromyogram signals.

    PubMed

    Yamanoi, Yusuke; Morishita, Soichiro; Kato, Ryu; Yokoi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the method of hand posture discrimination and grip force estimation by means of Selective Linear-Regression Model. Generally, myoelectric hands which discriminate hand posture and estimate grip force at the same time result in unsatisfying results because of complication of EMG signals. Therefore, most of myoelectric hands can control either the force or the posture. However, the proposed method is able to discriminate hand posture and to estimate grip force simultaneously while the accuracy results are achieved. In experiments, EMG signals were measured while hand posture and grip force were changing. As a result, it appears that EMG features increase monotonically with grip force. In addition, increasing forms of EMG features are different on each posture. Based on these experimental results, the authors propose the method for both discriminating hand posture and estimating grip force by means of several linear-regression models which utilize the relationship between the grip force and EMG features on each posture. To evaluate the effectiveness of this method, the failure rates of discrimination and the estimation errors of the proposed method were employed. The results indicate that failure rates and estimation errors are improved significantly.

  3. A feasibility study of implementing grip strength measurement into routine hospital practice (GRImP): study protocol.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Kinda; May, Carl; Patel, Harnish P; Baxter, Mark; Sayer, Avan A; Roberts, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip strength is a non-invasive marker of muscle strength, and low grip strength in hospital inpatients is associated with poor healthcare outcomes including longer length of stay, increased functional limitations, and mortality. Measuring grip strength is simple and inexpensive. However, grip strength measurement is not routinely used in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of implementing grip strength measurement into routine clinical practice. This feasibility study is a mixed methods design combining qualitative, quantitative, and economic elements and is based on the acute medical wards for older people in one hospital. The study consists of three phases: phase 1 will define current baseline practice for the identification of inpatients at high risk of poor healthcare outcomes, their nutrition, and mobility care through interviews and focus groups with staff as well as a review of patients' clinical records. Phase 2 will focus on the feasibility of developing and implementing a training programme using Normalisation Process Theory to enable nursing and medical staff to measure and interpret grip strength values. Following the training, grip strength will be measured routinely for older patients as part of admission procedures with the use of a care plan for those with low grip strength. Finally, phase 3 will evaluate the acceptability of grip strength measurement, its adoption, coverage, and basic costs using interviews and focus groups with staff and patients, and re-examination of clinical records. The results of this study will inform the translation of grip strength measurement from a research tool into clinical practice to improve the identification of older inpatients at risk of poor healthcare outcomes. Clinicaltrials.gov NCTO2447445.

  4. First flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Bain, H. M.; Amman, M.; Mochizuki, B. A.; Hoberman, J.; Olson, J.; Maruca, B. A.; Godbole, N. M.; Smith, D. M.; Sample, J.; Kelley, N. A.; Zoglauer, A.; Caspi, A.; Kaufmann, P.; Boggs, S.; Lin, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument is a balloon-borne telescope designed to study solar- are particle acceleration and transport. We describe GRIPS's first Antarctic long-duration flight in January 2016 and report preliminary calibration and science results. Electron and ion dynamics, particle abundances and the ambient plasma conditions in solar flares can be understood by examining hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray emission (20 keV to 10 MeV). Enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of are emissions in this energy range are needed to study particle acceleration and transport questions. The GRIPS instrument is specifically designed to answer questions including: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? GRIPS's key technological improvements over the current solar state of the art at HXR/gamma-ray energies, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), include 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulation collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs have spectral FWHM resolution of a few hundred keV and spatial resolution <1 mm3. For photons that Compton scatter, usually > 150 keV, the energy deposition sites can be tracked, providing polarization measurements as well as enhanced background reduction through Compton imaging. Each of GRIPS's detectors has 298 electrode strips read out with ASIC/FPGA electronics. In GRIPS's energy range, indirect imaging methods provide higher resolution than focusing optics or Compton imaging techniques. The MPRM gridimaging system has a single-grid design which provides twice the throughput of a bi-grid imaging system like RHESSI. The grid is

  5. First Flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Bain, H. M.; Amman, M.; Mochizuki, A. B.; Hoberman, J.; Olson, J.; Maruca, B. A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar ares (GRIPS) instrument is a balloon-borne telescope designed to study solar-flare particle acceleration and transport. We describe GRIPS's first Antarctic long-duration flight in January 2016 and report preliminary calibration and science results. Electron and ion dynamics, particle abundances and the ambient plasma conditions in solar flares can be understood by examining hard X-ray (HXR) and gamma-ray emission (20 keV to 10 MeV). Enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of flare emissions in this energy range are needed to study particle acceleration and transport questions. The GRIPS instrument is specifically designed to answer questions including: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? GRIPS's key technological improvements over the current solar state of the art at HXR/gamma-ray energies, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), include 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulation collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs have spectral FWHM resolution of a few hundred keV and spatial resolution less than 1cu mm. For photons that Compton scatter, usually greater or equal to 150 keV, the energy deposition sites can be tracked, providing polarization measurements as well as enhanced background reduction through Compton imaging. Each of GRIPS's detectors has 298 electrode strips read out with ASIC/FPGA electronics. In GRIPS's energy range, indirect imaging methods provide higher resolution than focusing optics or Compton imaging techniques. The MPRM grid-imaging system has a single-grid design which provides twice the throughput of a bi-grid imaging system

  6. Grip preference, dermatoglyphics, and hand use in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Hopkins, William D; Russell, Jamie L; Hostetter, Autumn; Pilcher, Dawn; Dahl, Jeremy F

    2005-09-01

    This paper examined the association between grip type, hand use, and fingerprint patterns in a sample of captive chimpanzees. Grip type for simple reaching was assessed for the left and right hand and classified as thumb-index, middle-index, or single-digit responses. Fingerprint patterns were characterized as whorls, loops, or arches on each finger. The results indicated that chimpanzees exhibit significantly more thumb-index responses for the right compared to the left hand. In addition, thumb-index responses were more prevalent for subjects that had a whorl compared to a loop or arch on their thumb. The results suggest that fingerprint patterns are associated with individual differences in grasping type in chimpanzees as well as some variation in hand use.

  7. Coefficient of variation in maximal and feigned static and dynamic grip efforts.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Z

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of the coefficient of variation as an identifier of feigned grip effort. Seventeen healthy female aged 20 to 25 yr participated in the study. Maximal and feigned efforts were measured isometrically and isokinetically (concentric and eccentric) using the Jamar and KinCom dynamometers, respectively. Findings indicated that, in all situations, the coefficient of variation derived from the maximal effort was significantly (P < 0.0001) lower than that derived from the feigned effort. However, the extent of overlapping between the two was sufficiently large to render the test sensitivities very low. Consequently, regardless of the measurement method, the coefficient of variation is not a valid tool for identifying feigned grip effort in healthy subjects.

  8. Grip Preference, Dermatoglyphics, and Hand Use in Captive Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, William D.; Russell, Jamie L.; Hostetter, Autumn; Pilcher, Dawn; Dahl, Jeremy F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examined the association between grip type, hand use, and fingerprint patterns in a sample of captive chimpanzees. Grip type for simple reaching was assessed for the left and right hand and classified as thumb-index, middle-index, or single-digit responses. Fingerprint patterns were characterized as whorls, loops, or arches on each finger. The results indicated that chimpanzees exhibit significantly more thumb-index responses for the right compared to the left hand. In addition, thumb-index responses were more prevalent for subjects that had a whorl compared to a loop or arch on their thumb. The results suggest that fingerprint patterns are associated with individual differences in grasping type in chimpanzees as well as some variation in hand use. PMID:15761856

  9. The relationship between hand anthropometrics, total grip strength and individual finger force for various handle shapes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Ku; Kim, Dae-Min

    2015-01-01

    The design and shape of hand tool handles are critical factors for preventing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) caused by the use of hand tools. We explored how these factors are related to total force and individual finger force in males and females with various hand anthropometrics. Using the MFFM system, we assessed four indices of anthropometry, and measured total force and individual finger force on various handle designs and shapes. Both total force and individual finger force were significant according to gender and handle shape. Total grip strength to the handle shape indicated the greatest strength with D shape and the least with A shape. From the regression analysis of hand anthropometric indices, the value of R was respectably high at 0.608-0.696. The current study examined the gender and handle shape factors affecting grip strength based on the force measurements from various handle types, in terms of influence on different hand anthropometric indices.

  10. Carpal bone movements in gripping action of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Sasaki, M; Hayashi, Y; Koie, H; Yamaya, Y; Kimura, J

    2001-02-01

    The movement of the carpal bones in gripping was clarified in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by means of macroscopic anatomy, computed tomography (CT) and related 3-dimensional (3-D) volume rendering techniques. In the gripping action, 3-D CT images demonstrated that the radial and 4th carpal bones largely rotate or flex to the radial and ulnar sides respectively. This indicates that these carpal bones on both sides enable the panda to flex the palm from the forearm and to grasp objects by the manipulation mechanism that includes the radial sesamoid. In the macroscopic observations, we found that the smooth articulation surfaces are enlarged between the radial carpal and the radius on the radial side, and between the 4th and ulnar carpals on the ulnar side. The panda skilfully grasps using a double pincer-like apparatus with the huge radial sesamoid and accessory carpal.

  11. Hurricane Observations with HAMSR in the GRIP and HS3 Field Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrigtsen, B.; Brown, S. E.; Behrangi, A.; Dang, H. T.

    2013-12-01

    The High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) is a microwave sounder similar to but more capable and accurate than current satellite microwave sounders. Since 2010 it has been adapted to fly on NASA's Global Hawk UAV and participated in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP hurricane field campaign in 2010 and is participating in the multiyear Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) hurricane campaign. We present results from GRIP and HS3, including an analysis of the development of the thermodynamic and precipitation structure of the inner core of Hurricane Karl during 13 hours of rapid intensification. Copyright 2013 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged. Warm core anomaly evolution in Karl during 10 hours of rapid intensification Nadir reflectivity across the eye of Karl during rapid intensification

  12. Grasping numbers: evidence for automatic influence of numerical magnitude on grip aperture.

    PubMed

    Namdar, Gal; Tzelgov, Joseph; Algom, Daniel; Ganel, Tzvi

    2014-06-01

    Previous research has shown that the fingers' aperture during grasp is affected by the numerical values of numbers embedded in the grasped objects: Numerically larger digits lead to larger grip apertures than do numerically smaller digits during the initial stages of the grasp. The relationship between numerical magnitude and visuomotor control has been taken to support the idea of a common underlying neural system mediating the processing of magnitude and the computation of object size for motor control. The purpose of the present study was to test whether the effect of magnitude on motor preparation is automatic. During grasping, we asked participants to attend to the colors of the digit while ignoring numerical magnitude. The results showed that numerical magnitude affected grip aperture during the initial stages of the grasp, even when magnitude information was irrelevant to the task at hand. These findings suggest that magnitude affects grasping preparation in an automatic fashion.

  13. Carpal bone movements in gripping action of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    ENDO, HIDEKI; SASAKI, MOTOKI; HAYASHI, YOSHIHIRO; KOIE, HIROSHI; YAMAYA, YOSHIKI; KIMURA, JUNPEI

    2001-01-01

    The movement of the carpal bones in gripping was clarified in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) by means of macroscopic anatomy, computed tomography (CT) and related 3-dimensional (3-D) volume rendering techniques. In the gripping action, 3-D CT images demonstrated that the radial and 4th carpal bones largely rotate or flex to the radial and ulnar sides respectively. This indicates that these carpal bones on both sides enable the panda to flex the palm from the forearm and to grasp objects by the manipulation mechanism that includes the radial sesamoid. In the macroscopic observations, we found that the smooth articulation surfaces are enlarged between the radial carpal and the radius on the radial side, and between the 4th and ulnar carpals on the ulnar side. The panda skilfully grasps using a double pincer-like apparatus with the huge radial sesamoid and accessory carpal. PMID:11273049

  14. Influence of vision and posture on grip-lift task parameters in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Dispa, Delphine; Tourbach, Catherine; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Lejeune, Thierry

    2014-12-01

    The grip-lift task enables a quantitative assessment of grasping ability. Patients are regularly assessed in a supine position, which offers a different view of the grasped object from that in the sitting position. To our knowledge, no data are currently available on the influence of posture and vision on grip-lift task parameters. We therefore aimed to determine the effects of posture and vision on these parameters. Twenty-six healthy right-handed adults performed grip-lift tasks with a manipulandum that measured different temporal and dynamic parameters in four conditions: sitting eyes open, sitting blindfolded, lying down eyes open and lying down blindfolded. A repeated-measures analysis of variance with two factors (vision and position) showed that the absence of vision affected all the parameters measured. The lying down position increased the time between the first contact with the object and the modification of the vertical force as well as the delay between the first increase of the horizontal force and the increase of the vertical force. In addition, there was a lower adaption of the horizontal force, required to squeeze the object, to the vertical force. Finally, the interaction of position and vision was associated with significant differences in the delay between the contact of each digit with the object, the maximum horizontal force and the ratio between the horizontal and vertical force during a static holding period. Both position and vision appear to affect the grip-lift task. Consequently, sequential assessments should be performed in the same condition to obtain reliable data.

  15. Effect of paddle grip on segmental fluid distribution in elite slalom paddlers.

    PubMed

    Bílý, Milan; Baláš, Jiří; Martin, Andrew John; Cochrane, Darryl; Coufalová, Klára; Süss, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Issues of high levels of muscular asymmetry have been associated with injury risk, and therefore have potential implications for decremental performance at the elite sport level. The aim of this current study was to assess the relationship between the segmental fluid distribution and the paddle grip in elite male and female slalom kayakers and canoeists. Eighty-four world-cup competitors (61 males and 23 females) took part in the study. Impedance analysis was used to assess segmental fluid asymmetry. The effect of paddle grip (loose/fixed hand in kayakers, lower/upper hand in canoeists), morphological dominance (dominant/non-dominant) and discipline (canoe/kayak) were evaluated by repeated measures ANOVA. The findings indicated a significant effect of paddle grip in canoeists on morphological asymmetry in upper limbs (arm of lower paddle hand mean fluid distribution 3.28, s=0.43 litres; arm of upper paddle hand mean fluid distribution 3.19, s=0.41 litres; P=0.000, [Formula: see text]=0.33). The sternmen demonstrated higher asymmetry between the arms of upper and lower paddle hand (mean 0.11, s=0.04 litres, P=0.000, [Formula: see text]=0.80) than the bowmen (mean 0.04, s=0.06 litres, P=0.015, [Formula: see text]=0.44) in double-canoes. Significant morphological asymmetry was found also in kayakers but the effect of paddle grip was not substantial. The use of segmental impedance analysis may be a suitable diagnostic tool for assessing morphological changes, which can be related to paddling training. Likewise muscular asymmetry is associated with injury risk; the evaluation of morphological changes during the training process may be considered by sport trainers and physical therapists.

  16. The impact of unilateral brain damage on anticipatory grip force scaling when lifting everyday objects.

    PubMed

    Eidenmüller, S; Randerath, J; Goldenberg, G; Li, Y; Hermsdörfer, J

    2014-08-01

    The scaling of our finger forces according to the properties of manipulated objects is an elementary prerequisite of skilled motor behavior. Lesions of the motor-dominant left brain may impair several aspects of motor planning. For example, limb-apraxia, a tool-use disorder after left brain damage is thought to be caused by deficient recall or integration of tool-use knowledge into an action plan. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether left brain damage affects anticipatory force scaling when lifting everyday objects. We examined 26 stroke patients with unilateral brain damage (16 with left brain damage, ten with right brain damage) and 21 healthy control subjects. Limb apraxia was assessed by testing pantomime of familiar tool-use and imitation of meaningless hand postures. Participants grasped and lifted twelve randomly presented everyday objects. Grip force was measured with help of sensors fixed on thumb, index and middle-finger. The maximum rate of grip force was determined to quantify the precision of anticipation of object properties. Regression analysis yielded clear deficits of anticipation in the group of patients with left brain damage, while the comparison of patient with right brain damage with their respective control group did not reveal comparable deficits. Lesion-analyses indicate that brain structures typically associated with a tool-use network in the left hemisphere play an essential role for anticipatory grip force scaling, especially the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the premotor cortex (PMC). Furthermore, significant correlations of impaired anticipation with limb apraxia scores suggest shared representations. However, the presence of dissociations, implicates also independent processes. Overall, our findings suggest that the left hemisphere is engaged in anticipatory grip force scaling for lifting everyday objects. The underlying neural substrate is not restricted to a single region or stream; instead it may rely on

  17. Relationship among maximal grip, throwing velocity and anthropometric parameters in elite water polo players.

    PubMed

    Ferragut, C; Vila, H; Abraldes, J A; Argudo, F; Rodriguez, N; Alcaraz, P E

    2011-03-01

    As independent aspects, body size, body composition, and physiological performance of elite athletes have aroused the interest of sports scientists but, unfortunately, studies that combine these aspects are scarcely avalaible in water polo. The aim of the present study was to: 1) to develop an anthropometric profile of highly skilled male Water Polo players, and 2) to identify significant relationships between these features and overhead throwing velocity in highly skilled male water polo players. Thirteen male water polo players, with a mean age of 26.10±4.82, were recruited from the Spanish Water Polo team and an anthropometric assessment on all of them was carried out. Throwing velocity was evaluated in three different situations from the 5 m-penalty line on the center of the water polo goal: A) throwing without a defender nor a goalkeeper; B) throwing with a goalkeeper only, and C) 3) armfuls running shot with goalkeeper. Maximal handgrip was also tested. Biacromial breadth shows a significative correlation with hand grip in water polo players (r=0.792; P=0.001) and also correlates with Throwing velocity (r=0.716; P<0.001). Biepicondylar femur breadth correlates significatively with hand grip (r=0.727; P<0.05) and also with throwing velocity in "throwing with goalkeeper" situation (r=0.664; P<0.05). Hand grip shows a significant correlation with throwing velocity in "throwing with goalkeeper" situation (r=0.603; P<0.05). In conclusion, body mass aspects are not related with throwing velocity in highly skilled Water Polo players. Maximal hand grip is related with throwing velocity in "throwing with goalkeeper" situation. More investigations about water polo are necessary.

  18. The Impact of Hand Grip Strength Exercises on the Target Shooting Accuracy Score for Archers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezer, Süreyya Yonca

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of hand grip strength exercises on the target shooting accuracy score for male archers. Thirty male archers (n1 = 15, 19.85 ± 1.35, n2 = 15 19.71 ± 1.31) ranging 18-20 years old were included in our study from the archery team of the city of Elazig, department of youth sports. The…

  19. Interactive Effects of Music Tempi and Intensities on Grip Strength and Subjective Affect.

    PubMed

    Karageorghis, Costas I; Cheek, Peter; Simpson, Stuart D; Bigliassi, Marcelo

    2017-09-16

    Pretask music is widely used by athletes albeit there is scant empirical evidence to support its use. The present study extended a line of work into pretask music by examining the interactive effects of music tempo and intensity (volume) on the performance of a simple motor skill and subjective affect. A 2 × 2 within-subjects factorial design was employed with an additional no-music control, the scores from which were used as a covariate. A sample of 52 male athletes (age = 26.1 ± 4.8 years) was exposed to five conditions: fast/loud (126 bpm/80 dBA), fast/quiet (126 bpm/70 dBA), slow/loud (87 bpm/80 dBA), slow/quiet (87 bpm/70 dBA) music, and a no-music control. Dependent variables were grip strength, measured with a handgrip dynamometer, and subjective affect, assessed by use of the Affect Grid. The tempo and intensity components of music had interactive effects for grip strength but only main effects for subjective affect. Fast-tempo music played at a high intensity yielded the highest grip strength, while fast-tempo music played at a low intensity resulted in much lower grip strength (M diff. = -1.11 Force kg). For affective valence, there were main effects of tempo and intensity, with fast and loud music yielding the highest scores. For affective arousal, there was no difference between tempi although there was between intensities, with the high-intensity condition yielding higher scores. The present findings indicate the utility of fast/loud pre-task music in enhancing affective valence and arousal in preparation for a simple or gross motor task. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Muscle grip strength predicts incident type 2 diabetes: Population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Li, Joule J; Wittert, Gary A; Vincent, Andrew; Atlantis, Evan; Shi, Zumin; Appleton, Sarah L; Hill, Catherine L; Jenkins, Alicia J; Januszewski, Andrzej S; Adams, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    To determine the longitudinal relationship of muscle mass and strength with incident type 2 diabetes, and previously unstudied mediating effects of testosterone and inflammation. Community-dwelling male participants (aged ≥35years) of the Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress (MAILES) Study underwent biomedical assessment in 2002-2006 and 2007-2010, including hand grip strength (dynamometer), testosterone and inflammatory markers. Body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) was assessed at baseline only. Incident type 2 diabetes was defined as a self-reported doctor diagnosis, diabetes medication use, fasting plasma glucose ≥7.0mmol/L, or glycated haemoglobin ≥6.5% (48mmol/mol) at follow-up, that was not present at baseline. Of n=1632 men, incident type 2 diabetes occurred in 146 (8.9%). Muscle mass was not associated with incident type 2 diabetes. Grip strength was inversely associated with incident type 2 diabetes [unadjusted odds ratio (OR) per 5kg: 0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.80-0.95; adjusted OR, 95% CI: 0.87, 0.78-0.97]. Arm muscle quality (grip strength divided by arm lean mass) was similarly associated with incident type 2 diabetes. Testosterone, IL-6 and TNF-α did not significantly mediate the associations. The population attributable fraction of type 2 diabetes from low grip strength was 27% (13-40%), assuming intervention could increase strength by 25%. Reduced muscle strength, but not reduced muscle mass, is a risk factor for incident type 2 diabetes in men. This is not mediated by testosterone or inflammation. Intervention could prevent a substantial proportion of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immediate effects of forearm elastic and nonelastic taping on wrist flexor muscle and grip strength of normal adults

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Shin, Young-Jun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of forearm elastic taping on grip and wrist flexor muscle strength. [Subjects and Methods] This was a single-blind, crossover study. This study selected 40 healthy subjects with no history of orthopedic disorders and was conducted after consent to participate was obtained. Grip and wrist flexor muscle strength of subjects were assessed by a handheld dynamometer and a Commander Muscle Tester, respectively, with forearm elastic taping or nonelastic taping. [Results] After application of forearm elastic taping, grip strength and wrist flexor muscle strength significantly increased compared with the nonelastic taping group. [Conclusion] Application of forearm elastic taping is considered to have positive effects on improving wrist and grip strength. PMID:27821932

  2. Arm function after stroke. An evaluation of grip strength as a measure of recovery and a prognostic indicator.

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, A; Tinson, D; Bradley, L; Hewer, R L

    1989-01-01

    The value of strength of voluntary grip as an indicator of recovery of arm function was assessed by testing 38 recent stroke patients using a sensitive electronic dynamometer, and comparing the results with those from five other arm movement and function tests (Motricity Index, Motor Club Assessment, Nine Hole Peg Test, and Frenchay Arm Test). This procedure allowed measurement of grip in a large proportion of patients, and strength correlated highly with performance on the other tests. Measuring grip over a six month follow up period was a sensitive method of charting intrinsic neurological recovery. The presence of voluntary grip at one month indicates that there will be some functional recovery at six months. PMID:2592969

  3. Computerized hand grip myometry reliably measures myotonia and muscle strength in myotonic dystrophy (DM1).

    PubMed

    Moxley, Richard T; Logigian, Eric L; Martens, William B; Annis, Chris L; Pandya, Shree; Moxley, Richard T; Barbieri, Cheryl A; Dilek, Nuran; Wiegner, Allen W; Thornton, Charles A

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a reliable, sensitive, quantitative measure of grip myotonia and strength and to determine whether CTG repeat length is correlated with grip myotonia and with muscle strength in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Three maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs) of the finger flexors (i.e., handgrip) were recorded on 2 successive days using a computerized handgrip myometer in 29 genetically confirmed DM1 patients and 17 normals. An automated computer program calculated MVIC peak force (PF) and relaxation times (RTs) along the declining (relaxation) phase of the force recordings at 90%, 75%, 50%, 10%, and 5% of PF. Patients also underwent quantitative strength testing (QST) manual muscle testing (MMT). The patients had longer grip RTs and lower PFs than normals. RT (90% to 5%) was above the normal mean +2.5 SD in 25 (86%) patients. In DM1, prolongation of RT was mainly in the terminal (50% to 5%), rather than the initial (90% to 50%) phase of relaxation. PFs and RTs for each patient were reproducible on consecutive days. RTs were positively correlated with leukocyte CTG repeat length, whereas measures of muscle strength, such as PF, QST, and MMT, were negatively correlated with repeat length. We conclude that computerized handgrip myometry provides a sensitive, reliable measure of myotonia and strength in DM1 and offers a method to assess natural history and response to treatment.

  4. Role of stag beetle jaw bending and torsion in grip on rivals

    PubMed Central

    Goyens, Jana; Dirckx, Joris; Piessen, Maxim; Aerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In aggressive battles, the extremely large male stag beetle jaws have to withstand strongly elevated bite forces. We found several adaptations of the male Cyclommatus metallifer jaw morphology for enhanced robustness that conspecific females lack. As a result, males improve their grip on opponents and they maintain their safety factor (5.2–7.2) at the same level as that of females (6.8), despite their strongly elevated bite muscle force (3.9 times stronger). Males have a higher second moment of area and torsion constant than females, owing to an enhanced cross-sectional area and shape. These parameters also increase faster with increasing bending moment towards the jaw base in males than in females. Male jaws are more bending resistant against the bite reaction force than against perpendicular forces (which remain lower in battles). Because of the triangular cross section of the male jaw base, it twists more easily than it bends. This torsional flexibility creates a safety system against overload that, at the same time, secures a firm grip on rivals. We found no structural mechanical function of the large teeth halfway along the male jaws. Therefore, it appears that the main purpose of these teeth is a further improvement of grip on rivals. PMID:26763329

  5. A simple technique to study embodied language processes: the grip force sensor.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Tatjana A; Hrycyk, Lianna; Moreau, Quentin; Frak, Victor; Cheylus, Anne; Ott, Laurent; Lindemann, Oliver; Fischer, Martin H; Paulignan, Yves; Delevoye-Turrell, Yvonne

    2017-02-01

    Research in cognitive neuroscience has shown that brain structures serving perceptual, emotional, and motor processes are also recruited during the understanding of language when it refers to emotion, perception, and action. However, the exact linguistic and extralinguistic conditions under which such language-induced activity in modality-specific cortex is triggered are not yet well understood. The purpose of this study is to introduce a simple experimental technique that allows for the online measure of language-induced activity in motor structures of the brain. This technique consists in the use of a grip force sensor that captures subtle grip force variations while participants listen to words and sentences. Since grip force reflects activity in motor brain structures, the continuous monitoring of force fluctuations provides a fine-grained estimation of motor activity across time. In other terms, this method allows for both localization of the source of language-induced activity to motor brain structures and high temporal resolution of the recorded data. To facilitate comparison of the data to be collected with this tool, we present two experiments that describe in detail the technical setup, the nature of the recorded data, and the analyses (including justification about the data filtering and artifact rejection) that we applied. We also discuss how the tool could be used in other domains of behavioral research.

  6. Communication skills training for general practitioners to promote patient coping: the GRIP approach.

    PubMed

    Mjaaland, Trond A; Finset, Arnstein

    2009-07-01

    To develop, perform and test the effects of a communication skills training program for general practitioners (GPs). The program specifically addresses the patients' coping and resources despite more or less severe psychological or physical illness. A training model was developed, based on cognitive therapy and solution-focused therapy. The training was given the acronym GRIP after its main content: Get a measure of the patient's subjective complaints and illness attributions. Respond to the patient's understanding of the complaints. Identify resources and solutions. Promote positive coping. The study involved a quasi-experimental design in which 266 consultations with 25 GPs were video recorded. Forty hours of communication skills training were given to the intervention group. Consultation duration, patient age and distress determined the frequency of the GRIP communication. There was a significant effect of training on four particular subcategories of the GRIP techniques. The effect of the training was most evident in a subgroup of GPs who used little or no resource-oriented communication before training. This pilot training model may help change the GPs' communicative pattern with patients in some situations. Communication skills training programmes that emphasize patient attributions and personal resources should be developed further and tested in general practice settings with an aim to promote patient coping.

  7. Automatic motor cortex activation for natural as compared to awkward grips of a manipulable object.

    PubMed

    Petit, Leila S; Pegna, Alan J; Harris, Irina M; Michel, Christoph M

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that, relative to natural objects, man-made object representations in the brain are more specifically defined by functional properties that reflect how an object is used and/or what it is used for (Warrington and Shallice 1984). We recorded 123-channel event-related potentials (ERP) in healthy participants during a mental rotation task involving a manipulable (hammer) and a non-manipulable (church) object. Both stimuli had standard and mirror-image versions rotated in four different orientations, resulting for the manipulable object in some natural and some awkward grips. Using spatial cluster analysis, time periods were determined during which the ERP maps differed between stimulus conditions. Specific maps appeared for natural versus awkward grips with the manipulable object at a very early stage (60-116 ms) as well as during a later stage (180-280 ms). Source estimations derived from the topographic data indicated that during the second time window the left motor cortex was significantly activated in the case of natural grips. We argue that the motor programs that are semantically associated with the object are automatically activated when it is presented in graspable orientations.

  8. Development and evaluation of an optimization-based model for power-grip posture prediction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Wook; Zhang, Xudong

    2005-08-01

    An optimization-based model for power-grip posture prediction was proposed. The model was based on the premise that the hand prehensile configuration in a power grip best conforms to the object shape. This premise was embodied by an optimization procedure that minimized the sum of distances from the finger joints to the object surface. The model was evaluated against data from an experiment that measured the grasp postures of 28 subjects having diverse anthropometry. The intra- and inter-person variabilities in grip postures were empirically assessed and used as benchmark values for model evaluation. The evaluation showed that the root-mean-square (RMS) values of angle differences between the predicted and measured postures had a 13.7 degrees grand mean (across all joints, subjects, and two cylindrical handles grasped), whereas the RMS values of the inter- and intra-person variabilities in measured postures had grand means of 13.0 degrees and 4.4 degrees , respectively. The model can be readily generalized to the prediction of postures in power-grasping objects of different shapes, and adapted for testing alternative prehensile strategies or performance criteria.

  9. The use of clamping grips and friction pads by tree frogs for climbing curved surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Aihong; Yuan, Shanshan; Hill, Iain; Wang, Huan; Barnes, W. Jon P.; Dai, Zhendong; Sitti, Metin

    2017-01-01

    Most studies on the adhesive mechanisms of climbing animals have addressed attachment against flat surfaces, yet many animals can climb highly curved surfaces, like twigs and small branches. Here we investigated whether tree frogs use a clamping grip by recording the ground reaction forces on a cylindrical object with either a smooth or anti-adhesive, rough surface. Furthermore, we measured the contact area of fore and hindlimbs against differently sized transparent cylinders and the forces of individual pads and subarticular tubercles in restrained animals. Our study revealed that frogs use friction and normal forces of roughly a similar magnitude for holding on to cylindrical objects. When challenged with climbing a non-adhesive surface, the compressive forces between opposite legs nearly doubled, indicating a stronger clamping grip. In contrast to climbing flat surfaces, frogs increased the contact area on all limbs by engaging not just adhesive pads but also subarticular tubercles on curved surfaces. Our force measurements showed that tubercles can withstand larger shear stresses than pads. SEM images of tubercles revealed a similar structure to that of toe pads including the presence of nanopillars, though channels surrounding epithelial cells were less pronounced. The tubercles' smaller size, proximal location on the toes and shallow cells make them probably less prone to buckling and thus ideal for gripping curved surfaces. PMID:28228509

  10. Observations During GRIP from HIRAD: Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Jones, L.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Bailey, M. C.; Buckley, C. D.; Simmons, D. E.; Johnstone, S.; Peterson, A.; Schultz, L. A.; Biewas, S.; Johnson, J. W.; Shah, G.; Feingstein, D.; Cleveland, W. H.; Johnson, J.; Hood, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    HIRAD (Hurricane Imaging Radiometer) flew on the WB-57 during NASA's GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be inferred. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years. The advantage of HIRAD over SFMR is that HIRAD can observe a +/- 60-degree swath, rather than a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. To the extent possible, comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  11. The use of clamping grips and friction pads by tree frogs for climbing curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Endlein, Thomas; Ji, Aihong; Yuan, Shanshan; Hill, Iain; Wang, Huan; Barnes, W Jon P; Dai, Zhendong; Sitti, Metin

    2017-02-22

    Most studies on the adhesive mechanisms of climbing animals have addressed attachment against flat surfaces, yet many animals can climb highly curved surfaces, like twigs and small branches. Here we investigated whether tree frogs use a clamping grip by recording the ground reaction forces on a cylindrical object with either a smooth or anti-adhesive, rough surface. Furthermore, we measured the contact area of fore and hindlimbs against differently sized transparent cylinders and the forces of individual pads and subarticular tubercles in restrained animals. Our study revealed that frogs use friction and normal forces of roughly a similar magnitude for holding on to cylindrical objects. When challenged with climbing a non-adhesive surface, the compressive forces between opposite legs nearly doubled, indicating a stronger clamping grip. In contrast to climbing flat surfaces, frogs increased the contact area on all limbs by engaging not just adhesive pads but also subarticular tubercles on curved surfaces. Our force measurements showed that tubercles can withstand larger shear stresses than pads. SEM images of tubercles revealed a similar structure to that of toe pads including the presence of nanopillars, though channels surrounding epithelial cells were less pronounced. The tubercles' smaller size, proximal location on the toes and shallow cells make them probably less prone to buckling and thus ideal for gripping curved surfaces.

  12. Role of stag beetle jaw bending and torsion in grip on rivals.

    PubMed

    Goyens, Jana; Dirckx, Joris; Piessen, Maxim; Aerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In aggressive battles, the extremely large male stag beetle jaws have to withstand strongly elevated bite forces. We found several adaptations of the male Cyclommatus metallifer jaw morphology for enhanced robustness that conspecific females lack. As a result, males improve their grip on opponents and they maintain their safety factor (5.2-7.2) at the same level as that of females (6.8), despite their strongly elevated bite muscle force (3.9 times stronger). Males have a higher second moment of area and torsion constant than females, owing to an enhanced cross-sectional area and shape. These parameters also increase faster with increasing bending moment towards the jaw base in males than in females. Male jaws are more bending resistant against the bite reaction force than against perpendicular forces (which remain lower in battles). Because of the triangular cross section of the male jaw base, it twists more easily than it bends. This torsional flexibility creates a safety system against overload that, at the same time, secures a firm grip on rivals. We found no structural mechanical function of the large teeth halfway along the male jaws. Therefore, it appears that the main purpose of these teeth is a further improvement of grip on rivals.

  13. Nutritional status is strongly correlated with grip strength and depression in community-living elderly Japanese.

    PubMed

    Kaburagi, Tomoko; Hirasawa, Reiko; Yoshino, Haruka; Odaka, Yukino; Satomi, Mariko; Nakano, Mana; Fujimoto, Eka; Kabasawa, Kazuyuki; Sato, Kazuto

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the utility of the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA) in assessing nutritional, physical and psychosocial functions in community-living elderly individuals. A cross-sectional study of elderly individuals investigated in August 2007 and August-September 2008. Nutritional status was assessed using serum biomarkers, anthropometric measurements and the MNA. Physical function was assessed by measuring grip strength and both usual and maximum walking speeds. The Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) was used to measure the individual's depressive state. Elder-care facilities in Tokyo, Japan. Community-living elderly individuals aged ≥65 years (n 130). The MNA evaluation classified twenty-seven (20·8 %) individuals as being at risk for malnutrition (MNA score ≤23·5); these at-risk individuals included a high proportion of the elderly aged ≥75 years. MNA scores correlated with nutritional biomarkers (total protein, albumin, cholinesterase, Hb) and anthropometric measurements (triceps skinfold, subscapular skinfold, mid-arm muscle area) and exhibited a strong correlation with grip strength and GDS score. Multivariate analysis revealed that grip strength, GDS score, marital status and maximum walking speed are strong predictors of MNA score. The MNA is considerably useful in providing a comprehensive assessment of nutritional status in elderly, community-living Japanese. However, larger-scale epidemiological studies are needed to determine the utility and the appropriate cut-off point of the MNA as a screen for risk of malnutrition.

  14. Substrate diameter and compliance affect the gripping strategies and locomotor mode of climbing boa constrictors.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Greg; Jayne, Bruce C

    2010-12-15

    Arboreal habitats pose unique challenges for locomotion as a result of their narrow cylindrical surfaces and discontinuities between branches. Decreased diameter of branches increases compliance, which can pose additional challenges, including effects on stability and energy damping. However, the combined effects of substrate diameter and compliance are poorly understood for any animal. We quantified performance, kinematics and substrate deformation while boa constrictors (Boa constrictor) climbed vertical ropes with three diameters (3, 6 and 9 mm) and four tensions (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 body weights). Mean forward velocity decreased significantly with both decreased diameter and increased compliance. Both diameter and compliance had numerous effects on locomotor kinematics, but diameter had larger and more pervasive effects than compliance. Locomotion on the largest diameter had a larger forward excursion per cycle, and the locomotor mode and gripping strategy differed from that on the smaller diameters. On larger diameters, snakes primarily applied opposing forces at the same location on the rope to grip. By contrast, on smaller diameters forces were applied in opposite directions at different locations along the rope, resulting in increased rope deformation. Although energy is likely to be lost during deformation, snakes might use increased surface deformation as a strategy to enhance their ability to grip.

  15. Cortical activation during power grip task with pneumatic pressure gauge: an fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, M.; Mardan, N. H.; Ismail, S. S.

    2017-05-01

    Aging is associated with a decline in cognitive and motor function. But, the relationships with motor performance are less well understood. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to assess cortical activation in older adults. This study employed power grip task that utilised block paradigm consisted of alternate 30s rest and active. A visual cue was used to pace the hand grip movement that clenched a cylindrical rubber bulb connected with pressure pneumatic gauge that measure the pressure (Psi). The objective of this study is determined the brain areas activated during motor task and the correlation between percentage signal change of each motor area (BA 4 and 6) and hand grip pressure. Result showed there was a significant difference in mean percentage signal change in BA 4 and BA 6 in both hemispheres and negative correlation obtained in BA 4 and BA 6. These results indicate that a reduced ability in the motor networks contribute to age-related decline in motor performance.

  16. Flash Detection Efficiencies of Long Range Lightning Detection Networks During GRIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte G.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We flew our Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) on the NASA Global Hawk as a part of the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field program. The GRIP program was a NASA Earth science field experiment during the months of August and September, 2010. During the program, the LIP detected lighting from 48 of the 213 of the storms overflown by the Global Hawk. The time and location of tagged LIP flashes can be used as a "ground truth" dataset for checking the detection efficiency of the various long or extended range ground-based lightning detection systems available during the GRIP program. The systems analyzed included Vaisala Long Range (LR), Vaisala GLD360, the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), and the Earth Networks Total Lightning Network (ENTLN). The long term goal of our research is to help understand the advantages and limitations of these systems so that we can utilize them for both proxy data applications and cross sensor validation of the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) sensor when it is launched in the 2015 timeframe.

  17. Effects of Tactile Sensitivity on Structural Variability of Digit Forces during Stable Precision Grip

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Na

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fingertip tactile sensitivity on the structural variability of thumb and index finger forces during stable precision grip. Thirty right-handed healthy subjects participated in the experiment. Transient perturbation of tactile afferents was achieved by wrapping up the distal pads of the thumb or index finger with transparent polyethylene films. The time-dependent structure of each digit force and the variability of interdigit force correlation were examined by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA), respectively. Results showed that the tactile sensitivity affected αDFA of the vertical shear force Fx (F3,239 = 6.814, p < 0.001) and αDCCA of Fx (χ2 = 16.440, p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in αDFA or αDCCA of the normal forces produced by the thumb or index finger. These results suggested that with blurred tactile sensory inputs the central nervous system might decrease the vertical shear force flexibility and increase the interdigit shear force coupling in order to guarantee a stable grip control of an object against gravity. This study shed light on the feedback and feed-forward strategies involved in digit force control and the role of SA-II afferent fibers in regulation of vertical shear force variability for precision grip. PMID:27847823

  18. The size of the visual size cue used for programming manipulative forces during precision grip.

    PubMed

    Mon-Williams, M; Murray, A H

    2000-12-01

    We used a perturbation technique to quantify the contribution of visual size cues to the programming of target force when lifting an object. Our results indicate that the nervous system attaches a reasonable weight to visual size cues when programming the target grip force for a novel object. In a subsequent lift of the same object, however, the confidence attached to the visual size cue fell dramatically. It is not clear whether the decrease in the use of size information was accelerated by the presence of a cue conflict or whether the fall represents the normal shift towards the use of a memory-based representation for programming grip force. In a second experiment, we used the "size-weight illusion" to explore the relationship between the verbal report of an object's weight and the programming of the grip and load force. We found that erroneous motor programming (as indexed by a number of measures) was neither necessary nor sufficient for the size-weight illusion to occur. These findings call for a re-evaluation of a previous explanation for the size-weight illusion. We suggest that the illusion arises because the cognitive system attempts to rationalise the fact that objects of apparently equal density but different size feel as if they have the same weight.

  19. Force control deficits in chronic stroke: grip formation and release phases.

    PubMed

    Naik, Sagar K; Patten, Carolynn; Lodha, Neha; Coombes, Stephen A; Cauraugh, James H

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a novel approach for quantifying stair-stepping in a trajectory tracking task with the goal of understanding how age and stroke-related differences in motor control contribute to force control deficits. Nine stroke participants, nine age-matched controls, and nine young healthy adults performed an isometric gripping task while squeezing, holding, and releasing a cylindrical device. The visual tracking task involved three different rates of force production (5, 10, and 20% maximal force/s). Four outcome measures determined force control deficits: (a) root mean square error, (b) standard deviation, (c) step number, and (d) mean pause duration. Our findings indicate that step number, and especially mean pause duration, differentiated force control deficits in the three groups more effectively than the traditional root mean square error. Moreover, stroke participants showed the largest force control deficits during the grip release phase compared to age-matched and young healthy controls. Importantly, step number and mean pause duration quantified stair-stepping while measuring different constructs than root mean square error. Distinct step and duration interruptions in force modulation by persons post-stroke during the grip release phase provide new information with implications for motor recovery during rehabilitation.

  20. Upper-limb kinematics and coordination of short grip and classic drives in field hockey.

    PubMed

    Bretigny, Perrine; Seifert, Ludovic; Leory, David; Chollet, Didier

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the upper-limb kinematics and coordination of the short grip and classic drives in field hockey. Ten elite female players participated in the experiment. The VICON system was used to record the displacement of markers placed on the stick and the players' joints during five short grip and five classic drives. Kinematic and coordination parameters were analyzed. The ball's velocity was recorded by a radar device that also served as the drive target. Kinematic differences were noted between the two drive conditions, with shorter duration and smaller overall amplitude in the short grip drive, explained by the shorter lever arm and the specific context in which it is used. No differences were noted for upper-limb coordination. In both types of stick holding, an interlimb dissociation was noted on the left side, whereas the right interlimb coordination was in phase. Moreover, the time lag increased in the disto-proximal direction, suggesting wrist uncocking before impact and the initiation of descent motion by the left shoulder. Mediolateral analysis confirmed these results: coordination of left-right limbs converged at the wrist but dissociated with more proximal joints (elbows and shoulders).

  1. Associations between grip strength of parents and their 4 year old children: findings from the Southampton Women’s Survey

    PubMed Central

    Inskip, Hazel; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Kapasi, Tasneem; Robinson, Siân; Godfrey, Keith; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Relationships between birthweight and grip strength throughout the lifecourse suggest that early influences on the growth and development of muscle are important for long-term muscle function. However, little is known about parental influences on children’s grip strength. We have explored this in the Southampton Women’s Survey, a prospective general population cohort study from before conception through childhood. Grip strength was measured using a Jamar handgrip dynamometer in the mother at 19 weeks’ gestation and her partner, and in the child at age four years. Pre-pregnancy heights and weights were measured in the mothers; reported weights and measured heights were available for the fathers. Complete data on parents and children were available for 444 trios. In univariate analyses, both parents’ grip strengths were significantly associated with that of the child (r=0.17, p<0.001 for mothers, r=0.15, p=0.002 for fathers). These correlations were similar to that between the grip strength of the mothers and the father (r=0.17, P<0.001). In the multivariate model, after adjustment for child’s height and physical activity, the correlations with the child’s grip strength were attenuated, being 0.10 (P=0.02) and 0.11 (P=0.01) for mothers’ and fathers’ grip strength respectively. The findings show that grip strength of both parents is associated with that of their child, indicating that heritable influences and the shared family environment influence the development of muscle strength. This contributes to our understanding of the role of heritable and environmental factors on early muscle growth and development, which are important for muscle function across the lifecourse. PMID:22150705

  2. Nutritional status is the major factor affecting grip strength of African HIV patients before and during antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Filteau, S; PrayGod, G; Woodd, S L; Friis, H; Heimburger, D C; Koethe, J R; Kelly, P; Kasonka, L; Rehman, A M

    2017-10-01

    Low grip strength is a marker of frailty and a risk factor for mortality among HIV patients and other populations. We investigated factors associated with grip strength in malnourished HIV patients at referral to ART, and at 12 weeks and 2-3 years after starting ART. The study involved HIV-infected Zambian and Tanzanian participants recruited to the NUSTART trial when malnourished (body mass index <18.5 kg/m(2) ) and requiring ART. The relationship of grip strength to nutritional, infectious and demographic factors was assessed by multivariable linear regression at referral for ART (n = 1742) and after 12 weeks (n = 778) and 2-3 years of ART (n = 273). In analyses controlled only for sex, age and height, most nutrition and infection-related variables were associated with grip strength. However, in multivariable analyses, consistent associations were seen for fat-free mass index, mid-upper arm circumference, haemoglobin and systolic blood pressure, and a variable association with fat mass index in men. C-reactive protein and CD4 count had limited independent effects on grip strength, while receiving tuberculosis treatment was associated with weaker grip strength. In this population of originally malnourished HIV patients, poor grip strength was more strongly and independently associated with nutritional than with infection and inflammation variables. Programmes to improve health and survival of HIV patients should incorporate nutritional assessment and management and could use grip strength as a functional indicator of improving nutrition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Grip strength is not associated with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus in healthy adults: The CoLaus study.

    PubMed

    Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Jornayvaz, François R

    2017-10-01

    We examined the association of grip strength with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in healthy subjects initially aged 50 to 75years after a follow-up of 5.5years and 10.7years. This was a prospective, population-based study derived from the CoLaus (Cohorte Lausannoise) study including 2318 participants (aged 60.2y; 1354 women) free from T2DM at baseline. Grip strength was assessed using a handheld dynamometer. The effect of grip strength on the incidence of T2DM was analyzed by logistic regression. After a follow-up of 5.5years, 190 (8.2%) T2DM cases were identified. In bivariate analysis, participants who developed T2DM had a higher absolute grip strength (35.3±10.6 versus 33.2±10.7kg, P=0.013). Analysis between grip strength expressed in 5kg increment and incident TD2M showed a negative association when adjusted for age and sex [ORs (95% CI): 0.88 (0.79, 0.98)], or for age, sex and body mass index (BMI) [ORs (95% CI): 0.87 (0.78, 097)]. After a follow-up of 10.7years, 131 supplemental (7.3%) T2DM cases were identified, but there was no association between grip strength and incident T2DM in bivariate and multivariable analysis, potentially due to a lack of statistical power. In non elderly healthy adults, the risk of incident T2DM is overall not associated with grip strength over a maximum follow-up of 10.7years. Future studies are warranted to better assess the association between grip strength and incident T2DM in bigger and even younger cohorts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vigorimeter grip strength in CIDP: a responsive tool that rapidly measures the effect of IVIG--the ICE study.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, E K; Latov, N; Deng, C; Hanna, K; Hughes, R A C; Bril, V; Dalakas, M C; Donofrio, P; van Doorn, P A; Hartung, H-P; Merkies, I S J

    2013-05-01

    In a recent trial in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), the ICE study, grip strength measurement captured significantly more improvement in patients receiving immune globulin (IGIV-C) intravenously than in those receiving placebo. We conducted a systematic analysis to determine the sensitivity of grip strength as an indicator of meaningful clinical changes in CIDP. A randomized double-blind trial was undertaken in 117 CIDP patients who received IGIV-C or placebo every 3 weeks for up to 24 weeks. Grip strength and inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) disability scores were assessed at each visit, and the responsiveness of each scale was compared. A minimum clinically important difference cut-off value for grip strength (>8 kPa) and INCAT score (>1 point) was applied to assess the proportion of responders to IGIV-C versus placebo. This analysis showed that grip strength demonstrated significant improvement earlier (as early as day 16) than the INCAT disability scale in patients receiving IGIV-C compared with placebo. A significantly higher proportion of improvers were seen in the IGIV-C group (37.5%-50.9%) than in the placebo group (21.1%-25.9%) for grip strength at day 16, week 3, week 6 and the end of the first period. Also, grip strength showed within the first 6 weeks in the placebo group significantly more patients with a clinically meaningful deterioration (>8 kPa), compared with the INCAT (>1-point deterioration) findings. Grip strength can be considered a sensitive tool for assessing clinically relevant changes in patients with CIDP. Its use in daily practice is suggested. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  5. Associations between grip strength of parents and their 4-year-old children: findings from the Southampton Women's Survey.

    PubMed

    Inskip, Hazel; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Kapasi, Tasneem; Robinson, Siân; Godfrey, Keith; Cooper, Cyrus; Harvey, Nicholas; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2012-01-01

    Relationships between birthweight and grip strength throughout the life course suggest that early influences on the growth and development of muscle are important for long-term muscle function. However, little is known about parental influences on children's grip strength. We have explored this in the Southampton Women's Survey, a prospective general population cohort study from before conception through childhood. Grip strength was measured using a Jamar handgrip dynamometer in the mother at 19 weeks' gestation and her partner, and in the child at age 4 years. Pre-pregnancy heights and weights were measured in the mothers; reported weights and measured heights were available for the fathers. Complete data on parents and children were available for 444 trios. In univariable analyses, both parents' grip strengths were significantly associated with that of the child (r = 0.17, P < 0.001 for mothers; r = 0.15, P = 0.002 for fathers). These correlations were similar to that between the grip strength of the mothers and the fathers (r = 0.17, P < 0.001). In the multivariable model, after adjustment for child's height and physical activity, the correlations with the child's grip strength were attenuated, being 0.10 (P = 0.02) and 0.11 (P = 0.01) for mothers' and fathers' grip strength respectively. The findings show that grip strength of each parent is associated with that of the child, indicating that heritable influences and the shared family environment influence the development of muscle strength. This contributes to our understanding of the role of heritable and environmental factors on early muscle growth and development, which are important for muscle function across the life course.

  6. The Association of Levels of and Decline in Grip Strength in Old Age with Trajectories of Life Course Occupational Position

    PubMed Central

    Fritzell, Johan; Hoffmann, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Background The study of the influence of life course occupational position (OP) on health in old age demands analysis of time patterns in both OP and health. We study associations between life course time patterns of OP and decline in grip strength in old age. Methods We analyze 5 waves from the Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe (n = 5108, ages 65–90). We use a pattern-mixture latent growth model to predict the level and decline in grip strength in old age by trajectory of life course OP. We extend and generalize the structured regression approach to establish the explanatory power of different life course models for both the level and decline of grip strength. Results Grip strength declined linearly by 0.70 kg (95% CI -0.74;-0.66) for men and 0.42 kg (95% CI -0.45;-0.39) for women per year. The level of men’s grip strength can best be explained by a critical period during midlife, with those exposed to low OP during this period having 1.67 kg (95% CI -2.33;-1.00) less grip strength. These differences remain constant over age. For women, no association between OP and levels of or decline in grip strength was found. Conclusions Men’s OP in midlife seems to be a critical period for the level of grip strength in old age. Inequalities remain constant over age. The integration of the structured regression approach and latent growth modelling offers new possibilities for life course epidemiology. PMID:27232696

  7. Assessment of grip strength with the modified sphygmomanometer test: association between upper limb global strength and motor function

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Júlia C.; Aguiar, Larissa T.; Lara, Eliza M.; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F.; Faria, Christina D. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Grip strength, commonly evaluated with the handgrip dynamometer, is a good indicator of upper limb (UL) function in stroke subjects and may reflect the global strength deficits of the whole paretic UL. The Modified Sphygmomanometer Test (MST) also provides objective and adequate measures at low-cost. Objective: To assess whether grip strength values obtained by using the MST and those obtained by using a handgrip dynamometer would present similar correlations with the global strength and motor function of the paretic UL in subjects with stroke, both in the subacute and chronic phases. Method: Measures of grip strength (MST and handgrip dynamometer), UL global strength (MST and hand-held dynamometer), and UL motor function (Fugl-Meyer motor assessment scale) were obtained with 33 subacute and 44 chronic stroke subjects. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated and Stepwise multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate predictor variables of grip strength (α=0.05). Results: Significant correlations of similar magnitude were found between measures of global strength of the paretic UL and grip strength assessed with both the MST (0.66≤r≤0.78) and handgrip dynamometer (0.66≤r≤0.78) and between UL motor function and grip strength assessed with both the MST (0.50≤rs≤0.51) and hand-held dynamometer (0.50≤rs≤0.63) in subacute and chronic stroke subjects. Only global strength remained as a significant predictor variable of grip strength for the MST (0.43≤R2≤0.61) and for the handgrip dynamometer (0.44≤R2≤0.61) for both stroke subgroups. Conclusion: Grip strength assessed with the MST could be used to report paretic UL global strength. PMID:26647752

  8. In vivo bite and grip forces, morphology and prey-killing behavior of North American accipiters (Accipitridae) and falcons (Falconidae).

    PubMed

    Sustaita, Diego; Hertel, Fritz

    2010-08-01

    Raptors exhibit a diversity of strategies to procure their prey but ultimately kill using their beaks and/or talons. Thus, bite and grip forces are ecologically important variables that have direct survival implications. Whereas hawks rely primarily on their feet for killing prey, falcons tend to employ their beaks. Consequently, falcons are expected to achieve relatively greater bite forces, and hawks are expected to generate relatively greater grip forces. Force estimates predicted from musculoskeletal morphology in a previous study indicated that falcons (Falco spp.) possess greater jaw force capabilities than accipiters (Accipiter spp.) but there were no clear differences in predicted grip-force capacity outside of differences in scaling. The objective of this study was to complement those results with measurements of in vivo forces by inducing captive and wild accipiters and falcons to bite and grasp force transducers. Bite force increased isometrically in both groups whereas grip force tended toward positive allometry. After adjusting for body mass, falcons produced greater bite forces, and accipiters produced greater grip forces. Thus, previous anatomical estimates of forces predicted the expected direction and magnitude of differences in bite forces but the overall greater in vivo grip forces of accipiters deviated from the pattern obtained from biomechanical estimates. Although the scaling relationships were similar between data sets, forces generated by live birds were consistently lower than those predicted from biomechanics. Estimated and in vivo jaw and digital forces were nevertheless correlated, and therefore provide an important link between morphology and killing behavior in these raptors.

  9. Age as a moderator of the secular trend for grip strength in Canada and the United States.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Irwin W

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether grip strength changed on average over recent decades at each of two age levels (children and adolescents versus adults) in Canada and the US. For each sex, weighted least squares regression analyses were performed on mean grip strength values as reported in studies conducted from the 1960s onwards. Grip strength did not change significantly as a function of year tested in children and adolescents, whereas it declined as a negatively accelerated function of year tested in adults. The results are contrary to what might be expected given that body weight has increased in both countries in recent decades and given that grip strength has been found to be positively correlated with body weight. It is suggested that there was a concurrent change in a factor that operated to counteract the effect of increased body weight on grip strength, a prime candidate being a decrease in levels of serum vitamin D. It is also suggested that the secular decline in adult grip strength can be explained by a factor that affects muscular function but which has a long latency period, a prime candidate here being obesity history.

  10. Transcranial direct current stimulation over multiple days enhances motor performance of a grip task.

    PubMed

    Fan, Julie; Voisin, Julien; Milot, Marie-Hélène; Higgins, Johanne; Boudrias, Marie-Hélène

    2017-09-01

    Recovery of handgrip is critical after stroke since it is positively related to upper limb function. To boost motor recovery, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising, non-invasive brain stimulation technique for the rehabilitation of persons with stroke. When applied over the primary motor cortex (M1), tDCS has been shown to modulate neural processes involved in motor learning. However, no studies have looked at the impact of tDCS on the learning of a grip task in both stroke and healthy individuals. To assess the use of tDCS over multiple days to promote motor learning of a grip task using a learning paradigm involving a speed-accuracy tradeoff in healthy individuals. In a double-blinded experiment, 30 right-handed subjects (mean age: 22.1±3.3 years) participated in the study and were randomly assigned to an anodal (n=15) or sham (n=15) stimulation group. First, subjects performed the grip task with their dominant hand while following the pace of a metronome. Afterwards, subjects trained on the task, at their own pace, over 5 consecutive days while receiving sham or anodal tDCS over M1. After training, subjects performed de novo the metronome-assisted task. The change in performance between the pre and post metronome-assisted task was used to assess the impact of the grip task and tDCS on learning. Anodal tDCS over M1 had a significant effect on the speed-accuracy tradeoff function. The anodal tDCS group showed significantly greater improvement in performance (39.28±15.92%) than the sham tDCS group (24.06±16.35%) on the metronome-assisted task, t(28)=2.583, P=0.015 (effect size d=0.94). Anodal tDCS is effective in promoting grip motor learning in healthy individuals. Further studies are warranted to test its potential use for the rehabilitation of fine motor skills in stroke patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Solar Particle Acceleration and The Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H.; Zoglauer, A.; Lin, R. P.; Boggs, S. E.

    2013-04-01

    Flares accelerate ions and relativistic electrons proportionally; the ratio of their fluences has been shown to remain constant over three orders of magnitude, a correlation that is independent of flare size. This evidence suggests that ion and electron populations are accelerated together, and possibly by similar mechanisms. In two of the best-observed flares of the last cycle, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite found the centroids of ion and relativistic electron associated emission to be significantly displaced from one another. This result is surprising; ions and electrons that are accelerated in the same region are thought to be transported along the same field lines, implying that they would enter the chromosphere together and have similar emission source locations. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) instrument is designed to address particle transport questions by providing enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of gamma/HXR flare emissions 20 keV to > 10MeV). GRIPS’ key technological improvements over the current solar state of the art in HXR/gamma ray energies (RHESSI) include the use of three dimensional germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single grid modulation collimator design, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs allow GRIPS to Compton track energy deposition within the crystal, providing significant background reduction and solar polarization measurements. Imaging will be primarily accomplished through the MPRM grid system. The single grid design provides quasi-continuous resolution from 12.5 - 162arcsecs with 2x the throughput of a dual grid imaging system like RHESSI. This spatial resolution will be capable of imaging the separate footpoints of many flare sizes. In comparison, RHESSI images with a minimum of 35arcsecs at HXR/gamma ray energies, making the footpoints resolvable in only the largest of flares. Here, we present a discussion of GRIPS science

  12. Relationship between grip, pinch strengths and anthropometric variables, types of pitch throwing among Japanese high school baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Tajika, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Shitara, Hitoshi; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Okura, Chisa; Kanazawa, Saeko; Nagai, Ayako; Takagishi, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    Grip and pinch strength are crucially important attributes and standard parameters related to the functional integrity of the hand. It seems significant to investigate normative data for grip and pinch strength of baseball players to evaluate their performance and condition. Nevertheless, few reports have explained the association between grip and pinch strength and anthropometric variables and types of pitch throwing for baseball pitchers. The aim of this study was to measure and evaluate clinical normative data for grip and tip, key, palmar pinch strength and to assess the relationship between these data and anthropometric variables and types of pitch throwing among Japanese high-school baseball pitchers. One hundred-thirty three healthy high school baseball pitchers were examined and had completed a self-administered questionnaire including items related to age, hand dominance, throwing ratio of type of pitch. A digital dynamometer was used to measure grip strength and a pinch gauge to measure tip, key and palmer pinch in both dominant and nondominant side. Body composition was measured by the multi frequency segmental body composition analyzer. Grip strength and tip and palmer pinch strength in dominant side were statistically greater than them in nondominant side (P < 0.05). There were significant associations between grip strength and height (r = 0.33, P < 0.001), body mass (r = 0.50, P < 0.001), BMI (r = 0.37, P < 0.001), muscle mass of upper extremity (r = 0.56, P < 0.001), fat free mass (r = 0.57, P < 0.001), fat mass (r = 0.22, P < 0.05) in dominant side. A stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that fat free mass and tip, palmer, key pinch strength were predictors of grip strength in dominant side. No statistical significant correlations were found between the throwing ratio of types of pitches thrown and grip strength and tip, key, palmar pinch strength. Our result provides normative values and evidences for grip and pinch strengths in high

  13. Radiographic outcomes of cable-plate versus cable-grip fixation in periprosthetic fractures of the proximal femur.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Benjamin F; Nodzo, Scott R; Oi, Kathryn; Lee, Yuo-Yu; Westrich, Geoffrey H

    2017-05-23

    Newer generation cable-plate designs are commonly used for periprosthetic proximal femur fractures; however, comparisons relative to cable-grips remain limited. The aim of this study was to compare radiographic healing rates of cable-plate versus cable-grip fixation for periprosthetic proximal femur fractures. Consecutive patients with an acute or chronic Vancouver A, B1, or B2 periprosthetic proximal femur fracture undergoing trochanteric fixation with a cable-plate (n = 46 cases) or cable-grip (n = 24 cases) system were identified retrospectively from a single-centre hospital database (mean follow-up 28 months [range 6-89 months]). Demographics, radiographic fracture healing, and complications were compared between the 2 groups. Radiographic union rates were not different between the cable-grip versus cable-plate group (67% vs. 76% respectively; p = 0.4). Healing rates of greater trochanteric fractures alone were not different between the cable-plate versus cable-grip groups (75% vs. 71% respectively; p = 0.38). The cable-plates were used for a more diverse range of fracture patterns relative to the cable-grips. An increased number of cables was associated with radiographic healing (odds ratio 14 [95% confidence interval 2-64]; p = 0.01), and body mass index had a negative correlation with radiographic healing (odds ratio -0.4 [95% confidence interval 0.5-0.9]. Similar rates of periprosthetic fracture healing were seen using a cable-grip versus cable-plate system; however, the cable-plate system could be used for a more diverse range of fracture patterns.

  14. Functional Corticospinal Projections from Human Supplementary Motor Area Revealed by Corticomuscular Coherence during Precise Grip Force Control

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sophie; Entakli, Jonathan; Bonnard, Mireille; Berton, Eric; De Graaf, Jozina B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether corticospinal projections from human supplementary motor area (SMA) are functional during precise force control with the precision grip (thumb-index opposition). Since beta band corticomuscular coherence (CMC) is well-accepted to reflect efferent corticospinal transmission, we analyzed the beta band CMC obtained with simultaneous recording of electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) signals. Subjects performed a bimanual precise visuomotor force tracking task by applying isometric low grip forces with their right hand precision grip on a custom device with strain gauges. Concurrently, they held the device with their left hand precision grip, producing similar grip forces but without any precision constraints, to relieve the right hand. Some subjects also participated in a unimanual control condition in which they performed the task with only the right hand precision grip while the device was held by a mechanical grip. We analyzed whole scalp topographies of beta band CMC between 64 EEG channels and 4 EMG intrinsic hand muscles, 2 for each hand. To compare the different topographies, we performed non-parametric statistical tests based on spatio-spectral clustering. For the right hand, we obtained significant beta band CMC over the contralateral M1 region as well as over the SMA region during static force contraction periods. For the left hand, however, beta band CMC was only found over the contralateral M1. By comparing unimanual and bimanual conditions for right hand muscles, no significant difference was found on beta band CMC over M1 and SMA. We conclude that the beta band CMC found over SMA for right hand muscles results from the precision constraints and not from the bimanual aspect of the task. The result of the present study strongly suggests that the corticospinal projections from human SMA become functional when high precision force control is required. PMID:23555945

  15. Hand grip strength and incident ADL disability in elderly Mexican Americans over a seven-year period.

    PubMed

    Al Snih, Soham; Markides, Kyriakos S; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Raji, Mukaila A

    2004-12-01

    Little is known about muscle strength as a predictor of disability among older Mexican Americans. The aim of this study was to examine the association between hand grip strength and 7-year incidence of ADL disability in older Mexican American men and women. A 7-year prospective cohort study of 2493 non-institutionalized Mexican American men and women aged 65 or older residing in five south-western states. Maximal hand grip strength test, body mass index, cognitive function, activities of daily living, self-reports of medical conditions (arthritis, diabetes, heart attack, stroke, cancer, hip fracture), and depressive symptoms were obtained. In a Cox proportional regression analysis, there was a linear relationship between hand grip strength at baseline and risk of incident ADL disability over a 7-year follow-up. Among non-disabled men at baseline, the hazard ratio of any new ADL limitation was 1.90 (95% CI 1.14-3.17) for those in the lowest quartile, when compared with men in the highest hand grip strength quartile, after controlling for age, marital status, medical conditions, high depressive symptoms, MMSE score, and BMI at baseline. Among non-disabled women at baseline, the hazard ratio of any new ADL limitation was 2.28 (95% CI 1.59-3.27) for those in the lowest quartile, when compared with women in the highest hand grip strength quartile. Hand grip strength is an independent predictor of ADL disability among older Mexican American men and women. The hand grip strength test is an easy, reliable, valid, inexpensive method of screening to identify older adults at risk of disability.

  16. Time-varying enhancement of human cortical excitability mediated by cutaneous inputs during precision grip.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, R S; Lemon, R N; Westling, G

    1994-01-01

    1. We have investigated the afferent neurogram, muscular activity and mechanical responses while subjects restrained, with a precision grip, an object subjected to pulling loads directed away from the hand. At unpredictable times 'ramp-and-hold' loads of 1 N were delivered at a rate of ca 80 N s-1. The load ramp produced a sharp increase in multiunit activity recorded from cutaneous afferents of the median nerve. The first response in the EMG of distal hand muscles commenced at 51 +/- 2.4 ms (mean +/- S.D.); a further steep increase in activity began about 20 ms later, and this was associated with a marked augmentation of the grip force increase. 2. In four subjects, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered to the contralateral motor cortex in 1000 out of a total of 1500 loading trials. The time of the stimulus was randomly selected to occur either at one of nine defined points (separated by 20 ms) before and after the computer command triggering the load force increase, or during steady periods of grip. 3. In most hand and arm muscles, there was a powerful facilitation of the short-latency EMG responses evoked by TMS delivered 40-140 ms after the load force command. The amplitudes of the largest responses (TMS delivered at 80-100 ms) were 850% higher on average than those observed when subjects gripped the unloaded object or when they restrained the statically loaded object. This large modulation was only obtained with stimulus intensities that were subthreshold in the relaxed subject. 4. The modulation was not simply a reflection of the time-varying level of motoneuronal activity during the loading trial. In most muscles, changes in the amplitude of the TMS-evoked responses were disproportionately larger than the corresponding modulation of the background EMG activity. At its maximum, the modulation in the TMS-evoked response was nearly 300% larger. Furthermore, the strength of the TMS-evoked responses did not strictly co-vary with amplitude of

  17. Quantification of hand function by power grip and pinch strength force measurements in ulnar nerve lesion simulated by ulnar nerve block.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Nikolaus Johannes; Mentzel, Martin; Krischak, Gert D; Gülke, Joachim

    2017-06-24

    In the assessment of hand and upper limb function, grip strength is of the major importance. The measurement by dynamometers has been established. In this study, the effect of a simulated ulnar nerve lesion on different grip force measurements was evaluated. In 25 healthy volunteers, grip force measurement was done by the JAMAR dynamometer (Fabrication Enterprises Inc, Irvington, NY) for power grip and by a pinch strength dynamometer for tip pinch strength, tripod grip, and key pinch strength. A within-subject research design was used in this prospective study. Each subject served as the control by preinjection measurements of grip and pinch strength. Subsequent measurements after ulnar nerve block were used to examine within-subject change. In power grip, there was a significant reduction of maximum grip force of 26.9% with ulnar nerve block compared with grip force without block (P < .0001). Larger reductions in pinch strength were observed with block: 57.5% in tip pinch strength (P < .0001), 61.0% in tripod grip (P < .0001), and 58.3% in key pinch strength (P < .0001). The effect of the distal ulnar nerve block on grip and pinch force could be confirmed. However, the assessment of other dimensions of hand strength as tip pinch, tripod pinch and key pinch had more relevance in demonstrating hand strength changes resulting from an distal ulnar nerve lesion. The measurement of tip pinch, tripod grip and key pinch can improve the follow-up in hand rehabilitation. II. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A demonstration of level-anchored ratio scaling for prediction of grip strength.

    PubMed

    Borg, Elisabet; Borg, Gunnar

    2013-09-01

    Level-anchored ratio scaling, such as the Borg CR10 scale(®) and the Borg CR100 scale(®), uses verbal anchors in congruence with numbers to give ratio data together with natural levels of intensity. This presupposes that the anchors possess natural positions in the subjective dynamic range and also "numerical" inter-relations. In an experiment, subjects had to produce a force of handgrip corresponding to their conception of "Strong", followed by a "Maximal" performance. By using the previously found relationship between "Strong" and "Maximal" of 1:2 together with knowledge of the exponent in the power S-R-function (R = c × S(n)) for grip strength, n = 1.8, predictions of individual maximal performances were obtained. The predicted values correlated 0.76 with, and deviated only 3% (ns) from, actual maximal performances of grip strength. This result -as previously also found for aerobic capacity-gives a strong support for the use of verbal anchors, so common in category scaling, also in "ratio scaling" and that the Borg CR-scales fulfill the requirements for ratio scales. For estimation of muscular strength, such as grip strength, this present study points to the value of using submaximal determinations as a compliment to maximal performances (e.g., to obtain measures of functional capacity). The results also support the increasingly common use of the CR-methodology in other ergonomic settings concerning suitable design of tools and equipment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Neto2 Interacts with the Scaffolding Protein GRIP and Regulates Synaptic Abundance of Kainate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Man; Ivakine, Evgueni; Mahadevan, Vivek; Salter, Michael W.; McInnes, Roderick R.

    2012-01-01

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are a class of ionotropic glutamate receptors that are expressed throughout the central nervous system. The function and subcellular localization of KARs are tightly regulated by accessory proteins. We have previously identified the single-pass transmembrane proteins, Neto1 and Neto2, to be associated with native KARs. In the hippocampus, Neto1, but not Neto2, controls the abundance and modulates the kinetics of postsynaptic KARs. Here we evaluated whether Neto2 regulates synaptic KAR levels in the cerebellum where Neto1 expression is limited to the deep cerebellar nuclei. In the cerebellum, where Neto2 is present abundantly, we found a ∼40% decrease in GluK2-KARs at the postsynaptic density (PSD) of Neto2-null mice. No change, however, was observed in total level of GluK2-KARs, thereby suggesting a critical role of Neto2 on the synaptic localization of cerebellar KARs. The presence of a putative class II PDZ binding motif on Neto2 led us to also investigate whether it interacts with PDZ domain-containing proteins previously implicated in regulating synaptic abundance of KARs. We identified a PDZ-dependent interaction between Neto2 and the scaffolding protein GRIP. Furthermore, coexpression of Neto2 significantly increased the amount of GRIP associated with GluK2, suggesting that Neto2 may promote and/or stabilize GluK2:GRIP interactions. Our results demonstrate that Neto2, like Neto1, is an important auxiliary protein for modulating the synaptic levels of KARs. Moreover, we propose that the interactions of Neto1/2 with various scaffolding proteins is a critical mechanism by which KARs are stabilized at diverse synapses. PMID:23236500

  20. Gloss, colour and grip: multifunctional epidermal cell shapes in bee- and bird-pollinated flowers.

    PubMed

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower-visitors.

  1. REDUCED HAND GRIP STRENGTH IN OVERWEIGHT AND OBESE CHRONIC HEPATITIS C PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Juliana Paula; Álvares-DA-Silva, Mário Reis; Alves, Bruna Cherubini; Dall'alba, Valesca

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C is a liver disease that causes significant changes in metabolism, and also has an impact on nutritional status. To evaluate the nutritional status and cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic hepatitis C. This cross-sectional study investigated 58 patients with chronic hepatitis C, non-cirrhotic and were not under active pharmacological treatment. Patients with significant alcohol consumption (greater than 10 g ethanol/day) were excluded. Patients underwent nutritional assessment through anthropometric measurements and functional assessment using hand grip strength by dynamometry. The physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Patients also underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation. Cardiovascular risk was calculated by the Framingham score. The mean age of patients was 51.6±9.7 years, 55.2% were female, and 79.3% had genotype 1. The most prevalent degree of fibrosis was F1 (37.9%) followed by F2 (27.6%) and F3 (1.7%). The prevalence of overweight/obesity considering the body mass index was 70.7%. However, 57.7% of men and 68.8% of women were considered malnourished according to hand grip strength. These patients also had waist circumference (93.5±10.7 cm) and neck circumference (37.0±3.6 cm) high. Almost 60% of patients were considered sedentary or irregularly active. In relation to cardiovascular risk, 50% of patients had high risk of suffering a cardiovascular event within 10 years. Although most patients with hepatitis C presented overweight, associated with high cardiovascular risk, they also have reduced functional capacity, indicative of protein-caloric commitment. Therefore, body mass index can not be considered the only method of assessment for nutritional diagnosis of patients with liver disease. Adopting methods such as hand grip strength can be important for a better understanding of nutritional status of these patients.

  2. Gloss, Colour and Grip: Multifunctional Epidermal Cell Shapes in Bee- and Bird-Pollinated Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R.; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  3. Breakfast consumption frequency is associated with grip strength in a population of healthy Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Niu, K; Momma, H; Kobayashi, Y; Guan, L; Chujo, M; Otomo, A; Cui, Y; Nagatomi, R

    2014-06-01

    Several studies have reported that regular consumption of breakfast is associated with health benefits. However, only a few studies have examined the association between frequency of breakfast consumption and muscular function. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the association between frequency of breakfast consumption and muscle strength among apparently healthy Japanese adults. A cross-sectional study design was used. Between 2008 and 2011 in Sendai, Japan, 1415 Japanese adult employees (1069 men and 346 women) aged between 19 and 83 years participated in the study. Grip strength, as measured by a handheld digital dynamometer, was used as an indicator of muscle strength. Frequency of breakfast consumption during the previous month was assessed using a brief self-administered dietary history questionnaire, and the results were divided into three categories for analysis: low (≤2 days week⁻¹), middle (3-5 days week⁻¹) and high (≥6 days week⁻¹). Multivariate analysis was performed using analysis of covariance, with covariates mainly including socio-demographic, lifestyle-related and health-related factors. After adjusting for several potential confounders, grip strength was shown to be positively associated with breakfast consumption frequency (geometric means, 95% confidence interval (CI): low frequency, 36.2 (35.7-36.8) kg; middle frequency, 36.7 (36.0-37.5) kg; high frequency, 37.0 (36.6-37.5) kg; P for trend = 0.03). Grip strength per kilogramme body weight (kg kg⁻¹) was also positively associated with frequency of breakfast consumption (P for trend = 0.01). This cross-sectional study reveals a positive association between breakfast consumption frequency and muscle strength in apparently healthy adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Normal gait speed, grip strength and thirty seconds chair stand test among older Indians.

    PubMed

    Gunasekaran, Venugopalan; Banerjee, Joyita; Dwivedi, Sada Nand; Upadhyay, Ashish Datt; Chatterjee, Prashun; Dey, Aparajit Ballav

    2016-01-01

    Gait speed, maximum grip strength and thirty seconds chair stand test are quick, reliable measures of functional capacity in older adults. The objective of this study was to develop normative data of the said parameters, which is lacking in older Indians. In a cross sectional study, 723 participants of ≥60 years without any morbidity, were recruited with written consent at Geriatric Medicine clinic of All India Institute of Medical sciences, New Delhi. Time taken to walk comfortably (4m) was taken as Gait speed. Maximum grip strength was assessed by using dynamometer by pressing it for 3 times in each hand, and the best of six values noted. Thirty second chair stand was assessed by the number of repetitions to stand and sit from a chair in thirty second. The Cut-off (25th percentile) of gait speed for both male and female in all age group was 0.6m/s. The Cut-off for maximum grip strength in 60-65 years, 66-70 years and >70 years for male were 20, 15 and 15 and for females were 8, 6 and 6 in kg, respectively. The Cut-off for thirty second chair stand test in 60-65 years, 66-70 years and >70 years for male were 10, 9 and 8 and for females was 8, 8 and 7, respectively. These normative data would be useful to the clinicians and researcher as Indian reference value, which is less as compared to western data. Community based multi-centre study is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bimanual force control strategies in chronic stroke: finger extension versus power grip.

    PubMed

    Lodha, Neha; Patten, Carolynn; Coombes, Stephen A; Cauraugh, James H

    2012-09-01

    Stroke leads to motor asymmetries in the flexor and extensor muscles of the hand. Typically, the strength deficits in the extensors are greater than the flexors. The impact of differential motor abilities of these muscle groups on the execution of bimanual force control tasks in individuals with stroke is unknown. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the influence of task constraints on visually guided bimanual force control in chronic stroke. Stroke survivors and age-matched individuals performed bimanual isometric contractions for 20s to match target submaximal force levels. Online visual feedback of the total force (sum of the forces produced by both hands) was provided. The task constraints were manipulated by (a) finger extension, and (b) finger flexion (power grip). Force asymmetry was indexed by the proportion of force contributed by the paretic hand to the total force. The stroke group demonstrated task-specific asymmetry in bimanual force control. Specifically, the paretic hand contributed less force than the non-paretic hand in finger extension whereas this relationship was reversed in power grip. Importantly, regardless of the nature of the task, reduction in motor impairments was associated with increased symmetry and coordination in bimanual tasks. Further, bimanual submaximal grip force control revealed asymmetry and coordination deficits that are not identified by investigating bimanual maximal force production alone. The motor control strategy adopted to optimize performance on bimanual tasks revealed the altered force production of the paretic hand due to the combined effect of extensor weakness and enhanced flexor bias following stroke. Bimanual asymmetries in stroke survivors highlight the need for identifying and treating the task-specific impairments for maximizing motor recovery post stroke.

  6. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Duncan, Nicole A.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Zoglauer, Andreas C.; Smith, David M.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; hide

    2012-01-01

    The balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from approximately 20 keV to greater than approximately 10 MeV. GRIPS will address questions raised by recent solar flare observations regarding particle acceleration and energy release, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution of less than 0.1 cubic millimeter. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-centimeter thick tungsten alloy slit/slat grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 millimeters. The MPRM is situated 8 meters from the spectrometer to provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e., as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS is scheduled for a continental-US engineering test flight in fall 2013, followed by long or ultra-long duration balloon flights in Antarctica.

  7. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Duncan, Nicole A.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Zoglauer, Andreas C.; Smith, David M.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark S.; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2012-09-01

    The balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from ~20 keV to >~10 MeV. GRIPS will address questions raised by recent solar flare observations regarding particle acceleration and energy release, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution of <0.1 mm3. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-cm thick tungstenalloy slit/slat grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 mm. The MPRM is situated 8 meters from the spectrometer to provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e., as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS is scheduled for a continental-US engineering test flight in fall 2013, followed by long or ultra-long duration balloon flights in Antarctica.

  8. Updating the programming of a precision grip is a function of recent history of available feedback.

    PubMed

    Whitwell, Robert L; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2009-04-01

    In a recent study (Whitwell et al. in Exp Brain Res 185:111-119, 2008), we showed that the visuomotor system is "cognitively impenetrable" to the extent that explicit predictive knowledge of the availability of visual feedback on an upcoming trial fails to optimize grasping. The results suggested that the effects of trial history, rather than the anticipatory knowledge of the nature of an upcoming trial, plays the most significant role in how the availability of visual feedback is exploited by the visuomotor system when programming grip aperture (e.g., opening the hand wider when visual feedback is unavailable). Here, we provide direct evidence that trial history indeed plays a critical role in the programming of grip aperture. Twelve individuals grasped objects of three different sizes placed at one of two distances either with or without visual feedback of the hand and object (closed- or open-loop trials, respectively). Runs of four consecutive closed- or open-loop trials were interleaved with sequences of closed and open-loop trials that alternated back and forth from trial to trial. Peak grip aperture (PGA) decreased linearly with successive closed-loop trials and increased linearly with successive open-loop trials. We also compared PGA for trials that were preceded by a run of four consecutive closed- (or open-loop) trials with trials that were preceded by only one closed- (or open-loop) trial. This analysis indicated that consistency in the runs of closed- or open-loop trials significantly reduced the effect of the availability of feedback on grasping in the trial following the run. We conclude that while the margin of error observed in precision grasping is largely a function of the availability of visual feedback on the current trial, it is evidently also a function of the recent history of the availability of visual feedback on previous trials.

  9. First flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Shih, Albert Y.; Duncan, Nicole; Bain, Hazel; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kelley, Nicole; Godbole, Niharika; Kaufmann, Pierre; Caspi, Amir; Sample, John; Hoberman, Jane; Mochizuki, Brent; Olson, Jerry; Boggs, Steven E.; Zoglauer, Andreas; Hurford, Gordon J.; Smith, David M.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) high altitude balloon payload was successfully flown in January 2016 from Antarctica (Jan 19 to Jan 30).GRIPS provides a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma ray/hard X-ray emissions from ~20 keV to >~10 MeV. GRIPS’s goal is to address questions raised by recent solar flare observations regarding particle acceleration and energy release, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of six 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution <0.1 mm3. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-cm thick tungsten alloy slit/slat grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 mm. The MPRM is situated 8 meters from the spectrometer to provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs, with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS was also equipped with active BGO shields, and three piggy-back instruments: a solar terahertz radiometer (Solar-T), a hard X-ray spectrometer (SMASH), and a sonic anemometer (TILDAE).We will present an overview of GRIPS's first flight, the performance of its instruments and subsystems, including the solar pointing and aspect systems, and

  10. The motor system estimates uncertainty and higher order statistics for the control of grip forces.

    PubMed

    Hadjiosif, Alkis M; Smith, Maurice A

    2011-01-01

    Successful manipulation of an object requires exerting grip forces (GF) sufficient to prevent slippage. To prevent slip in more uncertain environments, GF would need to increase. Here we investigate the brain's ability to efficiently control grasp by producing GFs that correspond to confidence estimates of uncertain environments that are characterized by probability density functions of different variances and higher order moments. We found that GFs increased dramatically with the level of environmental uncertainty, and even when environmental uncertainty was held constant while higher order moments were varied, GFs changes in a way that was appropriate for kurtosis.

  11. Effects of grip force on median nerve deformation at different wrist angles

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of grip on changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameter in the radial-ulnar direction (D1) and dorsal-palmar direction (D2) at three wrist angles. Twenty-nine healthy participants (19 men [mean age, 24.2 ± 1.6 years]; 10 women [mean age, 24.0 ± 1.6 years]) were recruited. The median nerve was examined at the proximal carpal tunnel region in three grip conditions, namely finger relaxation, unclenched fist, and clenched fist. Ultrasound examinations were performed in the neutral wrist position (0°), at 30°wrist flexion, and at 30°wrist extension for both wrists. The grip condition and wrist angle showed significant main effects (p < 0.01) on the changes in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. Furthermore, significant interactions (p < 0.01) were found between the grip condition and wrist angle for the MNCSA, D1, and D2. In the neutral wrist position (0°), significant reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2 were observed when finger relaxation changed to unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Clenched fist condition caused the highest deformations in the median nerve measurements (MNCSA, approximately −25%; D1, −13%; D2, −12%). The MNCSA was significantly lower at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension than in the neutral wrist position (0°) at unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Notably, clenched fist condition at 30°wrist flexion showed the highest reduction of the MNCSA (−29%). In addition, 30°wrist flexion resulted in a lower D1 at clenched fist condition. In contrast, 30°wrist extension resulted in a lower D2 at both unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Our results suggest that unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions cause reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. More importantly, unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension can lead to further deformation of the median nerve. PMID:27688983

  12. Effect of Three Different Grip Angles on Physiological Parameters During Laboratory Handcycling Test in Able-Bodied Participants

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Thomas; Burkett, Brendan; Thees, Barbara; Schneider, Stefan; Askew, Christopher D.; Strüder, Heiko K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Handcycling is a relatively new wheelchair sport that has gained increased popularity for people with lower limb disabilities. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of three different grip positions on physical parameters during handcycling in a laboratory setting. Methods: Twenty one able-bodied participants performed three maximum incremental handcycling tests until exhaustion, each with a different grip angle. The angle between the grip and the crank was randomly set at 90° (horizontal), 0° (vertical), or 10° (diagonal). The initial load was 20 W and increased by 20 W each 5 min. In addition, participants performed a 20 s maximum effort. Results: The relative peak functional performance (W/kg), peak heart rate (bpm), associated lactate concentrations (mmol/l) and peak oxygen uptake per kilogram body weight (ml.min−1.kg−1) for the different grip positions during the stage test were: (a) Horizontal: 1.43 ± 0.21 W/kg, 170.14 ± 12.81 bpm, 9.54 ± 1.93 mmol/l, 30.86 ± 4.57 ml/kg; (b) Vertical: 1.38 ± 0.20 W/kg, 171.81 ± 13.87 bpm, 9.91 ± 2.29 mmol/l, 29.75 ± 5.13 ml/kg; (c) Diagonal: 1.40 ± 0.22 W/kg, 169.19 ± 13.31 bpm, 9.34 ± 2.36 mmol/l, 29.39 ± 4.70 ml/kg. Statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences could only be found for lactate concentration between the vertical grip position and the other grips during submaximal handcycling. Conclusion: The orientation of three different grip angles made no difference to the peak load achieved during an incremental handcycling test and a 20 s maximum effort. At submaximal load, higher lactate concentrations were found when the vertical grip position was used, suggesting that this position may be less efficient than the alternative diagonal or horizontal grip positions. PMID:26635617

  13. The steroid receptor coactivator, GRIP-1, is necessary for MEF-2C-dependent gene expression and skeletal muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shen Liang; Dowhan, Dennis H.; Hosking, Brett M.; Muscat, George E.O.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear receptor-mediated activation of transcription involves coactivation by cofactors collectively denoted the steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs). The process also involves the subsequent recruitment of p300/CBP and PCAF to a complex that synergistically regulates transcription and remodels the chromatin. PCAF and p300 have also been demonstrated to function as critical coactivators for the muscle-specific basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) protein MyoD during myogenic commitment. Skeletal muscle differentiation and the activation of muscle-specific gene expression is dependent on the concerted action of another bHLH factor, myogenin, and the MADS protein, MEF-2, which function in a cooperative manner. We examined the functional role of one SRC, GRIP-1, in muscle differentiation, an ideal paradigm for the analysis of the determinative events that govern the cell's decision to divide or differentiate. We observed that the mRNA encoding GRIP-1 is expressed in proliferating myoblasts and post-mitotic differentiated myotubes, and that protein levels increase during differentiation. Exogenous/ectopic expression studies with GRIP-1 sense and antisense vectors in myogenic C2C12 cells demonstrated that this SRC is necessary for (1) induction/activation of myogenin, MEF-2, and the crucial cell cycle regulator, p21, and (2) contractile protein expression and myotube formation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SRC GRIP-1 coactivates MEF-2C-mediated transcription. GRIP-1 also coactivates the synergistic transactivation of E box-dependent transcription by myogenin and MEF-2C. GST-pulldowns, mammalian two-hybrid analysis, and immunoprecipitation demonstrate that the mechanism involves direct interactions between MEF-2C and GRIP-1 and is associated with the ability of the SRC to interact with the MADS domain of MEF-2C. The HLH region of myogenin mediates the direct interaction of myogenin and GRIP-1. Interestingly, interaction with myogenic factors is mediated by two

  14. Effect of grip type, wrist motion, and resistance level on pressures within the carpal tunnel of normal wrists.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; Fallentin, Nils; Andersen, Johan H; Keir, Peter J; Hansen, Torben B; Pransky, Glenn; Lin, Jia-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Elevated carpal tunnel pressure (CTP) has been associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. This study systematically evaluated the effect of wrist motion resistance and grip type on CTP during wrist motion typical of occupational tasks. CTP during four wrist motion patterns, with and without resistance, and with and without gripping, was measured in vivo in 14 healthy individuals. CTP measured during compound motions fell between that measured in the cardinal planes of wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Generally, with no active gripping there was little pressure change due to wrist angular displacement or resistance level. However, concurrent active pinch or power grip increased CTP particularly in motions including extension. CTP typically did not increase during wrist flexion, and in fact often decreased. Extension motions against resistance when employing a pinch or power grip increase CTP more than motions with flexion. Results could help inform design or modification of wrist motion intensive occupational tasks. © 2014 The Authors. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. Systematic mutational analysis of the active-site threonine of HIV-1 proteinase: rethinking the "fireman's grip" hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Strisovsky, K.; Tessmer, U.; Langner, J.; Konvalinka, J.; Kräusslich, H. G.

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinases share a conserved network of hydrogen bonds (termed "fireman's grip"), which involves the hydroxyl groups of two threonine residues in the active site Asp-Thr-Gly triplets (Thr26 in the case of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PR). In the case of retroviral proteinases (PRs), which are active as symmetrical homodimers, these interactions occur at the dimer interface. For a systematic analysis of the "fireman's grip," Thr26 of HIV-1 PR was changed to either Ser, Cys, or Ala. The variant enzymes were tested for cleavage of HIV-1 derived peptide and polyprotein substrates. PR(T26S) and PR(T26C) showed similar or slightly reduced activity compared to wild-type HIV-1 PR, indicating that the sulfhydryl group of cysteine can substitute for the hydroxyl of the conserved threonine in this position. PR(T26A), which lacks the "fireman's grip" interaction, was virtually inactive and was monomeric in solution at conditions where wild-type PR exhibited a monomer-dimer equilibrium. All three mutations had little effect when introduced into only one chain of a linked dimer of HIV-1 PR. In this case, even changing both Thr residues to Ala yielded residual activity suggesting that the "fireman's grip" is not essential for activity but contributes significantly to dimer formation. Taken together, these results indicate that the "fireman's grip" is crucial for stabilization of the retroviral PR dimer and for overall stability of the enzyme. PMID:11045610

  16. Effect of Grip Type, Wrist Motion, and Resistance Level on Pressures within the Carpal Tunnel of Normal Wrists

    PubMed Central

    McGorry, Raymond W; Fallentin, Nils; Andersen, Johan H; Keir, Peter J; Hansen, Torben B; Pransky, Glenn; Lin, Jia-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Elevated carpal tunnel pressure (CTP) has been associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. This study systematically evaluated the effect of wrist motion resistance and grip type on CTP during wrist motion typical of occupational tasks. CTP during four wrist motion patterns, with and without resistance, and with and without gripping, was measured in vivo in 14 healthy individuals. CTP measured during compound motions fell between that measured in the cardinal planes of wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Generally, with no active gripping there was little pressure change due to wrist angular displacement or resistance level. However, concurrent active pinch or power grip increased CTP particularly in motions including extension. CTP typically did not increase during wrist flexion, and in fact often decreased. Extension motions against resistance when employing a pinch or power grip increase CTP more than motions with flexion. Results could help inform design or modification of wrist motion intensive occupational tasks. © 2014 The Authors. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24391059

  17. The brain adjusts grip forces differently according to gravity and inertia: a parabolic flight experiment

    PubMed Central

    White, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life, one of the most frequent activities involves accelerating and decelerating an object held in precision grip. In many contexts, humans scale and synchronize their grip force (GF), normal to the finger/object contact, in anticipation of the expected tangential load force (LF), resulting from the combination of the gravitational and the inertial forces. In many contexts, GF and LF are linearly coupled. A few studies have examined how we adjust the parameters–gain and offset–of this linear relationship. However, the question remains open as to how the brain adjusts GF regardless of whether LF is generated by different combinations of weight and inertia. Here, we designed conditions to generate equivalent magnitudes of LF by independently varying mass and movement frequency. In a control experiment, we directly manipulated gravity in parabolic flights, while other factors remained constant. We show with a simple computational approach that, to adjust GF, the brain is sensitive to how LFs are produced at the fingertips. This provides clear evidence that the analysis of the origin of LF is performed centrally, and not only at the periphery. PMID:25717293

  18. Gripping Mechanisms for Microgravity and Extreme Terrain and Vertical Climbing Micro Ground Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Clifford; Parness, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Asteroids and comets may provide insight into the origins of our solar system and the precursors to life on our planet. Near Earth objects offer an accessible target of opportunity, but are small and lack the gravity necessary for conventional wheeled travel. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative methods for maneuvering in these environments. This project researched and developed a method for gripping rock surfaces. Work has been completed on the design and prototyping of several possible hooked gripping mechanisms. Future work includes quantitative testing, downselection to a final design, and attachment to the robotic platform, Lemur IIb. A second project focuses on the development of a 100g, crash-proof robot capable of climbing vertical surfaces using a novel silicone adhesive. Capable of carrying video/audio payloads the robot may serve as a surveillance tool for the Department of Defense or as a method of pre-flight spacecraft inspections. A specialized track was developed to provide the specific loading conditions necessary for proper engagement of the adhesive. Both of these projects rely heavily on the shape deposition manufacturing process, being researched at JPL, and 3D printing.

  19. Is the coefficient of variation a valid measure for detecting sincerity of effort of grip strength?

    PubMed

    Shechtman, Orit

    1999-01-01

    The wide use of the coefficient of variation in detecting sincerity of effort is puzzling since existing research findings regarding its effectiveness are contradictory. The lack of empirical support in the literature raises the question of whether or not the coefficient of variation is a valid measure for detecting sincerity of effort. Many clinicians, especially those who use a computer software to calculate the coefficient of variation, may not understand how the coefficient of variation is derived and what it is based on. The coefficient of variation is a measure of relative variability and would be used correctly only if the average and the standard deviation of grip strength trials increased proportionally. This case study, however, demonstrated that the average and standard deviation of grip strength are independent. Thus, the coefficient of variation is not a valid measure of sincerity of effort. In addition, this study indicated that the coefficient of variation may be inflated in individuals after carpal tunnel release surgery. The author, therefore, cautions clinicians against the use of the coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort especially in injured individuals with compromised hand strength.

  20. The administration and interpretation of the rapid exchange grip test: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, Orit; Goodall, Sara K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if the administration and interpretation of the rapid exchange grip (REG) test vary among hand therapists nationally. The REG is used to determine sincerity of effort of grip strength. There are inconsistencies in the literature regarding the administration and interpretation of the REG, as various studies use different testing protocols and diverse interpretation criteria for what constitutes a sincere effort. As a result, we expected to find a lack of standardization in the administration and interpretation of the REG in clinical practice. We conducted a random nationwide survey of 200 hand therapists. The questionnaire items regarding the administration of the REG included patient position, test instructions, handle settings, handling of the dynamometer, hand switch rate, number of repetitions, and techniques used to record the score. The items for the interpretation of the REG involved questions regarding comparative tests. We found that the REG test lacks standardized administration protocols and interpretation criteria among therapists nationwide. The lack of standardization is likely to affect the reliability and validity of the REG and to hinder the therapist's ability to accurately report its outcomes. The implications of lack of standardization in assessment techniques to the profession are discussed.

  1. Segregated and overlapping neural circuits exist for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Kristina A.; Coombes, Stephen A.; Planetta, Peggy J.; Vaillancourt, David E.

    2011-01-01

    A central topic in sensorimotor neuroscience is the static-dynamic dichotomy that exists throughout the nervous system. Previous work examining motor unit synchronization reports that the activation strategy and timing of motor units differ for static and dynamic tasks. However, it remains unclear whether segregated or overlapping blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity exists in the brain for static and dynamic motor control. This study compared the neural circuits associated with the production of static force to those associated with the production of dynamic force pulses. To that end, healthy young adults (n = 17) completed static and dynamic precision grip force tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Both tasks activated core regions within the visuomotor network, including primary and sensory motor cortices, premotor cortices, multiple visual areas, putamen, and cerebellum. Static force was associated with unique activity in a right-lateralized cortical network including inferior parietal lobe, ventral premotor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, dynamic force was associated with unique activity in left-lateralized and midline cortical regions, including supplementary motor area, superior parietal lobe, fusiform gyrus, and visual area V3. These findings provide the first neuroimaging evidence supporting a lateralized pattern of brain activity for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force. PMID:22109998

  2. Positive force feedback in development of substrate grip in the stick insect tarsus.

    PubMed

    Zill, Sasha N; Chaudhry, Sumaiya; Exter, Annelie; Büschges, Ansgar; Schmitz, Josef

    2014-09-01

    The mechanics of substrate adhesion has recently been intensively studied in insects but less is known about the sensorimotor control of substrate engagement. We characterized the responses and motor effects of tarsal campaniform sensilla in stick insects to understand how sensory signals of force could contribute to substrate grip. The tarsi consist of a chain of segments linked by highly flexible articulations. Morphological studies showed that one to four campaniform sensilla are located on the distal end of each segment. Activities of the receptors were recorded neurographically and sensilla were identified by stimulation and ablation of their cuticular caps. Responses were characterized to bending forces and axial loads, muscle contractions and to forces applied to the retractor apodeme (tendon). The tarsal sensilla effectively encoded both the rate and amplitude of loads and muscle forces, but only when movement was resisted. Mechanical stimulation of the receptors produced activation of motor neurons in the retractor unguis and tibial flexor muscles. These findings indicate that campaniform sensilla can provide information about the effectiveness of the leg muscles in generating substrate adherence. They can also produce positive force feedback that could contribute to the development of substrate grip and stabilization of the tarsal chain.

  3. Grip force control and hand dexterity are impaired in individuals with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Kauê Carvalho de Almeida; Borges, Leandro da Silva; Hatanaka, Elaine; Rolim, Luiz Clemente; de Freitas, Paulo Barbosa

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) affects the sensory function of the hands and, consequently, may negatively impact hand dexterity, maximum grip strength (GSMax), and hand grip force (GF) control during object manipulation. The aims of this study were to examine and compare the GF control during a simple holding task as well as GSMax and hand dexterity of individuals with DPN and healthy controls. Ten type 2 diabetic individuals diagnosed with DPN and ten age- and gender-matched healthy controls performed two traditional timed hand dexterity tests (i.e., nine-hole peg test and Jebsen-Taylor hand function test), a GSMax test, and a GF control test (i.e., hold a instrumented handle). The results indicated that individuals with DPN and controls produced similar GSMax. However, individuals with DPN took longer to perform the hand dexterity tests and set lower safety margin (exerted lower GF) than controls when holding the handle. The findings showed that mild to moderate DPN did not significantly affect maximum hand force generation, but does impair hand dexterity and hand GF control, which could impair the performance of daily living manipulation tasks and put them in risk of easily dropping handheld objects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. GRiP: a computational tool to simulate transcription factor binding in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Zabet, Nicolae Radu; Adryan, Boris

    2012-05-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate gene activity by binding to specific sites on the DNA. Understanding the way these molecules locate their target site is of great importance in understanding gene regulation. We developed a comprehensive computational model of this process and estimated the model parameters in (N.R.Zabet and B.Adryan, submitted for publication). GRiP (gene regulation in prokaryotes) is a highly versatile implementation of this model and simulates the search process in a computationally efficient way. This program aims to provide researchers in the field with a flexible and highly customizable simulation framework. Its features include representation of DNA sequence, TFs and the interaction between TFs and the DNA (facilitated diffusion mechanism), or between various TFs (cooperative behaviour). The software will record both information on the dynamics associated with the search process (locations of molecules) and also steady-state results (affinity landscape, occupancy-bias and collision hotspots). http://logic.sysbiol.cam.ac.uk/grip, program and source code

  5. Measurement of finger joint angles and maximum finger forces during cylinder grip activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, J W; Rim, K

    1991-03-01

    Finger joint angles and finger forces during maximal cylindrical grasping were measured using multi-camera photogrammetry and pressure-sensitive sheets, respectively. The experimental data were collected from four healthy subjects gripping cylinders of five different sizes. For joint angles, an image analysis system was used to digitize slides showing markers. During the calibration of the camera system, both the nonlinear least square and the direct linear transform methods were applied and compared, the former providing the fewer errors; it was used to determine joint angles. Data were collected from the pressure-sensitive grip films by using the same image analysis system as used in the collection of the joint angle data. The method of using pressure-sensitive sheets provided an estimation of the weighted centre of the phalangeal forces. Results indicate that finger flexion angles at the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints gradually increase as cylinder diameter decreases, but that at the distal interphalangeal joint the angle remains constant throughout all cylinder sizes. It was also found that most of the radio-ulnar deviation and the axial rotation angles at the finger joints deviate from zero, but the deviations are small. For the force measurement, it was found that total finger force increases as cylinder size decreases, and the phalangeal force centres are not located at the mid-points of the phalanges. The data obtained in this experiment would be useful for muscle force predictions and for the design of handles.

  6. Electric Field Measurements During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Field Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, Monte G.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field program, a system of 6 electric field mills was flown on one of NASA's Global Hawk aircraft. We placed several mills on the aircraft to enable us to measure the vector electric field. We created a distributed, ethernet-connected system so that each sensor has its own embedded Linux system, complete with web server. This makes our current generation system fully "sensor web enabled." The Global Hawk has several unique qualities, but relevant to quality storm electric field measurements are high altitude (20 km) and long duration (20-30 hours) flights. There are several aircraft participating in the GRIP program, and coordinated measurements are happening. Lightning and electric field measurements will be used to study the relationships between lightning and other storm characteristics. It has been long understood that lightning can be used as a marker for strong convective activity. Past research and field programs suggest that lightning flash rate may serve as an indicator and precursor for rapid intensification change in tropical cyclones and hurricanes. We have the opportunity to sample hurricanes for many hours at a time and observe intensification (or de-intensification) periods. The electrical properties of hurricanes during such periods are not well known. American

  7. Efficiency of grip force adjustments for impulsive loading during imposed and actively produced collisions.

    PubMed

    Delevoye-Turrell, Y N; Li, F-X; Wing, A M

    2003-10-01

    During object manipulation, both predictive feedforward and reactive feedback mechanisms are available to adjust grip force (GF) levels to compensate for the destabilizing effects of load force changes. During collisions, load force increases impulsively (< 20 ms). Thus, only predictive control of GF can be used to ensure grasp stabilization. A collision paradigm is here used to investigate the effects of practice and vision on the efficiency of the predictive control of GF. Subjects actively produced or received an imposed collision with a pendulum. Subjects were more efficient (used smaller GF for identical loads) when producing than when receiving the collisions. Effects of practice were evident in the active producing task only, with GF levels reducing over repetitions, suggesting that sensorimotor memory for the task was used to adjust GF more efficiently. With imposed collisions, GF levels did not reduce with repetition, which suggests that a direct relation between motor action and sensory feedback may be necessary to improve efficiency. Nevertheless, in this condition GF was lower with visual feedback, indicating potential for more efficient grip possibly associated with subjects degree of confidence. We discuss the implications of these results for accounts of the predictive and the reactive control of movement.

  8. Effect of skin hydration on the dynamics of fingertip gripping contact

    PubMed Central

    André, T.; Lévesque, V.; Hayward, V.; Lefèvre, P.; Thonnard, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of fingertip contact manifest themselves in the complex skin movements observed during the transition from a stuck state to a fully developed slip. While investigating this transition, we found that it depended on skin hydration. To quantify this dependency, we asked subjects to slide their index fingertip on a glass surface while keeping the normal component of the interaction force constant with the help of visual feedback. Skin deformation inside the contact region was imaged with an optical apparatus that allowed us to quantify the relative sizes of the slipping and sticking regions. The ratio of the stuck skin area to the total contact area decreased linearly from 1 to 0 when the tangential force component increased from 0 to a maximum. The slope of this relationship was inversely correlated to the normal force component. The skin hydration level dramatically affected the dynamics of the contact encapsulated in the course of evolution from sticking to slipping. The specific effect was to reduce the tendency of a contact to slip, regardless of the variations of the coefficient of friction. Since grips were more unstable under dry skin conditions, our results suggest that the nervous system responds to dry skin by exaggerated grip forces that cannot be simply explained by a change in the coefficient of friction. PMID:21490002

  9. Gripping Mechanisms for Microgravity and Extreme Terrain and Vertical Climbing Micro Ground Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Clifford; Parness, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Asteroids and comets may provide insight into the origins of our solar system and the precursors to life on our planet. Near Earth objects offer an accessible target of opportunity, but are small and lack the gravity necessary for conventional wheeled travel. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative methods for maneuvering in these environments. This project researched and developed a method for gripping rock surfaces. Work has been completed on the design and prototyping of several possible hooked gripping mechanisms. Future work includes quantitative testing, downselection to a final design, and attachment to the robotic platform, Lemur IIb. A second project focuses on the development of a 100g, crash-proof robot capable of climbing vertical surfaces using a novel silicone adhesive. Capable of carrying video/audio payloads the robot may serve as a surveillance tool for the Department of Defense or as a method of pre-flight spacecraft inspections. A specialized track was developed to provide the specific loading conditions necessary for proper engagement of the adhesive. Both of these projects rely heavily on the shape deposition manufacturing process, being researched at JPL, and 3D printing.

  10. MusicGlove: motivating and quantifying hand movement rehabilitation by using functional grips to play music.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Nizan; Chan, Vicky; Zondervan, Danny; Bachman, Mark; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2011-01-01

    People with stroke typically must perform much of their hand exercise at home without professional assistance as soon as two weeks after the stroke. Without feedback and encouragement, individuals often lose motivation to practice using the affected hand, and this disuse contributes to further declines in hand function. We developed the MusicGlove as a way to facilitate and motivate at home practice of hand movement. This low-cost device uses music as an interactive and motivating medium to guide hand exercise and to quantitatively assess hand movement recovery. It requires the user to practice functional movements, including pincer grip, key-pinch grip, and finger-thumb opposition, by using those movements to play different musical notes, played along to songs displayed by an interactive computer game. We report here the design of the glove and the results of a single-session experiment with 10 participants with chronic stroke. We found that the glove is well suited for use by people with an impairment level quantified by a Box and Blocks score of at least around 7; that the glove can be used to obtain a measure of hand dexterity (% of notes hit) that correlates strongly with the Box and Blocks score; and that the incorporation of music into training significantly improved both objective measures of hand motor performance and self-ratings of motivation for training in the single session.

  11. Biodynamic response of human fingers in a power grip subjected to a random vibration.

    PubMed

    Dong, R G; Welcome, D E; McDowell, T W; Wu, J Z

    2004-08-01

    Knowledge of the biodynamic response (BR) of the human hand-arm system is an important part of the foundation for the measurement and assessment of hand-transmitted vibration exposure. This study investigated the BR of human fingers in a power grip subjected to a random vibration. Ten male subjects were used in the experiment. Each subject applied three coupling actions to a simulated tool handle at three different finger grip force levels. The BR is practically independent of the hand coupling actions for frequencies at or above 100 Hz. Above 50 Hz, the BR is correlated to finger and hand sizes. Increasing the finger coupling force significantly increases the BR. Therefore, hand forces should be measured and used when assessing hand-transmitted vibration exposure. The results also show that under a constant-velocity vibration, the finger vibration power absorption at frequencies above 200 Hz is approximately twice that at frequencies below 100 Hz. This suggests that the frequency weighting specified in the current ISO 5349-1 (2001) may underestimate the high frequency effect on vibration-induced finger disorders.

  12. Effect of skin hydration on the dynamics of fingertip gripping contact.

    PubMed

    André, T; Lévesque, V; Hayward, V; Lefèvre, P; Thonnard, J-L

    2011-11-07

    The dynamics of fingertip contact manifest themselves in the complex skin movements observed during the transition from a stuck state to a fully developed slip. While investigating this transition, we found that it depended on skin hydration. To quantify this dependency, we asked subjects to slide their index fingertip on a glass surface while keeping the normal component of the interaction force constant with the help of visual feedback. Skin deformation inside the contact region was imaged with an optical apparatus that allowed us to quantify the relative sizes of the slipping and sticking regions. The ratio of the stuck skin area to the total contact area decreased linearly from 1 to 0 when the tangential force component increased from 0 to a maximum. The slope of this relationship was inversely correlated to the normal force component. The skin hydration level dramatically affected the dynamics of the contact encapsulated in the course of evolution from sticking to slipping. The specific effect was to reduce the tendency of a contact to slip, regardless of the variations of the coefficient of friction. Since grips were more unstable under dry skin conditions, our results suggest that the nervous system responds to dry skin by exaggerated grip forces that cannot be simply explained by a change in the coefficient of friction.

  13. Segregated and overlapping neural circuits exist for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force.

    PubMed

    Neely, Kristina A; Coombes, Stephen A; Planetta, Peggy J; Vaillancourt, David E

    2013-03-01

    A central topic in sensorimotor neuroscience is the static-dynamic dichotomy that exists throughout the nervous system. Previous work examining motor unit synchronization reports that the activation strategy and timing of motor units differ for static and dynamic tasks. However, it remains unclear whether segregated or overlapping blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity exists in the brain for static and dynamic motor control. This study compared the neural circuits associated with the production of static force to those associated with the production of dynamic force pulses. To that end, healthy young adults (n = 17) completed static and dynamic precision grip force tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Both tasks activated core regions within the visuomotor network, including primary and sensory motor cortices, premotor cortices, multiple visual areas, putamen, and cerebellum. Static force was associated with unique activity in a right-lateralized cortical network including inferior parietal lobe, ventral premotor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, dynamic force was associated with unique activity in left-lateralized and midline cortical regions, including supplementary motor area, superior parietal lobe, fusiform gyrus, and visual area V3. These findings provide the first neuroimaging evidence supporting a lateralized pattern of brain activity for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force.

  14. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer Wind Speed and Rain Rate Retrievals during the 2010 GRIP Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahawneh, Saleem; Farrar, Spencer; Johnson, James; Jones, W. Linwood; Roberts, Jason; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing observations of hurricanes, from NOAA and USAF hurricane surveillance aircraft, provide vital data for hurricane research and operations, for forecasting the intensity and track of tropical storms. The current operational standard for hurricane wind speed and rain rate measurements is the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a nadir viewing passive microwave airborne remote sensor. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, HIRAD, will extend the nadir viewing SFMR capability to provide wide swath images of wind speed and rain rate, while flying on a high altitude aircraft. HIRAD was first flown in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes, GRIP, NASA hurricane field experiment in 2010. This paper reports on geophysical retrieval results and provides hurricane images from GRIP flights. An overview of the HIRAD instrument and the radiative transfer theory based, wind speed/rain rate retrieval algorithm is included. Results are presented for hurricane wind speed and rain rate for Earl and Karl, with comparison to collocated SFMR retrievals and WP3D Fuselage Radar images for validation purposes.

  15. GRiP: a computational tool to simulate transcription factor binding in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Zabet, Nicolae Radu; Adryan, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that regulate gene activity by binding to specific sites on the DNA. Understanding the way these molecules locate their target site is of great importance in understanding gene regulation. We developed a comprehensive computational model of this process and estimated the model parameters in (N.R.Zabet and B.Adryan, submitted for publication). Results: GRiP (gene regulation in prokaryotes) is a highly versatile implementation of this model and simulates the search process in a computationally efficient way. This program aims to provide researchers in the field with a flexible and highly customizable simulation framework. Its features include representation of DNA sequence, TFs and the interaction between TFs and the DNA (facilitated diffusion mechanism), or between various TFs (cooperative behaviour). The software will record both information on the dynamics associated with the search process (locations of molecules) and also steady-state results (affinity landscape, occupancy-bias and collision hotspots). Availability: http://logic.sysbiol.cam.ac.uk/grip, program and source code Contact: n.r.zabet@gen.cam.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22426343

  16. The effect of vibration exposure during haul truck operation on grip strength, touch sensation, and balance.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Jonisha; Porter, William; Mayton, Alan; Xu, Xueyan; Weston, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Falls from mobile equipment are reported at surface mine quarry operations each year in considerable numbers. Research shows that a preponderance of falls occur while getting on/off mobile equipment. Contributing factors to the risk of falls include the usage of ladders, exiting onto a slippery surface, and foot or hand slippage. Balance issues may also contribute to fall risks for mobile equipment operators who are exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV). For this reason, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Office of Mine Safety and Health Research conducted a study at four participating mine sites with seven haul truck operators. The purpose was to ascertain whether WBV and hand-arm vibration (HAV) exposures for quarry haul truck operators were linked to short-term decreases in performance in relation to postural stability, touch sensation threshold, and grip strength that are of crucial importance when getting on/off the trucks. WBV measures of frequency-weighted RMS accelerations (wRMS) and vibration dose value (VDV), when compared to the ISO/ANSI standards, were mostly below levels identified for the Health Guidance Caution Zone (HGCZ), although there were instances where the levels were within and above the specified Exposure Action Value. Comparably, all mean HAV levels, when compared to the ISO/ANSI standards, were below the HGCZ. For the existing conditions and equipment, no significant correlation could be identified between the WBV, HAV, postural stability, touch sensation threshold, and grip strength measures taken during this study.

  17. Muscular forearm activation in hand-grip tasks with superimposition of mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, L; Tirabasso, A; Lunghi, A; Di Giovanni, R; Sacco, F; Marchetti, E

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the muscular activation of the forearm, with or without vibration stimuli at different frequencies while performing a grip tasks of 45s at various level of exerted force. In 16 individuals, 9 females and 7 males, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of extensor carpi radialis longus and the flexor carpi ulnari muscles were assessed. At a short latency from onset EMG, RMS and the level of MU synchronization were assessed to evaluate the muscular adaptations. Whilst a trend of decay of EMG Median frequency (MDFd) was employed as an index of muscular fatigue. Muscular tasks consists of the grip of an instrumented handle at a force level of 20%, 30%, 40%, 60% of the maximum voluntary force. Vibration was supplied by a shaker to the hand in mono-frequential waves at 20, 30, 33 and 40Hz. In relation to EMG, RMS and MU synchronization, the muscular activation does not seem to change with the superimposition of the mechanical vibrations, on the contrary a lower MDFd was observed at 33Hz than in absence of vibration. This suggests an early muscular fatigue induced by vibration due to the fact that 33Hz is a resonance frequency for the hand-arm system.

  18. The coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength, Part I: the statistical principle.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, O

    2001-01-01

    The coefficient of variation (CV) is a widely used measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength despite contradictory research findings and lack of empirical support in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the CV is an appropriate measure of sincerity of effort. One hundred forty-six uninjured volunteers underwent a series of grip strength tests. The mean, standard deviation (SD), and CV of repeated strength trials were calculated, and paired comparisons were conducted between maximal and submaximal efforts. While the mean of maximal trials was significantly greater, there were no differences in SD between maximal and submaximal trials. Therefore, the increased CV associated with submaximal effort was an artifact of reduced torque rather than an indicator of a true increase in variability. Consequently, the CV is not an appropriate measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength.

  19. Effects of a 10-Week Introductory Judo Course on Postural Control During a Bilateral Reactionary Gripping Task.

    PubMed

    Muddle, Tyler W D; Fukuda, David H; Wang, Ran; Riffe, Joshua J; Church, David D; Beyer, Kyle S; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the effect of a 10-week introductory judo course on postural control during a bilateral reactionary gripping task using different stance conditions. A total of 20 volunteers were divided into experimental (JDO) and control (CON) groups. Countermovement jump was measured and center of pressure variables were evaluated while performing a bilateral reactionary gripping task under different stance conditions during pre- and posttesting. No interactions were observed for the center of pressure variables (p > .05), while both countermovement jump power (+165.4 W; p = .036) and height (+3.5 cm; p = .018) significantly improved in the JDO group following the 10-week course. Results indicate that 10 weeks of an introductory judo course has no effect on postural control while performing a bilateral reactionary gripping task using different stance conditions.

  20. Modified forelimb grip strength test detects aging-associated physiological decline in skeletal muscle function in male mice.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Hikari; Yamamoto, Koichi; Nozato, Satoko; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Imaizumi, Yuki; Hongyo, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Serina; Takeda, Masao; Oguro, Ryosuke; Takami, Yoichi; Itoh, Norihisa; Takeya, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Ken; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2017-02-08

    The conventional forelimb grip strength test is a widely used method to assess skeletal muscle function in rodents; in this study, we modified this method to improve its variability and consistency. The modified test had lower variability among trials and days than the conventional test in young C57BL6 mice, especially by improving the variabilities in male. The modified test was more sensitive than the conventional test to detect a difference in motor function between female and male mice, or between young and old male mice. When the modified test was performed on male mice during the aging process, reduction of grip strength manifested between 18 and 24 months of age at the group level and at the individual level. The modified test was similar to the conventional test in detecting skeletal muscle dysfunction in young male dystrophic mice. Thus, the modified forelimb grip strength test, with its improved validity and reliability may be an ideal substitute for the conventional method.

  1. Haptic feedback enhances grip force control of sEMG-controlled prosthetic hands in targeted reinnervation amputees.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keehoon; Colgate, J Edward

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that haptic feedback would enhance grip force control of surface electromyography (sEMG)-controlled prosthetic hands for targeted reinnervation (TR) amputees. A new miniature haptic device, a tactor, that can deliver touch, pressure, shear, and temperature sensation, allows modality-matching haptic feedback. TR surgery that creates sensory regions on the patient's skin that refer to the surface of the missing limb allows somatotopic-matching haptic feedback. This paper evaluates the hypothesis via an sEMG-controlled virtual prosthetic arm operated by TR amputees under diverse haptic feedback conditions. The results indicate that the grip force control is significantly enhanced via the haptic feedback. However, the simultaneous display of two haptic channels (pressure and shear) does not enhance, but instead degrades, grip force control.

  2. Equivalent comfort contours for vertical vibration of steering wheels: effect of vibration magnitude, grip force, and hand position.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Miyuki; Griffin, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Vehicle drivers receive tactile feedback from steering-wheel vibration that depends on the frequency and magnitude of the vibration. From an experiment with 12 subjects, equivalent comfort contours were determined for vertical vibration of the hands at two positions with three grip forces. The perceived intensity of the vibration was determined using the method of magnitude estimation over a range of frequencies (4-250 Hz) and magnitudes (0.1-1.58 ms(-2) r.m.s.). Absolute thresholds for vibration perception were also determined for the two hand positions over the same frequency range. The shapes of the comfort contours were strongly dependent on vibration magnitude and also influenced by grip force, indicating that the appropriate frequency weighting depends on vibration magnitude and grip force. There was only a small effect of hand position. The findings are explained by characteristics of the Pacinian and non-Pacinian tactile channels in the glabrous skin of the hand.

  3. Influence of finger amputation on grip strength and objectively measured hand function: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kuret, Zala; Burger, Helena; Vidmar, Gaj

    2015-06-01

    Finger amputations are common and hands are essential for functioning, but studies on factors influencing functioning after finger amputation are lacking. Therefore, we aimed to explore the influence of the number and level of amputated fingers on hand function and grip strength. A prospective descriptive cross-sectional study involving 69 patients with partial or complete amputation of one or more fingers of one hand was carried out. The function of both hands was assessed using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure test; grip strength was measured in 42 patients. We confirmed that finger amputation worsens hand function (especially tripod and tip pinch) and reduces grip strength, whereby the extent of the worsening depends on amputation type - it is the smallest after thumb amputation and the largest after amputation of the index finger and fingers III-V. However, because of the variety of amputation types, we recommend that future studies either involve very large samples or focus on specific amputations.

  4. Effect of the Mandibular Orthopedic Repositioning Appliance (MORA) on Forearm Muscle Activation and Grasping Power during Pinch and Hook Grip

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Park, Yi-Jeong; Park, Hye-Min; Bae, Hae-Jin; Yu, Min-Ji; Choi, Hee-Won; Hwang, Na-Young

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study verified the changes in muscle activities and grasping power during maximal isometric exercise of the forearm and masseter muscle with and without a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance (MORA). It also offers basic data for defining the correlation of function of hand with mouth. [Methods] EMG was used to measure masticatory muscle, flexor bundle and extensor bundle activities with or without MORA while subjects performed the hook grip and pinch grip. The measuring tool used for measuring grip strength was the same as that used for measuring pinch and hook strength. The subjects were 28 healthy young adults. [Result] Muscle activity and grasping power significantly increased when wearing the MORA. [Conclusion] The result indicates that wearing MORA can increase muscle activity and grasping power of forearm and masseter muscle. We think wearing MORA might help improve the function of the forearm because it activates the function of the masseter. PMID:24648630

  5. Grip and Pinch Strength in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Primary Osteoarthritis of the Hand: A Reproducibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Ziv, Efrat; Patish, Hagar; Dvir, Zeevi

    2008-01-01

    Grip, Key Pinch (KP), 3 Point Pinch (3PP) and 2 Point Pinch (2PP) strengths were measured twice weekly in 32 women with primary osteoarthritis of the hand (POAH) and 25 healthy women. Reproducibility was assessed by standard error of measurement (SEM) and the coefficient of variation (CV). Cutoff values for significant improvement or deterioration were determined and expressed, respectively, as either the smallest detectable difference (SDD) or critical difference (CD). The SDD and CD of grip and pinch strengths were higher in POAH patients than in the healthy group. Among the pinch tests the 2PP findings were least reproducible. The relatively high SDD and CD scores indicate that improvement may be detected only in patients with moderate to severe weakness of grip and pinch. Furthermore, in POAH patients, diagnosing strength changes using the 2PP test is invalid due to low reproducibility. PMID:19478930

  6. [Evaluation of grip strength in normal and obese Wistar rats submitted to swimming with overload after median nerve compression].

    PubMed

    Coradinia, Josinéia Gresele; Kakihata, Camila Mayumi Martin; Kunz, Regina Inês; Errero, Tatiane Kamada; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2015-01-01

    To verify the functionality through muscle grip strength in animals with obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) and in control animals, which suffered compression of the right median nerve, and treated with swimming with overload. During the first five days of life, neonatal Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of MSG. The control group received a hypertonic saline solution. Forty-eight rats were divided into six groups: G1 (control); G2 (control + injury); G3 (control + injury + swimming); G4 (obese); G5 (obese + injury); G6 (obese + injury + swimming). The animals in groups G2, G3, G5 and G6 were submitted to compression of the median nerve and G3 and G6 groups were treated, after injury, with swimming exercise with load for three weeks. The swimming exercise had a progressive duration, according to the week, of 20, 30 and 40minutes. Muscle strength was assessed using a grip strength meter preoperatively and on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st days after surgery. The results were expressed and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. When the grip strength was compared among assessments regardless of group, in the second assessment the animals exhibited lower grip strength. G1 and G4 groups had greater grip strength, compared to G2, G3, G4 and G6. The swimming exercise with overload has not been effective in promoting improvement in muscle grip strength after compression injury of the right median nerve in control and in obese-MSG rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Fast-adapting mechanoreceptors are important for force control in precision grip but not for sensorimotor memory

    PubMed Central

    Park, Susanna B.; Davare, Marco; Falla, Marika; Kennedy, William R.; Selim, Mona M.; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen

    2016-01-01

    Sensory feedback from cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the fingertips is important in effective object manipulation, allowing appropriate scaling of grip and load forces during precision grip. However, the role of mechanoreceptor subtypes in these tasks remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, psychophysical tasks that may specifically assess function of type I fast-adapting (FAI) and slowly adapting (SAI) mechanoreceptors were used with object manipulation experiments to examine the regulation of grip force control in an experimental model of graded reduction in tactile sensitivity (healthy volunteers wearing 2 layers of latex gloves). With gloves, tactile sensitivity decreased significantly from 1.9 ± 0.4 to 12.3 ± 2.2 μm in the Bumps task assessing function of FAI afferents but not in a grating orientation task assessing SAI afferents (1.6 ± 0.1 to 1.8 ± 0.2 mm). Six axis force/torque sensors measured peak grip (PGF) and load (PLF) forces generated by the fingertips during a grip-lift task. With gloves there was a significant increase of PGF (14 ± 6%), PLF (17 ± 5%), and grip and load force rates (26 ± 8%, 20 ± 8%). A variable-weight series task was used to examine sensorimotor memory. There was a 20% increase in PGF when the lift of a light object was preceded by a heavy relative to a light object. This relationship was not significantly altered when lifting with gloves, suggesting that the addition of gloves did not change sensorimotor memory effects. We conclude that FAI fibers may be important for the online force scaling but not for the buildup of a sensorimotor memory. PMID:27052582

  8. Fast-adapting mechanoreceptors are important for force control in precision grip but not for sensorimotor memory.

    PubMed

    Park, Susanna B; Davare, Marco; Falla, Marika; Kennedy, William R; Selim, Mona M; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Koltzenburg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Sensory feedback from cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the fingertips is important in effective object manipulation, allowing appropriate scaling of grip and load forces during precision grip. However, the role of mechanoreceptor subtypes in these tasks remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, psychophysical tasks that may specifically assess function of type I fast-adapting (FAI) and slowly adapting (SAI) mechanoreceptors were used with object manipulation experiments to examine the regulation of grip force control in an experimental model of graded reduction in tactile sensitivity (healthy volunteers wearing 2 layers of latex gloves). With gloves, tactile sensitivity decreased significantly from 1.9 ± 0.4 to 12.3 ± 2.2 μm in the Bumps task assessing function of FAI afferents but not in a grating orientation task assessing SAI afferents (1.6 ± 0.1 to 1.8 ± 0.2 mm). Six axis force/torque sensors measured peak grip (PGF) and load (PLF) forces generated by the fingertips during a grip-lift task. With gloves there was a significant increase of PGF (14 ± 6%), PLF (17 ± 5%), and grip and load force rates (26 ± 8%, 20 ± 8%). A variable-weight series task was used to examine sensorimotor memory. There was a 20% increase in PGF when the lift of a light object was preceded by a heavy relative to a light object. This relationship was not significantly altered when lifting with gloves, suggesting that the addition of gloves did not change sensorimotor memory effects. We conclude that FAI fibers may be important for the online force scaling but not for the buildup of a sensorimotor memory. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. The Contribution of Prenatal Environment and Genetic Factors to the Association between Birth Weight and Adult Grip Strength

    PubMed Central

    Ridgway, Charlotte L.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Derom, Catherine; Beunen, Gaston; Fagard, Robert; Vlietinck, Robert; Ekelund, Ulf; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2011-01-01

    Low birth weight has been associated with reduced hand grip strength, which is a marker of future physical function and disease risk. The aim of this study was to apply a twin pair approach, using both ‘individual’ data and ‘within-pair’ differences, to investigate the influence of birth weight on hand grip strength and whether this association may be mediated through fat free mass (FFM). Participants from the East Flanders Prospective Twin Survey were included if born without congenital abnormalities, birth weight >500 g and ≥22 weeks of gestation. Follow up in adulthood (age: 18–34 year), included anthropometric measures and hand grip (n = 783 individuals, n = 326 same-sex twin pairs). Birth weight was positively associated with hand grip strength (β = 2.60 kg, 95% CI 1.52, 3.67, p<0.001) and FFM (β = 4.2, 95% CI 3.16, 5.24, p<0.001), adjusted for gestational age, sex and adult age. Using ‘within-pair’ analyses, the birth weight hand grip association was significant in DZ men only (β = 5.82, 95% CI 0.67, 10.97, p = 0.028), which was attenuated following adjustment for FFM. Within-pair birth weight FFM associations were most pronounced in DZ men (β = 11.20, 95% CI 7.18, 15.22, p<0.001). Our ‘individual’ analyses show that higher birth weight is associated with greater adult hand grip strength, which is mediated through greater adult FFM. The ‘within-pair’ analyses confirm this observation and furthermore show that, particularly in men, genetic factors may in part explain this association, as birth weight differences in DZ men result in greater differences in adult strength and FFM. PMID:21423582

  10. GRIP: A web-based system for constructing Gold Standard datasets for protein-protein interaction prediction.

    PubMed

    Browne, Fiona; Wang, Haiying; Zheng, Huiru; Azuaje, Francisco

    2009-01-26

    Information about protein interaction networks is fundamental to understanding protein function and cellular processes. Interaction patterns among proteins can suggest new drug targets and aid in the design of new therapeutic interventions. Efforts have been made to map interactions on a proteomic-wide scale using both experimental and computational techniques. Reference datasets that contain known interacting proteins (positive cases) and non-interacting proteins (negative cases) are essential to support computational prediction and validation of protein-protein interactions. Information on known interacting and non interacting proteins are usually stored within databases. Extraction of these data can be both complex and time consuming. Although, the automatic construction of reference datasets for classification is a useful resource for researchers no public resource currently exists to perform this task. GRIP (Gold Reference dataset constructor from Information on Protein complexes) is a web-based system that provides researchers with the functionality to create reference datasets for protein-protein interaction prediction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both positive and negative cases for a reference dataset can be extracted, organised and downloaded by the user. GRIP also provides an upload facility whereby users can submit proteins to determine protein complex membership. A search facility is provided where a user can search for protein complex information in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. GRIP is developed to retrieve information on protein complex, cellular localisation, and physical and genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Manual construction of reference datasets can be a time consuming process requiring programming knowledge. GRIP simplifies and speeds up this process by allowing users to automatically construct reference datasets. GRIP is free to access at http://rosalind.infj.ulst.ac.uk/GRIP/.

  11. Modeling the Maturation of Grip Selection Planning and Action Representation: Insights from Typical and Atypical Motor Development

    PubMed Central

    Fuelscher, Ian; Williams, Jacqueline; Wilmut, Kate; Enticott, Peter G.; Hyde, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the purported association between developmental changes in grip selection planning and improvements in an individual’s capacity to represent action at an internal level [i.e., motor imagery (MI)]. Participants were groups of healthy children aged 6–7 years and 8–12 years respectively, while a group of adolescents (13–17 years) and adults (18–34 years) allowed for consideration of childhood development in the broader context of motor maturation. A group of children aged 8–12 years with probable DCD (pDCD) was included as a reference group for atypical motor development. Participants’ proficiency to generate and/or engage internal action representations was inferred from performance on the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of MI. A grip selection task designed to elicit the end-state comfort (ESC) effect provided a window into the integrity of grip selection planning. Consistent with earlier accounts, the efficiency of grip selection planning followed a non-linear developmental progression in neurotypical individuals. As expected, analysis confirmed that these developmental improvements were predicted by an increased capacity to generate and/or engage internal action representations. The profile of this association remained stable throughout the (typical) developmental spectrum. These findings are consistent with computational accounts of action planning that argue that internal action representations are associated with the expression and development of grip selection planning across typical development. However, no such association was found for our sample of children with pDCD, suggesting that individuals with atypical motor skill may adopt an alternative, sub-optimal strategy to plan their grip selection compared to their same-age control peers. PMID:26903915

  12. Meta-analysis of self-gripping mesh (Progrip) versus sutured mesh in open inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Mittapalli, Devender; Rao, Ahsan; Prasad, Raj; Ahmad, Niaz

    2014-04-01

    This metaanalysis was designed to systematically analyse all published randomized controlled trials comparing self-gripping mesh (ProGrip) and sutured mesh to analyse early and long term outcomes for open inguinal hernia repair. A literature search was performed using the Cochrane Colorectal Cancer Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index Expanded. Randomized trials comparing self-gripping mesh with sutured mesh were included. Statistical analysis was performed using Review Manager Version 5.2 software. The primary outcome measures were hernia recurrence and chronic pain after operation. Secondary outcome measures included surgical time, wound complications and perioperative complications. Five randomized trials were identified as suitable, including 1170 patients. There was no significant difference between the two types of mesh repairs in perioperative complications, wound haematoma, chronic groin pain and hernia recurrence. Wound infection was lower in self gripping mesh group compared to sutured mesh but this was not statistically significant (risk ratio (RR) 0.57, 95% confidence interval 0.30-1.06, P = 0.08). The duration of operation was significantly shorter with self-gripping mesh compared to sutured mesh with a mean difference of -5.48 min [-9.31, -1.64] Z = 2.80 (P = 0.005). Self-gripping mesh was associated with shorter operative time compared to sutured mesh. Both types of mesh repairs have comparable perioperative and long term outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling the Maturation of Grip Selection Planning and Action Representation: Insights from Typical and Atypical Motor Development.

    PubMed

    Fuelscher, Ian; Williams, Jacqueline; Wilmut, Kate; Enticott, Peter G; Hyde, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the purported association between developmental changes in grip selection planning and improvements in an individual's capacity to represent action at an internal level [i.e., motor imagery (MI)]. Participants were groups of healthy children aged 6-7 years and 8-12 years respectively, while a group of adolescents (13-17 years) and adults (18-34 years) allowed for consideration of childhood development in the broader context of motor maturation. A group of children aged 8-12 years with probable DCD (pDCD) was included as a reference group for atypical motor development. Participants' proficiency to generate and/or engage internal action representations was inferred from performance on the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of MI. A grip selection task designed to elicit the end-state comfort (ESC) effect provided a window into the integrity of grip selection planning. Consistent with earlier accounts, the efficiency of grip selection planning followed a non-linear developmental progression in neurotypical individuals. As expected, analysis confirmed that these developmental improvements were predicted by an increased capacity to generate and/or engage internal action representations. The profile of this association remained stable throughout the (typical) developmental spectrum. These findings are consistent with computational accounts of action planning that argue that internal action representations are associated with the expression and development of grip selection planning across typical development. However, no such association was found for our sample of children with pDCD, suggesting that individuals with atypical motor skill may adopt an alternative, sub-optimal strategy to plan their grip selection compared to their same-age control peers.

  14. Hard X-ray imaging survey of the Galactic plane with the Caltech gamma-ray imaging payload GRIP-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbel, S.; Cook, W. R.; Harrison, F. A.; Prince, T. A.; Schindler, S. M.; Wang, S.

    1997-01-01

    In a two-day balloon flight during October 1995, the Caltech coded aperture gamma ray imaging payload (GRIP-2) imaged various fields in the Galactic plane and center in the 25 to 600 keV energy band. The large phoswich detector, the 15 deg field of view, the 30 arcmin angular resolution and 6 arcmin point source localization capability of GRIP-2 provides the possibility of surveying the accreting binary population of the Galaxy at high energy. The instrument is described and preliminary imaging results are reported on. The capabilities of this instrument for hard X-ray/gamma ray imaging are demonstrated.

  15. Coordinated isometric muscle commands adequately and erroneously programmed for the weight during lifting task with precision grip.

    PubMed

    Johansson, R S; Westling, G

    1988-01-01

    Small objects were lifted from a table, held in the air, and replaced using the precision grip between the index finger and thumb. The adaptation of motor commands to variations in the object's weight and sensori-motor mechanisms responsible for optimum performance of the transition between the various phases of the task were examined. The lifting movement involved mainly a flexion of the elbow joint. The grip force, the load force (vertical lifting force) and the vertical position were measured. Electromyographic activity (e.m.g.) was recorded from four antagonist pairs of hand/arm muscles primarily influencing the grip force or the load force. In the lifting series with constant weight, the force development was adequately programmed for the current weight during the loading phase (i.e. the phase of parallel increase in the load and grip forces during isometric conditions before the lift-off). The grip and load force rate trajectories were mainly single-peaked, bell-shaped and roughly proportional to the final force. In the lifting series with unexpected weight changes between lifts, it was established that these force rate profiles were programmed on the basis of the previous weight. Consequently, with lifts programmed for a lighter weight the object did not move at the end of the continuous force increase. Then the forces increased in a discontinous fashion until the force of gravity was overcome. With lifts programmed for a heavier weight, the high load and grip force rates at the moment the load force overcame the force of gravity caused a pronounced positional overshoot and a high grip force peak, respectively. In these conditions the erroneous programmed commands were automatically terminated by somatosensory signals elicited by the start of the movement. A similar triggering by somatosensory information applied to the release of programmed motor commands accounting for the unloading phase (i.e. the parallel decrease in the grip and load forces after the

  16. Reliability of the grip strength coefficient of variation for detecting sincerity in normal and blocked median nerve in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Wachter, N J; Mentzel, M; Hütz, R; Gülke, J

    2017-04-01

    In the assessment of hand and upper limb function, detecting sincerity of effort (SOE) for grip strength is of major importance to identifying feigned loss of strength. Measuring maximal grip strength with a dynamometer is very common, often combined with calculating the coefficient of variation (CV), a measure of the variation over the three grip strength trials. Little data is available about the relevance of these measurements in patients with median nerve impairment due to the heterogeneity of patient groups. This study examined the reliability of grip strength tests as well as the CV to detect SOE in healthy subjects. The power distribution of the individual fingers and the thenar was taken into account. To assess reliability, the measurements were performed in subjects with a median nerve block to simulate a nerve injury. The ability of 21 healthy volunteers to exert maximal grip force and to deliberately exert half-maximal force to simulate reduced SOE in a power grip was examined using the Jamar(®) dynamometer. The experiment was performed in a combined setting with and without median nerve block of the same subject. The force at the fingertips of digits 2-5 and at the thenar eminence was measured with a sensor glove with integrated pressure receptors. For each measurement, three trials were recorded subsequently and the mean and CV were calculated. When exerting submaximal force, the subjects reached 50-62% of maximal force, regardless of the median nerve block. The sensor glove revealed a significant reduction of force when exerting submaximal force (P1 sensor) with (P<0.032) and without median nerve block (P<0.017). An increase in CV at submaximal force was found, although it was not significant. SOE can be detected with the CV at the little finger at using a 10% cut-off (sensitivity 0.84 and 0.92 without and with median nerve block, respectively). These findings suggest low reliability of the power grip measurement with the Jamar(®) dynamometer, as

  17. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter For Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, R. P.; Hurford, G. J.; Boggs, S. E.; Zoglauer, A. C.; Wunderer, C. B.; Sample, J. G.; Turin, P.; McBride, S.; Smith, D. M.; Tajima, H.; Luke, P. N.; Amman, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    The new balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from 20 keV to > 10 MeV. GRIPS will address questions relevant to particle acceleration and energy release that have been raised by recent solar flare observations, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electron producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the accelerated electrons, and why do relativistic electron dominate in the corona? How does the composition of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM) situated 8 meters from the spectrometer to provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), using a similar technique to rotating-modulation-collimator imaging used on missions such as RHESSI but now taking advantage of the position sensitivity of the spectrometer. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e. as an active scatterer). A balloon platform for this instrument minimizes atmospheric attenuation and accommodates its weight and size, and long-duration balloon flights (LDBFs) from Antarctica allow for month-long uninterrupted observations of the Sun to continuously observe active regions and to maximize the chance of capturing a gamma-ray flare. A continental-US test flight is slated for 2012 with the eventual goal of Antarctic LDBFs of the completed instrument. In addition to the direct science return from these flights, GRIPS will prove these technologies for a future space

  18. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter For Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, R. P.; Hurford, G. J.; Boggs, S. E.; Zoglauer, A. C.; Wunderer, C. B.; Sample, J. G.; Turin, P.; McBride, S.; Smith, D. M.; Tajima, H.; Luke, P. N.; Amman, M. S.

    2009-05-01

    The new balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from 20 keV to > 10 MeV. GRIPS will address questions relevant to particle acceleration and energy release that have been raised by recent solar flare observations, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electron producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the accelerated electrons, and why do relativistic electron dominate in the corona? How does the composition of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM) situated 8 meters from the spectrometer to provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), using a similar technique to rotating-modulation-collimator imaging used on missions such as RHESSI but now taking advantage of the position sensitivity of the spectrometer. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e. as an active scatterer). A balloon platform for this instrument minimizes atmospheric attenuation and accommodates its weight and size, and long-duration balloon flights (LDBFs) from Antarctica allow for month-long uninterrupted observations of the Sun to continuously observe active regions and to maximize the chance of capturing a gamma-ray flare. A continental-US test flight is slated for 2012 with the eventual goal of Antarctic LDBFs of the completed instrument. In addition to the direct science return from these flights, GRIPS will prove these technologies for a future space

  19. Functional dimorphism and characteristics of maximal hand grip force in top level female athletes.

    PubMed

    Ivanović, Jelena; Dopsaj, Milivoj

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work is to determine functional dimorphism (F(max)Nd/DoHG(iso)) and model characteristics at maximal isometric hand grip force (F(max)HG(iso)) in top level female athletes. 275 top level female athletes were tested from Taekwondo, Synchronised Swimming, Track and field, Table tennis, Volleyball, Karate, Skiing, Handball, well-trained students (students of the Academy for Criminalistic and Police studies - ACPS) and Control group. In order to assess the F(max)HG(iso), we used standardised equipment, i.e., a sliding device that measures isometric finger flexor force, with a tensiometric probe fixed inside the device. The average values of F(max)HG(iso) and relative force measured by allometric and classic method for dominant and non-dominant hand grip for the total sample were 381.87 +/- 60.28, 344.63 +/- 55.60 N; 24.06 +/- 3.50, 21.72 +/- 3.28 N/BM0.667; 0.62 +/- 0.10, 0.56 +/- 0.09 N/BM. The average value of F(max)Nd/DoHG(iso) was 0.9030 +/- 0.0797. General Significant difference was established between subsamples for the measurement characteristics at the level of Wilks' Lambda 0.476, F = 3.276, p = 0.000. Maximal average value F(max)HG(iso) for non-dominant and dominant hand is found in Karate (372.04 +/- 46.71, 407.04 +/- 71.31 N) and minimal in Table tennis (282.00 +/- 56.00, 304.00 +/- 58.51 N). The minimal index value of F(max)Nd/DoHG(iso) was found in Control group 0.8771 +/- 0.0877. Considering defined classification of F(max)Nd/ DoHG(iso), we classified the examinees from different sports in 4 groups: dominant symmetry of functional hand grip relations (Skiing > 0.9595); symmetry (Table tennis and Taekwondo 0.9288 to 0.9594); average (Karate, Volleyball, ACPS, Track and field 0.8980 to 0.9287); asymmetry (Control, Synchronised swimming and Handball 0.8674 to 0.8979). The results obtained can be used to determine criteria decisions from the aspect of diagnostic procedures, metric aspect, medical aspect.

  20. Latest Progress on the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Duncan, Nicole A.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Smith, David Miles; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present the latest progress on building the balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument, including testing and calibration of the detectors and development of the imaging and aspect systems. A continental-US test flight is slated for fall 2012. GRIPS will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from approx.20. keV to > approx.10 MeV. The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution to within <0.1 cu mm. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-cm thick tungsten-alloy grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 mm. With the MPRM situated 8 meters from the spectrometer, this instrument will provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate the 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e. as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS will address questions relevant to particle acceleration and energy release that ha-.e been raised by recent solar flare observations, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electron producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the accelerated electrons, and why do relativistic electron dominate in the corona? How does the composition of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why?

  1. Latest Progress on the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Duncan, Nicole A.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Smith, David Miles; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present the latest progress on building the balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument, including testing and calibration of the detectors and development of the imaging and aspect systems. A continental-US test flight is slated for fall 2012. GRIPS will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from approx.20. keV to > approx.10 MeV. The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution to within <0.1 cu mm. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-cm thick tungsten-alloy grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 mm. With the MPRM situated 8 meters from the spectrometer, this instrument will provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate the 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e. as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS will address questions relevant to particle acceleration and energy release that ha-.e been raised by recent solar flare observations, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electron producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the accelerated electrons, and why do relativistic electron dominate in the corona? How does the composition of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why?

  2. Latest Progress on the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A. Y.; Lin, R. P.; Hurford, G. J.; Duncan, N. A.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Smith, D. M.; Tajima, H.; Amman, M.; Grips Team

    2011-12-01

    We present the latest progress on building the balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument, including testing and calibration of the detectors and development of the imaging and aspect systems. A continental-US test flight is slated for fall 2012. GRIPS will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from ~20 keV to >~10 MeV. The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution to within <0.1 mm^3. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-cm thick tungsten-alloy grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 mm. With the MPRM situated 8 meters from the spectrometer, this instrument will provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate the 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e. as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS will address questions relevant to particle acceleration and energy release that have been raised by recent solar flare observations, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electron producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the accelerated electrons, and why do relativistic electron dominate in the corona? How does the composition of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why?

  3. Phalanx force magnitude and trajectory deviation increased during power grip with an increased coefficient of friction at the hand-object interface.

    PubMed

    Enders, Leah R; Seo, Na Jin

    2011-05-17

    This study examined the effect of friction between the hand and grip surface on a person's grip strategy and force generation capacity. Twelve young healthy adults performed power grip exertions on an instrumented vertical cylinder with the maximum and 50% of maximum efforts (far above the grip force required to hold the cylinder), while normal and shear forces at each phalanx of all five fingers in the direction orthogonal to the gravity were recorded. The cylinder surface was varied for high-friction rubber and low-friction paper coverings. An increase in surface friction by replacing the paper covering with the rubber covering resulted in 4% greater mean phalanx normal force (perpendicular to the cylinder surface) and 22% greater mean phalanx shear force in either the proximal or distal direction of the digits (p<0.05; for both 50% and maximum grip efforts). Consequently, increased friction with the rubber surface compared to the paper surface was associated with a 20% increase in the angular deviation of the phalanx force from the direction normal to the cylinder surface (p<0.05). This study demonstrates that people significantly changed the magnitude and direction of phalanx forces depending on the surface they gripped. Such change in the grip strategy appears to help increase grip force generation capacity. This finding suggests that a seemingly simple power grip exertion involves sensory feedback-based motor control, and that people's power grip capacity may be reduced in cases of numbness, glove use, or injuries resulting in reduced sensation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of blocking tactile information from the fingertips on adaptation and execution of grip forces to friction at the grasping surface.

    PubMed

    Bilaloglu, Seda; Lu, Ying; Geller, Daniel; Rizzo, John Ross; Aluru, Viswanath; Gardner, Esther P; Raghavan, Preeti

    2016-03-01

    Adaptation of fingertip forces to friction at the grasping surface is necessary to prevent use of inadequate or excessive grip forces. In the current study we investigated the effect of blocking tactile information from the fingertips noninvasively on the adaptation and efficiency of grip forces to surface friction during precision grasp. Ten neurologically intact subjects grasped and lifted an instrumented grip device with 18 different frictional surfaces under three conditions: with bare hands or with a thin layer of plastic (Tegaderm) or an additional layer of foam affixed to the fingertips. The coefficient of friction at the finger-object interface of each surface was obtained for each subject with bare hands and Tegaderm by measuring the slip ratio (grip force/load force) at the moment of slip. We found that the foam layer reduced sensibility for two-point discrimination and pressure sensitivity at the fingertips, but Tegaderm did not. However, Tegaderm reduced static, but not dynamic, tactile discrimination. Adaptation of fingertip grip forces to surface friction measured by the rate of change of peak grip force, and grip force efficiency measured by the grip-load force ratio at lift, showed a proportional relationship with bare hands but were impaired with Tegaderm and foam. Activation of muscles engaged in precision grip also varied with the frictional surface with bare hands but not with Tegaderm and foam. The results suggest that sensitivity for static tactile discrimination is necessary for feedforward and feedback control of grip forces and for adaptive modulation of muscle activity during precision grasp.

  5. Does socio-economic status predict grip strength in older Europeans? Results from the SHARE study in non-institutionalised men and women aged 50+.

    PubMed

    Mohd Hairi, Farizah; Mackenbach, Johan P; Andersen-Ranberg, K; Avendano, Mauricio

    2010-09-01

    Reduced hand-grip strength predicts disability, morbidity and mortality, but whether it is shaped by socio-economic experiences is yet unknown. The authors examined the association of education, occupation, income and wealth with grip strength in older Europeans. Data came from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe comprising 27 351 participants ages 50+ in 11 countries. Grip strength was objectively measured using a handheld dynamometer. Estimates were obtained based on multivariate linear regression controlling for a wide set of confounders, demographics, health and disability measures, and behavioural risk factors. In the total sample, education, occupational class, income and wealth predicted grip strength among men, whereas only education and wealth predicted grip strength among women. While education and income effects were inconsistent in most countries, wealth consistently predicted grip strength in each country. A one-point increase in the log of wealth was associated with 0.38 kg (95% CI 0.31 to 0.45) higher grip strength in men and 0.18 kg (95% CI 0.15 to 0.21) higher grip strength in women. While education, income and occupation effects disappeared after adjustment for health measures, log of wealth effects remained significant in both men (0.22, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.29) and women (0.08, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.11). Wealth effects were particularly evident in the two lowest quintiles. Old-age socio-economic and financial circumstances as measured by wealth are associated with grip strength, particularly among the least wealthy, while circumstances defined earlier in life as measured by education, income and occupation do not consistently predict grip strength.

  6. Effect of blocking tactile information from the fingertips on adaptation and execution of grip forces to friction at the grasping surface

    PubMed Central

    Bilaloglu, Seda; Lu, Ying; Geller, Daniel; Rizzo, John Ross; Aluru, Viswanath; Gardner, Esther P.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation of fingertip forces to friction at the grasping surface is necessary to prevent use of inadequate or excessive grip forces. In the current study we investigated the effect of blocking tactile information from the fingertips noninvasively on the adaptation and efficiency of grip forces to surface friction during precision grasp. Ten neurologically intact subjects grasped and lifted an instrumented grip device with 18 different frictional surfaces under three conditions: with bare hands or with a thin layer of plastic (Tegaderm) or an additional layer of foam affixed to the fingertips. The coefficient of friction at the finger-object interface of each surface was obtained for each subject with bare hands and Tegaderm by measuring the slip ratio (grip force/load force) at the moment of slip. We found that the foam layer reduced sensibility for two-point discrimination and pressure sensitivity at the fingertips, but Tegaderm did not. However, Tegaderm reduced static, but not dynamic, tactile discrimination. Adaptation of fingertip grip forces to surface friction measured by the rate of change of peak grip force, and grip force efficiency measured by the grip-load force ratio at lift, showed a proportional relationship with bare hands but were impaired with Tegaderm and foam. Activation of muscles engaged in precision grip also varied with the frictional surface with bare hands but not with Tegaderm and foam. The results suggest that sensitivity for static tactile discrimination is necessary for feedforward and feedback control of grip forces and for adaptive modulation of muscle activity during precision grasp. PMID:26655820

  7. Using the coefficient of variation to detect sincerity of effort of grip strength: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, O

    2000-01-01

    Many clinicians use the coefficient of variation (CV) to assess sincerity of effort, without understanding the premise on which it is based or its physiological and mathematical bases. Clinicians who use computerized evaluation systems that calculate the CV may not even be aware of the formula used to derive it. The wide use of the CV in detecting sincerity of effort of grip strength is puzzling, since it lacks empirical support in the literature. This paper examines the physiological rationale for using measures of variability to detect sincerity of effort, the mathematical basis on which the CV is founded, and the reliability and validity of the CV. The conclusions based on this literature review are that the CV is not an appropriate method for determining whether an effort is sincere and that CV values may be inflated in injured patients with compromised hand strength.

  8. Hurricanes Karl and Tropical Storm Matthew Structure Observed by HIWRAP During GRIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Guimond, S. R.; Tian, L.

    2012-12-01

    The dual-wavelength (Ku and Ka band) High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) flew for the first time on the Global Hawk during the 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). HIWRAP is conical scanning and Doppler, and winds and reflectivity can be mapped within the swath below the Global Hawk. Two interesting cases from the HIWRAP flights were the rapid intensification of Hurricane Karl and the intensification of Tropical Storm Matthew. This presentation will highlight the precipitation and wind structure of these storms during their intensification as derived from the HIWRAP observations. If time permits and if available, highlights from HIWRAP observations from the Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) field campaign in September 2012 will be presented.

  9. Strengthening the reporting of genetic risk prediction studies (GRIPS): explanation and elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, A Cecile JW; Ioannidis, John PA; Bedrosian, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Dolan, Siobhan M; Dowling, Nicole; Fortier, Isabel; Freedman, Andrew N; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Gulcher, Jeffrey; Gwinn, Marta; Hlatky, Mark A; Janes, Holly; Kraft, Peter; Melillo, Stephanie; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Pencina, Michael J; Ransohoff, David; Schully, Sheri D; Seminara, Daniela; Winn, Deborah M; Wright, Caroline F; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Little, Julian; Khoury, Muin J

    2011-01-01

    The rapid and continuing progress in gene discovery for complex diseases is fueling interest in the potential application of genetic risk models for clinical and public health practice. The number of studies assessing the predictive ability is steadily increasing, but they vary widely in completeness of reporting and apparent quality. Transparent reporting of the strengths and weaknesses of these studies is important to facilitate the accumulation of evidence on genetic risk prediction. A multidisciplinary workshop sponsored by the Human Genome Epidemiology Network developed a checklist of 25 items recommended for strengthening the reporting of Genetic RIsk Prediction Studies (GRIPS), building on the principles established by previous reporting guidelines. These recommendations aim to enhance the transparency, quality and completeness of study reporting, and thereby to improve the synthesis and application of information from multiple studies that might differ in design, conduct or analysis. PMID:21407270

  10. Observations of C-band Brightness Temperature from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) During GRIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Buckley, C. D.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; May, C.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Albers, C.; Black, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD is a new technology developed by NASA/MSFC, in partnership with NOAA and the Universities of Central Florida, Michigan, and Alabama-Huntsville. HIRAD is designed to measure wind speed and rain rate over a wide swath in heavy-rain, strong-wind conditions. HIRAD is expected to eventually fly routinely on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) such as Global Hawk over hurricanes threatening the U.S. coast and other Atlantic basin areas, and possibly in the Western Pacific as well. HIRAD first flew on GRIP in 2010 and is planned to fly 2012-14 on the NASA Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) missions on the Global Hawk, a high-altitude UAV. HIRAD technology will eventually be used on a satellite platform to extend the dynamical range of Ocean Surface Wind (OSV) observations from space.

  11. Computer vision-based classification of hand grip variations in neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Zariffa, José; Steeves, John D

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of hand function is such that most existing upper limb rehabilitation robotic devices use only simplified hand interfaces. This is in contrast to the importance of the hand in regaining function after neurological injury. Computer vision technology has been used to identify hand posture in the field of Human Computer Interaction, but this approach has not been translated to the rehabilitation context. We describe a computer vision-based classifier that can be used to discriminate rehabilitation-relevant hand postures, and could be integrated into a virtual reality-based upper limb rehabilitation system. The proposed system was tested on a set of video recordings from able-bodied individuals performing cylindrical grasps, lateral key grips, and tip-to-tip pinches. The overall classification success rate was 91.2%, and was above 98% for 6 out of the 10 subjects.

  12. Coordinated gripping of substrate by subunits of a AAA+ proteolytic machine

    PubMed Central

    Iosefson, Ohad; Nager, Andrew R.; Baker, Tania A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Hexameric AAA+ unfoldases of ATP-dependent proteases and protein-remodeling machines use conserved loops that line the axial pore to apply force to substrates during the mechanical processes of protein unfolding and translocation. Whether loops from multiple subunits act independently or coordinately in these processes is a critical aspect of mechanism but is currently unknown for any AAA+ machine. By studying covalently linked hexamers of the E. coli ClpX unfoldase bearing different numbers and configurations of wild-type and mutant pore loops, we show that loops function synergistically, with the number of wild-type loops required for efficient degradation depending upon the stability of the protein substrate. Our results support a mechanism in which a power stroke initiated in one subunit of the ClpX hexamer results in the concurrent movement of all six pore loops, which coordinately grip and apply force to the substrate. PMID:25599533

  13. Coming to grips with breast cancer: the spouse's experience with his wife's first six months.

    PubMed

    Zahlis, Ellen H; Lewis, Frances M

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of 48 spouses of wives newly diagnosed with local or regional breast cancer. Their reported experiences were organized into the core construct of coming to grips reflected by four domains: (1) feeling nailed by the breast cancer, (2) changing us, (3) taking care of me, and (4) making things work. Prior studies have underestimated the extent to which the assumptive world and day-to-day lives of spouses are shattered by the diagnosis of breast cancer and the work they do to guess how to be supportive to their wives. Interventions are needed that directly assist spouses add to their ways of managing the intrusion of their wife's breast cancer in their lives.

  14. The Effect of Repetitive Rhythmic Precision Grip Task-Oriented Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispa, Delphine; Lejeune, Thierry; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic stroke patients present with difficulty in the manipulation of objects. The aim of this study was to test whether an intensive program of precision grip training could improve hand functioning of patients at more than 6 months after a stroke. This was a cross-over study; hence, at inclusion, the patients were randomly divided into two…

  15. Role of the Visuomotor System in On-Line Attenuation of a Premovement Illusory Bias in Grip Aperture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, M.; Rival, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this investigation participants formulated a grip aperture (GA) consistent with the size of an object embedded within a Muller-Lyer (ML) figure prior to initiating visually guided grasping movements. The accuracy of the grasping response was emphasized to determine whether or not the visuomotor system might resolve the premovement bias in GA…

  16. [Reliability and validity of the analysis of hand grip and pinch force in isometric and isokinetic conditions].

    PubMed

    Benaglia, P G; Franchignoni, F; Ferriero, G; Zebellin, G; Sartorio, F

    1999-01-01

    Strength measurement of the hand grip is at the core of most protocols of functional assessment of the upper limb and in rehabilitation plays a major role in the analysis of treatment efficacy and patients' occupational ability. The aims of this study were to: a) verify the repeatability of strength measurements made during performance of the hand grip and three types of pinch, carried out under isometric and isokinetic conditions; b) compare maximal isometric strength with the corresponding isokinetic value for each of the manoeuvres studied; c) investigate the correlations between the strength expressed in the different manoeuvres, under both isometric and isokinetic conditions. We studied 14 voluntary subjects over three sessions conducted at 48-hr intervals, employing a computerized isokinetic dynamometer Lido WorkSet equipped with device N(o) 21 for the study of pinch (lateral pinch, pulp pinch, chuck pinch) and device N(o) 52 for the grip study. Isometric contractions resulted stronger than isokinetic ones, and the hand grip was found to be the manoeuvre able to produce most strength. The repeatability of each strength measurement test over the three days was high (Intraclass Correlation Coefficients: 0.89-0.93). Correlations between the isometric and isokinetic performance for each of the manoeuvres examined were always high (Pearson's r coefficients: 0.89-0.95) as were those between the different manoeuvres, whether performed in isometric or isokinetic modality (r: 0.60-0.94).

  17. Role of the Visuomotor System in On-Line Attenuation of a Premovement Illusory Bias in Grip Aperture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, M.; Rival, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this investigation participants formulated a grip aperture (GA) consistent with the size of an object embedded within a Muller-Lyer (ML) figure prior to initiating visually guided grasping movements. The accuracy of the grasping response was emphasized to determine whether or not the visuomotor system might resolve the premovement bias in GA…

  18. Physical function, grip strength and frailty in people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Charlotte; Dabis, François; de Rekeneire, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    To present the current knowledge on physical function, grip strength and frailty in HIV-infected patients living in sub-Saharan Africa, where the phenomenon is largely underestimated. A systematic search was conducted on MEDLINE, Scopus and African Index Medicus. We reviewed articles on sub-Saharan African people living with HIV (PLHIV) >18 years old, published until November 2016. Of 537 articles, 12 were conducted in six African countries and included in this review. Five articles reported information on functional limitation and one on disability. Two of these five articles reported functional limitation (low gait speed) in PLHIV. Disability was observed in 27% and 3% of PLHIV living in rural and urban places, respectively. Two of three studies reporting grip strength reported lower grip strength (nearly 4 kg) in PLHIV in comparison with uninfected patients. One study reported that PLHIV were more likely to be frail than HIV-uninfected individuals (19.4% vs. 13.3%), whereas another reported no statistical difference. Decline in physical function, grip strength and frailty are now part of the burden of PLHIV living in SSA countries, but current data are insufficient to characterise the real public health dimension of these impairments. Further studies are needed to depict this major public health challenge. As this is likely to contribute to a significant burden on the African healthcare systems and human resources in the near future, a holistic care approach should be developed to inform guidelines. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R.; Crone, Wendy C.; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  20. Coefficient of friction of dry slash pine and southern red oak on three tension-grip facings

    Treesearch

    T.J. Lemoine; P. Koch

    1975-01-01

    A urethane material proved to have nine times higher static friction coefficient (0.9) than smooth steel (0.1) on radial and tangential wood surfaces pulled parallel to the grain. It is probably superior to 22O-grit garnet paper or sand coatings for tension-grip facings in lumber testing machines.

  1. Coefficient of friction of dry slash pine and southern red oak on three tension-grip facings

    Treesearch

    Truett J. Lemoine; Peter Koch

    1974-01-01

    A urethane material proved to have nine times higher static friction coefficient (0.9) than smooth steel (0.1) on radial and tangential wood surfaces pulled parallel to the grain. It is probably superior to 220-grit garnet paper or sand coatings for tension-grip facings in lumber testing machines.

  2. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R; Crone, Wendy C; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. GRIP1 interlinks N-cadherin and AMPA receptors at vesicles to promote combined cargo transport into dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Heisler, Frank F.; Lee, Han Kyu; Gromova, Kira V.; Pechmann, Yvonne; Schurek, Beate; Ruschkies, Laura; Schroeder, Markus; Schweizer, Michaela; Kneussel, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The GluA2 subunit of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) regulates excitatory synaptic transmission in neurons. In addition, the transsynaptic cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin controls excitatory synapse function and stabilizes dendritic spine structures. At postsynaptic membranes, GluA2 physically binds N-cadherin, underlying spine growth and synaptic modulation. We report that N-cadherin binds to PSD-95/SAP90/DLG/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain 2 of the glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) through its intracellular C terminus. N-cadherin and GluA2-containing AMPARs are presorted to identical transport vesicles for dendrite delivery, and live imaging reveals cotransport of both proteins. The kinesin KIF5 powers GluA2/N-cadherin codelivery by using GRIP1 as a multilink interface. Notably, GluA2 and N-cadherin use different PDZ domains on GRIP1 to simultaneously bind the transport complex, and interference with either binding motif impairs the turnover of both synaptic cargoes. Depolymerization of microtubules, deletion of the KIF5 motor domain, or specific blockade of AMPAR exocytosis affects delivery of GluA2/N-cadherin vesicles. At the functional level, interference with this cotransport reduces the number of spine protrusions and excitatory synapses. Our data suggest the concept that the multi-PDZ-domain adaptor protein GRIP1 can act as a scaffold at trafficking vesicles in the combined delivery of AMPARs and N-cadherin into dendrites. PMID:24639525

  4. The Effect of Repetitive Rhythmic Precision Grip Task-Oriented Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispa, Delphine; Lejeune, Thierry; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic stroke patients present with difficulty in the manipulation of objects. The aim of this study was to test whether an intensive program of precision grip training could improve hand functioning of patients at more than 6 months after a stroke. This was a cross-over study; hence, at inclusion, the patients were randomly divided into two…

  5. The role of GRIP1 and ephrin B3 in blood pressure control and vascular smooth muscle cell contractility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujia; Wu, Zenghui; Luo, Hongyu; Peng, Junzheng; Raelson, John; Ehret, Georg B.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Stoyanova, Ekatherina; Qin, Zhao; Cloutier, Guy; Bradley, W. Edward; Wu, Tao; Shen, Jian-Zhong; Hu, Shenjiang; Wu, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    Several erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor B family (EPHB) and their ligands, ephrinBs (EFNBs), are involved in blood pressure regulation in animal models. We selected 528 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the genes of EPHB6, EFNB2, EFNB3 and GRIP1 in the EPH/EFN signalling system to query the International Blood Pressure Consortium dataset. A SNP within the glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) gene presented a p-value of 0.000389, approaching the critical p-value of 0.000302, for association with diastolic blood pressure of 60,396 individuals. According to echocardiography, we found that Efnb3 gene knockout mice showed enhanced constriction in the carotid arteries. In vitro studies revealed that in mouse vascular smooth muscle cells, siRNA knockdown of GRIP1, which is in the EFNB3 reverse signalling pathway, resulted in increased contractility of these cells. These data suggest that molecules in the EPHB/EFNB signalling pathways, specifically EFNB3 and GRIP1, are involved blood pressure regulation. PMID:27941904

  6. Using goal- and grip-related information for understanding the correctness of other's actions: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    van Elk, Michiel; Bousardt, Roel; Bekkering, Harold; van Schie, Hein T

    2012-01-01

    Detecting errors in other's actions is of pivotal importance for joint action, competitive behavior and observational learning. Although many studies have focused on the neural mechanisms involved in detecting low-level errors, relatively little is known about error-detection in everyday situations. The present study aimed to identify the functional and neural mechanisms whereby we understand the correctness of other's actions involving well-known objects (e.g. pouring coffee in a cup). Participants observed action sequences in which the correctness of the object grasped and the grip applied to a pair of objects were independently manipulated. Observation of object violations (e.g. grasping the empty cup instead of the coffee pot) resulted in a stronger P3-effect than observation of grip errors (e.g. grasping the coffee pot at the upper part instead of the handle), likely reflecting a reorienting response, directing attention to the relevant location. Following the P3-effect, a parietal slow wave positivity was observed that persisted for grip-errors, likely reflecting the detection of an incorrect hand-object interaction. These findings provide new insight in the functional significance of the neurophysiological markers associated with the observation of incorrect actions and suggest that the P3-effect and the subsequent parietal slow wave positivity may reflect the detection of errors at different levels in the action hierarchy. Thereby this study elucidates the cognitive processes that support the detection of action violations in the selection of objects and grips.

  7. Predictive force programming in the grip-lift task: the role of memory links between arbitrary cues and object weight.

    PubMed

    Ameli, Mitra; Dafotakis, Manuel; Fink, Gereon R; Nowak, Dennis A

    2008-01-01

    We tested the ability of healthy participants to learn an association between arbitrary sensory cues and the weight of an object to be lifted using a precision grip between the index finger and thumb. Right-handed participants performed a series of grip-lift tasks with each hand. In a first experiment, participants lifted two objects of equal visual appearance which unexpectedly and randomly changed their weight. In two subsequent experiments, the change in object weight was indicated by cues, which were presented (i) visually or (ii) auditorily. When no cue about the weight of the object to be lifted was presented, participants programmed grip force according to the most recent lift, regardless of the hand used. In contrast, participants were able to rapidly establish an association between a particular sensory cue with a given weight and scaled grip force precisely to the actual weight thereafter, regardless of the hand used or the sensory modality of the cue. We discuss our data within the theoretical concept of internal models.

  8. Hand Grip Strength and Myocardial Oxygen Consumption Index among Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sokran, Siti Nur Baait Biniti Mohd; Mohan, Vikram; Kamaruddin, Kamaria; Sulaiman, Mohd Daud; Awang, Yahya; Othman, Ida Rosmini Binti; Victor, Smiley Jesu Priya

    2015-01-01

    Background Hand grip strength (HGS) is a reliable indicator of peripheral muscle strength. Although, numerous studies have investigated the strength of hand grip; little attention has been given to coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, exploring the relationship between HGS and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) index. The current study aimed to evaluate the interaction between HGS and MVO2 index findings before and after cardiac surgery. Methods Twenty-seven patients with CAD had HGS were assessed using handheld dynamometer. HGS for each hand were documented. MVO2 index was assessed using rate pressure product (RPP), which is the product of the heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Repeated measures MANOVA were carried out to estimate the interaction between both hands HGS and MVO2 index before and after surgery. Results There was significant interactions (P<0.001) for both HGS dominant and non-dominant with large effect sizes (HGS dominant×MVO2 index: hp2=0.44; HGS dominant×RPP: hp2=0.49). This signifies that peripheral muscle strength of the upper limb (HGS dominant and non-dominant) had different effects on MVO2 index before and after surgery. The interaction graph shows that the increase in MVO2 index after surgery was significantly greater for peripheral muscle strength of the dominant hand when compared to non-dominant.  Conclusion Patients with CAD had interactions between HGS and oxygen consumption before and after surgery. Hence, HGS might be used as a predictor to assess oxygen consumption among cardiac patients. PMID:26170520

  9. Hand Grip Strength and Myocardial Oxygen Consumption Index among Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Patients.

    PubMed

    Sokran, Siti Nur Baait Biniti Mohd; Mohan, Vikram; Kamaruddin, Kamaria; Sulaiman, Mohd Daud; Awang, Yahya; Othman, Ida Rosmini Binti; Victor, Smiley Jesu Priya

    2015-07-01

    Hand grip strength (HGS) is a reliable indicator of peripheral muscle strength. Although, numerous studies have investigated the strength of hand grip; little attention has been given to coronary artery disease (CAD) patients, exploring the relationship between HGS and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) index. The current study aimed to evaluate the interaction between HGS and MVO2 index findings before and after cardiac surgery. Twenty-seven patients with CAD had HGS were assessed using handheld dynamometer. HGS for each hand were documented. MVO2 index was assessed using rate pressure product (RPP), which is the product of the heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). Repeated measures MANOVA were carried out to estimate the interaction between both hands HGS and MVO2 index before and after surgery. There was significant interactions (P<0.001) for both HGS dominant and non-dominant with large effect sizes (HGS dominant×MVO2 index: hp (2)=0.44; HGS dominant×RPP: hp (2)=0.49). This signifies that peripheral muscle strength of the upper limb (HGS dominant and non-dominant) had different effects on MVO2 index before and after surgery. The interaction graph shows that the increase in MVO2 index after surgery was significantly greater for peripheral muscle strength of the dominant hand when compared to non-dominant. Patients with CAD had interactions between HGS and oxygen consumption before and after surgery. Hence, HGS might be used as a predictor to assess oxygen consumption among cardiac patients.

  10. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A. Y.; Lin, R. P.; Hurford, G. J.; Boggs, S. E.; Zoglauer, A. C.; Wunderer, C. B.; Sample, J. G.; Turin, P.; McBride, S.; Smith, D. M.; Tajima, H.; Luke, P. N.; Amman, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    The new balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from ~20 keV to >~10 MeV. The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution to within <0.1 mm3. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2-cm thick tungsten grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 mm. With the MPRM situated 8 meters from the spectrometer, this instrument will provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate the 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e. as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150--650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS will address questions relevant to particle acceleration and energy release that have been raised by recent solar flare observations, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electron producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the accelerated electrons, and why do relativistic electron dominate in the corona? How does the composition of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why?

  11. Isometric hand grip strength measured by the Nintendo Wii Balance Board - a reliable new method.

    PubMed

    Blomkvist, A W; Andersen, S; de Bruin, E D; Jorgensen, M G

    2016-02-03

    Low hand grip strength is a strong predictor for both long-term and short-term disability and mortality. The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) is an inexpensive, portable, wide-spread instrument with the potential for multiple purposes in assessing clinically relevant measures including muscle strength. The purpose of the study was to explore intrarater reliability and concurrent validity of the WBB by comparing it to the Jamar hand dynamometer. Intra-rater test-retest cohort design with randomized validity testing on the first session. Using custom WBB software, thirty old adults (69.0 ± 4.2 years of age) were studied for reproducibility and concurrent validity compared to the Jamar hand dynamometer. Reproducibility was tested for dominant and non-dominant hands during the same time-of-day, one week apart. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM) and limits of agreement (LOA) were calculated to describe relative and absolute reproducibility respectively. To describe concurrent validity, Pearson's product-moment correlation and ICC was calculated. Reproducibility was high with ICC values of >0.948 across all measures. Both SEM and LOA were low (0.2-0.5 kg and 2.7-4.2 kg, respectively) in both the dominant and non-dominant hand. For validity, Pearson correlations were high (0.80-0.88) and ICC values were fair to good (0.763-0.803). Reproducibility for WBB was high for relative measures and acceptable for absolute measures. In addition, concurrent validity between the Jamar hand dynamometer and the WBB was acceptable. Thus, the WBB may be a valid instrument to assess hand grip strength in older adults.

  12. Grip force, EDL contractile properties, and voluntary wheel running after postdevelopmental myostatin depletion in mice.

    PubMed

    Personius, Kirkwood E; Jayaram, Aditi; Krull, David; Brown, Roger; Xu, Tianshun; Han, Bajin; Burgess, Kerri; Storey, Christopher; Shah, Bharati; Tawil, Rabi; Welle, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    There is no consensus about whether making muscles abnormally large by reducing myostatin activity affects force-generating capacity or the ability to perform activities requiring muscular endurance. We therefore examined grip force, contractile properties of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, and voluntary wheel running in mice in which myostatin was depleted after normal muscle development. Cre recombinase activity was induced to knock out exon 3 of the myostatin gene in 4-mo-old mice in which this exon was flanked by loxP sequences (Mstn[f/f]). Control mice with normal myostatin genes (Mstn[w/w]) received the same Cre-activating treatment. Myostatin depletion increased the mass of all muscles that were examined (gastrocnemius, quadriceps, tibialis anterior, EDL, soleus, triceps) by approximately 20-40%. Grip force, measured multiple times 2-22 wk after myostatin knockout, was not consistently greater in the myostatin-deficient mice. EDL contractile properties were determined 7-13 mo after myostatin knockout. Twitch force tended to be greater in myostatin-deficient muscles (+24%; P=0.09), whereas tetanic force was not consistently elevated (mean +11%; P=0.36), even though EDL mass was greater than normal in all myostatin-deficient mice (mean +36%; P<0.001). The force deficit induced by eccentric contractions was approximately twofold greater in myostatin-deficient than in normal EDL muscles (31% vs. 16% after five eccentric contractions; P=0.02). Myostatin-deficient mice ran 19% less distance (P<0.01) than control mice during the 12 wk following myostatin depletion, primarily because of fewer running bouts per night rather than diminished running speed or bout duration. Reduced specific tension (ratio of force to mass) and reduced running have been observed after muscle hypertrophy was induced by other means, suggesting that they are characteristics generally associated with abnormally large muscles rather than unique effects of myostatin deficiency.

  13. Friction between finger flexor tendons and the pulley system in the crimp grip position.

    PubMed

    Moor, Beat K; Nagy, Ladislav; Snedeker, Jess G; Schweizer, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of the finger flexor tendon pulleys are the most often occurring injury in rock climbers due to bowstringing of tendons during crimp grip position. The aim of this study was to quantify friction between the flexor tendons and pulleys and the influence of high load and speed of movement as a potential factor of pulley disruption. Friction between the flexor tendons and pulleys of eight human cadaver fingers was indirectly determined using an isokinetic movement device. During flexion and extension movement with rotational speed from 30 to 210 deg/s in the proximal interphalangeal joint and with load from 20 to 100 N to the flexor tendons the flexion force at the tip of the finger was measured. With 40 N loaded flexor tendons the force at the fingertip was 14.5 N (SD1.5) during extension and 12.6N (SD1.3) during flexion movement. Corresponding force difference of 12.9% and 3.77 N (SD0.6) force of friction can be calculated. Friction peaked at 85.8 degrees (SD2.05) of flexion of the proximal interphalangeal joint. Different speed of motion and load to the flexor tendons did not influence force difference other than linear. Considerable friction between flexor tendons and pulleys is apparent and therefore may have an influence on pulley injuries. Particularly during the crimp grip position where the proximal interphalangeal joint is flexed about 90 degrees shows the greatest amount of friction. However there was no change of friction during high speed motion and no other than linear increase during high load.

  14. Multicentric observational study of pain after the use of a self-gripping lightweight mesh.

    PubMed

    García Ureña, M Á; Hidalgo, M; Feliu, X; Velasco, M Á; Revuelta, S; Gutiérrez, R; Utrera, A; Porrero, J L; Marín, M; Zaragoza, C

    2011-10-01

    Investigation in the field of inguinal hernia surgery is now focused on postoperative pain. The extended use of lightweight meshes and alternative methods of fixation may play a relevant role in the reduction of pain. In this study, a new self-gripping lightweight polypropylene mesh is tested. A multicentric, observational study was scheduled to prospectively evaluate this new mesh. Ten centers agreed to participate. Only primary, type 1 or 2 uncomplicated hernias in adults were included. The mesh was placed as a Lichtenstein procedure without any fixation. A complete pain questionnaire was followed at 1 week, and at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. The principal goal of the study was to evaluate maximum pain score at 6 months. Pain was assessed by a visual analog scale. A total of 256 patients were operated. Mean operative time was 35.6 min; 76.2% of patients were operated in an ambulatory setting. There were a few postoperative complications: 2 wound infections, 17 seromas, 21 hematomas, 6 orchitis. The incidence of acute pain was 27.3% at week 1 and 7.5% at month 1. The incidence of chronic pain was 3.6% at month 3 and 2.8% at month 6. No recurrences or long-term complications were observed. This self-gripping mesh can be used safely in type 1 and 2 primary, uncomplicated inguinal hernia with minimal morbidity and most patients under ambulatory setting. The registered incidence of chronic pain is lower than 3%.

  15. Fabric along the NEEM ice core, Greenland, and its comparison with GRIP and NGRIP ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, M.; Azuma, N.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Eichler, J.; Fujita, S.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Samyn, D.; Svensson, A.; Weikusat, I.

    2014-07-01

    Fabric (distribution of crystallographic orientations) along the full NEEM ice core, Greenland was measured in the field by an automatic ice texture analyzer every 10 m, from 33 m down to 2461 m depth. The fabric evolves from a slightly anisotropic fabric at the top, toward a strong single maximum at about 2300 m, which is typical of a deformation pattern mostly driven by uniaxial compression and simple shearing. A sharp increase in the fabric strengthening rate is observed at the Holocene to Wisconsin (HW) climatic transition. From a simple model we estimate that this depth is located at a transition from a state dominated by vertical compression to a state dominated by vertical shear. Comparisons are made to two others ice cores drilled along the same ridge; the GRIP ice core, drilled at the summit of the ice sheet, and the NGRIP ice core, drilled 325 km to the NNW of the summit along the ridge, and 365 km upstream from NEEM. This comparison tends to demonstrate that the ice viscosity change with the HW climatic transition must be associated with the shear-dominated state to induce the abrupt fabric strengthening observed at NEEM. This comparison therefore reflects the increasing role of shear deformation on the coring site when moving NW along the ridge from GRIP to NGRIP and NEEM. The difference in fabric profiles between NEEM and NGRIP also evidences a stronger lateral extension associated with a sharper ridge at NGRIP. Further along the core, centimeter scale abrupt texture (fabric and microstructure) variations are observed in the bottom part of the core. Their positions are in good agreement with the observed folding layers in Dahl-Jensen et al. (2013).

  16. Effects of local and core body temperature on grip force modulation during movement-induced load force fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Stephen S; Reynolds, Luke F; Macdonald, Mark A B; Tweedie, Constance L; Urquhart, Robin L; Westwood, David A

    2008-05-01

    Impaired manual functioning often occurs when the hands are exposed to cold temperatures, but the underlying mechanism is not clearly understood. Tactile feedback is thought to provide important information during object manipulations in order to scale and regulate grip forces; however, topical anaesthetic-induced tactile sensation impairments may not realistically simulate the systemic neuromuscular impairment of the whole hand that could occur during cold temperature exposure. In two experiments, we studied the impact of (1) local hand cooling [thermoneutral finger skin temperature, cold (<8 degrees C)] and (2) core body temperature (thermoneutral core body temperature, pre-heated by 0.5 degrees C, pre-cooled by 0.5 degrees C) with cold hands on manual dexterity and the ability to control and co-ordinate grip forces during a cyclical load-lifting task. In Experiment 1 (n = 10), hand cooling significantly decreased Purdue Pegboard performance (P = 0.002), while increasing grip force by approximately 5 N during the cyclical load-lifting task compared to thermoneutral (P = 0.037). The temporal co-ordination of grip and load forces was unaffected by hand cooling. In Experiment 2 (n = 11), pegboard performance was impaired following hand cooling (P < 0.001), and to a greater extent when the body was pre-cooled (p < 0.001). However, neither grip force (P = 0.99) nor the temporal co-ordination of grasping and lifting forces (P = 0.85) were affected by core body temperature. These data support the existence of a robust centrally controlled feedforward system able to anticipate the dynamics of manual manipulations and accordingly regulate the temporal co-ordination of fingertip forces during object manipulation. This centrally controlled mechanism appears to differ from the mechanisms governing other aspects of manual dexterity.

  17. GRIP: A web-based system for constructing Gold Standard datasets for protein-protein interaction prediction

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Fiona; Wang, Haiying; Zheng, Huiru; Azuaje, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Background Information about protein interaction networks is fundamental to understanding protein function and cellular processes. Interaction patterns among proteins can suggest new drug targets and aid in the design of new therapeutic interventions. Efforts have been made to map interactions on a proteomic-wide scale using both experimental and computational techniques. Reference datasets that contain known interacting proteins (positive cases) and non-interacting proteins (negative cases) are essential to support computational prediction and validation of protein-protein interactions. Information on known interacting and non interacting proteins are usually stored within databases. Extraction of these data can be both complex and time consuming. Although, the automatic construction of reference datasets for classification is a useful resource for researchers no public resource currently exists to perform this task. Results GRIP (Gold Reference dataset constructor from Information on Protein complexes) is a web-based system that provides researchers with the functionality to create reference datasets for protein-protein interaction prediction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both positive and negative cases for a reference dataset can be extracted, organised and downloaded by the user. GRIP also provides an upload facility whereby users can submit proteins to determine protein complex membership. A search facility is provided where a user can search for protein complex information in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion GRIP is developed to retrieve information on protein complex, cellular localisation, and physical and genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Manual construction of reference datasets can be a time consuming process requiring programming knowledge. GRIP simplifies and speeds up this process by allowing users to automatically construct reference datasets. GRIP is free to access at . PMID:19171033

  18. Effects of changing gravity on anticipatory grip force control during point-to-point movements of a hand-held object.

    PubMed

    Nowak, D A; Hermsdörfer, J; Philipp, J; Marquardt, C; Glasauer, S; Mai, N

    2001-07-01

    We investigated the quality of predictive grip force control during gravity changes induced by parabolic flight maneuvers. During these maneuvers gravity varied: There were 2 periods of hypergravity, in which terrestrial gravity nearly doubled, and a 20-s period of microgravity, during which a manipulated object was virtually weightless. We determined grip and load forces during vertical point-to-point movements of an instrumented object. Point-to-point movements were a combination of static (stationary holding) and dynamic (continuous movements) task conditions, which were separately analyzed in our previous studies. Analysis of the produced grip forces revealed that grip adjustments were closely linked to load force fluctuations under each gravity condition. In particular, grip force maxima coincided closely in time with load force peaks, although these occurred at different phases of the movement depending on the gravity level. However, quantitative analysis of the ratio of maximum grip force to the corresponding load force peak revealed an increased force ratio during microgravity when compared to that during normal and hypergravity. We hypothesize that the impaired precision of force coupling with respect to force magnitude during microgravity results from reduced feedback information about the object's mass during the stationary holding of the object in between each movement. The results indicate that the temporal grip force regulation is highly automatized and stable, whereas economical planning of force magnitude is more flexible and might reflect changes of the external loading condition.

  19. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields.

    PubMed

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-05-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain.

  20. No strong correlations between serum cytokine levels, CMV serostatus and hand-grip strength in older subjects in the Berlin BASE-II cohort.

    PubMed

    Goldeck, David; Pawelec, Graham; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Oettinger, Lilly; Haehnel, Karin; Demuth, Ilja

    2016-02-01

    Hand-grip strength is strongly correlated with measures of muscle mass and can be taken to predict morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hand-grip strength and other markers associated with immune ageing, such as Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, leukocyte telomere length and serum levels of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in the elderly. We have assessed grip strength with the Smedley Dynamometer in younger (22-37 years) and older (60-85 years) men and women in a sample of people living in Berlin (the BASE-II study). Serum cytokine levels were determined by flow-cytometry, CMV serostatus via ELISA and leukocyte telomere length by quantitative PCR. IL-1β levels tended to be negatively associated with grip strength, but we did not find a significant association with IL-6 levels. CMV-seropositivity was not associated with higher levels of IL-1β, IL-6 or TNF, nor with weaker grip strength in men or women at any age. A putative general measure of organismal ageing, overall leukocyte telomere length, was also found not to be associated with lower grip strength in the elderly. Hand-grip strength remains an important biomarker independent of CMV infection or shorter telomere lengths, and poorly reflected in peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, all of which have been associated in some studies with frailty and mortality.

  1. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields

    PubMed Central

    Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-01-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain. PMID:25717155

  2. The impact of multimorbidity on grip strength in adults age 50 and older: Data from the health and retirement survey (HRS).

    PubMed

    Yorke, Amy M; Curtis, Amy B; Shoemaker, Michael; Vangsnes, Eric

    2017-09-01

    Multimorbidity, the presence of two or more chronic diseases, is a public health concern. The measurement of grip strength has been proposed as a measure of overall body strength and is reliable and easy to measure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the number of chronic diseases and common co-occurring chronic diseases with grip strength. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of 5877 respondents (2744=male, 3103=female) from the 2008 Health and Retirement Study (HRS) who completed grip strength measurements (kg). As the number of chronic diseases increased, an incremental decrease in grip strength occurred and became more pronounced with ≥3 chronic diseases present (b=3.1, 95% CI=2.3-3.9, p<0.001). No statistically significant relationship was identified between specific chronic diseases (except for stroke) and grip strength. Multimorbidity has a statistically significant negative relationship on grip strength. Grip strength should be considered as a physical performance measure to incorporate into the care of patients with multimorbidity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. SAO and Kelvin Waves in the EuroGRIPS GCMS and the UK Meteorological Offices Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amodei, M.; Pawson, S.; Scaife, A. A.; Lahoz, W.; Langematz, U.; Li, Ding Min; Simon, P.

    2000-01-01

    This work is an intercomparison of four tropospheric-stratospheric climate models, the Unified Model (UM) of the U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO), the model of the Free University in Berlin (FUB). the ARPEGE-climat model of the National Center for Meteorological Research (CNRM), and the Extended UGAMP GCM (EUGCM) of the Center for Global Atmospheric Modelling (CGAM), against the UKMO analyses. This comparison has been made in the framework of the "GSM-Reality Intercomparison Project for SPARC" (GRIPS). SPARC (Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate) aims are to investigate the effects of the middle atmosphere on climate and the GRIPS purpose is to organized a comprehensive assessment of current Middle Atmosphere-Climate Models (MACMs). The models integrations were made without identical contraints e.g. boundary conditions, incoming solar radiation). All models are able to represent the dominant features of the extratropical circulation. In this paper, the structure of the tropical winds and the strengths of the Kelvin waves are examined. Explanations for the differences exhibited. between the models. as well as between models and analyses, are also proposed. In the analyses a rich spectrum of waves (eastward and westward) is present and contributes to drive the SAO (SemiAnnual Oscillation) and the QBO (Quasi-Biennal Oscillation). The amplitude of the Kelvin waves is close to the one observed in UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) data. In agreement with observations, the Kelvin waves generated in the models propagate into the middle atmosphere as wave packets which underlines convective forcing origin. In most models, slow Kelvin waves propagate too high and are hence overestimated in the upper stratosphere and in the mesosphere, except for the UM which is more diffusive. These waves are not sufficient to force realistic westerlies of the QBO or SAO westerly phases. If the SAO is represented by all models only two of them are able to generate

  4. Aging Effects on the Control of Grip Force Magnitude: an fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Jeremy W.; Eng, Janice J.; Kokotilo, Kristen J.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2011-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging techniques have allowed for investigations into the mechanisms of age-related deterioration in motor control. This study used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to investigate age related differences in the control of grip force magnitude. Using an event-related design, fMRI scans were completed on 13 older adults, and 13 gender matched younger adults, while using their dominant hand to squeeze a rubber bulb for 4s at 10%, 40% or 70% of their maximum voluntary contraction. Both groups were able to match the relative force targets, however the older adults produced significantly lower levels of absolute force. fMRI analysis consisted of a 1) region of interest (ROI) approach to detect differences in selected motor areas within brain and 2) a voxel-wise whole brain comparison to find areas of differential activation that were not defined a priori between the older and younger group. The ROI analysis revealed that despite producing lower levels of absolute force, the older adults showed higher levels of activity predominantly in subcortical structures (putamen, thalamus and cerebellum) when compared to the younger group. The older adults also showed higher levels of activity in the ipsilateral ventral premotor cortex. A total of 19 of the 22 ROIs analyzed showed a significant main effect of the required force-level. In the majority of the ROIs that showed a significant force effect there were no significant differences in the magnitude of the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal between the 10% and 40% conditions but a significantly higher BOLD signal in the 70% condition, suggesting that the modulation of brain activation with grip force may not be controlled in a linear fashion. It was also found that the older adult group demonstrate higher levels of activation in 7 areas during a force production task at higher force levels using a voxel-wise analysis. The 7 clusters that showed significant differences tended to be areas

  5. Effects of strength and balance training on the mobility, fear of falling and grip strength of elderly female fallers.

    PubMed

    Prata, Melina Galleti; Scheicher, Marcos Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of virtual reality and strength training on the balance, fear of falling and handgrip strength of older women with a history of falls. The fear of falling, mobility and grip strength were evaluated in 11 elderly fallers (72.4 ± 5.2 years). The faller group was submitted to 12 weeks of virtual reality and muscle strength training. The results showed improvement in mobility (p = 0.0004) and in the fear of falling (p = 0.002). No significant difference was observed for hand grip strength. It can be concluded that virtual reality and muscle strength interventions are beneficial for mobility and fear of falling in older women with a history of falls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effort, performance, and motivation: insights from robot-assisted training of human golf putting and rat grip strength.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Jaime E; Gebrekristos, Berkenesh; Perez, Sergi; Rowe, Justin B; Sharp, Kelli; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-06-01

    Robotic devices can modulate success rates and required effort levels during motor training, but it is unclear how this affects performance gains and motivation. Here we present results from training unimpaired humans in a virtual golf-putting task, and training spinal cord injured (SCI) rats in a grip strength task using robotically modulated success rates and effort levels. Robotic assistance in golf practice increased trainees feelings of competence, and, paradoxically, increased their sense effort, even though it had mixed effects on learning. Reducing effort during a grip strength training task led rats with SCI to practice the task more frequently. However, the more frequent practice of these rats did not cause them to exceed the strength gains achieved by rats that exercised less often at higher required effort levels. These results show that increasing success and decreasing effort with robots increases motivation, but has mixed effects on performance gains.

  7. DAWN Coherent Wind Profiling Lidar Flights on NASA's DC-8 During GRIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Creary, Garfield A.; Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Trieu, Bo C.; Yu, Jirong

    2011-01-01

    Almost from their invention, lasers have been used to measure the velocity of wind and objects; over distances of cm to 10s of km. Long distance (remote) sensing of wind has been accomplished with continuous-wave (CW), focused pulsed, and collimated pulsed lasers; with direct and coherent (heterodyne) optical detection; and with a multitude of laser wavelengths. Airborne measurement of wind with pulsed, coherent-detection lidar was first performed in 1971 with a CW CO2 laser1, in 1972 with a pulsed CO2 laser2, in 1993 with a pulsed 2-micron laser3, and in 1999 with a pulsed CO2 laser and nadir-centered conical scanning4. Of course there were many other firsts and many other groups doing lidar wind remote sensing with coherent and direct detection. A very large FOM coherent wind lidar has been built by LaRC and flown on a DC-8. However a burn on the telescope secondary mirror prevented the full demonstration of high FOM. Both the GRIP science product and the technology and technique demonstration from aircraft are important to NASA. The technology and technique demonstrations contribute to our readiness for the 3D Winds space mission. The data analysis is beginning and we hope to present results at the conference.

  8. Evidence for motor planning in monkeys: rhesus macaques select efficient grips when transporting spoons.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Eliza L; Berthier, Neil E; Metevier, Christina M; Novak, Melinda A

    2011-07-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naïve adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with the elevated spoon problem, and observed how monkeys learned the affordances of spoons over sessions. Strikingly, monkeys developed two different strategies for efficient spoon transport in just 12 to 36 trials. In subsequent testing with a novel double bowl spoon approximately 1 year later, monkeys demonstrated that they were attending to the baited spoon bowl and continued to select efficient grips for transporting the spoon. Monkey data were contrasted with previous studies in human infants using a perception-action perspective in an effort to understand the fundamentals of tool use and motor planning that may be common in the development of these abilities across species and their origins in human behavior. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Effects of material properties and object orientation on precision grip kinematics.

    PubMed

    Paulun, Vivian C; Gegenfurtner, Karl R; Goodale, Melvyn A; Fleming, Roland W

    2016-08-01

    Successfully picking up and handling objects requires taking into account their physical properties (e.g., material) and position relative to the body. Such features are often inferred by sight, but it remains unclear to what extent observers vary their actions depending on the perceived properties. To investigate this, we asked participants to grasp, lift and carry cylinders to a goal location with a precision grip. The cylinders were made of four different materials (Styrofoam, wood, brass and an additional brass cylinder covered with Vaseline) and were presented at six different orientations with respect to the participant (0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120°, 150°). Analysis of their grasping kinematics revealed differences in timing and spatial modulation at all stages of the movement that depended on both material and orientation. Object orientation affected the spatial configuration of index finger and thumb during the grasp, but also the timing of handling and transport duration. Material affected the choice of local grasp points and the duration of the movement from the first visual input until release of the object. We find that conditions that make grasping more difficult (orientation with the base pointing toward the participant, high weight and low surface friction) lead to longer durations of individual movement segments and a more careful placement of the fingers on the object.

  10. The effectiveness of combined gripping method in tensile testing of UHMWPE single yarn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. X.; Hazell, P. J.; Shankar, K.; Morozov, E. V.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the experimental study on the effectiveness of combined gripping method employed in the tensile testing of UHMWPE (Dyneema® SK75) single yarn. Seven different solutions including epoxy, acrylic, and ethyl cyanoacrylate adhesives were tested under quasi-static loadings in order to determine the most effective adhesive for bonding UHMWPE single yarn to aluminium sheets. The ethyl cyanoacrylate adhesive combined with polyolefin surface primer was found to be the best choice which could prevent yarn slippage and ensure the failure of yarn occurs in the gauge section. The single yarns were then tested at three strain rates of 3.3×10-5, 3.3×10-3, and 0.33 s-1. The tensile strength, maximum strain, and Young's modulus were determined from the measured stress-strain curves and compared with the values from literature; the results showed these tensile properties of single yarn depend on strain rate over the range tested.

  11. Reconstructed animation from four-phase grip MRI of the wrist with ulnar-sided pain.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Wada, T; Iba, K; Aoki, M; Tamakawa, M; Yamashita, T

    2013-09-01

    In order to visualize dynamic variations related to ulnar-sided wrist pain, animation was reconstructed from T2* coronal-sectioned magnetic resonance imaging in each of the four phases of grip motion for nine wrists in patients with ulnar pain. Eight of the nine wrists showed a positive ulnar variance of less than 2 mm. Ulnocarpal impaction and triangular fibrocartilage complex injury were assessed on the basis of animation and arthroscopy, respectively. Animation revealed ulnocarpal impaction in four wrists. In one of the four wrists, the torn portion of the articular disc was impinged between the ulnar head and ulnar proximal side of the lunate. In another wrist, the ulnar head impacted the lunate directly through the defect in the articular disc that had previously been excised. An ulnar shortening osteotomy successfully relieved ulnar wrist pain in all four cases with both ulnocarpal impaction and Palmer's Class II triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. This method demonstrated impairment of the articular disc and longitudinal instability of the distal radioulnar joint simultaneously and should be of value in investigating dynamic pathophysiology causing ulnar wrist pain.

  12. Getting a Grip on the Handgrip Task: Handgrip Duration Correlates with Neuroticism But Not Conscientiousness.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Simon B; Flook, Lisa; Hirshberg, Matthew J; Findley, David; Kesebir, Pelin; Schaefer, Stacey M; Davidson, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Questions regarding the replicability of key findings in the self-regulation literature (e.g., ego-depletion effect) have led some to call for a more thorough evaluation of commonly used measures of self-control. The isometric handgrip task is one such measure. The current study examined correlates of handgrip persistence using data drawn from a larger randomized controlled trial. Handgrip persistence was measured both at baseline and following a physical stressor (cold pressor test). Correlations were examined between handgrip performance and personality traits theoretically closely linked with self-regulation: conscientiousness and neuroticism. Baseline handgrip performance was correlated with several measures drawn from the nomological network of self-regulation including measures of trait neuroticism, mindfulness, anxiety sensitivity, perceived stress, and positive affect, although not with trait conscientiousness. Baseline handgrip predicted aversiveness experienced during the physical stressor, while changes in handgrip performance tracked changes in implicit and explicit negative affect (i.e., affective reactivity). These associations were largely maintained when controlling for variables highly correlated with overall grip strength (i.e., gender, height, and weight), although correlations separated by gender suggest associations were primarily driven by female participants. Results support future research using the handgrip task.

  13. Hand grip strength and anthropometric characteristics in Italian female national basketball teams.

    PubMed

    Pizzigalli, Luisa; Micheletti Cremasco, Margherita; LA Torre, Antonio; Rainoldi, Alberto; Benis, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hand and body dimensions on hand grip strength and to define a reference scale for talent identification in basketball players. Body and hand anthropometric data and the maximal handgrip strength of 109 female Italian basketball National players (Under14-Seniores) were measured. Handgrip strength and arm length trend increased, raising the statistical significant differences only for players from the age of 19 (U20, Seniores) with respect to sub-elite groups (U14, U15) (P<0.05). Handgrip strength showed low positive correlations with height and Body Mass Index but a positive relationships with arm length (r=0.5; P<0.001). Findings underline training and years of practice have effects on increasing handgrip strength. Data show that to select female basketball players by arm length means selecting by handgrip strength. Thus it is possible to suggest that in addition to height, arm length could also be considered a useful parameter in young female talent identification.

  14. EVIDENCE FOR MOTOR PLANNING IN MONKEYS: RHESUS MACAQUES SELECT EFFICIENT GRIPS WHEN TRANSPORTING SPOONS

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2014-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naïve adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with the elevated spoon problem, and observed how monkeys learned the affordances of spoons over sessions. Strikingly, monkeys developed two different strategies for efficient spoon transport in just 12 to 36 trials. In subsequent testing with a novel double bowl spoon approximately 1 year later, monkeys demonstrated that they were attending to the baited spoon bowl and continued to select efficient grips for transporting the spoon. Monkey data were contrasted with previous studies in human infants using a perception-action perspective in an effort to understand the fundamentals of tool use and motor planning that may be common in the development of these abilities across species and their origins in human behavior. PMID:21676101

  15. Optimal combination of auxiliary device size and its location on chopsticks for food-gripping performances.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Chen, Yi-Lang

    2012-08-01

    Chopsticks are the main utensils for daily dining in Asia. Lee and Chen (2008) designed a novel auxiliary device for chopsticks that successfully converts people experienced in scissor-pinching to the correct method: pincer-pinching. This study attempts to assess the optimal combination of auxiliary size and location on chopstick stems for food-gripping performance. Twenty-four male participants experienced in scissor-pinching were recruited for the experiment. They were requested to perform 3 simulated tasks (force, precision, and stability) using 6 auxiliary combinations of 3 sizes (15, 25, and 35 mm) of chopsticks and 2 locations (on top of the stems and 1/3 stem-length from the top). Results indicate that auxiliary device size influenced simulated task performance and the user's subjective rating of chopsticks use. The auxiliary device measuring 15 mm wide showed the best performance in pinching force, precision, stability, and subjective rating. The location of the auxiliary device only affected the pinching force. The auxiliary device produced greater force when located at the top of the stems. This finding improves the application of auxiliary devices to chopstick operation.

  16. Object orientation in two dimensional grasp with friction towards minimization of gripping power.

    PubMed

    Ito, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Shouta; Sasaki, Minoru

    2009-09-01

    This article reports an analysis of two dimensional grasp where a convex rigid object is grasped by two contact points with friction. The purpose is to find the object orientation that minimizes the norm of the contact force vector, each element of which is composed from the normal force and friction force at each contact point. The formulation of this problem requires some equality or inequality conditions. In the analysis, the solution of the equality conditions is parameterized at first. Based on the fact that the norm of the contact force vector becomes monotonic increasing function of this parameter, the minimal parameter values are calculated by means of the piecewise analysis. Using the relation between the friction coefficient and the apex angle of the friction cone effectively, the following result is obtained: the norm of the contact force, i.e, gripping power becomes locally minimal at the object orientation where the intersection point of the upper sides of two friction cones is located in opposite direction of the gravity from the center of mass of the grasped object.

  17. Simple and Reliable Method to Estimate the Fingertip Static Coefficient of Friction in Precision Grip.

    PubMed

    Barrea, Allan; Bulens, David Cordova; Lefevre, Philippe; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    The static coefficient of friction (µstatic) plays an important role in dexterous object manipulation. Minimal normal force (i.e., grip force) needed to avoid dropping an object is determined by the tangential force at the fingertip-object contact and the frictional properties of the skin-object contact. Although frequently assumed to be constant for all levels of normal force (NF, the force normal to the contact), µ static actually varies nonlinearly with NF and increases at low NF levels. No method is currently available to measure the relationship between µstatic and NF easily. Therefore, we propose a new method allowing the simple and reliable measurement of the fingertip µstatic at different NF levels, as well as an algorithm for determining µstatic from measured forces and torques. Our method is based on active, back-and-forth movements of a subject's finger on the surface of a fixed six-axis force and torque sensor. µstatic is computed as the ratio of the tangential to the normal force at slip onset. A negative power law captures the relationship between µstatic and NF. Our method allows the continuous estimation of µstatic as a function of NF during dexterous manipulation, based on the relationship between µstatic and NF measured before manipulation.

  18. Getting a Grip on the Handgrip Task: Handgrip Duration Correlates with Neuroticism But Not Conscientiousness

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Simon B.; Flook, Lisa; Hirshberg, Matthew J.; Findley, David; Kesebir, Pelin; Schaefer, Stacey M.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Questions regarding the replicability of key findings in the self-regulation literature (e.g., ego-depletion effect) have led some to call for a more thorough evaluation of commonly used measures of self-control. The isometric handgrip task is one such measure. The current study examined correlates of handgrip persistence using data drawn from a larger randomized controlled trial. Handgrip persistence was measured both at baseline and following a physical stressor (cold pressor test). Correlations were examined between handgrip performance and personality traits theoretically closely linked with self-regulation: conscientiousness and neuroticism. Baseline handgrip performance was correlated with several measures drawn from the nomological network of self-regulation including measures of trait neuroticism, mindfulness, anxiety sensitivity, perceived stress, and positive affect, although not with trait conscientiousness. Baseline handgrip predicted aversiveness experienced during the physical stressor, while changes in handgrip performance tracked changes in implicit and explicit negative affect (i.e., affective reactivity). These associations were largely maintained when controlling for variables highly correlated with overall grip strength (i.e., gender, height, and weight), although correlations separated by gender suggest associations were primarily driven by female participants. Results support future research using the handgrip task. PMID:28848480

  19. A method to study precision grip control in viscoelastic force fields using a robotic gripper.

    PubMed

    Lambercy, Olivier; Metzger, Jean-Claude; Santello, Marco; Gassert, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Instrumented objects and multipurpose haptic displays have commonly been used to investigate sensorimotor control of grasping and manipulation. A major limitation of these devices, however, is the extent to which the experimenter can vary the interaction dynamics to fully probe sensorimotor control mechanisms. We propose a novel method to study precision grip control using a grounded robotic gripper with two moving, mechanically coupled finger pads instrumented with force sensors. The device is capable of stably rendering virtual mechanical properties with a wide dynamic range of achievable impedances. Eight viscoelastic force fields with different combinations of stiffness and damping parameters were implemented, and tested on eight healthy subjects performing 30 consecutive repetitions of a grasp, hold, and release task with time and position constraints. Rates of thumb and finger force were found to be highly correlated (r>0.9) during grasping, revealing that, despite the mechanical coupling of the two finger pads, subjects performed grasping movements in a physiological fashion. Subjects quickly adapted to the virtual dynamics (within seven trials), but, depending on the presented force field condition, used different control strategies to correctly perform the task. The proof of principle presented in this paper underscores the potential of such a one-degree-of-freedom robotic gripper to study neural control of grasping, and to provide novel insights on sensorimotor control mechanisms.

  20. Fire hose gripping device and process for fighting fires in oil refineries and the like

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, D.R.; Everding, R.J.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a firefighting process. It comprises the steps of: attaching one end of a fire hose to a fire hydrant when the end of the fire hose is in a generally collapsed flattened position; uncoiling the fire hose; attaching a manually grippable spray nozzle to the other end of the fire hose; inflating and substantially filling the fire hose with water from the water supply means to expand the hose to a semirigid expanded position; grasping, lifting, and carrying the filled fire hose with one hand; gripping a vertical elastomeric handle of a hose clamp with the other hand. The hose clamp having a generally U-shaped hose-engaging member. The U-shaped hose-engaging member having an open end defining an access opening for receiving the hose. The access opening being larger than the maximum diameter and transverse span of the uncoiled filled fire hose: inserting the hose-engaging member on the fire hose such that there is sufficient clearance between the hose-engaging member and the fire hose to side hose clamp to another position; moving the hose clamp at an acute angle of inclination relative to the hose to detachable secure and inter-lockingly engage the hose-engaging member to the filled fire hose; manually lifting the vertical elastomeric handle of the hose clamp to elevate the fire hose; pointing the nozzle towards the fire; and spraying water from the nozzle on the fire.

  1. A new technique to improve tissue grip: "the lasso-loop stitch".

    PubMed

    Lafosse, Laurent; Van Raebroeckx, Antoon; Brzoska, Roman

    2006-11-01

    In the chain of reattachment of the rotator cuff, links extend from the tendon to the anchor within the bone. Passage of the suture through the tendon is noted at the start of the chain, but as shown before, this is most vulnerable, depending on the quality of the tendon. We present a new technique of suture placement designed to improve tissue grip: "The lasso-loop stitch." One side of the wire is passed through the edge of the tendon, which is ruptured by the wire in the middle-not at the end. The wire is not p