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Sample records for rasmus grip jan-gunnar

  1. GRIPPING TOOL

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, R.J.

    1961-12-12

    A self-actuated gripping tool is described for transferring fuel elements and the like into reactors and other inaccessible locations. The tool will grasp or release the load only when properly positioned for this purpose. In addition, the load cannot be released except when unsupported by the tool, so that jarring or contact will not bring about accidental release of the load. The gripping members or jaws of the device are cam-actuated by an axially slidable shaft which has two lockable positions. A spring urges the shaft into one position and a solenoid is provided to overcome the spring and move it into the other position. The weight of the tool operates a sleeve to lock the shaft in its existing position. Only when the cable supporting the tool is slack is the device capable of being actuated either to grasp or release its load. (AEC)

  2. Domo-Grip: functional evaluation and rehabilitation using grip force.

    PubMed

    Hewson, David J; Li, Ke; Frerejean, Alexis; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Duchene, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Grip force measurement is routinely used to identify pathologies, evaluate muscular function, and as part of rehabilitation. Grip force has also been shown to be a good indicator of the capacity of elderly to live independently owing to its strong relationship with clinical tests such as the Index of Activities of Daily Living. An autonomous, communicant grip-force measurement device is presented in this paper in order to perform grip-force evaluation at home. The Domo-Grip system consists of the Grip-Ball, the Grip-Box, and Grip-Soft. The Grip-Ball measures the pressure resulting from grip force, the Grip-Box serves as the communication hub, while Grip-Soft is an interactive software suite. The Domo-Grip system can be used as part of a home-based rehabilitation, and also for functional evaluation as part of an assessment of the capacity of elderly to live autonomously.

  3. Timelapse: GRIPS Assembly

    NASA Video Gallery

    The GRIPS team integrated and tested their balloon payload at NASA’s Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas, July 18-Aug. 28, 2015. After putting the finishing touches on the payl...

  4. NASA Hurricane Mission - GRIP

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is an overview of NASA's hurricane research campaign called Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). The six-week mission was conducted in coordination with NOAA and the National Sc...

  5. Bi-stem gripping apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Fred G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to devices which grip cylindrical structures and more particularly to a device which has three arcuate gripping members having frictional surfaces for gripping and compressing a bi-stem. The bi-stem gripping apparatus is constructed having a pair of side gripping members, and an intermediate gripping member disposed between them. Sheets of a gum stock silicone rubber with frictional gripping surfaces are bonded to the inner region of the gripping members and provide frictional engagement between the bi-stem and the apparatus. A latch secures the gripping apparatus to a bi-stem, and removable handles are attached, allowing an astronaut to pull the bi-stem from its cassette. A tethering ring on the outside of the gripping apparatus provides a convenient point to which a lanyard may be attached.

  6. Estimation of grip force using the Grip-ball dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Chkeir, Aly; Jaber, Rana; Hewson, David J; Duchêne, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The Grip-ball is an innovative device that has been designed to measure grip strength. The Grip-ball consists of an airtight ball that contains a pressure sensor and Bluetooth communication system. The Grip-ball can be inflated to different initial pressures, with data available continuously in real time. The aim of this study was to build a model to predict the force applied to the Grip-ball dynamometer based only on the pressure measured by the Grip-ball and its initial pressure. Forces ranging from 2 to 70 kg were applied to a hybrid version of the device for 10 different initial pressures, ranging from atmospheric pressure of 100 kPa through to 190 kPa. A model was constructed to predict applied force, with force as a function of the initial pressure and the pressure measured. The error of the model was calculated as 1.29 kg across all initial pressures and forces applied. The results of the study are comparable with the errors observed for the gold standard in grip force measurement, the Jamar dynamometer. The best results for force prediction were obtained over the range in which frailty is typically detected. The Grip-ball will now be tested using a large population in order to establish clinical norms.

  7. The Grip of Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondhalekar, Prabhakar

    2001-09-01

    Gravity is one of the most inexplicable forces of nature, controlling everything, from the expansion of the Universe to the ebb and flow of ocean tides. The search for the laws of motion and gravitation began more than two thousand years ago, a quest that Prabhakar Gondhalekar recounts in The Grip of Gravity. Beginning with Aristotle and concluding with Planck, Gondhalekar outlines a 'genealogy' of gravity and lucidly explains how previous explanations have shaped the most recent development in the field, string theory. In this work, physicist and astronomer Gondhalekar describes experiments, both planned and proposed, and clearly explains natural phenomena like ocean tides, seasons, ice ages, the formation of planets, stars, and exotic objects like black holes and neutron stars, which are all controlled by gravity. Including anecdotes and thumb-nail sketches of the personalities involved, The Grip of Gravity provides an introduction to the foundation of modern physics and shows how the current developments in string theory may lead to a new and radical interpretation of gravity. Prabhakar Gondhalekar is an Honorary Fellow in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College, London. Until his retirement in 1998, he was the head of the Space Astronomy Group at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, where he had been a researcher for 18 years. His research has included a number of topics in galactic and extragalactic astronomy, with his major work focusing on the interstellar medium and active galactic nuclei. Gondhalekar has been awarded Royal Society, Leverhulme Trust, and NATO Research Fellowships to do research in universities in the United States and Israel.

  8. Robot Hand Grips Cylinders Securely

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Jaws and linkage accommodate various sizes. Robot hand includes two pairs of parallel jaws that grasp rods, pipes, tubes, struts, and other long, heavy cylindrical objects. Hand features compact rotary drive and butterfly configuration simplifying approach and gripping maneuvers of robot. Parallelogram linkages maintain alignment of each jaw with other jaws. One bar of each linkage connected to one of two concentric, counterrotating shafts; rotation of shafts moves jaws in each pair toward or away from each other to grasp or release workpiece. Each jaw includes rigid gripping pad lined with rubber to give firm grip and to prevent damage to workpiece. Inner cylindrical surface (corner) of each jaw tapers off to flat sides. Enables jaw to grasp workpieces with diameters larger than or equal to twice the corner radius.

  9. Measuring Grip Pressure during the Golf Swing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budney, David R.

    1979-01-01

    With the use of a special instrumented golf club, grip pressure measurements can be used by the instructor to quantify and discuss the effects of grip pressure in relation to instructional points. (MM)

  10. Well casing grip assurance system

    SciTech Connect

    Mosing, D.E.; Webre, C.M.

    1987-06-30

    An apparatus is described for assuring that at least one of the elevator or the spider of well casing installation apparatus is fully closed in gripping connection about a well casing before the other of the elevator or the spider may be released from fully closed gripping connection about the well casing, the continuation comprising: (a) two-position elevator valve means connected to admit fluid pressure and to optionally direct it to open and close the elevator; (b) two-position spider valve means connected to admit fluid pressure into the spider and to optionally direct the fluid pressure to open and to close the spider; (c) two-position spider position valve means connected to the elevator valve means. The spider position valve means is mechanically connected for passing the fluid pressure to the elevator valve means only when the spider is fully closed into gripping position; and (d) two-position elevator position valve means connected to the spider valve means. The elevator position valve is mechanically connected to the elevator for passing fluid pressure to the spider valve when the elevator is fully closed into gripping position.

  11. Constraints on grip-selection: minimizing awkwardness.

    PubMed

    Fischman, M G

    1998-02-01

    In picking up and manipulating an object, the selection of an initial grip (overhand versus underhand) often depends on how comfortable the hand and arm will be at the end of the movement. This effect has been called "end-state comfort" and seems to be an important constraint in grip-selection. The present experiment further explored this effect by selecting a task that would ensure a comfortable ending position regardless of the initial choice of grip. 206 undergraduates picked up a cardboard paper-towel roll from a horizontal position and placed one end down on a table. Analysis showed a clear preference for the overhand grip, as 78% of the participants chose this grip. In addition, more women preferred the overhand grip than men. The findings indicate that people may be sensitive to minimizing awkwardness in both terminal and initial positions. PMID:9530757

  12. Verbal regulation of grip force in preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Haishi, Koichi; Okuzumi, Hideyuki; Kokubun, Mitsuru; Komatsu, Ayumi; Kitajima, Yoshio; Hosobuchi, Tomio

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the developmental processes in verbal regulation by preschool children. Participants were 152 typically developing children (74 boys, 78 girls) between 4 and 6 years of age (M = 5.3, SD = .8), and 30 healthy adults (15 men, 15 women) between 19 and 26 years of age (M = 20.8, SD = 1.4). In Exp. 1, the task was to regulate grip force based on quantitative instruction which implies using a scale for regulation. Participants were required to produce a half-grip force of the maximum (Task 1). In Exp. 2, the task was grip-force regulation based on nonquantitative instruction. The participants were asked to respond with a slightly weaker grip force than the maximum (Task 2) and then a further weaker grip force (Task 3) than that used on Task 2. The regulation rates produced the extent of regulation and suggest regulation by quantitative instruction may develop earlier than by nonquantitative instruction. Also, precise grip-force regulation based on the semantic aspect of instruction may be difficult for young children. The developmental changes in the rate of performance especially observed in children of 4 to 6 years indicate that the tendency to use too much grip force disappears during this preschool period. In addition, too little grip force in regulation may reflect the developmental process toward fine grasping movements. PMID:19544959

  13. Task Dependency of Grip Stiffness—A Study of Human Grip Force and Grip Stiffness Dependency during Two Different Tasks with Same Grip Forces

    PubMed Central

    Höppner, Hannes; McIntyre, Joseph; van der Smagt, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    It is widely known that the pinch-grip forces of the human hand are linearly related to the weight of the grasped object. Less is known about the relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. We set out to determine variations to these dependencies in different tasks with and without visual feedback. In two different settings, subjects were asked to (a) grasp and hold a stiffness-measuring manipulandum with a predefined grip force, differing from experiment to experiment, or (b) grasp and hold this manipulandum of which we varied the weight between trials in a more natural task. Both situations led to grip forces in comparable ranges. As the measured grip stiffness is the result of muscle and tendon properties, and since muscle/tendon stiffness increases more-or-less linearly as a function of muscle force, we found, as might be predicted, a linear relationship between grip force and grip stiffness. However, the measured stiffness ranges and the increase of stiffness with grip force varied significantly between the two tasks. Furthermore, we found a strong correlation between regression slope and mean stiffness for the force task which we ascribe to a force stiffness curve going through the origin. Based on a biomechanical model, we attributed the difference between both tasks to changes in wrist configuration, rather than to changes in cocontraction. In a new set of experiments where we prevent the wrist from moving by fixing it and resting it on a pedestal, we found subjects exhibiting similar stiffness/force characteristics in both tasks. PMID:24324643

  14. NASA Gets 'GRIP' on Hurricane Formation

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's GRIP 2010 hurricane mission is in full force. During this year's Atlantic hurricane season, researchers using powerful instruments onboard three aircraft will be able to "see"" below the clo...

  15. Grip strength in post-stroke hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soohee; Park, Joo-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed in order to investigate the grip strength of the unaffected hand of hemiplegic post-stroke patients. [Subjects] This study conducted on 83 hemiplegic post-stroke patients from May to August 2012. [Methods] This study was measured the mean grip strength of the unaffected hand of patients with hemiplegia and comparatively analyzed this with the mean normal grip strength. [Results] The grip strength of the unaffected hand of patients with hemiplegia was weaker compared to the of normal. [Conclusion] Patients with hemiplegia demonstrated problems in both their unaffected and affected sides. Based on the results of this study, it is necessary to expand treatment from the affected to unaffected areas of patients with hemiplegia. PMID:27065562

  16. Helical grip for the cable cars of San Francisco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peyran, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A helical cable car grip to minimize high maintenance costs of San Francisco's cable car operation is presented. The grip establishes a rolling contact between the cable and grip to reduce sliding friction and associated cable wear. The design, development, and testing of the helical cable car grip are described.

  17. Grip for fatigue testing pure aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, P.; Yuan, G. S.; Hartwig, K. T.

    A simple method of clamping pure aluminium for fatigue tests at cryogenic temperatures is described. Easily machined cylindrical specimens are aligned and held firmly by collet grips that counteract sample shrinkage during cooldown. Specimens are quickly mounted and removed after testing without distortion or thermal treatment 99.999% aluminium, aluminium alloys and copper were gripped successfully through tens of thousands of fully reversed tension-compression cycles at 295, 77 and 4.2 K.

  18. The geostationary remote infrared pollution sounder (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, H.; Dickerson, Russell; Schoeberl, M.; Gordley, L. L.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M.; Spackman, R.; Fish, C.; Kim, J.

    2012-11-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases remain highly uncertain [IPCC, 2007] making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) with unprecedented precision to reduce substantially this uncertainty. The GRIPS instrument uses gas filter correlation radiometry (GFCR) to detect reflected and thermal IR radiation from geostationary orbit. GRIPS is designed to haves sensitivity down to the Earth's surface at ~8 km nadir resolution. GRIPS can also resolve CO2, CO, and CH4 anomalies in the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere to quantify lofting, diurnal variations and long-range transport. With repeated measurements throughout the day GRIPS can maximize the number of cloud free measurements determining biogenic and anthropogenic sources, sinks, and fluxes. Finally, the GFCR technique is, to first order, insensitive to aerosols interference. GRIPS is highly complementary to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, OCO-2, and other existing and planned missions.

  19. Design and validation of the Grip-ball for measurement of hand grip strength.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Rana; Hewson, David J; Duchêne, Jacques

    2012-11-01

    The Grip-ball is a new dynamometer used to evaluate grip strength, as well as for use in home-based rehabilitation of the hand and forearm. The Grip-ball consists of pressure and temperature sensors and an electronic wireless communication system contained in an airtight ball. That can be inflated to different pressures. The device has advantages over standard dynamometers in that it looks like a simple ball, and can wirelessly communicate via Bluetooth to any compatible receiver, thus have potential to be used for clinical assessment and rehabilitation in a remote setting. The reliability and reproducibility of the device were assessed for the pressure sensor itself, as well as the relationship between the force applied and the pressure measured by the Grip-ball. The initial validation was performed using the pressure sensor without the ball in order to confirm the accuracy of the sensor used. A second validation study was conducted using the Grip-ball rather than just its sensor to examine the relationship between the pressure measured inside the ball and force applied. The results showed that there is a very good correlation (r=0.997, p<0.05) between the pressure measured by the Grip-ball sensor and that measured by a Vigorimeter, thus confirming the reliability of the sensor used in the Grip-ball. A quadratic regression equation was calculated in order to predict the force applied based on the pressure measured inside the ball, and the initial pressure to which the ball was inflated (R(2)=0.97, standard error 10.9N). Such a finding compares favourably with the variability inherent in Jamar recordings, thus indicating that the Grip-ball could be used to assess grip force. An industrial version of the Grip-ball, which is currently under development, will be able to be used for the entire range of grip force in the population.

  20. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, R. R.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Gordley, L. L.; McHugh, M. J.; Thompson, A. M.; Burrows, J. P.; Zeng, N.; Marshall, B. T.; Fish, C. S.; Spackman, J. R.; Kim, J.; Park, R.; Warner, J. X.; Bhartia, P. K.; Kollonige, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century - for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  1. GRIPS - The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Dickerson, Russell; Schoeberl, Mark; Bloom, Hal; Gordley, Larry; McHugh, Martin; Thompson, Anne; Burrows, John; Zeng, Ning; Marshall, Tom; Fish, Chad; Kim, Jhoon; Park, Rokjin; Warner, Juying; Bhartia, Pawan; Kollonige, Debra

    2013-04-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century for America and for the world as a whole. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases and other pollutants remain highly uncertain making atmospheric composition predictions difficult. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) will measure carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and methane (CH4). By using measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) and the O2 A-band to help correct for clouds and aerosols, GRIPS will achieve unprecedented precision. Together these gases account for about 85% of all climate forcing and they impact atmospheric ozone (O3). GRIPS, employing gas-filter correlation radiometry, uses the target gases themselves in place of dispersive elements to achieve outstanding throughput, sensitivity, and specificity. Because it uses a combination of reflected and thermal IR, GRIPS will detect trace gas concentrations right down to the Earth's surface. When flown in parallel to a UV/VIS sensor such as GEMS on GEO-KOMPSAT-2B over East Asia or the Sentinel 4 on MTG over Europe/Africa, the combination offers powerful finger-printing capabilities to distinguish and quantify diverse pollution sources such as electricity generation, biomass burning, and motor vehicles. From geostationary orbit, GRIPS will be able to focus on important targets to quantify sources, net flux, diurnal cycles, and long-range transport of these key components in the Earth's radiative balance and air quality.

  2. Selective Influences of Precision and Power Grips on Speech Categorization.

    PubMed

    Tiainen, Mikko; Tiippana, Kaisa; Vainio, Martti; Peromaa, Tarja; Komeilipoor, Naeem; Vainio, Lari

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that articulatory gestures are systematically associated with specific manual grip actions. Here we show that executing such actions can influence performance on a speech-categorization task. Participants watched and/or listened to speech stimuli while executing either a power or a precision grip. Grip performance influenced the syllable categorization by increasing the proportion of responses of the syllable congruent with the executed grip (power grip-[ke] and precision grip-[te]). Two follow-up experiments indicated that the effect was based on action-induced bias in selecting the syllable. PMID:26978074

  3. 23. POWELLTYPE CAR THROUGH GRIP REMOVAL DOOR: View looking through ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. POWELL-TYPE CAR THROUGH GRIP REMOVAL DOOR: View looking through grip removal door into interior of a Powell-type cable car. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  4. Variability of Grip Kinetics during Adult Signature Writing

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Bassma; Thalanki Anantha, Nayanashri; Chan, Jennifer; Chau, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Grip kinetics and their variation are emerging as important considerations in the clinical assessment of handwriting pathologies, fine motor rehabilitation, biometrics, forensics and ergonomic pen design. This study evaluated the intra- and inter-participant variability of grip shape kinetics in adults during signature writing. Twenty (20) adult participants wrote on a digitizing tablet using an instrumented pen that measured the forces exerted on its barrel. Signature samples were collected over 10 days, 3 times a day, to capture temporal variations in grip shape kinetics. A kinetic topography (i.e., grip shape image) was derived per signature by time-averaging the measured force at each of 32 locations around the pen barrel. The normalized cross correlations (NCC) of grip shape images were calculated within- and between-participants. Several classification algorithms were implemented to gauge the error rate of participant discrimination based on grip shape kinetics. Four different grip shapes emerged and several participants made grip adjustments (change in grip shape or grip height) or rotated the pen during writing. Nonetheless, intra-participant variation in grip kinetics was generally much smaller than inter-participant force variations. Using the entire grip shape images as a 32-dimensional input feature vector, a K-nearest neighbor classifier achieved an error rate of % in discriminating among participants. These results indicate that writers had unique grip shape kinetics that were repeatable over time but distinct from those of other participants. The topographic analysis of grip kinetics may inform the development of personalized interventions or customizable grips in clinical and industrial applications, respectively. PMID:23658812

  5. Variability of grip kinetics during adult signature writing.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Bassma; Thalanki Anantha, Nayanashri; Chan, Jennifer; Chau, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Grip kinetics and their variation are emerging as important considerations in the clinical assessment of handwriting pathologies, fine motor rehabilitation, biometrics, forensics and ergonomic pen design. This study evaluated the intra- and inter-participant variability of grip shape kinetics in adults during signature writing. Twenty (20) adult participants wrote on a digitizing tablet using an instrumented pen that measured the forces exerted on its barrel. Signature samples were collected over 10 days, 3 times a day, to capture temporal variations in grip shape kinetics. A kinetic topography (i.e., grip shape image) was derived per signature by time-averaging the measured force at each of 32 locations around the pen barrel. The normalized cross correlations (NCC) of grip shape images were calculated within- and between-participants. Several classification algorithms were implemented to gauge the error rate of participant discrimination based on grip shape kinetics. Four different grip shapes emerged and several participants made grip adjustments (change in grip shape or grip height) or rotated the pen during writing. Nonetheless, intra-participant variation in grip kinetics was generally much smaller than inter-participant force variations. Using the entire grip shape images as a 32-dimensional input feature vector, a K-nearest neighbor classifier achieved an error rate of 1.2±0.4% in discriminating among participants. These results indicate that writers had unique grip shape kinetics that were repeatable over time but distinct from those of other participants. The topographic analysis of grip kinetics may inform the development of personalized interventions or customizable grips in clinical and industrial applications, respectively.

  6. Effect of grip strength and grip strengthening exercises on instantaneous bat velocity of collegiate baseball players.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shawn S; Lyons, Brian C; Mayo, Jerry J

    2004-05-01

    Bat velocity is considered to be an important factor for successful hitting. The relationship between grip strength and bat velocity has not been conclusively established. The purposes of this study were to determine the relationship of grip strength to bat velocity and to ascertain whether the performance of resistance training exercises designed to specifically target the forearms and grip would significantly alter bat velocity. The subjects for this study were 23 male members (mean +/- SD, age = 19.7 +/- 1.3 years, height = 182.5 +/- 5.9 cm, weight = 85.4 +/- 15.5 kg, experience = 14.4 +/- 1.7 years) of a varsity baseball team at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II school. The Jamar hand dynamometer was used to test grip strength, and the SETPRO Rookie was used to measure instantaneous bat velocity at the point of contact with the ball. Subjects were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. For 6 weeks, both groups participated in their usual baseball practice sessions, but the experimental group also performed extra forearm and grip strengthening exercises, whereas the control group did not. Pretest and posttest correlations between grip strength and bat velocity revealed no significant relationship between grip strength and bat velocity (pretest r = 0.054, p = 0.807; posttest r = 0.315, p = 0.145). A dependent t-test performed on all subjects revealed that a significant (p = 0.001) increase in bat velocity did occur over the course of the study. A covariate analysis, employing pretest bat velocity as the covariate, revealed no significant difference (p = 0.795) in posttest bat velocity scores between the experimental and control groups. Thus, increases in bat velocity occurred, but the differences were similar for both the experimental and control groups. The findings of this study suggest that grip strength and bat velocity are not significantly related, and that the allocation of time and energy for added training

  7. Effect of grip strength and grip strengthening exercises on instantaneous bat velocity of collegiate baseball players.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Shawn S; Lyons, Brian C; Mayo, Jerry J

    2004-05-01

    Bat velocity is considered to be an important factor for successful hitting. The relationship between grip strength and bat velocity has not been conclusively established. The purposes of this study were to determine the relationship of grip strength to bat velocity and to ascertain whether the performance of resistance training exercises designed to specifically target the forearms and grip would significantly alter bat velocity. The subjects for this study were 23 male members (mean +/- SD, age = 19.7 +/- 1.3 years, height = 182.5 +/- 5.9 cm, weight = 85.4 +/- 15.5 kg, experience = 14.4 +/- 1.7 years) of a varsity baseball team at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II school. The Jamar hand dynamometer was used to test grip strength, and the SETPRO Rookie was used to measure instantaneous bat velocity at the point of contact with the ball. Subjects were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. For 6 weeks, both groups participated in their usual baseball practice sessions, but the experimental group also performed extra forearm and grip strengthening exercises, whereas the control group did not. Pretest and posttest correlations between grip strength and bat velocity revealed no significant relationship between grip strength and bat velocity (pretest r = 0.054, p = 0.807; posttest r = 0.315, p = 0.145). A dependent t-test performed on all subjects revealed that a significant (p = 0.001) increase in bat velocity did occur over the course of the study. A covariate analysis, employing pretest bat velocity as the covariate, revealed no significant difference (p = 0.795) in posttest bat velocity scores between the experimental and control groups. Thus, increases in bat velocity occurred, but the differences were similar for both the experimental and control groups. The findings of this study suggest that grip strength and bat velocity are not significantly related, and that the allocation of time and energy for added training

  8. Factors affecting grip force: anatomy, mechanics, and referent configurations.

    PubMed

    Ambike, Satyajit; Paclet, Florent; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2014-04-01

    The extrinsic digit muscles naturally couple wrist action and grip force in prehensile tasks. We explored the effects of wrist position on the steady-state grip force and grip-force change during imposed changes in the grip aperture [apparent stiffness (AS)]. Subjects held an instrumented handle steady using a prismatic five-digit grip. The grip aperture was changed slowly, while the subjects were instructed not to react voluntarily to these changes. An increase in the aperture resulted in an increase in grip force, and its contraction resulted in a proportional drop in grip force. The AS values (between 4 and 6 N/cm) were consistent across a wide range of wrist positions. These values were larger when the subjects performed the task with eyes open as compared to eyes-closed trials. They were also larger for trials that started from a larger initial aperture. After a sequence of aperture increase and decrease to the initial width, grip force dropped by about 25% without the subjects being aware of this. We interpret the findings within the referent configuration hypothesis of grip-force production. The results support the idea of back-coupling between the referent and actual digit coordinates. According to this idea, the central nervous system defines referent coordinates for the digit tips, and the difference between the referent and actual coordinates leads to force production. If actual coordinates are not allowed to move to referent ones, referent coordinates show a relatively slow drift toward the actual ones. PMID:24477762

  9. Factors affecting grip force: Anatomy, mechanics, and referent configurations

    PubMed Central

    Ambike, Satyajit; Paclet, Florent; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    The extrinsic digit muscles naturally couple wrist action and grip force in prehensile tasks. We explored the effects of wrist position on the steady-state grip force and grip-force change during imposed changes in the grip aperture (apparent stiffness). Subjects held an instrumented handle steady using a prismatic five-digit grip. The grip aperture was changed slowly, while the subjects were instructed not to react voluntarily to these changes. An increase in the aperture resulted in an increase in grip force and its contraction resulted in a proportional drop in grip force. The apparent stiffness values (between 4 and 6 N/cm) were consistent across a wide range of wrist positions. These values were larger when the subjects performed the task with eyes open as compared to eyes-closed trials. They were also larger for trials that started from a larger initial aperture. After a sequence of aperture increase and decrease to the initial width, grip force dropped by about 25% without the subjects being aware of this. We interpret the findings within the referent configuration hypothesis of grip force production. The results support the idea of back-coupling between the referent and actual digit coordinates. According to this idea, the central nervous system defines referent coordinates for the digit tips, and the difference between the referent and actual coordinates leads to force production. If actual coordinates are not allowed to move to referent ones, referent coordinates show a relatively slow drift towards the actual ones. PMID:24477762

  10. Systems and Methods for Gravity-Independent Gripping and Drilling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron (Inventor); Frost, Matthew A. (Inventor); Thatte, Nitish (Inventor); King, Jonathan P. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for gravity independent gripping and drilling are described. The gripping device can also comprise a drill or sampling devices for drilling and/or sampling in microgravity environments, or on vertical or inverted surfaces in environments where gravity is present. A robotic system can be connected with the gripping and drilling devices via an ankle interface adapted to distribute the forces realized from the robotic system.

  11. Microspine Gripping Mechanism for Asteroid Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, Ezekiel G.; Berg, Andrew B.; Willig, Andrew; Parness, Aaron; Frey, Tim; Howell, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper details the development and early testing of a compliant suspension for a microspine gripper device for asteroid capture or micro-gravity percussive drilling. The microspine gripper architecture is reviewed, and a proposed microspine suspension design is presented and discussed. Prototyping methods are discussed, as well as testing methods and results. A path forward is identified from the results of the testing completed thus far. Key findings include: the microspine concept has been established as a valid architecture and the compliant suspension exhibits the desired stiffness characteristics for good gripping behavior. These developments will aid in developing the capability to grasp irregularly shaped boulders in micro-gravity.

  12. ALTERED PHALANX FORCE DIRECTION DURING POWER GRIP FOLLOWING STROKE

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Leah R.

    2015-01-01

    Many stroke survivors with severe impairment can grasp only with a power grip. Yet, little knowledge is available on altered power grip after stroke, other than reduced power grip strength. This study characterized stroke survivors’ static power grip during 100% and 50% maximum grip. Each phalanx force’s angular deviation from the normal direction and its contribution to total normal force was compared for 11 stroke survivors and 11 age-matched controls. Muscle activities and skin coefficient of friction (COF) were additionally compared for another 20 stroke and 13 age-matched control subjects. The main finding was that stroke survivors gripped with a 34% greater phalanx force angular deviation of 19±2° compared to controls of 14±1° (p<.05). Stroke survivors’ phalanx force angular deviation was closer to the 23° threshold of slippage between the phalanx and grip surface, which may explain increased likelihood of object dropping in stroke survivors. In addition, this altered phalanx force direction decreases normal grip force by tilting the force vector, indicating a partial role of phalanx force angular deviation in reduced grip strength post stroke. Greater phalanx force angular deviation may biomechanically result from more severe underactivation of stroke survivors’ first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscles compared to their flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) or somatosensory deficit. While stroke survivors’ maximum power grip strength was approximately half of the controls’, the distribution of their remaining strength over the fingers and phalanges did not differ, indicating evenly distributed grip force reduction over the entire hand. PMID:25795079

  13. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cable clamps and grips. 18.40 Section 18.40... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable (trailing) cables to prevent strain on the cable terminals of a machine. Also insulated clamps shall be provided...

  14. 30 CFR 18.40 - Cable clamps and grips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prevent strain on both ends of each cable or cord leading from a machine to a detached or separately... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cable clamps and grips. 18.40 Section 18.40... Requirements § 18.40 Cable clamps and grips. Insulated clamps shall be provided for all portable...

  15. Tensile testing grips are easily assembled under liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalka, R. J.; Vandergrift, E. F.

    1967-01-01

    Split-screw grips for tensile testing provide uniform loading on the specimen shoulders. Holes in the heads enable the screws and specimen to be threaded as an assembly into a grip body, closely controlled guides and seats afford positive seating, and precision machining of mating surfaces minimizes misalignment effects.

  16. Personality and Grip Strength Relationships Between Monozygous and Dizygous Twins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, A. Craig; And Others

    The purposes of this study were a) to investigate the relationship between grip strength and the measures of age, height, weight, and the personality traits revealed by the Comrey Personality and Attitude Factor Scales and b) to assess the influence of heredity on height, weight, and grip strength. Fifty-eight pairs of twins (MZ, 30 and DZ, 28)…

  17. Alterations in grip strength during male sexual arousal.

    PubMed

    Jiao, C; Turman, B; Weerakoon, P; Knight, P

    2006-01-01

    Although it is known that alterations in grip strength occur under a number of conditions, little is known about relationships between grip strength and sexual arousal. This relationship was investigated in 30 healthy heterosexual males, who viewed both erotic and nonerotic videos. A questionnaire was used to assess the extent of sexual arousal. The grip strengths of both hands were measured with a five-position (P1-P5) dynamometer, before and after watching the videos. After watching the erotic video, there was a statistically significant reduction in grip strength for the P2 position, with nonsignificant overall reductions in grip strength for all other positions tested. No such effect was observed in control tests. The results indicate that during sexual arousal, the neural system is likely to reduce the output to muscles not directly related to sexual function, presumably to enhance the physiological responses of sexual arousal. PMID:16254571

  18. Effects of bat grip on baseball hitting kinematics.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Fleisig, Glenn S; DeRenne, Coop; Taylor, Marcus K; Moorman, Claude T; Imamura, Rodney; Barakatt, Edward; Andrews, James R

    2009-08-01

    A motion system collected 120-Hz data from 14 baseball adult hitters using normal and choke-up bat grips. Six swings were digitized for each hitter, and temporal and kinematic parameters were calculated. Compared with a normal grip, the choke-up grip resulted in 1) less time during stride phase and swing; 2) the upper torso more opened at lead foot contact; 3) the pelvis more closed and less bat linear velocity at bat-ball contact; 4) less range of motion of the upper torso and pelvis during swing; 5) greater elbow flexion at lead foot contact; and 6) greater peak right elbow extension angular velocity. The decreased time during the stride phase when using a choke-up grip implies that hitters quicken their stride when they choke up. Less swing time duration and less upper torso and pelvis rotation range of motion using the choke-up grip supports the belief of many coaches and players that using a choke-up grip results in a "quicker" swing. However, the belief that using a choke-up grip leads to a faster moving bat was not supported by the results of this study. PMID:19827469

  19. Potential effects of racket grip size on lateral epicondilalgy risks.

    PubMed

    Rossi, J; Vigouroux, L; Barla, C; Berton, E

    2014-12-01

    The effects of tennis racket grip size on the forces exerted by muscles affecting lateral epicondylalgia (LE) were assessed in this study. Grip forces and joint moments applied on the wrist were quantified under three different handle size conditions, with and without induced muscle fatigue for intermediate and advanced players. The obtained experimental results were then used as input data of a biomechanical model of the hand. This simulation aimed to quantify the impact of grip strength modulation obtained in the experiment on the wrist extensor muscle forces. Our results show that there is an optimal grip diameter size defined as the handle inducing a reduced grip force during the stroke, in both fatigued and non-fatigued sessions. The results of the simulation suggested that extensor muscles were highly employed during forehand strokes, which confirms that the mechanical overuse of extensor tendons is a potential risk factor for tennis elbow occurrence. The handle grip size appeared to be a significant factor to reduce this extensor tendon loading. This suggests that grip size should be taken into account by players and designers in order to reduce the mechanical risk factors of overuse injury occurrence.

  20. Effects of bat grip on baseball hitting kinematics.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Fleisig, Glenn S; DeRenne, Coop; Taylor, Marcus K; Moorman, Claude T; Imamura, Rodney; Barakatt, Edward; Andrews, James R

    2009-08-01

    A motion system collected 120-Hz data from 14 baseball adult hitters using normal and choke-up bat grips. Six swings were digitized for each hitter, and temporal and kinematic parameters were calculated. Compared with a normal grip, the choke-up grip resulted in 1) less time during stride phase and swing; 2) the upper torso more opened at lead foot contact; 3) the pelvis more closed and less bat linear velocity at bat-ball contact; 4) less range of motion of the upper torso and pelvis during swing; 5) greater elbow flexion at lead foot contact; and 6) greater peak right elbow extension angular velocity. The decreased time during the stride phase when using a choke-up grip implies that hitters quicken their stride when they choke up. Less swing time duration and less upper torso and pelvis rotation range of motion using the choke-up grip supports the belief of many coaches and players that using a choke-up grip results in a "quicker" swing. However, the belief that using a choke-up grip leads to a faster moving bat was not supported by the results of this study.

  1. Modified pen grip in the treatment of Writer's Cramp.

    PubMed

    Baur, Barbara; Schenk, Thomas; Fürholzer, Waltraud; Scheuerecker, Johanna; Marquardt, Christian; Kerkhoff, Georg; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2006-10-01

    Writer's Cramp (WC) is a focal, action-related dystonia, which induces hypertonic co-contractions and severely impairs handwriting. One behavioral treatment approach is the handwriting training developed by Mai and Marquardt (1999), [Mai, N., & Marquardt, C. (1999). Schreibtraining in der neurologischen Rehabilitation. In EKN-Materialien für die Rehabilitation. Dortmund: Borgmann] which includes among various motor exercises the use of a modified pen grip (stabilized between index and middle finger). This pen grip has proven particularly successful in clinical practice. The current study aims at elucidating the immediate effects of the modified pen grip on writing in 23 WC patients and 11 healthy controls. All participants wrote a sentence with their usual and also with the modified pen grip. Movement and pressure were recorded with a digitizing tablet. Pressure, movement time for the whole sentence, script size and writing fluency were analyzed. When writing with their usual pen grip, pressure in the WC patients was elevated, and writing speed was decreased compared to healthy controls. Changing over to the modified pen grip reduced the pressure significantly in WC patients and controls, but left other aspects of their writing unaffected. This shows that the use of the modified pen grip is an effective way to normalize pen pressure in WC patients, thereby providing the best conditions for the training of speed and fluency.

  2. G×E Interaction Influences Trajectories of Hand Grip Strength

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Nancy L.; Rantanen, Taina; Kremen, William S.; Johnson, Wendy; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Christiansen, Lene; Franz, Carol E.; McGue, Matt; Christensen, Kaare; Hamdi, Nayla R.; Krueger, Robert F.; Reynolds, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Age-related decline in grip strength predicts later life disability, frailty, lower well-being and cognitive change. While grip strength is heritable, genetic influence on change in grip strength has been relatively ignored, with non-shared environmental influence identified as the primary contributor in a single longitudinal study. The extent to which gene-environment interplay, particularly gene-environment interactions, contributes to grip trajectories has yet to be examined. We considered longitudinal grip strength measurements in seven twin studies of aging in the Interplay of Genes and Environment across Multiple Studies consortium. Growth curve parameters were estimated for same-sex pairs, aged 34–99 (N = 10,681). Fisher's test for mixture distribution of within-monozy-gotic twin-pair differences (N = 1724) was performed on growth curve parameters. We observed significant gene-environment interaction on grip strength trajectories. Finally, we compared the variability of within-pair differences of growth curve parameters by APOE haplotypes. Though not statistically significant, the results suggested that APOE ε2ε2/ε2ε3 haplotypes might buffer environmental influences on grip strength trajectories. PMID:26318288

  3. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination.

    PubMed

    Vermillion, Billy C; Lum, Peter S; Lee, Sang Wook

    2015-10-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio). PMID:26289460

  4. Proximal arm kinematics affect grip force-load force coordination

    PubMed Central

    Vermillion, Billy C.; Lum, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    During object manipulation, grip force is coordinated with load force, which is primarily determined by object kinematics. Proximal arm kinematics may affect grip force control, as proximal segment motion could affect control of distal hand muscles via biomechanical and/or neural pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of proximal kinematics on grip force modulation during object manipulation. Fifteen subjects performed three vertical lifting tasks that involved distinct proximal kinematics (elbow/shoulder), but resulted in similar end-point (hand) trajectories. While temporal coordination of grip and load forces remained similar across the tasks, proximal kinematics significantly affected the grip force-to-load force ratio (P = 0.042), intrinsic finger muscle activation (P = 0.045), and flexor-extensor ratio (P < 0.001). Biomechanical coupling between extrinsic hand muscles and the elbow joint cannot fully explain the observed changes, as task-related changes in intrinsic hand muscle activation were greater than in extrinsic hand muscles. Rather, between-task variation in grip force (highest during task 3) appears to contrast to that in shoulder joint velocity/acceleration (lowest during task 3). These results suggest that complex neural coupling between the distal and proximal upper extremity musculature may affect grip force control during movements, also indicated by task-related changes in intermuscular coherence of muscle pairs, including intrinsic finger muscles. Furthermore, examination of the fingertip force showed that the human motor system may attempt to reduce variability in task-relevant motor output (grip force-to-load force ratio), while allowing larger fluctuations in output less relevant to task goal (shear force-to-grip force ratio). PMID:26289460

  5. Predicting maximal grip strength using hand circumference.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Hewson, David J; Duchêne, Jacques; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the correlations between anthropometric data and maximal grip strength (MGS) in order to establish a simple model to predict "normal" MGS. Randomized bilateral measurement of MGS was performed on a homogeneous population of 100 subjects. MGS was measured according to a standardized protocol with three dynamometers (Jamar, Myogrip and Martin Vigorimeter) for both dominant and non-dominant sides. Several anthropometric data were also measured: height; weight; hand, wrist and forearm circumference; hand and palm length. Among these data, hand circumference had the strongest correlation with MGS for all three dynamometers and for both hands (0.789 and 0.782 for Jamar; 0.829 and 0.824 for Myogrip; 0.663 and 0.730 for Vigorimeter). In addition, the only anthropometric variable systematically selected by a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was also hand circumference. Based on this parameter alone, a predictive regression model presented good results (r(2) = 0.624 for Jamar; r(2) = 0.683 for Myogrip and r(2) = 0.473 for Vigorimeter; all adjusted r(2)). Moreover a single equation was predictive of MGS for both men and women and for both non-dominant and dominant hands. "Normal" MGS can be predicted using hand circumference alone.

  6. Predicting maximal grip strength using hand circumference.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Hewson, David J; Duchêne, Jacques; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the correlations between anthropometric data and maximal grip strength (MGS) in order to establish a simple model to predict "normal" MGS. Randomized bilateral measurement of MGS was performed on a homogeneous population of 100 subjects. MGS was measured according to a standardized protocol with three dynamometers (Jamar, Myogrip and Martin Vigorimeter) for both dominant and non-dominant sides. Several anthropometric data were also measured: height; weight; hand, wrist and forearm circumference; hand and palm length. Among these data, hand circumference had the strongest correlation with MGS for all three dynamometers and for both hands (0.789 and 0.782 for Jamar; 0.829 and 0.824 for Myogrip; 0.663 and 0.730 for Vigorimeter). In addition, the only anthropometric variable systematically selected by a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was also hand circumference. Based on this parameter alone, a predictive regression model presented good results (r(2) = 0.624 for Jamar; r(2) = 0.683 for Myogrip and r(2) = 0.473 for Vigorimeter; all adjusted r(2)). Moreover a single equation was predictive of MGS for both men and women and for both non-dominant and dominant hands. "Normal" MGS can be predicted using hand circumference alone. PMID:20708427

  7. Gripped by Gout: Avoiding the Ache and Agony

    MedlinePlus

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Gripped by Gout Avoiding the Ache and Agony Sudden, painful swelling ... toe is often the first warning sign of gout. It can affect other joints as well. Without ...

  8. Effect of Syllable Articulation on Precision and Power Grip Performance

    PubMed Central

    Vainio, Lari; Schulman, Mirjam; Tiippana, Kaisa; Vainio, Martti

    2013-01-01

    The present study was motivated by a theory, which proposes that speech includes articulatory gestures that are connected to particular hand actions. We hypothesized that certain articulatory gestures would be more associated with the precision grip than with the power grip, and vice versa. In the study, the participants pronounced a syllable and performed simultaneously a precision or power grip that was theorized to be either congruent or incongruent with the syllable. Relatively fast precision grip responses were associated with articulatory gestures in which the tip of the tongue contacted the alveolar ridge ([te]) or the aperture of the vocal tract remained small ([hi]), as well as gestures that required lip protrusion ([pu]). In contrast, relatively fast power grip responses were associated with gestures that were produced by moving the back of the tongue against the velum ([ke]) or in which the aperture of the vocal tract remained large ([hα]). In addition to demonstrating that certain articulatory gestures are systematically connected to different grip types, the study may shed some light on discussion concerning sound symbolism and evolution of speech. PMID:23326381

  9. Precision and power grip priming by observed grasping.

    PubMed

    Vainio, Lari; Tucker, Mike; Ellis, Rob

    2007-11-01

    The coupling of hand grasping stimuli and the subsequent grasp execution was explored in normal participants. Participants were asked to respond with their right- or left-hand to the accuracy of an observed (dynamic) grasp while they were holding precision or power grasp response devices in their hands (e.g., precision device/right-hand; power device/left-hand). The observed hand was making either accurate or inaccurate precision or power grasps and participants signalled the accuracy of the observed grip by making one or other response depending on instructions. Responses were made faster when they matched the observed grip type. The two grasp types differed in their sensitivity to the end-state (i.e., accuracy) of the observed grip. The end-state influenced the power grasp congruency effect more than the precision grasp effect when the observed hand was performing the grasp without any goal object (Experiments 1 and 2). However, the end-state also influenced the precision grip congruency effect (Experiment 3) when the action was object-directed. The data are interpreted as behavioural evidence of the automatic imitation coding of the observed actions. The study suggests that, in goal-oriented imitation coding, the context of an action (e.g., being object-directed) is more important factor in coding precision grips than power grips.

  10. Grip-load force coordination in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Serrien, D J; Wiesendanger, M

    1999-09-01

    The study examined the anticipatory grip force modulations to load force changes during a drawer-opening task. An impact force was induced by a mechanical stop which abruptly arrested movement of the pulling hand. In performing this task, normal subjects generated a typical grip force profile characterized by an initial force impulse related to drawer movement onset, followed by a ramp-like grip force increase prior to the impending load perturbation. Finally, a reactive response was triggered by the impact. In patients with bilateral cerebellar dysfunction, the drawer-opening task was performed with an alternative control strategy. During pulling, grip force was increased to a high (overestimated) default level. The latter suggests that cerebellar patients were unable to adjust and to scale precisely the grip force according to the load force. In addition, the latency between impact and reactive activity was prolonged in the patients, suggesting an impaired cerebellar transmission of the long-latency responses. In conclusion, these data demonstrate the involvement of cerebellar circuits in both proactive and reactive mechanisms in view of predictable load perturbations during manipulative behavior. PMID:10473743

  11. Biometric verification based on grip-pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldhuis, Raymond N.; Bazen, Asker M.; Kauffman, Joost A.; Hartel, Pieter

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a user-verification system for a smart gun, which is based on grip-pattern recognition. An existing pressure sensor consisting of an array of 44 × 44 piezoresistive elements is used to measure the grip pattern. An interface has been developed to acquire pressure images from the sensor. The values of the pixels in the pressure-pattern images are used as inputs for a verification algorithm, which is currently implemented in software on a PC. The verification algorithm is based on a likelihoodratio classifier for Gaussian probability densities. First results indicate that it is feasible to use grip-pattern recognition for biometric verification.

  12. Circadian variations in the kinematics of handwriting and grip strength.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Isabelle; Haussler, Andreas; Baur, Barbara; Marquardt, Christian; Hermsdorfer, Joachim

    2009-04-01

    The present study determined whether the motor process of handwriting is influenced by a circadian rhythm during writing tasks of high everyday relevance and analyzed the relationship to the circadian rhythm of grip strength. Ten healthy young male subjects underwent a 40 h sleep-deprivation protocol under constant routine conditions. Starting at 09:00 h, subjects performed three handwriting tasks of increasing perceptual-motor complexity (writing a sentence, writing one's signature, and copying a text for 3 min) and assessed grip strength of both hands every 3 h. Handwriting performance was analyzed by writing speed, writing fluency, script size, break times, and pen pressure. The handwriting tasks revealed a coincident circadian rhythm for the frequency of handwriting as a measure of movement speed, with slowest writing speed at 03:16 h. A weak effect of task complexity was evident for the non-writing episodes: while copying a text, break times were influenced by a circadian rhythm, whereas during sentence writing, the non-writing episodes remained constant. The circadian rhythm of grip strength paralleled the time course of motivation ratings, with least motivation and weakest grip strength around 06:00 h concurrently for both hands. The rate of force production also displayed circadian rhythmicity and sharply decreased with the onset of melatonin secretion. Neither grip strength nor the kinematics of handwriting was influenced by sleep deprivation; only the level of the force rate was decreased the second day. The results show a clear circadian rhythm in the speed of handwriting and grip strength.

  13. Comparison of toe grip strength and muscle activities during maximal toe grip strength exertion according to the presence/absence of an ankle immobilization belt.

    PubMed

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yousuke; Murata, Jun; Miyazaki, Junya

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare toe grip strength and muscle activity during toe grip strength exertion according to the presence/absence of an ankle immobilization belt and to examine the relationship between the differences in muscle activity and toe grip strength. [Subjects] The Subjects were 13 healthy young women. [Methods] We measured toe grip strength and muscle activity during toe grip strength exertion in the presence and absence of an ankle immobilization belt using electromyography. Activity in the following leg muscles was recorded: rectus femoris, biceps femoris, medial head of the gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior. We then calculated the percent integrated electromyography during toe gripping. [Results] Toe grip strength and percent integrated electromyography of the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle were significantly higher with ankle belt immobilization compared with without ankle belt immobilization. In addition, in the presence of ankle belt immobilization, the percent integrated electromyography of the tibialis anterior muscle and medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle demonstrated a positive correlation with toe grip strength (r = 0.75 and r = 0.65, respectively). [Conclusion] These findings suggest that greater toe grip strength could be exerted in the presence of ankle belt immobilization. The measured values reflect the percent integrated electromyography of the crural muscles. Therefore, it was shown that toe grip strength should be measured in the presence of an immobilization belt.

  14. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Marta; Wiliński, Wojciech; Struzik, Artur; Rokita, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 – 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed. PMID:26834881

  15. Soft shape-adaptive gripping device made from artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburg, E.; Vunder, V.; Johanson, U.; Kaasik, F.; Aabloo, A.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a multifunctional four-finger gripper for soft robotics, suitable for performing delicate manipulation tasks. The gripping device is comprised of separately driven gripping and lifting mechanisms, both made from a separate single piece of smart material - ionic capacitive laminate (ICL) also known as artificial muscle. Compared to other similar devices the relatively high force output of the ICL material allows one to construct a device able to grab and lift objects exceeding multiple times its own weight. Due to flexible design of ICL grips, the device is able to adapt the complex shapes of different objects and allows grasping single or multiple objects simultaneously without damage. The performance of the gripper is evaluated in two different configurations: a) the ultimate grasping strength of the gripping hand; and b) the maximum lifting force of the lifting actuator. The ICL is composed of three main layers: a porous membrane consisting of non-ionic polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene) (PVdF-HFP), ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethane-sulfonate (EMITFS), and a reinforcing layer of woven fiberglass cloth. Both sides of the membrane are coated with a carbonaceous electrode. The electrodes are additionally covered with thin gold layers, serving as current collectors. Device made of this material operates silently, requires low driving voltage (<3 V), and is suitable for performing tasks in open air environment.

  16. Get a Grip! A Middle School Engineering Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Suzanne A.; Harrell, Deborah A.; Valente, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    Investigating the field of engineering offers the opportunity for interdisciplinary, hands-on, inquiry-based units that integrate real-world applications. However, many K-12 students are not exposed to engineering until they enter college. Get a Grip! is a problem-based unit that places middle school students in the role of engineers who are…

  17. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Marta; Wiliński, Wojciech; Struzik, Artur; Rokita, Andrzej

    2015-11-22

    Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 - 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed.

  18. Hand Grip Strength Vs. Sprint Effectiveness in Amputee Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Marta; Wiliński, Wojciech; Struzik, Artur; Rokita, Andrzej

    2015-11-22

    Amputee soccer is one of the types of soccer designed for the disabled, especially those who have undergone amputations, as well as those with extremity dysfunction. The objective of the study was to find the relationship between hand grip strength and sprint time in amputee soccer players. Thirteen field amputee soccer players participated in the study. A SAEHAN hydraulic hand dynamometer manufactured by Jamar was used for hand grip strength measurements. The sprint running test was conducted over a distance of 30 m. The Fusion Smart Speed System was employed for running time measurements. No statistically significant relationships were found between hand grip strength of the left or right hand, and sprint times over 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 m. Analysis of the running velocity curve of the subjects showed an interesting profile characterized by a 15 meter-long acceleration phase and a significant velocity increase over a distance of 20 - 25 m. The study suggests that there is no relationship between hand grip strength and sprint effectiveness in amputee soccer players. The specificity of locomotion with the use of elbow crutches among elite Polish amputee soccer players probably accounts for the profile of the sprint velocity curve. Extension of the acceleration phase in the sprint run and a velocity increase in the subsequent part of the run were observed. PMID:26834881

  19. Grip Strength Cutpoints for the Identification of Clinically Relevant Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Shardell, Michelle D.; Peters, Katherine W.; McLean, Robert R.; Dam, Thuy-Tien L.; Kenny, Anne M.; Fragala, Maren S.; Harris, Tamara B.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Studenski, Stephanie A.; Vassileva, Maria T.; Cawthon, Peggy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Weakness is common and contributes to disability, but no consensus exists regarding a strength cutpoint to identify persons at high risk. This analysis, conducted as part of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Sarcopenia Project, sought to identify cutpoints that distinguish weakness associated with mobility impairment, defined as gait speed less than 0.8 m/s. Methods. In pooled cross-sectional data (9,897 men and 10,950 women), Classification and Regression Tree analysis was used to derive cutpoints for grip strength associated with mobility impairment. Results. In men, a grip strength of 26–32 kg was classified as “intermediate” and less than 26 kg as “weak”; 11% of men were intermediate and 5% were weak. Compared with men with normal strength, odds ratios for mobility impairment were 3.63 (95% CI: 3.01–4.38) and 7.62 (95% CI 6.13–9.49), respectively. In women, a grip strength of 16–20 kg was classified as “intermediate” and less than 16 kg as “weak”; 25% of women were intermediate and 18% were weak. Compared with women with normal strength, odds ratios for mobility impairment were 2.44 (95% CI 2.20–2.71) and 4.42 (95% CI 3.94–4.97), respectively. Weakness based on these cutpoints was associated with mobility impairment across subgroups based on age, body mass index, height, and disease status. Notably, in women, grip strength divided by body mass index provided better fit relative to grip strength alone, but fit was not sufficiently improved to merit different measures by gender and use of a more complex measure. Conclusions. Cutpoints for weakness derived from this large, diverse sample of older adults may be useful to identify populations who may benefit from interventions to improve muscle strength and function. PMID:24737558

  20. Effects of hyperthyroidism on hand grip strength and function.

    PubMed

    Erkol İnal, Esra; Çarlı, Alparslan Bayram; Çanak, Sultan; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Köroğlu, Banu Kale; Savaş, Serpil

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a pathologic condition in which the body is exposed to excessive amounts of circulating thyroid hormones. Skeletal muscle is one of the major target organs of thyroid hormones. We evaluated hand grip strength and function in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. Fifty-one patients newly diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and 44 healthy controls participated in this study. Age, height, weight, and dominant hand of all participants were recorded. The diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was confirmed by clinical examination and laboratory tests. Hand grip strength was tested at the dominant hand with a Jamar hand dynamometer. The grooved pegboard test (PGT) was used to evaluate hand dexterity. The Duruöz Hand Index (DHI) was used to assess hand function. No significant differences were found in terms of clinical and demographic findings between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls (p > 0.05). Significant differences were found between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls regarding PGT and DHI scores (p < 0.05). Hyperthyroidism seemed to affect hand dexterity and function more than hand grip strength and seemed to be associated with reduced physical function more than muscle strength. This may also indicate that patients with hyperthyroidism should be evaluated by multidisplinary modalities.

  1. Effects of hyperthyroidism on hand grip strength and function.

    PubMed

    Erkol İnal, Esra; Çarlı, Alparslan Bayram; Çanak, Sultan; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Köroğlu, Banu Kale; Savaş, Serpil

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a pathologic condition in which the body is exposed to excessive amounts of circulating thyroid hormones. Skeletal muscle is one of the major target organs of thyroid hormones. We evaluated hand grip strength and function in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. Fifty-one patients newly diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and 44 healthy controls participated in this study. Age, height, weight, and dominant hand of all participants were recorded. The diagnosis of hyperthyroidism was confirmed by clinical examination and laboratory tests. Hand grip strength was tested at the dominant hand with a Jamar hand dynamometer. The grooved pegboard test (PGT) was used to evaluate hand dexterity. The Duruöz Hand Index (DHI) was used to assess hand function. No significant differences were found in terms of clinical and demographic findings between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls (p > 0.05). Significant differences were found between the patients with hyperthyroidism and healthy controls regarding PGT and DHI scores (p < 0.05). Hyperthyroidism seemed to affect hand dexterity and function more than hand grip strength and seemed to be associated with reduced physical function more than muscle strength. This may also indicate that patients with hyperthyroidism should be evaluated by multidisplinary modalities. PMID:26562373

  2. Age and grip strength predict hand dexterity in adults.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jason A; Ramsay, Jill; Hughes, Christopher; Peters, Derek M; Edwards, Martin G

    2015-01-01

    In the scientific literature, there is much evidence of a relationship between age and dexterity, where increased age is related to slower, less nimble and less smooth, less coordinated and less controlled performances. While some suggest that the relationship is a direct consequence of reduced muscle strength associated to increased age, there is a lack of research that has systematically investigated the relationships between age, strength and hand dexterity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the associations between age, grip strength and dexterity. 107 adults (range 18-93 years) completed a series of hand dexterity tasks (i.e. steadiness, line tracking, aiming, and tapping) and a test of maximal grip strength. We performed three phases of analyses. Firstly, we evaluated the simple relationships between pairs of variables; replicating the existing literature; and found significant relationships of increased age and reduced strength; increased age and reduced dexterity, and; reduced strength and reduced dexterity. Secondly, we used standard Multiple Regression (MR) models to determine which of the age and strength factors accounted for the greater variance in dexterity. The results showed that both age and strength made significant contributions to the data variance, but that age explained more of the variance in steadiness and line tracking dexterity, whereas strength explained more of the variance in aiming and tapping dexterity. In a third phase of analysis, we used MR analyses to show an interaction between age and strength on steadiness hand dexterity. Simple Slopes post-hoc analyses showed that the interaction was explained by the middle to older aged adults showing a relationship between reduced strength and reduced hand steadiness, whereas younger aged adults showed no relationship between strength and steadiness hand dexterity. The results are discussed in terms of how age and grip strength predict different types of hand dexterity in

  3. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael J.; Johnson, Simon A.; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick–slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function. PMID:23256185

  4. Finger pad friction and its role in grip and touch.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael J; Johnson, Simon A; Lefèvre, Philippe; Lévesque, Vincent; Hayward, Vincent; André, Thibaut; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-03-01

    Many aspects of both grip function and tactile perception depend on complex frictional interactions occurring in the contact zone of the finger pad, which is the subject of the current review. While it is well established that friction plays a crucial role in grip function, its exact contribution for discriminatory touch involving the sliding of a finger pad is more elusive. For texture discrimination, it is clear that vibrotaction plays an important role in the discriminatory mechanisms. Among other factors, friction impacts the nature of the vibrations generated by the relative movement of the fingertip skin against a probed object. Friction also has a major influence on the perceived tactile pleasantness of a surface. The contact mechanics of a finger pad is governed by the fingerprint ridges and the sweat that is exuded from pores located on these ridges. Counterintuitively, the coefficient of friction can increase by an order of magnitude in a period of tens of seconds when in contact with an impermeably smooth surface, such as glass. In contrast, the value will decrease for a porous surface, such as paper. The increase in friction is attributed to an occlusion mechanism and can be described by first-order kinetics. Surprisingly, the sensitivity of the coefficient of friction to the normal load and sliding velocity is comparatively of second order, yet these dependencies provide the main basis of theoretical models which, to-date, largely ignore the time evolution of the frictional dynamics. One well-known effect on taction is the possibility of inducing stick-slip if the friction decreases with increasing sliding velocity. Moreover, the initial slip of a finger pad occurs by the propagation of an annulus of failure from the perimeter of the contact zone and this phenomenon could be important in tactile perception and grip function.

  5. Control of Precision Grip Force in Lifting and Holding of Low-Mass Objects

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Daisuke; Kadota, Koji; Ito, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the control of grip force when manipulating an object with an extremely small mass using a precision grip, although some related information has been provided by studies conducted in an unusual microgravity environment. Grip-load force coordination was examined while healthy adults (N = 17) held a moveable instrumented apparatus with its mass changed between 6 g and 200 g in 14 steps, with its grip surface set as either sandpaper or rayon. Additional measurements of grip-force-dependent finger-surface contact area and finger skin indentation, as well as a test of weight discrimination, were also performed. For each surface condition, the static grip force was modulated in parallel with load force while holding the object of a mass above 30 g. For objects with mass smaller than 30 g, on the other hand, the parallel relationship was changed, resulting in a progressive increase in grip-to-load force (GF/LF) ratio. The rayon had a higher GF/LF force ratio across all mass levels. The proportion of safety margin in the static grip force and normalized moment-to-moment variability of the static grip force were also elevated towards the lower end of the object mass for both surfaces. These findings indicate that the strategy of grip force control for holding objects with an extremely small mass differs from that with a mass above 30 g. The data for the contact area, skin indentation, and weight discrimination suggest that a decreased level of cutaneous feedback signals from the finger pads could have played some role in a cost function in efficient grip force control with low-mass objects. The elevated grip force variability associated with signal-dependent and internal noises, and anticipated inertial force on the held object due to acceleration of the arm and hand, could also have contributed to the cost function. PMID:26376484

  6. Grip force adjustments induced by predictable load perturbations during a manipulative task.

    PubMed

    Serrien, D J; Kaluzny, P; Wicki, U; Wiesendanger, M

    1999-01-01

    The experiment examined the anticipatory modulation of grip force with respect to load force during a drawer opening task. An impact force was introduced by a mechanical stop that arrested movement of the pulling hand. The results showed a typical grip force profile which consisted of two evolving phases, one to control drawer movement onset, and the other to secure grip force at the expected impact. Initially, grip force increased with the load force that was developed to overcome the inertia of the drawer. After the first peak, a small decline was observed, followed by a proactive grip force increase prior to the time of impact. During this ramp-like increase of grip force, load force remained unchanged. In addition, a reactive response was triggered by the impact. That anticipatory control with respect to an impact force is not innate but, rather, is learned by experience was evidenced by a comparison of adults and children. Whereas adults made the characteristic grip force adjustments to anticipate the impact, children used a probing strategy with irregular build-up of force until impact. Furthermore, adults calibrated the second phase of the grip force profile in the initial trials of the task, indicating that grip force was rapidly updated with information related to the impact force. The present results demonstrate that grip-load force coordination during manipulation is a necessity for dealing with destabilizing load perturbations produced by self-induced movement and impact forces. It is concluded that grip force is adjusted automatically, but in a flexible manner, to secure grip in accordance with the characteristics of the pulling synergy. PMID:9928794

  7. Control of Precision Grip Force in Lifting and Holding of Low-Mass Objects.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Yuichi; Kimura, Daisuke; Kadota, Koji; Ito, Taro; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the control of grip force when manipulating an object with an extremely small mass using a precision grip, although some related information has been provided by studies conducted in an unusual microgravity environment. Grip-load force coordination was examined while healthy adults (N = 17) held a moveable instrumented apparatus with its mass changed between 6 g and 200 g in 14 steps, with its grip surface set as either sandpaper or rayon. Additional measurements of grip-force-dependent finger-surface contact area and finger skin indentation, as well as a test of weight discrimination, were also performed. For each surface condition, the static grip force was modulated in parallel with load force while holding the object of a mass above 30 g. For objects with mass smaller than 30 g, on the other hand, the parallel relationship was changed, resulting in a progressive increase in grip-to-load force (GF/LF) ratio. The rayon had a higher GF/LF force ratio across all mass levels. The proportion of safety margin in the static grip force and normalized moment-to-moment variability of the static grip force were also elevated towards the lower end of the object mass for both surfaces. These findings indicate that the strategy of grip force control for holding objects with an extremely small mass differs from that with a mass above 30 g. The data for the contact area, skin indentation, and weight discrimination suggest that a decreased level of cutaneous feedback signals from the finger pads could have played some role in a cost function in efficient grip force control with low-mass objects. The elevated grip force variability associated with signal-dependent and internal noises, and anticipated inertial force on the held object due to acceleration of the arm and hand, could also have contributed to the cost function. PMID:26376484

  8. Method and apparatus for gripping uniaxial fibrous composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Hurwitz, F. I. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A strip specimen is cut from a unidirectional strong, brittle fiber composite material, and the surfaces of both ends of the specimen are grit blasted. The specimen is then placed between metal load transfer members having grit blasted surfaces. Sufficient compressive stress is applied to the load transfer members to prevent slippage during testing at both elevated temperatures and room temperatures. The need for adhesives, load pads, and other secondary composite processing is eliminated. This gripping system was successful in tensile testing, creep rupture testing, and fatigue testing uniaxial composite materials at 316 C.

  9. An adjustable table tennis bat and grip system for tetraplegics.

    PubMed

    Taktak, D M

    1997-01-01

    A table tennis bat and gripping system has been devised which can be used by people who are tetraplegic who are unable to hold the bat unassisted. The multi-positional head of the bat allows the user to alter the bat angle with respect to the hand whilst an elasticated glove ensures the bat is held firmly in place allowing the player access to a greater range of playing shots. The system has been used successfully to introduce recently injured players to the game, and has also been used by a British ranked tetraplegic table tennis player. It is suitable for general, rehabilitative or competition use.

  10. Contribution of the Cerebellum in Cue-Dependent Force Changes During an Isometric Precision Grip Task.

    PubMed

    Kutz, Dieter F; Schmid, Barbara C; Meindl, Tobias; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P

    2016-08-01

    The "raspberry task" represents a precision grip task that requires continuous adjustment of grip forces and pull forces. During this task, subjects use a specialised grip rod and have to increase the pull force linearly while the rod is locked. The positions of the fingers are unrestrained and freely selectable. From the finger positions and the geometry of the grip rod, a physical lever was derived which is a comprehensive measurement of the subject's grip behaviour. In this study, the involvement of the cerebellum in establishing cued force changes (CFC) was examined. The auditory stimulus was associated with a motor behaviour that has to be readjusted during an ongoing movement that already started. Moreover, cerebellar involvement on grip behaviour was examined. The results show that patients presenting with degenerating cerebellar disease (CBL) were able to elicit CFC and were additionally able to optimise grip behaviour by minimising the lever. Comparison of the results of CBL with a control group of healthy subjects showed, however, that the CFC incidence was significantly lower and the reduction of the lever was less in CBL. Hence, the cerebellum is involved not only in the classical conditioning of reflexes but also in the association of sensory stimuli with complex changes in motor behaviour. Furthermore, the cerebellum is involved in the optimisation of grip behaviour during ongoing movements. Recent studies lead to the assumption that the cerebello-reticulo-spinal pathway might be important for the reduced optimisation of grip behaviour in CBL.

  11. Comparison of Infant Car Seat grip orientations and lift strategies.

    PubMed

    Clamann, Michael; Zhu, Biwen; Beaver, Leah; Taylor, Kinley; Kaber, David

    2012-07-01

    The rear-facing Infant Car Seat (ICS) is designed to meet federal requirements for transporting children less than 1 year old. Typical use includes transfer in and out of a vehicle, which is shown to be a difficult lift. Despite the frequency of this lift, manufacturers provide little guidance for users. Review of relevant literature suggested an ICS featuring an angled handle, promoting a neutral wrist posture, would increase grip stability and decrease lifting effort. Popular press suggested a foot-in-car stance for the ICS lift would do the same. An experiment was conducted in which wrist deviations from neutral posture were recorded along with lifting muscle activation levels (multiple flexor muscles and biceps brachii) and overall perceived exertion for straight versus a new bent handle design and conventional stance versus foot-in-car. Foot position was examined to test the recommendations in the popular press. Surprisingly, wrist deviation was not significantly affected by the new bent handle design (due to compensatory behavior with the straight handle) but was related to foot placement (p=0.04). Results revealed the bent handle to significantly reduce flexor activation compared with the straight handle (p=0.0003); however, the level of biceps activation increased. Biceps activation also significantly increased for foot-in-car stance (p=0.035) but not flexor activation. In general, the bent handle enabled the user to lift the ICS with a steadier grip and less effort.

  12. Vitamin D status is associated with grip strength in centenarians.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Alyson; Johnson, Mary Ann; Hausman, Dorothy B; Cress, M Elaine; Houston, Denise K; Davey, Adam; Poon, Leonard W

    2014-01-01

    Low serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) have been associated with poor physical function in older adults, but few, if any, studies have examined this relationship in the very old. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine this relationship in the very old. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were obtained from 194 centenarians and near centenarians (98 years and older). The associations between 25(OH)D concentrations and measures of physical function were evaluated with unadjusted and adjusted regression models. We found that 35% of centenarians had 25(OH)D concentrations less than 50 nmol/L. Adjusted mean grip strength was lower for centenarians with 25(OH)D concentrations less than 75 nmol/L than for centenarians with higher concentrations (P<0.05). However, there were no differences in the Georgia Centenarian Study (GCS) Composite Scale, a global measure of physical function, between those with higher and lower 25(OH)D concentrations. We conclude that low 25(OH)D concentrations are associated with poor grip strength, but not GCS Composite Scale, in the very old. Considering the high burden of poor physical function in older adults, understanding the relationship between vitamin D and different measures of physical function, including strength, becomes increasingly important.

  13. Grip Forces During Object Manipulation: Experiment, Mathematical Model & Validation

    PubMed Central

    Slota, Gregory P.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2011-01-01

    When people transport handheld objects, they change the grip force with the object movement. Circular movement patterns were tested within three planes at two different rates (1.0, 1.5 Hz), and two diameters (20, 40 cm). Subjects performed the task reasonably well, matching frequencies and dynamic ranges of accelerations within expectations. A mathematical model was designed to predict the applied normal forces from kinematic data. The model is based on two hypotheses: (a) the grip force changes during movements along complex trajectories can be represented as the sum of effects of two basic commands associated with the parallel and orthogonal manipulation, respectively; (b) different central commands are sent to the thumb and virtual finger (Vf- four fingers combined). The model predicted the actual normal forces with a total variance accounted for of better than 98%. The effects of the two components of acceleration—along the normal axis and the resultant acceleration within the shear plane—on the digit normal forces are additive. PMID:21735245

  14. Grip forces during object manipulation: experiment, mathematical model, and validation.

    PubMed

    Slota, Gregory P; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2011-08-01

    When people transport handheld objects, they change the grip force with the object movement. Circular movement patterns were tested within three planes at two different rates (1.0, 1.5 Hz) and two diameters (20, 40 cm). Subjects performed the task reasonably well, matching frequencies and dynamic ranges of accelerations within expectations. A mathematical model was designed to predict the applied normal forces from kinematic data. The model is based on two hypotheses: (a) the grip force changes during movements along complex trajectories can be represented as the sum of effects of two basic commands associated with the parallel and orthogonal manipulation, respectively; (b) different central commands are sent to the thumb and virtual finger (Vf-four fingers combined). The model predicted the actual normal forces with a total variance accounted for of better than 98%. The effects of the two components of acceleration-along the normal axis and the resultant acceleration within the shear plane-on the digit normal forces are additive. PMID:21735245

  15. Influence of central set on anticipatory and triggered grip-force adjustments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winstein, C. J.; Horak, F. B.; Fisher, B. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of predictability of load magnitude on anticipatory and triggered grip-force adjustments were studied as nine normal subjects used a precision grip to lift, hold, and replace an instrumented test object. Experience with a predictable stimulus has been shown to enhance magnitude scaling of triggered postural responses to different amplitudes of perturbations. However, this phenomenon, known as a central-set effect, has not been tested systematically for grip-force responses in the hand. In our study, predictability was manipulated by applying load perturbations of different magnitudes to the test object under conditions in which the upcoming load magnitude was presented repeatedly or under conditions in which the load magnitudes were presented randomly, each with two different pre-load grip conditions (unconstrained and constrained). In constrained conditions, initial grip forces were maintained near the minimum level necessary to prevent pre-loaded object slippage, while in unconstrained conditions, no initial grip force restrictions were imposed. The effect of predictable (blocked) and unpredictable (random) load presentations on scaling of anticipatory and triggered grip responses was tested by comparing the slopes of linear regressions between the imposed load and grip response magnitude. Anticipatory and triggered grip force responses were scaled to load magnitude in all conditions. However, regardless of pre-load grip force constraint, the gains (slopes) of grip responses relative to load magnitudes were greater when the magnitude of the upcoming load was predictable than when the load increase was unpredictable. In addition, a central-set effect was evidenced by the fewer number of drop trials in the predictable relative to unpredictable load conditions. Pre-load grip forces showed the greatest set effects. However, grip responses showed larger set effects, based on prediction, when pre-load grip force was constrained to lower levels. These

  16. Grip strength is potentially an early indicator of age-related decline in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xuan; Cho, Anthony; Ciol, Marcia A.; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Snyder, Jessica; Rabinovitch, Peter; Ladiges, Warren

    2016-01-01

    The hand grip test has been correlated with mobility and physical performance in older people and has been shown to be a long-term predictor of mortality. Implementation of new strategies for enhancing healthy aging and maintaining independent living are dependent on predictable preclinical studies. The mouse is used extensively as a model in these types of studies, and the paw grip strength test is similar to the hand grip test for people in that it assesses the ability to grip a device with the paw, is non-invasive and easy to perform, and provides reproducible information. However, little has been reported on how grip strength declines with increasing age in mice. This report shows that grip strength was decreased in C57BL/6 (B6) NIA and C57BL/6×BALB/c F1 (CB6F1) NIA male mice at 12 months of age compared to 8-month-old mice, and continued a robust decline to 20 months and then 28 months of age, when the study was terminated. The decline was not related to lean muscle mass, but extensive age-related carpal and digital exostosis could help explain the decreased grip strength times with increasing age. In conclusion, the grip strength test could be useful in mouse preclinical studies to help make translational predictions on treatment strategies to enhance healthy aging. PMID:27613499

  17. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS): measurement of the carbon gases from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeberl, M.; Dickerson, R.; Marshall, B. T.; McHugh, M.; Fish, C.; Bloom, H.

    2013-09-01

    Climate change and air quality are the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. Despite decades of research, the sources and sinks of key greenhouse gases remain highly uncertain [IPCC1] making quantitative predictions of atmospheric composition and their impacts. The Geostationary Remote Infrared Pollution Sounder (GRIPS) is a multi-purpose instrument designed to reduce uncertainty associated with atmospheric radiative forcing. GRIPS will measure will measure greenhouse gases and aerosols - two of the most important elements in the earth's radiation budget. GRIPS will observe carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), - the carbon gases, nitrous oxide (N2O), water vapor and aerosols with unprecedented precision through the atmosphere. The GRIPS instrument uses gas filter correlation radiometry (GFCR) to detect reflected and thermal IR radiation to detect the gases and the reflected solar radiation in the visible and short-wave infrared bands for aerosols. GRIPS is designed to have sensitivity down to the Earth's surface at ~2-8km nadir resolution. GRIPS can resolve CO2, CO, and CH4 anomalies in the planetary boundary layer and the free troposphere to quantify lofting, diurnal variations and longrange transport. With repeated measurements throughout the day GRIPS can maximize the number of cloud free measurements determining biogenic and anthropogenic sources, sinks, and fluxes. GRIPS is highly complementary to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory, OCO-2, the geostationary Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) and Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and other existing and planned missions.

  18. Children with flat feet have weaker toe grip strength than those having a normal arch

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yuto; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Uritani, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Adachi, Daiki; Hotta, Takayuki; Morino, Saori; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the relationship between toe grip strength and foot posture in children. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 619 children participated in this study. The foot posture of the participants was measured using a foot printer and toe grip strength was measured using a toe grip dynamometer. Children were classified into 3 groups; flatfoot, normal, and high arch, according to Staheli’s arch index. The differences in demographic data and toe grip strength among each foot posture group were analyzed by analysis of variance. Additionally, toe grip strength differences were analyzed by analysis of covariance, adjusted to body mass index, age, and gender. [Results] The number of participants classified as flatfoot, normal, and high arch were 110 (17.8%), 468 (75.6%), and 41 (6.6%), respectively. The toe grip strength of flatfoot children was significantly lower than in normal children, as shown by both analysis of variance and analysis of covariance. [Conclusion] A significant difference was detected in toe grip strength between the low arch and normal foot groups. Therefore, it is suggested that training to increase toe grip strength during childhood may prevent the formation of flat feet or help in the development of arch. PMID:26696732

  19. Age-Related and Sex-Related Differences in Hand and Pinch Grip Strength in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puh, Urska

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to quantify age-related changes in hand grip strength and three types of pinch grip strength (key pinch, tip pinch, and palmar pinch) among male and female participants. The study included 199 healthy participants (100 females, 99 males) aged 20-79 years, who were divided into four age groups. The Baseline Hydraulic…

  20. Do changes in hand grip strength correlate with shoulder rotator cuff function?

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Lee; Hoyle, Rebecca; Prescott, Evie; Bellamy, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain as a result of rotator cuff pathology is one of the most common musculoskeletal complaints presenting within primary care. Assessment of hand grip strength has been proposed as an indicator of rotator cuff function. This experimental study assessed the relationship between grip strength and shoulder lateral rotator muscle strength in a number of different shoulder positions, aiming to investigate whether such a relationship existed and whether grip strength could be used as a functional assessment tool for the posterior cuff. Methods Twenty-seven healthy, physically active, volunteers (19 males, eight females) with no history of shoulder, upper limb or neck injury comprised the study group. The mean (SD) age was 19.8 (5.7) years (range 18 years to 23 years). Grip strength (measured with hand grip dynamometer) and lateral rotator strength (measured with a hand held dynamometer) was measured at neutral, 90° abduction, and 90° abduction with 90° external rotation. Results The correlation between grip strength and shoulder lateral rotation strength ranged between r = 0.91 (r2 = 0.84) and r = 0.72 (r2 = 0.52) across all positions. Conclusions A strong correlation between grip strength and lateral rotator strength was shown at all positions for both left and right hands, suggesting that assessment of grip strength could be used as a rotator cuff monitor of recruitment function. PMID:27583010

  1. Grip strength is potentially an early indicator of age-related decline in mice.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xuan; Cho, Anthony; Ciol, Marcia A; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Snyder, Jessica; Rabinovitch, Peter; Ladiges, Warren

    2016-01-01

    The hand grip test has been correlated with mobility and physical performance in older people and has been shown to be a long-term predictor of mortality. Implementation of new strategies for enhancing healthy aging and maintaining independent living are dependent on predictable preclinical studies. The mouse is used extensively as a model in these types of studies, and the paw grip strength test is similar to the hand grip test for people in that it assesses the ability to grip a device with the paw, is non-invasive and easy to perform, and provides reproducible information. However, little has been reported on how grip strength declines with increasing age in mice. This report shows that grip strength was decreased in C57BL/6 (B6) NIA and C57BL/6×BALB/c F1 (CB6F1) NIA male mice at 12 months of age compared to 8-month-old mice, and continued a robust decline to 20 months and then 28 months of age, when the study was terminated. The decline was not related to lean muscle mass, but extensive age-related carpal and digital exostosis could help explain the decreased grip strength times with increasing age. In conclusion, the grip strength test could be useful in mouse preclinical studies to help make translational predictions on treatment strategies to enhance healthy aging. PMID:27613499

  2. Getting a Grip on Numbers: Numerical Magnitude Priming in Object Grasping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindemann, Oliver; Abolafia, Juan M.; Girardi, Giovanna; Bekkering, Harold

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the functional connection between numerical cognition and action planning, the authors required participants to perform different grasping responses depending on the parity status of Arabic digits. The results show that precision grip actions were initiated faster in response to small numbers, whereas power grips were initiated…

  3. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS... Actuator Showing Grip Dimension EC03OC91.072...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS... Actuator Showing Grip Dimension EC03OC91.072...

  5. Development and Application of a Multi-Axis Dynamometer for Measuring Grip Force

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, C.B.; Towles, J.D; Radwin, R.G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This article describes the development and application of a novel multi-axis hand dynamometer for quantifying two-dimensional grip force magnitude and direction in the flexion-extension plane of the fingers. Methods A three-beam reconfigurable form dynamometer, containing two active beams for measuring orthogonal forces and moments regardless of point of force application, was designed, fabricated and tested. Maximum grip exertions were evaluated for sixteen subjects gripping cylindrical handles varying in diameter. Results Mean grip force magnitudes were 231 N (SD=67.7 N), 236 N (72.9 N), 208 N (72.5 N), and 158 N (45.7 N) for 3.81 cm, 5.08 cm, 6.35 cm and 7.62 cm diameter handles, respectively. Grip force direction rotated clockwise and the centre of pressure moved upward along the handle as handle diameter increased. Conclusions Given that the multi-axis dynamometer simultaneously measures planar grip force magnitude and direction, and centre of pressure along the handle, this novel sensor design provides more grip force characteristics than current sensor designs that would improve evaluation of grip characteristics and model-driven calculations of musculoskeletal forces from dynamometer data. PMID:24134054

  6. The Effect of Handedness on Grip Strength in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppewal, Alyt; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Grip strength is an important predictor of several health outcomes in the general older population. Grip strength assessment is feasible and reliable in older adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), which makes it a valuable measurement for application in this population. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of handedness on…

  7. I forgot when I lost my grip-strong associations between cognition and grip strength in level of performance and change across time in relation to impending death.

    PubMed

    Praetorius Björk, Marcus; Johansson, Boo; Hassing, Linda B

    2016-02-01

    An association between level of cognitive function and grip strength is well established, whereas evidence for longitudinal associations of change in the 2 functions is still unclear. We examined associations between cognition and grip strength in levels of performance and in longitudinal change in late life in a population-based sample, aged ≥80 years at baseline, followed until death. The sample consisted of 449 nondemented individuals drawn from the OCTO-Twin Study. A test battery assessing 6 cognitive domains and grip strength was administered at 5 occasions with measurements intervals of 2 years. We fitted time to death bivariate growth curve models, adjusted for age, education, and sex which resulted in associations between grip strength and cognition in both levels of performance (across all cognitive domains) and rates of change (in 4 of 6 domains). These results show that cognition and grip strength change conjointly in later life and that the association between cognition and grip strength is stronger before death than earlier in life. PMID:26827644

  8. Adaptive force generation for precision-grip lifting by a spectral timing model of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Antonio; Bullock, Daniel; Rhodes, Bradley J

    2003-01-01

    We modeled adaptive generation of precision grip forces during object lifting. The model presented adjusts reactive and anticipatory grip forces to a level just above that needed to stabilize lifted objects in the hand. The model obeys principles of cerebellar structure and function by using slip sensations as error signals to adapt phasic motor commands to tonic force generators associated with output synergies controlling grip aperture. The learned phasic commands are weight- and texture-dependent. Simulations of the new circuit model reproduce key aspects of experimental observations of force application. Over learning trials, the onset of grip force buildup comes to lead the load force buildup, and the rate-of-rise of grip force, but not load force, scales inversely with the friction of the object.

  9. NBL Pistol Grip Tool for Underwater Training of Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liszka, Michael; Ashmore, Matthew; Behnke, Mark; Smith, Walter; Waterman, Tod

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a lightweight, functional mockup of the Pistol Grip Tool for use during underwater astronaut training. Previous training tools have caused shoulder injuries. This new version is more than 50 percent lighter [in water, weight is 2.4 lb (=1.1 kg)], and can operate for a six-hour training session after 30 minutes of prep for submersion. Innovations in the design include the use of lightweight materials (aluminum and Delrin(Registered TradeMark)), creating a thinner housing, and the optimization of internal space with the removal of as much excess material as possible. This reduces tool weight and maximizes buoyancy. Another innovation for this tool is the application of a vacuum that seats the Orings in place and has shown to be reliable in allowing underwater usage for up to six hours.

  10. Using Hand Grip Force as a Correlate of Longitudinal Acceleration Comfort for Rapid Transit Trains.

    PubMed

    Guo, Beiyuan; Gan, Weide; Fang, Weining

    2015-07-02

    Longitudinal acceleration comfort is one of the essential metrics used to evaluate the ride comfort of train. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of using hand grip force as a correlate of longitudinal acceleration comfort of rapid transit trains. In the paper, a motion simulation system was set up and a two-stage experiment was designed to investigate the role of the grip force on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains. The results of the experiment show that the incremental grip force was linearly correlated with the longitudinal acceleration value, while the incremental grip force had no correlation with the direction of the longitudinal acceleration vector. The results also show that the effects of incremental grip force and acceleration duration on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains were significant. Based on multiple regression analysis, a step function model was established to predict the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains using the incremental grip force and the acceleration duration. The feasibility and practicably of the model was verified by a field test. Furthermore, a comparative analysis shows that the motion simulation system and the grip force based model were valid to support the laboratory studies on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains.

  11. Measurement of Hand/Handrim Grip Forces in Two Different One Arm Drive Wheelchairs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to explore the total and regional grip forces in the hand when propelling two different manual one arm drive wheelchairs: the Neater Uni-wheelchair (NUW) and a foot steered Action3 wheelchair. Methods. 17 nondisabled users were randomly assigned to each wheelchair to drive around an indoor obstacle course. The Grip, a multiple sensor system taking continuous measurement of handgrip force, was attached to the propelling hand. Total grip force in each region of the hand and total grip force across the whole hand were calculated per user per wheelchair. Results. The Action3 with foot steering only generated significantly greater total grip force in straight running compared to the NUW and also in the fingers and thumb in straight running. Conclusions. The results suggest that the Action3 with foot steering generated greater grip forces which may infer a greater potential for repetitive strain injury in the upper limb. Further work is required to explore whether the difference in grip force is of clinical significance in a disabled population. PMID:25045684

  12. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm. PMID:27313372

  13. Effects of kinesio tape compared with non-elastic tape on hand grip strength.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Yeol

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Many assumptions have been made about taping and several studies have considered tape application methods; however, the true effect of taping on muscle strength remains unclear. Most previous studies compared application techniques using Kinesio tape (KT), but studies that compared muscle strength using non-elastic tape (NT) are limited. Moreover, no studies have applied KT and NT in the same way to assess grip strength in normal subjects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of application of two tapes with different elastic properties on maximal grip strength in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were divided into two groups (KT and NT). Maximal grip strength was measured with a dynamometer. Forearm extensor muscles of the dominant hand were then taped and subjects were immediately asked to perform hand grip movement with maximum strength in the same standardized manner. [Results] In the KT group, maximal grip strength was significantly increased compared to the initial value; however, in the NT group, there was no significant difference in maximal grip strength. [Conclusion] This study suggests that only Kinesio tape can increase maximal grip strength immediately after application on the extensor region of the forearm.

  14. Enslaving in a serial chain: interactions between grip force and hand force in isometric tasks.

    PubMed

    Paclet, Florent; Ambike, Satyajit; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M; Latash, Mark L

    2014-03-01

    This study was motivated by the double action of extrinsic hand muscles that produce grip force and also contribute to wrist torque. We explored interactions between grip force and wrist torque in isometric force production tasks. In particular, we tested a hypothesis that an intentional change in one of the two kinetic variables would produce an unintentional change in the other (enslaving). When young healthy subjects produced accurate changes in the grip force, only minor effects on the force produced by the hand (by wrist flexion/extension action) were observed. In contrast, a change in the hand force produced consistent changes in grip force in the same direction. The magnitude of such unintentional grip force change was stronger for intentional hand force decrease as compared to hand force increase. These effects increased with the magnitude of the initial grip force. When the subjects were asked to produce accurate total force computed as the sum of the hand and grip forces, strong negative covariation between the two forces was seen across trials interpreted as a synergy stabilizing the total force. An index of this synergy was higher in the space of "modes," hypothetical signals to the two effectors that could be changed by the controller one at a time. We interpret the complex enslaving effects (positive force covariation) as conditioned by typical everyday tasks. The presence of synergic effects (negative, task-specific force covariation) can be naturally interpreted within the referent configuration hypothesis. PMID:24309747

  15. Enslaving in a serial chain: Interactions between grip force and hand force in isometric tasks

    PubMed Central

    Paclet, Florent; Ambike, Satyajit; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    This study was motivated by the double action of extrinsic hand muscles that produce grip force and also contribute to wrist torque. We explored interactions between grip force and wrist torque in isometric force production tasks. In particular, we tested a hypothesis that an intentional change in one of the two kinetic variables would produce an unintentional change in the other (enslaving). When young healthy subjects produced accurate changes in the grip force, only minor effects on the force produced by the hand (by wrist flexion/extension action) were observed. In contrast, a change in the hand force produced consistent changes in grip force in the same direction. The magnitude of such unintentional grip force change was stronger for intentional hand force decrease as compared to hand force increase. These effects increased with the magnitude of the initial grip force. When the subjects were asked to produce accurate total force computed as the sum of the hand and grip forces, strong negative co-variation between the two forces was seen across trials interpreted as a synergy stabilizing the total force. An index of this synergy was higher in the space of “modes”, hypothetical signals to the two effectors that could be changed by the controller one at a time. We interpret the complex enslaving effects (positive force co-variation) as conditioned by typical everyday tasks. The presence of synergic effects (negative, task-specific force co-variation) can be naturally interpreted within the referent configuration hypothesis. PMID:24309747

  16. Grips and hand movements of chimpanzees during feeding in Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Marzke, Mary W; Marchant, Linda F; McGrew, William C; Reece, Sandra P

    2015-03-01

    It has long been assumed that stone tool making was a major factor in the evolution of derived hominin hand morphology. However, stresses on the hand associated with food retrieval and processing also have been recognized as relevant early hominin behaviors that should be investigated. To this end, chimpanzee food manipulation was videotaped in the Mahale Mountains National Park, Tanzania. Grips and hand movements by 39 chimpanzees were analyzed for arboreal and terrestrial feeding involving 10 food-types and associated vegetation. It was predicted that (1) new grips would be found that had not been observed in captivity, (2) forceful precision grips would be absent from the repertoire, as in captivity, and (3) precision handling would be observed. New grips involving the full thumb and buttressed index finger, and a new integrated pattern of grips and forceful hand movements were discovered, associated with feeding on large fruits and meat. Participation of the full thumb in these grips, rather than the distal thumb and fingers, throws light on feeding behaviors that may have become increasingly significant factors in the evolution of derived hominin thumb morphology. The proximal thumb stabilizes food with the flexed index finger against the pull of the teeth and provides leverage in breaking food into portions. Isolated qualitative observations of possibly forceful pinch by the thumb and side of the index finger highlight the need for comparative quantitative data to test whether humans are unique in forceful precision gripping capability. Precision handling was not seen. PMID:25363236

  17. Using Hand Grip Force as a Correlate of Longitudinal Acceleration Comfort for Rapid Transit Trains

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Beiyuan; Gan, Weide; Fang, Weining

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal acceleration comfort is one of the essential metrics used to evaluate the ride comfort of train. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of using hand grip force as a correlate of longitudinal acceleration comfort of rapid transit trains. In the paper, a motion simulation system was set up and a two-stage experiment was designed to investigate the role of the grip force on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains. The results of the experiment show that the incremental grip force was linearly correlated with the longitudinal acceleration value, while the incremental grip force had no correlation with the direction of the longitudinal acceleration vector. The results also show that the effects of incremental grip force and acceleration duration on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains were significant. Based on multiple regression analysis, a step function model was established to predict the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains using the incremental grip force and the acceleration duration. The feasibility and practicably of the model was verified by a field test. Furthermore, a comparative analysis shows that the motion simulation system and the grip force based model were valid to support the laboratory studies on the longitudinal comfort of rapid transit trains. PMID:26147730

  18. Relation between grip strength and radial bone mineral density in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, S; Tsunoda, N; Yata, H; Katsukawa, F; Onishi, S; Yamazaki, H

    1995-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle strength in young athletes who had not yet experienced age-related bone loss. Radial BMD and grip strength were measured in 10 male college wrestlers, 16 female college basketball players, and 12 female college tennis players. Radial BMD was measured in the distal and middle radius by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Isometric grip strength was assessed with a hand-held dynamometer. The dominant forearm was examined in the amateur wrestlers and basketball players for grip strength and BMD. Both forearms were examined in the tennis players. A significant positive correlation was found between radial BMD and grip strength in the dominant forearm, and between radial BMD and body weight. Moreover, to eliminate a possible effect of body weight on radial BMD, we compared radial BMD with grip strength in both the dominant and nondominant arm of 12 college tennis players. Grip strength in the dominant forearm was significantly greater than in the nondominant forearm. The midradial BMD of the dominant forearm was also significantly higher than in the nondominant forearm. Based on these findings, we conclude that grip strength is one of the determinant factors of radial BMD in the dominant forearm of young college athletes.

  19. Grip forces during fast point-to-point and continuous hand movements.

    PubMed

    Viviani, Paolo; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Three experiments investigated the grip force exerted by the fingers on an object displaced actively in the near-body space. In one condition (unimanual) the object was held by one hand with the tripod grip and was moved briskly back and forth along one of the three coordinate directions (up-down, left-right, near-far). In the second condition (bimanual) the same point-to-point movements were performed while holding the object with the index and middle fingers of both hands. In the third condition (bimanual) the object was held as in the second condition and moved along a circular path lying in one of the three coordinate planes (horizontal, frontal, sagittal). In all conditions participants were asked to exert a baseline level of grip force largely exceeding the safety margin against slippage. Both grip forces and hand displacements were measured with high accuracy. As reported in previous studies, in the two point-to-point conditions we observed an upsurge of the grip force at the onset and at the end the movements. However, the timing of the transient increases of the grip force relative to hand kinematics did not confirm the hypothesis set forth by several previous studies that grip modulation is a pre-planned action based on an internal model of the expected effects of the movement. In the third condition, the systematic modulation of the grip force also for circular movements was again at variance with the internal model hypothesis because it cannot be construed as a pre-planned action aiming at countering large changes in dynamic load. We argue that a parsimonious account of the covariations of load and grip forces can be offered by taking into account the visco-elastic properties of the neuromuscular system. PMID:26223578

  20. Computational model of precision grip in Parkinson's disease: a utility based approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankur; Balasubramani, Pragathi P; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2013-01-01

    We propose a computational model of Precision Grip (PG) performance in normal subjects and Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients. Prior studies on grip force generation in PD patients show an increase in grip force during ON medication and an increase in the variability of the grip force during OFF medication (Ingvarsson et al., 1997; Fellows et al., 1998). Changes in grip force generation in dopamine-deficient PD conditions strongly suggest contribution of the Basal Ganglia, a deep brain system having a crucial role in translating dopamine signals to decision making. The present approach is to treat the problem of modeling grip force generation as a problem of action selection, which is one of the key functions of the Basal Ganglia. The model consists of two components: (1) the sensory-motor loop component, and (2) the Basal Ganglia component. The sensory-motor loop component converts a reference position and a reference grip force, into lift force and grip force profiles, respectively. These two forces cooperate in grip-lifting a load. The sensory-motor loop component also includes a plant model that represents the interaction between two fingers involved in PG, and the object to be lifted. The Basal Ganglia component is modeled using Reinforcement Learning with the significant difference that the action selection is performed using utility distribution instead of using purely Value-based distribution, thereby incorporating risk-based decision making. The proposed model is able to account for the PG results from normal and PD patients accurately (Ingvarsson et al., 1997; Fellows et al., 1998). To our knowledge the model is the first model of PG in PD conditions. PMID:24348373

  1. Immediate and Delayed Effects of Forearm Kinesio Taping on Grip Strength

    PubMed Central

    Kouhzad Mohammadi, Hosein; Khademi Kalantari, Khosro; Naeimi, Sedighe Sadat; Pouretezad, Mohammad; Shokri, Esmaeil; Tafazoli, Mojdeh; Dastjerdi, Mahboobeh; Kardooni, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the fundamental role of gripping in most upper limb activities, grip strength promotion is a chief goal in the treatment of patients with upper limb musculoskeletal disorders. Kinesio taping is a novel and effective therapeutic technique believed to facilitate muscle contraction through stimulating mechanoreceptors and increasing the sensory feedback around the taped region. Objectives: The present study aimed to identify the best region (flexor, extensor and flexor/extensor regions) and time (immediate, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 hours) of forearm Kinesio taping to obtain the maximum improvement in grip strength. Materials and Methods: In this longitudinal study, 40 healthy men and women (the mean age of 22.3 ± 2.19 years) were selected among students of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran by simple, nonrandom sampling method. A dynamometer was used to measure grip strength immediately and every 30 minutes during the two hours after I-shaped application of tape (with 50% stretch) to the flexor, extensor, and flexor/extensor forearm muscles. Results: Grip strength was significantly increased in various muscle groups for males (P = 0.002) and females (P = 0.000) of the forearm and at different intervals for males (P = 0.000) and females (P = 0.000). Moreover, in both men and women, tape application to the extensor region provided greater grip strength compared to taping of the flexor and flexor/extensor regions (P = 0.000 for both). Furthermore, the maximum increase in grip strength were 0.5 (10.8% increase, P = 0.001) and 1.5 h (23.9% increase, P = 0.000) after taping in males and females, respectively. Conclusions: Taping the extensor region of forearm is recommended to achieve higher grip strength. Although grip strength increased at a slower pace in females than males, the final values were higher in women. PMID:25389492

  2. Grip forces during fast point-to-point and continuous hand movements.

    PubMed

    Viviani, Paolo; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Three experiments investigated the grip force exerted by the fingers on an object displaced actively in the near-body space. In one condition (unimanual) the object was held by one hand with the tripod grip and was moved briskly back and forth along one of the three coordinate directions (up-down, left-right, near-far). In the second condition (bimanual) the same point-to-point movements were performed while holding the object with the index and middle fingers of both hands. In the third condition (bimanual) the object was held as in the second condition and moved along a circular path lying in one of the three coordinate planes (horizontal, frontal, sagittal). In all conditions participants were asked to exert a baseline level of grip force largely exceeding the safety margin against slippage. Both grip forces and hand displacements were measured with high accuracy. As reported in previous studies, in the two point-to-point conditions we observed an upsurge of the grip force at the onset and at the end the movements. However, the timing of the transient increases of the grip force relative to hand kinematics did not confirm the hypothesis set forth by several previous studies that grip modulation is a pre-planned action based on an internal model of the expected effects of the movement. In the third condition, the systematic modulation of the grip force also for circular movements was again at variance with the internal model hypothesis because it cannot be construed as a pre-planned action aiming at countering large changes in dynamic load. We argue that a parsimonious account of the covariations of load and grip forces can be offered by taking into account the visco-elastic properties of the neuromuscular system.

  3. Anticipatory grip force between 1 and 3g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Olivier; Van Loon, ing.. Jack J. W. A.; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Hermsdorfer, Joachim; Lefevre, Philippe

    One remarkable capacity of utilizing common tools appropriately as soon as we grasp them relies on the ability to determine in advance the grip force (GF) required to handle them in relation to their mechanical properties and the surrounding environment. This anticipatory strategy avoids the uncompressible delays in the feedback system. The predictive control of GF is made possible because the nervous system can learn, store and then select the internal representations of the dynamics of innumerable objects, known as internal models. Beside this flexibility, the nervous system's ability to learn different task dynamics is often limited in classical robotic experiments The environment itself can be profoundly modified in altered gravity or centrifugation. The few studies that investigated motor adaptation in such contexts did not consider the interaction between gravitational phases and even less the transitions across environments. Here, we tested subject's abilities to adapt to levels of gravitational fields generated by a human centrifuge. In Experiment 1, seven subjects performed 4 lifting trials in each gravitational phase (1 to 2.5g and then 2.5 to 1g by steps of 0.5g) with a 0.12 kg instrumented object. In Experiment 2, six subjects performed vertical oscillations of the object during transitions between 1 and 3g (0.5g steps, ascending and descending phases, profile repeated twice). We continuously measured GF, load force (LF) and ambient gravity. We hypothesized that participants were able to predictively adjust GF to the new environment. In Experiment 1, participants adjusted their GF proportionally to gravity and decreased GF across trials within a given gravitational environment. Preload phases decreased over time from 300ms to 50ms irrespective of gravity. We quantified the abilities of participants to switch across environments by subtracting GF recorded in the last trial in the current gravity level from GF during the first trial in the new environment

  4. JPL Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, P. Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.; Turk, Francis J.; Shen, Tsae-Pyng J.; Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.; Licata, Stephen J.; Poulsen, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite observations can play a very important role in airborne field campaigns, since they provide a comprehensive description of the environment that is essential for the experiment design, flight planning, and post-experiment scientific data analysis. In the past, it has been difficult to fully utilize data from multiple NASA satellites due to the large data volume, the complexity of accessing NASA s data in near-real-time (NRT), as well as the lack of software tools to interact with multi-sensor information. The JPL GRIP Portal is a Web portal that serves a comprehensive set of NRT observation data sets from NASA and NOAA satellites describing the atmospheric and oceanic environments related to the genesis and intensification of the tropical storms in the North Atlantic Ocean. Together with the model forecast data from four major global atmospheric models, this portal provides a useful tool for the scientists and forecasters in planning and monitoring the NASA GRIP field campaign during the 2010 Atlantic Ocean hurricane season. This portal uses the Google Earth plug-in to visualize various types of data sets, such as 2D maps, wind vectors, streamlines, 3D data sets presented at series of vertical cross-sections or pointwise vertical profiles, and hurricane best tracks and forecast tracks. Additionally, it allows users to overlap multiple data sets, change the opacity of each image layer, generate animations on the fly with selected data sets, and compare the observation data with the model forecast using two independent calendars. The portal also provides the capability to identify the geographic location of any point of interest. In addition to supporting the airborne mission planning, the NRT data and portal will serve as a very rich source of information during the post-field campaign analysis stage of the airborne experiment. By including a diverse set of satellite observations and model forecasts, it provides a good spatial and temporal context for the

  5. Targeting of the GRIP domain to the trans-Golgi network is conserved from protists to animals.

    PubMed

    McConville, Malcolm J; Ilgoutz, Steven C; Teasdale, Rohan D; Foth, Bernardo J; Matthews, Antony; Mullin, Kylie A; Gleeson, Paul A

    2002-09-01

    The GRIP domain, found in a family of coiled-coil peripheral membrane Golgi proteins, is a specific targeting sequence for the trans-Golgi network of animal cells. In this study we show that a coiled-coil protein with a GRIP domain occurs in the primitive eukaryote, Trypanosoma brucei, and that reporter proteins containing this domain can be used as a marker for the poorly characterized trans Golgi/trans-Golgi network of trypanosomatid parasites. The T. brucei GRIP domain, when fused to the carboxyl terminus of the green fluorescent protein (GFP-TbGRIP), was efficiently localized to the Golgi apparatus of transfected COS cells. Overexpression of GFP-TbGRIP in COS cells displaced the endogenous GRIP protein, GCC1p, from the Golgi apparatus indicating that the trypanosomatid and mammalian GRIP sequences interact with similar membrane determinants. GFP fusion proteins containing either the T. brucei GRIP domain or the human p230 GRIP (p230GRIP) domain were also expressed in the trypanosomatid parasite, Leishmania mexicana, and localized by fluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy to the trans face of the single Golgi apparatus and a short tubule that extended from the Golgi apparatus. Binding of GFP-p230GRIP to Golgi membranes in L. mexicana was abrogated by mutation of a critical tyrosine residue in the p230 GRIP domain. The levels of GFP-GRIP fusion proteins were dramatically reduced in stationary-phase L. mexicana promastigotes, suggesting that specific Golgi trafficking steps may be down-regulated as the promastigotes cease dividing. This study provides a protein marker for the trans-Golgi network of trypanosomatid parasites and suggests that the GRIP domain binds to a membrane component that has been highly conserved in eukaryotic evolution.

  6. Effect of putting grip on eye and head movements during the golf putting stroke.

    PubMed

    Hung, George K

    2003-03-24

    The objective of this article is to determine the effect of three different putting grips (conventional, cross-hand, and one-handed) on variations in eye and head movements during the putting stroke. Seven volunteer novice players, ranging in age from 21 to 22 years, participated in the study. During each experimental session, the subject stood on a specially designed platform covered with artificial turf and putted golf balls towards a standard golf hole. The three different types of grips were tested at two distances: 3 and 9 ft. For each condition, 20 putts were attempted. For each putt, data were recorded over a 3-s interval at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. Eye movements were recorded using a helmet-mounted eye movement monitor. Head rotation about an imaginary axis through the top of the head and its center-of-rotation was measured by means of a potentiometer mounted on a fixed frame and coupled to the helmet. Putter-head motion was measured using a linear array of infrared phototransistors embedded in the platform. The standard deviation (STD, relative to the initial level) was calculated for eye and head movements over the duration of the putt (i.e., from the beginning of the backstroke, through the forward stroke, to impact). The averaged STD for the attempted putts was calculated for each subject. Then, the averaged STDs and other data for the seven subjects were statistically compared across the three grip conditions. The STD of eye movements were greater (p < 0.1) for conventional than cross-hand (9 ft) and one-handed (3 and 9 ft) grips. Also, the STD of head movements were greater (p < 0.1; 3 ft) for conventional than cross-hand and one-handed grips. Vestibulo-ocular responses associated with head rotations could be observed in many 9 ft and some 3 ft putts. The duration of the putt was significantly longer (p < 0.05; 3 and 9 ft) for the one-handed than conventional and cross-hand grips. Finally, performance, or percentage putts made, was significantly

  7. Grip Strength across the Life Course: Normative Data from Twelve British Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, Richard M.; Syddall, Holly E.; Cooper, Rachel; Benzeval, Michaela; Deary, Ian J.; Dennison, Elaine M.; Der, Geoff; Gale, Catharine R.; Inskip, Hazel M.; Jagger, Carol; Kirkwood, Thomas B.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Robinson, Sian M.; Starr, John M.; Steptoe, Andrew; Tilling, Kate; Kuh, Diana; Cooper, Cyrus; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies have shown that weaker grip strength in later life is associated with disability, morbidity, and mortality. Grip strength is a key component of the sarcopenia and frailty phenotypes and yet it is unclear how individual measurements should be interpreted. Our objective was to produce cross-sectional centile values for grip strength across the life course. A secondary objective was to examine the impact of different aspects of measurement protocol. Methods We combined 60,803 observations from 49,964 participants (26,687 female) of 12 general population studies in Great Britain. We produced centile curves for ages 4 to 90 and investigated the prevalence of weak grip, defined as strength at least 2.5 SDs below the gender-specific peak mean. We carried out a series of sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of dynamometer type and measurement position (seated or standing). Results Our results suggested three overall periods: an increase to peak in early adult life, maintenance through to midlife, and decline from midlife onwards. Males were on average stronger than females from adolescence onwards: males’ peak median grip was 51 kg between ages 29 and 39, compared to 31 kg in females between ages 26 and 42. Weak grip strength, defined as strength at least 2.5 SDs below the gender-specific peak mean, increased sharply with age, reaching a prevalence of 23% in males and 27% in females by age 80. Sensitivity analyses suggested our findings were robust to differences in dynamometer type and measurement position. Conclusion This is the first study to provide normative data for grip strength across the life course. These centile values have the potential to inform the clinical assessment of grip strength which is recognised as an important part of the identification of people with sarcopenia and frailty. PMID:25474696

  8. A comparison of the high and low backspin backhand drives in tennis using different grips.

    PubMed

    Elliott, B; Christmass, M

    1995-04-01

    Three-dimensional, high-speed cinematography was used to compare backspin backhand techniques of high performance players hitting low (5.4 cm below hip height) and high (41.6 cm above hip height) bouncing balls using their preferred method of holding the racket (eastern backhand or continental grip: hand generally on top of the handle) and non-preferred ('behind the handle') grip. The Direct Linear Transformation method was used for three-dimensional space reconstruction from two-dimensional images recorded from laterally placed phase-locked cameras operating at 200 Hz. The only significant differences (P < 0.05) caused by the change in grip were that the ball was impacted further in front of the body when using the non-preferred grip, and a lower peak racket-shoulder speed was recorded for a high bouncing ball when using the non-preferred grip. Irrespective of the type of grip, the players significantly modified (P < 0.01) their technique to hit a high bouncing ball by adopting a more upright trunk, more rotated shoulder alignment (racket shoulder pointing more towards opponent), a larger front knee angle and a more abducted upper arm. Hitting a high ball was also characterized by a less inclined approach trajectory of the racket, a more vertical racket-face and a different speed profile for the segments of the upper limb and racket. PMID:7595982

  9. Role of transcriptional coregulator GRIP1 in the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Chinenov, Yurii; Gupte, Rebecca; Dobrovolna, Jana; Flammer, Jamie R.; Liu, Bill; Michelassi, Francesco E.; Rogatsky, Inez

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of cytokine gene expression by the hormone-activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is the key component of the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we report that glucocorticoid repression of cytokine genes in primary macrophages is mediated by GR-interacting protein (GRIP)1, a transcriptional coregulator of the p160 family, which is recruited to the p65-occupied genomic NFκB-binding sites in conjunction with liganded GR. We created a mouse strain enabling a conditional hematopoietic cell-restricted deletion of GRIP1 in adult animals. In this model, GRIP1 depletion in macrophages attenuated in a dose-dependent manner repression of NFκB target genes by GR irrespective of the upstream Toll-like receptor pathway responsible for their activation. Furthermore, genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed a broad derepression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced glucocorticoid-sensitive targets in GRIP1-depleted macrophages without affecting their activation by LPS. Consistently, conditional GRIP1-deficient mice were sensitized, relative to the wild type, to a systemic inflammatory challenge developing characteristic signs of LPS-induced shock. Thus, by serving as a GR corepressor, GRIP1 facilitates the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids in vivo. PMID:22753499

  10. Evaluation of total grip strength and individual finger forces on opposing (A-type) handles among Koreans.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Ku; Seo, Min-Tae; Kang, Hyun-Sung

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of grip span on finger forces and defined the best grip span for maximising total grip strength based on the finger forces and subjective discomfort in a static exertion. Five grip spans (45, 50, 55, 60 and 65 mm) of the opposing (A-type) handle shape were tested in this study to measure total grip strength and individual finger force among Korean population. A total of 30 males who participated in this study were asked to exert a maximum grip force with two repetitions, and to report the subjective discomfort experienced between exertions using the Borg's CR-10 scale. The highest grip strength was obtained at 45 mm and 50 mm grip spans. Results also showed that forces of all fingers, except for the middle finger force, significantly differed over the grip spans. The lowest subjective discomfort was observed in the 50 mm grip span. The results might be used as development guidelines for ergonomic opposing (A-type) hand tools for Korean population.

  11. Impaired grip-lift synergy in children with unilateral brain lesions.

    PubMed

    Forssberg, H; Eliasson, A C; Redon-Zouitenn, C; Mercuri, E; Dubowitz, L

    1999-06-01

    Children with spastic hemiplegia have impaired dexterity in the affected extremity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the force co-ordination pattern during precision grip in 13 children between 4 and 10 years of age with predominant unilateral brain lesions is related to manual dexterity and to the location and size of the brain lesion. The force co-ordination pattern was investigated by means of a specially designed object that monitored the isometric fingertip forces applied to the contact surfaces during precision grip. Hand function was measured by means of neurological examination, functional hand-grips and dexterity. Brain lesions were identified by series of ultrasound and MRI scans. Normally, the fingertip forces are applied to the object in the initial phase of the lift in an invariant force co-ordination pattern (i.e. grip-lift synergy), in which the grip and load forces are initiated simultaneously and increase in parallel with unimodal force rate trajectories. A majority of children with unilateral brain lesions had not developed the force co-ordination pattern typical for their age, but produced an immature or a pathological pattern. The developmental level of the grip-lift synergy was determined and quantified according to criteria derived from earlier studies on normally developed children. There was a clear relationship between the developmental level of the grip-lift synergy and impaired dexterity, indicating that proper development of the force co-ordination pattern is important for skilled hand function. The grip-lift synergy correlated with the total extent of lesions in the contralateral cortex and white matter and with lesions in the thalamus/basal ganglia, while no correlation was found for isolated cortical lesions. The results suggest that the neural circuits involved in the control of the precision grip are organized in a parallel and distributed system in the hemispheres, and that the basal ganglia are important

  12. Inertial torque during reaching directly impacts grip-force adaptation to weightless objects.

    PubMed

    Giard, T; Crevecoeur, F; McIntyre, J; Thonnard, J-L; Lefèvre, P

    2015-11-01

    A hallmark of movement control expressed by healthy humans is the ability to gradually improve motor performance through learning. In the context of object manipulation, previous work has shown that the presence of a torque load has a direct impact on grip-force control, characterized by a significantly slower grip-force adjustment across lifting movements. The origin of this slower adaptation rate remains unclear. On the one hand, information about tangential constraints during stationary holding may be difficult to extract in the presence of a torque. On the other hand, inertial torque experienced during movement may also potentially disrupt the grip-force adjustments, as the dynamical constraints clearly differ from the situation when no torque load is present. To address the influence of inertial torque loads, we instructed healthy adults to perform visually guided reaching movements in weightlessness while holding an unbalanced object relative to the grip axis. Weightlessness offered the possibility to remove gravitational constraints and isolate the effect of movement-related feedback on grip force adjustments. Grip-force adaptation rates were compared with a control group who manipulated a balanced object without any torque load and also in weightlessness. Our results clearly show that grip-force adaptation in the presence of a torque load is significantly slower, which suggests that the presence of torque loads experienced during movement may alter our internal estimates of how much force is required to hold an unbalanced object stable. This observation may explain why grasping objects around the expected location of the center of mass is such an important component of planning and control of manipulation tasks.

  13. Effects of bat composition, grip firmness, and impact location on postimpact ball velocity.

    PubMed

    Weyrich, A S; Messier, S P; Ruhmann, B S; Berry, M J

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of bat composition (aluminum and wooden), impact location [center of percussion (COP), center of gravity (COG), and end of the bat (E)], and grip firmness [tight (T) and no tension (NT)] on postimpact ball velocity. With the bats placed alternately in NT and T conditions, baseballs were delivered at a speed of 27.1 m.s-1 from a pitching machine positioned 1.5 m from the bat. High-speed photography (400 fps) was performed using a Locam camera positioned 7.54 m from and perpendicular to the principal plane of ball movement. A three-way ANCOVA revealed significant (P less than 0.01) differences in postimpact ball velocity between the three impact locations, with the COP yielding the greatest values, followed by the COG and E. Moreover, there was a significant (P less than 0.01) grip vs bat interaction. A simple-effects procedure revealed the following results: 1) the T grip produced greater (P less than 0.01) velocities than the NT grip across the aluminum (Al) bat; 2) there was no difference (P greater than 0.01) between the T and NT grips across the wooden (W) bat; 3) the W bat produced greater (P less than 0.01) velocities than the Al bat across the NT grip; and 4) there was no difference (P greater than 0.01) between the Al and W bats across the T grip.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2709983

  14. Effects of bat composition, grip firmness, and impact location on postimpact ball velocity.

    PubMed

    Weyrich, A S; Messier, S P; Ruhmann, B S; Berry, M J

    1989-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of bat composition (aluminum and wooden), impact location [center of percussion (COP), center of gravity (COG), and end of the bat (E)], and grip firmness [tight (T) and no tension (NT)] on postimpact ball velocity. With the bats placed alternately in NT and T conditions, baseballs were delivered at a speed of 27.1 m.s-1 from a pitching machine positioned 1.5 m from the bat. High-speed photography (400 fps) was performed using a Locam camera positioned 7.54 m from and perpendicular to the principal plane of ball movement. A three-way ANCOVA revealed significant (P less than 0.01) differences in postimpact ball velocity between the three impact locations, with the COP yielding the greatest values, followed by the COG and E. Moreover, there was a significant (P less than 0.01) grip vs bat interaction. A simple-effects procedure revealed the following results: 1) the T grip produced greater (P less than 0.01) velocities than the NT grip across the aluminum (Al) bat; 2) there was no difference (P greater than 0.01) between the T and NT grips across the wooden (W) bat; 3) the W bat produced greater (P less than 0.01) velocities than the Al bat across the NT grip; and 4) there was no difference (P greater than 0.01) between the Al and W bats across the T grip.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Longitudinal assessment of grip strength using bulb dynamometer in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pizzato, Tatiana M.; Baptista, Cyntia R. J. A.; Souza, Mariana A.; Benedicto, Michelle M. B.; Martinez, Edson Z.; Mattiello-Sverzut, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Grip strength is used to infer functional status in several pathological conditions, and the hand dynamometer has been used to estimate performance in other areas. However, this relationship is controversial in neuromuscular diseases and studies with the bulb dynamometer comparing healthy children and children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) are limited. OBJECTIVE: The evolution of grip strength and the magnitude of weakness were examined in boys with DMD compared to healthy boys. The functional data of the DMD boys were correlated with grip strength. METHOD: Grip strength was recorded in 18 ambulant boys with DMD (Duchenne Group, DG) aged 4 to 13 years (mean 7.4±2.1) and 150 healthy volunteers (Control Group, CG) age-matched using a bulb dynamometer (North Coast- NC70154). The follow-up of the DG was 6 to 33 months (3-12 sessions), and functional performance was verified using the Vignos scale. RESULTS: There was no difference between grip strength obtained by the dominant and non-dominant side for both groups. Grip strength increased in the CG with chronological age while the DG remained stable or decreased. The comparison between groups showed significant difference in grip strength, with CG values higher than DG values (confidence interval of 95%). In summary, there was an increment in the differences between the groups with increasing age. Participants with 24 months or more of follow-up showed a progression of weakness as well as maintained Vignos scores. CONCLUSIONS: The amplitude of weakness increased with age in the DG. The bulb dynamometer detected the progression of muscular weakness. Functional performance remained virtually unchanged in spite of the increase in weakness. PMID:25003277

  16. Threshold position control of arm movement with anticipatory increase in grip force.

    PubMed

    Pilon, Jean-François; De Serres, Sophie J; Feldman, Anatol G

    2007-07-01

    The grip force holding an object between fingers usually increases before or simultaneously with arm movement thus preventing the object from sliding. We experimentally analyzed and simulated this anticipatory behavior based on the following notions. (1) To move the arm to a new position, the nervous system shifts the threshold position at which arm muscles begin to be recruited. Deviated from their activation thresholds, arm muscles generate activity and forces that tend to minimize this deviation by bringing the arm to a new position. (2) To produce a grip force, with or without arm motion, the nervous system changes the threshold configuration of the hand. This process defines a threshold (referent) aperture (R(a)) of appropriate fingers. The actual aperture (Q(a)) is constrained by the size of the object held between the fingers whereas, in referent position R(a), the fingers virtually penetrate the object. Deviated by the object from their thresholds of activation, hand muscles generate activity and grip forces in proportion to the gap between the Q(a) and R(a). Thus, grip force emerges since the object prevents the fingers from reaching the referent position. (3) From previous experiences, the system knows that objects tend to slide off the fingers when arm movements are made and, to prevent sliding, it starts narrowing the referent aperture simultaneously with or somewhat before the onset of changes in the referent arm position. (4) The interaction between the fingers and the object is accomplished via the elastic pads on the tips of fingers. The pads are compressed not only due to the grip force but also due to the tangential inertial force ("load") acting from the object on the pads along the arm trajectory. Compressed by the load force, the pads move back and forth in the gap between the finger bones and object, thus inevitably changing the normal component of the grip force, in synchrony with and in proportion to the load force. Based on these notions

  17. Grip pressure distributions and associated variability in golf: a two-club comparison.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Sean M; Broker, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Teaching and playing professionals offer multiple theories concerning the manner in which forces should be applied to the handle of the club during the golf swing. This study extends recent research concerning grip pressures and forces in golf, with the purpose of exploring the similarities and differences between force profiles for a 7-iron and driver swung by proficient golfers. A secondary purpose was to further analyze the way that golfers use grip forces to manipulate the club. Grip forces were measured on eight low handicap golfers (USGA indexes 0 to 7) swinging their own 7-irons and drivers. In total, lead-hand and trail-hand grip forces were isolated as well as anatomically specific forces within the hands. Force profile variability across multiple swings for each golfer and between golfers characterized consistencies and important differences. Correlations between 7-iron and driver force profiles characterized force 'signatures.' The data highlight large fluctuations in grip forces during the swing. Marked differences between participants were observed, involving force magnitudes and phasing. Dominant forces arose primarily from the lead hand, specifically the last three fingers. Force profiles were highly repeatable across swings for a golfer (standard deviations < 7% of total force) and force profile correlations between 7-iron and driver for a golfer were remarkably high (r2 = 0.86). Notably, within swing force variability was greatest during club acceleration, but dramatically decreased at impact.

  18. Grip pressure distributions and associated variability in golf: a two-club comparison.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Sean M; Broker, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Teaching and playing professionals offer multiple theories concerning the manner in which forces should be applied to the handle of the club during the golf swing. This study extends recent research concerning grip pressures and forces in golf, with the purpose of exploring the similarities and differences between force profiles for a 7-iron and driver swung by proficient golfers. A secondary purpose was to further analyze the way that golfers use grip forces to manipulate the club. Grip forces were measured on eight low handicap golfers (USGA indexes 0 to 7) swinging their own 7-irons and drivers. In total, lead-hand and trail-hand grip forces were isolated as well as anatomically specific forces within the hands. Force profile variability across multiple swings for each golfer and between golfers characterized consistencies and important differences. Correlations between 7-iron and driver force profiles characterized force 'signatures.' The data highlight large fluctuations in grip forces during the swing. Marked differences between participants were observed, involving force magnitudes and phasing. Dominant forces arose primarily from the lead hand, specifically the last three fingers. Force profiles were highly repeatable across swings for a golfer (standard deviations < 7% of total force) and force profile correlations between 7-iron and driver for a golfer were remarkably high (r2 = 0.86). Notably, within swing force variability was greatest during club acceleration, but dramatically decreased at impact. PMID:25122996

  19. Grip strength characteristics using force-time curves in rheumatoid hands.

    PubMed

    Dias, J J; Singh, H P; Taub, Nick; Thompson, J

    2013-02-01

    The use of force-time curves in rheumatoid hands was investigated to assess peak force, average force, total grip time, area under the curve, and variability of the plateau region of the curves to identify the impact of different rheumatoid hand deformities on grip strength. We studied 43 patients - 10 men and 33 women - with established rheumatoid arthritis affecting their hands. Mean age was 61 years and mean duration of hand involvement was 13 years. Of the 86 hands, 38 had no finger deformity, eight had metacarpophalangeal joint ulnar deviation without any additional finger deformities, 16 had swan neck deformities, and 10 had boutonnière deformities. Fourteen hands had a combination of deformities. The hands with combined deformities were the weakest, had poor grip strength (34.7 N, SE 8), and were able to sustain grip for only a short time (22 sec, SE 3). Swan neck deformity also profoundly affects the magnitude (49.8 N, SE 7) and sustainability of grip (15 sec, SE 2). Even when only one finger had a swan neck deformity the mean strength was poor at 45 N. Swan neck deformity causes greater loss of strength than boutonnière deformity (82.7 N, SE 15). The strongest rheumatoid hands were those with only ulnar deviation deformities (90.8 N, SE 14). The area under the curve best predicted disability assessed using the Patient Evaluation Measure. PMID:22357327

  20. Probabilistic information on object weight shapes force dynamics in a grip-lift task.

    PubMed

    Trampenau, Leif; Kuhtz-Buschbeck, Johann P; van Eimeren, Thilo

    2015-06-01

    Advance information, such as object weight, size and texture, modifies predictive scaling of grip forces in a grip-lift task. Here, we examined the influence of probabilistic advance information about object weight. Fifteen healthy volunteers repeatedly grasped and lifted an object equipped with a force transducer between their thumb and index finger. Three clearly distinguishable object weights were used. Prior to each lift, the probabilities for the three object weights were given by a visual cue. We examined the effect of probabilistic pre-cues on grip and lift force dynamics. We expected predictive scaling of grip force parameters to follow predicted values calculated according to probabilistic contingencies of the cues. We observed that probabilistic cues systematically influenced peak grip and load force rates, as an index of predictive motor scaling. However, the effects of probabilistic cues on force rates were nonlinear, and anticipatory adaptations of the motor output generally seemed to overestimate high probabilities and underestimate low probabilities. These findings support the suggestion that anticipatory adaptations and force scaling of the motor system can integrate probabilistic information. However, probabilistic information seems to influence motor programs in a nonlinear fashion.

  1. Motor learning of cue-dependent pull-force changes during an isometric precision grip task.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Barbara C; Meindl, Tobias; Timmann, Dagmar; Kolb, Florian P; Kutz, Dieter F

    2015-02-01

    The "raspberry task" represents a precision grip task that requires continuous adjustment of grip and pull forces. During this task subjects grip a specialized grip rod and have to increase the pull force linearly while the rod is locked. The aim of this study was to determine whether an associated, initially neutral cue is able to evoke pull-force changes in the raspberry task. A standard delay paradigm was used to study cued pull-force changes during an ongoing movement resulting in unloading. Pull force and EMG activity of hand and arm muscles were recorded from 13 healthy, young subjects. The cue was associated with a complex change in motor behavior. In this task, cued force changes take place more rapidly than in protective reflex systems (in median after the second presentation of the cueing stimulus). A cued force change was detectable in two-thirds of paired trials. Although the force change is produced by a decrease of the EMG activity in several grip- and pull-force-producing muscles, the most significant effect in the majority of the subjects was an increase of the activity of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle which antagonises corresponding pull-force-producing muscles. Cued force changes require adequately and precisely controlled activation of the muscle groups involved in the movement.

  2. Effects of Taping on Pain, Grip Strength and Wrist Extension Force in Patients with Tennis Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Shamsoddini, Alireza; Hollisaz, Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    Background Tennis elbow (TE) is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Different modes of treatment are used for management of tennis elbow. Objectives This study investigated the effect of the taping technique (TT) on pain, grip strength and wrist extension force in treatment of tennis elbow. Patients and Methods Thirty patients (16 men /14 women with a mean age of 32.2 years) with tennis elbow of their dominant arm participated in this study. Outcome measures were assessment of pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow, grip strength and wrist extension force before and five to ten minutes after application of elbow tape on the affected and unaffected arms. A Visual Analog Scale was used to assess pain. A dynamometer and a hand-held dynamometer were used for evaluation of grip strength and wrist extension force, respectively. Results Among the variables, significant differences were found in wrist extension forces between effected and unaffected arms (P = 0.02). Changes in grip strength showed statically significant improvements in the affected arm compared to the unaffected arm (P = 0.03). Also, in assessment of pain at the lateral epicondyle, the mean change between affected and unaffected arms was significant, with P = 0.001. Conclusions The taping technique, as applied in this study demonstrates an impressive effect on wrist extension force and grip strength of patients with TE. Elbow taping also reduces pain at the lateral aspect of the elbow in these patients. PMID:24350156

  3. Grip type and task goal modify reach-to-grasp performance in post-stroke hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Sydney Y.; DeJong, Stacey L.; Cherry, Kendra M.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated whether grip type and/or task goal influenced reaching and grasping performance in post-stroke hemiparesis. Sixteen adults with post-stroke hemiparesis and twelve healthy adults reached to and grasped a cylindrical object using one of two grip types (3-finger or palmar) to achieve one of two task goals (hold or lift). Performance of the stroke group was characteristic of hemiparetic limb movement during reach-to-grasp, with more curved handpaths and slower velocities compared to the control group. These effects were present regardless of grip type or task goal. Other measures of reaching (reach time and reach velocity at object contact) and grasping (peak thumb-index finger aperture during the reach and peak grip force during the grasp) were differentially affected by grip type, task goal, or both, despite the presence of hemiparesis, providing new evidence that changes in motor patterns after stroke may occur to compensate for stroke-related motor impairment. PMID:22357103

  4. The effect of upper extremity fatigue on grip strength and passing accuracy in junior basketball players.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Taghread

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is an unavoidable part of a basketball game, which may affect an athlete's performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of upper extremity fatigue on grip strength and passing accuracy in basketball, and ascertain if the effects of different fatigue protocols on grip strength and passing accuracy are the same. Twenty-four juniors under 18 years old (age: 16.75 ± 0.62 years; body height: 184.5 ± 3.31 cm; body mass: 77.25 ± 3.22 kg) volunteered to participate in the study, and were divided into two groups. After a warm-up, both groups performed the basketball passing test and grip strength was recorded for each group under three different testing conditions: rest, 70% and 90% exercise intensity. The protocol used for the first group was the chest press, and for the second group the wrist curls. Results show that after the upper extremity fatigue protocol all parameters of the study (grip strength and passing accuracy) showed a significant decrease, and there was no significant difference between both groups regarding grip strength and passing accuracy. The study suggested that in order to avoid upper extremity fatigue, basketball trainers and coaches need to include upper extremity conditioning exercises into their training sessions.

  5. Similar motion of a handheld object may trigger non-similar grip force adjustments

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fan; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2007-01-01

    The tight coupling between load (L) and grip (G) forces during voluntary manipulation of a hand-held object is well established. The current study is to examine grip-load force coupling when motion of the hand with an object was either self-generated (voluntary) or externally generated. Subjects performed similar cyclic movements of different loads at various frequencies with three types of manipulation: (a) voluntary oscillation, (b) oscillating the right arm via the pulley system by the left leg (self-driven oscillation), (c) oscillating the arm via the pulley system by another person (other-driven oscillation). During the self-generated movements: (a) the grip forces were larger and (b) grip-load force modulation was more pronounced than in the externally generated movements. The G-L adjustments are not completely determined by the mechanics of object motion; non-mechanical factors related to movement performance, for instance perceptual factors, may affect the G-L coupling. Potentially the results of study can be used to provide hand therapists with another way for administering the Rapid Exchange Gripping Test. PMID:17954351

  6. Estimating thumb-index finger precision grip and manipulation potential in extant and fossil primates.

    PubMed

    Feix, Thomas; Kivell, Tracy L; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-05-01

    Primates, and particularly humans, are characterized by superior manual dexterity compared with other mammals. However, drawing the biomechanical link between hand morphology/behaviour and functional capabilities in non-human primates and fossil taxa has been challenging. We present a kinematic model of thumb-index precision grip and manipulative movement based on bony hand morphology in a broad sample of extant primates and fossil hominins. The model reveals that both joint mobility and digit proportions (scaled to hand size) are critical for determining precision grip and manipulation potential, but that having either a long thumb or great joint mobility alone does not necessarily yield high precision manipulation. The results suggest even the oldest available fossil hominins may have shared comparable precision grip manipulation with modern humans. In particular, the predicted human-like precision manipulation of Australopithecus afarensis, approximately one million years before the first stone tools, supports controversial archaeological evidence of tool-use in this taxon.

  7. Menstrual cyclicity of finger joint size and grip strength in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Rudge, S R; Kowanko, I C; Drury, P L

    1983-01-01

    Daily measurements of finger joint size, grip strength, and body weight have been made throughout 2 complete menstrual cycles in 7 female patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 6 healthy female controls. Sine wave analysis showed significant individual cyclical rhythms (p less than 0.05) for finger joint size (5 patients, 4 controls), nude weight (5 patients, 3 controls), and grip strength (4 patients, 3 controls). In addition analysis of group data, on the assumption of a 28-day cycle, showed a significant cycle for grip strength in the rheumatoid patients, with a nadir at 28 days. In the normal subjects much of the cyclical variation in finger joint size could be explained by changes in weight (median 49.5%), but this was not so in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (median 2.8%). These findings suggest the existence of a cyclical variation in disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:6882039

  8. Grip force is part of the semantic representation of manual action verbs.

    PubMed

    Frak, Victor; Nazir, Tatjana; Goyette, Michel; Cohen, Henri; Jeannerod, Marc

    2010-03-16

    Motor actions and action verbs activate similar cortical brain regions. A functional interference can be taken as evidence that there is a parallel treatment of these two types of information and would argue for the biological grounding of language in action. A novel approach examining the relationship between language and grip force is presented. With eyes closed and arm extended, subjects listened to words relating (verbs) or not relating (nouns) to a manual action while holding a cylinder with an integrated force sensor. There was a change in grip force when subjects heard verbs that related to manual action. Grip force increased from about 100 ms following the verb presentation, peaked at 380 ms and fell abruptly after 400 ms, signalling a possible inhibition of the motor simulation evoked by these words. These observations reveal the intimate relationship that exists between language and grasp and show that it is possible to elucidate online new aspects of sensorimotor interaction.

  9. Estimating thumb–index finger precision grip and manipulation potential in extant and fossil primates

    PubMed Central

    Feix, Thomas; Kivell, Tracy L.; Pouydebat, Emmanuelle; Dollar, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    Primates, and particularly humans, are characterized by superior manual dexterity compared with other mammals. However, drawing the biomechanical link between hand morphology/behaviour and functional capabilities in non-human primates and fossil taxa has been challenging. We present a kinematic model of thumb–index precision grip and manipulative movement based on bony hand morphology in a broad sample of extant primates and fossil hominins. The model reveals that both joint mobility and digit proportions (scaled to hand size) are critical for determining precision grip and manipulation potential, but that having either a long thumb or great joint mobility alone does not necessarily yield high precision manipulation. The results suggest even the oldest available fossil hominins may have shared comparable precision grip manipulation with modern humans. In particular, the predicted human-like precision manipulation of Australopithecus afarensis, approximately one million years before the first stone tools, supports controversial archaeological evidence of tool-use in this taxon. PMID:25878134

  10. Two cases of firearm grip impressions on the hands of suicide victims.

    PubMed

    Poulos, Christopher K; Peterson, Brian L

    2012-03-01

    Many factors are used to help distinguish firearm suicides from homicides and accidents, including range of fire, location of entrance defects, wound path trajectory, backspatter (blowback), and gunshot residue. Specifically, authors have discussed examination of the hands for backspatter, gunshot residue, cylinder gap effects, iron staining, and trauma as means of supporting a person having held a firearm while committing suicide. Here, we discuss 2 cases where suicidal gunshot wounds were accompanied by unique firearm grip impressions on the hands of the decedents. In 1 case, a "negative"[ impression of a grip pattern was left in a decedent's hand and in another case a grip pattern was left on the decedent's hand in dried blood. Such impressions can be used to provide support for establishing suicide as the manner of death. PMID:20661121

  11. Extraction of time and frequency features from grip force rates during dexterous manipulation.

    PubMed

    Mojtahedi, Keivan; Fu, Qiushi; Santello, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The time course of grip force from object contact to onset of manipulation has been extensively studied to gain insight into the underlying control mechanisms. Of particular interest to the motor neuroscience and clinical communities is the phenomenon of bell-shaped grip force rate (GFR) that has been interpreted as indicative of feedforward force control. However, this feature has not been assessed quantitatively. Furthermore, the time course of grip force may contain additional features that could provide insight into sensorimotor control processes. In this study, we addressed these questions by validating and applying two computational approaches to extract features from GFR in humans: 1) fitting a Gaussian function to GFR and quantifying the goodness of the fit [root-mean-square error, (RMSE)]; and 2) continuous wavelet transform (CWT), where we assessed the correlation of the GFR signal with a Mexican Hat function. Experiment 1 consisted of a classic pseudorandomized presentation of object mass (light or heavy), where grip forces developed to lift a mass heavier than expected are known to exhibit corrective responses. For Experiment 2, we applied our two techniques to analyze grip force exerted for manipulating an inverted T-shaped object whose center of mass was changed across blocks of consecutive trials. For both experiments, subjects were asked to grasp the object at either predetermined or self-selected grasp locations ("constrained" and "unconstrained" task, respectively). Experiment 1 successfully validated the use of RMSE and CWT as they correctly distinguished trials with versus without force corrective responses. RMSE and CWT also revealed that grip force is characterized by more feedback-driven corrections when grasping at self-selected contact points. Future work will examine the application of our analytical approaches to a broader range of tasks, e.g., assessment of recovery of sensorimotor function following clinical intervention, interlimb

  12. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Danielle Christine; Thomas, Scott Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip (HG) exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP) among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT) HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets) and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex) of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm) that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep research is a novel HG exercise strategy with enhanced accessibility by being easy to understand and simple to execute. The long-term training effectiveness of MINT as an exercise

  13. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool

    PubMed Central

    Bentley, Danielle Christine; Thomas, Scott Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip (HG) exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP) among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT) HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets) and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex) of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm) that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep research is a novel HG exercise strategy with enhanced accessibility by being easy to understand and simple to execute. The long-term training effectiveness of MINT as an exercise

  14. Fabric measurement along the NEEM ice core, Greenland, and comparison with GRIP and NGRIP ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, M.; Azuma, N.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Eichler, J.; Fujita, S.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Samyn, D.; Svensson, A.; Weikusat, I.

    2014-01-01

    Fabric (distribution of crystallographic orientations) profile along the full NEEM ice core, Greenland, is presented in this work. Data were measured in the field by an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer every 10 m, from 33 m down to 2461 m depth. The fabric evolves from a slightly anisotropic fabric at the top, toward a strong single maximum at about 2300 m, which is typical of a deformation pattern mostly driven by uniaxial compression and simple shearing. A sharp increase in the fabric strengthening is observed at the Holocene to Wisconsin climatic transition. A similar strengthening, toward an anisotropic single maximum-type fabric, has been observed in several ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, and can be attributed to a positive feedback between changes in ice viscosity at the climatic transition, and the impact of a shear component of stress. Centimeter scale abrupt texture (fabric and microstructure) variations are observed in the bottom part of the core. Their positions are in good agreement with the folding hypothesis used for a climatic reconstruction by Dahl-Jensen et al. (2013). Comparison is made to two others ice cores drilled along the same ridge; the GRIP ice core drilled at the summit of the ice sheet, and the NorthGRIP ice core, drilled 325 km to the NNW of the summit along the ridge, and 365 km upstream from NEEM. The fabric profile clearly reflects the increase in shear deformation when moving NW along the ridge from GRIP to NorthGRIP and NEEM. The difference in fabric profiles between NEEM and NorthGRIP also evidences a stronger lateral extension associated with a sharper ridge at NorthGRIP.

  15. Fabric measurement along the NEEM ice core, Greenland, and comparison with GRIP and NGRIP ice cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Dahl Jensen, Dorthe; Eichler, Jan; Fujita, Shuji; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Samyn, Denis; Svensson, Anders; Weikusat, Ilka

    2014-05-01

    Fabric (distribution of crystallographic orientations) profile along the full NEEM ice core, Greenland, is presented in this work. Data were measured in the field by an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer every 10 m, from 33 m down to 2461 m depth. The fabric evolves from a slightly anisotropic fabric at the top, toward a strong single maximum at about 2300 m, which is typical of a deformation pattern mostly driven by uniaxial compression and simple shearing. A sharp increase in the fabric strengthening is observed at the Holocene to Wisconsin climatic transition. A similar strengthening, toward an anisotropic single maximum-type fabric, has been observed in several ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, and can be attributed to a positive feedback between changes in ice viscosity at the climatic transition, and the impact of a shear component of stress. Centimeter scale abrupt texture (fabric and microstructure) variations are observed in the bottom part of the core. Their positions are in good agreement with the folding hypothesis used for a climatic reconstruction by Dahl-Jensen and co authors (2013). Comparison is made to two others ice cores drilled along the same ridge; the GRIP ice core drilled at the summit of the ice sheet, and the NorthGRIP ice core, drilled 325 km to the NNW of the summit along the ridge, and 365 km upstream from NEEM. The fabric profile clearly reflects the increase in shear deformation when moving NW along the ridge from GRIP to NorthGRIP and NEEM. The difference in fabric profiles between NEEM and NorthGRIP also evidences a stronger lateral extension associated with a sharper ridge at NorthGRIP. References: Dahl-Jensen, D. and 120 co-authors. Eemian interglacial reconstructed from a Greenland folded ice core, Nature, 493, 489-493, 2013.

  16. Relationship Between Grip and Pinch Strength and Activities of Daily Living in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung Hyun; Seo, Kyung Mook; Kim, Don-Kyu; Shin, Hyun Iee; Shin, Hye Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between grip and pinch strength and independence in activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients. Methods Medical records of 577 stroke patients from January 2010 to February 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' grip and pinch strength of both hemiplegic and non-hemiplegic hands and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) score were collected. These patients were divided into three groups: group A (onset duration: ≤3 months), group B (onset duration: >3 months and <2 years), and group C (onset duration: ≥2 years). The correlation between grip and pinch strength and the K-MBI score was analyzed. Results In group A (95 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of both hands in patients with right hemiplegia. Significant (p<0.05) correlation between the K-MBI score and the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand was shown in patients with left hemiplegia. In group B (69 patients) and group C (73 patients), the K-MBI score was significantly (p<0.05) correlated with the grip and pinch strength of the hemiplegic hand. Conclusion Stroke patients in subacute stage mainly performed activities of daily living using their dominant hand. However, independence in ADL was associated with the strength of the affected dominant hand. For stroke patients in chronic and late chronic stages, their hand power of the affected hand was associated with independence in ADL regardless whether the dominant hand was affected. PMID:26605173

  17. Grip-force modulation in multi-finger prehension during wrist flexion and extension

    PubMed Central

    Ambike, Satyajit S.; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    Extrinsic digit muscles contribute to both fingertip forces and wrist movements (FDP and FPL – flexion, EDC - extension). Hence it is expected that finger forces depend on the wrist movement and position. We investigated the relation between grip force and wrist kinematics to examine whether and how the force: (1) scales with wrist flexion-extension (FE) angle; (2) can be predicted from accelerations induced during FE movement. In one experiment subjects naturally held an instrumented handle using a prismatic grasp and performed very slow FE movements. In another experiment, the same movement was performed cyclically at three prescribed frequencies. In quasistatic conditions, the grip force remained constant over the majority of the wrist range of motion. During the cyclic movements, the grip force changed. The changes were described with a linear regression model that represents the thumb and virtual finger (VF = four fingers combined) normal forces as the sum of the effects of the object’s tangential and radial accelerations and an object-weight-dependent constant term. The model explained 99% of the variability in the data. The independence of the grip force from wrist position agrees with the theory that that the thumb and VF forces are controlled with two neural variables that encode referent coordinates for each digit while accounting for changes in the position dependence of muscle forces, rather than a single neural variable like referent aperture. The results of the cyclical movement study extend the principle of superposition (some complex actions can be decomposed into independently controlled elemental actions) for a motor task involving simultaneous grip force exertion and wrist motion with significant length changes of the grip-force producing muscles. PMID:23625077

  18. Grip-force modulation in multi-finger prehension during wrist flexion and extension.

    PubMed

    Ambike, Satyajit S; Paclet, Florent; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2013-06-01

    Extrinsic digit muscles contribute to both fingertip forces and wrist movements (FDP and FPL-flexion, EDC-extension). Hence, it is expected that finger forces depend on the wrist movement and position. We investigated the relation between grip force and wrist kinematics to examine whether and how the force (1) scales with wrist flexion-extension (FE) angle and (2) can be predicted from accelerations induced during FE movement. In one experiment, subjects naturally held an instrumented handle using a prismatic grasp and performed very slow FE movements. In another experiment, the same movement was performed cyclically at three prescribed frequencies. In quasistatic conditions, the grip force remained constant over the majority of the wrist range of motion. During the cyclic movements, the grip force changed. The changes were described with a linear regression model that represents the thumb and virtual finger (VF = four fingers combined) normal forces as the sum of the effects of the object's tangential and radial accelerations and an object-weight-dependent constant term. The model explained 99 % of the variability in the data. The independence of the grip force from wrist position agrees with the theory that the thumb and VF forces are controlled with two neural variables that encode referent coordinates for each digit while accounting for changes in the position dependence of muscle forces, rather than a single neural variable like referent aperture. The results of the cyclical movement study extend the principle of superposition (some complex actions can be decomposed into independently controlled elemental actions) for a motor task involving simultaneous grip-force exertion and wrist motion with significant length changes of the grip-force-producing muscles. PMID:23625077

  19. Maximal intermittent handgrip strategy: design and evaluation of an exercise protocol and a grip tool.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Danielle Christine; Thomas, Scott Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Handgrip (HG) exercise has been prescribed as a lifestyle intervention to successfully reduce resting blood pressure (BP) among heterogeneous groups of participants. Current HG protocols have limited accessibility due to complicated exercise prescriptions and sophisticated required equipment. Therefore, this research describes the design and evaluation of the maximal intermittent (MINT) HG exercise strategy, consisting of both a novel exercise protocol (32×5 seconds maximal grip squeezes separated by 5 seconds of rest between sets) and an original grip tool. This research was a multistep progressive design that included 51 postmenopausal women as participants in three separate research studies. Part 1 of this research focuses on the MINT exercise protocol. A literature-informed rationale for the design of the protocol is described. This includes exercise intensity, work-to-rest ratio, and total exercise duration with reference to the unique physiology (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex) of postmenopausal women. Subsequent experimental analyses of acute responses to the MINT protocol revealed that women produced 50% of their maximum grip force with moderate cardiovascular responses (increases of systolic BP: 41.6 mmHg, diastolic BP: 20.1 mmHg, heart rate: 35.1 bpm) that remained far below the thresholds of concern identified by the American College of Sports Medicine. Part 2 of this research describes the creation of a novel grip tool, beginning with a mixed-methods assessment of participant opinions regarding two distinct in-laboratory grip tools, leading to the creation of four prototype MINT tools. Structured focus groups revealed a strong preference for MINT prototype 1 for all tool design features, including color, shape, size, and foam grip. Collectively, the result of this multistep research is a novel HG exercise strategy with enhanced accessibility by being easy to understand and simple to execute. The long-term training effectiveness of MINT as an exercise

  20. Association between floating toe and toe grip strength in school age children: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka, Seishiro; Matsubara, Keisuke; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Matsushita, Tomofumi; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the association between floating toe and toe grip strength. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 635 Japanese children aged 9–11 years participated in this study. Floating toe was evaluated using footprint images, while toe grip strength was measured using a toe grip dynamometer. All 1,270 feet were classified into a floating toe group and a normal toe group according to visual evaluation of the footprint images. Intergroup differences in toe grip strength were analyzed using the unpaired t-test and logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, and Rohrer Index. [Results] There were 512 feet (40.3%) in the floating toe group. Mean toe grip strength of the feet with floating toe was significantly lower than that of normal feet (floating toe group, 12.9 ± 3.7 kg; normal toe group, 13.6 ± 4.1 kg). In addition, lower toe grip strength was associated with floating toe on logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, gender, and Rohrer Index (odds ratio, 0.954; 95% confidence interval, 0.925–0.984). [Conclusion] This study revealed that lower toe grip strength was significantly associated with floating toe. Therefore, increasing toe grip strength may play a role in preventing floating toe in school age children.

  1. Association between floating toe and toe grip strength in school age children: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka, Seishiro; Matsubara, Keisuke; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Matsushita, Tomofumi; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the association between floating toe and toe grip strength. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 635 Japanese children aged 9–11 years participated in this study. Floating toe was evaluated using footprint images, while toe grip strength was measured using a toe grip dynamometer. All 1,270 feet were classified into a floating toe group and a normal toe group according to visual evaluation of the footprint images. Intergroup differences in toe grip strength were analyzed using the unpaired t-test and logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, and Rohrer Index. [Results] There were 512 feet (40.3%) in the floating toe group. Mean toe grip strength of the feet with floating toe was significantly lower than that of normal feet (floating toe group, 12.9 ± 3.7 kg; normal toe group, 13.6 ± 4.1 kg). In addition, lower toe grip strength was associated with floating toe on logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, gender, and Rohrer Index (odds ratio, 0.954; 95% confidence interval, 0.925–0.984). [Conclusion] This study revealed that lower toe grip strength was significantly associated with floating toe. Therefore, increasing toe grip strength may play a role in preventing floating toe in school age children. PMID:27630423

  2. Association between floating toe and toe grip strength in school age children: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Seishiro; Matsubara, Keisuke; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Matsushita, Tomofumi; Fukumoto, Takahiko; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the association between floating toe and toe grip strength. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 635 Japanese children aged 9-11 years participated in this study. Floating toe was evaluated using footprint images, while toe grip strength was measured using a toe grip dynamometer. All 1,270 feet were classified into a floating toe group and a normal toe group according to visual evaluation of the footprint images. Intergroup differences in toe grip strength were analyzed using the unpaired t-test and logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, and Rohrer Index. [Results] There were 512 feet (40.3%) in the floating toe group. Mean toe grip strength of the feet with floating toe was significantly lower than that of normal feet (floating toe group, 12.9 ± 3.7 kg; normal toe group, 13.6 ± 4.1 kg). In addition, lower toe grip strength was associated with floating toe on logistic regression analysis after adjustment for age, gender, and Rohrer Index (odds ratio, 0.954; 95% confidence interval, 0.925-0.984). [Conclusion] This study revealed that lower toe grip strength was significantly associated with floating toe. Therefore, increasing toe grip strength may play a role in preventing floating toe in school age children. PMID:27630423

  3. An investigation of the association between grip strength and hip and knee joint moments in older adults.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Dinesh; Rowe, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Grip strength is a predictor of health outcomes but with differing rates of age-related decline in muscle strength, it is unclear whether handgrip is a reliable indicator of lower limb moments. This study investigated the relationship between grip strength and lower extremity moments in community-dwelling older adults. Eighty-two healthy volunteers aged 60-82 years (mean age 73.2 years) performed maximal voluntary contractions of knee and hip extensors and flexors at three positions and at neutral position for hip abductors and adductors using a custom-built dynamometer. Grip strength was measured using an electronic Jamar dynamometer. The relative reduction in muscle strength of 80s age category compared to 60-year-olds ranged from 14% for grip strength to 27% for hip abductors. Peak torque of flexors and extensors of the knee and hip joints were significantly correlated with grip strength and Pearson's correlation coefficients ranged from 0.56 to 0.78 with the highest correlations observed between knee moments and grip strength. "Good" correlation was found but only 31-60% of the variation in grip strength could be related to changes in joint torques. Hence the assumption that grip strength is an indicator of strength in the lower limb would seem unjustified in the healthy older adult.

  4. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade

    PubMed Central

    Gainey, Melanie A.; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up. PMID:26109571

  5. Role of movement velocity on the magnitude of grip force while lifting an object with touch from the contralateral finger.

    PubMed

    Iyengar, Veena; Santos, Marcio J; Aruin, Alexander S

    2009-04-01

    We investigated whether slower velocity of arm movement affects grip-force generation in conditions with the finger touch provided to the wrist of the target arm. Nine subjects performed the task of lifting and transporting an object at slow, intermediate, and fast velocities with a light finger touch from the contralateral arm and without it. There was an effect of velocity of arm movement on grip-force generation in both conditions. However, when the no touch and touch trials performed with similar velocity were matched, the effect of touch on grip-force reduction was statistically significant (p < .001). The observed decrease in grip force could not be explained by slower movement execution in the touch conditions and underlines the importance of using a contralateral touch in the performance of activities of daily living. It also points to a possibility of the development of therapeutic advances for the enhancement of grip-force control in patients with neurological impairments.

  6. Effect of grip type, wrist motion, and resistance level on pressures within the carpal tunnel of normal wrists.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; Fallentin, Nils; Andersen, Johan H; Keir, Peter J; Hansen, Torben B; Pransky, Glenn; Lin, Jia-Hua

    2014-04-01

    Elevated carpal tunnel pressure (CTP) has been associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. This study systematically evaluated the effect of wrist motion resistance and grip type on CTP during wrist motion typical of occupational tasks. CTP during four wrist motion patterns, with and without resistance, and with and without gripping, was measured in vivo in 14 healthy individuals. CTP measured during compound motions fell between that measured in the cardinal planes of wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Generally, with no active gripping there was little pressure change due to wrist angular displacement or resistance level. However, concurrent active pinch or power grip increased CTP particularly in motions including extension. CTP typically did not increase during wrist flexion, and in fact often decreased. Extension motions against resistance when employing a pinch or power grip increase CTP more than motions with flexion. Results could help inform design or modification of wrist motion intensive occupational tasks. © 2014 The Authors.

  7. Automated pressure map segmentation for quantifying phalangeal kinetics during cylindrical gripping.

    PubMed

    Sinsel, Erik W; Gloekler, Daniel S; Wimer, Bryan M; Warren, Christopher M; Wu, John Z; Buczek, Frank L

    2016-02-01

    Inverse dynamics models used to investigate musculoskeletal disorders associated with handle gripping require accurate phalangeal kinetics. Cylindrical handles wrapped with pressure film grids have been used in studies of gripping kinetics. We present a method fusing six degree-of-freedom hand kinematics and a kinematic calibration of a cylinder-wrapped pressure film. Phalanges are modeled as conic frusta and projected onto the pressure grid, automatically segmenting the pressure map into regions of interest (ROIs). To demonstrate the method, segmented pressure maps are presented from two subjects with substantially different hand length and body mass, gripping cylinders 50 and 70 mm in diameter. For each ROI, surface-normal force vectors were summed to create a reaction force vector and center of pressure location. Phalangeal force magnitudes for a data sample were similar to that reported in previous studies. To evaluate our method, a surrogate was designed for each handle such that when modeled as a phalanx it would generate a ROI around the cells under its supports; the classification F-score was above 0.95 for both handles. Both the human subject results and the surrogate evaluation suggest that the approach can be used to automatically segment the pressure map for quantifying phalangeal kinetics of the fingers during cylindrical gripping.

  8. The transcriptional coregulator GRIP1 controls macrophage polarization and metabolic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Coppo, Maddalena; Chinenov, Yurii; Sacta, Maria A.; Rogatsky, Inez

    2016-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity causes chronic macrophage-driven inflammation in white adipose tissue (WAT) leading to insulin resistance. WAT macrophages, however, differ in their origin, gene expression and activities: unlike infiltrating monocyte-derived inflammatory macrophages, WAT-resident macrophages counteract inflammation and insulin resistance, yet, the mechanisms underlying their transcriptional programming remain poorly understood. We recently reported that a nuclear receptor cofactor—glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-interacting protein (GRIP)1—cooperates with GR to repress inflammatory genes. Here, we show that GRIP1 facilitates macrophage programming in response to IL4 via a GR-independent pathway by serving as a coactivator for Kruppel-like factor (KLF)4—a driver of tissue-resident macrophage differentiation. Moreover, obese mice conditionally lacking GRIP1 in macrophages develop massive macrophage infiltration and inflammation in metabolic tissues, fatty livers, hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance recapitulating metabolic disease. Thus, GRIP1 is a critical regulator of immunometabolism, which engages distinct transcriptional mechanisms to coordinate the balance between macrophage populations and ultimately promote metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27464507

  9. Infants' grip strength predicts mu rhythm attenuation during observation of lifting actions with weighted blocks.

    PubMed

    Upshaw, Michaela B; Bernier, Raphael A; Sommerville, Jessica A

    2016-03-01

    Research has established that the body is fundamentally involved in perception: bodily experience influences activation of the shared neural system underlying action perception and production during action observation, and bodily characteristics influence perception of the spatial environment. However, whether bodily characteristics influence action perception and its underlying neural system is unknown, particularly in early ontogeny. We measured grip strength in 12-month-old infants and investigated relations with mu rhythm attenuation, an electroencephalographic correlate of the neural system underlying action perception, during observation of lifting actions performed with differently weighted blocks. We found that infants with higher grip strength exhibited significant mu attenuation during observation of lifting actions, whereas infants with lower grip strength did not. Moreover, a progressively strong relation between grip strength and mu attenuation during observation of lifts was found with increased block weight. We propose that this relation is attributable to differences in infants' ability to recognize the effort associated with lifting objects of different weights, as a consequence of their developing strength. Together, our results extend the body's role in perception by demonstrating that bodily characteristics influence action perception by shaping the activation of its underlying neural system.

  10. Precision Grip in Congenital and Acquired Hemiparesis: Similarities in Impairments and Implications for Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Gordon, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with congenital and acquired hemiparesis incur long-term functional deficits, among which the loss of prehension that may impact their functional independence. Identifying, understanding, and comparing the underlying mechanisms of prehension impairments represent an opportunity to better adapt neurorehabilitation. Objective: The present review aims to provide a better understanding of precision grip deficits in congenital and acquired hemiparesis and to determine whether the severity and type of fine motor control impairments depend on whether or not the lesions are congenital or acquired in adulthood. Methods: Using combinations of the following key words: fingertip force, grip force, precision grip, cerebral palsy, stroke, PubMed, and Scopus databases were used to search studies from 1984 to 2013. Results: Individuals with both congenital and acquired hemiparesis were able to some extent to use anticipatory motor control in precision grip tasks, even if this control was impaired in the paretic hand. In both congenital and acquired hemiparesis, the ability to plan efficient anticipatory motor control when the less-affected hand is used provides a possibility to remediate impairments in anticipatory motor control of the paretic hand. Conclusion: Surprisingly, we observed very few differences between the results of studies in children with congenital hemiplegia and stroke patients. We suggest that the underlying specific strategies of neurorehabilitation developed for each one could benefit the other. PMID:25071502

  11. The transcriptional coregulator GRIP1 controls macrophage polarization and metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Coppo, Maddalena; Chinenov, Yurii; Sacta, Maria A; Rogatsky, Inez

    2016-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity causes chronic macrophage-driven inflammation in white adipose tissue (WAT) leading to insulin resistance. WAT macrophages, however, differ in their origin, gene expression and activities: unlike infiltrating monocyte-derived inflammatory macrophages, WAT-resident macrophages counteract inflammation and insulin resistance, yet, the mechanisms underlying their transcriptional programming remain poorly understood. We recently reported that a nuclear receptor cofactor-glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-interacting protein (GRIP)1-cooperates with GR to repress inflammatory genes. Here, we show that GRIP1 facilitates macrophage programming in response to IL4 via a GR-independent pathway by serving as a coactivator for Kruppel-like factor (KLF)4-a driver of tissue-resident macrophage differentiation. Moreover, obese mice conditionally lacking GRIP1 in macrophages develop massive macrophage infiltration and inflammation in metabolic tissues, fatty livers, hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance recapitulating metabolic disease. Thus, GRIP1 is a critical regulator of immunometabolism, which engages distinct transcriptional mechanisms to coordinate the balance between macrophage populations and ultimately promote metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27464507

  12. Grip Force Control Is Dependent on Task Constraints in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Sui-Heung; Lo, Sing Kai; Chow, Susanna; Cheing, Gladys L.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive grip force (GF) is often found in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). However, their GF control may vary when task constraints are imposed upon their motor performance. This study aimed to investigate how their GF control changes in response to task demands, and to examine their tactile sensitivity. Twenty-one…

  13. How Predictive Is Grip Force Control in the Complete Absence of Somatosensory Feedback?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak, Dennis A.; Glasauer, Stefan; Hermsdorfer, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    Grip force control relies on accurate internal models of the dynamics of our motor system and the external objects we manipulate. Internal models are not fixed entities, but rather are trained and updated by sensory experience. Sensory feedback signals relevant object properties and mechanical events, e.g. at the skin-object interface, to modify…

  14. Motor command for precision grip in the macaque monkey can be mediated by spinal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Alstermark, B; Pettersson, L G; Nishimura, Y; Yoshino-Saito, K; Tsuboi, F; Takahashi, M; Isa, T

    2011-07-01

    In motor control, the general view is still that spinal interneurons mainly contribute to reflexes and automatic movements. The question raised here is whether spinal interneurons can mediate the cortical command for independent finger movements, like a precision grip between the thumb and index finger in the macaque monkey, or if this function depends exclusively on a direct corticomotoneuronal pathway. This study is a followup of a previous report (Sasaki et al. J Neurophysiol 92: 3142-3147, 2004) in which we trained macaque monkeys to pick a small piece of sweet potato from a cylinder by a precision grip between the index finger and thumb. We have now isolated one spinal interneuronal system, the C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons with projection to hand and arm motoneurons. In the previous study, the lateral corticospinal tract (CST) was interrupted in C4/C5 (input intact to the C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons), and in this study, the CST was interrupted in C2 (input abolished). The precision grip could be performed within the first 15 days after a CST lesion in C4/C5 but not in C2. We conclude that C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons also can carry the command for precision grip. PMID:21511706

  15. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512—Typical...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512—Typical...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 5 to Part 1512 - Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Typical Handbrake Actuator Showing Grip Dimension 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 5 Figure 5 to Part 1512—Typical...

  18. Earthquakes and Ice Cores Point to Wet Feet at the NorthGRIP Deep Drill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl-Jensen, D.; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Gundestrup, N. S.

    2001-12-01

    A seismic broadband station was placed at the NorthGRIP deep drill site (75N, 42W) on the Greenland Ice Cap for the summer 2000. During the 2 month acquisition period 15 earthquakes with sufficient quality for Receiver Function analysis aimed at crust and mantle structure under NorthGRIP were recorded. The models are consistent with the presence of a thin sedimentary layer at the base of the ice. The seismic velocities in the sediments are lower than in the ice, indicating wet sediments. The results from the deep drilling program reveal high basal temperatures at the base of the 3080 m thick ice at NorthGRIP. The measured temperatures and the observed layer thickness' in the ice core indicate that there is basal melting of the order of 5 mm /yr. and that the geothermal heatflow is of the order of 100 mW/m2 (REF), much higher than expected. A detailed radio echo mapping of the bedrock show that NorthGRIP is located in a large, flat-bottomed valley, suggesting that the sediments observed are lacustrine. The thin layer of sediments cannot account for the unexpected high heatflow causing equally unexpected basal melting. The geology is presumed to be Precambrian. Heatflow determined in a similar way at the GRIP deep drill site (73N, 38W) is 51 mW/ m2 (Dahl-Jensen et al, 1998), more in line with expected values. Magnetic anomaly data do not indicate any volcanic structures, which could help explain the high heatflow. Gravity anomaly data show that NorthGRIP is located at the edge of marked gravity discontinuity. The cause of the discontinuity is not known, but "edge effects" could be speculated upon to be the cause of the high heatflow. D. Dahl-Jensen, N. Gundestrup, H. Miller, O. Watanabe, S.J. Johnsen, J.P. Steffensen, H.B. Clausen, A. Svensson, L.B. Larsen in press: The NorthGRIP drilling program. Annals of Glaciology, vol 35 D. Dahl-Jensen, K Mosegaard, N. Grundestrup, G.D. Clow, S.J. Johnson and N. Balling 1998: Past Temperatures Directly from the Greenland Ice

  19. Relation between hand grip strength, respiratory muscle strength and spirometric measures in male nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Asli; Ozkaya, Hilal; Tufan, Fatih; Akpinar, Timur Selçuk; Akin, Sibel; Bahat, Zumrut; Kaya, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Erten, Nilgün; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2014-09-01

    Adverse-outcomes related to sarcopenia are mostly mentioned as physical disability. As the other skeletal muscles, respiratory muscles may also be affected by sarcopenia. Respiratory muscle strength is known to affect pulmonary functions. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relations between extremity muscle strength, respiratory muscle strengths and spirometric measures in a group of male nursing home residents. Among a total of 104 male residents, residents with obstructive measures were excluded and final study population was composed of 62 residents. Mean age was 70.5 ± 6.7 years, body mass index: 27.7 ± 5.3 kg/m2 and dominant hand grip strength: 29.7 ± 6.5 kg. Hand grip strength was positively correlated with maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) (r = 0.35, p < 0.01 and r = 0.26, p < 0.05, respectively). In regression analysis, the only factor related to MIP was hand grip strength; among spirometric measures only parameter significantly related to grip strength was peak cough flow (PCF). The association of PCF with grip strength disappeared when MIP alone or "MIP and MEP" were included in the regression analysis. In the latter case, PCF was significantly associated only with MIP. We found peripheric muscle strength be associated with MIP and PCF but not with MEP or any other spirometric parameters. The relation between peripheral muscle strength and PCF was mediated by MIP. Our findings suggest that sarcopenia may affect inspiratory muscle strength earlier or more than the expiratory muscle strength. Sarcopenia may cause decrease in PCF in the elderly, which may stand for some common adverse respiratory complications.

  20. An electromyographic study of the effect of hand grip sizes on forearm muscle activity and golf performance.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Hunter, Henry H; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike Chris

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the differences in surface electromyography (EMG) activity of two forearm muscles in the lead and trail arm at specific phases of the golf swing using a 7-iron with three different grip sizes among amateur and professional golfers. Fifteen right-handed male golfers performed five golf swings using golf clubs with three different grip sizes. Surface EMG was used to measure muscle activity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) on both forearms. There were no significant differences in forearm muscle activity when using the three golf grips within the group of 15 golfers (p > 0.05). When using the undersize grip, club head speed significantly increased (p = 0.044). During the backswing and downswing phases, amateurs produced significantly greater forearm muscle activity with all three grip sizes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, forearm muscle activity is not affected by grip sizes. However, club head speed increases when using undersize grips. PMID:27267082

  1. An electromyographic study of the effect of hand grip sizes on forearm muscle activity and golf performance.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Hunter, Henry H; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike Chris

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the differences in surface electromyography (EMG) activity of two forearm muscles in the lead and trail arm at specific phases of the golf swing using a 7-iron with three different grip sizes among amateur and professional golfers. Fifteen right-handed male golfers performed five golf swings using golf clubs with three different grip sizes. Surface EMG was used to measure muscle activity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) on both forearms. There were no significant differences in forearm muscle activity when using the three golf grips within the group of 15 golfers (p > 0.05). When using the undersize grip, club head speed significantly increased (p = 0.044). During the backswing and downswing phases, amateurs produced significantly greater forearm muscle activity with all three grip sizes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, forearm muscle activity is not affected by grip sizes. However, club head speed increases when using undersize grips.

  2. Hand grip strength and associated factors in non-institutionalised men and women 50 years and older in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the prevalence, predictors and gender differences in hand grip strength of older adults in Africa. This study aims to investigate social and health differences in hand grip strength among older adults in a national probability sample of older South Africans who participated in the Study of Global Ageing and Adults Health (SAGE wave 1) in 2008. Methods We conducted a national population-based cross-sectional study with a sample of 3840 men and women aged 50 years or older in South Africa. The questionnaire included socio-demographic characteristics, health variables, and anthropometric measurements. Linear multivariate regression analysis was performed to assess the association of social factors, health variables and grip strength. Results The mean overall hand grip strength was 37.9 kgs for men (mean age 61.1 years, SD = 9.1) and 31.5 kgs for women (mean age 62.0 years, SD = 9.7). In multivariate analysis among men, greater height, not being underweight and lower functional disability was associated with greater grip strength, and among women, greater height, better cognitive functioning, and lower functional disability were associated with greater grip strength. Conclusions Greater height and lower functional disability were found for both older South African men and women to be significantly associated with grip strength. PMID:24393403

  3. The relationship between hand anthropometrics, total grip strength and individual finger force for various handle shapes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Ku; Kim, Dae-Min

    2015-01-01

    The design and shape of hand tool handles are critical factors for preventing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) caused by the use of hand tools. We explored how these factors are related to total force and individual finger force in males and females with various hand anthropometrics. Using the MFFM system, we assessed four indices of anthropometry, and measured total force and individual finger force on various handle designs and shapes. Both total force and individual finger force were significant according to gender and handle shape. Total grip strength to the handle shape indicated the greatest strength with D shape and the least with A shape. From the regression analysis of hand anthropometric indices, the value of R was respectably high at 0.608-0.696. The current study examined the gender and handle shape factors affecting grip strength based on the force measurements from various handle types, in terms of influence on different hand anthropometric indices.

  4. Coefficient of variation in maximal and feigned static and dynamic grip efforts.

    PubMed

    Dvir, Z

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of the coefficient of variation as an identifier of feigned grip effort. Seventeen healthy female aged 20 to 25 yr participated in the study. Maximal and feigned efforts were measured isometrically and isokinetically (concentric and eccentric) using the Jamar and KinCom dynamometers, respectively. Findings indicated that, in all situations, the coefficient of variation derived from the maximal effort was significantly (P < 0.0001) lower than that derived from the feigned effort. However, the extent of overlapping between the two was sufficiently large to render the test sensitivities very low. Consequently, regardless of the measurement method, the coefficient of variation is not a valid tool for identifying feigned grip effort in healthy subjects.

  5. The relationship between hand anthropometrics, total grip strength and individual finger force for various handle shapes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yong-Ku; Kim, Dae-Min

    2015-01-01

    The design and shape of hand tool handles are critical factors for preventing musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) caused by the use of hand tools. We explored how these factors are related to total force and individual finger force in males and females with various hand anthropometrics. Using the MFFM system, we assessed four indices of anthropometry, and measured total force and individual finger force on various handle designs and shapes. Both total force and individual finger force were significant according to gender and handle shape. Total grip strength to the handle shape indicated the greatest strength with D shape and the least with A shape. From the regression analysis of hand anthropometric indices, the value of R was respectably high at 0.608-0.696. The current study examined the gender and handle shape factors affecting grip strength based on the force measurements from various handle types, in terms of influence on different hand anthropometric indices. PMID:26323777

  6. Influence of vision and posture on grip-lift task parameters in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Dispa, Delphine; Tourbach, Catherine; Thonnard, Jean-Louis; Lejeune, Thierry

    2014-12-01

    The grip-lift task enables a quantitative assessment of grasping ability. Patients are regularly assessed in a supine position, which offers a different view of the grasped object from that in the sitting position. To our knowledge, no data are currently available on the influence of posture and vision on grip-lift task parameters. We therefore aimed to determine the effects of posture and vision on these parameters. Twenty-six healthy right-handed adults performed grip-lift tasks with a manipulandum that measured different temporal and dynamic parameters in four conditions: sitting eyes open, sitting blindfolded, lying down eyes open and lying down blindfolded. A repeated-measures analysis of variance with two factors (vision and position) showed that the absence of vision affected all the parameters measured. The lying down position increased the time between the first contact with the object and the modification of the vertical force as well as the delay between the first increase of the horizontal force and the increase of the vertical force. In addition, there was a lower adaption of the horizontal force, required to squeeze the object, to the vertical force. Finally, the interaction of position and vision was associated with significant differences in the delay between the contact of each digit with the object, the maximum horizontal force and the ratio between the horizontal and vertical force during a static holding period. Both position and vision appear to affect the grip-lift task. Consequently, sequential assessments should be performed in the same condition to obtain reliable data.

  7. Serotonergic-postsynaptic receptors modulate gripping-induced immobility episodes in male taiep rats.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, José R; Cortés, M C; Ita, M L

    2009-09-01

    The Taiep rat is a myelin mutant with a motor syndrome characterized by tremor, ataxia, immobility, epilepsy, and paralysis. The rat shows a hypomyelination followed by a progressive demyelination. During immobilities taiep rats show a REM-like sleep pattern and a disorganized sleep-wake pattern suggesting taiep rats as a model of narcolepsy-cataplexy. Our study analyzed the role of postsynaptic serotonin receptors in the expression of gripping-induced immobility episodes (IEs) in 8-month-old male taiep rats. The specific postsynaptic serotonin agonist +/-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (+/-DOI) decreased the frequency of gripping-induced IEs, but that was not the case with alpha-methyl-serotonin maleate (alpha-methyl-5HT), a nonspecific postsynaptic agonist. Although the serotonin antagonists, ketanserine and metergoline, produced a biphasic effect, first a decrease followed by an increase with higher doses, similar effects were obtained with a mean duration of gripping-induced IEs. These findings correlate with the pharmacological observations in narcoleptic dogs and humans in which serotonin-reuptake inhibitors improve cataplexy, particularly in long-term treatment that could change the serotonin receptor levels. Polysomnographic recordings showed an increase in the awakening time and a decrease in the slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep concomitant with a decrease in immobilities after use of +/-DOI, this being stronger with the highest dose. Taken together, our results show that postsynaptic serotonin receptors are involved in the modulation in gripping-induced IEs caused by the changes in the organization of the sleep-wake cycle in taiep rats. It is possible that specific agonists, without side effects, could be a useful treatment in human narcoleptic patients. PMID:19484723

  8. Substrate diameter and compliance affect the gripping strategies and locomotor mode of climbing boa constrictors.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, Greg; Jayne, Bruce C

    2010-12-15

    Arboreal habitats pose unique challenges for locomotion as a result of their narrow cylindrical surfaces and discontinuities between branches. Decreased diameter of branches increases compliance, which can pose additional challenges, including effects on stability and energy damping. However, the combined effects of substrate diameter and compliance are poorly understood for any animal. We quantified performance, kinematics and substrate deformation while boa constrictors (Boa constrictor) climbed vertical ropes with three diameters (3, 6 and 9 mm) and four tensions (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 body weights). Mean forward velocity decreased significantly with both decreased diameter and increased compliance. Both diameter and compliance had numerous effects on locomotor kinematics, but diameter had larger and more pervasive effects than compliance. Locomotion on the largest diameter had a larger forward excursion per cycle, and the locomotor mode and gripping strategy differed from that on the smaller diameters. On larger diameters, snakes primarily applied opposing forces at the same location on the rope to grip. By contrast, on smaller diameters forces were applied in opposite directions at different locations along the rope, resulting in increased rope deformation. Although energy is likely to be lost during deformation, snakes might use increased surface deformation as a strategy to enhance their ability to grip.

  9. Flash Detection Efficiencies of Long Range Lightning Detection Networks During GRIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Bateman, Monte G.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    We flew our Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) on the NASA Global Hawk as a part of the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field program. The GRIP program was a NASA Earth science field experiment during the months of August and September, 2010. During the program, the LIP detected lighting from 48 of the 213 of the storms overflown by the Global Hawk. The time and location of tagged LIP flashes can be used as a "ground truth" dataset for checking the detection efficiency of the various long or extended range ground-based lightning detection systems available during the GRIP program. The systems analyzed included Vaisala Long Range (LR), Vaisala GLD360, the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), and the Earth Networks Total Lightning Network (ENTLN). The long term goal of our research is to help understand the advantages and limitations of these systems so that we can utilize them for both proxy data applications and cross sensor validation of the GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) sensor when it is launched in the 2015 timeframe.

  10. Effect of vibrating steering on grip strength in heavy vehicle drivers.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, A

    1991-06-01

    The grip strength in both hands of thirty-two heavy vehicle drivers and twenty-two nondrivers ranging from 30 to 60 years of age was investigated. Blood pressure, heart rate and other physical parameters were also investigated. The subjects were drawn at random from the employees of the North Bengal State Transport Corporation and Civil Aviation. Heavy vehicle drivers perform their duties 8 hr per day with an average speed of 60-70 km hour for 4-5 hr of continuous driving at a time. The only significant difference in the physical characteristics of heavy vehicle drivers and nondrivers was their body weight (p less than 0.05). The right and left wrist power of heavy vehicle drivers was respectively 6% and 3% higher than that of nondrivers. The mean blood pressure, heart rate and wrist width were found to be almost same in heavy vehicle drivers and nondrivers. From our studies we concluded that vibrating steering probably has no influence on the grip strength and that performing 8 hr of driving daily does not affect the blood pressure and heart rate in heavy vehicle drivers. However, further studies are needed to determine the influence of vibrating steering on grip strength.

  11. The Great Lakes Runoff Intercomparison Project (GRIP): Phase II, Lake Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronewold, A.; Tolson, B.; Gaborit, E.; Fortin, V.; Fry, L. M.; Hunter, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Great Lakes runoff intercomparison project (GRIP) was established to assess a suite of models used primarily for simulating and forecasting flows from all of the major tributaries within the Great Lakes basin. These models are somewhat unique, in part because they were developed to overcome challenges of assimilating data across an international border, and in part because they are often an integral component of regional water budget models that also include simulations of over-lake precipitation and over-lake evaporation (both of which are, on annual time scales, of the same magnitude as runoff). Here, we present the next step in the evolution of GRIP (following GRIP-M, the first phase of the project that focused on Lake Michigan) with a comparison between different hydrological models (including GR4J and the NOAA large basin runoff model) and different regional precipitation data sources across the Lake Ontario basin. Results of our analysis provide insights that underscore the importance of the spatial and temporal resolution of a model domain and its forcings, along with their connections to model skill and selected objective criteria. Perhaps more importantly, our results are expected to assist in the advancement of regional hydrological models not only for improved forecasts of the Great Lakes water cycle, but in other large international freshwater basins as well.

  12. Observations During GRIP from HIRAD: Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Jones, L.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Bailey, M. C.; Buckley, C. D.; Simmons, D. E.; Johnstone, S.; Peterson, A.; Schultz, L. A.; Biewas, S.; Johnson, J. W.; Shah, G.; Feingstein, D.; Cleveland, W. H.; Johnson, J.; Hood, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    HIRAD (Hurricane Imaging Radiometer) flew on the WB-57 during NASA's GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be inferred. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years. The advantage of HIRAD over SFMR is that HIRAD can observe a +/- 60-degree swath, rather than a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. To the extent possible, comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  13. Role of stag beetle jaw bending and torsion in grip on rivals.

    PubMed

    Goyens, Jana; Dirckx, Joris; Piessen, Maxim; Aerts, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In aggressive battles, the extremely large male stag beetle jaws have to withstand strongly elevated bite forces. We found several adaptations of the male Cyclommatus metallifer jaw morphology for enhanced robustness that conspecific females lack. As a result, males improve their grip on opponents and they maintain their safety factor (5.2-7.2) at the same level as that of females (6.8), despite their strongly elevated bite muscle force (3.9 times stronger). Males have a higher second moment of area and torsion constant than females, owing to an enhanced cross-sectional area and shape. These parameters also increase faster with increasing bending moment towards the jaw base in males than in females. Male jaws are more bending resistant against the bite reaction force than against perpendicular forces (which remain lower in battles). Because of the triangular cross section of the male jaw base, it twists more easily than it bends. This torsional flexibility creates a safety system against overload that, at the same time, secures a firm grip on rivals. We found no structural mechanical function of the large teeth halfway along the male jaws. Therefore, it appears that the main purpose of these teeth is a further improvement of grip on rivals.

  14. The Association of Levels of and Decline in Grip Strength in Old Age with Trajectories of Life Course Occupational Position

    PubMed Central

    Fritzell, Johan; Hoffmann, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Background The study of the influence of life course occupational position (OP) on health in old age demands analysis of time patterns in both OP and health. We study associations between life course time patterns of OP and decline in grip strength in old age. Methods We analyze 5 waves from the Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe (n = 5108, ages 65–90). We use a pattern-mixture latent growth model to predict the level and decline in grip strength in old age by trajectory of life course OP. We extend and generalize the structured regression approach to establish the explanatory power of different life course models for both the level and decline of grip strength. Results Grip strength declined linearly by 0.70 kg (95% CI -0.74;-0.66) for men and 0.42 kg (95% CI -0.45;-0.39) for women per year. The level of men’s grip strength can best be explained by a critical period during midlife, with those exposed to low OP during this period having 1.67 kg (95% CI -2.33;-1.00) less grip strength. These differences remain constant over age. For women, no association between OP and levels of or decline in grip strength was found. Conclusions Men’s OP in midlife seems to be a critical period for the level of grip strength in old age. Inequalities remain constant over age. The integration of the structured regression approach and latent growth modelling offers new possibilities for life course epidemiology. PMID:27232696

  15. Assessment of grip strength with the modified sphygmomanometer test: association between upper limb global strength and motor function

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Júlia C.; Aguiar, Larissa T.; Lara, Eliza M.; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F.; Faria, Christina D. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Grip strength, commonly evaluated with the handgrip dynamometer, is a good indicator of upper limb (UL) function in stroke subjects and may reflect the global strength deficits of the whole paretic UL. The Modified Sphygmomanometer Test (MST) also provides objective and adequate measures at low-cost. Objective: To assess whether grip strength values obtained by using the MST and those obtained by using a handgrip dynamometer would present similar correlations with the global strength and motor function of the paretic UL in subjects with stroke, both in the subacute and chronic phases. Method: Measures of grip strength (MST and handgrip dynamometer), UL global strength (MST and hand-held dynamometer), and UL motor function (Fugl-Meyer motor assessment scale) were obtained with 33 subacute and 44 chronic stroke subjects. Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated and Stepwise multiple regression analyses were performed to investigate predictor variables of grip strength (α=0.05). Results: Significant correlations of similar magnitude were found between measures of global strength of the paretic UL and grip strength assessed with both the MST (0.66≤r≤0.78) and handgrip dynamometer (0.66≤r≤0.78) and between UL motor function and grip strength assessed with both the MST (0.50≤rs≤0.51) and hand-held dynamometer (0.50≤rs≤0.63) in subacute and chronic stroke subjects. Only global strength remained as a significant predictor variable of grip strength for the MST (0.43≤R2≤0.61) and for the handgrip dynamometer (0.44≤R2≤0.61) for both stroke subgroups. Conclusion: Grip strength assessed with the MST could be used to report paretic UL global strength. PMID:26647752

  16. In vivo bite and grip forces, morphology and prey-killing behavior of North American accipiters (Accipitridae) and falcons (Falconidae).

    PubMed

    Sustaita, Diego; Hertel, Fritz

    2010-08-01

    Raptors exhibit a diversity of strategies to procure their prey but ultimately kill using their beaks and/or talons. Thus, bite and grip forces are ecologically important variables that have direct survival implications. Whereas hawks rely primarily on their feet for killing prey, falcons tend to employ their beaks. Consequently, falcons are expected to achieve relatively greater bite forces, and hawks are expected to generate relatively greater grip forces. Force estimates predicted from musculoskeletal morphology in a previous study indicated that falcons (Falco spp.) possess greater jaw force capabilities than accipiters (Accipiter spp.) but there were no clear differences in predicted grip-force capacity outside of differences in scaling. The objective of this study was to complement those results with measurements of in vivo forces by inducing captive and wild accipiters and falcons to bite and grasp force transducers. Bite force increased isometrically in both groups whereas grip force tended toward positive allometry. After adjusting for body mass, falcons produced greater bite forces, and accipiters produced greater grip forces. Thus, previous anatomical estimates of forces predicted the expected direction and magnitude of differences in bite forces but the overall greater in vivo grip forces of accipiters deviated from the pattern obtained from biomechanical estimates. Although the scaling relationships were similar between data sets, forces generated by live birds were consistently lower than those predicted from biomechanics. Estimated and in vivo jaw and digital forces were nevertheless correlated, and therefore provide an important link between morphology and killing behavior in these raptors.

  17. The interdigital brace and other grips for termite nest perforation by chimpanzees of the Goualougo Triangle, Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Lesnik, Julie J; Sanz, Crickette M; Morgan, David B

    2015-06-01

    Studies of chimpanzee termite foraging enlighten our understanding of early hominin tool use not only by modeling the cognitive ability of our ancestors but also by emphasizing the possible role of social insects in the hominin diet. The chimpanzees of the Goualougo Triangle are known to have one of the largest and most complex tool repertoires reported for wild chimpanzees. One tool set habitually used by this population includes a perforating tool to penetrate the hard outer crust of elevated termite nests before fishing for termite prey with an herbaceous stem. Here, we report the variation present in the grips used on the perforating tool. Our analysis of video recordings of chimpanzee visitation to termite nests over a 3-year period shows that these chimpanzees use a variety of grips to navigate the challenges encountered in opening a termite nest. For situations in which the soil is most hardened, perforating requires force and a power grip is often used. When the soil in the passageway is loose, precision grips are suitable for the task. One of the preferred grips reported here is an interdigital brace, which has previously been described in studies of how some people hold a pencil. In this study, for the first time, the interdigital brace has been thoroughly described for chimpanzees. The various strategies and grips used during perforation emphasize the importance of termites as a nutritional resource that should be considered more strongly as a food used by early hominins. PMID:25916822

  18. Relationship Between Grip, Pinch Strengths and Anthropometric Variables, Types of Pitch Throwing Among Japanese High School Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Tajika, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Shitara, Hitoshi; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Okura, Chisa; Kanazawa, Saeko; Nagai, Ayako; Takagishi, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Grip and pinch strength are crucially important attributes and standard parameters related to the functional integrity of the hand. It seems significant to investigate normative data for grip and pinch strength of baseball players to evaluate their performance and condition. Nevertheless, few reports have explained the association between grip and pinch strength and anthropometric variables and types of pitch throwing for baseball pitchers. Objectives: The aim of this study was to measure and evaluate clinical normative data for grip and tip, key, palmar pinch strength and to assess the relationship between these data and anthropometric variables and types of pitch throwing among Japanese high-school baseball pitchers. Materials and Methods: One hundred-thirty three healthy high school baseball pitchers were examined and had completed a self-administered questionnaire including items related to age, hand dominance, throwing ratio of type of pitch. A digital dynamometer was used to measure grip strength and a pinch gauge to measure tip, key and palmer pinch in both dominant and nondominant side. Body composition was measured by the multi frequency segmental body composition analyzer. Results: Grip strength and tip and palmer pinch strength in dominant side were statistically greater than them in nondominant side (P < 0.05). There were significant associations between grip strength and height (r = 0.33, P < 0.001), body mass (r = 0.50, P < 0.001), BMI (r = 0.37, P < 0.001), muscle mass of upper extremity (r = 0.56, P < 0.001), fat free mass (r = 0.57, P < 0.001), fat mass (r = 0.22, P < 0.05) in dominant side. A stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that fat free mass and tip, palmer, key pinch strength were predictors of grip strength in dominant side. No statistical significant correlations were found between the throwing ratio of types of pitches thrown and grip strength and tip, key, palmar pinch strength. Conclusions: Our result provides

  19. Functional Corticospinal Projections from Human Supplementary Motor Area Revealed by Corticomuscular Coherence during Precise Grip Force Control

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sophie; Entakli, Jonathan; Bonnard, Mireille; Berton, Eric; De Graaf, Jozina B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether corticospinal projections from human supplementary motor area (SMA) are functional during precise force control with the precision grip (thumb-index opposition). Since beta band corticomuscular coherence (CMC) is well-accepted to reflect efferent corticospinal transmission, we analyzed the beta band CMC obtained with simultaneous recording of electroencephalographic (EEG) and electromyographic (EMG) signals. Subjects performed a bimanual precise visuomotor force tracking task by applying isometric low grip forces with their right hand precision grip on a custom device with strain gauges. Concurrently, they held the device with their left hand precision grip, producing similar grip forces but without any precision constraints, to relieve the right hand. Some subjects also participated in a unimanual control condition in which they performed the task with only the right hand precision grip while the device was held by a mechanical grip. We analyzed whole scalp topographies of beta band CMC between 64 EEG channels and 4 EMG intrinsic hand muscles, 2 for each hand. To compare the different topographies, we performed non-parametric statistical tests based on spatio-spectral clustering. For the right hand, we obtained significant beta band CMC over the contralateral M1 region as well as over the SMA region during static force contraction periods. For the left hand, however, beta band CMC was only found over the contralateral M1. By comparing unimanual and bimanual conditions for right hand muscles, no significant difference was found on beta band CMC over M1 and SMA. We conclude that the beta band CMC found over SMA for right hand muscles results from the precision constraints and not from the bimanual aspect of the task. The result of the present study strongly suggests that the corticospinal projections from human SMA become functional when high precision force control is required. PMID:23555945

  20. Gloss, colour and grip: multifunctional epidermal cell shapes in bee- and bird-pollinated flowers.

    PubMed

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower-visitors.

  1. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Duncan, Nicole A.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Zoglauer, Andreas C.; Smith, David M.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark S.; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2012-01-01

    The balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from approximately 20 keV to greater than approximately 10 MeV. GRIPS will address questions raised by recent solar flare observations regarding particle acceleration and energy release, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution of less than 0.1 cubic millimeter. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-centimeter thick tungsten alloy slit/slat grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 millimeters. The MPRM is situated 8 meters from the spectrometer to provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e., as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS is scheduled for a continental-US engineering test flight in fall 2013, followed by long or ultra-long duration balloon flights in Antarctica.

  2. First flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Shih, Albert Y.; Duncan, Nicole; Bain, Hazel; Maruca, Bennett A.; Kelley, Nicole; Godbole, Niharika; Kaufmann, Pierre; Caspi, Amir; Sample, John; Hoberman, Jane; Mochizuki, Brent; Olson, Jerry; Boggs, Steven E.; Zoglauer, Andreas; Hurford, Gordon J.; Smith, David M.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) high altitude balloon payload was successfully flown in January 2016 from Antarctica (Jan 19 to Jan 30).GRIPS provides a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma ray/hard X-ray emissions from ~20 keV to >~10 MeV. GRIPS’s goal is to address questions raised by recent solar flare observations regarding particle acceleration and energy release, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of six 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution <0.1 mm3. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-cm thick tungsten alloy slit/slat grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 mm. The MPRM is situated 8 meters from the spectrometer to provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs, with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS was also equipped with active BGO shields, and three piggy-back instruments: a solar terahertz radiometer (Solar-T), a hard X-ray spectrometer (SMASH), and a sonic anemometer (TILDAE).We will present an overview of GRIPS's first flight, the performance of its instruments and subsystems, including the solar pointing and aspect systems, and

  3. Effects of grip force on median nerve deformation at different wrist angles.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of grip on changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameter in the radial-ulnar direction (D1) and dorsal-palmar direction (D2) at three wrist angles. Twenty-nine healthy participants (19 men [mean age, 24.2 ± 1.6 years]; 10 women [mean age, 24.0 ± 1.6 years]) were recruited. The median nerve was examined at the proximal carpal tunnel region in three grip conditions, namely finger relaxation, unclenched fist, and clenched fist. Ultrasound examinations were performed in the neutral wrist position (0°), at 30°wrist flexion, and at 30°wrist extension for both wrists. The grip condition and wrist angle showed significant main effects (p < 0.01) on the changes in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. Furthermore, significant interactions (p < 0.01) were found between the grip condition and wrist angle for the MNCSA, D1, and D2. In the neutral wrist position (0°), significant reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2 were observed when finger relaxation changed to unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Clenched fist condition caused the highest deformations in the median nerve measurements (MNCSA, approximately -25%; D1, -13%; D2, -12%). The MNCSA was significantly lower at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension than in the neutral wrist position (0°) at unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Notably, clenched fist condition at 30°wrist flexion showed the highest reduction of the MNCSA (-29%). In addition, 30°wrist flexion resulted in a lower D1 at clenched fist condition. In contrast, 30°wrist extension resulted in a lower D2 at both unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Our results suggest that unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions cause reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. More importantly, unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension can lead to further deformation of the median nerve. PMID:27688983

  4. Effects of grip force on median nerve deformation at different wrist angles

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of grip on changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameter in the radial-ulnar direction (D1) and dorsal-palmar direction (D2) at three wrist angles. Twenty-nine healthy participants (19 men [mean age, 24.2 ± 1.6 years]; 10 women [mean age, 24.0 ± 1.6 years]) were recruited. The median nerve was examined at the proximal carpal tunnel region in three grip conditions, namely finger relaxation, unclenched fist, and clenched fist. Ultrasound examinations were performed in the neutral wrist position (0°), at 30°wrist flexion, and at 30°wrist extension for both wrists. The grip condition and wrist angle showed significant main effects (p < 0.01) on the changes in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. Furthermore, significant interactions (p < 0.01) were found between the grip condition and wrist angle for the MNCSA, D1, and D2. In the neutral wrist position (0°), significant reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2 were observed when finger relaxation changed to unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Clenched fist condition caused the highest deformations in the median nerve measurements (MNCSA, approximately −25%; D1, −13%; D2, −12%). The MNCSA was significantly lower at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension than in the neutral wrist position (0°) at unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Notably, clenched fist condition at 30°wrist flexion showed the highest reduction of the MNCSA (−29%). In addition, 30°wrist flexion resulted in a lower D1 at clenched fist condition. In contrast, 30°wrist extension resulted in a lower D2 at both unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Our results suggest that unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions cause reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. More importantly, unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension can lead to further deformation of the median nerve. PMID:27688983

  5. Effects of grip force on median nerve deformation at different wrist angles

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of grip on changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameter in the radial-ulnar direction (D1) and dorsal-palmar direction (D2) at three wrist angles. Twenty-nine healthy participants (19 men [mean age, 24.2 ± 1.6 years]; 10 women [mean age, 24.0 ± 1.6 years]) were recruited. The median nerve was examined at the proximal carpal tunnel region in three grip conditions, namely finger relaxation, unclenched fist, and clenched fist. Ultrasound examinations were performed in the neutral wrist position (0°), at 30°wrist flexion, and at 30°wrist extension for both wrists. The grip condition and wrist angle showed significant main effects (p < 0.01) on the changes in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. Furthermore, significant interactions (p < 0.01) were found between the grip condition and wrist angle for the MNCSA, D1, and D2. In the neutral wrist position (0°), significant reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2 were observed when finger relaxation changed to unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Clenched fist condition caused the highest deformations in the median nerve measurements (MNCSA, approximately −25%; D1, −13%; D2, −12%). The MNCSA was significantly lower at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension than in the neutral wrist position (0°) at unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Notably, clenched fist condition at 30°wrist flexion showed the highest reduction of the MNCSA (−29%). In addition, 30°wrist flexion resulted in a lower D1 at clenched fist condition. In contrast, 30°wrist extension resulted in a lower D2 at both unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Our results suggest that unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions cause reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. More importantly, unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension can lead to further deformation of the median nerve.

  6. Effect of Three Different Grip Angles on Physiological Parameters During Laboratory Handcycling Test in Able-Bodied Participants

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Thomas; Burkett, Brendan; Thees, Barbara; Schneider, Stefan; Askew, Christopher D.; Strüder, Heiko K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Handcycling is a relatively new wheelchair sport that has gained increased popularity for people with lower limb disabilities. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of three different grip positions on physical parameters during handcycling in a laboratory setting. Methods: Twenty one able-bodied participants performed three maximum incremental handcycling tests until exhaustion, each with a different grip angle. The angle between the grip and the crank was randomly set at 90° (horizontal), 0° (vertical), or 10° (diagonal). The initial load was 20 W and increased by 20 W each 5 min. In addition, participants performed a 20 s maximum effort. Results: The relative peak functional performance (W/kg), peak heart rate (bpm), associated lactate concentrations (mmol/l) and peak oxygen uptake per kilogram body weight (ml.min−1.kg−1) for the different grip positions during the stage test were: (a) Horizontal: 1.43 ± 0.21 W/kg, 170.14 ± 12.81 bpm, 9.54 ± 1.93 mmol/l, 30.86 ± 4.57 ml/kg; (b) Vertical: 1.38 ± 0.20 W/kg, 171.81 ± 13.87 bpm, 9.91 ± 2.29 mmol/l, 29.75 ± 5.13 ml/kg; (c) Diagonal: 1.40 ± 0.22 W/kg, 169.19 ± 13.31 bpm, 9.34 ± 2.36 mmol/l, 29.39 ± 4.70 ml/kg. Statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences could only be found for lactate concentration between the vertical grip position and the other grips during submaximal handcycling. Conclusion: The orientation of three different grip angles made no difference to the peak load achieved during an incremental handcycling test and a 20 s maximum effort. At submaximal load, higher lactate concentrations were found when the vertical grip position was used, suggesting that this position may be less efficient than the alternative diagonal or horizontal grip positions. PMID:26635617

  7. Intra-session and inter-day reliability of forearm surface EMG during varying hand grip forces.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Oskouei, Alireza; Paulin, Michael G; Carman, Allan B

    2013-02-01

    Surface electromyography (EMG) is widely used to evaluate forearm muscle function and predict hand grip forces; however, there is a lack of literature on its intra-session and inter-day reliability. The aim of this study was to determine reliability of surface EMG of finger and wrist flexor muscles across varying grip forces. Surface EMG was measured from six forearm flexor muscles of 23 healthy adults. Eleven of these subjects undertook inter-day test-retest. Six repetitions of five randomized isometric grip forces between 0% and 80% of maximum force (MVC) were recorded and normalized to MVC. Intra- and inter-day reliability were calculated through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM). Normalized EMG produced excellent intra-session ICC of 0.90 when repeated measurements were averaged. Intra-session SEM was low at low grip forces, however, corresponding normalized SEM was high (23-45%) due to the small magnitude of EMG signals. This may limit the ability to evaluate finer forearm muscle function and hand grip forces in daily tasks. Combining EMG of functionally related muscles improved intra-session SEM, improving within-subject reliability without taking multiple measurements. Removing and replacing electrodes inter-day produced poor ICC (ICC < 0.50) but did not substantially affect SEM.

  8. Low haemoglobin levels contribute to low grip strength independent of low-grade inflammation in Japanese elderly women.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Eriko; Takeuchi, Mika; Kurata, Miki; Tsuboi, Ayaka; Kazumi, Tsutomu; Fukuo, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Muscle strength declines with age. However, factors that contribute to such declines are not well documented and have not been extensively studied in elderly populations of Asian origin. Correlations of grip strength with a broad range of factors associated with declines in muscle strength were examined in 202 community-living elderly Japanese women. After adjustment for age, grip strength was positively correlated with body weight, height, serum albumin, haemoglobin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and serum iron and inversely with serum copper, and log high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Multiple linear regression analysis with grip strength as a dependent variable showed that 47.0% of variability of grip strength could be accounted for by height, age and haemoglobin in order of increasing R2. In conclusion, low haemoglobin may contribute to low muscle strength independently of age, anthropometric, nutritional, and inflammatory markers in the elderly, and may represent an important confounder of the association between grip strength and functional decline in community- living Japanese elderly women. PMID:26420185

  9. The brain adjusts grip forces differently according to gravity and inertia: a parabolic flight experiment

    PubMed Central

    White, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life, one of the most frequent activities involves accelerating and decelerating an object held in precision grip. In many contexts, humans scale and synchronize their grip force (GF), normal to the finger/object contact, in anticipation of the expected tangential load force (LF), resulting from the combination of the gravitational and the inertial forces. In many contexts, GF and LF are linearly coupled. A few studies have examined how we adjust the parameters–gain and offset–of this linear relationship. However, the question remains open as to how the brain adjusts GF regardless of whether LF is generated by different combinations of weight and inertia. Here, we designed conditions to generate equivalent magnitudes of LF by independently varying mass and movement frequency. In a control experiment, we directly manipulated gravity in parabolic flights, while other factors remained constant. We show with a simple computational approach that, to adjust GF, the brain is sensitive to how LFs are produced at the fingertips. This provides clear evidence that the analysis of the origin of LF is performed centrally, and not only at the periphery. PMID:25717293

  10. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer Wind Speed and Rain Rate Retrievals during the 2010 GRIP Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahawneh, Saleem; Farrar, Spencer; Johnson, James; Jones, W. Linwood; Roberts, Jason; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing observations of hurricanes, from NOAA and USAF hurricane surveillance aircraft, provide vital data for hurricane research and operations, for forecasting the intensity and track of tropical storms. The current operational standard for hurricane wind speed and rain rate measurements is the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a nadir viewing passive microwave airborne remote sensor. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, HIRAD, will extend the nadir viewing SFMR capability to provide wide swath images of wind speed and rain rate, while flying on a high altitude aircraft. HIRAD was first flown in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes, GRIP, NASA hurricane field experiment in 2010. This paper reports on geophysical retrieval results and provides hurricane images from GRIP flights. An overview of the HIRAD instrument and the radiative transfer theory based, wind speed/rain rate retrieval algorithm is included. Results are presented for hurricane wind speed and rain rate for Earl and Karl, with comparison to collocated SFMR retrievals and WP3D Fuselage Radar images for validation purposes.

  11. Is the coefficient of variation a valid measure for detecting sincerity of effort of grip strength?

    PubMed

    Shechtman, Orit

    1999-01-01

    The wide use of the coefficient of variation in detecting sincerity of effort is puzzling since existing research findings regarding its effectiveness are contradictory. The lack of empirical support in the literature raises the question of whether or not the coefficient of variation is a valid measure for detecting sincerity of effort. Many clinicians, especially those who use a computer software to calculate the coefficient of variation, may not understand how the coefficient of variation is derived and what it is based on. The coefficient of variation is a measure of relative variability and would be used correctly only if the average and the standard deviation of grip strength trials increased proportionally. This case study, however, demonstrated that the average and standard deviation of grip strength are independent. Thus, the coefficient of variation is not a valid measure of sincerity of effort. In addition, this study indicated that the coefficient of variation may be inflated in individuals after carpal tunnel release surgery. The author, therefore, cautions clinicians against the use of the coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort especially in injured individuals with compromised hand strength.

  12. BOLD correlations to force in precision grip: an event-related study.

    PubMed

    Sulzer, James S; Chib, Vikram S; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kollias, Spyros; Gassert, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of functional neuroimaging has resulted in a profusion of knowledge on various topics, including how blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal in the brain is related to force. To date, studies that have explicitly examined this relationship have used block designs. To gain a better understanding of the networks involved in human motor control, analyses sensitive to temporal relationships, such as Granger Causality or Dynamic Causal Modeling, require event-related designs. Therefore the goal of this experiment was to examine whether similar or even better relationships between BOLD and force during precision grip could be determined with an event-related design. Five healthy subjects exerted forces at 10%, 20% and 30% of maximum voluntary force, along with an observation condition. We report that the BOLD signal was linearly correlated with precision grip force in primary sensorimotor cortex and cerebellum, showing slightly better correlations than previous work. The results provide a clearer picture regarding the sensitivity of BOLD signal to force and show that event-related designs can be more appropriate than block designs in motor tasks.

  13. Effect of skin hydration on the dynamics of fingertip gripping contact

    PubMed Central

    André, T.; Lévesque, V.; Hayward, V.; Lefèvre, P.; Thonnard, J.-L.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of fingertip contact manifest themselves in the complex skin movements observed during the transition from a stuck state to a fully developed slip. While investigating this transition, we found that it depended on skin hydration. To quantify this dependency, we asked subjects to slide their index fingertip on a glass surface while keeping the normal component of the interaction force constant with the help of visual feedback. Skin deformation inside the contact region was imaged with an optical apparatus that allowed us to quantify the relative sizes of the slipping and sticking regions. The ratio of the stuck skin area to the total contact area decreased linearly from 1 to 0 when the tangential force component increased from 0 to a maximum. The slope of this relationship was inversely correlated to the normal force component. The skin hydration level dramatically affected the dynamics of the contact encapsulated in the course of evolution from sticking to slipping. The specific effect was to reduce the tendency of a contact to slip, regardless of the variations of the coefficient of friction. Since grips were more unstable under dry skin conditions, our results suggest that the nervous system responds to dry skin by exaggerated grip forces that cannot be simply explained by a change in the coefficient of friction. PMID:21490002

  14. Segregated and overlapping neural circuits exist for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force.

    PubMed

    Neely, Kristina A; Coombes, Stephen A; Planetta, Peggy J; Vaillancourt, David E

    2013-03-01

    A central topic in sensorimotor neuroscience is the static-dynamic dichotomy that exists throughout the nervous system. Previous work examining motor unit synchronization reports that the activation strategy and timing of motor units differ for static and dynamic tasks. However, it remains unclear whether segregated or overlapping blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity exists in the brain for static and dynamic motor control. This study compared the neural circuits associated with the production of static force to those associated with the production of dynamic force pulses. To that end, healthy young adults (n = 17) completed static and dynamic precision grip force tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Both tasks activated core regions within the visuomotor network, including primary and sensory motor cortices, premotor cortices, multiple visual areas, putamen, and cerebellum. Static force was associated with unique activity in a right-lateralized cortical network including inferior parietal lobe, ventral premotor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, dynamic force was associated with unique activity in left-lateralized and midline cortical regions, including supplementary motor area, superior parietal lobe, fusiform gyrus, and visual area V3. These findings provide the first neuroimaging evidence supporting a lateralized pattern of brain activity for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force.

  15. The brain adjusts grip forces differently according to gravity and inertia: a parabolic flight experiment.

    PubMed

    White, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life, one of the most frequent activities involves accelerating and decelerating an object held in precision grip. In many contexts, humans scale and synchronize their grip force (GF), normal to the finger/object contact, in anticipation of the expected tangential load force (LF), resulting from the combination of the gravitational and the inertial forces. In many contexts, GF and LF are linearly coupled. A few studies have examined how we adjust the parameters-gain and offset-of this linear relationship. However, the question remains open as to how the brain adjusts GF regardless of whether LF is generated by different combinations of weight and inertia. Here, we designed conditions to generate equivalent magnitudes of LF by independently varying mass and movement frequency. In a control experiment, we directly manipulated gravity in parabolic flights, while other factors remained constant. We show with a simple computational approach that, to adjust GF, the brain is sensitive to how LFs are produced at the fingertips. This provides clear evidence that the analysis of the origin of LF is performed centrally, and not only at the periphery.

  16. Gripping Mechanisms for Microgravity and Extreme Terrain and Vertical Climbing Micro Ground Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Clifford; Parness, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Asteroids and comets may provide insight into the origins of our solar system and the precursors to life on our planet. Near Earth objects offer an accessible target of opportunity, but are small and lack the gravity necessary for conventional wheeled travel. Therefore, it is necessary to develop alternative methods for maneuvering in these environments. This project researched and developed a method for gripping rock surfaces. Work has been completed on the design and prototyping of several possible hooked gripping mechanisms. Future work includes quantitative testing, downselection to a final design, and attachment to the robotic platform, Lemur IIb. A second project focuses on the development of a 100g, crash-proof robot capable of climbing vertical surfaces using a novel silicone adhesive. Capable of carrying video/audio payloads the robot may serve as a surveillance tool for the Department of Defense or as a method of pre-flight spacecraft inspections. A specialized track was developed to provide the specific loading conditions necessary for proper engagement of the adhesive. Both of these projects rely heavily on the shape deposition manufacturing process, being researched at JPL, and 3D printing.

  17. Muscular forearm activation in hand-grip tasks with superimposition of mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, L; Tirabasso, A; Lunghi, A; Di Giovanni, R; Sacco, F; Marchetti, E

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the muscular activation of the forearm, with or without vibration stimuli at different frequencies while performing a grip tasks of 45s at various level of exerted force. In 16 individuals, 9 females and 7 males, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of extensor carpi radialis longus and the flexor carpi ulnari muscles were assessed. At a short latency from onset EMG, RMS and the level of MU synchronization were assessed to evaluate the muscular adaptations. Whilst a trend of decay of EMG Median frequency (MDFd) was employed as an index of muscular fatigue. Muscular tasks consists of the grip of an instrumented handle at a force level of 20%, 30%, 40%, 60% of the maximum voluntary force. Vibration was supplied by a shaker to the hand in mono-frequential waves at 20, 30, 33 and 40Hz. In relation to EMG, RMS and MU synchronization, the muscular activation does not seem to change with the superimposition of the mechanical vibrations, on the contrary a lower MDFd was observed at 33Hz than in absence of vibration. This suggests an early muscular fatigue induced by vibration due to the fact that 33Hz is a resonance frequency for the hand-arm system.

  18. Grip force control is dependent on task constraints in children with and without developmental coordination disorder.

    PubMed

    Law, Sui-Heung; Lo, Sing Kai; Chow, Susanna; Cheing, Gladys L Y

    2011-06-01

    Excessive grip force (GF) is often found in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). However, their GF control may vary when task constraints are imposed upon their motor performance. This study aimed to investigate how their GF control changes in response to task demands, and to examine their tactile sensitivity. Twenty-one children with DCD and 17 controls participated in the study. The instrument used to measure GF was a cylindrical cup equipped with a load cell. The children were asked to hold and transport three cups with varying physical properties as quickly as possible. For tactile function, static and moving two-point discrimination senses were recorded. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of covariance. Children with DCD displayed slower rate of GF generation, which might be related to their lower sensitivity of two-point dynamic discrimination. Given the slow rate of GF generation and time constraint, the peak GF for children with DCD was lower than that for the control children, but the peak GF of both the groups depended on the time allowed for the performance and the task demand. Both the groups of children cautiously modulated the grip when the cup was filled with water, and graded GF according to the physical property of the cup. We conclude that GF control in children with or without DCD was task dependent.

  19. Electric Field Measurements During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) Field Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bateman, Monte G.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Mach, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    During the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field program, a system of 6 electric field mills was flown on one of NASA's Global Hawk aircraft. We placed several mills on the aircraft to enable us to measure the vector electric field. We created a distributed, ethernet-connected system so that each sensor has its own embedded Linux system, complete with web server. This makes our current generation system fully "sensor web enabled." The Global Hawk has several unique qualities, but relevant to quality storm electric field measurements are high altitude (20 km) and long duration (20-30 hours) flights. There are several aircraft participating in the GRIP program, and coordinated measurements are happening. Lightning and electric field measurements will be used to study the relationships between lightning and other storm characteristics. It has been long understood that lightning can be used as a marker for strong convective activity. Past research and field programs suggest that lightning flash rate may serve as an indicator and precursor for rapid intensification change in tropical cyclones and hurricanes. We have the opportunity to sample hurricanes for many hours at a time and observe intensification (or de-intensification) periods. The electrical properties of hurricanes during such periods are not well known. American

  20. The coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength, Part I: the statistical principle.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, O

    2001-01-01

    The coefficient of variation (CV) is a widely used measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength despite contradictory research findings and lack of empirical support in the literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the CV is an appropriate measure of sincerity of effort. One hundred forty-six uninjured volunteers underwent a series of grip strength tests. The mean, standard deviation (SD), and CV of repeated strength trials were calculated, and paired comparisons were conducted between maximal and submaximal efforts. While the mean of maximal trials was significantly greater, there were no differences in SD between maximal and submaximal trials. Therefore, the increased CV associated with submaximal effort was an artifact of reduced torque rather than an indicator of a true increase in variability. Consequently, the CV is not an appropriate measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength.

  1. Rapid and Differential Regulation of AMPA and Kainate Receptors at Hippocampal Mossy Fibre Synapses by PICK1 and GRIP

    PubMed Central

    Hirbec, Hélène; Francis, Joanna C.; Lauri, Sari E.; Braithwaite, Steven P.; Coussen, Françoise; Mulle, Christophe; Dev, Kumlesh K.; Couthino, Victoria; Meyer, Guido; Isaac, John T.R.; Collingridge, Graham L.; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We identified four PDZ domain-containing proteins, syntenin, PICK1, GRIP, and PSD95, as interactors with the kainate receptor (KAR) subunits GluR52b, GluR52c, and GluR6. Of these, we show that both GRIP and PICK1 interactions are required to maintain KAR-mediated synaptic function at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses. In addition, PKCα can phosphorylate ct-GluR52b at residues S880 and S886, and PKC activity is required to maintain KAR-mediated synaptic responses. We propose that PICK1 targets PKCα to phosphorylate KARs, causing their stabilization at the synapse by an interaction with GRIP. Importantly, this mechanism is not involved in the constitutive recycling of AMPA receptors since blockade of PDZ interactions can simultaneously increase AMPAR- and decrease KAR-mediated synaptic transmission at the same population of synapses. PMID:12597860

  2. Influence of finger amputation on grip strength and objectively measured hand function: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kuret, Zala; Burger, Helena; Vidmar, Gaj

    2015-06-01

    Finger amputations are common and hands are essential for functioning, but studies on factors influencing functioning after finger amputation are lacking. Therefore, we aimed to explore the influence of the number and level of amputated fingers on hand function and grip strength. A prospective descriptive cross-sectional study involving 69 patients with partial or complete amputation of one or more fingers of one hand was carried out. The function of both hands was assessed using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure test; grip strength was measured in 42 patients. We confirmed that finger amputation worsens hand function (especially tripod and tip pinch) and reduces grip strength, whereby the extent of the worsening depends on amputation type - it is the smallest after thumb amputation and the largest after amputation of the index finger and fingers III-V. However, because of the variety of amputation types, we recommend that future studies either involve very large samples or focus on specific amputations.

  3. Polymer cable/grip-plate system with locking screws for stable fixation to promote healing of trochanteric osteotomies or fractures in revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berend, Keith R; Willen, Jacob L; Morris, Michael J; Adams, Joanne B; Lombardi, Adolph V

    2014-11-01

    Multiple methods have been proposed to establish stable fixation to promote healing of trochanteric osteotomies or fractures in revision total hip arthroplasty (revTHA), from wiring techniques through cable-plate systems with or without supplemental locking screws. The purpose of this study is to report the clinical results of a single cable-plate system with locked screw fixation in revTHA. Between 2009 and 2012, 27 grip-plates (Supercable® System, Kinamed Inc., Camarillo, CA) were used in 26 patients in 27 revTHA procedures. Utilization was 12 1-hole (50 mm) grip-plates, 10 2-hole (135 mm) grip-plates, four 4-hole (190 mm) grip-plates, and one 6-hole (245 mm) grip-plate. There were 14 women and 12 men. Age averaged 63.2 years and BMI averaged 29.4 kg/m2. At average 2.5 year follow-up, grip-plate fixation was considered successful in 22 hips (81%) with five failures. Three failures consisted of 50 mm/short grip-plates used in one trochanteric slide, and two intraoperative trochanteric fractures during revTHA. The two additional failures were related to pre-revision trochanteric avulsion from bony necrosis of the proximal femur. An additional three grip-plates were removed electively for soft-tissue irritation and pain but with successful fixation and bony healing. Thus 70% of hips were free of reoperation related to the grip-plate. All other hips had successful fixation and the grip-plate was not symptomatic. In this study, the cable-grip system and isoelastic Supercables provided reliable fixation for adequate healing of difficult ETO and trochanteric fractures with an 81% rate of mechanical success with radiographic and clinical healing observed.

  4. Fast-adapting mechanoreceptors are important for force control in precision grip but not for sensorimotor memory.

    PubMed

    Park, Susanna B; Davare, Marco; Falla, Marika; Kennedy, William R; Selim, Mona M; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Koltzenburg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Sensory feedback from cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the fingertips is important in effective object manipulation, allowing appropriate scaling of grip and load forces during precision grip. However, the role of mechanoreceptor subtypes in these tasks remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, psychophysical tasks that may specifically assess function of type I fast-adapting (FAI) and slowly adapting (SAI) mechanoreceptors were used with object manipulation experiments to examine the regulation of grip force control in an experimental model of graded reduction in tactile sensitivity (healthy volunteers wearing 2 layers of latex gloves). With gloves, tactile sensitivity decreased significantly from 1.9 ± 0.4 to 12.3 ± 2.2 μm in the Bumps task assessing function of FAI afferents but not in a grating orientation task assessing SAI afferents (1.6 ± 0.1 to 1.8 ± 0.2 mm). Six axis force/torque sensors measured peak grip (PGF) and load (PLF) forces generated by the fingertips during a grip-lift task. With gloves there was a significant increase of PGF (14 ± 6%), PLF (17 ± 5%), and grip and load force rates (26 ± 8%, 20 ± 8%). A variable-weight series task was used to examine sensorimotor memory. There was a 20% increase in PGF when the lift of a light object was preceded by a heavy relative to a light object. This relationship was not significantly altered when lifting with gloves, suggesting that the addition of gloves did not change sensorimotor memory effects. We conclude that FAI fibers may be important for the online force scaling but not for the buildup of a sensorimotor memory. PMID:27052582

  5. Modeling the Maturation of Grip Selection Planning and Action Representation: Insights from Typical and Atypical Motor Development

    PubMed Central

    Fuelscher, Ian; Williams, Jacqueline; Wilmut, Kate; Enticott, Peter G.; Hyde, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the purported association between developmental changes in grip selection planning and improvements in an individual’s capacity to represent action at an internal level [i.e., motor imagery (MI)]. Participants were groups of healthy children aged 6–7 years and 8–12 years respectively, while a group of adolescents (13–17 years) and adults (18–34 years) allowed for consideration of childhood development in the broader context of motor maturation. A group of children aged 8–12 years with probable DCD (pDCD) was included as a reference group for atypical motor development. Participants’ proficiency to generate and/or engage internal action representations was inferred from performance on the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of MI. A grip selection task designed to elicit the end-state comfort (ESC) effect provided a window into the integrity of grip selection planning. Consistent with earlier accounts, the efficiency of grip selection planning followed a non-linear developmental progression in neurotypical individuals. As expected, analysis confirmed that these developmental improvements were predicted by an increased capacity to generate and/or engage internal action representations. The profile of this association remained stable throughout the (typical) developmental spectrum. These findings are consistent with computational accounts of action planning that argue that internal action representations are associated with the expression and development of grip selection planning across typical development. However, no such association was found for our sample of children with pDCD, suggesting that individuals with atypical motor skill may adopt an alternative, sub-optimal strategy to plan their grip selection compared to their same-age control peers. PMID:26903915

  6. Fast-adapting mechanoreceptors are important for force control in precision grip but not for sensorimotor memory.

    PubMed

    Park, Susanna B; Davare, Marco; Falla, Marika; Kennedy, William R; Selim, Mona M; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Koltzenburg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Sensory feedback from cutaneous mechanoreceptors in the fingertips is important in effective object manipulation, allowing appropriate scaling of grip and load forces during precision grip. However, the role of mechanoreceptor subtypes in these tasks remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, psychophysical tasks that may specifically assess function of type I fast-adapting (FAI) and slowly adapting (SAI) mechanoreceptors were used with object manipulation experiments to examine the regulation of grip force control in an experimental model of graded reduction in tactile sensitivity (healthy volunteers wearing 2 layers of latex gloves). With gloves, tactile sensitivity decreased significantly from 1.9 ± 0.4 to 12.3 ± 2.2 μm in the Bumps task assessing function of FAI afferents but not in a grating orientation task assessing SAI afferents (1.6 ± 0.1 to 1.8 ± 0.2 mm). Six axis force/torque sensors measured peak grip (PGF) and load (PLF) forces generated by the fingertips during a grip-lift task. With gloves there was a significant increase of PGF (14 ± 6%), PLF (17 ± 5%), and grip and load force rates (26 ± 8%, 20 ± 8%). A variable-weight series task was used to examine sensorimotor memory. There was a 20% increase in PGF when the lift of a light object was preceded by a heavy relative to a light object. This relationship was not significantly altered when lifting with gloves, suggesting that the addition of gloves did not change sensorimotor memory effects. We conclude that FAI fibers may be important for the online force scaling but not for the buildup of a sensorimotor memory.

  7. Normative static grip strength of population of Turkey, effects of various factors and a comparison with international norms.

    PubMed

    Ekşioğlu, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    Normative data are of importance in ergonomics and clinical settings. Applying normative data internationally is questionable. To this end, this study aimed to establish gender- and age-specific reference values for static (isometric) hand grip strength of normal population of Turkey with special regard to occupational demand, and compare them with the international norms. The secondary aims were to investigate the effects of gender, age-group, weight-group, job-group, hand and several anthropometric variables on static grip strength. A sample of 211 (128 male and 83 female) volunteers aged between 18 and 69 with various occupations participated in the study. Grip strength data were collected using a Jamar dynamometer with standard testing position, protocol and instructions. The mean and std deviation of maximum voluntary static grip strength values (in N) for dominant and non-dominant hands respectively were 455.2 ± 73.6 and 441.5 ± 72.6 for males, and 258 ± 46.1 and 246.2 ± 49.1 for females. The mean female strength was about 57% of the mean male strength value for both dominant and non-dominant hands. There was a curvilinear relationship of grip strength to age, significant differences between genders, hands, and some age-groups, and a correlation to height, body-mass, BMI and hand dimensions depending on the gender. The comparisons with the norms of other world populations indicate that there are cross-national grip strength variations among some nations but not all.

  8. Impaired bone microarchitecture at the distal radius in older men with low muscle mass and grip strength: the STRAMBO study.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Pawel; Blaizot, Stéphanie; Boutroy, Stephanie; Vilayphiou, Nicolas; Boonen, Steven; Chapurlat, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to study the association between bone microarchitecture and muscle mass and strength in older men. Volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and bone microarchitecture were assessed in 810 men aged ≥60 years at the distal radius by high-resolution peripheral computed tomography (HR-pQCT). Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and appendicular muscle mass (ASM) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Relative ASM of the upper limbs (RASM-u.l.) was calculated as ASM of the upper limbs/(height)(2). Grip strength was measured by dynanometry. In multivariable models, men in the lowest RASM-u.l. quartile had lower cross-sectional area (CSA), cortical area (Ct.Ar), cortical thickness (Ct.Th), and trabecular area (Tb.Ar) at distal radius compared with men in the highest quartile. The trends remained significant after adjustment for grip strength. Men in the lowest quartile of the normalized grip strength (grip strength/[height](2)) had lower aBMD, total vBMD, Ct.Ar, Ct.Th, Tb.vBMD, and Tb.N, and higher Tb.Sp and Tb.Sp.SD. The associations for Ct.Ar, total vBMD, Ct.Th, Tb.vBMD, and Tb.Sp remained significant after adjustment for RASM-u.l. In the models including RASM-u.l. and normalized grip strength, CSA and Tb.Ar were associated with RASM-u.l. but not with the strength. Lower Ct.Th, Tb.vBMD, and Tb.N were associated with lower grip strength but not with RASM-u.l. Lower Ct.Ar was associated with lower grip strength and with lower RASM-u.l. In conclusion, in older men, low RASM-u.l. and low grip strength are associated with poor cortical and trabecular microarchitecture partly independently of each other, after adjustment for confounders. PMID:22865787

  9. Corrosion caused by elevator and spider marks on CRA pipe: Comparison of conventional inserts and a new gripping system

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Corrosion-resistant alloys (CRA) are used to reduce corrosion damage to casing and tubing strings and prolong the life span of the well pipe. An analysis of various corrosion mechanisms shows that surface integrity is an important factor in corrosion prevention. Surface damage caused by inappropriate handling or conventional slip markings contribute directly to the development and propagation of corrosion. A newly developed gripping system distributes the load equally onto a large number of small peaks, minimizing the indentation of each single peak. The new gripping system does not damage the surface integrity of the pipe, virtually eliminating the corrosion potential.

  10. Hard X-ray imaging survey of the Galactic plane with the Caltech gamma-ray imaging payload GRIP-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbel, S.; Cook, W. R.; Harrison, F. A.; Prince, T. A.; Schindler, S. M.; Wang, S.

    1997-01-01

    In a two-day balloon flight during October 1995, the Caltech coded aperture gamma ray imaging payload (GRIP-2) imaged various fields in the Galactic plane and center in the 25 to 600 keV energy band. The large phoswich detector, the 15 deg field of view, the 30 arcmin angular resolution and 6 arcmin point source localization capability of GRIP-2 provides the possibility of surveying the accreting binary population of the Galaxy at high energy. The instrument is described and preliminary imaging results are reported on. The capabilities of this instrument for hard X-ray/gamma ray imaging are demonstrated.

  11. G.R.I.P.S activities in the development of direct use of geothermal resources and small scale geothermal power development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-10-01

    The activities of the geothermal research information and planning services (G.R.I.P.S.) in the four Geysers-Calistoga KGRA counties (i.e., Lake, Mendocino, Napa, Sonoma) in California are reported. Activities in the G.R.I.P.S. information and outreach program, workshop presentations, pilot project development, permit processing improvements and Department of Energy reporting are described.

  12. Recent Developments: The Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Imaging and Detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H.; Zoglauer, A.; Lin, R. P.; Boggs, S. E.

    2013-07-01

    In two of the best-observed flares of the last cycle, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite found the centroids of ion and relativistic electron emission to have a significant displacement. This result is surprising; co-spatially accelerated ions and electrons are thought to be transported along the same field lines, implying they would enter the chromosphere together and have similar emission locations. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) balloon instrument will investigate particle transport in solar flares by providing enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of gamma/HXR flare emission (20keV - 10MeV). GRIPS’ key technological improvements over the solar state of the art in HXR/gamma ray energies (RHESSI) include three-dimensional position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulating collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs allow GRIPS to Compton track energy deposition within the crystal. This capability (1) enables the MPRM design by acting as a second modulation grid, (2) provides significant background rejection and (3) makes solar polarization measurements possible. The MPRM imager provides quasi-continuous resolution from 12.5 - 162 arcsecs with 2x the throughput of a dual grid collimator system like RHESSI. This spatial resolution can resolve the separate footpoints of many flare sizes. In comparison, RHESSI images with a minimum of 35 arcsecs for gamma-rays, making these footpoints resolvable in only the largest flares. Here, we present the intial calibration of GRIPS’ 3D-GED detectors using laboratory radioactive sources. We evaluate charge sharing between adjacent strips, the detection of coincidences and preliminary depth measurements. The detectors have been shown to have a linear response and resolve line emission. The MPRM modulation grid is constructed and we present initial results from calibration. GRIPS is scheduled for a

  13. Latest Progress on the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Duncan, Nicole A.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Smith, David Miles; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present the latest progress on building the balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument, including testing and calibration of the detectors and development of the imaging and aspect systems. A continental-US test flight is slated for fall 2012. GRIPS will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from approx.20. keV to > approx.10 MeV. The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution to within <0.1 cu mm. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-cm thick tungsten-alloy grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 mm. With the MPRM situated 8 meters from the spectrometer, this instrument will provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate the 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e. as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS will address questions relevant to particle acceleration and energy release that ha-.e been raised by recent solar flare observations, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electron producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the accelerated electrons, and why do relativistic electron dominate in the corona? How does the composition of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why?

  14. The JPL GRIP Portal - Serving Near Real-time Observation and Model Forecast for Hurricane Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Turk, F. J.; Vu, Q.; Knosp, B. W.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Poulsen, W. L.; Shen, T. J.; Licata, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    NASA conducted a field experiment, the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP), in the summer of 2010 to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. The DC-8 aircraft and the Global Hawk Unmanned Airborne System (UAS) were deployed loaded with instruments for measurements including lightning, temperature, 3D wind, precipitation, liquid and ice water contents, aerosol and cloud profiles. JPL created a web portal to collect, process and display both the satellite and the airborne observations in near real-time (NRT) and integrated then with the hurricane forecast models. The objective of the JPL GRIP portal is to provide environmental context and temporal continuity for the field campaign observations to help: (1) mission planning, (2) understanding of the physical processes, and (3) improving models through validation and data assimilation. Built on top of the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) infrastructure, we developed a GRIP portal presenting a near-real time (NRT) basin-scale view of the atmospheric and surface conditions over the Atlantic, characterizing large-scale and storm-scale processes, as depicted by satellites and models. Using Google Earth embedded in the web browser and two independent calendars, we provide 3D visualization of a comprehensive collection of observations and model results as overlapping image overlays, wind vectors, curtain plots, or clickable tracks. We also provide Google Earth time animations of multiple data and model variables. In the portal, we offer more than two dozen NRT satellite products from a wide variety of instruments, model forecasts from four large-scale models (i.e., NOGAPS, GFS, ECMWF, and UKMET), and the best tracks and the forecast tracks from National Hurricane Center’s ATCF models. As they become available, we also display the airborne observations from HAMSR, APR2 and Dropsonde. It is a great challenge to set up a reliable infrastructure to collect data

  15. Functional dimorphism and characteristics of maximal hand grip force in top level female athletes.

    PubMed

    Ivanović, Jelena; Dopsaj, Milivoj

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work is to determine functional dimorphism (F(max)Nd/DoHG(iso)) and model characteristics at maximal isometric hand grip force (F(max)HG(iso)) in top level female athletes. 275 top level female athletes were tested from Taekwondo, Synchronised Swimming, Track and field, Table tennis, Volleyball, Karate, Skiing, Handball, well-trained students (students of the Academy for Criminalistic and Police studies - ACPS) and Control group. In order to assess the F(max)HG(iso), we used standardised equipment, i.e., a sliding device that measures isometric finger flexor force, with a tensiometric probe fixed inside the device. The average values of F(max)HG(iso) and relative force measured by allometric and classic method for dominant and non-dominant hand grip for the total sample were 381.87 +/- 60.28, 344.63 +/- 55.60 N; 24.06 +/- 3.50, 21.72 +/- 3.28 N/BM0.667; 0.62 +/- 0.10, 0.56 +/- 0.09 N/BM. The average value of F(max)Nd/DoHG(iso) was 0.9030 +/- 0.0797. General Significant difference was established between subsamples for the measurement characteristics at the level of Wilks' Lambda 0.476, F = 3.276, p = 0.000. Maximal average value F(max)HG(iso) for non-dominant and dominant hand is found in Karate (372.04 +/- 46.71, 407.04 +/- 71.31 N) and minimal in Table tennis (282.00 +/- 56.00, 304.00 +/- 58.51 N). The minimal index value of F(max)Nd/DoHG(iso) was found in Control group 0.8771 +/- 0.0877. Considering defined classification of F(max)Nd/ DoHG(iso), we classified the examinees from different sports in 4 groups: dominant symmetry of functional hand grip relations (Skiing > 0.9595); symmetry (Table tennis and Taekwondo 0.9288 to 0.9594); average (Karate, Volleyball, ACPS, Track and field 0.8980 to 0.9287); asymmetry (Control, Synchronised swimming and Handball 0.8674 to 0.8979). The results obtained can be used to determine criteria decisions from the aspect of diagnostic procedures, metric aspect, medical aspect. PMID:23390816

  16. Action-perception dissociation; preserved reactive grip force despite tactile extinction due to cortical stroke.

    PubMed

    Wimperis, Andrew; Wing, Alan

    2007-06-11

    Sensory extinction following stroke, manifests as a bias in spatial attention towards ipsilesional spatial locations, which arises when stimuli from other locations compete for pathologically limited attentional resources. In the tactile domain, extinction results in a failure to verbally report tactile stimuli applied to a contralesional body part when they are timed to coincide with ipsilesional tactile contact. While it is typical for research in this area to focus on the verbal report of sensory stimuli as a measure of conscious awareness, work in visual extinction has shown that when contralesional stimuli fail to reach conscious awareness, they may still contribute to the control of actions. We describe the case of a woman with tactile extinction who failed to verbally report contralesional tactile input associated with perturbations to bimanual grasp. Despite this, the same stimulus was sufficient to drive reflexive grip force responses.

  17. Caging planar bodies by one-parameter two-fingered gripping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rimon, E.; Blake, A.

    1999-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a caging problem: the authors wish to surround an object B by a multifingered hand such that B has some freedom to move, but still cannot escape the cage formed by the fingers. The authors introduce a new notion of the caging set, which is based on the configuration-space representation of the free motions of the hand system with respect to the object. Using stratified Morse theory, they show that the hand`s configuration at which the cage is broken corresponds to a frictionless equilibrium grasp. This allows them to formulate a technique for computing the caging set of a two-fingered hand whose opening is controlled by a single parameter. The technique generalizes to one-parameter gripping systems having a higher number of fingers.

  18. Computer vision-based classification of hand grip variations in neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Zariffa, José; Steeves, John D

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of hand function is such that most existing upper limb rehabilitation robotic devices use only simplified hand interfaces. This is in contrast to the importance of the hand in regaining function after neurological injury. Computer vision technology has been used to identify hand posture in the field of Human Computer Interaction, but this approach has not been translated to the rehabilitation context. We describe a computer vision-based classifier that can be used to discriminate rehabilitation-relevant hand postures, and could be integrated into a virtual reality-based upper limb rehabilitation system. The proposed system was tested on a set of video recordings from able-bodied individuals performing cylindrical grasps, lateral key grips, and tip-to-tip pinches. The overall classification success rate was 91.2%, and was above 98% for 6 out of the 10 subjects.

  19. Using the coefficient of variation to detect sincerity of effort of grip strength: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, O

    2000-01-01

    Many clinicians use the coefficient of variation (CV) to assess sincerity of effort, without understanding the premise on which it is based or its physiological and mathematical bases. Clinicians who use computerized evaluation systems that calculate the CV may not even be aware of the formula used to derive it. The wide use of the CV in detecting sincerity of effort of grip strength is puzzling, since it lacks empirical support in the literature. This paper examines the physiological rationale for using measures of variability to detect sincerity of effort, the mathematical basis on which the CV is founded, and the reliability and validity of the CV. The conclusions based on this literature review are that the CV is not an appropriate method for determining whether an effort is sincere and that CV values may be inflated in injured patients with compromised hand strength.

  20. Hurricanes Karl and Tropical Storm Matthew Structure Observed by HIWRAP During GRIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Guimond, S. R.; Tian, L.

    2012-12-01

    The dual-wavelength (Ku and Ka band) High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) flew for the first time on the Global Hawk during the 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP). HIWRAP is conical scanning and Doppler, and winds and reflectivity can be mapped within the swath below the Global Hawk. Two interesting cases from the HIWRAP flights were the rapid intensification of Hurricane Karl and the intensification of Tropical Storm Matthew. This presentation will highlight the precipitation and wind structure of these storms during their intensification as derived from the HIWRAP observations. If time permits and if available, highlights from HIWRAP observations from the Hurricane Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) field campaign in September 2012 will be presented.

  1. Observations of C-band Brightness Temperature from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) During GRIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Buckley, C. D.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; May, C.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Albers, C.; Black, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD is a new technology developed by NASA/MSFC, in partnership with NOAA and the Universities of Central Florida, Michigan, and Alabama-Huntsville. HIRAD is designed to measure wind speed and rain rate over a wide swath in heavy-rain, strong-wind conditions. HIRAD is expected to eventually fly routinely on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) such as Global Hawk over hurricanes threatening the U.S. coast and other Atlantic basin areas, and possibly in the Western Pacific as well. HIRAD first flew on GRIP in 2010 and is planned to fly 2012-14 on the NASA Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) missions on the Global Hawk, a high-altitude UAV. HIRAD technology will eventually be used on a satellite platform to extend the dynamical range of Ocean Surface Wind (OSV) observations from space.

  2. Strengthening the reporting of genetic risk prediction studies: the GRIPS statement.

    PubMed

    Janssens, A Cecile J W; Ioannidis, John P A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Little, Julian; Khoury, Muin J

    2011-09-01

    • The rapid and continuing progress in gene discovery for complex diseases is fuelling interest in the potential application of genetic risk models for clinical and public health practice. • The number of studies assessing the predictive ability is steadily increasing, but the quality and completeness of reporting vary. • A multidisciplinary workshop sponsored by the Human Genome Epidemiology Network developed a checklist of 25 items recommended for strengthening the reporting of Genetic RIsk Prediction Studies (GRIPS), building on the principles established by prior reporting guidelines. • These recommendations aim to enhance the transparency of study reporting and thereby to improve the synthesis and application of information from multiple studies that might differ in design, conduct or analysis. • A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published as an accompanying article [1].

  3. Strengthening the reporting of genetic risk prediction studies: the GRIPS statement.

    PubMed

    Janssens, A Cecile J W; Ioannidis, John P A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Little, Julian; Khoury, Muin J

    2011-04-01

    The rapid and continuing progress in gene discovery for complex diseases is fueling interest in the potential application of genetic risk models for clinical and public health practice. The number of studies assessing the predictive ability is steadily increasing, but the quality and completeness of reporting varies. A multidisciplinary workshop sponsored by the Human Genome Epidemiology Network developed a checklist of 25 items recommended for strengthening the reporting of Genetic RIsk Prediction Studies (GRIPS), building on the principles established by prior reporting guidelines. These recommendations aim to enhance the transparency of study reporting, and thereby to improve the synthesis and application of information from multiple studies that might differ in design, conduct, or analysis. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published.

  4. Respiratory performance and grip strength tests on the basketball players of inter-university competition.

    PubMed

    De, A K; Bhattacharya, A K; Panda, B K; Das Gupta, P K

    1980-01-01

    The participants of Basketball in the Inter-University competition were tested for assessing the physical efficiency level with special reference to respiratory and strength performances. The simple anthropometric measurements like height and weight of these subjects were noted to be higher than those of average healthy nonathlete populations of India. The socio-economic status of these subjects was assessed by standard questionnaire method and they were from families having income range between Rs. 85/-165/ per capita per month. The respiratory performances viz. FVC, FEV1, MVV, MEFR, PEFR were all noted to be high in these sportsmen in comparison to those of age-matched healthy Indians. The grip strength test values were similar to those of hockey and soccer players. This study, therefore, indicated more efficiency in basketball players than in the age-matched average non-athlete healthy Indians.

  5. Effect of blocking tactile information from the fingertips on adaptation and execution of grip forces to friction at the grasping surface.

    PubMed

    Bilaloglu, Seda; Lu, Ying; Geller, Daniel; Rizzo, John Ross; Aluru, Viswanath; Gardner, Esther P; Raghavan, Preeti

    2016-03-01

    Adaptation of fingertip forces to friction at the grasping surface is necessary to prevent use of inadequate or excessive grip forces. In the current study we investigated the effect of blocking tactile information from the fingertips noninvasively on the adaptation and efficiency of grip forces to surface friction during precision grasp. Ten neurologically intact subjects grasped and lifted an instrumented grip device with 18 different frictional surfaces under three conditions: with bare hands or with a thin layer of plastic (Tegaderm) or an additional layer of foam affixed to the fingertips. The coefficient of friction at the finger-object interface of each surface was obtained for each subject with bare hands and Tegaderm by measuring the slip ratio (grip force/load force) at the moment of slip. We found that the foam layer reduced sensibility for two-point discrimination and pressure sensitivity at the fingertips, but Tegaderm did not. However, Tegaderm reduced static, but not dynamic, tactile discrimination. Adaptation of fingertip grip forces to surface friction measured by the rate of change of peak grip force, and grip force efficiency measured by the grip-load force ratio at lift, showed a proportional relationship with bare hands but were impaired with Tegaderm and foam. Activation of muscles engaged in precision grip also varied with the frictional surface with bare hands but not with Tegaderm and foam. The results suggest that sensitivity for static tactile discrimination is necessary for feedforward and feedback control of grip forces and for adaptive modulation of muscle activity during precision grasp. PMID:26655820

  6. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R; Crone, Wendy C; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  7. The Effect of Repetitive Rhythmic Precision Grip Task-Oriented Rehabilitation in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dispa, Delphine; Lejeune, Thierry; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic stroke patients present with difficulty in the manipulation of objects. The aim of this study was to test whether an intensive program of precision grip training could improve hand functioning of patients at more than 6 months after a stroke. This was a cross-over study; hence, at inclusion, the patients were randomly divided into two…

  8. The coefficient of variation as a measure of sincerity of effort of grip strength, Part II: sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, O

    2001-01-01

    The coefficient of variation (CV) is commonly used to detect sincerity of effort. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the CV possessed adequate sensitivity and specificity to effectively detect sincerity of effort of grip strength. One hundred forty-six uninjured volunteers underwent a series of grip strength tests. Sensitivity and specificity values were calculated for various CV cut-off values (between 2.5% and 22%) of the static grip test. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves based on these values demonstrated the trade-offs between specificity and sensitivity. For example, the "traditional" 15% cut-off value yielded poor sensitivity (0.55), whereas the 11% cut-off value yielded poor specificity (0.74). Selecting any cut-off value along the continuum did not provide adequate sensitivity or specificity for labeling an effort sincere or insincere. Although the CV differentiated between maximal and submaximal effort, it was not sensitive or specific enough to do so effectively. Thus, the CV should not be used to assess sincerity of effort of grip strength.

  9. Role of the Visuomotor System in On-Line Attenuation of a Premovement Illusory Bias in Grip Aperture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, M.; Rival, C.

    2005-01-01

    In this investigation participants formulated a grip aperture (GA) consistent with the size of an object embedded within a Muller-Lyer (ML) figure prior to initiating visually guided grasping movements. The accuracy of the grasping response was emphasized to determine whether or not the visuomotor system might resolve the premovement bias in GA…

  10. Description of the finger mechanical load of climbers of different levels during different hand grips in sport climbing.

    PubMed

    Morenas Martín, Jesús; Del Campo, Vicente Luis; Leyton Román, Marta; Gómez-Valadés Horrillo, Juan Miguel; Gómez Navarrete, Juan Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Currently, direct empirical evidence exists about the amount of mechanical load that climbers apply to each finger during several hand grips specific to sport climbing, but not yet in a specific hanging position. The objectives of this study are a) to draw and build a solid and rigid support that simulates the real action of a hand grip in a hanging position in sport climbing, to enable the measurement of the mechanical load endured by the fingers in a hanging position and in addition, b) to describe the distribution of mechanical load among fingers as a function of the level of climbing during different hand grips in a hanging position. Thirty young male participants took part in the initial phase of reliability of the measurements, while another 64 male climbers participated in the subsequent study phase to check the relations between independent and dependent variables. The level of on sight climbing and the total practice experience were used to define the groups. The research task consisted of performing hanging positions on the created support in order to measure the mechanical load endured by the fingers in the three most characteristic hand grips in climbing (crimp, half crimp and slope). It has been concluded that the performance level of the climbers had no influence on the production of a pattern of differentiated finger mechanical load during the research task.

  11. Fabric along the NEEM ice core, Greenland, and its comparison with GRIP and NGRIP ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, M.; Azuma, N.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Eichler, J.; Fujita, S.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Samyn, D.; Svensson, A.; Weikusat, I.

    2014-07-01

    Fabric (distribution of crystallographic orientations) along the full NEEM ice core, Greenland was measured in the field by an automatic ice texture analyzer every 10 m, from 33 m down to 2461 m depth. The fabric evolves from a slightly anisotropic fabric at the top, toward a strong single maximum at about 2300 m, which is typical of a deformation pattern mostly driven by uniaxial compression and simple shearing. A sharp increase in the fabric strengthening rate is observed at the Holocene to Wisconsin (HW) climatic transition. From a simple model we estimate that this depth is located at a transition from a state dominated by vertical compression to a state dominated by vertical shear. Comparisons are made to two others ice cores drilled along the same ridge; the GRIP ice core, drilled at the summit of the ice sheet, and the NGRIP ice core, drilled 325 km to the NNW of the summit along the ridge, and 365 km upstream from NEEM. This comparison tends to demonstrate that the ice viscosity change with the HW climatic transition must be associated with the shear-dominated state to induce the abrupt fabric strengthening observed at NEEM. This comparison therefore reflects the increasing role of shear deformation on the coring site when moving NW along the ridge from GRIP to NGRIP and NEEM. The difference in fabric profiles between NEEM and NGRIP also evidences a stronger lateral extension associated with a sharper ridge at NGRIP. Further along the core, centimeter scale abrupt texture (fabric and microstructure) variations are observed in the bottom part of the core. Their positions are in good agreement with the observed folding layers in Dahl-Jensen et al. (2013).

  12. No strong correlations between serum cytokine levels, CMV serostatus and hand-grip strength in older subjects in the Berlin BASE-II cohort.

    PubMed

    Goldeck, David; Pawelec, Graham; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Oettinger, Lilly; Haehnel, Karin; Demuth, Ilja

    2016-02-01

    Hand-grip strength is strongly correlated with measures of muscle mass and can be taken to predict morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hand-grip strength and other markers associated with immune ageing, such as Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, leukocyte telomere length and serum levels of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in the elderly. We have assessed grip strength with the Smedley Dynamometer in younger (22-37 years) and older (60-85 years) men and women in a sample of people living in Berlin (the BASE-II study). Serum cytokine levels were determined by flow-cytometry, CMV serostatus via ELISA and leukocyte telomere length by quantitative PCR. IL-1β levels tended to be negatively associated with grip strength, but we did not find a significant association with IL-6 levels. CMV-seropositivity was not associated with higher levels of IL-1β, IL-6 or TNF, nor with weaker grip strength in men or women at any age. A putative general measure of organismal ageing, overall leukocyte telomere length, was also found not to be associated with lower grip strength in the elderly. Hand-grip strength remains an important biomarker independent of CMV infection or shorter telomere lengths, and poorly reflected in peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, all of which have been associated in some studies with frailty and mortality.

  13. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields

    PubMed Central

    Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-01-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain. PMID:25717155

  14. Effects of changing gravity on anticipatory grip force control during point-to-point movements of a hand-held object.

    PubMed

    Nowak, D A; Hermsdörfer, J; Philipp, J; Marquardt, C; Glasauer, S; Mai, N

    2001-07-01

    We investigated the quality of predictive grip force control during gravity changes induced by parabolic flight maneuvers. During these maneuvers gravity varied: There were 2 periods of hypergravity, in which terrestrial gravity nearly doubled, and a 20-s period of microgravity, during which a manipulated object was virtually weightless. We determined grip and load forces during vertical point-to-point movements of an instrumented object. Point-to-point movements were a combination of static (stationary holding) and dynamic (continuous movements) task conditions, which were separately analyzed in our previous studies. Analysis of the produced grip forces revealed that grip adjustments were closely linked to load force fluctuations under each gravity condition. In particular, grip force maxima coincided closely in time with load force peaks, although these occurred at different phases of the movement depending on the gravity level. However, quantitative analysis of the ratio of maximum grip force to the corresponding load force peak revealed an increased force ratio during microgravity when compared to that during normal and hypergravity. We hypothesize that the impaired precision of force coupling with respect to force magnitude during microgravity results from reduced feedback information about the object's mass during the stationary holding of the object in between each movement. The results indicate that the temporal grip force regulation is highly automatized and stable, whereas economical planning of force magnitude is more flexible and might reflect changes of the external loading condition.

  15. The effect of force feedback delay on stiffness perception and grip force modulation during tool-mediated interaction with elastic force fields.

    PubMed

    Leib, Raz; Karniel, Amir; Nisky, Ilana

    2015-05-01

    During interaction with objects, we form an internal representation of their mechanical properties. This representation is used for perception and for guiding actions, such as in precision grip, where grip force is modulated with the predicted load forces. In this study, we explored the relationship between grip force adjustment and perception of stiffness during interaction with linear elastic force fields. In a forced-choice paradigm, participants probed pairs of virtual force fields while grasping a force sensor that was attached to a haptic device. For each pair, they were asked which field had higher level of stiffness. In half of the pairs, the force feedback of one of the fields was delayed. Participants underestimated the stiffness of the delayed field relatively to the nondelayed, but their grip force characteristics were similar in both conditions. We analyzed the magnitude of the grip force and the lag between the grip force and the load force in the exploratory probing movements within each trial. Right before answering which force field had higher level of stiffness, both magnitude and lag were similar between delayed and nondelayed force fields. These results suggest that an accurate internal representation of environment stiffness and time delay was used for adjusting the grip force. However, this representation did not help in eliminating the bias in stiffness perception. We argue that during performance of a perceptual task that is based on proprioceptive feedback, separate neural mechanisms are responsible for perception and action-related computations in the brain.

  16. Body composition and grip strength are improved in transgenic sickle mice fed a high-protein diet.

    PubMed

    Capers, Patrice L; Hyacinth, Hyacinth I; Cue, Shayla; Chappa, Prasanthi; Vikulina, Tatyana; Roser-Page, Susanne; Weitzmann, M Neale; Archer, David R; Newman, Gale W; Quarshie, Alexander; Stiles, Jonathan K; Hibbert, Jacqueline M

    2015-01-01

    Key pathophysiology of sickle cell anaemia includes compensatory erythropoiesis, vascular injury and chronic inflammation, which divert amino acids from tissue deposition for growth/weight gain and muscle formation. We hypothesised that sickle mice maintained on an isoenergetic diet with a high percentage of energy derived from protein (35 %), as opposed to a standard diet with 20 % of energy derived from protein, would improve body composition, bone mass and grip strength. Male Berkeley transgenic sickle mice (S; n 8-12) were fed either 20 % (S20) or 35 % (S35) diets for 3 months. Grip strength (BIOSEB meter) and body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan) were measured. After 3 months, control mice had the highest bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) (P < 0·005). S35 mice had the largest increase in grip strength. A two-way ANOVA of change in grip strength (P = 0·043) attributed this difference to genotype (P = 0·025) and a trend in type of diet (P = 0·067). l-Arginine (l-Arg) supplementation of the 20 % diet was explored, as a possible mechanism for improvement obtained with the 35 % diet. Townes transgenic sickle mice (TS; n 6-9) received 0·8, 1·6, 3·2 or 6·4 % l-Arg based on the same protocol and outcome measures used for the S mice. TS mice fed 1·6 % l-Arg for 3 months (TS1.6) had the highest weight gain, BMD, BMC and lean body mass compared with other groups. TS3.2 mice showed significantly more improvement in grip strength than TS0·8 and TS1.6 mice (P < 0·05). In conclusion, the high-protein diet improved body composition and grip strength. Outcomes observed with TS1.6 and TS3.2 mice, respectively, confirm the hypothesis and reveal l-Arg as part of the mechanism.

  17. SAO and Kelvin Waves in the EuroGRIPS GCMS and the UK Meteorological Offices Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amodei, M.; Pawson, S.; Scaife, A. A.; Lahoz, W.; Langematz, U.; Li, Ding Min; Simon, P.

    2000-01-01

    This work is an intercomparison of four tropospheric-stratospheric climate models, the Unified Model (UM) of the U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO), the model of the Free University in Berlin (FUB). the ARPEGE-climat model of the National Center for Meteorological Research (CNRM), and the Extended UGAMP GCM (EUGCM) of the Center for Global Atmospheric Modelling (CGAM), against the UKMO analyses. This comparison has been made in the framework of the "GSM-Reality Intercomparison Project for SPARC" (GRIPS). SPARC (Stratospheric Processes and their Role in Climate) aims are to investigate the effects of the middle atmosphere on climate and the GRIPS purpose is to organized a comprehensive assessment of current Middle Atmosphere-Climate Models (MACMs). The models integrations were made without identical contraints e.g. boundary conditions, incoming solar radiation). All models are able to represent the dominant features of the extratropical circulation. In this paper, the structure of the tropical winds and the strengths of the Kelvin waves are examined. Explanations for the differences exhibited. between the models. as well as between models and analyses, are also proposed. In the analyses a rich spectrum of waves (eastward and westward) is present and contributes to drive the SAO (SemiAnnual Oscillation) and the QBO (Quasi-Biennal Oscillation). The amplitude of the Kelvin waves is close to the one observed in UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) data. In agreement with observations, the Kelvin waves generated in the models propagate into the middle atmosphere as wave packets which underlines convective forcing origin. In most models, slow Kelvin waves propagate too high and are hence overestimated in the upper stratosphere and in the mesosphere, except for the UM which is more diffusive. These waves are not sufficient to force realistic westerlies of the QBO or SAO westerly phases. If the SAO is represented by all models only two of them are able to generate

  18. Effort, performance, and motivation: insights from robot-assisted training of human golf putting and rat grip strength.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Jaime E; Gebrekristos, Berkenesh; Perez, Sergi; Rowe, Justin B; Sharp, Kelli; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-06-01

    Robotic devices can modulate success rates and required effort levels during motor training, but it is unclear how this affects performance gains and motivation. Here we present results from training unimpaired humans in a virtual golf-putting task, and training spinal cord injured (SCI) rats in a grip strength task using robotically modulated success rates and effort levels. Robotic assistance in golf practice increased trainees feelings of competence, and, paradoxically, increased their sense effort, even though it had mixed effects on learning. Reducing effort during a grip strength training task led rats with SCI to practice the task more frequently. However, the more frequent practice of these rats did not cause them to exceed the strength gains achieved by rats that exercised less often at higher required effort levels. These results show that increasing success and decreasing effort with robots increases motivation, but has mixed effects on performance gains.

  19. Effort, performance, and motivation: insights from robot-assisted training of human golf putting and rat grip strength.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Jaime E; Gebrekristos, Berkenesh; Perez, Sergi; Rowe, Justin B; Sharp, Kelli; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-06-01

    Robotic devices can modulate success rates and required effort levels during motor training, but it is unclear how this affects performance gains and motivation. Here we present results from training unimpaired humans in a virtual golf-putting task, and training spinal cord injured (SCI) rats in a grip strength task using robotically modulated success rates and effort levels. Robotic assistance in golf practice increased trainees feelings of competence, and, paradoxically, increased their sense effort, even though it had mixed effects on learning. Reducing effort during a grip strength training task led rats with SCI to practice the task more frequently. However, the more frequent practice of these rats did not cause them to exceed the strength gains achieved by rats that exercised less often at higher required effort levels. These results show that increasing success and decreasing effort with robots increases motivation, but has mixed effects on performance gains. PMID:24187278

  20. LASE system upgrade and measurements from the NASA GRIP field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.; Notari, A.; Collins, J. E.; Nehrir, A. R.; Butler, C. F.; Halverson, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) system has operated on the NASA ER-2, P-3, and DC-8 aircraft during the past 16 years and participated in 13 field experiments. This system provides vertical profiles of water vapor mixing ratio and aerosol and cloud backscattering. A brief overview is presented on the upgrade of LASE that included refurbishment of laser diode seeding, control and data system, and zenith receiver system. These developments have enhanced the operational reliability of the system and improved its performance. The LASE system was deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft recently for the NASA GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) field experiment, which was conducted during August and September 2010 from operational bases in Fort Lauderdale, FL and St. Croix, VI. Initial measurements from this field experiment are presented including distributions of water vapor, aerosol, and clouds. Temperature profiles from DC-8 dropsondes and nearby radiosondes are used to derive relative humidity profiles from the LASE water vapor mixing ratio profiles. Comparisons of LASE water vapor mixing ratio profiles with those measured by the new AVAPS-II dropsondes from the NASA DC-8 are also presented.

  1. EVIDENCE FOR MOTOR PLANNING IN MONKEYS: RHESUS MACAQUES SELECT EFFICIENT GRIPS WHEN TRANSPORTING SPOONS

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2014-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naïve adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with the elevated spoon problem, and observed how monkeys learned the affordances of spoons over sessions. Strikingly, monkeys developed two different strategies for efficient spoon transport in just 12 to 36 trials. In subsequent testing with a novel double bowl spoon approximately 1 year later, monkeys demonstrated that they were attending to the baited spoon bowl and continued to select efficient grips for transporting the spoon. Monkey data were contrasted with previous studies in human infants using a perception-action perspective in an effort to understand the fundamentals of tool use and motor planning that may be common in the development of these abilities across species and their origins in human behavior. PMID:21676101

  2. Reconstructed animation from four-phase grip MRI of the wrist with ulnar-sided pain.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Wada, T; Iba, K; Aoki, M; Tamakawa, M; Yamashita, T

    2013-09-01

    In order to visualize dynamic variations related to ulnar-sided wrist pain, animation was reconstructed from T2* coronal-sectioned magnetic resonance imaging in each of the four phases of grip motion for nine wrists in patients with ulnar pain. Eight of the nine wrists showed a positive ulnar variance of less than 2 mm. Ulnocarpal impaction and triangular fibrocartilage complex injury were assessed on the basis of animation and arthroscopy, respectively. Animation revealed ulnocarpal impaction in four wrists. In one of the four wrists, the torn portion of the articular disc was impinged between the ulnar head and ulnar proximal side of the lunate. In another wrist, the ulnar head impacted the lunate directly through the defect in the articular disc that had previously been excised. An ulnar shortening osteotomy successfully relieved ulnar wrist pain in all four cases with both ulnocarpal impaction and Palmer's Class II triangular fibrocartilage complex tears. This method demonstrated impairment of the articular disc and longitudinal instability of the distal radioulnar joint simultaneously and should be of value in investigating dynamic pathophysiology causing ulnar wrist pain.

  3. Detecting submaximal efforts in grip strength testing with the coefficient of variation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M E; Geisser, M E; Hanson, C S; O'Connor, P D

    1993-03-01

    The use of the coefficient of variation (CV) to determine level of effort in grip strength testing was examined empirically. Twenty-nine asymptomatic subjects participated in two conditions of testing: 100% effort and 50% effort. Order of conditions was counterbalanced and each subject was run in both conditions twice in the same order in order to assess the stability of the method. The number of trials (grasps) per condition was three for a total of 12 grasps for the study. The submaximal (50%) effort condition showed significantly more variability than the maximal effort condition in both sets of conditions (p<.01). Intra-class correlation coefficients were very low for both maximal effort and submaximal efforts (.036 and .025) indicating very low stability for the coefficient of variation. Classification rates were also found to have unacceptably large errors with 69% of the submaximal efforts being classified as maximal with the traditional 15% CV cutoff and 55% misclassification of submaximal efforts with an optimized 11% CV cutoff. It was concluded that the currently practiced method of using a low number of repetitions to calculate the CV may result in very unstable measures. Furthermore the "false negative" rate in using this method is unacceptably high for practical application. The implications of using the method and suggestions for improvement are discussed.

  4. Analysis of fatigue and tremor during sustained maximal grip contractions using Hilbert-Huang Transformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Duchêne, Jacques; Hewson, David J

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate muscle fatigue and tremor during a Sustained Maximal Grip Contraction (SMGC) using the Hilbert-Huang Transformation (HHT). Thirty-nine healthy subjects volunteered for the study and performed a 25-s SMGC. Fatigue parameters such as the relative force output (RFO) were calculated from the residual of SMGC after applying Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD). Using the energy spectrum of the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) obtained using HHT, isometric force tremor was identified from the 4 to 12 Hz region in IMF3 and IMF4. Data were analysed for five consecutive 5-s epochs to identify changes in fatigue and tremor over time. The HHT method was able to identify a greater resistance to fatigue in women compared to men (p≤0.05) and in non-dominant hands compared to dominant hands (p≤0.05). Consistent with the results for fatigue, women had less tremor than men (p≤0.05), while non-dominant hands trembled less than did dominant hands (p≤0.05). Higher levels of tremor were observed for non-fatigue-resistant subjects for both 10-15 s and 15-20 s epochs (p≤0.05). The HHT is an appropriate method to identify both fatigue and tremor during SMGC. It would be of interest to apply this method to the study the elderly or patients with neuromuscular disorders.

  5. Effects of material properties and object orientation on precision grip kinematics.

    PubMed

    Paulun, Vivian C; Gegenfurtner, Karl R; Goodale, Melvyn A; Fleming, Roland W

    2016-08-01

    Successfully picking up and handling objects requires taking into account their physical properties (e.g., material) and position relative to the body. Such features are often inferred by sight, but it remains unclear to what extent observers vary their actions depending on the perceived properties. To investigate this, we asked participants to grasp, lift and carry cylinders to a goal location with a precision grip. The cylinders were made of four different materials (Styrofoam, wood, brass and an additional brass cylinder covered with Vaseline) and were presented at six different orientations with respect to the participant (0°, 30°, 60°, 90°, 120°, 150°). Analysis of their grasping kinematics revealed differences in timing and spatial modulation at all stages of the movement that depended on both material and orientation. Object orientation affected the spatial configuration of index finger and thumb during the grasp, but also the timing of handling and transport duration. Material affected the choice of local grasp points and the duration of the movement from the first visual input until release of the object. We find that conditions that make grasping more difficult (orientation with the base pointing toward the participant, high weight and low surface friction) lead to longer durations of individual movement segments and a more careful placement of the fingers on the object. PMID:27016090

  6. Fire hose gripping device and process for fighting fires in oil refineries and the like

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, D.R.; Everding, R.J.

    1989-08-15

    This patent describes a firefighting process. It comprises the steps of: attaching one end of a fire hose to a fire hydrant when the end of the fire hose is in a generally collapsed flattened position; uncoiling the fire hose; attaching a manually grippable spray nozzle to the other end of the fire hose; inflating and substantially filling the fire hose with water from the water supply means to expand the hose to a semirigid expanded position; grasping, lifting, and carrying the filled fire hose with one hand; gripping a vertical elastomeric handle of a hose clamp with the other hand. The hose clamp having a generally U-shaped hose-engaging member. The U-shaped hose-engaging member having an open end defining an access opening for receiving the hose. The access opening being larger than the maximum diameter and transverse span of the uncoiled filled fire hose: inserting the hose-engaging member on the fire hose such that there is sufficient clearance between the hose-engaging member and the fire hose to side hose clamp to another position; moving the hose clamp at an acute angle of inclination relative to the hose to detachable secure and inter-lockingly engage the hose-engaging member to the filled fire hose; manually lifting the vertical elastomeric handle of the hose clamp to elevate the fire hose; pointing the nozzle towards the fire; and spraying water from the nozzle on the fire.

  7. DAWN Coherent Wind Profiling Lidar Flights on NASA's DC-8 During GRIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Creary, Garfield A.; Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Trieu, Bo C.; Yu, Jirong

    2011-01-01

    Almost from their invention, lasers have been used to measure the velocity of wind and objects; over distances of cm to 10s of km. Long distance (remote) sensing of wind has been accomplished with continuous-wave (CW), focused pulsed, and collimated pulsed lasers; with direct and coherent (heterodyne) optical detection; and with a multitude of laser wavelengths. Airborne measurement of wind with pulsed, coherent-detection lidar was first performed in 1971 with a CW CO2 laser1, in 1972 with a pulsed CO2 laser2, in 1993 with a pulsed 2-micron laser3, and in 1999 with a pulsed CO2 laser and nadir-centered conical scanning4. Of course there were many other firsts and many other groups doing lidar wind remote sensing with coherent and direct detection. A very large FOM coherent wind lidar has been built by LaRC and flown on a DC-8. However a burn on the telescope secondary mirror prevented the full demonstration of high FOM. Both the GRIP science product and the technology and technique demonstration from aircraft are important to NASA. The technology and technique demonstrations contribute to our readiness for the 3D Winds space mission. The data analysis is beginning and we hope to present results at the conference.

  8. Lipodystrophy and inflammation predict later grip strength in HIV-infected men: the MACS Body Composition substudy.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Keith W; Li, Xiuhong; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Abraham, Alison G; Dobs, Adrian S; Margolick, Joseph B; Palella, Frank J; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Witt, Mallory D; Brown, Todd T

    2013-08-01

    Body fat changes in HIV-infected persons are associated with increased systemic inflammation and increased mortality. It is unknown whether lipodystrophy is also associated with declines in physical function. Between 2001 and 2003, 33 HIV-infected men with evidence of lipodystrophy (LIPO⁺), 23 HIV-infected men without lipodystrophy (LIPO⁻), and 33 seronegative men were recruited from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) for the Body Composition substudy. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) was assessed by quantitative computed tomography. Lean body mass (LBM) and extremity fat were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Insulin resistance was estimated by Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA). Serum interleukin (IL)-6, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α receptors I and II (sTNFRI and sTNFRII), and highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations were quantified from archived serum samples. These measurements were correlated with grip strength measured in 2007 using linear regression. At the substudy visit, the LIPO⁺ group had higher HOMA, sTNFRI, sTNFRII, and IL-6 levels than the LIPO⁻ group. In 2007, the LIPO⁺ group had lower median grip strength than the LIPO⁻ group (34.4 vs. 42.7 kg, p=0.002). Multivariable analysis of HIV⁺ men showed older age, lower LBM, higher sTNFRII concentrations, and LIPO⁺ status [adjusted mean difference -4.9 kg (p=0.045)] at the substudy visit were independently associated with lower subsequent grip strength. Inflammation, lower LBM, and lipodystrophy in HIV-infected men were associated with lower subsequent grip strength. These findings suggest that inflammation may contribute to declines in functional performance, independent of age.

  9. LXRα represses LPS-induced inflammatory responses by competing with IRF3 for GRIP1 in Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chun-Mu; He, Kun; Li, Pei-Zhi; Liu, Zuo-Jin; Zhu, Xi-Wen; Ou, Zhi-Bing; Ruan, Xiong-Zhong; Gong, Jian-Ping; Liu, Chang-An

    2016-06-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) in the nucleus play important roles in lipid metabolism and inflammation. The mechanism of LXR regulation of the LPS-induced Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inflammatory signaling pathway remains to be elucidated. C57/BL6 mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, T0901317 (a LXRs agonist), LPS and T0901317+LPS. Additionally, Kupffer cells isolated from male C57/BL6 mice were divided into the same four groups. A decreased amount of inflammatory cells infiltrated the portal areas and the hepatic sinusoids in the livers of mice in the T0901317+LPS group than in those of mice in the LPS group. In the T0901317+LPS group, the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were lower, while the serum level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) was higher. In vitro, Kupffer cells pretreated with T0901317 for 24h presented reduced TNF-α, interferon-beta (IFN-β) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) levels, while the IL-10 level increased; however, the mRNA and protein expression levels of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and glucocorticoid receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) were not significantly reduced. The co-IP data illustrated that LXRα bound to GRIP1 specifically in the T0901317+LPS group, while less IRF3 was bound to GRIP1 in the T0901317+LPS group than in the LPS group. Furthermore, the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB was decreased by pretreating Kupffer cells with T0901317 for 24h. These results suggest that activated LXRα competes with IRF3 for GRIP1 binding, thus repressing IRF3 and NF-κB transcriptional activity and inhibiting the inflammatory response initiated by LPS in Kupffer cells. PMID:27085678

  10. Using Goal- and Grip-Related Information for Understanding the Correctness of Other’s Actions: An ERP Study

    PubMed Central

    van Elk, Michiel; Bousardt, Roel; Bekkering, Harold; van Schie, Hein T.

    2012-01-01

    Detecting errors in other’s actions is of pivotal importance for joint action, competitive behavior and observational learning. Although many studies have focused on the neural mechanisms involved in detecting low-level errors, relatively little is known about error-detection in everyday situations. The present study aimed to identify the functional and neural mechanisms whereby we understand the correctness of other’s actions involving well-known objects (e.g. pouring coffee in a cup). Participants observed action sequences in which the correctness of the object grasped and the grip applied to a pair of objects were independently manipulated. Observation of object violations (e.g. grasping the empty cup instead of the coffee pot) resulted in a stronger P3-effect than observation of grip errors (e.g. grasping the coffee pot at the upper part instead of the handle), likely reflecting a reorienting response, directing attention to the relevant location. Following the P3-effect, a parietal slow wave positivity was observed that persisted for grip-errors, likely reflecting the detection of an incorrect hand-object interaction. These findings provide new insight in the functional significance of the neurophysiological markers associated with the observation of incorrect actions and suggest that the P3-effect and the subsequent parietal slow wave positivity may reflect the detection of errors at different levels in the action hierarchy. Thereby this study elucidates the cognitive processes that support the detection of action violations in the selection of objects and grips. PMID:22606261

  11. Rapamycin increases grip strength and attenuates age-related decline in maximal running distance in old low capacity runner rats

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Qian-Li; Yang, Huanle; Li, Hui-Fen; Abadir, Peter M.; Burks, Tyesha N.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Carlson, Joshua; Chen, Laura; Walston, Jeremy D.; Leng, Sean X.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is known to extend lifespan. We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled study of enteric rapamycin-treatment to evaluate its effect on physical function in old low capacity runner (LCR) rats, a rat model selected from diverse genetic background for low intrinsic aerobic exercise capacity without genomic manipulation and characterized by increased complex disease risks and aging phenotypes. The study was performed in 12 male and 16 female LCR rats aged 16-22 months at baseline. The treatment group was fed with rapamycin-containing diet pellets at approximately 2.24mg/kg body weight per day and the placebo group with the same diet without rapamycin for six months. Observation was extended for additional 2 months. Physical function measurements include grip strength measured as maximum tensile force using a rat grip strength meter and maximum running distance (MRD) using rat physical treadmill test. The results showed that rapamycin improved grip strength by 13% (p=.036) and 60% (p<.001) from its baseline in female and male rats, respectively. Rapamycin attenuated MRD decline by 66% (p<.001) and 46% (p=.319) in females and males, respectively. These findings provide initial evidence for beneficial effect of rapamycin on physical functioning in an aging rat model of high disease risks with significant implication in humans. PMID:26997106

  12. Observations During GRIP from HIRAD: Images of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Jones, W. L.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Biswas, S.; May, C.; Shah, G.; Black, P.; Buckley, C. D.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD (Hurricane Imaging Radiometer) flew on the WB-57 during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be inferred. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years. The advantage of HIRAD over SFMR is that HIRAD can observe a +/- 60-degree swath, rather than a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP campaign will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. To the extent possible, comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the GRIP campaign, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eyewall, location of vortex wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  13. GRiP - A flexible approach for calculating risk as a function of consequence, vulnerability, and threat.

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R. G.; Buehring, W. A.; Bassett, G. W.

    2011-04-08

    Get a GRiP (Gravitational Risk Procedure) on risk by using an approach inspired by the physics of gravitational forces between body masses! In April 2010, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Special Events staff (Protective Security Advisors [PSAs]) expressed concern about how to calculate risk given measures of consequence, vulnerability, and threat. The PSAs believed that it is not 'right' to assign zero risk, as a multiplicative formula would imply, to cases in which the threat is reported to be extremely small, and perhaps could even be assigned a value of zero, but for which consequences and vulnerability are potentially high. They needed a different way to aggregate the components into an overall measure of risk. To address these concerns, GRiP was proposed and developed. The inspiration for GRiP is Sir Isaac Newton's Universal Law of Gravitation: the attractive force between two bodies is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the squares of the distance between them. The total force on one body is the sum of the forces from 'other bodies' that influence that body. In the case of risk, the 'other bodies' are the components of risk (R): consequence, vulnerability, and threat (which we denote as C, V, and T, respectively). GRiP treats risk as if it were a body within a cube. Each vertex (corner) of the cube represents one of the eight combinations of minimum and maximum 'values' for consequence, vulnerability, and threat. The risk at each of the vertices is a variable that can be set. Naturally, maximum risk occurs when consequence, vulnerability, and threat are at their maximum values; minimum risk occurs when they are at their minimum values. Analogous to gravitational forces among body masses, the GRiP formula for risk states that the risk at any interior point of the box depends on the squares of the distances from that point to each of the eight vertices. The risk value at an interior (movable) point will be

  14. Tyre-road grip coefficient assessment - Part II: online estimation using instrumented vehicle, extended Kalman filter, and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque, Pablo; Mántaras, Daniel A.; Fidalgo, Eloy; Álvarez, Javier; Riva, Paolo; Girón, Pablo; Compadre, Diego; Ferran, Jordi

    2013-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to determine the limit of safe driving conditions by identifying the maximal friction coefficient in a real vehicle. The study will focus on finding a method to determine this limit before reaching the skid, which is valuable information in the context of traffic safety. Since it is not possible to measure the friction coefficient directly, it will be estimated using the appropriate tools in order to get the most accurate information. A real vehicle is instrumented to collect information of general kinematics and steering tie-rod forces. A real-time algorithm is developed to estimate forces and aligning torque in the tyres using an extended Kalman filter and neural networks techniques. The methodology is based on determining the aligning torque; this variable allows evaluation of the behaviour of the tyre. It transmits interesting information from the tyre-road contact and can be used to predict the maximal tyre grip and safety margin. The maximal grip coefficient is estimated according to a knowledge base, extracted from computer simulation of a high detailed three-dimensional model, using Adams® software. The proposed methodology is validated and applied to real driving conditions, in which maximal grip and safety margin are properly estimated.

  15. Perturbing the action observation network during perception and categorization of actions' goals and grips: state-dependency and virtual lesion TMS effects.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Pierre O; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-03-01

    Watching others grasping and using objects activates an action observation network (AON), including inferior frontal (IFC), anterior intraparietal (AIP), and somatosensory cortices (S1). Yet, causal evidence of the differential involvement of such AON sensorimotor nodes in representing high- and low-level action components (i.e., end-goals and grip type) is meager. To address this issue, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation-adaptation (TMS-A) during 2 novel action perception tasks. Participants were shown adapting movies displaying a demonstrator performing goal-directed actions with a tool, using either power or precision grips. They were then asked to match the end-goal (Goal-recognition task) or the grip (Grip-recognition task) of actions shown in test pictures to the adapting movies. TMS was administered over IFC, AIP, or S1 during presentation of test pictures. Virtual lesion-like effects were found in the Grip-recognition task where IFC stimulation induced a general performance decrease, suggesting a critical role of IFC in perceiving grips. In the Goal-recognition task, IFC and S1 stimulation differently affected the processing of "adapted" and "nonadapted" goals. These "state-dependent" effects suggest that the overall goal of seen actions is encoded into functionally distinct and spatially overlapping neural populations in IFC-S1 and such encoding is critical for recognizing and understanding end-goals.

  16. Grip strength is a predictor of bone mineral density among adolescent combat sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Raouf; Hassen Zrour, Saoussen; Rebai, Haithem; Fadhel Najjar, Mohamed; Neffeti, Fadoua; Bergaoui, Naceur; Mejdoub, Hafedh; Tabka, Zouhair

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was firstly to investigate the correlation between bone parameters and grip strength (GS) in hands, explosive legs power (ELP), and hormonal parameters; second, to identify the most determinant variables of bone mineral density (BMD) among adolescent combat sport athletes. Fifty combat sport athletes aged 17.1 ± 0.2 year were compared with 30 sedentary subjects matched for age, height, and pubertal stage. For all subjects, the BMD in deferent sites associated with anthropometric parameters were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The growth hormone (GH) and testosterone (TESTO) concentrations were tested. The GS in dominant (GSDA) and nondominant arms (GSNDA) and ELP were evaluated. All BMD measured were greater in athletes than in sedentary group (p<0.01). The GS and ELP showed higher values in athletes than in sedentary group (p<0.01). The BMD in all sites were correlated with weight, but without correlation with height. The GSNDA and ELP were significantly correlated with BMD of both spine and legs. The GH was correlated with the BMD of whole body and spine (p<0.05). The TESTO was only correlated with BMD of the arms (p<0.01). The best predictor of BMD measurements is GSNDA. This study has proved the osteogenic effect of combat sports practice, especially judo and karate kyokushinkai. Therefore, children and adolescent should be encouraged to participate in combat sport. Moreover, it suggested that the best model predicting BMD in different sites among adolescent combat sports athletes was the GSNDA. PMID:22980488

  17. Status of Middle Atmosphere-Climate Models: Results SPARC-GRIPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Kodera, Kunihiko

    2003-01-01

    The middle atmosphere is an important component of the climate system, primarily because of the radiative forcing of ozone. Middle atmospheric ozone can change, over long times, because of changes in the abundance of anthropogenic pollutants which catalytically destroy it, and because of the temperature sensitivity of kinetic reaction rates. There is thus a complex interaction between ozone, involving chemical and climatic mechanisms. One question of interest is how ozone will change over the next decades , as the "greenhouse-gas cooling" of the middle atmosphere increases but the concentrations of chlorine species decreases (because of policy changes). concerns the climate biases in current middle atmosphere-climate models, especially their ability to simulate the correct seasonal cycle at high latitudes, and the existence of temperature biases in the global mean. A major obstacle when addressing this question This paper will present a summary of recent results from the "GCM-Reality Intercomparison Project for SPARC" (GRIPS) initiative. A set of middle atmosphere-climate models has been compared, identifying common biases. Mechanisms for these biases are being studied in some detail, including off-line assessments of the radiation transfer codes and coordinated studies of the impacts of gravity wave drag due to sub-grid-scale processes. ensemble of models will be presented, along with numerical experiments undertaken with one or more models, designed to investigate the mechanisms at work in the atmosphere. The discussion will focus on dynamical and radiative mechanisms in the current climate, but implications for coupled ozone chemistry and the future climate will be assessed.

  18. Self-organization, free energy minimization, and optimal grip on a field of affordances

    PubMed Central

    Bruineberg, Jelle; Rietveld, Erik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we set out to develop a theoretical and conceptual framework for the new field of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience. This framework should be able to integrate insights from several relevant disciplines: theory on embodied cognition, ecological psychology, phenomenology, dynamical systems theory, and neurodynamics. We suggest that the main task of Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience is to investigate the phenomenon of skilled intentionality from the perspective of the self-organization of the brain-body-environment system, while doing justice to the phenomenology of skilled action. In previous work, we have characterized skilled intentionality as the organism's tendency toward an optimal grip on multiple relevant affordances simultaneously. Affordances are possibilities for action provided by the environment. In the first part of this paper, we introduce the notion of skilled intentionality and the phenomenon of responsiveness to a field of relevant affordances. Second, we use Friston's work on neurodynamics, but embed a very minimal version of his Free Energy Principle in the ecological niche of the animal. Thus amended, this principle is helpful for understanding the embeddedness of neurodynamics within the dynamics of the system “brain-body-landscape of affordances.” Next, we show how we can use this adjusted principle to understand the neurodynamics of selective openness to the environment: interacting action-readiness patterns at multiple timescales contribute to the organism's selective openness to relevant affordances. In the final part of the paper, we emphasize the important role of metastable dynamics in both the brain and the brain-body-environment system for adequate affordance-responsiveness. We exemplify our integrative approach by presenting research on the impact of Deep Brain Stimulation on affordance responsiveness of OCD patients. PMID:25161615

  19. Grip strength is a predictor of bone mineral density among adolescent combat sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Nasri, Raouf; Hassen Zrour, Saoussen; Rebai, Haithem; Fadhel Najjar, Mohamed; Neffeti, Fadoua; Bergaoui, Naceur; Mejdoub, Hafedh; Tabka, Zouhair

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was firstly to investigate the correlation between bone parameters and grip strength (GS) in hands, explosive legs power (ELP), and hormonal parameters; second, to identify the most determinant variables of bone mineral density (BMD) among adolescent combat sport athletes. Fifty combat sport athletes aged 17.1 ± 0.2 year were compared with 30 sedentary subjects matched for age, height, and pubertal stage. For all subjects, the BMD in deferent sites associated with anthropometric parameters were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The growth hormone (GH) and testosterone (TESTO) concentrations were tested. The GS in dominant (GSDA) and nondominant arms (GSNDA) and ELP were evaluated. All BMD measured were greater in athletes than in sedentary group (p<0.01). The GS and ELP showed higher values in athletes than in sedentary group (p<0.01). The BMD in all sites were correlated with weight, but without correlation with height. The GSNDA and ELP were significantly correlated with BMD of both spine and legs. The GH was correlated with the BMD of whole body and spine (p<0.05). The TESTO was only correlated with BMD of the arms (p<0.01). The best predictor of BMD measurements is GSNDA. This study has proved the osteogenic effect of combat sports practice, especially judo and karate kyokushinkai. Therefore, children and adolescent should be encouraged to participate in combat sport. Moreover, it suggested that the best model predicting BMD in different sites among adolescent combat sports athletes was the GSNDA.

  20. Birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction and nutritional status in childhood in relation to grip strength in adults: from the 1982 Pelotas (Brazil) birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bielemann, Renata Moraes; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; Horta, Bernardo Lessa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the association among birth weight, intrauterine growth, and nutritional status in childhood with grip strength in young adults from the 1982 Pelotas (Brazil) birth cohort. Methods In 1982, the hospital live births of Pelotas were followed. In 2012, grip strength was evaluated using a hand dynamometer and the best of the six measurements was used. Birth weight was analyzed as z-score for gestational age according to Williams (1982) curve. Weight-for-age, weight-for-length/height, and length/height-for-age at 2 and 4 y were analyzed in z-scores according to 2006 World Health Organization Child Growth Standards. Lean mass at 30 y was included as possible mediator using the g-computation formula. Results In 2012, 3701 (68.1%) individuals were interviewed and 3470 were included in the present analyses. An increase of 1 z-score in birth weight was associated with an increase of 1.5 kg in grip strength in males (95% confidence interval, 1.1–1.9). Positive effect of birth weight on grip strength was found in females. Grip strength was greater in individuals who were born with appropriate size for gestational age and positively associated with weight- and length/height-for-age z-score at 2 and 4 y of age. A positive association between birth weight and grip strength was only partially mediated by adult lean mass (50% and 33% of total effect in males and females), whereas direct effect of weight at 2 y was found only in males. Conclusions It is suggested that good nutrition in prenatal and early postnatal life has a positive influence on adult muscle strength. The results from birth weight were suggestive of fetal programming on grip strength measurement. PMID:26678603

  1. alpha2 adrenoceptors are involved in the regulation of the gripping-induced immobility episodes in taiep rats.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, José R; Cortés, Ma Del Carmen; Valencia, Jaime; Arias-Montaño, José A

    2006-10-01

    In 1989 Holmgren et al. (Holmgren et al. 1989 Lab Anim Sci 39:226-228) described a new mutant rat that developed a progressive motor disturbance during its lifespan. The syndrome is characterized by a tremor in the hind limbs followed by ataxia, episodes of tonic immobility, epilepsy, and paralysis. The acronym of these symptoms (taiep) became the name of this autosomic, recessive mutant rat. The taiep rats are neurological mutant animals with a hypomyelination, followed by a progressive demyelination process. At 7-8 months of age, taiep rats develop immobility episodes (IEs) characterized by a cortical desynchronization, associated with the theta rhythm in the hippocampus and changes of the nucal electromyogram (EMG), whose pattern is like rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. These rats also show an altered sleep pattern with an equal REM sleep distribution. This study analyzed therole of alpha(2) adrenoceptors in the expression of gripping-induced IEs in 8-month-old male taiep rats. The alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonists clonidine and xylacine increased the frequency of gripping-induced IEs whereas the alpha(2) antagonists yohimbine and idazoxandecreased or prevented such episodes. These findings correlate with the pharmacological observations in narcoleptic dogs and humans in which alpha(2) adrenergic mechanisms are involved in the modulation of cataplexy. Unexpectedly, the repetitive administration of clonidine resulted in jumping behavior, indicative of phasic activation of extensor musculature. Taken together, our results show that alpha(2) adrenoceptors are involved in the modulation in gripping-induced IEs and after the administration of several doses of clonidine produced phasic motor activation.

  2. Deficient grip force control in schizophrenia: behavioral and modeling evidence for altered motor inhibition and motor noise.

    PubMed

    Teremetz, Maxime; Amado, Isabelle; Bendjemaa, Narjes; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Lindberg, Pavel G; Maier, Marc A

    2014-01-01

    Whether upper limb sensorimotor control is affected in schizophrenia and how underlying pathological mechanisms may potentially intervene in these deficits is still being debated. We tested voluntary force control in schizophrenia patients and used a computational model in order to elucidate potential cerebral mechanisms underlying sensorimotor deficits in schizophrenia. A visuomotor grip force-tracking task was performed by 17 medicated and 6 non-medicated patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) and by 15 healthy controls. Target forces in the ramp-hold-and-release paradigm were set to 5 N and to 10% maximal voluntary grip force. Force trajectory was analyzed by performance measures and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). A computational model incorporating neural control signals was used to replicate the empirically observed motor behavior and to explore underlying neural mechanisms. Grip task performance was significantly lower in medicated and non-medicated schizophrenia patients compared to controls. Three behavioral variables were significantly higher in both patient groups: tracking error (by 50%), coefficient of variation of force (by 57%) and duration of force release (up by 37%). Behavioral performance did not differ between patient groups. Computational simulation successfully replicated these findings and predicted that decreased motor inhibition, together with an increased signal-dependent motor noise, are sufficient to explain the observed motor deficits in patients. PCA also suggested altered motor inhibition as a key factor differentiating patients from control subjects: the principal component representing inhibition correlated with clinical severity. These findings show that schizophrenia affects voluntary sensorimotor control of the hand independent of medication, and suggest that reduced motor inhibition and increased signal-dependent motor noise likely reflect key pathological mechanisms of the sensorimotor deficit.

  3. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals the neural substrates of arm transport and grip formation in reach-to-grasp actions in humans.

    PubMed

    Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Monaco, Simona; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio; McAdam, Teresa D; Quinlan, Derek J; Goodale, Melvyn A; Culham, Jody C

    2010-08-01

    Picking up a cup requires transporting the arm to the cup (transport component) and preshaping the hand appropriately to grasp the handle (grip component). Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the human neural substrates of the transport component and its relationship with the grip component. Participants were shown three-dimensional objects placed either at a near location, adjacent to the hand, or at a far location, within reach but not adjacent to the hand. Participants performed three tasks at each location as follows: (1) touching the object with the knuckles of the right hand; (2) grasping the object with the right hand; or (3) passively viewing the object. The transport component was manipulated by positioning the object in the far versus the near location. The grip component was manipulated by asking participants to grasp the object versus touching it. For the first time, we have identified the neural substrates of the transport component, which include the superior parieto-occipital cortex and the rostral superior parietal lobule. Consistent with past studies, we found specialization for the grip component in bilateral anterior intraparietal sulcus and left ventral premotor cortex; now, however, we also find activity for the grasp even when no transport is involved. In addition to finding areas specialized for the transport and grip components in parietal cortex, we found an integration of the two components in dorsal premotor cortex and supplementary motor areas, two regions that may be important for the coordination of reach and grasp.

  4. Strength and muscle activities during the toe-gripping action: comparison of ankle angle in the horizontal plane between the sitting upright and standing positions

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether toe grip strength and muscle activities are affected by the ankle angle in the horizontal plane in the sitting upright and standing positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 16 healthy young women. [Methods] We measured toe grip strength and the maximum voluntary contraction activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, anterior tibialis, and medial head of the gastrocnemius. In addition, we calculated the percent integrated electromyography during foot gripping in 3 different ankle joint positions between the long axis of the foot and the line of progression on the horizontal plane, namely 10° of internal rotation, 0°, and 10° of external rotation. [Results] Two-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences. A significant main effect was observed in the measurement conditions for the percent integrated electromyography of the rectus femoris muscle and long head of the biceps femoris. However, two-way analysis of variance did not reveal any significant difference, and a significant main effect was not observed in toe grip strength. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that exerted toe grip strength is only slightly affected by the ankle angle in the horizontal plane in the sitting upright and standing positions. Therefore, the current measurement positions were shown to be optimal for measurement. PMID:27134399

  5. Factor recruitment and TIF2/GRIP1 corepressor activity at a collagenase-3 response element that mediates regulation by phorbol esters and hormones

    PubMed Central

    Rogatsky, Inez; Zarember, Kol A.; Yamamoto, Keith R.

    2001-01-01

    To investigate determinants of specific transcriptional regulation, we measured factor occupancy and function at a response element, col3A, associated with the collagenase-3 gene in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells; col3A confers activation by phorbol esters, and repression by glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones. The subunit composition and activity of AP-1, which binds col3A, paralleled the intracellular level of cFos, which is modulated by phorbol esters and glucocorticoids. In contrast, a similar AP-1 site at the collagenase-1 gene, not inducible in U2OS cells, was not bound by AP-1. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) associated with col3A through protein–protein interactions with AP-1, regardless of AP-1 subunit composition, and repressed transcription. TIF2/GRIP1, reportedly a coactivator for GR and the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), was recruited to col3A and potentiated GR-mediated repression in the presence of a GR agonist but not antagonist. GRIP1 mutants deficient in GR binding and coactivator functions were also defective for corepression, and a GRIP1 fragment containing the GR-interacting region functioned as a dominant-negative for repression. In contrast, repression by TR was unaffected by GRIP1. Thus, the composition of regulatory complexes, and the biological activities of the bound factors, are dynamic and dependent on cell and response element contexts. Cofactors such as GRIP1 probably contain distinct surfaces for activation and repression that function in a context-dependent manner. PMID:11689447

  6. Factor recruitment and TIF2/GRIP1 corepressor activity at a collagenase-3 response element that mediates regulation by phorbol esters and hormones.

    PubMed

    Rogatsky, I; Zarember, K A; Yamamoto, K R

    2001-11-01

    To investigate determinants of specific transcriptional regulation, we measured factor occupancy and function at a response element, col3A, associated with the collagenase-3 gene in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells; col3A confers activation by phorbol esters, and repression by glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones. The subunit composition and activity of AP-1, which binds col3A, paralleled the intracellular level of cFos, which is modulated by phorbol esters and glucocorticoids. In contrast, a similar AP-1 site at the collagenase-1 gene, not inducible in U2OS cells, was not bound by AP-1. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) associated with col3A through protein-protein interactions with AP-1, regardless of AP-1 subunit composition, and repressed transcription. TIF2/GRIP1, reportedly a coactivator for GR and the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), was recruited to col3A and potentiated GR-mediated repression in the presence of a GR agonist but not antagonist. GRIP1 mutants deficient in GR binding and coactivator functions were also defective for corepression, and a GRIP1 fragment containing the GR-interacting region functioned as a dominant-negative for repression. In contrast, repression by TR was unaffected by GRIP1. Thus, the composition of regulatory complexes, and the biological activities of the bound factors, are dynamic and dependent on cell and response element contexts. Cofactors such as GRIP1 probably contain distinct surfaces for activation and repression that function in a context-dependent manner. PMID:11689447

  7. [Gait speed, grip strength and self-rated health among the elderly: data from the FIBRA Campinas network, São Paulo, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Bez, Joelita Pessoa de Oliveira; Neri, Anita Liberalesso

    2014-08-01

    The article seeks to investigate patterns of performance and relationships between grip strength, gait speed and self-rated health, and investigate the relationships between them, considering the variables of gender, age and family income. This was conducted in a probabilistic sample of community-dwelling elderly aged 65 and over, members of a population study on frailty. A total of 689 elderly people without cognitive deficit suggestive of dementia underwent tests of gait speed and grip strength. Comparisons between groups were based on low, medium and high speed and strength. Self-related health was assessed using a 5-point scale. The males and the younger elderly individuals scored significantly higher on grip strength and gait speed than the female and oldest did; the richest scored higher than the poorest on grip strength and gait speed; females and men aged over 80 had weaker grip strength and lower gait speed; slow gait speed and low income arose as risk factors for a worse health evaluation. Lower muscular strength affects the self-rated assessment of health because it results in a reduction in functional capacity, especially in the presence of poverty and a lack of compensatory factors.

  8. Stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry and physical comparison for the forensic examination of grip-seal plastic bags.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Erica; Carter, James F; Hill, Jenny C; Morton, Carolyn; Daeid, Niamh Nic; Sleeman, Richard

    2008-05-20

    Plastic bags are frequently used to package drugs, explosives and other contraband. There exists, therefore, a requirement in forensic casework to compare bags found at different locations. This is currently achieved almost exclusively by the use of physical comparisons such as birefringence patterns. This paper discusses some of the advantages and shortcomings of this approach, and presents stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) as a supplementary tool for effecting comparisons of this nature. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic data are presented for sixteen grip-seal plastic bags from a wide range of sources, in order to demonstrate the range of values which is likely to be encountered. Both isotopic and physical comparison (specifically birefringence) techniques are then applied to the analysis of rolls of bags from different manufacturing lots from a leading manufacturer. Both approaches are able to associate bags from a common production batch. IRMS can be applied to small fragments which are not amenable to physical comparisons, and is able to discriminate bags which could be confused using birefringence patterns alone. Similarly, in certain cases birefringence patterns discriminate bags with similar isotopic compositions. The two approaches are therefore complementary. When more than one isotopically distinct region exists within a bag (e.g. the grip-seal is distinct from the body) the ability to discriminate and associate bags is greatly increased.

  9. The fusion of gerontology and technology in nursing education: History and demonstration of the Gerontological Informatics Reasoning Project--GRIP.

    PubMed

    Dreher, H Michael; Cornelius, Fran; Draper, Judy; Pitkar, Harshad; Manco, Janet; Song, Il-Yeol

    2006-01-01

    Phase I of our Gerontological Reasoning Informatics Project (GRIP) began in the summer of 2002 when all 37 senior undergraduate nursing students in our accelerated BSN nursing program were given PDAs. These students were oriented to use a digitalized geriatric nursing assessment tool embedded into their PDA in a variety of geriatric clinical agencies. This informatics project was developed to make geriatric nursing more technology oriented and focused on seven modules of geriatric assessment: intellect (I), nutrition (N), self-concept (S), physical activity (P), interpersonal functioning (I), restful sleep (R), and elimination (E)--INSPIRE. Through phase II and now phase III, the GRIP Project has become a major collaboration between the College of Nursing & Health Professions and College of Information Science and Technology at Drexel University. The digitalized geriatric nursing health assessment tool has undergone a second round of reliability and validity testing and is now used to conduct a 20 minute comprehensive geriatric health assessment on the PDA, making our undergraduate gerontology course the most high tech clinical course in our nursing curriculum.

  10. Prognostic value of physical function tests: hand grip strength and six-minute walking test in elderly hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Martín-Ponce, Esther; Hernández-Betancor, Iván; González-Reimers, Emilio; Hernández-Luis, Rubén; Martínez-Riera, Antonio; Santolaria, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    To discern if physical function test are better mortality predictors than muscle mass in elderly hospitalized patients, we analyzed the prognostic value of muscle mass malnutrition and compared it with physical muscle function tests, including the six-minute walking test (6 MWT) and hand grip strength. We included the ankle brachial index (ABI) to assess arterial disease, related to muscle atrophy due to hypoperfusion. We also analyzed the relationship of ABI with malnutrition, physical function tests and survival. We studied 310 hospitalized patients older than 60 years. To assess nutritional status, we determined BMI, triceps skinfold and mid-arm muscle area; we performed a subjective nutritional assessment; and evaluated the degree of inflammatory stress. We assessed physical function by hand grip strength and 6 MWT. We evaluated arterial disease by ABI. Forty-one patients died during hospitalization; 269 were discharged and followed for a mean 808 days, reaching a mortality of 49%. Muscle malnutrition was frequent and was related to mortality, but the best predictors were physical function tests: inability to perform the 6 MWT and low handgrip strength. Function tests were closely related to each other and correlated with nutritional data. Reduced ABI was related to impaired nutritional status, physical function tests and mortality.

  11. Grip Strength Decline and Its Determinants in the Very Old: Longitudinal Findings from the Newcastle 85+ Study

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Karen; Jagger, Carol; Kirkwood, Thomas B. L.; Syddall, Holly E.; Sayer, Avan A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Weak grip strength (GS) is a key component of sarcopenia and frailty and a powerful predictor of mortality, morbidity and disability. Despite increasing interest in understanding GS across the lifespan, little is known about GS decline in the very old (aged ≥85). We examined trajectories of GS in very old adults and identified the determinants. Methods GS (kg) was measured four times over 5 years in 319 men and 526 women participating in the Newcastle 85+ Study. A weak GS sub-cohort was identified as having strength of ≤27 kg (men), and ≤16 kg (women) at baseline and follow-up. Mixed models were used to establish trajectories of GS and associated factors in all participants, men and women, and in those with weak GS. Results Men’s mean grip strength was 24.42 (SD = 6.77) kg, and women’s 13.23 (4.42) kg (p<0.001) at baseline, with mean absolute change of -5.27 (4.90) kg and -3.14 (3.41), respectively (p<0.001) by 5-year follow-up. In the time-only mixed model, men experienced linear annual decline in GS of -1.13 (0.8) kg (β (SE), p<0.001), whilst women’s decline although slower, accelerated by -0.06 (0.02) kg (p = 0.01) over time. In the saturated model, higher baseline physical activity, height, fat-free mass, better self-rated health, and not having arthritis in hand(s) were associated with stronger GS initially in both sexes. Annual GS decline in men and participants with weak GS who were highly physically active was slower by 0.95 and 0.52 kg, respectively compared with inactive counterparts. Conclusion Grip strength decline in the very old followed linear (men) and curvilinear (women) trends. High levels of physical activity were protective of GS loss in men (but not in women) and in those with weak GS. Thus maintaining muscle strength in later life is important to reduce the morbidity and mortality in the very old. PMID:27637107

  12. Grip force and heart rate responses to manual carrying tasks: effects of material, weight, and base area of the container.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Hsien; Tseng, Chia-Yun

    2014-01-01

    This study recruited 16 industrial workers to examine the effects of material, weight, and base area of container on reduction of grip force (ΔGF) and heart rate for a 100-m manual carrying task. This study examined 2 carrying materials (iron and water), 4 carrying weights (4.4, 8.9, 13.3, 17.8 kg), and 2 base areas of container (24 × 24 cm, 35 × 24 cm). This study showed that carrying water significantly increased ΔGF and heart rate as compared with carrying iron. Also, ΔGF and heart rate significantly increased with carrying weight and base area of container. The effects of base area of container on ΔGF and heart rate were greater in carrying water condition than in carrying iron condition. The maximum dynamic effect of water on ΔGF and heart rate occurred when water occupied ~60%-80% of full volume of the container.

  13. Coming to Grips with Breast Cancer: The Spouse’s Experience with His Wife’s First Six Months

    PubMed Central

    Zahlis, Ellen H.; Lewis, Frances M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of 48 spouses of wives newly diagnosed with local or regional breast cancer. Their reported experiences were organized into the core construct of Coming to Grips reflected by four domains: (1) Feeling nailed by the breast cancer; (2) Changing us; (3) Taking care of me; and (4) Making things work. Prior studies have underestimated the extent to which the assumptive world and day-to-day lives of spouses are shattered by the diagnosis of breast cancer and the work they do to guess how to be supportive to their wives. Interventions are needed which directly assist spouses add to their ways of managing the intrusion of their wife’s breast cancer in their lives. PMID:20391067

  14. Golf players exhibit changes to grip speed parameters during club release in response to changes in club stiffness.

    PubMed

    Osis, Sean T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2012-02-01

    The influence of golf club stiffness on driving performance is currently unclear, and it is possible that this ambiguity is due in part to golfer adaptation to equipment. The purpose of the current study was to elucidate mechanisms of adaptation to club stiffness, during the golf swing, by employing tendon vibration to distort proprioceptive feedback. Vibration (∼50 Hz, ∼1 mm amplitude) was applied to the upper extremities of 24 golfers using DC motors with eccentric weights. Golfers hit golf balls in a laboratory setting using three clubs of varying shaft stiffness, and club kinematics were recorded using high speed (180 Hz) digital cameras. The results demonstrated significant slowing of the club grip during club release for a high-stiffness shaft with vibration. This suggests that, when proprioceptive feedback is available, players adapt to changes in club stiffness by modifying the release dynamics of the club late in the downswing. PMID:21820748

  15. Description of Primary Education 1st Grade Students' Forms of Holding a Pencil as well as Their Grip and Compression Strengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temur, Turan

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to examine how first grade students in primary education held and gripped a pencil and their compressive strength using a descriptive research method. The participants of the research comprises first grade students attending a private school in the city center of Ankara (n=79). All of the four different sections in this private…

  16. Group Reading Interaction Pattern Observation Instrument: (GRIP) Programmed Review (Long Research Form) [and] Group Reading Interaction Pattern Observation Instrument--Mastery Learning Form Programmed Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangano, Nancy G.

    Designed to assist the observer in the understanding of the Group Reading Interaction Pattern Observation Instrument (GRIP) training manual, this programmed review contains a series of coding activities provided for the purpose of determining if each observer can differentiate between the categories and subcategories of the instrument as well as…

  17. Relationship between grip strength and newly diagnosed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in a large-scale adult population

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ge; Wu, Hongmei; Fang, Liyun; Li, Chunlei; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Li; Du, Huanmin; Shi, Hongbin; Xia, Yang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xing; Bao, Xue; Su, Qian; Gu, Yeqing; Yang, Huijun; Bin Yu; Wu, Yuntang; Sun, Zhong; Niu, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced muscle strength is often related to improved insulin sensitivity and secretion, control of lipid metabolism, and increased secretion of myokines. These factors have emerged as important mechanisms involved in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), implying that muscle strength may be a useful predictor for NAFLD. We aimed to assess the relationship between grip strength (GS) and NAFLD in a large-scale adult population. GS was assessed using an electronic hand-grip dynamometer, and NAFLD was diagnosed by the liver ultrasonography. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between the quartiles of GS per body weight and the prevalence of NAFLD. After adjusting for potentially confounding factors, the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for overall NAFLD, NAFLD with normal alanine aminotransferase levels, and NAFLD with elevated alanine aminotransferase levels across the quartiles of GS were 1.00 (reference), 0.89 (0.78, 1.01), 0.77 (0.67, 0.89), and 0.67 (0.57, 0.79); 1.00 (reference), 0.91 (0.80, 1.04), 0.79 (0.68, 0.92), and 0.72 (0.61, 0.85); 1.00 (reference), 0.77 (0.61, 0.98), 0.67 (0.51, 0.86), and 0.53 (0.40, 0.71) (all P for trend < 0.01), respectively. This is the first study shows that increased GS is independently associated with lower prevalence of NAFLD. PMID:27616599

  18. Microscopic vision modeling method by direct mapping analysis for micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuezong; Zhao, Zhizhong; Wang, Junshuai

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel and high-precision microscopic vision modeling method, which can be used for 3D data reconstruction in micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope. This method consists of four parts: image distortion correction, disparity distortion correction, initial vision model and residual compensation model. First, the method of image distortion correction is proposed. Image data required by image distortion correction comes from stereo images of calibration sample. The geometric features of image distortions can be predicted though the shape deformation of lines constructed by grid points in stereo images. Linear and polynomial fitting methods are applied to correct image distortions. Second, shape deformation features of disparity distribution are discussed. The method of disparity distortion correction is proposed. Polynomial fitting method is applied to correct disparity distortion. Third, a microscopic vision model is derived, which consists of two models, i.e., initial vision model and residual compensation model. We derive initial vision model by the analysis of direct mapping relationship between object and image points. Residual compensation model is derived based on the residual analysis of initial vision model. The results show that with maximum reconstruction distance of 4.1mm in X direction, 2.9mm in Y direction and 2.25mm in Z direction, our model achieves a precision of 0.01mm in X and Y directions and 0.015mm in Z direction. Comparison of our model with traditional pinhole camera model shows that two kinds of models have a similar reconstruction precision of X coordinates. However, traditional pinhole camera model has a lower precision of Y and Z coordinates than our model. The method proposed in this paper is very helpful for the micro-gripping system based on SLM microscopic vision.

  19. Normative data for hand grip strength and key pinch strength, stratified by age and gender for a multiethnic Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Ngee Wei; Goh, Hui Ting; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Chin, Ai-Vyrn; Poi, Philip Jun Hua; Tan, Maw Pin

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Hand strength is a good indicator of physical fitness and frailty among the elderly. However, there are no published hand strength references for Malaysians aged > 65 years. This study aimed to establish normative data for hand grip strength (HGS) and key pinch strength (KPS) for Malaysians aged ≥ 60 years, and explore the relationship between hand strength and physical ability. METHODS Healthy participants aged ≥ 60 years with no neurological conditions were recruited from rural and urban locations in Malaysia. HGS and KPS were measured using hand grip and key pinch dynamometers. Basic demographic data, anthropometric measures, modified Barthel Index scores and results of the Functional Reach Test (FRT), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test and Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test (JTHFT) were recorded. RESULTS 362 subjects aged 60–93 years were recruited. The men were significantly stronger than the women in both HGS and KPS (p < 0.001). The hand strength of the study cohort was lower than that of elderly Western populations. Significant correlations were observed between hand strength, and residential area (p < 0.001), FRT (r = 0.236, p = 0.028), TUG (r = −0.227, p = 0.009) and JTHFT (r = −0.927, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION This study established reference ranges for the HGS and KPS of rural and urban elderly Malaysian subpopulations. These will aid the use of hand strength as a screening tool for frailty among elderly persons in Malaysia. Future studies are required to determine the modifiable factors for poor hand strength. PMID:26768064

  20. Relationship between grip strength and newly diagnosed nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in a large-scale adult population.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ge; Wu, Hongmei; Fang, Liyun; Li, Chunlei; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Li; Du, Huanmin; Shi, Hongbin; Xia, Yang; Guo, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xing; Bao, Xue; Su, Qian; Gu, Yeqing; Yang, Huijun; Bin Yu; Wu, Yuntang; Sun, Zhong; Niu, Kaijun

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced muscle strength is often related to improved insulin sensitivity and secretion, control of lipid metabolism, and increased secretion of myokines. These factors have emerged as important mechanisms involved in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), implying that muscle strength may be a useful predictor for NAFLD. We aimed to assess the relationship between grip strength (GS) and NAFLD in a large-scale adult population. GS was assessed using an electronic hand-grip dynamometer, and NAFLD was diagnosed by the liver ultrasonography. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between the quartiles of GS per body weight and the prevalence of NAFLD. After adjusting for potentially confounding factors, the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for overall NAFLD, NAFLD with normal alanine aminotransferase levels, and NAFLD with elevated alanine aminotransferase levels across the quartiles of GS were 1.00 (reference), 0.89 (0.78, 1.01), 0.77 (0.67, 0.89), and 0.67 (0.57, 0.79); 1.00 (reference), 0.91 (0.80, 1.04), 0.79 (0.68, 0.92), and 0.72 (0.61, 0.85); 1.00 (reference), 0.77 (0.61, 0.98), 0.67 (0.51, 0.86), and 0.53 (0.40, 0.71) (all P for trend < 0.01), respectively. This is the first study shows that increased GS is independently associated with lower prevalence of NAFLD. PMID:27616599

  1. Microscopic vision modeling method by direct mapping analysis for micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuezong; Zhao, Zhizhong; Wang, Junshuai

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel and high-precision microscopic vision modeling method, which can be used for 3D data reconstruction in micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope. This method consists of four parts: image distortion correction, disparity distortion correction, initial vision model and residual compensation model. First, the method of image distortion correction is proposed. Image data required by image distortion correction comes from stereo images of calibration sample. The geometric features of image distortions can be predicted though the shape deformation of lines constructed by grid points in stereo images. Linear and polynomial fitting methods are applied to correct image distortions. Second, shape deformation features of disparity distribution are discussed. The method of disparity distortion correction is proposed. Polynomial fitting method is applied to correct disparity distortion. Third, a microscopic vision model is derived, which consists of two models, i.e., initial vision model and residual compensation model. We derive initial vision model by the analysis of direct mapping relationship between object and image points. Residual compensation model is derived based on the residual analysis of initial vision model. The results show that with maximum reconstruction distance of 4.1mm in X direction, 2.9mm in Y direction and 2.25mm in Z direction, our model achieves a precision of 0.01mm in X and Y directions and 0.015mm in Z direction. Comparison of our model with traditional pinhole camera model shows that two kinds of models have a similar reconstruction precision of X coordinates. However, traditional pinhole camera model has a lower precision of Y and Z coordinates than our model. The method proposed in this paper is very helpful for the micro-gripping system based on SLM microscopic vision. PMID:26924646

  2. Coordination of precision grip in 2-6 years-old children with autism spectrum disorders compared to children developing typically and children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    David, Fabian J; Baranek, Grace T; Wiesen, Chris; Miao, Adrienne F; Thorpe, Deborah E

    2012-01-01

    Impaired motor coordination is prevalent in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and affects adaptive skills. Little is known about the development of motor patterns in young children with ASD between 2 and 6 years of age. The purpose of the current study was threefold: (1) to describe developmental correlates of motor coordination in children with ASD, (2) to identify the extent to which motor coordination deficits are unique to ASD by using a control group of children with other developmental disabilities (DD), and (3) to determine the association between motor coordination variables and functional fine motor skills. Twenty-four children with ASD were compared to 30 children with typical development (TD) and 11 children with DD. A precision grip task was used to quantify and analyze motor coordination. The motor coordination variables were two temporal variables (grip to load force onset latency and time to peak grip force) and two force variables (grip force at onset of load force and peak grip force). Functional motor skills were assessed using the Fine Motor Age Equivalents of the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and the Mullen Scales of Early Learning. Mixed regression models were used for all analyses. Children with ASD presented with significant motor coordination deficits only on the two temporal variables, and these variables differentiated children with ASD from the children with TD, but not from children with DD. Fine motor functional skills had no statistically significant associations with any of the motor coordination variables. These findings suggest that subtle problems in the timing of motor actions, possibly related to maturational delays in anticipatory feed-forward mechanisms, may underlie some motor deficits reported in children with ASD, but that these issues are not unique to this population. Further research is needed to investigate how children with ASD or DD compensate for motor control deficits to establish functional skills.

  3. The Effect of Hand Dimensions, Hand Shape and Some Anthropometric Characteristics on Handgrip Strength in Male Grip Athletes and Non-Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Ali Asghar; Jadidian, Ali Akbar

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that athletes with longer fingers and larger hand surfaces enjoy stronger grip power. Therefore, some researchers have examined a number of factors and anthropometric variables that explain this issue. To our knowledge, the data is scarce. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hand dimensions, hand shape and some anthropometric characteristics on handgrip strength in male grip athletes and non-athletes. 80 subjects aged between 19 and 29 participated in this study in two groups including: national and collegian grip athletes (n=40), and non-athletes (n=40). Body height and mass were measured to calculate body mass index. The shape of the dominant hand was drawn on a piece of paper with a thin marker so that finger spans, finger lengths, and perimeters of the hand could be measured. The hand shape was estimated as the ratio of the hand width to hand length. Handgrip strength was measured in the dominant and non-dominant hand using a standard dynamometer. Descriptive statistics were used for each variable and independent t test was used to analyze the differences between the two groups. The Pearson correlation coefficient test was used to evaluate the correlation between studied variables. Also, to predict important variables in handgrip strength, the linear trend was assessed using a linear regression analysis. There was a significant difference between the two groups in absolute handgrip strength (p<0.001) and handgrip/height ratio (p<0.001). The indices of body height, body mass, lean body mass and body fat content (p<0.001) were significantly greater in grip athletes. All hand variables except FS1-4 (p>0.05) were significantly different between the groups (p<0.001). After controlling body mass all hand anthropometric characteristics except thumb length (r=0.240, p= 0.135), hand shape (r=−0.029, p=0.858), middle finger length (r=0.305, p=0.056) and forearm circumference (r=0.162, p=0.319) significantly correlated with

  4. The effects of smiling or crying facial expressions on grip strength, measured with a hand dynamometer and the bi-digital O-ring test.

    PubMed

    Ozerkan, K N

    2001-01-01

    The effects of smiling or crying facial expressions on grip strength and the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test were evaluated in this study. Ten right-handed basketball players (age group 18-28) were included in the study. Grip strength was measured with a Riester hand dynamometer and the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test successively, after the players had looked at the drawing of a "crying face" for 5 seconds from a distance of 40 cm at the eye level. Immediately afterwards they were shown the drawing of a "smiling face" and were asked to grip with the same condition. Once all 10 players carried out this experiment, the order in which the drawings were shown was reversed. We then proceeded to measure the same variables, using the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test. The statistics obtained thereby were subjected to Pearsons correlation coefficient and paired t-test. Using a hand dynamometer and the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, it was found that, in both tests, the "smiling face" drawing (first crying, then smiling face: with hand dynamometer, it increased from 8.34+/-0.97 kg to 9.18+/-0.9 kg; t=5.39,p=0.0001) increased the grip strength of the basketball players, and the "crying face" drawing (first smiling face, then crying face: with hand dynamometer it decreased from 9.35 +/- 0.90 kg to 8.51+/- 0.96 kg; t=9.81, p=0.0001) decreased the grip strength. Exposure to the smiling face drawing increased the grip strength, and exposure to the crying face decreased it, in every subject tested in this group. Similar effects were observed with the Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (first crying, then smiling: it increased from -2.80 +/- 1.13 to 2.20 +/- 1.32; t=33.54, p=0.0001; first smiling then crying: it decreased from 2.40 +/- 1.34 to -2.20 +/- 1.62; t = 15.06, p=0.0001).

  5. Muscular activity during uphill cycling: effect of slope, posture, hand grip position and constrained bicycle lateral sways.

    PubMed

    Duc, S; Bertucci, W; Pernin, J N; Grappe, F

    2008-02-01

    Despite the wide use of surface electromyography (EMG) to study pedalling movement, there is a paucity of data concerning the muscular activity during uphill cycling, notably in standing posture. The aim of this study was to investigate the muscular activity of eight lower limb muscles and four upper limb muscles across various laboratory pedalling exercises which simulated uphill cycling conditions. Ten trained cyclists rode at 80% of their maximal aerobic power on an inclined motorised treadmill (4%, 7% and 10%) with using two pedalling postures (seated and standing). Two additional rides were made in standing at 4% slope to test the effect of the change of the hand grip position (from brake levers to the drops of the handlebar), and the influence of the lateral sways of the bicycle. For this last goal, the bicycle was fixed on a stationary ergometer to prevent the lean of the bicycle side-to-side. EMG was recorded from M. gluteus maximus (GM), M. vastus medialis (VM), M. rectus femoris (RF), M. biceps femoris (BF), M. semimembranosus (SM), M. gastrocnemius medialis (GAS), M. soleus (SOL), M. tibialis anterior (TA), M. biceps brachii (BB), M. triceps brachii (TB), M. rectus abdominis (RA) and M. erector spinae (ES). Unlike the slope, the change of pedalling posture in uphill cycling had a significant effect on the EMG activity, except for the three muscles crossing the ankle's joint (GAS, SOL and TA). Intensity and duration of GM, VM, RF, BF, BB, TA, RA and ES activity were greater in standing while SM activity showed a slight decrease. In standing, global activity of upper limb was higher when the hand grip position was changed from brake level to the drops, but lower when the lateral sways of the bicycle were constrained. These results seem to be related to (1) the increase of the peak pedal force, (2) the change of the hip and knee joint moments, (3) the need to stabilize pelvic in reference with removing the saddle support, and (4) the shift of the mass

  6. Gripping tool for MEMS Assembly with an absolute distance measurement sensor using a fibre optic WL interferometer with high measuring frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Tilo; Aleriano, Ubaldo; Depiereux, Frank

    2003-03-01

    Reduction in the size of produced parts, increases the difficulty for precise manufacturing observation-processes and it makes manufacturing control cycles even more complex. Among all the production steps for micro-systems, assembly seems to be specially affected with this manufacturing handicap. Usual sensors used for the macro-world have to be modified or redesigned in order to address its use for the micro-world. This document presents the integration of a white light interferometer into a flexible fibre-scope used already for process monitoring purposes and which is mounted into a gripping-tool. The goal is to achieve a linear measurement between a gripping-tool and a target-part during the assembly process of hybrid micro systems.

  7. 10Be measured in a GRIP snow pit and modeled using the ECHAM5-HAM general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, U.; Beer, J.; Jouzel, J.; Feichter, J.; Kubik, P.

    2008-03-01

    10Be measured in a Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) snow pit (1986-1990) with a seasonal resolution is compared with the ECHAM5-HAM GCM run. The mean modeled 10Be concentration in ice (1.0.104 atoms/g) agrees well with the measured value (1.2.104 atoms/g). The measured 10Be deposition flux (88 atoms/m2/s) also agrees well with the modeled flux (69 atoms/m2/s) and the measured precipitation rate (0.67 mm/day) agrees with the modeled rate (0.61 mm/day). The mean surface temperature of -31°C estimated from δ 18O is lower than the temperature measured at a near-by weather station (-29°C) and the modeled temperature (-26°C). During the 5-year period the concentrations and deposition fluxes, both measured and modeled, show a decreasing trend consistent with the increase in the solar activity. The variability of the measured and modeled concentrations and deposition fluxes is very similar suggesting that the variability is linked to a variability in production rather than the local meteorology.

  8. The effects of instruction and hand dominance on grip-to-load force coordination in manipulation tasks.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Uygur, Mehmet; Getchell, Nancy; Hall, Susan J; Jaric, Slobodan

    2011-10-31

    The force applied upon a vertically oriented hand-held object could be decomposed into two orthogonal and highly coordinated components: the grip force (GF; the component perpendicular to the hand-object contact area that provides friction) and the load force (LF; the parallel component that can move the object or support the body). The aim of this study was to investigate the underexplored effects of task instruction and hand dominance on GF-LF coordination. Sixteen right-handed subjects performed bimanual manipulation against a horizontally oriented instrumented device under different sets of instructions. The tasks involved exertion of ramp-and-hold or oscillation patterns of LF performed symmetrically with two hands, while the instructions regarding individual actions were either similar (pull with both hands) or dissimilar (pull with one hand and hold with another). The results revealed that the instruction "to pull" leads to higher indices of GF-LF coordination than the instruction "to hold", as evidenced by a lower GF-LF ratio, higher GF-LF coupling, and higher GF modulation. The only effect of hand dominance was a moderate time lag of GF relative to LF changes observed in the non-dominant hand. We conclude that the instructions could play an important role in GF-LF coordination and, therefore, they should be taken into account when exploring or routinely testing hand function. Additionally, the results suggest that the neural control of GF of the non-dominant hand could involve some feedback mechanisms.

  9. Losing grip: Senescent decline in physical strength in a small-bodied primate in captivity and in the wild.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Anni; Dammhahn, Melanie; Aujard, Fabienne; Kraus, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Muscle strength reflects physical functioning, declines at old age and predicts health and survival in humans and laboratory animals. Age-associated muscle deterioration causes loss of strength and may impair fitness of wild animals. However, the effects of age and life-history characteristics on muscle strength in wild animals are unknown. We investigated environment- and sex-specific patterns of physical functioning by measuring grip strength in wild and captive gray mouse lemurs. We expected more pronounced strength senescence in captivity due to condition-dependent, extrinsic mortality found in nature. Males were predicted to be stronger but potentially experience more severe senescence than females as predicted by life history theory. We found similar senescent declines in captive males and females as well as wild females, whereas wild males showed little decline, presumably due to their early mortality. Captive animals were generally weaker and showed earlier declines than wild animals. Unexpectedly, females tended to be stronger than males, especially in the reproductive season. Universal intrinsic mechanisms (e.g. sarcopenia) likely cause the similar patterns of strength loss across settings. The female advantage in muscle strength merits further study; it may follow higher reproductive investment by males, or be an adaptation associated with female social dominance.

  10. The Effect of the Silicone Ring Tourniquet and Standard Pneumatic Tourniquet on the Motor Nerve Conduction, Pain and Grip Strength in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Georgios I.; Kiziridis, Georgios; Aggelopoulou, Cristina; Galiatsatos, Dimitrios; Anastassopoulos, George; Ververidis, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pneumatic tourniquet (PT) is routinely used in upper and lower limb operations by most orthopaedic surgeons. The silicone ring tourniquet (SRT) was introduced in clinical practice over the last decade. Clinical as well as comparative studies have been published in volunteers concerning its safety and efficacy. The aim of this study was to investigate the postoperative effect of the silicone ring tourniquet (SRT), primarily on the motor nerve conduction, and secondarily on the pain and grip strength, in comparison to the effect of the pneumatic tourniquet (PT) in healthy volunteers. Methods: Both tourniquets were applied in the forearm of the dominant arm in 20 healthy volunteers and were kept on for 10 minutes. Pain was measured using the visual analogue scale and grip strength was measured with a hand dynamometer. We evaluated the following parameters of median nerve conduction: motor conduction velocity (MCV), latency (LAT) and amplitude (AMP). Results: Pain score at the time of tourniquet application was higher in SRT group but the alteration in pain scores in PT group was higher, with statistical significance (P<0.05). The grip strength was reduced by the application of both tourniquets; however there was a significantly higher reduction in the SRT group (P<0.05). The conduction impairment of the median nerve was worse in the PT group than in the SRT one, according to the changes in MCV (P<0.05). Conclusion: Median nerve conduction was affected more after PT application as compared to the SRT. Nevertheless, the reduction of grip strength was higher after the SRT application. PMID:26894213

  11. Changes in Pain, Dysfunction, and Grip Strength of Patients with Acute Lateral Epicondylitis Caused by Frequency of Physical Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soyoung; Ko, Youngjun; Lee, Wanhee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in pain, dysfunction, and grip strength of patients with acute lateral epicondylitis and to suggest the appropriate treatment frequency and period. [Subjects] The subjects were divided into three: 2 days per week group (n=12), 3 days per week group (n=15), and 6 days per week group (n=13). [Methods] All groups received conventional physical therapy for 40 minutes and therapeutic exercises for 20 minutes per session during 6 weeks. The outcome measurements were the visual analogue scale (VAS), Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE), and grip strength. [Results] The results of this study were as follows: at 3 weeks, there were no significant differences in VAS and PRTEE in the 3 groups, but at 6 weeks, 6 days per week group significantly decreased these two outcomes. Grip strength was significantly increased in 3 and 6 days per week groups at 6 weeks. [Conclusion] In conclusion, physical therapy is needed 3 days per week for 3 weeks in patients with acute lateral epicondylitis. After 3 weeks, 6 days per week is the most effective treatment frequency. PMID:25140091

  12. Reference Values of Grip Strength Measured with a Jamar Dynamometer in 1526 Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Compared to Adults without Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio; Hilgenkamp, Thessa

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate grip strength in a large sample of people with intellectual disabilities, to establish reference values for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) and compare it to adults without intellectual disability. Methods This study analysed pooled baseline data from two independent studies for all 1526 adults with ID: Special Olympics Funfitness Spain (n = 801) and the Dutch cross-sectional study ‘Healthy aging and intellectual disabilities’ (n = 725). Results The grip strength result of people with ID across gender and age subgroups is presented with CI95% values from higher 25.5–31.0 kg in male younger to lower 4.3–21.6 kg in female older. Conclusion This study is the first to present grip strength results of a large sample of people with ID from 20–90 years of age. This study provides reference values for people with ID for use in clinical practice. PMID:26053852

  13. Diurnal, seasonal, and sex patterns of heart rate in grip-restrained African giant rats (Cricetomys gambianus, Waterhouse)

    PubMed Central

    Dzenda, Tavershima; Ayo, Joseph O; Sinkalu, Victor O; Yaqub, Lukuman S

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine heart rate (HR) values, including diurnal, seasonal, and sex patterns, in the African giant rat (Cricetomys gambianus, Waterhouse). HR was measured using stethoscope in grip-restrained African giant rats of either sex (103 bucks and 98 does), live-trapped from a tropical Savannah, and caged individually in the laboratory during the harmattan (cold-dry), hot-dry, and rainy seasons over a 3-year period. The HR fluctuated between 90 and 210 beats per minute (bpm) throughout the study period. Diurnal changes in HR (mean ± SEM) during the hot-dry and rainy seasons were nonsignificant (P > 0.05), but the morning and afternoon values differed (P < 0.01) during the cold-dry season. The HR varied (P < 0.05) among seasons, with peak, nadir, and moderate values recorded during the cold-dry (165.8 ± 0.51 bpm), hot-dry (153.1 ± 0.74 bpm), and rainy (163.4 ± 0.70 bpm) seasons, respectively. Mean HR of bucks was lower than that of does during the cold-dry (P < 0.0001) and hot-dry (P < 0.01) seasons, but sex difference during the rainy season was insignificant (P > 0.05). Overall, mean HR was lower (P < 0.0001) in bucks (158.8 ± 0.53 bpm) than in does (164.8 ± 0.53 bpm). In conclusion, values of HR in African giant rats are shown for the first time. Season, sex, and daytime influenced the HR, and should be considered during clinical evaluations of the rats. PMID:26471756

  14. Radiation accident grips Goiania

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.

    1987-11-20

    On 13 September two young scavengers in Goiania, Brazil, removed a stainless steel cylinder from a cancer therapy machine in an abandoned clinic, touching off a radiation accident second only to Chernobyl in its severity. On 18 September they sold the cylinder, the size of a 1-gallon paint can, to a scrap dealer for $25. At the junk yard an employee dismantled the cylinder and pried open the platinum capsule inside to reveal a glowing blue salt-like substance - 1400 curies of cesium-137. Fascinated by the luminescent powder, several people took it home with them. Some children reportedly rubbed in on their bodies like carnival glitter - an eerie image of how wrong things can go when vigilance over radioactive materials lapses. In all, 244 people in Goiania, a city of 1 million in central Brazil, were contaminated. The eventual toll, in terms of cancer or genetic defects, cannot yet be estimated. Parts of the city are cordoned off as radiation teams continue washing down buildings and scooping up radioactive soil. The government is also grappling with the political fallout from the accident.

  15. Gripped by science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebele, Elaine

    A new handbook, Science Teaching Reconsidered, helps science educators understand students, accommodate individual differences, and clearly communicate the principles, the method, and the excitement of science. Drawing on the experiences of successful educators and the results of education research, the handbook from the National Research Council provides examples of practical and effective teaching techniques. Skillful, experienced professors indicate that class exercises completed by small groups of students (a far less passive experience than listening to lectures) generates lively discussion. Furthermore, explaining aconcept or working out a problem aloud forces students to examine the logic of their thinking processes and gives them confidence in figuring out a problem or contradiction.

  16. Quantification of surface temperature changes during rapid climatic events 18-20 from air isotopic measurements in NorthGRIP ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landais, A.; Barnola, J. M.; Goujon, C.; Jouzel, J.; Caillon, N.; Chappellaz, J.; Johnsen, S.

    2003-04-01

    Although water stable isotope profiles from Greenland ice cores have evidenced the succession of glacial climate variability, their quantitative interpretation in terms of temperature changes remains uncertain due to possible changes in the seasonality of the precipitation. Here we use an alternative paleothermometry method based on the gravitational and thermal diffusion of permanent gasesin the firn (porous upper part of the ice sheets) in response to abrupt temperature changes. The variety of measurements conducted on the air trapped in the ice enables to study the relative timing of fluctuations in local temperature (isotopic measurements of 15N/14N, d15N, and 40Ar/36Ar, d40Ar), ice volume and Dole effect (18O/16O of atmospheric oxygene, d18Oatm) and temperate and tropical wetland CH4 production. We have obtained high resolution profiles of these tracers measured along the Dansgaard-Oeschger events 18, 19 and 20 from the recently drilled NorthGRIP ice core (300 km to the north of GRIP and GISP2). Isotopic nitrogen data combined to CH4 on the whole profile firmly confirm the in phase increase of both temperature and CH4 during Dansgard-Oeschger events. d15N, d40Ar and firn densification modeling enable us to estimate the associated temperature changes which can be compared to the estimate by Lang et al (GRIP event 19). Indeed, nitrogen combined to argon isotopic anomalies enable to extract the sole thermal effect from the total signal (gravitational and thermal). Finally, the air d18Oatm shows a slow increasing trend due to the ice sheet growth but also small fluctuations maybe related to the DO events (either due to effusion in the ice or to biosphere modification).

  17. Setting a chronology for the basal ice at Dye-3 and GRIP: Implications for the long-term stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Audrey M.; Bender, Michael L.; Blunier, Thomas; Jouzel, Jean

    2016-10-01

    The long-term stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) is an important issue in our understanding of the climate system. Limited data suggest that the northern and southern sections extend well back into the Pleistocene, but most age constraints do not definitively date the ice. Here, we re-examine the GRIP and Dye-3 ice cores to provide direct ice core observations as to whether the GIS survived previous interglacials known to be warmer (˜130 ka) or longer (˜430 ka) than the present interglacial. We present geochemical analyses of the basal ice from Dye-3 (1991-2035 m) and GRIP (3020-3026 m) that characterize and date the ice. We analyzed the elemental and isotopic composition of O2, N2, and Ar, of trapped air in these two cores to assess the origin of trapped gases in silty ice. Dating of the trapped air was then achieved by measuring the paleoatmospheric δ40Ar/38Ar and the 17O anomaly (17Δ) of O2. The resulting age is a lower limit because the trapped air may be contaminated with crustal radiogenic 40Ar. The oldest average age of replicates measured at various depths is 970 ± 140 ka for the GRIP ice core and 400 ka ± 170 ka for Dye-3. 17Δ data from Dye-3 also argue strongly that basal ice in this core predates the Eemian. This confirms that the Greenland Ice Sheet did not completely melt at Southern Greenland during the last interglacial, nor did it completely melt at Summit Greenland during the unusually long interglacial ˜430 kyr before present.

  18. Synchronization in monkey motor cortex during a precision grip task. II. effect of oscillatory activity on corticospinal output.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart N; Pinches, Elizabeth M; Lemon, Roger N

    2003-04-01

    Recordings from primary motor cortex (M1) during periods of steady contraction show oscillatory activity; these oscillations are coherent with the activity of contralateral muscles. We investigated synchronization of corticospinal output neurons with the oscillations, which could provide the pathway for their transmission to the spinal motoneurons. One hundred seventy-six antidromically identified pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) were recorded from M1 in three macaque monkeys trained to perform a precision grip task. Local field potentials (LFP) were simultaneously recorded. All analysis was confined to the hold period of the task, where our previous work has shown that there is the strongest oscillatory activity. Coherence was calculated between LFP and PTN discharge. Significant coherence was seen in three bands, with frequencies of 10-14, 17-31, and 34-44 Hz. Coherence values were low, with the majority of PTN-LFP coherences having a peak lower than 0.05. The phase of coherence was approximately -pi/2 radians for each band (with LFP polarity defined as negative upward), although there was some dispersion of phase across the population of PTNs. Coherence was also calculated between pairs of PTNs that had been simultaneously recorded. Where there was significant coherence, it was also generally smaller than 0.05. The phase of PTN-PTN coherence clustered around zero radians. A computer model was constructed to assist the interpretation of the experimental results. It simulated an integrate-and-fire neuron responding to synaptic inputs. A fraction of the synaptic inputs was synchronized with a simulated LFP; the remainder were uncorrelated with it. The model showed that coherence between the LFP and the output spike train considerably underestimated the fraction of synchronized inputs. Additionally, for a given fraction of synchronized inputs, coherence was smaller for high- compared with low-frequency bins. Cell discharge rate also influenced the spike-LFP coherence

  19. Short Term Microgravity Effect on Isometric Hand Grip and Precision Pinch Force with Visual and Propioceptive Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastacaldi, P.; Bracciaferri, F.; Neri, G.; Porciani, M.; Zolesi, V.

    Experiments executed on the upper limb are assuming increasing significance in the frame of the Human Physiology in space, for at least two reasons: -the upper limb is the principal means of locomotion for the subject living in aspace station -fatigue can have a significant effect the hand, for the ordinary work on board,and in particular for the extra-vehicular activities. The degradation of the performances affecting the muscular-skeletal apparatus can be easily recognized on the upper limb, by exerting specific scientific protocols, to be repeated through the permanence of the subject in weightlessness conditions. Also, the effectiveness of adequate counter-measures aimed to the reduction of calcium and muscular mass need to be verified, by means of specific assessments on the upper limb. Another aspect relevant to the effect of microgravity on the upper limb is associated with the alteration of the motor control programs due to the different gravity factor, affecting not only the bio-mechanics of the subject, but in general all his/her psycho- physical conditions, induced by the totally different environment. Specific protocols on the upper limb can facilitate the studies on learning mechanisms for the motor control. The results of such experiments can be transferred to the Earth, useful for treatment of subjects with local traumas or diseases of the Central Nervous System.In the frame of the mission of the Italian astronaut Roberto Vittori on board the International Space Station (ISS), the Italian Space Agency (ASI) has promoted the program "Marco Polo", with a number of experiments devoted to the study of the effect of microgravity on the human body. The experiment CHIRO ("Crew's Health: Investigation on Reduced Operability) is a part of the program. Its purpose is the determination of the influence of the altered gravity on the control of the grip force exerted by the hand or by a group of fingers and the adaptive behavior of this control through the

  20. A comparison of hand grasp breakaway strengths and bare-handed grip strengths of the astronauts, SML 3 test subjects, and the subjects from the general population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar L.; Klute, Glenn K.

    1993-01-01

    Astronauts have the task of retrieving and deploying satellites and handling massive objects in a around the payload bay. Concerns were raised that manual handling of such massive objects might induce loads to the shuttle suits exceeding the design-certified loads. The Crew and Thermal Division of NASA JSC simulated the satellite handling tasks (Satellite Manload Tests 1 and 3) and determined the maximum possible load that a suited member could impart onto the suit. In addition, the tests revealed that the load to the suit by an astronaut could be calculated from the astronaut's maximum hand grasp breakaway strength. Thus, this study was conducted to document that hand grasp breakaway strengths of the astronauts who were scheduled to perform EVA during the upcoming missions. In addition, this study verified whether the SML 3 test results were sufficient for documenting the maximum possible load. An attempt was made to predict grasp strength from grip strength and hand anthropometry. Based on the results from this study, the SML 3 test results were deemed sufficient to document the maximum possible load on the suit. Finally, prediction of grasp strength from grip strength was not as accurate as expected. Hence, it was recommended that grasp strength be collected from the astronauts in order to obtain accurate load estimation.

  1. Handedness for Unimanual Grasping in 564 Great Apes: The Effect on Grip Morphology and a Comparison with Hand Use for a Bimanual Coordinated Task.

    PubMed

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Phillips, Kimberley A; Chapelain, Amandine; Mahovetz, Lindsay M; Milne, Scott; Stoinski, Tara; Bania, Amanda; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth; Schaeffer, Jennifer; Russell, Jamie; Hopkins, William D

    2015-01-01

    A number of factors have been proposed to influence within and between species variation in handedness in non-human primates. In the initial study, we assessed the influence of grip morphology on hand use for simple reaching in a sample of 564 great apes including 49 orangutans Pongo pygmaeus, 66 gorillas Gorilla gorilla, 354 chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and 95 bonobos Pan paniscus. Overall, we found a significant right hand bias for reaching. We also found a significant effect of the grip morphology of hand use. Grasping with the thumb and index finger was more prevalent in the right compared to left hand in all four species. There was no significant sex effect on the patterns of handedness. In a subsample of apes, we also compared consistency in hand use for simple reaching with previously published data on a task that measures handedness for bimanual actions. We found that the ratio of subjects with consistent right compared to left hand use was more prevalent in bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas but not orangutans. However, for all species, the proportion of subjects with inconsistent hand preferences between the tasks was relatively high suggesting some measures may be more sensitive in assessing handedness than others. PMID:26635693

  2. Handedness for Unimanual Grasping in 564 Great Apes: The Effect on Grip Morphology and a Comparison with Hand Use for a Bimanual Coordinated Task

    PubMed Central

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Phillips, Kimberley A.; Chapelain, Amandine; Mahovetz, Lindsay M.; Milne, Scott; Stoinski, Tara; Bania, Amanda; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth; Schaeffer, Jennifer; Russell, Jamie; Hopkins, William D.

    2015-01-01

    A number of factors have been proposed to influence within and between species variation in handedness in non-human primates. In the initial study, we assessed the influence of grip morphology on hand use for simple reaching in a sample of 564 great apes including 49 orangutans Pongo pygmaeus, 66 gorillas Gorilla gorilla, 354 chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and 95 bonobos Pan paniscus. Overall, we found a significant right hand bias for reaching. We also found a significant effect of the grip morphology of hand use. Grasping with the thumb and index finger was more prevalent in the right compared to left hand in all four species. There was no significant sex effect on the patterns of handedness. In a subsample of apes, we also compared consistency in hand use for simple reaching with previously published data on a task that measures handedness for bimanual actions. We found that the ratio of subjects with consistent right compared to left hand use was more prevalent in bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas but not orangutans. However, for all species, the proportion of subjects with inconsistent hand preferences between the tasks was relatively high suggesting some measures may be more sensitive in assessing handedness than others. PMID:26635693

  3. Muscle Fatigue in the Three Heads of the Triceps Brachii During a Controlled Forceful Hand Grip Task with Full Elbow Extension Using Surface Electromyography.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asraf; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Badlishah Ahmad, R; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Islam, Anamul; Sundaraj, Sebastian

    2015-06-27

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the time to fatigue and compare the fatiguing condition among the three heads of the triceps brachii muscle using surface electromyography during an isometric contraction of a controlled forceful hand grip task with full elbow extension. Eighteen healthy subjects concurrently performed a single 90 s isometric contraction of a controlled forceful hand grip task and full elbow extension. Surface electromyographic signals from the lateral, long and medial heads of the triceps brachii muscle were recorded during the task for each subject. The changes in muscle activity among the three heads of triceps brachii were measured by the root mean square values for every 5 s period throughout the total contraction period. The root mean square values were then analysed to determine the fatiguing condition for the heads of triceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue in the long, lateral, and medial heads of the triceps brachii started at 40 s, 50 s, and 65 s during the prolonged contraction, respectively. The highest fatiguing rate was observed in the long head (slope = -2.863), followed by the medial head (slope = -2.412) and the lateral head (slope = -1.877) of the triceps brachii muscle. The results of the present study concurs with previous findings that the three heads of the triceps brachii muscle do not work as a single unit, and the fiber type/composition is different among the three heads.

  4. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) during GRIP and HS3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Biswas, S.; Jones, W. L.; Johnson, J.; Farrar, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    HIRAD is a new technology developed by NASA/MSFC, in partnership with NOAA and the Universities of Central Florida, Michigan, and Alabama-Huntsville. HIRAD is designed to measure wind speed and rain rate over a wide swath in heavy-rain, strong-wind conditions. HIRAD is expected to eventually fly routinely on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) such as Global Hawk over hurricanes threatening the U.S. coast and other Atlantic basin areas, and possibly in the Western Pacific as well. HIRAD first flew on GRIP in 2010 and is part of the 2012-14 NASA Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission on the Global Hawk, a high-altitude UAV. The next-generation HIRAD will include wind direction observations, and the technology can eventually be used on a satellite platform to extend the dynamical range of Ocean Surface Wind (OSV) observations from space.

  5. Observations of C-Band Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) during GRIP and HS3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2013-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and at the time of this writing plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain cross-track resolution of approximately 3 degrees, out to approximately 60 degrees to each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. This technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  6. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Observations of Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate During NASA's GRIP and HS3 Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain spatial resolution of approximately 2 km, out to roughly 30 km each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. The physical retrieval technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  7. Vitamin D Receptor Ablation and Vitamin D Deficiency Result in Reduced Grip Strength, Altered Muscle Fibers, and Increased Myostatin in Mice.

    PubMed

    Girgis, Christian M; Cha, Kuan Minn; Houweling, Peter J; Rao, Renuka; Mokbel, Nancy; Lin, Mike; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Gunton, Jenny E

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with muscle weakness, pain, and atrophy. Serum vitamin D predicts muscle strength and age-related muscle changes. However, precise mechanisms by which vitamin D affects skeletal muscle are unclear. To address this question, this study characterizes the muscle phenotype and gene expression of mice with deletion of vitamin D receptor (VDRKO) or diet-induced vitamin D deficiency. VDRKO and vitamin D-deficient mice had significantly weaker grip strength than their controls. Weakness progressed with age and duration of vitamin D deficiency, respectively. Histological assessment showed that VDRKO mice had muscle fibers that were significantly smaller in size and displayed hyper-nuclearity. Real-time PCR also indicated muscle developmental changes in VDRKO mice with dysregulation of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and increased myostatin in quadriceps muscle (>2-fold). Vitamin D-deficient mice also showed increases in myostatin and the atrophy marker E3-ubiqutin ligase MuRF1. As a potential explanation for grip strength weakness, both groups of mice had down-regulation of genes encoding calcium-handling and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase (Serca) channels. This is the first report of reduced strength, morphological, and gene expression changes in VDRKO and vitamin D-deficient mice where confounding by calcium, magnesium, and phosphate have been excluded by direct testing. Although suggested in earlier in vitro work, this study is the first to report an in vivo association between vitamin D, myostatin, and the regulation of muscle mass. These findings support a direct role for vitamin D in muscle function and corroborate earlier work on the presence of VDR in this tissue.

  8. Slip of grip of a molecular motor on a crowded track: Modeling shift of reading frame of ribosome on RNA template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhavya; Schütz, Gunter M.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2016-06-01

    We develop a stochastic model for the programmed frameshift of ribosomes synthesizing a protein while moving along a mRNA template. Normally the reading frame of a ribosome decodes successive triplets of nucleotides on the mRNA in a step-by-step manner. We focus on the programmed shift of the ribosomal reading frame, forward or backward, by only one nucleotide which results in a fusion protein; it occurs when a ribosome temporarily loses its grip to its mRNA track. Special “slippery” sequences of nucleotides and also downstream secondary structures of the mRNA strand are believed to play key roles in programmed frameshift. Here we explore the role of an hitherto neglected parameter in regulating ‑1 programmed frameshift. Specifically, we demonstrate that the frameshift frequency can be strongly regulated also by the density of the ribosomes, all of which are engaged in simultaneous translation of the same mRNA, at and around the slippery sequence. Monte Carlo simulations support the analytical predictions obtained from a mean-field analysis of the stochastic dynamics.

  9. Studyng the Influence of Aerosols in the Evolution of Cloud Microphysics Procesess Associated with Tropical Cyclone Earl Using Airborne Measurements from the NASA Grip Field Campaing 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Cruz, Y.; Heymsfield, A.; Jenkins, G. S.; Bansemer, A.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud microphysics processes are strongly related to tropical cyclones evolution. Although there have been three decades of research dedicated to understand the role of cloud microphysics in tropical cyclogenesis, there are still questions unanswered. With the intention of fulfill the gaps and to better understand the processes involves in tropical storms formation the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign was conducted during the months of August and September of 2010. In-situ microphysical measurements, including particle size distributions, shapes, liquid/ice water content and supercooled liquid water were obtained from the DC-8 aircraft. A total of 139 hrs of flying science modules were performed including sampling of four named storms (Earl, Gaston, Karl and Matthew). One tropical cyclone, Earl, was one of the major hurricanes of the season reaching a category 4 in the Saffir-Simpson scale. Earl emerged from the West Africa on August 22 as an easterly wave, moved westward and became a tropical storm on August 25 before undergoing rapid intensification. This project seeks to explore the lifecycle of hurricane Earl including the genesis and rapid intensification from a microphysics perspective; to develop a better understanding of the relationship between dust from the Saharan Air Layer and cloud microphysics evolution and to develop a better understanding of how cloud microphysics processes interacts and serve as precursor for thermodynamics processes. An overview of the microphysics measurements as well as preliminary results will be presented.

  10. Slip of grip of a molecular motor on a crowded track: Modeling shift of reading frame of ribosome on RNA template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhavya; Schütz, Gunter M.; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2016-06-01

    We develop a stochastic model for the programmed frameshift of ribosomes synthesizing a protein while moving along a mRNA template. Normally the reading frame of a ribosome decodes successive triplets of nucleotides on the mRNA in a step-by-step manner. We focus on the programmed shift of the ribosomal reading frame, forward or backward, by only one nucleotide which results in a fusion protein; it occurs when a ribosome temporarily loses its grip to its mRNA track. Special “slippery” sequences of nucleotides and also downstream secondary structures of the mRNA strand are believed to play key roles in programmed frameshift. Here we explore the role of an hitherto neglected parameter in regulating -1 programmed frameshift. Specifically, we demonstrate that the frameshift frequency can be strongly regulated also by the density of the ribosomes, all of which are engaged in simultaneous translation of the same mRNA, at and around the slippery sequence. Monte Carlo simulations support the analytical predictions obtained from a mean-field analysis of the stochastic dynamics.

  11. Light Intensity Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to Body Mass Index and Grip Strength in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional Findings from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Bann, David; Hire, Don; Manini, Todd; Cooper, Rachel; Botoseneanu, Anda; McDermott, Mary M.; Pahor, Marco; Glynn, Nancy W.; Fielding, Roger; King, Abby C.; Church, Timothy; Ambrosius, Walter T.; Gill, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying modifiable determinants of fat mass and muscle strength in older adults is important given their impact on physical functioning and health. Light intensity physical activity and sedentary behavior are potential determinants, but their relations to these outcomes are poorly understood. We evaluated associations of light intensity physical activity and sedentary time—assessed both objectively and by self-report—with body mass index (BMI) and grip strength in a large sample of older adults. Methods We used cross-sectional baseline data from 1130 participants of the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study, a community-dwelling sample of relatively sedentary older adults (70-89 years) at heightened risk of mobility disability. Time spent sedentary and in light intensity activity were assessed using an accelerometer worn for 3–7 days (Actigraph GT3X) and by self-report. Associations between these exposures and measured BMI and grip strength were evaluated using linear regression. Results Greater time spent in light intensity activity and lower sedentary times were both associated with lower BMI. This was evident using objective measures of lower-light intensity, and both objective and self-reported measures of higher-light intensity activity. Time spent watching television was positively associated with BMI, while reading and computer use were not. Greater time spent in higher but not lower intensities of light activity (assessed objectively) was associated with greater grip strength in men but not women, while neither objectively assessed nor self-reported sedentary time was associated with grip strength. Conclusions In this cross-sectional study, greater time spent in light intensity activity and lower sedentary times were associated with lower BMI. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that replacing sedentary activities with light intensity activities could lead to lower BMI levels and obesity

  12. Effects of push-up exercise on shoulder stabilizer muscle activation according to the grip thickness of the push-up bar

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaemin; Cho, Woonik

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of bar thickness on shoulder stabilizer muscle activation during push-up exercise. [Subjects] Twenty-six healthy male adults in their twenties. [Methods] The study had four experimental conditions (grip thicknesses of 0%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of the subjects’ hand size). Measurements were conducted from the start to the end of push-up for deltoid anterior fiber, deltoid posterior fiber, infraspinatus, serratus anterior, and pectoralis major muscle activation. [Results] The deltoid anterior fiber muscle activity was 4,852.6 ± 975.2 in the 0%, 5,787.3 ± 1,514.1 in the 50%, 5,635.3 ± 1,220.1 in the 75%, and 5,032.9 ± 841.0 in the 100% condition. The infraspinatus muscle activity was 1,877.2 ± 451.3 in the 0%, 2,310.9 ± 765.4 in the 50%, 2,353.6 ± 761.9 in the 75%, and 2,016.8 ± 347.7 in the 100% condition. The pectoralis major muscle activity was 1,675.8 ± 355.1 in the 0%, 2,365.5 ± 1,287.3 in the 50%, 2,125.3 ± 382.5 in the 75%, and 1,878.8 ± 419.7 in the 100% condition, showing significant differences respectively. [Conclusion] The use of push-up bars with different thicknesses customized to personal characteristics, rather than the conventional standard, could be more effective for training and rehabilitation. PMID:26504343

  13. Water isotope diffusion rates from the NorthGRIP ice core for the last 16,000 years - Glaciological and paleoclimatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkinis, V.; Simonsen, S. B.; Buchardt, S. L.; White, J. W. C.; Vinther, B. M.

    2014-11-01

    A high resolution (0.05 m) water isotopic record (δO18) is available from the NorthGRIP ice core. In this study we look into the water isotope diffusion history as estimated by the spectral characteristics of the δO18 time series covering the last 16,000 years. The diffusion of water vapor in the porous medium of the firn pack attenuates the initial isotopic signal, predominantly having an impact on the high frequency components of the power spectrum. Higher temperatures induce higher rates of smoothing and thus the signal can be used as a firn paleothermometer. We use a water isotope diffusion model coupled to a steady-state densification model in order to infer the temperature signal from the site, assuming the accumulation and strain rate history as estimated using the GICC05 layer counted chronology and a Dansgaard-Johnsen ice flow model. The temperature reconstruction accurately captures the timing and magnitude of the Bølling-Allerød and Younger Dryas transitions. A Holocene climatic optimum is seen between 7 and 9 ky b2k with an apparent cooling trend thereafter. Our temperature estimate for the Holocene climatic optimum, points to a necessary adjustment of the ice thinning function indicating that the ice flow model overestimates past accumulation rates by about 10% at 8 ky b2k. This result, is supported by recent gas isotopic fractionation studies proposing a similar reduction for glacial conditions. Finally, the record presents a climatic variability over the Holocene spanning millennial and centennial scales with a profound cooling occurring at approximately 4000 years b2k. The new reconstruction technique is able to provide past temperature estimates by overcoming the issues apparent in the use of the classical δO18 slope method. It can at the same time resolve temperature signals at low and high frequencies.

  14. Hand grip strength is associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second among subjects with COPD: report from a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Strandkvist, Viktor Johansson; Backman, Helena; Röding, Jenny; Stridsman, Caroline; Lindberg, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases and skeletal muscle dysfunction are common comorbidities in COPD. Hand grip strength (HGS) is related to general muscle strength and is associated with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality, while the results from small selected COPD populations are contradictory. The aim of this population-based study was to compare HGS among the subjects with and without COPD, to evaluate HGS in relation to COPD severity, and to evaluate the impact of heart disease. Subjects and methods Data were collected from the Obstructive Lung disease in Northern Sweden COPD study, where the subjects with and without COPD have been invited to annual examinations since 2005. In 2009–2010, 441 subjects with COPD (postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]/vital capacity <0.70) and 570 without COPD participated in structured interviews, spirometry, and measurements of HGS. Results The mean HGS was similar when comparing subjects with and without COPD, but those with heart disease had lower HGS than those without. When compared by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, the subjects with GOLD 3–4 had lower HGS than those without COPD in both sexes (females 21.4 kg vs 26.9 kg, P=0.010; males 41.5 kg vs 46.3 kg, P=0.038), and the difference persisted also when adjusted for confounders. Among the subjects with COPD, HGS was associated with FEV1% of predicted value but not heart disease when adjusted for height, age, sex, and smoking habits, and the pattern was similar among males and females. Conclusion In this population-based study, the subjects with GOLD 3–4 had lower HGS than the subjects without COPD. Among those with COPD, HGS was associated with FEV1% of predicted value but not heart disease, and the pattern was similar in both sexes. PMID:27785009

  15. Serotonin and Histamine Therapy Increases Tetanic Forces of Myoblasts, Reduces Muscle Injury, and Improves Grip Strength Performance of Dmd(mdx) Mice.

    PubMed

    Gurel, Volkan; Lins, Jeremy; Lambert, Kristyn; Lazauski, Joan; Spaulding, James; McMichael, John

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked fatal disorder caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene. Although several therapeutic approaches have been studied, none has led to substantial long-term effects in patients. The aim of this study was to test a serotonin and histamine (S&H) combination on human skeletal myoblasts and Dmd(mdx) mice for its effects on muscle strength and injury. Normal human bioartificial muscles (BAMs) were treated, and muscle tetanic forces and muscle injury tests were performed using the MyoForce Analysis System. Dmd(mdx) mice, the murine model of DMD, were administered serotonin, histamine, or S&H combination twice daily for 6 weeks, and functional performance tests were conducted once a week. The S&H combination treatment caused significant increases in tetanic forces at all time points and concentrations tested as compared to the saline controls. Dose response of the BAMs to the treatment demonstrated a significant increase in force generation at all concentrations compared to the controls after 3 to 4 days of drug treatment. The highest 3 concentrations had a significant effect on lowering contractile-induced injury as measured by a reduction in the release of adenylate kinase. Histamine-only and S&H treatments improved grip strength of Dmd(mdx) mice, whereas serotonin-only treatment resulted in no significant improvement in muscle strength. The results of this study indicate that S&H therapy might be a promising new strategy for muscular dystrophies and that the mechanism should be further investigated. PMID:26740813

  16. Functional connectivity associated with hand shape generation: Imitating novel hand postures and pantomiming tool grips challenge different nodes of a shared neural network.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, Guy; Clauwaert, Amanda

    2015-09-01

    Clinical research suggests that imitating meaningless hand postures and pantomiming tool-related hand shapes rely on different neuroanatomical substrates. We investigated the BOLD responses to different tasks of hand posture generation in 14 right handed volunteers. Conjunction and contrast analyses were applied to select regions that were either common or sensitive to imitation and/or pantomime tasks. The selection included bilateral areas of medial and lateral extrastriate cortex, superior and inferior regions of the lateral and medial parietal lobe, primary motor and somatosensory cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal, and ventral and dorsal premotor cortices. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that during hand shape generation the BOLD-response of every region correlated significantly with every other area regardless of the hand posture task performed, although some regions were more involved in some hand postures tasks than others. Based on between-task differences in functional connectivity we predict that imitation of novel hand postures would suffer most from left superior parietal disruption and that pantomiming hand postures for tools would be impaired following left frontal damage, whereas both tasks would be sensitive to inferior parietal dysfunction. We also unveiled that posterior temporal cortex is committed to pantomiming tool grips, but that the involvement of this region to the execution of hand postures in general appears limited. We conclude that the generation of hand postures is subserved by a highly interconnected task-general neural network. Depending on task requirements some nodes/connections will be more engaged than others and these task-sensitive findings are in general agreement with recent lesion studies. PMID:26095674

  17. Functional connectivity associated with hand shape generation: Imitating novel hand postures and pantomiming tool grips challenge different nodes of a shared neural network.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, Guy; Clauwaert, Amanda

    2015-09-01

    Clinical research suggests that imitating meaningless hand postures and pantomiming tool-related hand shapes rely on different neuroanatomical substrates. We investigated the BOLD responses to different tasks of hand posture generation in 14 right handed volunteers. Conjunction and contrast analyses were applied to select regions that were either common or sensitive to imitation and/or pantomime tasks. The selection included bilateral areas of medial and lateral extrastriate cortex, superior and inferior regions of the lateral and medial parietal lobe, primary motor and somatosensory cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal, and ventral and dorsal premotor cortices. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that during hand shape generation the BOLD-response of every region correlated significantly with every other area regardless of the hand posture task performed, although some regions were more involved in some hand postures tasks than others. Based on between-task differences in functional connectivity we predict that imitation of novel hand postures would suffer most from left superior parietal disruption and that pantomiming hand postures for tools would be impaired following left frontal damage, whereas both tasks would be sensitive to inferior parietal dysfunction. We also unveiled that posterior temporal cortex is committed to pantomiming tool grips, but that the involvement of this region to the execution of hand postures in general appears limited. We conclude that the generation of hand postures is subserved by a highly interconnected task-general neural network. Depending on task requirements some nodes/connections will be more engaged than others and these task-sensitive findings are in general agreement with recent lesion studies.

  18. Clip-on extensometer grip

    DOEpatents

    Korellis, J.S.

    1986-08-12

    A self-gauging extensometer assembly for measuring axial strain of a test specimen through the wall of a high temperature furnace comprises an extensometer having a pair of telescoping arms carrying jaws that clip to the specimen at points spaced apart from each other by a predetermined gauge length. The jaws, which open parallel to the longitudinal axis of the telescoping arms, are biased closed into contact with opposite sides of the specimen by helical springs. A knife edge formed in each jaw prevents any slippage of the specimen between jaws during measurements. Because the jaws of the telescoping arms require no lateral pivoting, to open or close, the assembly is able to be clipped to a specimen through a relatively small opening in the furnace wall.

  19. Cell biology: A greasy grip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Anthony G.

    2005-12-01

    How do the lipids and proteins of the cell membrane interact to create a functioning barrier for the cell? A high-resolution structure of a membrane protein reveals intimate contacts with its lipid neighbours.

  20. Getting a Grip on Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the need for academic and public libraries to confront the challenges and inevitability of change to retain their relevancy in the information age. Visioning, strategic planning, TQM (total quality management), and Preferred Futuring are considered. (Author/LRW)

  1. Getting a Grip on Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yan; Viola, Cristina; Bieniossek, Christoph; Trowitzsch, Simon; Vijay-achandran, Lakshmi Sumitra; Chaillet, Maxime; Garzoni, Frederic; Berger, Imre

    2009-01-01

    We are witnessing tremendous advances in our understanding of the organization of life. Complete genomes are being deciphered with ever increasing speed and accuracy, thereby setting the stage for addressing the entire gene product repertoire of cells, towards understanding whole biological systems. Advances in bioinformatics and mass spectrometric techniques have revealed the multitude of interactions present in the proteome. Multiprotein complexes are emerging as a paramount cornerstone of biological activity, as many proteins appear to participate, stably or transiently, in large multisubunit assemblies. Analysis of the architecture of these assemblies and their manifold interactions is imperative for understanding their function at the molecular level. Structural genomics efforts have fostered the development of many technologies towards achieving the throughput required for studying system-wide single proteins and small interaction motifs at high resolution. The present shift in focus towards large multiprotein complexes, in particular in eukaryotes, now calls for a likewise concerted effort to develop and provide new technologies that are urgently required to produce in quality and quantity the plethora of multiprotein assemblies that form the complexome, and to routinely study their structure and function at the molecular level. Current efforts towards this objective are summarized and reviewed in this contribution. PMID:20514218

  2. Getting to Grips with Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William; Saunders, John

    This booklet has been written to help persons interested in assessment of education and training programs in general and competency-based vocational education programs in particular. The following topics are covered in the individual sections: the meaning of the term "assessment"; the importance of assessment; curriculum models; percentages and…

  3. In the grips of growth.

    PubMed

    Sherman, D

    1992-04-01

    Rapid population growth and increasing environmental degradation threaten the likelihood of a better life for citizens in the US and those in developing countries in the future. To achieve sustainable development, population cannot continue to grow (possible 3-fold increase during the 20th century) since it only burdens the earth and future generations with more and more pollution, waste, and resource depletion. Warning signs already exist: global warming, ozone depletion, vanishing species, and deforestations. Future projections for population growth highlight the problem of employment, unemployment, and underemployment, and underemployment in the US and even more so in developing countries where they are already of great concern. The US population is growing faster than any other developed nation. Yet many economists believe that population growth equated a healthy economy and environmental degradation is necessary for progress. The Workforce 2000 report prepared by conservative think tank contends that even though unemployment increases steadily, the US will soon face a shortage of workers. The report used misleading data and false assumptions, however. For example, it shows the work force growing at 1%/year in the 1990s compared with 3% in the 1970s, but the higher growth in the 1970s was due to the maturing of the baby boomers. Other economists note that in a stable population, fewer people compete for jobs which increases wages and thus the standard of living for most people. Communities can monitor local food, water, and energy supplies, jobs, and health care in a stable population. Company worries about labor shortages are really worries about shortages of cheap labor, consequently many companies are moving factories outside the US where they can employ cheap labor. An economist who favors self-reliance notes that the US population policy is to let population take its natural course, which is antiquated thinking.

  4. Getting a Grip on Interfacing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assetto, Antonio R.; Dowden, Edward

    1988-01-01

    Introduces the unique interfacing equipment for measuring muscle strength over time. Explains the materials, setup method, operation, and typical display. Suggests other activities with which to utilize this device. (YP)

  5. Finding Relief from Allergy's Grip

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Antihistamines. These medications counter the effects of histamine, the substance that makes eyes water and noses ... stop hay fever, perhaps by blocking release of histamine and other symptomproducing chemicals. This product has few ...

  6. Consistently dated records from the Greenland GRIP, GISP2 and NGRIP ice cores for the past 104 ka reveal regional millennial-scale δ18O gradients with possible Heinrich event imprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seierstad, Inger K.; Abbott, Peter M.; Bigler, Matthias; Blunier, Thomas; Bourne, Anna J.; Brook, Edward; Buchardt, Susanne L.; Buizert, Christo; Clausen, Henrik B.; Cook, Eliza; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Davies, Siwan M.; Guillevic, Myriam; Johnsen, Sigfús J.; Pedersen, Desirée S.; Popp, Trevor J.; Rasmussen, Sune O.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Svensson, Anders; Vinther, Bo M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a synchronization of the NGRIP, GRIP and GISP2 ice cores onto a master chronology extending back to 104 ka before present, providing a consistent chronological framework for these three Greenland records. The synchronization aligns distinct peaks in volcanic proxy records and other impurity records (chemo-stratigraphic matching) and assumes that these layers of elevated impurity content represent the same, instantaneous event in the past at all three sites. More than 900 marker horizons between the three cores have been identified and our matching is independently confirmed by 24 new and previously identified volcanic ash (tephra) tie-points. Using the reference horizons, we transfer the widely used Greenland ice-core chronology, GICC05modelext, to the two Summit cores, GRIP and GISP2. Furthermore, we provide gas chronologies for the Summit cores that are consistent with the GICC05modelext timescale by utilizing both existing and new gas data (CH4 concentration and δ15N of N2). We infer that the accumulation contrast between the stadial and interstadial phases of the glacial period was ˜10% greater at Summit compared to at NGRIP. The δ18O temperature-proxy records from NGRIP, GRIP, and GISP2 are generally very similar and display synchronous behaviour at climate transitions. The δ18O differences between Summit and NGRIP, however, changed slowly over the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle and also underwent abrupt millennial-to-centennial-scale variations. We suggest that this observed latitudinal δ18O gradient in Greenland during the glacial period is the result of 1) relatively higher degree of precipitation with a Pacific signature at NGRIP, 2) increased summer bias in precipitation at Summit, and 3) enhanced Rayleigh distillation due to an increased source-to-site distance and a potentially larger source-to-site temperature gradient. We propose that these processes are governed by changes in the North American Ice Sheet (NAIS) volume and North

  7. Getting to Grips with Work Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misko, Josie

    This booklet, which is intended for individuals responsible for organizing student placements in work experience programs in Australia, provides an overview of the basic issues regarding work experience programs. The following are among the topics discussed in the 14 sections: (1) understanding the characteristics and purposes of industry…

  8. The Great Lakes Runoff Intercomparison Project (GRIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronewold, A. D.; Fortin, V.; Fry, L. M.

    2012-12-01

    As a continuation of investments in the development of alternative methods for estimating major components of the Great Lakes water budget through the recently-completed International Joint Commission (IJC) International Upper Great Lakes Study (IUGLS), representatives from a variety of United States and Canadian agencies have formed a bi-national collaboration to assess alternative methods for modeling runoff within the Great Lakes basin. The project is based on assessing and comparing simulated runoff across the watersheds of both Lake Michigan and Lake Ontario, with an emphasis on understanding the different sources of data needed to support these models, and a comparison between both total runoff and estimated runoff at individual gauging stations. Models, or modeling frameworks (and contributing agencies) participating in the project include (but are not limited to) Analysis of Flows in Networks of Channels (or AFINCH, from USGS), the Community Hydrologic Prediction System (or CHPS, from NOAA's National Weather Service), the MESH system (from Environment Canada), the Large Basin Runoff Model (or LBRM, from NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory) as well as a series of empirical methods for extrapolating historical gauge measurements to ungauged portions of each Lake basin. This presentation will also explore alternative methods for comparing runoff estimates over broad spatial scales, and for understanding potential sources of bias and uncertainty within and between these estimates. For models generating probabilistic estimates (i.e. with an explicit expression of uncertainty) we provide a comparison based on posterior predictive p-values (similar to rank histograms), an approach which, unlike conventional deterministic metrics, provides an indication of the relative importance of uncertainty in large-scale hydrological model assessment and how expressions of that uncertainty propagate into model-based water resources management planning decisions.

  9. NASA's GRIP Mission Flies Through Hurricane Earl

    NASA Video Gallery

    The eye of Hurricane Earl in the Atlantic Ocean is captured by a videographer aboard NASA’s DC-8 research aircraft on Monday, Aug. 30, 2010. The DC-8 passed through the eye of the storm six times j...

  10. Getting a Grip on the Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    2010-01-01

    From the nefarious achievement gaps, to the racial isolation in increasingly segregated schools; from the digital divide that results in kids not having access to computers, to the poverty gulf that results in kids not having homes; from boys' reading difficulties and girls' problems with math, to the disparities among rural, suburban, and urban…

  11. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John Martin; Guo Xiaofeng; Midia, Mehran

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  12. Vision-guided gripping of a cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicewarner, Keith E.; Kelley, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    The motivation for vision-guided servoing is taken from tasks in automated or telerobotic space assembly and construction. Vision-guided servoing requires the ability to perform rapid pose estimates and provide predictive feature tracking. Monocular information from a gripper-mounted camera is used to servo the gripper to grasp a cylinder. The procedure is divided into recognition and servo phases. The recognition stage verifies the presence of a cylinder in the camera field of view. Then an initial pose estimate is computed and uncluttered scan regions are selected. The servo phase processes only the selected scan regions of the image. Given the knowledge, from the recognition phase, that there is a cylinder in the image and knowing the radius of the cylinder, 4 of the 6 pose parameters can be estimated with minimal computation. The relative motion of the cylinder is obtained by using the current pose and prior pose estimates. The motion information is then used to generate a predictive feature-based trajectory for the path of the gripper.

  13. Getting a Grip on Strategic Alliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Susan Whealler; Noftsinger, John B., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The authors of this article maintain that in times that call for doing more with less, partnerships among institutions may hold the key to leveraging resources and enhancing program effectiveness. Collaboration is useful when most institutions are facing tremendous budget strains; intensifying demographic pressures are confronting all of higher…

  14. Hurricane Scientist talks GRIP, Hurricane Earl

    NASA Video Gallery

    Hurricane Earl, currently a powerful category 4 storm, is barreling north with the potential to batter the East Coast and threaten Labor Day plans for beachgoers from North Carolina to Massachusett...

  15. Internet-Based Implementation of Non-Pharmacological Interventions of the "People Getting a Grip on Arthritis" Educational Program: An International Online Knowledge Translation Randomized Controlled Trial Design Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Roanne; De Angelis, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects 2.1% of the Australian population (1.5% males; 2.6% females), with the highest prevalence from ages 55 to over 75 years (4.4-6.1%). In Canada, RA affects approximately 0.9% of adults, and within 30 years that is expected to increase to 1.3%. With an aging population and a greater number of individuals with modifiable risk factors for chronic diseases, such as arthritis, there is an urgent need for co-care management of arthritic conditions. The increasing trend and present shifts in the health services and policy sectors suggest that digital information delivery is becoming more prominent. Therefore, it is necessary to further investigate the use of online resources for RA information delivery. Objective The objective is to examine the effect of implementing an online program provided to patients with RA, the People Getting a Grip on Arthritis for RA (PGrip-RA) program, using information communication technologies (ie, Facebook and emails) in combination with arthritis health care professional support and electronic educational pamphlets. We believe this can serve as a useful and economical method of knowledge translation (KT). Methods This KT randomized controlled trial will use a prospective randomized open-label blinded-endpoint design to compare four different intervention approaches of the PGrip-RA program to a control group receiving general electronic educational pamphlets self-management in RA via email. Depending on group allocation, links to the Arthritis Society PGrip-RA material will be provided either through Facebook or by email. One group will receive feedback online from trained health care professionals. The intervention period is 6 weeks. Participants will have access to the Internet-based material after the completion of the baseline questionnaires until the final follow-up questionnaire at 6 months. We will invite 396 patients from Canadian and Australian Arthritis Consumers’ Associations to

  16. News Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-03-01

    Demonstrations: Lecture showcases the best of physics Astronomy: April 2011 celebrates astronomy Award: Physics project wins Guardian innovation award Teaching: Liverpool conference inspires teachers Media: Physics Education finds fame at last Conference: Network stimulates physics at ASE Lectures: University of Oxford hosts a crowd for an update on physics Materials: Goldsmiths course lets teachers get to grips with materials Workshop: Stimulating Physics workshop offers places for teachers and technicians

  17. Reviews Book: Visible Learning Book: Getting to Grips with Graphs Book: A Teacher's Guide to Classroom Research Book: Relativity: A Graphic Guide Book: The Last Man Who Knew Everything Game: Planet Quest Equipment: Minoru 3D Web Camera Equipment: Throwies Equipment: Go Science Optics Kit Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    WE RECOMMEND Visible Learning A compilation of more than 800 meta-analyses of achievement A Teacher's Guide to Classroom Research A useful aid for teachers who want to improve standards in class The Last Man Who Knew Everything This biography of Thomas Young is a 'lucid account' of his life Novo Minoru 3D Web Camera Welcome a mini alien to your classroom for fun 3D lessons WORTH A LOOK Getting to Grips with Graphs A useful collection of worksheets for teaching about graphs Relativity: A Graphic Guide This book works best as a supplementary text on relativity Planet Quest A space board game that will engage younger children Throwies Make a torch and liven up lessons on conductors and insulators Go Science Optics Kit Do-it-yourself optics kit should be priced a little lower WEB WATCH This month we take a look at NASA's technology and education web pages, which offer a great selection of space-related topics and activities for young scientists

  18. In the grip of the big telescope age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, David H.

    2009-08-01

    George Ellery Hale was a man of many dreams. One of his most persistent was to find the means to collect as much light as possible, but there is another element in his designs for the modern astrophysical observatory that has even greater significance, as it defines and distinguishes the practice of astrophysics from that of classical astronomy. Here we examine factors that either impeded or drove the acceptance of reflectors over refractors around the turn of the twentieth century at the outset of what may best be called the “Hale era.” This commenced in the late nineteenth century, when the first large multi-focus photographic reflectors emerged during the reign of the great refractors. It lasted through to the onset of World War II when astronomical practice was dominated by ten reflectors with mirrors between 60 and 100 in., and was about to add one more whose surface area would almost double that of all the rest combined. We will touch upon how design choice reflected both scientific priorities and technological limitations.

  19. Grip and detachment of locusts on inverted sandpaper substrates.

    PubMed

    Han, Longbao; Wang, Zhouyi; Ji, Aihong; Dai, Zhendong

    2011-12-01

    Locusts (Locusta migratoria manilensis) are characterized by their strong flying and grasping ability. Research on the grasping mechanism and behaviour of locusts on sloping substrates plays an important role in elucidating the mechanics of hexapod locomotion. Data on the maximum angles of slope at which locusts can grasp stably (critical angles of detachment) were obtained from high-speed video recordings at 215 fps. The grasping forces were collected by using two sensors, in situations where all left legs were standing on one and the right legs on the other sensor plate. These data were used to illustrate the grasping ability of locusts on slopes with varying levels of roughness. The grasping morphologies of locusts' bodies and tarsi were observed, and the surface roughness as well as diameters of their claw tips was measured under a microscope to account for the grasping mechanism of these insects on the sloping substrate. The results showed that the claw tips and part of the pads were in contact with the inverted substrate when the mean particle diameter was in the range of 15.3-40.5 µm. The interaction between pads and substrates may improve the stability of contact, and claw tips may play a key role in keeping the attachment reliable. A model was developed to explain the significant effects of the relative size of claw tips and mean particle diameter on grasping ability as well as the observed increase in lateral force (2.09-4.05 times greater than the normal force during detachment) with increasing slope angle, which indicates that the lateral force may be extremely important in keeping the contact reliable. This research lays the groundwork for the probable design and development of biomimetic robotics. PMID:21993149

  20. Global Hawk instrument installation for GRIP hurricane mission

    NASA Video Gallery

    Technicians from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ames and Goddard field centers prepare and install specialized environmental monitoring instrumentation on NASA's Global Hawk No. 872 at the Dryde...

  1. Precision and Power Grip Priming by Observed Grasping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vainio, Lari; Tucker, Mike; Ellis, Rob

    2007-01-01

    The coupling of hand grasping stimuli and the subsequent grasp execution was explored in normal participants. Participants were asked to respond with their right- or left-hand to the accuracy of an observed (dynamic) grasp while they were holding precision or power grasp response devices in their hands (e.g., precision device/right-hand; power…

  2. Grip Force Coordination during Bimanual Tasks in Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Mominul; Gordon, Andrew M.; Skold, Annika; Forssberg, Hans; Eliasson, Ann-Christin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate coordination of fingertip forces during an asymmetrical bimanual task in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Twelve participants (six males, six females; mean age 14y 4mo, SD 3.3y; range 9-20y;) with unilateral CP (eight right-sided, four left-sided) and 15 age-matched typically…

  3. University Knowledge Production and Innovation: Getting a Grip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooij, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    Today universities are increasingly seen as motors of innovation: they not only need to provide trained manpower and publications to society, but also new products, new processes and new services that create firms, jobs, and economic growth. This function of universities is controversial, and a huge and still expanding literature has tried to…

  4. Coming to grips with autism: Parents engaging with science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinstein, Noah Robert

    When and how does science matter to people in their everyday lives? In this dissertation, I explore the importance of science to parents of young children recently diagnosed with autism. I examine the questions parents ask and the resources they use as they attempt to understand and advocate for their children, and use this data to develop a new conceptual model of engagement with science: the intrapersonal and interpersonal process through which people connect science with their lived experience. I recruited a socio-economically diverse sample of ten parents, each with at least one young child (18 months--7 years) who had been diagnosed with autism 6--24 months prior to recruitment. Each parent completed a series of 8--12 semi-structured interviews over a period of approximately six months. These interviews were analyzed using both grounded theory and conceptually driven coding strategies. Two findings stand out. First, only a small fraction of parents' questions (15%) and resources (11%) were directly related to science. A much larger fraction (41% and 42%) fell into the broader categories of near-science questions and resources. Second, half of the parents demonstrated an iterative pattern of activity that I referred to as progressive engagement with science. In each case, a science or near-science question led the parent to a science or near-science resource, which transformed the question. The new question led to different science or near-science resources, which led to new questions and so forth. Parents who did not undertake progressive engagement with science were also less interested in autism as an organizing construct for understanding their children. Drawing on the work of Peter Galison, I propose that the idea of autism helps create a "trading zone" between the distinct social systems of family life and medical science. Parents who ask near-science questions must find near-science resources to help them direct their questions appropriately. They must also re-articulate the answers in terms that are personally meaningful. Even when parents and doctors disagree on the meaning and significance of an autism diagnosis, their mutual investment in the idea of autism fosters conceptual "trading" and enables future engagement with science.

  5. Helping Students Come to Grips with the Meaning of Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II

    2004-01-01

    Many years ago, Arons pointed out the incomprehension science students exhibit of the basic mathematical operations multiplication and division and the need to address the problem in physics classes to assure student understanding of the physical world. McDermott et al.'s Physics by Inquiry program does address this need directly and in detail (by…

  6. Quo vadimus: Coming to grips with the information world

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blados, Walter R.

    1991-01-01

    The new information-oriented culture in which we find ourselves has created new relationships, new stimulating and expanding opportunities, new methods of doing our work, and new environments in which we carry out our work. An integral part of the NASA aerospace research and development (R and D) process is the scientific and technical information (STI) associated with it; it is both a raw material (input) and a product (output) of this process. Within this process, the NASA STI Program is tasked to provide information management and services, to ensure that accurate and timely STI is generated and entered into an appropriate information service and made available in a usable form to those who have a need for it; in essence, a means to exploit both internal (NASA corporate) and pertinent external (other governmental/industrial/foreign) information to meet the requirements of the R and D community. To understand the STI Program management issues, it is critical to understand the role of the STI Program in the context of the R and D process. STI management must become part of the accepted culture of the R and D community, but it cannot become so unless adopted and accepted by it. A start should be made now to integrate the NASA STI Program into the R and D infrastructure, including funding and operational control. Within this infrastructure, we must obtain management commitment, review and produce policy reflecting the organizational status, allocate responsibilities, and set to work on implementing the true requirements of the R and D community.

  7. Getting to Grips with Competency-Based Training and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foyster, John

    Written for the Australian general reader who wants to understand important trends in vocational education and training, this document consists of a description of competency-based training (CBT) and assessment, a short test of readers' CBT understanding, and an annotated bibliography. The introduction states the aims of the document, lists five…

  8. Scaling and jumping: gravity loses grip on small jumpers.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Melanie N; Bobbert, Maarten F; Knoek van Soest, A J

    2006-06-21

    There are several ways to quantify jumping performance, a common definition being the height gained by the body's centre of mass (CM) in the airborne phase. Under this definition, jump height is determined by take-off velocity. According to the existing literature on jumping and scaling, take-off velocity, and hence jumping performance is independent of size because the energy that differently sized geometrically scaled jumpers can generate with their muscles is proportional to their mass. In this article it is shown, based on a simple energy balance, that it is incorrect to presume that jump height does not depend on size. Contrary to common belief, size as such has does have an effect on take-off velocity, putting small jumpers at a mechanical advantage, as is shown analytically. To quantify the effect of size on take-off velocity, a generic jumper model was scaled geometrically and evaluated numerically. While a 70-kg jumper took off at 2.65 m/s and raised its CM by 0.36 m after take-off, a perfectly geometrically similar jumper of 0.7 g reached a take-off velocity of 3.46 m/s and raised its CM by 0.61 m. The reason for the better performance of small jumpers is their higher efficacy in transforming the energy generated by the actuators into energy due to vertical velocity of the CM. Considering the ecological and evolutionary relevance of different definitions of jump height, size-dependent efficacy might explain why habitual jumping is especially prominent among small animals such as insects.

  9. Getting a firm grip on the realities for physician executives.

    PubMed

    Lyons, M F; Cejka, S

    1994-06-01

    Today, physician executives can be found in every health care setting-group practices, hospitals and academic medical centers, insurance companies, drug companies, airlines, the government, and more. But before physicians land these positions, they must negotiate the often difficult passage from clinician to manager to executive to business-minded leader. To manage this transition successfully, physicians must be aware of and understand some basic realities of management positions. The nature of these realities and how physicians interested in management can deal with them are the subject of this article.

  10. Kinetochores’ Gripping Feat: Conformational Wave or Biased Diffusion?

    PubMed Central

    Asbury, Charles L.; Tien, Jerry F.; Davis, Trisha N.

    2010-01-01

    Climbing up a cliff while the rope unravels underneath your fingers does not sound like a well planned adventure. Yet chromosomes face a similar challenge during each cell division. Their alignment and accurate segregation depends on staying attached to the assembling and disassembling tips of microtubule fibers. This coupling is mediated by kinetochores, intricate machines that attach chromosomes to an ever changing microtubule substrate. Two models for kinetochore-microtubule coupling were proposed a quarter century ago: conformational wave and biased diffusion. These two models differ in their predictions for how coupling is performed and therefore in how the coupling can be regulated. The availability of purified kinetochore proteins has enabled a series of biochemical and biophysical analyses of the kinetochore-microtubule interface. Here, we discuss what these studies reveal about the contributions of each model. PMID:20951587

  11. Getting to Grips with On-the-Job Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foyster, John

    This booklet is one in a series that has been written for the general reader who wants to understand important trends in vocational education and training in Australia. Its focus is competency-based training and assessment. The booklet starts with the specific working environment of a blackjack dealer in a casino and explores the meaning of…

  12. Getting to grips with the obesity epidemic in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Cuschieri, Sarah; Mamo, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic. It is responsible for increased patient morbidity and mortality. Significant related pathologies including diabetes mellitus compound the overall risks. Obesity is a significant financial burden. This includes direct and indirect medical costs, amounting to millions of euros each year. Multiple European studies have outlined a steady incline in obesity prevalence rates. Tackling obesity is no easy task. Policy makers aiming to reduce obesity rates should adopt an evidence-based approach. This entails adopting both micro- and macro-interventions tweaked to each country’s individual requirements. The ideal way forward would be to tackle obesity from the individual, population-wide and food industry angles. The key towards a successful intervention is for each country to carry out well-planned health examination studies, in an attempt to pin point local risk factors. Having a correct individualized picture, each country can move forward and draw policies and interventional procedures. The aim should be to primarily improve the quality of life. Second, the country’s capital expenditure is also reduced. PMID:27708778

  13. Get a Grip on Demographics with Geospatial Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Randall E.

    2009-01-01

    Aging school infrastructure, changing population dynamics, decreased funding, and increased accountability for reporting school success all require today's school business officials to combine a variety of disparate data sets into a coherent system that enables effective and efficient decision making. School business officials are required to: (1)…

  14. GRIPS Commission quarterly report, December 1, 1979-February 29, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    Progress is reported on the following: the establishment of the Data Acquisition and Retrieval System under the Environmental Data Base Program; the completion of the Comprehensive Air Monitoring Program Report, and county input to the revisions of the California legislative bill, which provides for the allocation of Bureau of Land Management Mineral Revenues. Also included are: a contract proposal, committee membership, topics and analysis framework for a master environmental assessment, work schedule, budget, and meeting minutes. (MHR)

  15. Template for robust soft-body crawling with reflex-triggered gripping.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Dieter W; Rife, Jason; Trimmer, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Caterpillars show a remarkable ability to get around in complex environments (e.g. tree branches). Part of this is attributable to crochets which allow the animal to firmly attach to a wide range of substrates. This introduces an additional challenge to locomotion, however, as the caterpillar needs a way to coordinate the release of the crochets and the activation of muscles to adjust body posture. Typical control models have focused on global coordination through a central pattern generator (CPG). This paper develops an alternative to the CPG, which accomplishes the same task and is robust to a wide range of body properties and control parameter variation. A one-dimensional model is proposed which consists of lumped masses connected by a network of springs, dampers and muscles. Computer simulations of the controller/model system are performed to verify its robustness and to permit comparison between the generated gaits and those observed in real caterpillars (specifically Manduca sexta.). PMID:25650372

  16. Basic survival needs and access to medicines--coming to grips with TRIPS: conversion + calculation.

    PubMed

    Van Puymbroeck, Rudolf V

    2010-01-01

    "Access to medicines" is a broad concept. After a review of three authoritative frameworks that help to identify its constitutive components, this essay summarizes the actual situation on the ground in low- and middle-income countries on the basis of recent empirical work. An analysis of survey data from 36 countries concluded that developing countries should promote generic medicines as a key policy option for improving access to medicines. Taking an international perspective to that recommendation, this essay reviews the World Trade Organization's Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) and, particularly, how this agreement has been applied in practice. As shown by the experience of Thailand, Brazil, and the Philippines, in order to deal effectively with international pressures for an excessive application of the TRIPS Agreement, some sort of conversion experience appears to be required, which then leads to a switch from a private enterprise, supply-driven approach to a public health vision that insists on universal and affordable access. But moral conviction is not sufficient. In order to muster and sustain the political will to face down international forces, civil society and government offices must be able and ready to show the costs and other adverse consequences of the TRIPS-based model for medicines. This calculation needs to reach beyond the health sector and calls for new alliances, nationally as well as internationally.

  17. Getting a grip on systems of care and child welfare using opposable thumbs.

    PubMed

    Fluke, John D; Oppenheim, Elizabeth

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this response paper is to discuss issues raised by two of the components of the definition of systems of care proffered by Hodges et al. [Hodges, S., Ferreira, K., Israel, N., & Mazza, J. (this issue). Systems of care, featherless bipeds, and the measure of all things. Evaluation and Program Planning]. In particular, this response will present some implications of the definition of the focus population and the value and core principle of family-driven care. It will also consider why these two components of the definition might serve as challenges to the applicability of the concept of systems of care to child welfare, and, in turn, integration of the model across child welfare and mental health. Recommendations for expanding and refining these component terms are provided.

  18. Coming to Grips with Change: The Initial Training of Geography Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stimpson, Philip

    2004-01-01

    Hong Kong styles itself as "the city that never sleeps", "the ever changing city". The dynamism and pace of change in teacher education, however, has to be seen as laggardly in comparison. This is not to say there has been no experiment but changes have been piecemeal and "add-ons". Teacher education in Hong Kong has now, however, reached…

  19. Evidence for Motor Planning in Monkeys: Rhesus Macaques Select Efficient Grips when Transporting Spoons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naive adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with…

  20. What to Do When Winter Has You in its Icy Grip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Introduction Safety Management Systems Workplace Safety Consulting Employee Perception Surveys Research Journey to Safety Excellence Join the ... Safety Safety Management Systems Workplace Safety Consulting Employee Perception Surveys Research Journey to Safety Excellence Join the ...

  1. Structures of Two Arabidopsis thaliana Major Latex Proteins Represent Novel Helix-Grip Folds

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Betsy L.; Song, Jikui; de la Cruz, Norberto B.; Peterson, Francis C.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-01-01

    The major latex proteins (MLP) are a protein family first identified in the latex of opium poppy. They are found only in plants and have 24 identified members in Arabidopsis alone as well as in other plants such as peach, strawberry, melon, cucumber, and soybean. While the function of the MLPs is unknown, they have been associated with fruit and flower development and in pathogen defense responses. Based on modest sequence similarity, they have been characterized as members of the Bet v 1 protein superfamily; however, no structures have yet been reported. As part of an ongoing structural genomics effort, we determined the structures of two Arabidopsis thaliana MLPs: the solution structure of MLP28 (gene product of At1g70830.1) and the crystal structure of At1g24000.1. The structures revealed distinct differences when compared to one another and to the typical Bet v 1 fold. Nevertheless, NMR titration experiments demonstrated that the characteristic Bet v 1 hydrophobic binding pocket of At1g24000.1 is able to bind a ligand, suggesting that it plays a role in the function of the MLPs. A structure-based sequence analysis identified conserved hydrophobic residues in the long alpha helix that contribute to the binding cavity and may specify preferred ligands for the MLP family. PMID:19326460

  2. The Great Lakes Runoff Intercomparison Project Phase 1: Lake Michigan (GRIP-M)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Lauren M.; Gronewold, Andrew D.; Fortin, Vincent; Buan, Steven; Clites, Anne H.; Luukkonen, Carol; Holtschlag, David; Diamond, Laura; Hunter, Timothy; Seglenieks, Frank; Durnford, Dorothy; Dimitrijevic, Milena; Subich, Christopher; Klyszejko, Erika; Kea, Kandace; Restrepo, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    We assembled and applied five models (one of which included three different configurations) to the Lake Michigan basin to improve our understanding of how differences in model skill at simulating total runoff to Lake Michigan relate to model structure, calibration protocol, model complexity, and assimilation (i.e. replacement of simulated discharge with discharge observations into historical simulations), and evaluate historical changes in runoff to Lake Michigan. We found that the performance among these models when simulating total runoff to the lake varied relatively little, despite variability in model structure, spatial representation, input data, and calibration protocol. Relatively simple empirical, assimilative models, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) area ratio-based model (ARM) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Analysis of Flows in Networks of CHannels (AFINCH) model, represent efficient and effective approaches to propagating discharge observations into basin-wide (including gaged and ungaged areas) runoff estimates, and may offer an opportunity to improve predictive models for simulating runoff to the Great Lakes. Additionally, the intercomparison revealed that the median of the simulations from non-assimilative models agrees well with assimilative models, suggesting that using a combination of different methodologies may be an appropriate approach for estimating runoff into the Great Lakes. We then applied one assimilative model (ARM) to the Lake Michigan basin and found that there was persistent reduction in the amount of precipitation that becomes runoff following 1998, corresponding to a period of persistent low Lake Michigan water levels. The study was conducted as a first phase of the Great Lakes Runoff Intercomparison Project, a regional binational collaboration that aims to systematically and rigorously assess a variety of models currently used (or that could readily be adapted) to simulate basin-scale runoff to the North American Laurentian Great Lakes.

  3. Getting to grips with the cannabis problem: the evolving contributions and impact of Griffith Edwards.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wayne

    2015-07-01

    Griffith Edwards played an important role in cannabis policy debates within government advisory committees in the United Kingdom from the early 1970s until the early 1980s. This has largely been hidden from public knowledge by the confidentiality of these committee discussions. The purpose of this paper is to use Griffith's writings and the results of recent historical scholarship to outline the views he expressed, the reasons he gave for them, and to provide a brief assessment of his contribution to the development of British cannabis policy. PMID:26042566

  4. Influence on grip of knife handle surface characteristics and wearing protective gloves.

    PubMed

    Claudon, Laurent

    2006-11-01

    Ten subjects were asked to apply maximum torques on knife handles with either their bare hand or their hand wearing a Kevlar fibre protective glove. Four knife handles (2 roughnesses, 2 hardnesses) were tested. Surface electromyograms of 6 upper limb and shoulder muscles were recorded and subject opinions on both knife handle hardness and friction in the hand were also assessed. The results revealed the significant influence of wearing gloves (p<0.0001), knife type (p<0.0005) and handle hardness (p<0.005) on the applied torque. Wearing Kevlar fibre gloves greatly increased the torque independently of the other two parameters. Under the bare hand condition, a 90 degrees ShA slightly rough handle provided the greatest torque. Subject opinion agreed with the observed effects on recorded torque values except for the hardness factor, for which a preference for the 70 degrees ShA value over the 90 degrees ShA value emerged.

  5. Hotspot or Heatwave? Getting to Grips with Neutron Star Burst Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, A.

    2005-01-01

    Many accreting neutron stars, including two of the millisecond pulsars, exhibit high frequency oscillations during Type I X-ray bursts. The properties of the burst oscillations reflect the nature of the thermal asymmetry on the stellar surface. The mechanism that gives rise to the aspzetry, however , remains unclear: possibilities include a hotspot due to uneven fuel distribution, modes of oscillation in the surface layers of the neutron star, or vortices driven by the Coriolis force. I will review some of the latest theory and observations, and present the results of a recent study of variability in the burst oscillations of the millisecond pulsar 51814-338.

  6. Placebo treatments, informed consent and 'the grip of a false picture'.

    PubMed

    Glackin, Shane Nicholas

    2015-08-01

    It is widely supposed that the prescription of placebo treatments to patients for therapeutic purposes is ethically problematic on the grounds that the patient cannot give informed consent to the treatment, and is therefore deceived by the physician. This claim, I argue, rests on two confusions: one concerning the meaning of 'informed consent' and its relation to the information available to the patient, and another concerning the relation of body and mind. Taken together, these errors lead naturally to the conclusion that the prescription of placebos to unwitting patients is unethical. Once they are dispelled, I argue, we can see that providing 'full' information against a background of metaphysical confusion may make a patient less informed and that the 'therapeutic' goal of relieving the patient of such confusions is properly the duty of the philosopher rather than the physician. Therapeutic placebos therefore do not violate the patient's informed consent or the ethical duties of the doctor.

  7. Grip it and rip it: Structural mechanisms of DNA helicase substrate binding and unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Basudeb; Keck, James L

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance and faithful transmission of genomic information depends on the efficient execution of numerous DNA replication, recombination, and repair pathways. Many of the enzymes that catalyze steps within these pathways require access to sequence information that is buried in the interior of the DNA double helix, which makes DNA unwinding an essential cellular reaction. The unwinding process is mediated by specialized molecular motors called DNA helicases that couple the chemical energy derived from nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to the otherwise non-spontaneous unwinding reaction. An impressive number of high-resolution helicase structures are now available that, together with equally important mechanistic studies, have begun to define the features that allow this class of enzymes to function as molecular motors. In this review, we explore the structural features within DNA helicases that are used to bind and unwind DNA. We focus in particular on “aromatic-rich loops” that allow some helicases to couple single-stranded DNA binding to ATP hydrolysis and “wedge/pin” elements that provide mechanical tools for DNA strand separation when connected to translocating motor domains. PMID:25131811

  8. "Thinking Things Through": Coming to Grips with Philosophical and Prudential Perspectives in Teachers' Educational Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husa, Jukka

    This paper examines what pedagogical issues mean to practicing teachers, discussing the ethics of purpose, rules and principles, and probability, and noting teachers' philosophical perspectives and practical interpretations. Interviews were conducted with 20 Finnish secondary school teachers working in urban schools during an in-service training…

  9. Get a grip on chaos: Tailored measures for complex systems on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firle, Sascha Oliver

    Complex systems are ubiquitous in physics, biology and mathematics. This thesis is concerned with describing and understanding complex systems. Some new concepts about how large systems can be viewed in a lower dimensional framework are proposed. The systems presented are examples from ecology and chemistry. In both cases we have a large amount of interacting units that can be understood by The predator-prey system investigated consists of ground beetles, Pterostichus cuprens L. (Coleoptera: Carabidae), that feeds on bird-cherry oat aphids. The beetles' movement can consistently be described by a combined model of surface diffusion and biased random walk. This allows conclusions about how fast and in which fashion the beetle covers its habitat. Movement is dependent on aphid densities and predation, in turn modifies aphid distributions locally. The presented generalized functional response theory describes predation rates in the presence of spatial heterogeneity. A single measure for fragmentation captures all essential features of the prey aggregation and allows the estimation of outbreak densities and distributions. The chemical example is the catalytic oxidation of CO on a Pt(110) single crystal surface. Unstable periodic orbits reconstructed from experimental data are used to reveal the topology of the attractor, underlying the time series dynamics. The found braid supports an orbit which implies that the time series is chaotic. The system is simulated numerically by a set of partial differential equations for surface coverage in one space dimension. The bifurcation diagram of the corresponding traveling wave ODE reveals the homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits that organize the phase space and mediate the transition to chaos. Studies in the PDE- framework relate this to the stability and to the interaction of pulse-like solutions.

  10. The Effect of Climbing Wall Use on the Grip Strength of Fourth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lirgg, Cathy D.; Dibrezzo, Ro; Gray, Michelle; Esslinger, Travis

    2011-01-01

    Physical educators are challenged to provide quality experiences that are fun for their students, enhance fitness levels, and build confidence. These challenges are amplified with the current decrease in activity levels of American youth. A possible solution to enhancing physical activity engagement in children is to incorporate climbing walls…

  11. Getting a grip on the transverse motion in a Zeeman decelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Dulitz, Katrin; Softley, Timothy P.; Motsch, Michael; Vanhaecke, Nicolas

    2014-03-14

    Zeeman deceleration is an experimental technique in which inhomogeneous, time-dependent magnetic fields generated inside an array of solenoid coils are used to manipulate the velocity of a supersonic beam. A 12-stage Zeeman decelerator has been built and characterized using hydrogen atoms as a test system. The instrument has several original features including the possibility to replace each deceleration coil individually. In this article, we give a detailed description of the experimental setup, and illustrate its performance. We demonstrate that the overall acceptance in a Zeeman decelerator can be significantly increased with only minor changes to the setup itself. This is achieved by applying a rather low, anti-parallel magnetic field in one of the solenoid coils that forms a temporally varying quadrupole field, and improves particle confinement in the transverse direction. The results are reproduced by three-dimensional numerical particle trajectory simulations thus allowing for a rigorous analysis of the experimental data. The findings suggest the use of a modified coil configuration to improve transverse focusing during the deceleration process.

  12. Grip and limb force limits to turning performance in competition horses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huiling; Wilson, Alan M

    2011-07-22

    Manoeuverability is a key requirement for successful terrestrial locomotion, especially on variable terrain, and is a deciding factor in predator-prey interaction. Compared with straight-line running, bend running requires additional leg force to generate centripetal acceleration. In humans, this results in a reduction in maximum speed during bend running and a published model assuming maximum limb force as a constraint accurately predicts how much a sprinter must slow down on a bend given his maximum straight-line speed. In contrast, greyhounds do not slow down or change stride parameters during bend running, which suggests that their limbs can apply the additional force for this manoeuvre. We collected horizontal speed and angular velocity of heading of horses while they turned in different scenarios during competitive polo and horse racing. The data were used to evaluate the limits of turning performance. During high-speed turns of large radius horizontal speed was lower on the bend, as would be predicted from a model assuming a limb force limit to running speed. During small radius turns the angular velocity of heading decreased with increasing speed in a manner consistent with the coefficient of friction of the hoof-surface interaction setting the limit to centripetal force to avoid slipping. PMID:21147799

  13. Grips and ties: agency, uncertainty, and the problem of suffering in North Karelia.

    PubMed

    Honkasalo, Marja-Liisa

    2009-03-01

    In medical anthropological research, the question of suffering has been a topic of salient interest mostly from two theoretical viewpoints: those of endurance and of agency. The concept "suffering" derives its origins from two etymological roots, those of suffering-souffrance-sofferanza and of misery-misère-miseria. According to the first approach, that of "endurance" and founded largely on Judeo-Christian theology, suffering is regarded as an existential experience at the borders of human meaning making. The question then is: how to endure, how to suffer? The latter view, that of "agency," follows the Enlightenment, and later the Marxist view on mundane suffering, misery, and the modern question of how to avoid or diminish it. This article follows the lines of the second approach, but my aim is also to try to build a theoretical bridge between the two. I ask whether agency would be understood as a culturally shared and interpreted modes of enduring, and if so, which conceptual definition of agency applies in this context? I theorize the relationship between suffering and agency using Ernesto de Martino's notion la crisi della presenza. In line with Pierre Bourdieu, I think that in people's lives, there may be sufferings in a plural form, as a variety of sufferings. The article is based on a one-year long fieldwork in Finnish North Karelia.

  14. Coming to Grips with Progress Testing: Some Guidelines for Its Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basanta, Carmen Perez

    2012-01-01

    The area of progress testing has been neglected and has lagged far behind developments in language teaching and testing in general. In most classrooms today, English is taught through communicative textbooks that provide neither accompanying tests nor any guidance for test construction. Teachers are on their own in constructing tests to measure…

  15. Climate Change and Vector Borne Diseases: Getting A Grip on Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, G. E.; Ellis, H.

    2011-12-01

    Pathogens that are transmitted by arthropods to humans kill millions of people a year and have long been identified as systems likely affected by climate change. Despite this, there has been a long controversy of how to evaluate the responses of these infectious disease systems to climatic conditions so that meaningful programmatic dcisions can be made. We briefly review the rationale for overall expectations, using them to identify both the temporal and spatial resolution needed for decision making and then discuss progress to date, using the world global malaria eradication program as an example.

  16. A Symmetric Recognition Motif between Vicinal Diols: The Fourfold Grip in Ethylene Glycol Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Kollipost, Franz; Otto, Katharina E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ethylene glycol has a transiently chiral, asymmetric global minimum structure, but it favors a highly symmetric, achiral dimer arrangement which has not been considered or found in previous quantum‐chemical studies. Complementary FTIR and Raman spectroscopy in supersonic jets allows for the detection and straightforward assignment of this four‐fold hydrogen‐bonded dimer, which introduces an interesting supramolecular binding motif for vicinal diols and provides a strong case for transient chirality synchronization. PMID:26929113

  17. Keeping a tight grip on the reins: donor control over aid coordination and management in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Buse, K

    1999-09-01

    A long-standing consensus that aid coordination should be owned by recipient authorities has been eclipsed by accord on the desirability of recipient management of aid along-side domestic resources. Nonetheless, in many low and lower-middle income countries, donors remain remarkably uncoordinated; where attempts at coordination are made, they are often donor-driven, and only a small proportion of aid is directly managed by recipients. This paper draws on evidence from an in-depth review of aid to the health sector in Bangladesh to analyze the systems by which external resources are managed. Based on interviews with key stakeholders, a questionnaire survey and analysis of documentary sources, the factors constraining the government from assuming a more active role in aid management are explored. The results suggest that donor perceptions of weak government capacity, inadequate accountability and compromised integrity only partially account for the propensity for donor leadership. Equally important is the consideration that aid coordination has a markedly political dimension. Stakeholders are well aware of the power, influence and leverage which aid coordination confers, an awareness which colours the desire of some stakeholders to lead aid coordination processes, and conditions the extent and manner by which others wish to be involved. It is argued that recipient management of external aid is dependent on major changes in the attitudes and behaviours of recipients and donors alike.

  18. In the Grip of the Distant Universe: The Science of Inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graneau, Peter; Graneau, Neal

    ch. 1. All matter instantaneously senses all other matter in the universe -- ch. 2. Johannes Kepler - The astronomer who coined the word inertia -- ch. 3. Free Fall - A hardly believable story of science -- ch. 4. The Cartesian interlude - a novel cosmology -- ch. 5. Newton's force of inertia - the basis of dynamics -- ch. 6. A century of consolidation - the early practitioners of Newtonian dynamics -- ch. 7. Mach's magic principle - the unique inertial system -- ch. 8. Albert Einstein - inertia obscured by gravitation -- ch. 9. Inducing inertia - an electromagnetic analogy -- ch. 10. Retarded action at a distance - a short lived misnomer -- ch. 11. Clock confusion in the 20th century - the connection between inertia and timekeeping -- ch. 12. Machian inertia and the isotropic universe - a new force law.

  19. The New Wave of Childhood Studies: Breaking the Grip of Bio-Social Dualism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Kevin William

    2012-01-01

    The article takes as its starting point a new wave of researchers who use concepts such as "hybridity" and "multiplicity" in a bid to move the study of childhood beyond the strictures of what Lee and Motzkau call "bio-social dualism", whereby the division between the "natural child" of developmental psychology and the "social child" of…

  20. Grip and limb force limits to turning performance in competition horses.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huiling; Wilson, Alan M

    2011-07-22

    Manoeuverability is a key requirement for successful terrestrial locomotion, especially on variable terrain, and is a deciding factor in predator-prey interaction. Compared with straight-line running, bend running requires additional leg force to generate centripetal acceleration. In humans, this results in a reduction in maximum speed during bend running and a published model assuming maximum limb force as a constraint accurately predicts how much a sprinter must slow down on a bend given his maximum straight-line speed. In contrast, greyhounds do not slow down or change stride parameters during bend running, which suggests that their limbs can apply the additional force for this manoeuvre. We collected horizontal speed and angular velocity of heading of horses while they turned in different scenarios during competitive polo and horse racing. The data were used to evaluate the limits of turning performance. During high-speed turns of large radius horizontal speed was lower on the bend, as would be predicted from a model assuming a limb force limit to running speed. During small radius turns the angular velocity of heading decreased with increasing speed in a manner consistent with the coefficient of friction of the hoof-surface interaction setting the limit to centripetal force to avoid slipping.

  1. Recession becomes major force to tighten grip on quarterly gas pipeline building costs

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.M.

    1983-04-25

    This article points out that the major force affecting gas pipeline building costs, during the second quarter of 1982, was the recession. The total composite cost index for building gas pipelines increased by only 1.01%. Material prices for steel line pipe, valves, fittings, and line pipe coating showed little or no gain during the period. Installation labor costs continued to climb. Discusses construction activity, compressor equipment and drive units, and high pressure gas station piping.

  2. Coming to Grips with Your Finances. Home Study Course. Misc. Series No. 112.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawroski, Mary Ann; Shinn, Marilyn C.

    This set of lessons is designed as a home study course to help individuals come to terms with their finances. Lesson 1 explains the following steps in developing a financial action plan: determining priorities, setting financial goals, analyzing cash flow, planning spending, developing spending guidelines, making written spending plans, planning…

  3. Getting a grip on strangles: recent progress towards improved diagnostics and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Waller, Andrew S; Jolley, Keith A

    2007-05-01

    'Strangles', caused by infection with the bacterium Streptococcus equi, remains one of the most commonly diagnosed and important infectious diseases of horses world-wide. This review discusses the diagnosis and pathogenesis of strangles with particular attention to the significance of persistent infections in disease transmission and the rapid progress now being made towards the development of effective preventative vaccines. It is now possible combine recent sequence data from the N-terminal region of the SeM protein and reassign the SeM alleles using the on-line database http://pubmlst.org/szooepidemicus/seM/. Hypotheses concerning the origin of this variation and the potential for its exploitation for the epidemiological analysis of outbreaks are proposed. Advances in understanding of the molecular evolution of S. equi highlight the role played by phage-mediated acquisition of virulence factors and suggest new avenues for prophylactic intervention.

  4. Infants' Grip Strength Predicts Mu Rhythm Attenuation during Observation of Lifting Actions with Weighted Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upshaw, Michaela B.; Bernier, Raphael A.; Sommerville, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Research has established that the body is fundamentally involved in perception: bodily experience influences activation of the shared neural system underlying action perception and production during action observation, and bodily characteristics influence perception of the spatial environment. However, whether bodily characteristics influence…

  5. Structures of two Arabidopsis thaliana major latex proteins represent novel helix-grip folds

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, Betsy L.; Song, Jikui; de la Cruz, Norberto B.; Peterson, Francis C.; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2009-06-02

    Here we report the first structures of two major latex proteins (MLPs) which display unique structural differences from the canonical Bet v 1 fold described earlier. MLP28 (SwissProt/TrEMBL ID Q9SSK9), the product of gene At1g70830.1, and the At1g24000.1 gene product (Swiss- Prot/TrEMBL ID P0C0B0), proteins which share 32% sequence identity, were independently selected as foldspace targets by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics. The structure of a single domain (residues 17-173) of MLP28 was solved by NMR spectroscopy, while the full-length At1g24000.1 structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. MLP28 displays greater than 30% sequence identity to at least eight MLPs from other species. For example, the MLP28 sequence shares 64% identity to peach Pp-MLP119 and 55% identity to cucumber Csf2.20 In contrast, the At1g24000.1 sequence is highly divergent (see Fig. 1), containing a gap of 33 amino acids when compared with all other known MLPs. Even when the gap is excluded, the sequence identity with MLPs from other species is less than 30%. Unlike some of the MLPs from other species, none of the A. thaliana MLPs have been characterized biochemically. We show by NMR chemical shift mapping that At1g24000.1 binds progesterone, demonstrating that despite its sequence dissimilarity, the hydrophobic binding pocket is conserved and, therefore, may play a role in its biological function and that of the MLP family in general.

  6. Getting a grip on problem gambling: what can neuroscience tell us?

    PubMed Central

    Goudriaan, Anna E.; Yücel, Murat; van Holst, Ruth J.

    2014-01-01

    In problem gamblers, diminished cognitive control and increased impulsivity is present compared to healthy controls. Moreover, impulsivity has been found to be a vulnerability marker for the development of pathological gambling (PG) and problem gambling (PrG) and to be a predictor of relapse. In this review, the most recent findings on functioning of the brain circuitry relating to impulsivity and cognitive control in PG and PrG are discussed. Diminished functioning of several prefrontal areas and of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) indicate that cognitive-control related brain circuitry functions are diminished in PG and PrG compared to healthy controls. From the available cue reactivity studies on PG and PrG, increased responsiveness towards gambling stimuli in fronto-striatal reward circuitry and brain areas related to attentional processing is present compared to healthy controls. At this point it is unresolved whether PG is associated with hyper- or hypo-activity in the reward circuitry in response to monetary cues. More research is needed to elucidate the complex interactions for reward responsivity in different stages of gambling and across different types of reward. Conflicting findings from basic neuroscience studies are integrated in the context of recent neurobiological addiction models. Neuroscience studies on the interface between cognitive control and motivational processing are discussed in light of current addiction theories. Clinical implications: We suggest that innovation in PG therapy should focus on improvement of dysfunctional cognitive control and/or motivational functions. The implementation of novel treatment methods like neuromodulation, cognitive training and pharmacological interventions as add-on therapies to standard treatment in PG and PrG, in combination with the study of their effects on brain-behavior mechanisms could prove an important clinical step forward towards personalizing and improving treatment results in PG. PMID:24904328

  7. Effect of bandwidth knowledge of results on the learning of a grip force control task.

    PubMed

    Ugrinowitsch, Herbert; Ugrinowitsch, Alessandra Aguilar Coca; Benda, Rodolfo Novellino; Tertuliano, Ivan Wallan

    2010-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the persistence of the effect of "bandwidth knowledge of results (KR)" manipulated during the learning phase of performing a manual force-control task. The experiment consisted of two phases, an acquisition phase with the goal of maintaining 60% maximum force in 30 trials, and a second phase with the objective of maintaining 40% of maximum force in 20 further trials. There were four bandwidths of KR: when performance error exceeded 5, 10, or 15% of the target, and a control group (0% bandwidth). Analysis showed that 5, 10, and 15% bandwidth led to better performance than 0% bandwidth KR at the beginning of the second phase and persisted during the extended trials.

  8. Coming to grips with the past: Effect of repeated simulation on the perceived plausibility of episodic counterfactual thoughts

    PubMed Central

    De Brigard, Felipe; Szpunar, Karl K.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    When people revisit previous experiences they often engage in episodic counterfactual thinking: mental simulations of alternative ways in which personal past events could have occurred. The present study employs a novel experimental paradigm to examine the influence of repeated simulation on the perceived plausibility of upward, downward and neutral episodic counterfactual thoughts. Participants were asked to remember negative, positive, and neutral autobiographical memories. One week later, they re-simulated self-generated upward, downward, and neutral counterfactual alternatives to those memories either once or four times. The results indicate that repeated simulation of upward, downward and neutral episodic counterfactual events decreases their perceived plausibility while increasing ratings of ease, detail, and valence. This finding suggests differences between episodic counterfactual thoughts and other kinds of self-referential simulations. Possible implications of this finding for pathological and non-pathological anxiety are discussed. PMID:23673994

  9. Explaining Sustained Inequalities in Ethnic Minority School Exclusions in England--Passive Racism in a Neoliberal Grip

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The enquiries into police action in the Stephen Lawrence murder, the Macpherson report and the subsequent race relations legislation have altered the political, professional and wider social climate of debate on equality issues, including inequalities in minority ethnic exclusions. The paper analyses the meanings given to racism and institutional…

  10. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  11. Grip on challenging behaviour: a multidisciplinary care programme for managing behavioural problems in nursing home residents with dementia. Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Behavioural problems are common in nursing home residents with dementia and they often are burdensome for both residents and nursing staff. In this study, the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a new care programme for managing behavioural problems will be evaluated. Methods/Design The care programme is based on Dutch national guidelines. It will consist of four steps: detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation. A stepped wedge design will be used. A total of 14 dementia special care units will implement the care programme. The primary outcome is behavioural problems. Secondary outcomes will include quality of life, prescription rate of antipsychotics, use of physical restraints and workload and job satisfaction of nursing staff. The effect of the care programme will be estimated using multilevel linear regression analysis. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will also be carried out. Discussion The care programme is expected to be cost-effective and effective in decreasing behavioural problems, workload of nursing staff and in increasing quality of life of residents. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register (NTR). Trial number: NTR 2141 PMID:21338502

  12. p53 Loses grip on PIK3CA expression leading to enhanced cell survival during platinum resistance.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Bhushan; Ray, Pritha

    2016-10-01

    Tumour suppressor p53, a master transcriptional regulator determines cell fate through preferential activation/repression of a myriad of genes during stress. Till date, activation and preferential binding of p53 on different promoters was reported to be influenced by the nature, strength and duration of stress which mediates its post translational modifications. Cisplatin, a widely used cytotoxic drug represses PIK3CA promoter activity and attenuates PI3K/AKT cell survival pathway through p53 activation in sensitive cells. However, very little is understood about the overall mechanism of p53-PIK3CA interaction and influence of p53 on the transcriptional status of PIK3CA during cisplatin resistance. Here we showed that cisplatin could dynamically alter p53 occupancy between the p53 binding sequences present in PIK3CA promoter in ovarian and breast cancer cells. This altered occupancy is dictated by higher acetylation and hyper-phosphorylation at serine 15, serine 20 and serine 46 residues. Interestingly, cisplatin resistant cells when challenged with cisplatin demonstrated abolished PIK3CA promoter attenuation, low level of p53 binding, and loss of p53 serine 46 phosphorylation. A phosphorylation deficient S46A mutant failed to repress PIK3CA in p53 deficient cells. Elevated expression of Bcl2, P27 and cFLIP indicated a pro-survival state in these resistant cells. Non-invasive real time imaging using two different luciferase reporters showed that cisplatin could simultaneously induce PIK3CA attenuation and p53 activation with growth regression in sensitive tumours but not in the resistant tumours where only low level of p53 activation and sustained growth was observed. This is the first report on phosphorylation of p53 serine 46 as a modulator of p53-PIK3CA promoter interaction which influences altered binding of p53 at different consensus sequences in the same promoter in response to chemotherapeutic stress. Absence of such modulation in resistant cellular milieu influences cellular homoeostasis in platinum-resistant cells probably due to altered post translational modification of p53. PMID:27401370

  13. Clinging, gripping, holding, containment: Reflections on a survival reflex and the development of a capacity to separate.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Alessandra

    2014-09-01

    This paper attempts to describe how, in the very first months of extra-uterine life, personality structures are formed around notions of personal space, separateness, attachment and individuation. The contribution of a forgotten Hungarian analyst, Imre Hermann, who wrote about the 'clinging reflex', will be explored in relation to the origin of Bowlby's concept of attachment and Rey's theoretical understanding of personal space. Particular attention will be given to transitions, transitional experiences and the development of a sense of internal space. Vignettes from infant observations will be used to illustrate the theoretical frame of reference. Clinical material from the analysis of a child and an adult patient will be provided to postulate how a distorted perception of personal space and separateness in the first few months of life may affect the capacity to attach and to individuate. PMID:25155677

  14. Tablet Keyboard Configuration Affects Performance, Discomfort and Task Difficulty for Thumb Typing in a Two-Handed Grip

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, Matthieu B.; Catalano, Paul J.; Jindrich, Devin L.; Dennerlein, Jack T.

    2013-01-01

    When holding a tablet computer with two hands, the touch keyboard configuration imposes postural constraints on the user because of the need to simultaneously hold the device and type with the thumbs. Designers have provided users with several possible keyboard configurations (device orientation, keyboard layout and location). However, potential differences in performance, usability and postures among these configurations have not been explored. We hypothesize that (1) the narrower standard keyboard layout in the portrait orientation leads to lower self-reported discomfort and less reach than the landscape orientation; (2) a split keyboard layout results in better overall outcomes compared to the standard layout; and (3) the conventional bottom keyboard location leads to the best outcomes overall compared to other locations. A repeated measures laboratory experiment of 12 tablet owners measured typing speed, discomfort, task difficulty, and thumb/wrist joint postures using an active marker system during typing tasks for different combinations of device orientation (portrait and landscape), keyboard layout (standard and split), and keyboard location (bottom, middle, top). The narrower standard keyboard with the device in the portrait orientation was associated with less discomfort (least squares mean (and S.E.) 2.9±0.6) than the landscape orientation (4.5±0.7). Additionally, the split keyboard decreased the amount of reaching required by the thumb in the landscape orientation as defined by a reduced range of motion and less MCP extension, which may have led to reduced discomfort (2.7±0.6) compared to the standard layout (4.5±0.7). However, typing speed was greater for the standard layout (127±5 char./min.) compared to the split layout (113±4 char./min.) regardless of device orientation and keyboard location. Usage guidelines and designers can incorporate these findings to optimize keyboard design parameters and form factors that promote user performance and usability for thumb interaction. PMID:23840730

  15. Improvement in precision grip force control with self-modulation of primary motor cortex during motor imagery

    PubMed Central

    Blefari, Maria L.; Sulzer, James; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kollias, Spyros; Gassert, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Motor imagery (MI) has shown effectiveness in enhancing motor performance. This may be due to the common neural mechanisms underlying MI and motor execution (ME). The main region of the ME network, the primary motor cortex (M1), has been consistently linked to motor performance. However, the activation of M1 during motor imagery is controversial, which may account for inconsistent rehabilitation therapy outcomes using MI. Here, we examined the relationship between contralateral M1 (cM1) activation during MI and changes in sensorimotor performance. To aid cM1 activity modulation during MI, we used real-time fMRI neurofeedback-guided MI based on cM1 hand area blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in healthy subjects, performing kinesthetic MI of pinching. We used multiple regression analysis to examine the correlation between cM1 BOLD signal and changes in motor performance during an isometric pinching task of those subjects who were able to activate cM1 during motor imagery. Activities in premotor and parietal regions were used as covariates. We found that cM1 activity was positively correlated to improvements in accuracy as well as overall performance improvements, whereas other regions in the sensorimotor network were not. The association between cM1 activation during MI with performance changes indicates that subjects with stronger cM1 activation during MI may benefit more from MI training, with implications toward targeted neurotherapy. PMID:25762907

  16. Actin Grips: Circular Actin-Rich Cytoskeletal Structures that Mediate the Wrapping of Polymeric Microfibers by Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Desiree; Park, DoYoung; Anghelina, Mirela; Pecot, Thierry; Machiraju, Raghu; Xue, Ruipeng; Lannutti, John; Thomas, Jessica; Cole, Sara; Moldovan, Leni; Moldovan, Nicanor I.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of endothelial-lineage cells with three-dimensional substrates was much less studied than that with flat culture surfaces. We investigated the in vitro attachment of both mature endothelial cells (ECs) and of less differentiated EC colony-forming cells to poly-e-capro-lactone (PCL) fibers with diameters in 5–20 μm range (‘scaffold microfibers’, SMFs). We found that notwithstanding the poor intrinsic adhesiveness to PCL, both cell types completely wrapped the SMFs after long-term cultivation, thus attaining a cylindrical morphology. In this system, both EC types grew vigorously for more than a week and became increasingly more differentiated, as shown by multiplexed gene expression. Three-dimensional reconstructions from multiphoton confocal microscopy images using custom software showed that the filamentous (F) actin bundles took a conspicuous ring-like organization around the SMFs. Unlike the classical F-actin-containing stress fibers, these rings were not associated with either focal adhesions or intermediate filaments. We also demonstrated that plasma membrane boundaries adjacent to these circular cytoskeletal structures were tightly yet dynamically apposed to the SMFs, for which reason we suggest to call them ‘actin grips’. In conclusion, we describe a particular form of F-actin assembly with relevance for cytoskeletal organization in response to biomaterials, for endothelial-specific cell behavior in vitro and in vivo, and for tissue engineering. PMID:25818446

  17. Motor Prediction at the Edge of Instability: Alteration of Grip Force Control during Changes in Bimanual Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danion, Frederic; Jirsa, Viktor K.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of actions is fundamental for skilled motor behavior. We investigated whether motor prediction is influenced by the fact that some movements are easier to perform and stabilize than others. Twelve subjects performed a bimanual rhythmical task either symmetrically or asymmetrically (the latter being more difficult and…

  18. Comparison of bilateral and unilateral contractions between swimmers and nonathletes during leg press and hand grip exercises.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Monica; Losier, Danielle; Chester, Victoria L; Kuruganti, Usha

    2014-11-01

    The bilateral limb deficit (BLD) is defined as the reduction in force production during bilateral compared with summed unilateral contractions of homologous muscles. The underlying mechanism for the BLD has been elusive to determine. The purpose of this study was to examine the presence of the BLD during maximal isometric leg press and handgrip exercises in female swimmers (n = 9, mean age = 20.1 ± 1.3 years) and nonathletes (n = 9, mean age = 21.7 ± 1.3 years) to gain further insight into this phenomenon. Force and electromyography (EMG) measures were collected from participants under bilateral and unilateral conditions for handgrip and leg press exercises. Bilateral limb ratios (BLR) were calculated for swimmers (BLRS) and nonathletes (BLRNA). A deficit was found for swimmers and nonathletes in leg force (BLRS = 79.84% ± 13.09% and BLRNA = 81.44% ± 19.23%) and leg EMG (BLRS = 88.45% ± 15.41% and BLRNA = 94.66% ± 13.62%); however, no BLD was seen in hand force (BLRS = 98.30% ± 11.21% and BLRNA = 95.91% ± 11.04%) and hand EMG (BLRS = 102.42% ± 11.20% and BLRNA = 103.30% ± 16.50%). Furthermore, no significant differences were found between groups for leg force, leg EMG, hand force, and hand EMG. In conclusion, a BLD was detected for both groups during bilateral isometric leg press. This suggests that while the BLD may be affected by neural influences, there may other factors involved such as postural stability requirements to perform the exercise.

  19. "Coming to grips with the nursing question": the politics of nursing education reform in 1960s America.

    PubMed

    Tobbell, Dominique A

    2014-01-01

    The 1950s and 1960s were decades of change for the American nursing profession. A new generation of nurse educators sought to create greater professional autonomy for the nurse by introducing new models of education that emphasized science-based learning over technical skills and bedside care, and creating new clinical roles for the nurse, based on advanced graduate education. They confronted resistance from an older generation of nurses who feared becoming "second-class citizens" in increasingly academic nursing schools, and from academic health care institutions all too comfortable with the gendered hierarchy on which the traditional model of nursing education and practice was predicated. Using the University of Minnesota and University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) as case studies, and based on institutional records and more than 40 oral histories with nursing and medical faculty, this article describes the generational conflicts this new cadre of nurse educators confronted within schools of nursing, and the institutional politics they struggled with as they sought to secure greater institutional status for the schools among the universities' other health science units.

  20. Getting to Grips with Education and Training for Industry. A Development of the Concept of Key Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde, Albert

    "Key technologies" is an umbrella term for appropriate technologies applied to give maximum economic benefit in particular circumstances that may cross traditional disciplinary boundaries. Development of the concept is necessitated by the rate of change of technological development. Key technologies may be classified in three groups related to…

  1. p53 Loses grip on PIK3CA expression leading to enhanced cell survival during platinum resistance.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Bhushan; Ray, Pritha

    2016-10-01

    Tumour suppressor p53, a master transcriptional regulator determines cell fate through preferential activation/repression of a myriad of genes during stress. Till date, activation and preferential binding of p53 on different promoters was reported to be influenced by the nature, strength and duration of stress which mediates its post translational modifications. Cisplatin, a widely used cytotoxic drug represses PIK3CA promoter activity and attenuates PI3K/AKT cell survival pathway through p53 activation in sensitive cells. However, very little is understood about the overall mechanism of p53-PIK3CA interaction and influence of p53 on the transcriptional status of PIK3CA during cisplatin resistance. Here we showed that cisplatin could dynamically alter p53 occupancy between the p53 binding sequences present in PIK3CA promoter in ovarian and breast cancer cells. This altered occupancy is dictated by higher acetylation and hyper-phosphorylation at serine 15, serine 20 and serine 46 residues. Interestingly, cisplatin resistant cells when challenged with cisplatin demonstrated abolished PIK3CA promoter attenuation, low level of p53 binding, and loss of p53 serine 46 phosphorylation. A phosphorylation deficient S46A mutant failed to repress PIK3CA in p53 deficient cells. Elevated expression of Bcl2, P27 and cFLIP indicated a pro-survival state in these resistant cells. Non-invasive real time imaging using two different luciferase reporters showed that cisplatin could simultaneously induce PIK3CA attenuation and p53 activation with growth regression in sensitive tumours but not in the resistant tumours where only low level of p53 activation and sustained growth was observed. This is the first report on phosphorylation of p53 serine 46 as a modulator of p53-PIK3CA promoter interaction which influences altered binding of p53 at different consensus sequences in the same promoter in response to chemotherapeutic stress. Absence of such modulation in resistant cellular milieu influences cellular homoeostasis in platinum-resistant cells probably due to altered post translational modification of p53.

  2. Short term microgravity effect on isometric hand grip and precision pinch force with visual and proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastacaldi, P.; Orsini, P.; Bracciaferri, F.; Neri, G.; Porciani, M.; Liuni, L.; Zolesi, V.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments executed on the upper limb are assuming increasing significance in the frame of the Human Physiology in space, for at least two reasons: the upper limb is the principal means of locomotion for the subject living in a space station; furthermore, fatigue can have a significant effect on the hand, for the ordinary work on board, and in particular for the extra-vehicular activities. The degradation of the performances affecting the muscular-skeletal apparatus can be easily recognized on the upper limb, by exerting specific scientific protocols, to be repeated through the permanence of the subject in weightlessness conditions. Another aspect relevant to the effect of microgravity on the upper limb is associated with the alteration of the motor control programs due to the different gravity factor, affecting not only the bio-mechanics of the subject, but in general all his/her psycho-physical conditions, induced by the totally different environment. Specific protocols on the upper limb can facilitate the studies on learning mechanisms for the motor control. The results of such experiments can be transferred to the Earth, useful for treatment of subjects with local traumas or diseases of the Central Nervous System.

  3. Pediatric Drug Safety Surveillance in FDA-AERS: A Description of Adverse Events from GRiP Project.

    PubMed

    de Bie, Sandra; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Straus, Sabine M J M; Verhamme, Katia M C; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Wong, Ian C K; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M

    2015-01-01

    Individual case safety reports (ICSRs) are a cornerstone in drug safety surveillance. The knowledge on using these data specifically for children is limited. We studied characteristics of pediatric ICSRs reported to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). Public available ICSRs reported in children (0-18 years) to FAERS were downloaded from the FDA-website for the period Jan 2004-Dec 2011. Characteristics of these ICSRs, including the reported drugs and events, were described and stratified by age-groups. We included 106,122 pediatric ICSRs (55% boys and 58% from United States) with a median of 1 drug [range 1-3] and 1 event [1-2] per ICSR. Mean age was 9.1 years. 90% was submitted through expedited (15-days) (65%) or periodic reporting (25%) and 10% by non-manufacturers. The proportion and type of pediatric ICSRs reported were relatively stable over time. Most commonly reported drug classes by decreasing frequency were 'nervous system drugs' (58%), 'antineoplastics' (32%) and 'anti-infectives' (25%). Most commonly reported system organ classes were 'general' (13%), 'nervous system' (12%) and 'psychiatric' (11%) disorders. Duration of use could be calculated for 19.7% of the reported drugs, of which 14.5% concerned drugs being used long-term (>6 months). Knowledge on the distribution of the drug classes and events within FAERS is a key first step in developing pediatric specific methods for drug safety surveillance. Because of several differences in terms of drugs and events among age-categories, drug safety signal detection analysis in children needs to be stratified by each age group. PMID:26090678

  4. The reliance on visual feedback control by older adults is highlighted in tasks requiring precise endpoint placement and precision grip.

    PubMed

    Coats, Rachel O; Wann, John P

    2011-09-01

    There is an ongoing debate as to whether a greater degree of sensory-motor control is required to maintain skills as humans progress to be septuagenarians. Here, we investigate the dependence of older participants upon vision to execute skilled prehension movements. In a first experiment, participants were required to place a small, round peg in one of three randomly cued holes. A mirror apparatus was used to create conditions where they could always see the target locations, but vision of their hand approaching the target could be removed, and we explored end position accuracy. In a second experiment, we examined the ability of participants to precisely control their grasp action under conditions where they could see the objects but not their hands completing the action. The results showed that in Experiment 1, the older adults undershot the target in their primary submovement and hence had to move further in their secondary movement to achieve their goal. In Experiment 2, the older adults spent longer in the final adjustment phase (a near zero velocity phase at the end of the reach) when vision of the hand was unavailable. These findings suggest that older adults are indeed more reliant on visual feedback than the young in tasks that require precise manual control, and this clarifies conflicting accounts in the prior literature.

  5. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis II: An Innovative Strategy to Implement Clinical Practice Guidelines for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis Patients through Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Brooks, Sydney; De Angelis, G.; Bell, Mary; Egan, Mary; Poitras, Stephane; King, Judy; Casimiro, Lynn; Loew, Laurianne; Novikov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study is to determine if an updated online evidence-based educational programme delivered through Facebook is effective in improving the knowledge, skills, and self-efficacy of patients with arthritis in relation to evidence-based self-management rehabilitation interventions for osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid…

  6. The Tomato Defensin TPP3 Binds Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-Bisphosphate via a Conserved Dimeric Cationic Grip Conformation To Mediate Cell Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Amy A.; Richter, Viviane; Lay, Fung T.; Poon, Ivan K. H.; Adda, Christopher G.; Veneer, Prem K.; Phan, Thanh Kha; Bleackley, Mark R.; Anderson, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Defensins are a class of ubiquitously expressed cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) that play an important role in innate defense. Plant defensins are active against a broad range of microbial pathogens and act via multiple mechanisms, including cell membrane permeabilization. The cytolytic activity of defensins has been proposed to involve interaction with specific lipid components in the target cell wall or membrane and defensin oligomerization. Indeed, the defensin Nicotiana alata defensin 1 (NaD1) binds to a broad range of membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates and forms an oligomeric complex with phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) that facilitates membrane lysis of both mammalian tumor and fungal cells. Here, we report that the tomato defensin TPP3 has a unique lipid binding profile that is specific for PIP2 with which it forms an oligomeric complex that is critical for cytolytic activity. Structural characterization of TPP3 by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that it forms a dimer in a “cationic grip” conformation that specifically accommodates the head group of PIP2 to mediate cooperative higher-order oligomerization and subsequent membrane permeabilization. These findings suggest that certain plant defensins are innate immune receptors for phospholipids and adopt conserved dimeric configurations to mediate PIP2 binding and membrane permeabilization. This mechanism of innate defense may be conserved across defensins from different species. PMID:25802281

  7. Unusual middle-ear mischief: trans-tympanic trauma from a hair grip resulting in ossicular, facial nerve and oval window disruption.

    PubMed

    Snelling, J D; Bennett, A; Wilson, P; Wickstead, M

    2006-09-01

    A case of piercing of the tympanic membrane, resulting in unusual consequences, is described. This is the first reported case of the long process of a dislocated incus resulting in trauma to the horizontal portion of a dehiscent facial nerve. Simultaneous depression of the stapes footplate resulted in a perilymph leak, but with delayed presentation.

  8. Cycle anatomy and variability in the storm-dominated type cincinnatian (Upper Ordovician): coming to grips with cycle delineation and genesis.

    PubMed

    Holland, S M; Miller, A I; Dattilo, B F; Meyer, D L; Diekmeyer, S L

    1997-03-01

    Although parasequence and sequence are scale-independent terms, they are frequently applied only to specific scales of cycles. For example, meter-scale cycles are commonly assumed to be parasequences or PACs. In the Upper Ordovician Kope and Fairview Formations of northern Kentucky, we examined a succession of 50 meter-scale cycles that have been variously interpreted as deepening-upward, shallowing-upward, or showing no relationship with water depth. Our analysis shows that these cycles, characterized by shifts in storm-bed proximality, are highly variable in their thickness and internal construction. Most cycles are best considered high-frequency sequences, because deepening-upward intervals are common, and many cycles contain evidence of abrupt basinward shifts in facies as expected at sequence boundaries. A minority fit the parasequence model of shallowing-upward cycles bounded by flooding surfaces. Larger, 20 m scale cycles are defined by systematic thickening and thinning trends of meter-scale cycles. However, meter-scale cycles do not display any systematic trends in cycle anatomy as a function of position within the 20 m cycles or position within the Kope and Fairview Formations. The high cycle variability and the lack of systematic stratigraphic organization with respect to longer-term cyclicity reflect either the irregularity of relative sea-level changes, the poor recording of sea-level changes in this deep-water setting, or the generation of these cycles by climate-induced cyclicity in storm intensity. These three mechanisms would generate similar patterns at the outcrop scale, so it is not possible at the present to distinguish between them. PMID:11540152

  9. Getting to grips with strangles: an effective multi-component recombinant vaccine for the protection of horses from Streptococcus equi infection.

    PubMed

    Guss, Bengt; Flock, Margareta; Frykberg, Lars; Waller, Andrew S; Robinson, Carl; Smith, Ken C; Flock, Jan-Ingmar

    2009-09-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi) is a clonal, equine host-adapted pathogen of global importance that causes a suppurative lymphodendopathy of the head and neck, more commonly known as Strangles. The disease is highly prevalent, can be severe and is highly contagious. Antibiotic treatment is usually ineffective. Live attenuated vaccine strains of S. equi have shown adverse reactions and they suffer from a short duration of immunity. Thus, a safe and effective vaccine against S. equi is highly desirable. The bacterium shows only limited genetic diversity and an effective vaccine could confer broad protection to horses throughout the world. Welsh mountain ponies (n = 7) vaccinated with a combination of seven recombinant S. equi proteins were significantly protected from experimental infection by S. equi, resembling the spontaneous disease. Vaccinated horses had significantly reduced incidence of lymph node swelling (p = 0.0013) lymph node abscessation (p = 0.00001), fewer days of pyrexia (p = 0.0001), reduced pathology scoring (p = 0.005) and lower bacterial recovery from lymph nodes (p = 0.004) when compared with non-vaccinated horses (n = 7). Six of 7 vaccinated horses were protected whereas all 7 non-vaccinated became infected. The protective antigens consisted of five surface localized proteins and two IgG endopeptidases. A second vaccination trial (n = 7+7), in which the IgG endopeptidases were omitted, demonstrated only partial protection against S. equi, highlighting an important role for these vaccine components in establishing a protective immune response. S. equi shares >80% sequence identity with Streptococcus pyogenes. Several of the components utilized here have counterparts in S. pyogenes, suggesting that our findings have broader implications for the prevention of infection with this important human pathogen. This is one of only a few demonstrations of protection from streptococcal infection conferred by a recombinant multi-component subunit vaccine in a natural host.

  10. Getting to Grips with Strangles: An Effective Multi-Component Recombinant Vaccine for the Protection of Horses from Streptococcus equi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Guss, Bengt; Flock, Margareta; Frykberg, Lars; Waller, Andrew S.; Robinson, Carl; Smith, Ken C.; Flock, Jan-Ingmar

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi) is a clonal, equine host-adapted pathogen of global importance that causes a suppurative lymphodendopathy of the head and neck, more commonly known as Strangles. The disease is highly prevalent, can be severe and is highly contagious. Antibiotic treatment is usually ineffective. Live attenuated vaccine strains of S. equi have shown adverse reactions and they suffer from a short duration of immunity. Thus, a safe and effective vaccine against S. equi is highly desirable. The bacterium shows only limited genetic diversity and an effective vaccine could confer broad protection to horses throughout the world. Welsh mountain ponies (n = 7) vaccinated with a combination of seven recombinant S. equi proteins were significantly protected from experimental infection by S. equi, resembling the spontaneous disease. Vaccinated horses had significantly reduced incidence of lymph node swelling (p = 0.0013) lymph node abscessation (p = 0.00001), fewer days of pyrexia (p = 0.0001), reduced pathology scoring (p = 0.005) and lower bacterial recovery from lymph nodes (p = 0.004) when compared with non-vaccinated horses (n = 7). Six of 7 vaccinated horses were protected whereas all 7 non-vaccinated became infected. The protective antigens consisted of five surface localized proteins and two IgG endopeptidases. A second vaccination trial (n = 7+7), in which the IgG endopeptidases were omitted, demonstrated only partial protection against S. equi, highlighting an important role for these vaccine components in establishing a protective immune response. S. equi shares >80% sequence identity with Streptococcus pyogenes. Several of the components utilized here have counterparts in S. pyogenes, suggesting that our findings have broader implications for the prevention of infection with this important human pathogen. This is one of only a few demonstrations of protection from streptococcal infection conferred by a recombinant multi-component subunit vaccine in a natural host. PMID:19763180

  11. Do We Need Another Hero? Year 8 Get to Grips with the Heroic Myth of the Defence of Rorke's Drift in 1879

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Mike Murray shares a lesson sequence in which his students examined changing interpretations of the Battle of Rorke's Drift in 1879. Building on earlier work on teaching interpretations across an extended chronological period and the work of Wheeley et al on Rorke's Drift in particular, Murray develops new emphases, fresh ways in to the…

  12. The Immersion Phenomenon: English-Speaking Canadians Come to Grips with the Country's Language Duality = l'enseignement immersif: le Canada anglais se dote d'un instrument efficace pour soutenir la gageure du biblinguisme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, H. H., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    A special journal issue on French language immersion programs in Canada consists of these articles: "The Immersion Phenomenon" (H. H. Stern); "For My Kids, It's French without Tears" (Judy Gibson); "A 'First' for a Toronto High School" (Claire Mian); "The Teachers, Key to the Success Story" (Andre Obadia); "A Promising Experiment at Ottawa…

  13. Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Mediates Platelet Adhesion and Thrombus Formation.

    PubMed

    Modjeski, Kristina L; Ture, Sara K; Field, David J; Cameron, Scott J; Morrell, Craig N

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis-associated pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Because platelets are necessary for hemostasis and thrombosis, platelet directed therapies must balance inhibiting platelet function with bleeding risk. Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) is a large scaffolding protein that localizes and organizes interacting proteins in other cells, such as neurons. We have investigated the role of GRIP1 in platelet function to determine its role as a molecular scaffold in thrombus formation. Platelet-specific GRIP1-/- mice were used to determine the role of GRIP1 in platelets. GRIP1-/- mice had normal platelet counts, but a prolonged bleeding time and delayed thrombus formation in a FeCl3-induced vessel injury model. In vitro stimulation of WT and GRIP1-/- platelets with multiple agonists showed no difference in platelet activation. However, in vivo platelet rolling velocity after endothelial stimulation was significantly greater in GRIP1-/- platelets compared to WT platelets, indicating a potential platelet adhesion defect. Mass spectrometry analysis of GRIP1 platelet immunoprecipitation revealed enrichment of GRIP1 binding to GPIb-IX complex proteins. Western blots confirmed the mass spectrometry findings that GRIP1 interacts with GPIbα, GPIbβ, and 14-3-3. Additionally, in resting GRIP1-/- platelets, GPIbα and 14-3-3 have increased interaction compared to WT platelets. GRIP1 interactions with the GPIb-IX binding complex are necessary for normal platelet adhesion to a stimulated endothelium. PMID:27631377

  14. Adaptive Force Control in Grasping as a Function of Level of Developmental Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, R. L.; Deutsch, K. M.; Newell, K. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The adaptation to the task demands of grasping (grip mode and object mass) was investigated as a function of level of developmental disability. Methods: Subjects grasped objects of different grip widths and masses that were instrumented to record grip forces. Results: Proportionally, fewer participants from the profound compared with…

  15. Split-Rail, Rolling-Friction Robotic Gripper With Tool Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.

    1992-01-01

    Robotic gripper includes split-rail drive assembly that moves two gripping fingers toward or away from each other. Gripping fingers equipped with rollers mating with recesses and seating ramps on specially designed object. Similar in design and operation, to those described in "Rolling-Friction Robotic Gripper" (GSC-13261). Present gripper includes rotary tool operating on mechanism in gripped object.

  16. Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Mediates Platelet Adhesion and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Modjeski, Kristina L.; Ture, Sara K.; Field, David J.; Cameron, Scott J.; Morrell, Craig N.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis-associated pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Because platelets are necessary for hemostasis and thrombosis, platelet directed therapies must balance inhibiting platelet function with bleeding risk. Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) is a large scaffolding protein that localizes and organizes interacting proteins in other cells, such as neurons. We have investigated the role of GRIP1 in platelet function to determine its role as a molecular scaffold in thrombus formation. Platelet-specific GRIP1-/- mice were used to determine the role of GRIP1 in platelets. GRIP1-/- mice had normal platelet counts, but a prolonged bleeding time and delayed thrombus formation in a FeCl3-induced vessel injury model. In vitro stimulation of WT and GRIP1-/- platelets with multiple agonists showed no difference in platelet activation. However, in vivo platelet rolling velocity after endothelial stimulation was significantly greater in GRIP1-/- platelets compared to WT platelets, indicating a potential platelet adhesion defect. Mass spectrometry analysis of GRIP1 platelet immunoprecipitation revealed enrichment of GRIP1 binding to GPIb-IX complex proteins. Western blots confirmed the mass spectrometry findings that GRIP1 interacts with GPIbα, GPIbβ, and 14-3-3. Additionally, in resting GRIP1-/- platelets, GPIbα and 14-3-3 have increased interaction compared to WT platelets. GRIP1 interactions with the GPIb-IX binding complex are necessary for normal platelet adhesion to a stimulated endothelium. PMID:27631377

  17. Some important aspects in testing high-modulus fiber composite tubes designed for multiaxial loading.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular specimens were potted in metal grips to determine the feasibility of this gripping method in applying multiaxial loads. Strain gage rosettes were used to assess grip transitional strains, through thickness strain variation and strain variations along the tube length and circumference. The investigation was limited to loading 0, 45, plus or minus 45, and 90 deg graphite/epoxy and glass/epoxy tubes in axial tension. Results include modifications made to the grips to reduce transitional strains, illustrations of the tube failure modes, and some material properties. The gripping concept shows promise as a satisfactory technique for applying multiaxial loads to high-strength, high-modulus fiber composite tubes.

  18. Some important aspects in testing high-modulus fiber composite tubes in axial tension.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    Tubular specimens were potted in metal grips to determine the feasibility of this gripping method in applying multiaxial loads. Strain gage rosettes were used to assess grip transitional strains, through thickness strain variation, and strain variations along the tube length and circumference. The investigation was limited to loading graphite/epoxy and glass/epoxy tubes in axial tension. Results include modifications made to the grips to reduce transitional strains, illustrations of the tube failure modes, and some material properties. The gripping concept shows promise as a satisfactory technique for applying multiaxial loads to high-strength, high-modulus fiber composite tubes.

  19. Some important aspects in testing high-modulus fiber composite tubes designed for multiaxial loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Chamis, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Tubular specimens were potted in metal grips to determine the feasibility of this gripping method in applying multiaxial loads. Strain gage rosettes were used to assess grip transitional strains, through thickness strain variation and strain variations along the tube length and circumference. The investigation was limited to loading 0 deg, + or - 45 deg, and 90 deg graphite/epoxy and glass/epoxy tubes in axial tension. Results include modifications made to the grips to reduce transitional strains, illustrations of the tube failure modes, and some material properties. The gripping concept shows promise as a satisfactory technique for applying multiaxial loads to high strength, high modulus fiber composite tubes.

  20. Calibrating Borg scale ratings of hand force exertion.

    PubMed

    Spielholz, Peregrin

    2006-09-01

    A study was conducted to assess the efficacy of calibrating subjective worker ratings of hand exertions to reduce error in estimates of applied force. Twenty volunteer subjects applied pinch and power grip forces corresponding to their perceptions of different Borg CR-10 scale levels using both "grip-to-scale" and "guided-grip" procedures. These data were used separately to define relationships between scale ratings and actual force application. Two gripping tasks were performed and corresponding subjective hand force ratings were calibrated using the grip-to-scale calibration data. Results showed that the mean estimation error for a 44.5 N (10 lb) power grip task was significantly reduced from 142.8 (+/-69.0) to 62.3 (+/-58.3) N. The guided-grip calibration method also significantly reduced rating error for the power grip task, however the estimates were biased toward zero. Neither calibration procedure improved rating accuracy of an 8.9 N (2 lb) pinch grip task. The study results indicate that calibration of hand force ratings using the grip-to-scale procedure may improve the accuracy of hand exertion measurements using the Borg CR-10 scale.

  1. Evaluation of four steering wheels to determine driver hand placement in a static environment.

    PubMed

    Mossey, Mary E; Xi, Yubin; McConomy, Shayne K; Brooks, Johnell O; Rosopa, Patrick J; Venhovens, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    While much research exists on occupant packaging both proprietary and in the literature, more detailed research regarding user preferences for subjective ratings of steering wheel designs is sparse in published literature. This study aimed to explore the driver interactions with production steering wheels in four vehicles by using anthropometric data, driver hand placement, and driver grip design preferences for Generation-Y and Baby Boomers. In this study, participants selected their preferred grip diameter, responded to a series of questions about the steering wheel grip as they sat in four vehicles, and rank ordered their preferred grip design. Thirty-two male participants (16 Baby Boomers between ages 47 and 65 and 16 Generation-Y between ages 18 and 29) participated in the study. Drivers demonstrated different gripping behavior between vehicles and between groups. Recommendations for future work in steering wheel grip design and naturalistic driver hand positioning are discussed.

  2. Evaluation of four steering wheels to determine driver hand placement in a static environment.

    PubMed

    Mossey, Mary E; Xi, Yubin; McConomy, Shayne K; Brooks, Johnell O; Rosopa, Patrick J; Venhovens, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    While much research exists on occupant packaging both proprietary and in the literature, more detailed research regarding user preferences for subjective ratings of steering wheel designs is sparse in published literature. This study aimed to explore the driver interactions with production steering wheels in four vehicles by using anthropometric data, driver hand placement, and driver grip design preferences for Generation-Y and Baby Boomers. In this study, participants selected their preferred grip diameter, responded to a series of questions about the steering wheel grip as they sat in four vehicles, and rank ordered their preferred grip design. Thirty-two male participants (16 Baby Boomers between ages 47 and 65 and 16 Generation-Y between ages 18 and 29) participated in the study. Drivers demonstrated different gripping behavior between vehicles and between groups. Recommendations for future work in steering wheel grip design and naturalistic driver hand positioning are discussed. PMID:24674782

  3. A practical microgripper by fine alignment, eutectic bonding and SMA actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Lehew, Stacy; Trevino, Jimmy; Northrup, M. Allen

    1995-04-01

    A silicon microgripper with a large gripping force, a relatively rigid structural body, and flexibility in functional design is presented. The actuation is generated by Ni-Ti-Cu shape memory alloy (SMA) films and the stress induced can deflect each side of the microgripper up to 55 microns for a total gripping motion of 110 microns. When fully open, the force exerted by the film corresponds to a 40 mN gripping force on the tip of the gripper.

  4. 3 degree of freedom hand controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menahem, Israel (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A hand controller which includes a hand grip having therein a gimble mechanism for allowing rotatory motion about three axes which intersect in the interior of the hand grip and from which motion transmitting members allow the motions about the three axes to be transmitted to remote pick off devices and also along which force feedback signals may be fedback to the gimble structure to provide the correct feel for the grip.

  5. Functional benefit of an adaptive myoelectric prosthetic hand compared to a conventional myoelectric hand.

    PubMed

    Bergman, K; Ornholmer, L; Zackrisson, K; Thyberg, M

    1992-04-01

    Eight patients with a traumatic unilateral upper limb amputation, who used conventional myoelectric prostheses, were also fitted with a commercially available myoelectric prosthetic hand with an adaptive grip, in order to compare the functional benefit of the two types of prostheses. Comparisons were made regarding width of grip, force of grip, scores in a standardised grip function test and prosthesis preference. The conventional prosthesis showed significantly better results regarding these parameters. The adaptive hand does not appear to be fully developed for practical use in prosthetic rehabilitation.

  6. Jar-opening challenges. Part 2: estimating the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles in healthy young adults during jar-opening tasks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, L C; Chang, J H; Lin, C F; Hsu, H Y; Ho, K Y; Su, F C

    2009-07-01

    This study discusses the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles during jar-opening tasks using two grip patterns: the power grip and the precision grip. This study develops a three-dimensional biomechanical model of the thumb to predict muscle forces in jar-opening activities based on external forces measured by a custom-designed jar device. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. Each participant turned a jar lid of 66 mm diameter counterclockwise with maximal effort and preferred speed using both grip patterns. The average normal and tangential forces applied by the thumb to the jar lid show that the normal force is the primary contributive force for opening a jar. This normal force is approximately three times the tangential force. Muscular force-generating capacity measurements show that the major active muscles during a jar-opening activity for both grips include the flexor pollicis longus, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis, adductor pollicis, and opponens pollicis. The total muscle force ratios for the precision grip and power grip with respect to externally applied forces are 5.6 and 4.7 respectively. These ratios indicate that the power grip pattern produces less muscle force per unit of external applied load. The technique proposed in this study provides a proper apparatus and model for measuring three-dimensional loads and estimating the force-generating capacity of each muscle and tendon of the thumb during jar-opening tasks. PMID:19623911

  7. Response to Eva Alerby and Cecilia Perm, "Learning Music: Embodied Experience in the Life-World"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, C. Victor

    2005-01-01

    At the onset of the essay by Alerby and Perm, musicality is described as emotional or cognitive phenomena. In this response, Fung questions what role a psychomotor phenomenon plays in musicality. Alerby and Perm describe "motor knowledge" in the context of Merleau-Ponty's "maximum grip." Does this mean that "motor knowledge" or "maximum grip" in…

  8. Bimanual Force Coordination in Children with Spastic Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits-Engelsman, B. C. M.; Klingels, K.; Feys, H.

    2011-01-01

    In this study bimanual grip-force coordination was quantified using a novel "Gripper" system that records grip forces produced while holding a lower and upper unit, in combination with the lift force necessary to separate these units. Children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP) (aged 5-14 years, n = 12) were compared to age matched typically…

  9. 75 FR 39192 - Airworthiness Directives; Arrow Falcon Exporters, Inc. (Previously Utah State University), et al...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). Examining the Docket You may examine the docket that contains the...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have... grip for a crack; inspecting the grip buffer pads for delamination and if delamination is...

  10. A Developmental Approach to Graduate Education Review: A New Take on a Traditional Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkola, Leah; King, Jean A.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we describe the Graduate Review and Improvement Process (GRIP), an innovative evaluation process that makes student input central, now beginning its fifth year of implementation at the University of Minnesota. We begin by contrasting GRIP with traditional graduate program review, and we then explain the conceptual underpinnings of…

  11. Reinforcement for Stretch Formed Sheet Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, J. B.; Baxter, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Tearing of aluminum sheet metal durinng stretch forming prevented by flame spraying layer of aluminum on edges held in stretch-forming machine. Technique improves grip of machine on metal and reinforced sheet better able to with stand concentration of force in vicinity of grips.

  12. Prosthetic Hand For Holding Rods, Tools, And Handles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Prosthetic hand with quick-grip/quick-release lever broadens range of specialized functions available to lower-arm amputee by providing improved capabilities for gripping rods, tools, handles, and like. Includes two stationary lower fingers opposed by one pivoting upper finger. Lever operates in conjunction with attached bracket.

  13. Handgrip performance in relation to self-perceived fatigue, physical functioning and circulating IL-6 in elderly persons without inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Bautmans, Ivan; Gorus, Ellen; Njemini, Rose; Mets, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Background Low grip strength is recognized as one of the characteristics of frailty, as are systemic inflammation and the sensation of fatigue. Contrary to maximal grip strength, the physical resistance of the muscles to fatigue is not often included in the clinical evaluation of elderly patients. The aim of this study was to investigate if the grip strength and the resistance of the handgrip muscles to fatigue are related to self-perceived fatigue, physical functioning and circulating IL-6 in independently living elderly persons. Methods Forty elderly subjects (15 female and 25 male, mean age 75 ± 5 years) were assessed for maximal grip strength, as well as for fatigue resistance and grip work (respectively time and work delivered until grip strength drops to 50% of its maximum during sustained contraction), self perceived fatigue (VAS-Fatigue, Mob-Tiredness scale and the energy & fatigue items of the WHOQOL-100), self rated physical functioning (domain of physical functioning on the MOS short-form) and circulating IL-6. Relationships between handgrip performance and the other outcome measures were assessed. Results In the male participants, fatigue resistance was negatively related to actual sensation of fatigue (VAS-F, p < .05) and positively to circulating IL-6 (p < .05). When corrected for body weight, the relations of fatigue resistance with self-perceived fatigue became stronger and also apparent in the female. Grip strength and grip work were significantly related with several items of self-perceived fatigue and with physical functioning. These relations became more visible by means of higher correlation coefficients when grip strength and grip work were corrected for body weight. Conclusion Well functioning elderly subjects presenting less handmuscle fatigue resistance and weaker grip strength are more fatigued, experience more tiredness during daily activities and are more bothered by fatigue sensations. Body weight seems to play an important role in the

  14. Past temperatures directly from the greenland ice sheet

    PubMed

    Dahl-Jensen; Mosegaard; Gundestrup; Clow; Johnsen; Hansen; Balling

    1998-10-01

    A Monte Carlo inverse method has been used on the temperature profiles measured down through the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) borehole, at the summit of the Greenland Ice Sheet, and the Dye 3 borehole 865 kilometers farther south. The result is a 50, 000-year-long temperature history at GRIP and a 7000-year history at Dye 3. The Last Glacial Maximum, the Climatic Optimum, the Medieval Warmth, the Little Ice Age, and a warm period at 1930 A.D. are resolved from the GRIP reconstruction with the amplitudes -23 kelvin, +2.5 kelvin, +1 kelvin, -1 kelvin, and +0.5 kelvin, respectively. The Dye 3 temperature is similar to the GRIP history but has an amplitude 1.5 times larger, indicating higher climatic variability there. The calculated terrestrial heat flow density from the GRIP inversion is 51.3 milliwatts per square meter. PMID:9765146

  15. Maturation and experience in action representation: Bilateral deficits in unilateral congenital amelia.

    PubMed

    Philip, B A; Buckon, C; Sienko, S; Aiona, M; Ross, S; Frey, S H

    2015-08-01

    Congenital unilateral absence of the hand (amelia) completely deprives individuals of sensorimotor experiences with their absent effector. The consequences of such deprivation on motor planning abilities are poorly understood. Fourteen patients and matched controls performed two grip selection tasks: 1) overt grip selection (OGS), in which they used their intact hand to grasp a three-dimensional object that appeared in different orientations using the most natural (under-or over-hand) precision grip, and 2) prospective grip selection (PGS), in which they selected the most natural grip for either the intact or absent hand without moving. For the intact hand, we evaluated planning accuracy by comparing concordance between grip preferences expressed in PGS vs. OGS. For the absent hand, we compared PGS responses with OGS responses for the intact hand that had been phase shifted by 180°, thereby accounting for mirror symmetrical biomechanical constraints of the two limbs. Like controls, amelic individuals displayed a consistent preference for less awkward grips in both OGS and PGS. Unexpectedly, however, they were slower and less accurate for PGS based on either the intact or the absent hand. We conclude that direct sensorimotor experience with both hands may be important for the typical development or refinement of effector-specific internal representations of either limb. PMID:26092768

  16. Maturation and experience in action representation: Bilateral deficits in unilateral congenital amelia

    PubMed Central

    Philip, B.A.; Buckon, C.; Sienko, S.; Aiona, M.; Ross, S.; Frey, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital unilateral absence of the hand (amelia) completely deprives individuals of sensorimotor experiences with their absent effector. The consequences of such deprivation on motor planning abilities are poorly understood. Fourteen patients and matched controls performed two grip selection tasks: 1) overt grip selection (OGS), in which they used their intact hand to grasp a three-dimensional object that appeared in different orientations using the most natural (under-or over-hand) precision grip, and 2) prospective grip selection (PGS), in which they selected the most natural grip for either the intact or absent hand without moving. For the intact hand, we evaluated planning accuracy by comparing concordance between grip preferences expressed in PGS vs. OGS. For the absent hand, we compared PGS responses with OGS responses for the intact hand that had been phase shifted by 180°, thereby accounting for mirror symmetrical biomechanical constraints of the two limbs. Like controls, amelic individuals displayed a consistent preference for less awkward grips in both OGS and PGS. Unexpectedly, however, they were slower and less accurate for PGS based on either the intact or the absent hand. We conclude that direct sensorimotor experience with both hands may be important for the typical development or refinement of effector-specific internal representations of either limb. PMID:26092768

  17. Forward models of inertial loads in weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Crevecoeur, F; Thonnard, J L; Lefèvre, P

    2009-06-30

    In this experiment, we investigated whether the CNS uses internal forward models of inertial loads to maintain the stability of a precision grip when manipulating objects in the absence of gravity. The micro-gravity condition causes profound changes in the profile of tangential constraints at the finger-object interface. In order to assess the ability to predict the micro-gravity-specific variation of inertial loads, we analyzed the grip force adjustments that occurred when naive subjects held an object in a precision grip and performed point-to-point movements under the weightless condition induced by parabolic flight. Such movements typically presented static and dynamic phases, which permitted distinction between a static component of the grip force (measured before the movement) and a dynamic component of the grip force (measured during the movement). The static component tended to gradually decrease across the parabolas, whereas the dynamic component was rapidly modulated with the micro-gravity-specific inertial loads. In addition, the amplitude of the modulation significantly correlated with the amplitude of the tangential constraints for the dynamic component. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the internal representation of arm and object dynamics adapts to new gravitational contexts. In addition, the difference in time scales of adaptation of static and dynamic components suggests that they can be processed independently. The prediction of self-induced variation of inertial loads permits fine modulation of grip force, which ensures a stable grip during manipulation of an object in a new environment.

  18. Integration of a computerized two-finger gripper for robot workstation safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sneckenberger, John E.; Yoshikata, Kazuki

    1988-01-01

    A microprocessor-based controller has been developed that continuously monitors and adjusts the gripping force applied by a special two-finger gripper. This computerized force sensing gripper system enables the endeffector gripping action to be independently detected and corrected. The gripping force applied to a manipulated object is real-time monitored for problem situations, situations which can occur during both planned and errant robot arm manipulation. When unspecified force conditions occur at the gripper, the gripping force controller initiates specific reactions to cause dynamic corrections to the continuously variable gripping action. The force controller for this intelligent gripper has been interfaced to the controller of an industrial robot. The gripper and robot controllers communicate to accomplish the successful completion of normal gripper operations as well as unexpected hazardous situations. An example of an unexpected gripping condition would be the sudden deformation of the object being manipulated by the robot. The capabilities of the interfaced gripper-robot system to apply workstation safety measures (e.g., stop the robot) when these unexpected gripping effects occur have been assessed.

  19. Shared processing of planning articulatory gestures and grasping.

    PubMed

    Vainio, L; Tiainen, M; Tiippana, K; Vainio, M

    2014-07-01

    It has been proposed that articulatory gestures are shaped by tight integration in planning mouth and hand acts. This hypothesis is supported by recent behavioral evidence showing that response selection between the precision and power grip is systematically influenced by simultaneous articulation of a syllable. For example, precision grip responses are performed relatively fast when the syllable articulation employs the tongue tip (e.g., [te]), whereas power grip responses are performed relatively fast when the syllable articulation employs the tongue body (e.g., [ke]). However, this correspondence effect, and other similar effects that demonstrate the interplay between grasping and articulatory gestures, has been found when the grasping is performed during overt articulation. The present study demonstrates that merely reading the syllables silently (Experiment 1) or hearing them (Experiment 2) results in a similar correspondence effect. The results suggest that the correspondence effect is based on integration in planning articulatory gestures and grasping rather than requiring an overt articulation of the syllables. We propose that this effect reflects partially overlapped planning of goal shapes of the two distal effectors: a vocal tract shape for articulation and a hand shape for grasping. In addition, the paper shows a pitch-grip correspondence effect in which the precision grip is associated with a high-pitched vocalization of the auditory stimuli and the power grip is associated with a low-pitched vocalization. The underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed in relation to the articulation-grip correspondence.

  20. The effect of somatosensory input on motor imagery depends upon motor imagery capability

    PubMed Central

    Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Yamagishi, Takahiro; Nakata, Hiroki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated that the relationship between motor imagery ability and the effect of tactile input associated with holding a tennis racket on motor imagery of the forehand and backhand swings. The effect was assessed by the time utilized for motor imagery (mental chronometry). Seventeen tennis players imagined forehand and backhand swings with a forehand grip, a backhand grip or while holding nothing. In all cases, imaging the swings took longer than the time taken for a real swing. For imagery of the backhand swing, holding a racket with a backhand grip decreased the imaging time (p < 0.05) as compared to the trials with a forehand grip or while holding nothing. On the other hand, holding the racket with a backhand grip tended to increase the time required for forehand swing imagery. These results suggest that a congruent grip improves, and an incongruent grip deteriorates, motor imagery of the backhand swing. For players who took a longer time in the condition where they held nothing (i.e., poor imaging ability), the effect of a congruent backhand grip was greater (r = 0.67, p < 0.01). However, a congruent forehand grip did not improve motor imagery of the forehand swing. Since 15 of the participants in the present study favored the forehand swing compared to the backhand swing, the participants would have been more familiar with the forehand swing. Thus it would have been easy to vividly imagine the (familiar) forehand swing even when they were not holding a racket. We speculate that tactile input associated with holding a tool improves a vividness of motor imagery of a less familiar movement, especially for those who have poor imaging ability. In the future, it will be important to clarify whether the effect of tactile input associated with holding a tool is dependent upon movement familiarity/performance level. PMID:25729373

  1. Method and apparatus for tensile testing of metal foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, O. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method for obtaining accurate and reproducible results in the tensile testing of metal foils in tensile testing machines is described. Before the test specimen are placed in the machine, foil side edges are worked until they are parallel and flaw free. The specimen are also aligned between and secured to grip end members. An aligning apparatus employed in the method is comprised of an alignment box with a longitudinal bottom wall and two upright side walls, first and second removable grip end members at each end of the box, and a means for securing the grip end members within the box.

  2. Airborne Wind Profiling With the Data Acquisition and Processing System for a Pulsed 2-Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    A pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia flew on the NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) during the summer of 2010. The participation was part of the project Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) Air. Selected results of airborne wind profiling are presented and compared with the dropsonde data for verification purposes. Panoramic presentations of different wind parameters over a nominal observation time span are also presented for selected GRIP data sets. The realtime data acquisition and analysis software that was employed during the GRIP campaign is introduced with its unique features.

  3. Fastening apparatus having shape memory alloy actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnis, Darin N.

    1992-11-01

    A releasable fastening apparatus is presented. The device includes a connecting member and a housing. The housing supports a gripping mechanism that is adapted to engage the connecting member. A triggering member is movable within the housing between a first position in which it constrains the gripping mechanism in locked engagement with the connecting member, and a second position in which the gripping mechanism is disengaged from the connecting member. A shaped memory alloy actuator is employed for translating the triggering member from its first to its second position. The actuator is designed to expand longitudinally when transitioned from a martensitic to an austenitic state.

  4. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1958-04-22

    An electromagnetic apparatus for moving a rod-like member in small steps in either direction is described. The invention has particular application in the reactor field where the reactor control rods must be moved only a small distance and where the use of mechanical couplings is impractical due to the high- pressure seals required. A neutron-absorbing rod is mounted in a housing with gripping uaits that engage the rod, and coils for magnetizing the gripping units to make them grip, shift, and release the rod are located outside the housing.

  5. Basic co-ordination of manipulative forces of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, A C; Gordon, A M; Forssberg, H

    1991-08-01

    The coordination of manipulatory forces during prehension was studied in 12 children with cerebral palsy (CP) and compared with that of controls. The results indicated that coupling of grip force and load force does not develop in children with CP. These children's force development increased in stages, with an early onset of excessive grip force. They did not use anticipatory control of the isometric force development during the load phase. Prolonged delays between successive phases indicated inefficient sensory feedback during the movement. The early onset of grip force and the over-all high force employment may compensate for the lack of anticipatory control and inefficient sensorimotor integration. PMID:1916022

  6. Concentric wrench for blind access opening in a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Laurer, Kurt Neal; Drlik, Gary Joseph; Gibler, Edward Eugene

    2001-01-01

    The concentric wrench includes an outer tube having flats at one end and a gripping surface at an opposite end. An inner tube has interior flats at one end and a gripping surface at its opposite end. With the inner and outer tubes disposed about a pressure transmitting conduit, the tubes may be inserted into a blind access opening in the outer turbine casing to engage the flats of the tubes against hex nuts of an internal fitting. By relatively rotating the tubes using the externally exposed gripping surfaces, the threaded connection between the parts of the fitting bearing the respective hex nuts can be tightened or loosened.

  7. A practical microgripper by fine alignment, eutectic bonding and SMA actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.P.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    1995-04-21

    A silicon microgripper with a large gripping force, a relatively rigid structural body, and flexibility in functional design is presented. The actuation is generated by Ni-Ti-Cu shape memory alloy (SMA) films and the stress induced can deflect each side of the microgripper up to 55 {mu}m for a total gripping motion of 110 {mu}m. When fully open, the force exerted by the film corresponds to a 40 mN gripping force on the tip of the gripper.

  8. Measurement of upper and lower body strength and its relationship to underhand pitching speed.

    PubMed

    Heitman, R J; Pugh, S F; Erdmann, J W; Kovaleski, J E

    2000-06-01

    This study investigated the possible relationship for legs, arms, shoulders, and grip strength with underhand throwing speed. 40 female subjects had their legs, arms, and shoulder strength measured using a multipurpose exercise machine for assessing resistive force. Grip strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer. Underhand throwing speed was measured with a radar gun. Regression analysis indicated a relationship (p < or = .05) between strength of the arms and underhand pitching speed. No significant relationships were found for legs, shoulders, and grip strength, and underhand pitching speed.

  9. Fastening apparatus having shape memory alloy actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnis, Darin N. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A releasable fastening apparatus is presented. The device includes a connecting member and a housing. The housing supports a gripping mechanism that is adapted to engage the connecting member. A triggering member is movable within the housing between a first position in which it constrains the gripping mechanism in locked engagement with the connecting member, and a second position in which the gripping mechanism is disengaged from the connecting member. A shaped memory alloy actuator is employed for translating the triggering member from its first to its second position. The actuator is designed to expand longitudinally when transitioned from a martensitic to an austenitic state.

  10. Real time 3D visualization of ultrasonic data using a standard PC.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pablo Gómez Gonzaléz, Juan; Arendt Jensen, Jørgen

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes a flexible, software-based scan converter capable of rendering 3D volumetric data in real time on a standard PC. The display system is used in the remotely accessible and software-configurable multichannel ultrasound sampling system (RASMUS system) developed at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging. The display system is split into two modules: data transfer and display. These two modules are independent and communicate using shared memory and a predefined set of functions. It is, thus, possible to use the display program with a different data-transfer module which is tailored to another source of data (scanner, database, etc.). The data-transfer module of the RASMUS system is based on a digital signal processor from Analog Devices--ADSP 21060. The beamformer is connected to a PC via the link channels of the ADSP. A direct memory access channel transfers the data from the ADSP to a memory buffer. The display module, which is based on OpenGL, uses this memory buffer as a texture map that is passed to the graphics board. The scan conversion, image interpolation, and logarithmic compression are performed by the graphics board, thus reducing the load on the main processor to a minimum. The scan conversion is done by mapping the ultrasonic data to polygons. The format of the image is determined only by the coordinates of the polygons allowing for any kind of geometry to be displayed on the screen. Data from color flow mapping is added by alpha-blending. The 3D data are displayed either as cross-sectional planes, or as a fully rendered 3D volume displayed as a pyramid. All sides of the pyramid can be changed to reveal B-mode or C-mode scans, and the pyramid can be rotated in all directions in real time.

  11. Science Speaks: AGU's New Way to Share Science and Its Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrogio, Olivia V.

    2013-12-01

    On the count of three, as the camera shutter clicked, Julia Galkiewicz jumped up, her expression gleeful as she gripped a whiteboard. Emblazoned on it was a message: "This is what a scientist looks like."

  12. FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    McGeary, R.K.; Winslow, F.R.

    1963-08-13

    A method of making fuel elements wherein several individual fuel pellets are positioned into a cladding tube and the tape stretched longitudinally until the cladding tube grips each pellet and, in addition, necks down between each pellet is described. (AEC)

  13. 46 CFR 160.044-3 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... operating lever shall have a steel or bronze core through its entire length, but for comfort may have a gripping surface of wood or other suitable material. The lever shall be removable and shall be attached...

  14. 46 CFR 161.006-4 - Requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., vertically or horizontally, without the use of tools. A sturdy metal hand grip shall be provided at the back... the beam shall be defined as a point at which the intensity of the light is 10 percent of the...

  15. 78 FR 11159 - Procurement List, Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ...: General Services Administration, New York, NY. Pen, Retractable, Cushion Grip, Gel Ink, Dignitary NSN: 7520-01-510-7490. NSN: 7520-01-510-7491. Refill, Dignitary Gel Ink Pen NSN: 7510-01-510-8416. NSN:...

  16. Design and implementation of a multiaxial loading capability during heating on an engineering neutron diffractometer

    DOE PAGES

    Benafan, O.; Padula, S. A.; Skorpenske, H. D.; An, K.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2014-10-02

    Here we discuss a gripping capability that was designed, implemented, and tested for in situ neutron diffraction measurements during multiaxial loading and heating on the VULCAN engineering materials diffractometer at the spallation neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  17. Writing Forces Associated With Four Pencil Grasp Patterns in Grade 4 Children

    PubMed Central

    Schwellnus, Heidi; Carnahan, Heather; Kushki, Azadeh; Polatajko, Helene; Missiuna, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We investigated differences in handwriting kinetics, speed, and legibility among four pencil grasps after a 10-min copy task. METHOD. Seventy-four Grade 4 students completed a handwriting assessment before and after a copy task. Grip and axial forces were measured with an instrumented stylus and force-sensitive tablet. We used multiple linear regression to analyze the relationship between grasp pattern and grip and axial forces. RESULTS. We found no kinetic differences among grasps, whether considered individually or grouped by the number of fingers on the barrel. However, when grasps were grouped according to the thumb position, the adducted grasps exhibited higher mean grip and axial forces. CONCLUSION. Grip forces were generally similar across the different grasps. Kinetic differences resulting from thumb position seemed to have no bearing on speed and legibility. Interventions for handwriting difficulties should focus more on speed and letter formation than on grasp pattern. PMID:23433277

  18. Learning to Write and Draw

    MedlinePlus

    ... means that your child understands that lines on paper can be a symbol of something else, like ... grip crayons, thick pencils, and washable markers. Cut paper bags up to draw on. Sometimes it helps ...

  19. Primary amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Swelling in the arms and legs Weak hand grip Weight loss Other symptoms that may occur with ... kidney involvement may lead to organ failure and death. Body-wide ( systemic ) amyloidosis can lead to death ...

  20. Sprains and Strains

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for strains. Gymnastics, tennis, rowing, golf, and other sports that require extensive gripping can ... Trials and You was designed to help people learn more about clinical trials, why they matter, and ...

  1. Brainstem White Matter Predicts Individual Differences in Manual Motor Difficulties and Symptom Severity in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Brittany G.; Bigler, Erin D.; Tromp, Do P. M.; Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Dan; Samsin, Danica; Froehlich, Alyson; Prigge, Molly D. B.; Duffield, Tyler; Lange, Nicholas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that poorer motor skills may be related to more severe autism symptoms. This study investigated if atypical white matter microstructure in the brain mediated the relationship between motor skills and ASD symptom severity. Sixty-seven males with ASD and 42 males with typical development (5-33 years old) completed a diffusion tensor imaging scan and measures of grip strength, finger tapping, and autism symptom severity. Within the ASD group, weaker grip strength predicted more severe autism symptoms. Fractional anisotropy of the brainstem's corticospinal tract predicted both grip strength and autism symptom severity and mediated the relationship between the two. These findings suggest that brainstem white matter may contribute to autism symptoms and grip strength in ASD. PMID:26001365

  2. Brainstem White Matter Predicts Individual Differences in Manual Motor Difficulties and Symptom Severity in Autism.

    PubMed

    Travers, Brittany G; Bigler, Erin D; Tromp, Do P M; Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Dan; Samsin, Danica; Froehlich, Alyson; Prigge, Molly D B; Duffield, Tyler C; Lange, Nicholas; Alexander, Andrew L; Lainhart, Janet E

    2015-09-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that poorer motor skills may be related to more severe autism symptoms. This study investigated if atypical white matter microstructure in the brain mediated the relationship between motor skills and ASD symptom severity. Sixty-seven males with ASD and 42 males with typical development (5-33 years old) completed a diffusion tensor imaging scan and measures of grip strength, finger tapping, and autism symptom severity. Within the ASD group, weaker grip strength predicted more severe autism symptoms. Fractional anisotropy of the brainstem's corticospinal tract predicted both grip strength and autism symptom severity and mediated the relationship between the two. These findings suggest that brainstem white matter may contribute to autism symptoms and grip strength in ASD.

  3. Effect of shape of elastic beam hair on its adhesion with wavy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemthavy, Pasomphone; Yazaki, Takehiko; Wang, Boqing; Sekiguchi, Yu; Takahashi, Kunio

    2014-08-01

    An analysis on a tapered elastic beam whose side surface partially adhered to a rigid surface was carried out to study the effect of the beam shape on the gripping force. Considering the total energy of the system, the relation between the gripping force and the displacement was obtained analytically in closed form. The analytical result is significant because it provides an intuitive picture of the gripping force. Although, an individually tapered beam can generate less gripping force for flat or slightly wavy surfaces, compared to a rectangular beam, the analysis result suggests that the tapered beam has more ability to absorb surface waviness. This result can be applied to a multi-beam structure.

  4. Sex Differences in Strength and Fatigability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The pattern of fatigue resulting from systematically varying the intercontraction rest interval was examined in male and female subjects employing a hand-grip fatigue exercise. Results and conclusions are presented. (Author/MT)

  5. Earth Science Week 2012: Janel Thomas

    NASA Video Gallery

    A short video profile of Janel Thomas. She was a member of NASA's Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field campaign in 2010 where she operated the dropsonde instrument on board NASA...

  6. 49 CFR 399.205 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... elements by the cab door when closed. Effective peripheral grip Any shaped surface, free of sharp edges, in... publication No. 1000-Series 11-No. 8 and is for sale from the U.S. Department of Commerce, National...

  7. Effects Of Vibrations On Grasp Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannaford, Blake; Rosar, William H.

    1989-01-01

    Vibration powerful and specific stimulus to low-level reflex behavior. Report describes experiments on interactions between human operators and hand control device for control of extent of opening and gripping force of remote gripper. Major purpose of study to determine effects of vibrations in device upon ability of operators to control gripping force. Used beneficially in design of controls to provide warning signals preventing operators from commanding excessive, or perhaps insufficient forces.

  8. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensil specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen irregardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis.

  9. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1987-08-18

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensile specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen regardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis. 4 figs.

  10. Increasing productivity of the McAuto CAD/CAE system by user-specific applications programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotrowski, S. M.; Vu, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    Significant improvements in the productivity of the McAuto Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Engineering (CAD/CAE) system were achieved by applications programming using the system's own Graphics Interactive Programming language (GRIP) and the interface capabilities with the main computer on which the system resides. The GRIP programs for creating springs, bar charts, finite element model representations and aiding management planning are presented as examples.

  11. Prehension Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The precision grip requires the control of the normal and tangential forces exerted by the fingers as well as the control of the rotational equilibrium of the grasped object. Prehension synergies involve the conjoint changes in finger forces and moments during multifinger gripping tasks. Some of these adjustments are dictated by mechanics, whereas others are the result of a choice by the performer. PMID:15064652

  12. Early reduction in toe flexor strength is associated with physical activity in elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Suwa, Masataka; Imoto, Takayuki; Kida, Akira; Yokochi, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the toe flexor, hand grip and knee extensor strengths of young and elderly men, and to examine the association between toe flexor strength and physical activity or inactivity levels. [Subjects and Methods] Young (n=155, 18–23 years) and elderly (n=60, 65–88 years) men participated in this study. Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength were measured. Physical activity (time spent standing/walking per day) and inactivity (time spent sitting per day) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. [Results] Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength of the elderly men were significantly lower than those of the young men. Standing/walking and sitting times of the elderly men were lower than those of the young men. Toe flexor strength correlated with hand grip and knee extensor strength in both groups. In elderly men, toe flexor strength correlated with standing/walking time. In comparison to the young men’s mean values, toe flexor strength was significantly lower than knee extensor and hand grip strength in the elderly group. [Conclusion] The results suggest that age-related reduction in toe flexor strength is greater than those of hand grip and knee extensor strengths. An early loss of toe flexor strength is likely associated with reduced physical activity in elderly men. PMID:27313353

  13. Motor facilitation during action observation: The role of M1 and PMv in grasp predictions.

    PubMed

    de Beukelaar, Toon T; Alaerts, Kaat; Swinnen, Stephan P; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-02-01

    Recent theories propose that movement observation is not a "passive mirror" of ongoing actions but might induce anticipatory activity when predictable movements are observed, e.g., because the action goal is known. Here we investigate this mechanism in a series of 3 experiments, by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to primary motor cortex (M1) while subjects observed either whole hand or precision grasping performed by an actor. We show that corticomotor excitability changes in a grip-specific manner but only once the grip can be decoded based on the observed kinematic cues (Exp. 1). By contrast, presenting informative contextual precues evokes anticipatory modulations in M1 already during the reach phase, i.e., well before the grip type could be observed, a finding in line with a predictive coding account (Exp. 2). Finally, we used paired-pulse (PP) TMS to show that ventral premotor cortex (PMv) facilitates grip-specific representations in M1 but only while grip formation is observed. These findings suggest that PMv and M1 interact temporarily and mainly when motor aspects of hand-object interactions are extracted from visual information. By contrast, no sustained input from PMv to M1 seems to be required to maintain action representations that are anticipated based on contextual information or once the grip is formed (Exp. 3). PMID:26800203

  14. Transfer of learned manipulation following changes in degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiushi; Hasan, Ziaul; Santello, Marco

    2011-09-21

    The present study was designed to determine whether manipulation learned with a set of digits can be transferred to grips involving a different number of digits, and possible mechanisms underlying such transfer. The goal of the task was to exert a torque and vertical forces on a visually symmetrical object at object lift onset to balance the external torque caused by asymmetrical mass distribution. Subjects learned this manipulation through consecutive practice using one grip type (two or three digits), after which they performed the same task but with another grip type (e.g., after adding or removing one digit, respectively). Subjects were able to switch grip type without compromising the behavioral outcome (i.e., the direction, timing, and magnitude of the torque exerted on the object was unchanged), despite the use of significantly different digit force-position coordination patterns in the two grip types. Our results support the transfer of learning for anticipatory control of manipulation and indicate that the CNS forms an internal model of the manipulation task independent of the effectors that are used to learn it. We propose that sensory information about the new digit placement--resulting from adding or removing a digit immediately after the switch in grip type--plays an important role in the accurate modulation of new digit force distributions. We discuss our results in relation to studies of manipulation reporting lack of learning transfer and propose a theoretical framework that accounts for failure or success of motor learning generalization.

  15. ELECTROMAGNETIC APPARATUS FOR MOVING A ROD

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.N.

    1957-08-20

    An electromagnetic device for moving an object in a linear path by increments is described. The device is specifically adapted for moving a neutron absorbing control rod into and out of the core of a reactor and consists essentially of an extension member made of magnetic material connected to one end of the control rod and mechanically flexible to grip the walls of a sleeve member when flexed, a magnetic sleeve member coaxial with and slidable between limit stops along the flexible extension, electromagnetic coils substantially centrally located with respect to the flexible extension to flex the extension member into gripping engagement with the sleeve member when ener gized, moving electromagnets at each end of the sleeve to attract the sleeve when energized, and a second gripping electromagnet positioned along the flexible extension at a distance from the previously mentioned electromagnets for gripping the extension member when energized. In use, the second gripping electromagnet is deenergized, the first gripping electromagnet is energized to fix the extension member in the sleeve, and one of the moving electromagnets is energized to attract the sleeve member toward it, thereby moving the control rod.

  16. The effectiveness of kinesio taping for athletes with medial elbow epicondylar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Chang, H-Y; Cheng, S-C; Lin, C-C; Chou, K-Y; Gan, S-M; Wang, C-H

    2013-11-01

    Kinesio taping has also been used for athletes with Medial Elbow Epicondylar Tendinopathy (MET) as an additional treatment method. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical effectiveness of Kinesio tape on maximal grip strength and absolute and related force sense in athletes with MET when applied to the medial forearm. 27 male athletes who voluntarily participated in this study were divided into a healthy group (n=17) and a MET group (n=10). All subjects were assessed for the maximal grip strength and grip force sense (absolute and related force sense) under 3 taping conditions: 1) without taping; 2) with placebo Kinesio taping; and 3) with Kinesio taping. No significant interaction was found between groups and taping condition in maximal grip force and related force sense error, except for absolute force sense error (p=0.04). Both groups with absolute force sense measurements had significantly decreased errors in the placebo Kinesio taping and Kinesio taping conditions. Both taping may enhance discrimination of magnitude of grip force control (absolute force sense) in both groups when applied to the forearm. However, Kinesio taping did not change maximal grip strength in either group. The effects of Kinesio taping on other muscle functions remain to be studied.

  17. Muscle Strength, Physical Activity, and Functional Limitations in Older Adults with Central Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Cassandra M.; Batsis, John A.; Vasquez, Elizabeth; McQuoid, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Obesity and muscle weakness are independently associated with increased risk of physical and functional impairment in older adults. It is unknown whether physical activity (PA) and muscle strength combined provide added protection against functional impairment. This study examines the association between muscle strength, PA, and functional outcomes in older adults with central obesity. Methods. Prevalence and odds of physical (PL), ADL, and IADL limitation were calculated for 6,388 community dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 with central obesity. Individuals were stratified by sex-specific hand grip tertiles and PA. Logistic models were adjusted for age, education, comorbidities, and body-mass index and weighted. Results. Overall prevalence of PL and ADL and IADL limitations were progressively lower by grip category. Within grip categories, prevalence was lower for individuals who were active than those who were inactive. Adjusted models showed significantly lower odds of PL OR 0.42 [0.31, 0.56]; ADL OR 0.60 [0.43, 0.84], and IADL OR 0.46 [0.35, 0.61] for those in the highest grip strength category as compared to those in the lowest grip category. Conclusion. Improving grip strength in obese elders who are not able to engage in traditional exercise is important for reducing odds of physical and functional impairment. PMID:27034833

  18. Tennis racket shock mitigation experiments.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J F; Davis, J S

    1995-11-01

    Measured in this study was the effectiveness of two types of retrofits in mitigating shocks in tennis rackets with ideally high grip fixity. The retrofits were a cushioned grip tape and a string implant device. Three types of rackets were investigated: wood, graphite composite, and metal. For low speed ball impact, neither retrofit changed significantly the magnitude and distribution of e, the coefficient of restitution on the racket heads. For moderate ball speeds impacting the rackets along the vertical centerline, three dynamic racket responses were measured: the free vibration damping based on racket head acceleration, the root-mean-square (rms) grip reaction force, and the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the grip force. These latter experiments showed that the string implant device had a negligible effect on the three dynamic measures of racket response. However, the cushioned grip tape increased racket damping by up to 100 percent, reduced the rms grip force by about 20 percent, and reduced the magnitude of the FFT of this force by about 40 percent.

  19. Early reduction in toe flexor strength is associated with physical activity in elderly men.

    PubMed

    Suwa, Masataka; Imoto, Takayuki; Kida, Akira; Yokochi, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] To compare the toe flexor, hand grip and knee extensor strengths of young and elderly men, and to examine the association between toe flexor strength and physical activity or inactivity levels. [Subjects and Methods] Young (n=155, 18-23 years) and elderly (n=60, 65-88 years) men participated in this study. Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength were measured. Physical activity (time spent standing/walking per day) and inactivity (time spent sitting per day) were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. [Results] Toe flexor, hand grip, and knee extensor strength of the elderly men were significantly lower than those of the young men. Standing/walking and sitting times of the elderly men were lower than those of the young men. Toe flexor strength correlated with hand grip and knee extensor strength in both groups. In elderly men, toe flexor strength correlated with standing/walking time. In comparison to the young men's mean values, toe flexor strength was significantly lower than knee extensor and hand grip strength in the elderly group. [Conclusion] The results suggest that age-related reduction in toe flexor strength is greater than those of hand grip and knee extensor strengths. An early loss of toe flexor strength is likely associated with reduced physical activity in elderly men. PMID:27313353

  20. Eye-Hand Coordination: Dexterous Object Manipulation in New Gravity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonnard, J. L.; Smith, A.; Wing, A.; McIntyre, J.; Lefèvre, P.; White, O.; Augurelle, A. S.; Langlais, J. S.; Witney, A.; Blohm, G.; Penta, M.; Elmann-Larsen, B.; Bracewell, R. M.; Stramigioli, S.

    2005-06-01

    The stabilisation of an object manipulated with the hand depends on applying a sufficiently strong force with each finger such that sufficient friction is generated to resist the load force acting tangentially to the contact surfaces. Gravity normally provides a constant force acting on the object (depending on its weight) which is adequately taken into account by an appropriate level of grip force.Variations in inertial forces caused by the subject's own arm movements over a range of accelerations also produce synchronous changes in grip forces that rise and fall with the changes in the tangential load forces on the fingers.That is, grip force reflects an anticipatory adjustment to the fluctuations in inertial forces.The modulation of grip force in anticipation of load force implies that the nervous system has access to information concerning the object's weight, mass and the kinematics of the forthcoming movement, since changes in any of these require a different grip force.This suggests that the internal models used to predict load forces and generate appropriate grip forces are pretty good. It remains to be proved, however, whether the entire control process of grip-force compensation is based on feedforward, model-based control, or if some components of the required grip responses are generated through reflex actions. Microgravity presents a significant challenge to dexterous object manipulation for a number of reasons. Owing to all the potential deviations from the expected characteristics of the load forces, planning movement under microgravity conditions might involve a greater reliance on visual, tactile and/or memory cues to an object's mass. In addition, there might be over- gripping to reduce the consequence of an erroneous estimate of mass. Alternatively, the hand might initially be moved more slowly than normal to allow more time for feedback-based adjustments to grip force. In this regard, a series of experiments has been designed in order to study

  1. Effects of structure and strain measurement technique on the material properties of young human tendons and fascia.

    PubMed

    Butler, D L; Grood, E S; Noyes, F R; Zernicke, R F; Brackett, K

    1984-01-01

    It is generally recognized that the organization of collagen bundles in soft tissues strongly influences their material properties. To study this, sixty failure tests were conducted on double-layered fascia lata, 'isolated' parallel-bundled tendons (gracilis and semitendinosus) and parallel-bundled bone-patellar tendon-bone units taken from about the knees of eighteen young human donors (mean age of 26 yr). Surprisingly, most material parameters for the two-layered fascia lata did not differ significantly from corresponding values for the isolated tendons and tendon-bone preparations, suggesting their longitudinal fibers predominated during loading. Differences were present however between the gracilis tendon and all other tissues for both modulus and maximum stress. The large variations in reported maximum and failure strains for tendons, fascia and other collagenous tissues prompted the other phase of the study. During 15 of the 60 failure tests, surface markers were simultaneously filmed to determine; differences between local surface strains and grip to grip values; the amount of tissue slippage and/or failure occurring in the grips; and the effect of strain measurement technique on tissue moduli and failure energy densities. Maximum local strains were found to be 25-30% of grip strains for all tissues tested. Some slippage and/or failure could be seen in all isolated tissues which were gripped directly although their maximum grip strains were similar to values for tendon-bone units. For all tissues, two to three fold differences were also found in moduli and failure energy densities between grip and midregion measurements.

  2. Linking Objects to Actions: Encoding of Target Object and Grasping Strategy in Primate Ventral Premotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Franquemont, Lachlan; Black, Michael J.; Donoghue, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Neural activity in ventral premotor cortex (PMv) has been associated with the process of matching perceived objects with the motor commands needed to grasp them. It remains unclear how PMv networks can flexibly link percepts of objects affording multiple grasp options into a final desired hand action. Here, we use a relational encoding approach to track the functional state of PMv neuronal ensembles in macaque monkeys through the process of passive viewing, grip planning, and grasping movement execution. We used objects affording multiple possible grip strategies. The task included separate instructed delay periods for object presentation and grip instruction. This approach allowed us to distinguish responses elicited by the visual presentation of the objects from those associated with selecting a given motor plan for grasping. We show that PMv continuously incorporates information related to object shape and grip strategy as it becomes available, revealing a transition from a set of ensemble states initially most closely related to objects, to a new set of ensemble patterns reflecting unique object-grip combinations. These results suggest that PMv dynamically combines percepts, gradually navigating toward activity patterns associated with specific volitional actions, rather than directly mapping perceptual object properties onto categorical grip representations. Our results support the idea that PMv is part of a network that dynamically computes motor plans from perceptual information. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The present work demonstrates that the activity of groups of neurons in primate ventral premotor cortex reflects information related to visually presented objects, as well as the motor strategy used to grasp them, linking individual objects to multiple possible grips. PMv could provide useful control signals for neuroprosthetic assistive devices designed to interact with objects in a flexible way. PMID:26224870

  3. Interfering effects of multitasking on muscle activity in the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Au, Alvin K; Keir, Peter J

    2007-10-01

    Multitasking, where workers are required to perform multiple physical tasks with various levels of cognitive load is common in today's workplace. Simultaneous physical and mental demands are thought to cause task interference and likely increase muscle activity. To test the interfering effects of multitasking, 16 healthy participants performed hand and shoulder exertions with combinations of four grip conditions (no grip, 30% grip with low precision, 30% grip with high precision, and maximal grip) and three shoulder conditions at 90 degrees abduction (maintaining posture, 40% force-controlled moment, 40% posture-controlled moment), with and without the Stroop test while surface EMG was recorded from eight upper extremity muscles. Both 40% MVC shoulder moments increased extrinsic forearm muscle activity by 2-4% MVE (p<0.01). Grip exertion at 30% MVC reduced anterior and middle deltoid activity by 2% MVE (p<0.01). Exerting a constant force against the transducer (force-controlled) required 3-4% MVE greater middle and posterior deltoid activity (p<0.001) compared to supporting an equivalent inertial load at the same shoulder angle (posture-controlled). Performing the mental task (Stroop test) concurrently with either 40% MVC shoulder moments significantly increased trapezius activity by nearly 2% MVE (p<0.05). Interestingly, the Stroop test also reduced all deltoid activity by 1% MVE (p<0.05). The addition of both the Stroop test and force-control shoulder exertion independently reduced maximal grip force by 7% and 10% MVC, respectively. These results suggest that more complex workplace tasks may act to increase muscle load or interfere with task performance. These small but significant findings may play a role in the development of long-term musculoskeletal disorders in the workplace.

  4. Carpal tunnel release with subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament compared with isolated open and endoscopic release.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Li, Y; Wen, S; Zhu, H; Shao, X; Yu, Y

    2015-02-01

    We report a new surgical technique of open carpal tunnel release with subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament and compare this with isolated open and endoscopic carpal tunnel release. Between December 2007 and October 2011, 213 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (70 male, 143 female; mean age 45.6 years; 29 to 67) were recruited from three different centres and were randomly allocated to three groups: group A, open carpal tunnel release with subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament (n = 68); group B, isolated open carpal tunnel release (n = 92); and group C, endoscopic carpal tunnel release (n = 53). At a mean final follow-up of 24 months (22 to 26), we found no significant difference between the groups in terms of severity of symptoms or lateral grip strength. Compared with groups B and C, group A had significantly better functional status, cylindrical grip strength and pinch grip strength. There were significant differences in Michigan Hand Outcome scores between groups A and B, A and C, and B and C. Group A had the best functional status, cylindrical grip strength, pinch grip strength and Michigan Hand Outcome score. Subneural reconstruction of the transverse carpal ligament during carpal tunnel decompression maximises hand strength by stabilising the transverse carpal arch. PMID:25628286

  5. Handgrip and general muscular strength and endurance during prolonged bedrest with isometric and isotonic leg exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Starr, J. C.; Van Beaumont, W.; Convertino, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of maximal grip strength and endurance at 40 percent max strength were obtained for 7 men 19-21 years of age, 1-2 days before and on the first recovery day during three 2-week bedrest (BR) periods, each separated by a 3-week ambulatory recovery period. The subjects performed isometric exercise (IME) for 1 hr/day, isotonic exercise (ITE) for 1 hr/day, and no exercise (NOE) in the three BR periods. It was found that the mean maximal grip strength was unchanged after all three BR periods. Mean grip endurance was found to be unchanged after IME and ITE training, but was significantly reduced after NOE. These results indicate that IME and ITE training during BR do not increase or decrease maximal grip strength, alghough they prevent loss of grip endurance, while the maximal strength of all other major muscle groups decreases in proportion to the length of BR to 70 days. The maximal strength reduction of the large muscle groups was found to be about twice that of the small muscle groups during BR. In addition, it is shown that changes in maximal strength after spaceflight, BR, or water immersion deconditioning cannot be predicted from changes in submaximal or maximal oxygen uptake values.

  6. Genome-wide identification of enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Tulin, Sarah; Barsi, Julius C; Bocconcelli, Carlo; Smith, Joel

    2016-01-01

    We present a prospective genome-wide regulatory element database for the sea urchin embryo and the modified chromosome capture-related methodology used to create it. The method we developed is termed GRIP-seq for genome-wide regulatory element immunoprecipitation and combines features of chromosome conformation capture, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and paired-end next-generation sequencing with molecular steps that enrich for active cis-regulatory elements associated with basal transcriptional machinery. The first GRIP-seq database, available to the community, comes from S. purpuratus 24 hpf embryos and takes advantage of the extremely well-characterized cis-regulatory elements in this system for validation. In addition, using the GRIP-seq database, we identify and experimentally validate a novel, intronic cis-regulatory element at the onecut locus. We find GRIP-seq signal sensitively identifies active cis-regulatory elements with a high signal-to-noise ratio for both distal and intronic elements. This promising GRIP-seq protocol has the potential to address a rate-limiting step in resolving comprehensive, predictive network models in all systems.

  7. Characterizing coordination of grasp and twist in hand function of healthy and post-stroke subjects.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Hamed; Kearney, Robert; Milner, Theodore

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the coordination of grasp and twist in hand function of normal and post-stroke subjects using a two degree of freedom hand robot. Results of the analysis of data from eight control subjects indicated that normal grip coordination involves the linear modulation of grip force with load torque. Thus, there was a high correlation between grip force and load torque. Also, the force generated by the thumb was highly correlated with the force generated by the index, middle and ring fingers. Finally, the safety margin used to stabilize grasp and avoid slip was consistent across normal subjects. In contrast, results from chronic post-stroke subjects indicated that they generally: (1) exerted excessive grip force to stabilize grasp using their ipsilesional hand; (2) lost the close amplitude coupling between grip force and load torque; and (3) lost the close modulation of the thumb force with finger force. These results suggest that our methods may provide objective, quantitative means of characterizing coordination problems following stroke.

  8. Developing Baby Bag Design by Using Kansei Engineering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janari, D.; Rakhmawati, A.

    2016-01-01

    Consumer's preferences and market demand are essential factors for product's success. Thus, in achieving its success, a product should have design that could fulfill consumer's expectation. Purpose of this research is accomplishing baby bag product as stipulated by Kansei. The results that represent Kanseiwords are; neat, unique, comfortable, safe, modern, gentle, elegant, antique, attractive, simple, spacious, creative, colorful, durable, stylish, smooth and strong. Identification value on significance of correlation for durable attribute is 0,000 < 0,005, which means significant to baby's bag. While the value of coefficient regression is 0,812 < 0,005, which means that durable attribute insignificant to baby's bag.The result of the baby's bag final design selectionbased on the questionnaire 3 is resulting the combination of all design. Space for clothes, diaper's space, shoulder grip, side grip, bottle's heater pocket and bottle's pocket are derived from design 1. Top grip, space for clothes, shoulder grip, and side grip are derived from design 2.Others design that were taken are, spaces for clothes from design 3, diaper's space and clothes’ space from design 4.

  9. Development and construct validation of the Hand Function Sort.

    PubMed

    Matheson, L N; Kaskutas, V K; Mada, D

    2001-06-01

    The construct validity of the Hand Function Sort (HFS) was investigated in 126 adults of working age (65% male) with medical impairments. Principal components factor analysis identified one major factor and two minor factors, which was consistent with the findings of a subsequent Harris Image Analysis. A Kaiser Image Analysis identified seven factors, partitioning the first global factor. Construct validity also was studied. HFS scores of subjects who had impairment of the dominant upper extremity were compared with subjects whose dominant upper extremities were not impaired. Significant differences were found between groups for total scores and in categories of tasks for which hand dominance was likely to be important. Conversely, there were no significant differences with tasks for which hand dominance was not important. HFS scores were compared with grip strength, which accounted for significant variance in the total HFS score. When categories of tasks were considered, substantial variance in the factors for which grip strength was important was accounted for by grip strength. For tasks in which grip strength was not likely to be important, variance accounted for by grip strength was negligible.

  10. Extended physiologic taction: design and evaluation of a proportional force feedback system.

    PubMed

    Meek, S G; Jacobsen, S C; Goulding, P P

    1989-01-01

    In both robot teleoperation and prosthetics, the feeding back of touch information to the human operator in a physiologically compatible manner is an important problem. Most research in feedback systems for prosthetic devices has concentrated on electrotactile or vibrotactile stimulation of the skin. While these techniques can transmit information to the user, the user does not have the same sensation as if he were grasping an object in his natural hand. The present research investigates a third method of stimulation using direct force. In the sense of Simpson's Extended Physiologic Proprioception (EPP), it is called: Extended Physiologic Taction (EPT). The EPT system produces a one-to-one correspondence of touch sensation to user stimulation. The EPT system applies a force on the surface of the skin of the operator proportional to the grip force applied at the terminal device, or applies a vibration to the operator proportional to the vibration at the terminal device. A method of quantifying grip controllability has also been developed. A prototype was built and tested using a myoelectrically-controlled prosthetic terminal device as the remote gripping device. Quantifiable comparisons can be made between different feedback and gripping systems as well as comparisons between artificial terminal devices and the natural hand. Results are reported of improved grip control and of improved ability to manipulate objects when using the EPT system.

  11. Intercomparison of garnet barometers and implications for garnet mixing models

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, L.M.; Essene, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Several well-calibrated barometers are available in the system Ca-Fe-Ti-Al-Si-O, including: Alm+3Ru-3Ilm+Sil+2Qtz (GRAIL), 2Alm+Grreverse arrow6Ru=6Ilm+3An+3Qtz (GRIPS); 2Alm+Gr=3Fa+3An (FAG); 3AnGr+Ky+Qtz (GASP); 2Fs-Fa+Qtz (FFQ); and Gr+Qtz=An+2Wo (WAGS). GRIPS, GRAIL and GASP form a linearly dependent set such that any two should yield the third given an a/X model for the grossular/almandine solid-solution. Application to barometry of garnet granulite assemblages from the Grenville in Ontario yields average pressures 0.1 kb lower for GRIPS and 0.4 kb higher for FAGS using our mixing model. Results from Parry Island, Ontario, yield 8.7 kb from GRAIL as opposed to 9.1 kb using Ganguly and Saxena's model. For GASP, Parry Island assemblages yield 8.4 kb with the authors calibration. Ganguly and Saxena's model gives 5.4 kb using Gasparik's reversals and 8.1 kb using the position of GASP calculated from GRIPS and GRAIL. These corrections allow GRIPS, GRAIL, GASP and FAGS to yield consistent pressures to +/- 0.5 kb in regional metamorphic terranes. Application of their mixing model outside of the fitted range 700-1000 K is not encouraged as extrapolation may yield erroneous results.

  12. Genome-wide identification of enhancer elements.

    PubMed

    Tulin, Sarah; Barsi, Julius C; Bocconcelli, Carlo; Smith, Joel

    2016-01-01

    We present a prospective genome-wide regulatory element database for the sea urchin embryo and the modified chromosome capture-related methodology used to create it. The method we developed is termed GRIP-seq for genome-wide regulatory element immunoprecipitation and combines features of chromosome conformation capture, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and paired-end next-generation sequencing with molecular steps that enrich for active cis-regulatory elements associated with basal transcriptional machinery. The first GRIP-seq database, available to the community, comes from S. purpuratus 24 hpf embryos and takes advantage of the extremely well-characterized cis-regulatory elements in this system for validation. In addition, using the GRIP-seq database, we identify and experimentally validate a novel, intronic cis-regulatory element at the onecut locus. We find GRIP-seq signal sensitively identifies active cis-regulatory elements with a high signal-to-noise ratio for both distal and intronic elements. This promising GRIP-seq protocol has the potential to address a rate-limiting step in resolving comprehensive, predictive network models in all systems. PMID:27389984

  13. [Study of mechanical effects of the EVA glove on finger base with finite element modeling].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyou; Ding, Li; Yue, Guodong

    2013-08-01

    The hand strength of astronauts, when they are outside the space capsule, is highly influenced by the residual pressure (the pressure difference between inside pressure and outside one of the suit) of extravehicular activity spacesuit glove and the pressure exerted by braided fabric. The hand strength decreases significantly on extravehicular activity, severely reducing the operation efficiency. To measure mechanical influence caused by spacesuit glove on muscle-tendon and joints, the present paper analyzes the movement anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of gripping, and then proposes a grip model. With phalangeal joint simplified as hinges, seven muscles as a finger grip energy unit, the Hill muscle model was used to compute the effects. We also used ANSYS in this study to establish a 3-D finite element model of an index finger which included both bones and muscles with glove, and then we verified the model. This model was applied to calculate the muscle stress in various situations of bare hands or hands wearing gloves in three different sizes. The results showed that in order to achieve normal grip strength with the influence caused by superfluous press, the finger's muscle stress should be increased to 5.4 times of that in normal situation, with most of the finger grip strength used to overcome the influence of superfluous pressure. When the gap between the finger surface and the glove is smaller, the mechanical influence which superfluous press made will decrease. The results would provide a theoretical basis for the design of the EVA Glove.

  14. Force Myography to Control Robotic Upper Extremity Prostheses: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Erina; Chen, Richard; Merhi, Lukas-Karim; Xiao, Zhen; Pousett, Brittany; Menon, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Advancement in assistive technology has led to the commercial availability of multi-dexterous robotic prostheses for the upper extremity. The relatively low performance of the currently used techniques to detect the intention of the user to control such advanced robotic prostheses, however, limits their use. This article explores the use of force myography (FMG) as a potential alternative to the well-established surface electromyography. Specifically, the use of FMG to control different grips of a commercially available robotic hand, Bebionic3, is investigated. Four male transradially amputated subjects participated in the study, and a protocol was developed to assess the prediction accuracy of 11 grips. Different combinations of grips were examined, ranging from 6 up to 11 grips. The results indicate that it is possible to classify six primary grips important in activities of daily living using FMG with an accuracy of above 70% in the residual limb. Additional strategies to increase classification accuracy, such as using the available modes on the Bebionic3, allowed results to improve up to 88.83 and 89.00% for opposed thumb and non-opposed thumb modes, respectively. PMID:27014682

  15. Assessment of handgrip strength in preschool children aged 3 to 5 years.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Delgado, G; Cadenas-Sanchez, C; Mora-Gonzalez, J; Martinez-Tellez, B; Chillón, P; Löf, M; Ortega, F B; Ruiz, J R

    2015-11-01

    We investigated whether there is an optimal grip span for determining the maximum handgrip strength in preschool children and if it is influenced by gender, age, or hand size. A total of 292 preschool children (3-5 years; 59.2% boys) carried out the handgrip strength test with different grip spans (4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, and 6.0 cm). The hand size was also measured. We also determined the reliability of the optimal grip span in another group of children (n = 56, 57% boys) who did the test twice, with a 3-hour difference between tests. The results showed that 4.0 cm is the optimal grip span to determine the maximum handgrip strength in preschool children. This result applied to both genders, all age groups, and hand sizes. Paired t-tests showed no significant differences between test and retest. These findings may guide clinicians and researchers in selecting the optimal grip span when measuring handgrip strength in preschool children.Level IV.

  16. Fluid assisted installation of electrical cable accessories

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Robert W.; Silva, Frank A.

    1977-01-01

    An electrical cable accessory includes a generally tubular member of elastomeric material which is to be installed by placement over a cylindrical surface to grip the cylindrical surface, when in appropriate assembled relation therewith, with a predetermined gripping force established by dilation of the tubular member, the installation being facilitated by introducing fluid under pressure, through means provided in the tubular member, between the tubular member and the cylindrical surface, and simultaneously impeding the escape of the fluid under pressure from between the tubular member and the cylindrical surface by means adjacent one of the ends of the tubular member to cause dilation of the tubular member and establish a fluid layer between the tubular member and the cylindrical surface, thereby reducing the gripping force during installation.

  17. Osteophytes in the osteoarthritic hand: their incidence, size, distribution, and progression.

    PubMed Central

    Buckland-Wright, J C; Macfarlane, D G; Lynch, J A

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative microfocal radiographic assessment of osteophytes in osteoarthritic hands showed that their number and area were greatest at joint margins, in the dominant hand, in the second and third compared with fourth and fifth phalanges, in the third phalanx, and in the second distal interphalangeal joint respectively. These sites correspond with those for the largest forces exerted in the hand: the dominant side, the finger tripod used in the precision grip, power grip, and pulp-pinch respectively. The greater osteophytosis on the trapezium of the nondominant first carpometacarpal joint was probably related to forces exerted during power grip. Osteophytes increased significantly in number and area during the 18 month study period. PMID:1929585

  18. Design of an auto change mechanism and intelligent gripper for the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehoff, Paul H.; Naik, Dipak P.

    1989-01-01

    Robot gripping of objects in space is inherently demanding and dangerous and nowhere is this more clearly reflected than in the design of the robot gripper. An object which escapes the gripper in a micro g environment is launched not dropped. To prevent this, the gripper must have sensors and signal processing to determine that the object is properly grasped, e.g., grip points and gripping forces and, if not, to provide information to the robot to enable closed loop corrections to be made. The sensors and sensor strategies employed in the NASA/GSFC Split-Rail Parallel Gripper are described. Objectives and requirements are given followed by the design of the sensor suite, sensor fusion techniques and supporting algorithms.

  19. Electromyographic analysis of an ergonomic risk factor: overhead work

    PubMed Central

    Kinali, Gulsah; Kara, Sadık; Yıldırım, Mustafa Selman

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Repetitive upper extremity exercises result in overuse injuries. However, it is challenging to identify the specific causative movements. This study evaluated the effects of different shoulder positions on grip and electrophysiological activity of upper extremity muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects ranging from 18 and 30 years of age were analyzed. Surface electromyography and hand grip strength were measured during a range of shoulder exercises and numerous signal processing methods were applied. [Results] The maximum electromyographic activity intensity was observed in the wrist extensors at various angles. Deltoid activity rose significantly during shoulder flexion. [Conclusion] Overhead work causes shoulder muscle fatigue and prevents effective hand function, which affects occupational health and efficiency. Overhead work involves a hazardous position and decreases efficiency. Ergonomic solutions should be developed to prevent muscle fatigue and decreased grip force. PMID:27390448

  20. Evolution of the human hand: the role of throwing and clubbing

    PubMed Central

    Young, Richard W

    2003-01-01

    It has been proposed that the hominid lineage began when a group of chimpanzee-like apes began to throw rocks and swing clubs at adversaries, and that this behaviour yielded reproductive advantages for millions of years, driving natural selection for improved throwing and clubbing prowess. This assertion leads to the prediction that the human hand should be adapted for throwing and clubbing, a topic that is explored in the following report. It is shown that the two fundamental human handgrips, first identified by J. R. Napier, and named by him the ‘precision grip’ and ‘power grip’, represent a throwing grip and a clubbing grip, thereby providing an evolutionary explanation for the two unique grips, and the extensive anatomical remodelling of the hand that made them possible. These results are supported by palaeoanthropological evidence. PMID:12587931