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Sample records for rastrelliger kanagurta canned

  1. Spatial distribution of Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuvier 1817) in the South China Sea Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razib, N. A.; Mustapha, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    Rastrelliger kanagurta inhabits the South China Sea, where it is the most abundant commercial fish. Understanding distribution of this species is important. Objective of this study is to describe the relationship between spatial distribution of R. kanagurta and its local environmental factors. Chlorophyll-a distribution and sea surface temperature was obtained from Aqua MODIS satellite image. Fisheries data of 2007 to 2010 were obtained from the Southeast Asean Fisheries Department Center (SEAFDEC). These data were analyzed in relation to physical and environmental factors to establish the spatial-temporal distribution of the species. Catch per unit effort (CPUE) was calculated from the fisheries data and used as abundance index. Kernel Density maps of the abundance were created. The result showed that the abundance generated by Kernel Density analysis at 10.0 to 12.0 were associated with chlorophyll-a concentration of 0.4 ± 0.1 mg/m3 and sea surface temperature of 27.0 ± 1.0 °C at offshore of Pahang coast. The density maps showed that the increase of R. kanagurta abundance was occurred in October. The environmental factors in South China Sea played an important role on R. kanagurta's density patterns. This study indicated the capability of GIS and satellite image to indicate aggregation area of R. kanagurta.

  2. Kudoa saudiensis sp. n. (Myxosporea: Multivalvulida) infecting oocytes of the Indian mackerel Rastrelliger kanagurta (Perciformes: Scombridae).

    PubMed

    Mansour, Lamjed; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Al, Suliman Y Omar

    2015-01-01

    During a survey the occurrence of Kudoa quraishii Mansour, Harrath, Abd-Elkader, Alwasel, Abdel-Baki et Al Omar, 2014, recently identified in the muscles of the Indian mackerel, Rastrelliger kanagurta (Cuvier), a species of Kudoa Meglitsch, 1947 infecting oocytes of mature females of the same host fish was found. The new species, for which the name Kudoa saudiensis sp. n. is proposed, infects oocytes that are enlarged with a whitish colour. The parasite develops in vesicular polysporous plasmodia within the oocyte. Infection occurs with a mean prevalence of 20% (7/35) of examined females. Mature spores are quadratic in shape in apical view, having four equal valves and four symmetrical polar capsules. Fresh spores are 2.4-3.6 µm long (mean ± SD 3.1 ± 0.3 µm), 4.3-5.4 µm (4.7 ± 0.3 µm) wide and 3.4-4.3 µm (3.8 ± 0.3 µm) in thickness and long. The smaller size of the new Kudoa species was the distinctive feature that separates it from all previously described species. Molecular analysis based on the SSU rDNA sequences shows that the highest percentage of similarity of 98.5% was observed with K. ovivora Swearer et Robertson, 1999, reported from oocytes of labroid fish from the Caribbean coasts of Panama. The percentage of similarity was 98% with K. azevedoi Mansour, Thabet, Chourabi, Harrath, Gtari, Al Omar et Ben Hassine, 2013 and 89% with K. quraishii. Phylogenetic analysis of the SSU and LSU rDNA data revealed a consistent of the new species with K. azevedoi and K. ovivora. Our findings support the creation of Kudoa saudiensis sp. n. that infects oocytes of the Indian mackerel Rastrelliger kanagurta. PMID:25960554

  3. High Connectivity in Rastrelliger kanagurta: Influence of Historical Signatures and Migratory Behaviour Inferred from mtDNA Cytochrome b

    PubMed Central

    Akib, Noor Adelyna Mohammed; Tam, Bui Minh; Phumee, Preeda; Abidin, Muchlisin Zainal; Tamadoni, Saied

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic patterns and population structure of the pelagic Indian mackerel, Rastrelliger kanagurta were examined in 23 populations collected from the Indonesian-Malaysian Archipelago (IMA) and the West Indian Ocean (WIO). Despite the vast expanse of the IMA and neighbouring seas, no evidence for geographical structure was evident. An indication that R. kanagurta populations across this region are essentially panmictic. This study also revealed that historical isolation was insufficient for R. kanagurta to attain migration drift equilibrium. Two distinct subpopulations were detected between the WIO and the IMA (and adjacent populations); interpopulation genetic variation was high. A plausible explanation for the genetic differentiation observed between the IMA and WIO regions suggest historical isolation as a result of fluctuations in sea levels during the late Pleistocene. This occurrence resulted in the evolution of a phylogeographic break for this species to the north of the Andaman Sea. PMID:25786216

  4. Effect of freezing time on the quality of Indian mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) during frozen storage.

    PubMed

    Lakshmisha, I P; Ravishankar, C N; Ninan, G; Mohan, C O; Gopal, T K S

    2008-09-01

    The present study aims to find the effect of freezing methods on the quality of mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) in commercial plate and air blast freezers during freezing and subsequent frozen storage (-18 degrees C). Total time for freezing was significantly different (P < 0.05) between the plate and air blast freezers (90 and 220 min, respectively). This difference in the freezing time could be attributed to the varied quality of the 2 samples. Upon freezing, the moisture content decreased in air blast frozen samples compared to plate freezer where protein content decreased in both the samples. Upon freezing and during frozen storage, lipid oxidation products (peroxide value, thiobarbutiric acid value, and free fatty acid value) and volatile bases (total volatile base nitrogen and trimethyl amine nitrogen) showed an increasing trend in both the samples with values slightly higher in air blast frozen samples compared to plate frozen samples. The total plate counts showed a significantly (P < 0.05) decreasing trend in both the samples. K value did not show any significant (P < 0.05) difference between the samples where as the histamine formation was significantly (P < 0.05) increased in air blast frozen samples compared to plate frozen samples. The taste and overall acceptability was significantly different (P < 0.05) in plate frozen samples compared to air blast frozen samples on 3rd month. Both samples were in acceptable condition up to 3 mo but the plate frozen samples quality was slightly better than the air blast frozen samples.

  5. Synthesis and in vitro antioxidant functions of protein hydrolysate from backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta by proteolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Sheik Abdulazeez; Sundaram, Balasubramanian; Ramamoorthy, Baranitharan; Ponnusamy, Ponmurugan

    2013-01-01

    Every year, a huge quantity of fishery wastes and by-products are generated by fish processing industries. These wastes are either underutilized to produce low market value products or dumped leading to environmental issues. Complete utilization of fishery wastes for recovering value added products would be beneficial to the society and individual. The fish protein hydrolysates and derived peptides of fishery resources are widely used as nutritional supplements, functional ingredients, and flavor enhancers in food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries. Antioxidants from fishery resources have attracted the attention of researchers as they are cheaper in cost, easy to derive, and do not have side effects. Thus the present investigation was designed to produce protein hydrolysate by pepsin and papain digestion from the backbones of Rastrelliger kanagurta (Indian mackerel) and evaluate its antioxidant properties through various in vitro assays. The results reveal that both hydrolysates are potent antioxidants, capable of scavenging 46% and 36% of DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl) and 58.5% and 37.54% of superoxide radicals respectively. The hydrolysates exhibit significant (p < 0.05) reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition. Among the two hydrolysates produced, pepsin derived fraction is superior than papain derived fraction in terms of yield, DH (Degree of hydrolysis), and antioxidant activity. PMID:24596496

  6. Antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of grape and papaya seed extracts and their application on the preservation of Indian mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) during ice storage.

    PubMed

    Sofi, Faisal Rashid; Raju, C V; Lakshmisha, I P; Singh, Rajkumar Ratankumar

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant properties of grape (GSE) and papaya seed extracts (PSE) were tested in vitro at varied concentrations and growth inhibition were seen against gram positive and gram negative bacteria by disc diffusion method. The results revealed that GSE contain four times higher phenolic and six folds higher flavonoid content than PSE. The antioxidant properties of GSE and PSE showed dose dependent activities and were comparatively much higher in GSE. Linoleic acid model of GSE and PSE displayed 67.67 and 46.43 % of inhibition respectively at 500 mg/L. The effect of dip treatment by GSE and PSE at a concentration of 500 and 1000 mg/L respectively on the quality changes of Indian mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) in iced condition were assessed using chemical, microbiological and sensory parameters along with chilled whole control (CWC). The inhibition of primary and secondary lipid oxidation products by GSE at 500 mg/L was comparable to BHT at 200 mg/L. GSE exhibited higher antimicrobial activity on gram-positive strains compared to PSE and reduced the formation of volatile bases significantly. On the day of sensory rejection for CWC, the formation of trimethylamine and total volatile base nitrogen were reduced by 32.27 and 31.85 % in GSE samples and 19.01 and 24.70 % in PSE samples respectively. The dip treatment of GSE increased the shelflife of mackerel up to 15 days, PSE by 12 and 9 days for CWC during ice storage. Therefore, it can be concluded that, GSE can be used as a promising natural preservative and a substitute to the synthetic counterparts. PMID:26787935

  7. Assessment of Radiation and Heavy Metals Risk due to the Dietary Intake of Marine Fishes (Rastrelliger kanagurta) from the Straits of Malacca

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, M. U.; Asaduzzaman, Kh.; Nawi, S. M.; Usman, A. R.; Amin, Y. M.; Daar, E.; Bradley, D. A.; Ahmed, H.; Okhunov, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The environment of the Straits of Malacca receives pollution as a result of various industrial and anthropogenic sources, making systematic studies crucial in determining the prevailing water quality. Present study concerns concentrations of natural radionuclides and heavy metals in marine fish (Rastrelliger kanagurta) collected from the Straits of Malacca, since aquatic stock form an important source of the daily diet of the surrouding populace. Assessment was made of the concentrations of key indicator radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th, 40K) and heavy metals (As, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Co, Sr, Al, Hg and Pb) together with various radiation indices linked to the consumption of seafish. The annual effective dose for all detected radionuclides for all study locations has been found to be within UNSCEAR acceptable limits as has the associated life-time cancer risk. The overall contamination of the sampled fish from heavy metals was also found to be within limits of tolerance. PMID:26075909

  8. Assessment of Radiation and Heavy Metals Risk due to the Dietary Intake of Marine Fishes (Rastrelliger kanagurta) from the Straits of Malacca.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, M U; Asaduzzaman, Kh; Nawi, S M; Usman, A R; Amin, Y M; Daar, E; Bradley, D A; Ahmed, H; Okhunov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The environment of the Straits of Malacca receives pollution as a result of various industrial and anthropogenic sources, making systematic studies crucial in determining the prevailing water quality. Present study concerns concentrations of natural radionuclides and heavy metals in marine fish (Rastrelliger kanagurta) collected from the Straits of Malacca, since aquatic stock form an important source of the daily diet of the surrounding populace. Assessment was made of the concentrations of key indicator radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th, 40K) and heavy metals (As, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Co, Sr, Al, Hg and Pb) together with various radiation indices linked to the consumption of seafish. The annual effective dose for all detected radionuclides for all study locations has been found to be within UNSCEAR acceptable limits as has the associated life-time cancer risk. The overall contamination of the sampled fish from heavy metals was also found to be within limits of tolerance.

  9. Assessment of Radiation and Heavy Metals Risk due to the Dietary Intake of Marine Fishes (Rastrelliger kanagurta) from the Straits of Malacca.

    PubMed

    Khandaker, M U; Asaduzzaman, Kh; Nawi, S M; Usman, A R; Amin, Y M; Daar, E; Bradley, D A; Ahmed, H; Okhunov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The environment of the Straits of Malacca receives pollution as a result of various industrial and anthropogenic sources, making systematic studies crucial in determining the prevailing water quality. Present study concerns concentrations of natural radionuclides and heavy metals in marine fish (Rastrelliger kanagurta) collected from the Straits of Malacca, since aquatic stock form an important source of the daily diet of the surrounding populace. Assessment was made of the concentrations of key indicator radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th, 40K) and heavy metals (As, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Co, Sr, Al, Hg and Pb) together with various radiation indices linked to the consumption of seafish. The annual effective dose for all detected radionuclides for all study locations has been found to be within UNSCEAR acceptable limits as has the associated life-time cancer risk. The overall contamination of the sampled fish from heavy metals was also found to be within limits of tolerance. PMID:26075909

  10. Effects of deep frying on proximate composition and micronutrient of Indian mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta), eel (Monopterus albus) and cockle (Anadara granosa).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Zamri, M; Fadilla, N

    2012-06-15

    This study was conducted to determine the proximate composition and four micronutrients (Cd, Cu, Mn and Zn) of Indian Mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta), Eel (Monopterus albus) and Cockle (Anadara granosa). All fish and shellfish were purchased from local fish market in Kuantan city. All samples of each species were mixed and divided into two groups based on random selection. Each group were again divided into 3 sub-groups which were considered as replications. The first group were kept uncooked. The second group were fried in a beaker of 400 mL palm cooking oil capacity at a temperature approximately of 180 degrees C for a 15 min period. Both raw and fried samples were analysed following standard methods to determine protein, lipid, ash, moisture, carbohydrate, Cd, Cu, Mn and Zn contents. Results showed that protein content was higher in Indian mackerel and eel than cockle while overall Cd, Cu, Mn and Zn contents were higher in cockle than Indian mackerel and eel. Therefore, fish is better than shellfish in the nutritional point of view. Fried fish and shellfish had very high fat content. Therefore, frying cannot be recommended to prepare a healthy diet. More research is needed including all cooking methods of fish to know the nutritional changes by each cooking method. Fish contains many important fatty acids and amino acids which might be lost during frying. Therefore, future study should include the effects of different cooking methods on amino acids and fatty acids compositions of fish and shellfish.

  11. Effects of deep frying on proximate composition and micronutrient of Indian mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta), eel (Monopterus albus) and cockle (Anadara granosa).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Zamri, M; Fadilla, N

    2012-06-15

    This study was conducted to determine the proximate composition and four micronutrients (Cd, Cu, Mn and Zn) of Indian Mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta), Eel (Monopterus albus) and Cockle (Anadara granosa). All fish and shellfish were purchased from local fish market in Kuantan city. All samples of each species were mixed and divided into two groups based on random selection. Each group were again divided into 3 sub-groups which were considered as replications. The first group were kept uncooked. The second group were fried in a beaker of 400 mL palm cooking oil capacity at a temperature approximately of 180 degrees C for a 15 min period. Both raw and fried samples were analysed following standard methods to determine protein, lipid, ash, moisture, carbohydrate, Cd, Cu, Mn and Zn contents. Results showed that protein content was higher in Indian mackerel and eel than cockle while overall Cd, Cu, Mn and Zn contents were higher in cockle than Indian mackerel and eel. Therefore, fish is better than shellfish in the nutritional point of view. Fried fish and shellfish had very high fat content. Therefore, frying cannot be recommended to prepare a healthy diet. More research is needed including all cooking methods of fish to know the nutritional changes by each cooking method. Fish contains many important fatty acids and amino acids which might be lost during frying. Therefore, future study should include the effects of different cooking methods on amino acids and fatty acids compositions of fish and shellfish. PMID:24191621

  12. Morphometric and molecular analysis of mackerel (Rastrelliger spp) from the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Darlina, M N; Masazurah, A R; Jayasankar, P; Jamsari, A F J; Siti, A M N

    2011-01-01

    Mackerel (Scombridae; Rastrelliger) are small commercially important pelagic fish found in tropical regions. They serve as a cheap source of animal protein and are commonly used as live bait. By using a truss morphometrics protocol and RAPD analysis, we examined morphological and genetic variation among 77 individual mackerel that were caught using long lines and gillnets at 11 locations along the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Nineteen morphometric traits were evaluated and genetic information was estimated using five 10-base RAPD random primers. Total DNA was extracted from muscle tissue. Morphometric discriminant function analysis revealed that two morphologically distinct groups of Rastrelliger kanagurta and a single group of R. brachysoma can be found along the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. We also found that the head-related characters and those from the anterior part of the body of Rastrelliger spp significantly contribute to stock assessment of this population. RAPD analysis showed a trend similar to that of the morphometric analysis, suggesting a genetic component to the observed phenotypic differentiation. These data will be useful for developing conservation strategies for these species. PMID:21968625

  13. Comparative evaluation of gum arabic coating and vacuum packaging on chilled storage characteristics of Indian mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta).

    PubMed

    Binsi, P K; Nayak, Natasha; Sarkar, P C; Sahu, Upali; Ninan, George; Ravishankar, C N

    2016-04-01

    The effect of edible coating using gum arabic on biochemical, microbiological, textural and sensory characteristics of fresh gutted mackerel stored at 4 °C was investigated. The results were further compared against the samples packed under vacuum (VP) and conventional polyethylene pouches (CP). Coating with gum arabic (GC) markedly retarded lipid oxidation process in gutted mackerel compared to VP and CP samples. Moreover, VP and CP samples showed higher degree of textural deterioration compared to GC samples. Microbiologically, the shelf life of chilled gutted Indian mackerel was estimated to be 7-8, 17 and 19-20 days for CP, GC and VP samples, respectively. The sensory analysis scores confirmed the efficacy of gum coating in retarding the spoilage process during chilled storage. The current study identifies the potential of edible coating with gum arabic to improve the overall quality of Indian mackerel and extend its storage life during chilled storage. PMID:27413215

  14. Changes in urocanic acid, histamine, putrescine and cadaverine levels in Indian mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta) during storage at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zare, Davood; Muhammad, Kharidah; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Ghazali, H M

    2013-08-15

    Histamine, putrescine cadaverine and cis-urocanic acid (UCA) have all been implicated or suggested in scombroid fish poisoning. However, there is little information on UCA especially during storage. Changes in their contents during storage of whole Indian mackerel at 0, 3±1, 10±1 for up to 15 days and 23±2°C for up to 2 days were monitored. Fresh muscles contained 14.83 mg/kg trans-UCA, 2.23 mg/kg cis-UCA and 1.86 mg/kg cadaverine. Histamine and putrescine were not detected. After 15 days at 0 and 3°C, trans-UCA content increased to 52.83 and 189.51 mg/kg, respectively, and decreased to <2 mg/kg at the other two temperatures. Storage at 10°C also resulted in an increase in trans-UCA after 3 days, only to decrease after 6 days. The concentration of cis-UCA increased nearly 13-fold after 15 days at 0 and 3°C, decreased at 10°C and remained unchanged at 23°C. Histamine, putrescine and cadaverine levels increased significantly (P value<0.05) at all temperatures especially at 23°C. PMID:23561112

  15. Comparative evaluation of gum arabic coating and vacuum packaging on chilled storage characteristics of Indian mackerel (Rastrelliger kanagurta).

    PubMed

    Binsi, P K; Nayak, Natasha; Sarkar, P C; Sahu, Upali; Ninan, George; Ravishankar, C N

    2016-04-01

    The effect of edible coating using gum arabic on biochemical, microbiological, textural and sensory characteristics of fresh gutted mackerel stored at 4 °C was investigated. The results were further compared against the samples packed under vacuum (VP) and conventional polyethylene pouches (CP). Coating with gum arabic (GC) markedly retarded lipid oxidation process in gutted mackerel compared to VP and CP samples. Moreover, VP and CP samples showed higher degree of textural deterioration compared to GC samples. Microbiologically, the shelf life of chilled gutted Indian mackerel was estimated to be 7-8, 17 and 19-20 days for CP, GC and VP samples, respectively. The sensory analysis scores confirmed the efficacy of gum coating in retarding the spoilage process during chilled storage. The current study identifies the potential of edible coating with gum arabic to improve the overall quality of Indian mackerel and extend its storage life during chilled storage.

  16. New record of Norileca indica from the west coast of India.

    PubMed

    Rameshkumar, Ganapathy; Ramesh, Mathan; Ravichandran, Samuthirapandian; Trilles, Jean-Paul; Subbiah, Shunmugam

    2015-12-01

    Two hundred and twenty samples of Rastrelliger kanagurta from the Cochin Fisheries Harbour were collected during the month of August 2013. Forty-one specimens (32 females and 9 males) were parasitized by the cymothoid isopod Norileca indica. N. indica is recorded for the first time from the west coast of India.

  17. Balanced Can

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-01-01

    The ordinary 12-oz beverage cans in the figures below are not held up with any props or glue. The bottom of such cans is stepped at its circumference for better stacking. When this kind of can is tilted, as shown in Fig. 1, the outside corners of the step touch the surface beneath, providing an effective contact about 1 cm wide. Because the…

  18. Balanced Can

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakerin, Said

    2013-12-01

    The ordinary 12-oz beverage cans in the figures below are not held up with any props or glue. The bottom of such cans is stepped at its circumference for better stacking. When this kind of can is tilted, as shown in Fig. 1, the outside corners of the step touch the surface beneath, providing an effective contact about 1 cm wide. Because the contact is relatively wide and the geometry is symmetrical, it is easy to balance an empty can by simply adding an appropriate amount of water so that the overall center of mass is located directly above the contact. In fact, any amount of water between about 40 and 210 mL will work. A computational animation of this trick by Sijia Liang and Bruce Atwood that shows center of mass as a function of amount of added water is available at http://demonstrations.wolfram.com. Once there, search "balancing can."

  19. Can It

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Kelly L.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.

    2004-03-31

    This short article describes the benefits of energy-efficient insulated recessed can downlights for use in residential and commercial buildings. The article describes DOE's program to bring more models of recessed cans that use pin-based compact fluorescent lamps to the market. The recessed can program is managed by PNNL for DOE. PNNL has conducted laboratory testing of several can lights and has found that three manufacturers are building lamps that meet DOE's strict criteria for performance and energy efficiency. The companies are PowerLux Corporation of Carlsbad, California; Technical Consumer Products (TCP), Inc. of Aurora, Ohio; and D-Light, a division of DiSci Labs LLC, is based in Corpus Christi, Texas.

  20. You Can!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, J. Jioni

    2008-01-01

    A young person's energy and creativity can be unleashed on the world of politics by a high school government or current events class. In the case of Ray Zaccaro, all it took was a teacher's question. It was 1995, the spring of his senior year at North Babylon High School on New York's Long Island. Zaccaro was 17, riding high with plans to attend…

  1. Under pressure: Investigating marine resource-based livelihoods in Jakarta Bay and the Thousand Islands.

    PubMed

    Baum, Gunilla; Kusumanti, Ima; Breckwoldt, Annette; Ferse, Sebastian C A; Glaser, Marion; Dwiyitno; Adrianto, Luky; van der Wulp, Simon; Kunzmann, Andreas

    2016-09-30

    Jakarta Bay, next to the Jakarta Metropolitan Area with around 30 million inhabitants, is facing extreme pollution. Although local coral reefs are degraded and marine resources heavily exploited, they provide livelihoods for millions of people. This study investigates anthropogenic pressures on local fisheries resources and associated livelihoods. Questionnaire surveys were conducted in 15 coastal communities (10 coastal neighborhoods in Jakarta Bay on the mainland and 5 of the offshore Thousand Islands). The most economically valuable species were Caesio cuning (Redbelly yellowtail fusilier) on the islands and Rastrelliger kanagurta (Indian mackerel) on the mainland. Over 80% of all interviewed fishermen regarded the current state of marine resources as declining, mainly due to pollution and overexploitation. While perceptions of declining resources were equally high on the islands and the mainland, pollution was listed as the principal cause of degradation significantly more on the mainland. Findings are discussed in the context of coastal livelihood vulnerability. PMID:27241879

  2. Under pressure: Investigating marine resource-based livelihoods in Jakarta Bay and the Thousand Islands.

    PubMed

    Baum, Gunilla; Kusumanti, Ima; Breckwoldt, Annette; Ferse, Sebastian C A; Glaser, Marion; Dwiyitno; Adrianto, Luky; van der Wulp, Simon; Kunzmann, Andreas

    2016-09-30

    Jakarta Bay, next to the Jakarta Metropolitan Area with around 30 million inhabitants, is facing extreme pollution. Although local coral reefs are degraded and marine resources heavily exploited, they provide livelihoods for millions of people. This study investigates anthropogenic pressures on local fisheries resources and associated livelihoods. Questionnaire surveys were conducted in 15 coastal communities (10 coastal neighborhoods in Jakarta Bay on the mainland and 5 of the offshore Thousand Islands). The most economically valuable species were Caesio cuning (Redbelly yellowtail fusilier) on the islands and Rastrelliger kanagurta (Indian mackerel) on the mainland. Over 80% of all interviewed fishermen regarded the current state of marine resources as declining, mainly due to pollution and overexploitation. While perceptions of declining resources were equally high on the islands and the mainland, pollution was listed as the principal cause of degradation significantly more on the mainland. Findings are discussed in the context of coastal livelihood vulnerability.

  3. Pneumonia Can Be Prevented -- Vaccines Can Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Emails CDC Features Pneumonia Can Be Prevented—Vaccines Can Help Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... not recommended. Learn more . Lower Your Risk with Vaccines In the United States, there are vaccines that ...

  4. Can Movement Promote Creativity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2009-01-01

    Creativity can be an elusive concept. It may be misunderstood and difficult to define, but it is clearly necessary, particularly in a world so rapidly changing. Creative people are those who can imagine. This means they can imagine solutions to problems and challenges faced. They can also imagine what it is like to be someone or something…

  5. "Can" the Black Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lestingi, Francis S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the use of the "Arcane (mysterious) Can" which is a "tin" can which is permanently sealed, both air- and water-tight, by means of a home canning device. The canning procedure permits the use of a large variety of materials which can not be utilized in the ordinary mystery box. This Can activity is valuable for illustrating in an…

  6. CAN HANDLING FIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Kelman, Ler.R.; Yaggee, F.L.

    1958-08-01

    A sleeveless cauning apparatus is described for bonding and canning uranium fuel elements under the surface of a liquid bonding alloy. The can is supported on a pedestal by vertical pegs, and an adjustable collar is placed around the upper, open end of the can, which preferably is flared to assure accurate centering in the fixture and to guide the uranium slug into the can. The fixture with a can in place is then immersed in a liquid aluminum-silicon alloy and the can becomes filled with the liquid alloy. The slug is inserted by a slug guide located vertically above the can opening. The slug settles by gravity into the can, after which a cap is emplaced. A quenching tool lifts the capped can out of the bath by means of a slot provided for it in the pedestal. This apparatus provides a simple means of canning the slug without danger of injury to the uranium metal or the aluminum can.

  7. Single can cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.P.

    1988-05-24

    A beverage cooler which can keep a beverage-filled can of predetermined diameter cool for an extended period of time while facilitating the drinking of a beverage from the still-cold can is described comprising: A hollow heat insulated container bottom assembly which includes a bottom end and side walls, and having a hollow inside with a can-supporting wall for supporting the bottom of the can; and a hollow heat insulated container top assembly which includes a top end, and which includes side walls which closely mate with the side walls of the bottom assembly to form a can-holding container which avoids the passage of air between the outside and inside of the container to thereby avoid convective heating. The bottom assembly is formed to closely surround the can along most of the height of the can to avoid can rattling when the bottom assembly is tilted, and the height of the hollow inside of the bottom assembly above the can-supporting wall being greater than the hollow inside of the top assembly and of a height more than 60% of the height of the can but no more than 75% of the height of the can to leave at least 25% of the top of the can free, whereby to facilitate drinking directly from the can while it lies in the bottom assembly.

  8. Tin Can Radiation Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crull, John L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides instructions for making tin can radiation detectors from empty aluminum cans, aluminum foil, clear plastic, copper wire, silica gel, and fine, unwaxed dental floss put together with tape or glue. Also provides suggestions for activities using the detectors. (JN)

  9. Can-Do Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Sheila M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposes the use of metal cans to create science experiments that motivate students to investigate the scientific concepts of electricity, magnetism, heat, inertia, and sound transmission. Describes several experiments using cans in which students explore the properties of metal. (MDH)

  10. You Can Do It!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, Carolyn, Ed.; And Others

    Children can often be heard asking what they can do to help wildlife and the environment. Listed in this pamphlet are materials on these topics and suggestions for projects that children can do. Topics addressed in this guide include: (1) "Giving Habitat a Hand"; (2) "Saving a Place for Wildlife"; (3) "Injured or Abandoned Wild Animals"; (4)…

  11. Can strain magnetize light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    Strain in photonic structures can induce pseudomagnetic fields and Landau levels. Nature Photonics spoke to Mordechai Segev, Mikael Rechtsman, Alexander Szameit and Julia Zeuner about their unique approach.

  12. But Can You Hit?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, R. E.

    2009-01-01

    The author shares a story told to him by a colleague more than thirty years ago. The dean of a midsized American university was explaining the path to tenure to a roomful of newly appointed assistant professors. "We know you boys can all "field"," he declared. "Now we want to see if you can hit." A lot has changed over the intervening decades. If…

  13. Can the Creativity!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasio, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Art teachers know that budget limitations are one of the obstacles that affect creativity in art class. However, teachers can now pour creative juices into their curriculum by using aluminum cans to give their high-school students a project that conceptualizes their sense of environment. This project allows students the freedom to experiment with…

  14. Can I Prevent Acne?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Can I Prevent Acne? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can I Prevent Acne? Print A A A Text Size What's ... too. Although there is no surefire way to prevent acne, try these tips to help reduce the ...

  15. What You Can Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beabout, Brian; Foley, Shawn; Rickard, Marjorie; Wriddle, Janise Venia; MacDonald, Laurie; Smith, Stephen; Campbell, Rob; Strobel, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    This article presents seven vignettes that focus on what technology specialists, instructional designers, teacher trainers, teachers, parents, corporate trainers and performance technologists can do to create positive and systemic change in education. These include: (1) "What Technology Specialists Can Do," by Brian Beabout; (2) "What…

  16. Managing Garbage Can Hierarchies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padgett, John F.

    1980-01-01

    Operationalizes garbage-can theory into a stochastic process model for the case of a traditional Weberian bureaucracy. Illustrates how ambiguity may impinge on decision making within a structural setting familiar to classical organization theorists and derives the managerial implications of garbage-can theory. (Author/IRT)

  17. Can You Beat This?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrow, Charles H.; Holbrow, Charles J.

    2016-05-01

    Here is a nice 1-D kinematics problem disguised in a musical (drumming) context. We think the novel perspective of the problem can enliven the study of the basic equations that describe motion under constant acceleration.

  18. Can Schools Teach Values?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Harold

    1987-01-01

    While the family is the main agency for helping young people develop the ideas, attitudes, and behavior of successful citizenship and work, schools can enrich the teacher-student relationship to the point that values rub off. (MT)

  19. Can Reading Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Ponders the effect of September 11th on teenagers. Proposes that reading books can help teenagers sort out complicated issues. Recommends young adult novels that offer hope for overcoming tragedy. Lists 50 short story collections worth reading. (PM)

  20. Can Physics Develop Reasoning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Robert G.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The findings of Piaget suggest that learning physics can help people achieve a series of four distinct but overlapping stages of intellectual growth as they search for patterns and relationships. (MLH)

  1. Fathers Can Support Breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... System Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Fathers Supporting Breastfeeding Last Published: 05/26/2016 Email Updates Click ... in each of the materials. FATHERS CAN SUPPORT BREASTFEEDING Poster - FNS 354 Be a Part of the ...

  2. Question: Who Can Vote?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodeheaver, Misty D.; Haas, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    This year's rollercoaster primary elections and the pending national election, with an anticipated record voter turnout, provide the perfect backdrop for an examination of the questions: (1) Who can vote?; and (2) Who will vote? Historically, the American government refused voting rights to various groups based on race, gender, age, and even…

  3. Can We Talk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Susan

    2015-01-01

    "One of the most powerful educational tools available to students and teachers lies hidden in plain sight, in every classroom--conversation," writes Susan Engel. The conversational exchanges that happen naturally between parents and young children are full of questions that can lead to learning. Within the context of these casual…

  4. Tin Can Textile Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Patricia; Sanford, Barbara

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of "canning"--applying textile pigment or dye to cloth by moving a pigment-filled can across the fabric to create a linear design. This printing process is described as low-cost, easy, and suitable for all age and artistic levels. (Author/SJL)

  5. Together We Can...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotson, Kaye B.; Clark, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Using technology in the classroom for learning is no longer new and innovative; it is expected and even demanded. K-12 teachers have a responsibility to employ technology tools in multiple ways to teach and foster students' development of 21st-century skills and enhance researching, learning, and creating. School librarians can be instrumental in…

  6. Words Can Hurt, but ...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stormon-Flynn, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Having a conscience and the ability to communicate verbal or non-verbal messages gives humans a great deal of power to express a broad range of emotions. We can then demonstrate our feelings to make an impression on the lives of those around us. Fortunately, our personal skills and available technological resources allow us to enhance lives and…

  7. Soup-Can Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Randall D.

    2004-01-01

    In these studies, a vegetable can containing fluid was swung as a pendulum by supporting its end-lips with a pair of knife edges. The motion was measured with a capacitive sensor and the logarithmic decrement in free decay was estimated from computer-collected records. Measurements performed with nine different homogeneous liquids, distributed…

  8. How Data Can Help.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Jane; Anthes, Katy

    2001-01-01

    The Education Commission of the States conducted interviews in six school districts in five different states (California, Colorado, Iowa, Maryland, and Texas) to understand how districts can use data most effectively. These districts had used data to dramatically improve student achievement. Districts that make wise use of data have strong…

  9. CanTrilBat

    2010-08-24

    This application can determine the performance and chemical behavior of batteries in 1D when they are cycled. With CanTrilBat, we are developing predictive phenomenological models for battery systems to predict operating performance and rate limiting steps in the performance of battery models. Particular attention is paid to primary and secondary chemistry mechanisms, such as the thermal runaway mechanisms experienced in secondary lithium ion batteries or self-discharge reaction mechanism that all batteries experience to one extentmore » or another. The first application of this model has been for modeling the performance of thermal batteries. However, an implementation for secondary ion batteries is next. CanTrilBat applications solves transient problems involving batteries. It is a 1-D application that represents 3-D physical systems that can be reduced using the porous flow approximation for the anode, cathode, and separator. A control volume formulation is used to track conserved quantities. An operator-split approach is used to calculate the chemistry, diffusion and electronic transport that occurs within cathode and anode particles, allowing for the reduction in code complexity.« less

  10. Science Can Be Attractive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the properties of neodymium magnets and magnets in general and how magnets can be used to teach students important scientific principles, such as attraction, repulsion, and polarity; the role of magnetic forces in electronic communications and computers; the magnetic properties of the earth and compasses; and the relationship between…

  11. Can India's "Literate" Read?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kothari, Brij; Bandyopadhyay, Tathagata

    2010-01-01

    This paper takes a close look at India's literacy rate by exploring whether the officially "literate" can read and at what level. In a large sample, aged 7+, drawn from four Hindi-speaking states, two methods were used to measure literacy. One was the standard Census Method (CM) which relies on self-reporting and the other was a Reading Method…

  12. Macrame and Tin Cans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James K.

    1978-01-01

    If your school district is like most school districts, money for supplies is an increasing problem. Art teachers are continually trying to develop meaningful art projects for which the cost is minimal. Here students learn to use discarded, large number 10 cans as planters for a macrame project. (Author/RK)

  13. Tin Can Racer Derby.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, James L.

    1986-01-01

    Describes directions for constructing "racing" cars out of simple materials like spools and coffee cans. Discusses procedures for students to build cars, then to test and race them. Stresses that the activity allows for self-discovery of problem solving techniques and opportunities to discuss the scientific concepts related to the activity. (TW)

  14. Tin Cans Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verderber, Nadine L.

    1992-01-01

    Presents the use of spreadsheets as an alternative method for precalculus students to solve maximum or minimum problems involving surface area and volume. Concludes that students with less technical backgrounds can solve problems normally requiring calculus and suggests sources for additional problems. (MDH)

  15. Can Virtue Be Measured?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curren, Randall; Kotzee, Ben

    2014-01-01

    This article explores some general considerations bearing on the question of whether virtue can be measured. What is moral virtue? What are measurement and evaluation, and what do they presuppose about the nature of what is measured or evaluated? What are the prospective contexts of, and purposes for, measuring or evaluating virtue, and how would…

  16. Hijacking cellular garbage cans.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Sonja; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2010-06-25

    Viruses are perfect opportunists that have evolved to modify numerous cellular processes in order to complete their replication cycle in the host cell. An article by Reggiori and coworkers in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe reveals how coronaviruses can divert a cellular quality control pathway that normally functions in degradation of mis-folded proteins to replicate the viral genome. PMID:20542246

  17. Music You Can See

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Shannon Sweny

    2012-01-01

    Children of all ages love painting to music. Aside from discovering the natural correlation between music and art, the author's students learned about Mozart's life and work in music class. In this article, students discover the influence that music can have on their art. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  18. Formed HIP Can Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Kester Diederik

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  19. We can do better.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Kathy S

    2014-01-01

    We should not expect a new model or a brilliant new study to transform staffing in health care from hard to easy. Nurses can't change the complexity of our work; however, we can and must improve the art and science of staffing. e have not mastered the translation of evidence on staffing to influencing budgets, adjusting policies, procedures, and changing cultures as rapidly as we need. esearch has helped in countless ways, but we need more and there is still much to understand. ccurate data collection and a willingness to share that data with researchers will help advance the science of staffing. The road ahead is not easy and will take courage, tenacity, and a lot of energy.

  20. Can Computers be Social?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Bertil

    2002-09-01

    Of main concern in agent based computing is the conception that software agents can attain socially responsible behavior. This idea has its origin in the need for agents to interact with one another in a cooperating manner. Such interplay between several agents can be seen as a combinatorial play where the rules are fixed and the actors are supposed to closely analyze the play in order to behave rational. This kind of rationality has successfully being mathematically described. When the social behavior is extended beyond rational behavior, mere mathematical analysis falls short. For such behavior language is decisive for transferring concepts and language is a holistic entity that cannot be analyzed and defined mathematically. Accordingly, computers cannot be furnished with a language in the sense that meaning can be conveyed and consequently they lack all the necessary properties to be made social. The attempts to postulate mental properties to computer programs are a misconception that is blamed the lack of true understanding of language and especially the relation between formal system and its semantics.

  1. Can power be shared?

    PubMed

    Ten Pas, William S

    2013-01-01

    Dental insurance began with a partnership between dental service organizations and state dental associations with a view toward expanding the number of Americans receiving oral health care and as a means for permitting firms and other organizations to offer employee benefits. The goals have been achieved, but the alliance between dentistry and insurance has become strained. A lack of dialogue has fostered mutual misconceptions, some of which are reviewed in this paper. It is possible that the public, the profession, and the dental insurance industry can all be strengthened, but only through power-sharing around the original common objective.

  2. Can We Build Inclusion?

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette; Grangaard, Sidse

    2016-01-01

    Inclusion of children with special needs in kindergartens and preschools may be approached from different angles. This paper raises the question of whether the physical framework of kindergartens makes any difference for daily life at the kindergarten at all, and whether it can support inclusion of some children with special needs. Hence the title - can we build inclusion? In the literature of Universal Design, accommodation and design features seldom reflect the less visible disabilities. The paper is based on a research project initiated to investigate how more or less space influences daily pedagogical practice in general. Twelve interviews were conducted with experienced teachers from twelve different kindergartens with different amounts of space, varying from a ratio of 2.1 m2 play area per child to 5.5 m2. The results indicated that, for a group of children with special needs in particular, the amount of space is crucial. This group consisted of children who were socially very extrovert, and who maybe were noisy, easily provoked, and quick to get involved in arguments with other children. Alternatively, children in the group were very restrained and withdrawn in social interaction. Based on the answers in the interviews, we found support for answering the question in the title in the affirmative; we can build inclusion! This is because the teachers' experience indicated that, if there was sufficient space per child, there were fewer conflicts and the children managed to stay in the same activity for a much longer period. Sufficient space made it possible to divide the children into smaller groups, and use any secluded space. Therefore, it was much easier for other children to include some children with special needs. Accordingly, we can say that, sufficient space per child and an adequate layout and furnishing of the kindergarten is an advantage for all children. This is a clear example of Universal Design in which architectural

  3. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  4. Can power be shared?

    PubMed

    Ten Pas, William S

    2013-01-01

    Dental insurance began with a partnership between dental service organizations and state dental associations with a view toward expanding the number of Americans receiving oral health care and as a means for permitting firms and other organizations to offer employee benefits. The goals have been achieved, but the alliance between dentistry and insurance has become strained. A lack of dialogue has fostered mutual misconceptions, some of which are reviewed in this paper. It is possible that the public, the profession, and the dental insurance industry can all be strengthened, but only through power-sharing around the original common objective. PMID:24761578

  5. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-10

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ)[1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  6. What can ESP do ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Judy

    ESP (English for Specific Purposes) has been the focus of much attention recently but the question arises of “what can ESP do?” Proposed here are three things that are possible with ESP. The first is using ESP as a tool to help students who are not English majors learn how language “works” via the concept of genre texts. The second is using an ESP approach to simulate professional communication contexts in order to raise student interest and motivation. The third is to aim for ESP bilingualism, which is a realistic and attainable goal. All three points will be illustrated with specific examples.

  7. How Can Evolution Learn?

    PubMed

    Watson, Richard A; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2016-02-01

    The theory of evolution links random variation and selection to incremental adaptation. In a different intellectual domain, learning theory links incremental adaptation (e.g., from positive and/or negative reinforcement) to intelligent behaviour. Specifically, learning theory explains how incremental adaptation can acquire knowledge from past experience and use it to direct future behaviours toward favourable outcomes. Until recently such cognitive learning seemed irrelevant to the 'uninformed' process of evolution. In our opinion, however, new results formally linking evolutionary processes to the principles of learning might provide solutions to several evolutionary puzzles - the evolution of evolvability, the evolution of ecological organisation, and evolutionary transitions in individuality. If so, the ability for evolution to learn might explain how it produces such apparently intelligent designs. PMID:26705684

  8. Can India's ``literate'' read?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothari, Brij; Bandyopadhyay, Tathagata

    2010-12-01

    This paper takes a close look at India's literacy rate by exploring whether the officially "literate" can read and at what level. In a large sample, aged 7+, drawn from four Hindi-speaking states, two methods were used to measure literacy. One was the standard Census Method (CM) which relies on self-reporting and the other was a Reading Method (RM) which required the same individuals to actually read a simple text at grade 2 level. The findings revealed a substantial difference between the reading literacy rates obtained by CM and RM. CM over-reported RM by 16%. The overestimation was higher for males. Decoding skills were found to erode in most cases after completion of primary schooling, assuming no further education. A minimum grade 8-9 education was required for decoding skills to not deteriorate after schooling.

  9. How Can Evolution Learn?

    PubMed

    Watson, Richard A; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2016-02-01

    The theory of evolution links random variation and selection to incremental adaptation. In a different intellectual domain, learning theory links incremental adaptation (e.g., from positive and/or negative reinforcement) to intelligent behaviour. Specifically, learning theory explains how incremental adaptation can acquire knowledge from past experience and use it to direct future behaviours toward favourable outcomes. Until recently such cognitive learning seemed irrelevant to the 'uninformed' process of evolution. In our opinion, however, new results formally linking evolutionary processes to the principles of learning might provide solutions to several evolutionary puzzles - the evolution of evolvability, the evolution of ecological organisation, and evolutionary transitions in individuality. If so, the ability for evolution to learn might explain how it produces such apparently intelligent designs.

  10. Can we measure connectivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazier, Richard; Vericat, Damia; Cerda, Artemi; Brardinoni, Francesco; Batalla, Ramon; Masselink, Rens; Wittenberg, Lea; Nadal Romero, Estela; López-Tarazón, José; Estrany, Joan; Keesstra, Saskia

    2015-04-01

    Whilst the term 'connectivity' in hydrological and sediment-based research is becoming increasing well-known, it is neither used consistently in the existing literature, nor is it clear from that literature, that the connectivity of a landscape, or part of a landscape can be measured. However, it is argued that understanding how well critical source areas of water or sediment are connected to receiving surface waters, may be an essential step towards improvement of land management to mitigate flooding, soil erosion and water quality problems. The first part of this paper, therefore, explores what is currently meant by the term connectivity; addressing the differences between structural and functional, or process-based connectivity, specifically with reference to the movement of water and sediment through an ecosystem. We argue that most existing studies do not measure connectivity. Instead, they address only part of the story. Existing work may describe structural change in a landscape, which can perhaps elucidate the potential for connectivity to occur, or indeed the emergent spatial properties of an ecosystem, but it rarely quantifies the connectivity of an ecosystem in a process-based manner through time. Alternatively, a great deal of work describes fluxes of water and sediment at (sometimes multiple) points in a landscape and infers connectivity of the system via analysis of time series data; from rainfall peak to hydrograph peak or start of sediment flux until peak sediment flux within an event. Such data are doubtless useful to understand catchment function, but alone, they do not provide evidence that quantifies (for example) how well connected sediment sources are to the outlets of the catchments from which they flux. Finally, there are many examples of water and particularly sediment tracing studies, which attempt to link, either directly or indirectly water or sediment sources with their sinks (which might more usefully be termed temporary stores

  11. Can polymersomes form colloidosomes?

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kate L; Chambon, Pierre; Verber, Robert; Armes, Steven P

    2012-08-01

    Hydroxy-functionalized polymersomes (or block copolymer vesicles) were prepared via a facile one-pot RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization protocol and evaluated as Pickering emulsifiers for the stabilization of emulsions of n-dodecane emulsion droplets in water. Linear polymersomes produced polydisperse oil droplets with diameters of ~50 μm regardless of the polymersome concentration in the aqueous phase. Introducing an oil-soluble polymeric diisocyanate cross-linker into the oil phase prior to homogenization led to block copolymer microcapsules, as expected. However, TEM inspection of these microcapsules after an alcohol challenge revealed no evidence for polymersomes, suggesting these delicate nanostructures do not survive the high-shear emulsification process. Thus the emulsion droplets are stabilized by individual diblock copolymer chains, rather than polymersomes. Cross-linked polymersomes (prepared by the addition of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as a third comonomer) also formed stable n-dodecane-in-water Pickering emulsions, as judged by optical and fluorescence microscopy. However, in this case the droplet diameter varied from 50 to 250 μm depending on the aqueous polymersome concentration. Moreover, diisocyanate cross-linking at the oil/water interface led to the formation of well-defined colloidosomes, as judged by TEM studies. Thus polymersomes can indeed stabilize colloidosomes, provided that they are sufficiently cross-linked to survive emulsification.

  12. Can coffee prevent caries?

    PubMed Central

    Anila Namboodiripad, PC; Kori, Sumathi

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To determine the anti-carious effect of coffee in humans. Coffee represents one of the most consumed products by the population. Materials and Methods: A random sample of 1000 individuals, of both sexes, who consumed only coffee as a beverage and who visited the Out-Patient Department of KLE Society's Institute of Dental Sciences, with a dental complaint and no history of any major illness, were considered as subjects. The patients' histories with regard to the coffee intake, such as, period of consumption, frequency of consumption, whether taken with milk or wihout milk, with sugar or without sugar, and the brand make, was noted. History of the type of diet, consumption of sweets, periodicity of brushing, and whether they had undergone fluoride applications were also noted. A thousand patients who consumed beverages other than coffee were taken as the control. Results: The results showed that coffee most consumed was roasted coffee, and the frequency on an average was about three cups per day, for an average period of 35 years. The Decayed/Missing/Filled Surface (DMFS) scores varied from 2.9, in subjects who drank black coffee, to 5.5 in subjects who consumed coffee together with sweeteners and creaming agents. The DMFS score was 3.4 in subjects who consumed coffee together with milk but no sugar. The DMFS score of the control subjects was 4, indicating that coffee if consumed alone had anticaries action, but in the presence of additives the antibacterial and anticaries action was totally minimized. Conclusion: Thus coffee can help in prevention of dental caries if consumed without additives. PMID:20379435

  13. [Can psychiatry become neuropsychiatry?].

    PubMed

    Slosarczyk, Mariusz

    2005-01-01

    Today more and more often there are prognoses that in the future psychiatry will have been absorbed by neurology. It would be thanks to the stormy progress of research on the neurophysiological, genetic and molecular foundations of mental disorders. The aim of the article is to assess the possibility as well as the supposed consequences of such an evolution of psychiatry. The considerations concern the peculiarity of the object of interest and the methods used in psychiatry in relation to the neurological object and methodology. This way the appraisal of raison d'etre of one common science: neuropsychiatry becomes possible. The question of fundamental importance for the evaluation of similarities and differences between the psychiatric and neurological perspectives is the way the psychophysical issue and especially the problem of the mind-brain relation are approached. The article presents the manners of solving these problems proposed by the contemporary philosophy of the mind. Together with parting with the full of errors and simplifications heritage of Descartes it appears the necessity to regard the presence of subjective mental states both conscious and unconscious in model of mind-brain relation. The example of such a solution is the biological naturalism of John Searle. The psychical life of the man in its subjective dimension remains the peculiar area of interests for psychiatry irrespective of the progress in research on the biological base of mental disorders. The especially valuable cognitive and therapeutic tool in this aspect is psychotherapy constituting the integral part of psychiatry. The present state of knowledge does not indicate that the psychotherapeutic wing of psychiatry can lose its importance and rather somewhat the contrary. The progress of neurobiology does not have to threaten the autonomy of psychiatry by any means and the maintenance of this autonomy depends decisively on the psychiatrists themselves. PMID:15881619

  14. Comparison of Microtox and Xenoassay Light as a Near Real Time River Monitoring Assay for Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Halmi, M. I. E.; Jirangon, Hussain; Johari, W. L. W.; Abdul Rachman, A. R.; Shukor, M. Y.; Syed, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Luminescence-based assays for toxicants such as Microtox, ToxAlert, and Biotox have been used extensively worldwide. However, the use of these assays in near real time conditions is limited due to nonoptimal assay temperature for the tropical climate. An isolate that exhibits a high luminescence activity in a broad range of temperatures was successfully isolated from the mackerel, Rastrelliger kanagurta. This isolate was tentatively identified as Photobacterium sp. strain MIE, based on partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. Optimum conditions that support high bioluminescence activity occurred between 24 and 30°C, with pH 5.5 to 7.5, 10 to 20 g/L of sodium chloride, 30 to 50 g/L of tryptone, and 4 g/L of glycerol as the carbon source. Assessment of near real time capability of this bacterial system, Xenoassay light to monitor heavy metals from a contaminated river running through the Juru River Basin shows near real time capability with assaying time of less than 30 minutes per samples. Samples returned to the lab were tested with a standard Microtox assay using Vibrio fishceri. Similar results were obtained to Xenoassay light that show temporal variation of copper concentration. Thus, this strain is suitable for near real time river monitoring of toxicants especially in the tropics. PMID:24977231

  15. Comparison of Microtox and Xenoassay light as a near real time river monitoring assay for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Halmi, M I E; Jirangon, Hussain; Johari, W L W; Rachman, A R Abdul; Shukor, M Y; Syed, M A

    2014-01-01

    Luminescence-based assays for toxicants such as Microtox, ToxAlert, and Biotox have been used extensively worldwide. However, the use of these assays in near real time conditions is limited due to nonoptimal assay temperature for the tropical climate. An isolate that exhibits a high luminescence activity in a broad range of temperatures was successfully isolated from the mackerel, Rastrelliger kanagurta. This isolate was tentatively identified as Photobacterium sp. strain MIE, based on partial 16S rDNA molecular phylogeny. Optimum conditions that support high bioluminescence activity occurred between 24 and 30°C, with pH 5.5 to 7.5, 10 to 20 g/L of sodium chloride, 30 to 50 g/L of tryptone, and 4 g/L of glycerol as the carbon source. Assessment of near real time capability of this bacterial system, Xenoassay light to monitor heavy metals from a contaminated river running through the Juru River Basin shows near real time capability with assaying time of less than 30 minutes per samples. Samples returned to the lab were tested with a standard Microtox assay using Vibrio fishceri. Similar results were obtained to Xenoassay light that show temporal variation of copper concentration. Thus, this strain is suitable for near real time river monitoring of toxicants especially in the tropics.

  16. Fatty acid profiles of fin fish in Langkawi Island, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Osman, Farida; Jaswir, Irwandi; Khaza'ai, Huzwah; Hashim, Ridzwan

    2007-01-01

    Total lipid contents and fatty acid composition of 13 marine fish species namely, "jenahak" (Lutianus agentimaculatus), "kebasi" (Anadontostoma chacunda), "duri" (Arius cumatranus), "tenggiri batang" (Scomberomorus commersoni), "kembong" (Rastrelliger kanagurta), "kintan" or "sebalah" (Psettodes crumei), "kerisi" (Pristipomodes typus), "kerapu" (Epinephelus sexfasciatus), "gelama kling" (Sciaena dussumieri), "malong" (Congresax talabon), "laban" (Cynoglossus lingua), "yu 9" (Scolidon sorrakowah) and "bagi" (Aacnthurs nigrosis) commonly found in Pulau Tuba, one of the islands surrounding the popular tourist destination Langkawi in Malaysia were determined. All fish showed a considerable amount of unsaturated fatty acids particularly those with 4, 5 and 6 double bonds. Two physiologically important n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), i.e. eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docasahaexaenoic acid (DHA), made up of more than 50% of the total PUFAs. For saturated fatty acids, palmitic was found to be the major one in all types of fish studied. Based on DHA, EPA and arachidonic acid (AA) contents, "gelama kling" was found to be the best source (23, 11 and 7%, respectively) followed by "kerapu" (21, 10, 9%) and "sebalah" (19, 14, 4%).

  17. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminarse las marcas de acne? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  18. How Can I Manage Stress?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Quit Smoking? How Can I Manage Stress? How Can I Make My Lifestyle Healthier? How Can I Monitor My Cholesterol, Blood Pressure and Weight? Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure ...

  19. 26. CAN CONVEYOR DRIVE MECHANISM Empty can conveyor driving mechanism, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. CAN CONVEYOR DRIVE MECHANISM Empty can conveyor driving mechanism, second floor above canning area. The belt has been removed from the conveyor, but sections of can conveyor tracks are visible on the floor. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  20. Waste product profile: Steel cans

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1996-07-01

    Steel cans are made from tinplate steel, which is produced in basic oxygen furnaces. A thin layer of tin is applied to the can`s inner and outer surfaces to prevent rusting and protect food and beverage flavors. As a result, steel cans are often called tin cans. Steel mills are the largest market for steel cans. Integrated mills use the basic oxygen process to manufacture tinplate, appliances, car bodies, and steel framing. Electric arc furnaces use 100% scrap to produce steel shapes such as railroad ties and bridge spans. Electric arc furnaces are more geographically diverse and tend to have smaller capacities than basic oxygen furnaces. Detinners remove the tin from steel cans for resale to tin using industries. Continued decreases in the amount of tin used in steel cans has lessened the importance of this market. Foundries use scrap as a raw material in making castings and molds for industrial users.

  1. Facebook Bullying Can Cause Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160991.html Facebook Bullying Can Cause Depression Social media attacks have ' ... Sept. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Negative experiences on Facebook can increase the odds of depression in young ...

  2. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Pneumonia Be Prevented? Pneumonia can be very serious and ... t last as long Fewer serious complications Pneumococcal Pneumonia Vaccine A vaccine is available to prevent pneumococcal ...

  3. What Can White Faculty Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Jill

    2007-01-01

    White faculty members, even those who desire to participate in institutional change, are often unsure what role they can play in making their campuses places where American racial minority students want, and are able, to learn. Knowing what they can do may be the first step for White faculty members to begin making changes that can positively…

  4. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

    1998-05-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item.

  5. Can Arousal Modulate Response Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinbach, Noam; Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine if and how arousal can modulate response inhibition. Two competing hypotheses can be drawn from previous literature. One holds that alerting cues that elevate arousal should result in an impulsive response and therefore impair response inhibition. The other suggests that alerting enhances processing of…

  6. Can-Filled Crash Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1983-01-01

    Crash barrier composed largely of used aluminum beverage cans protects occupants of cars in collisions with poles or trees. Lightweight, can-filled barrier very effective in softening impact of an automobile in head-on and off-angle collisions. Preliminary results indicate barrier is effective in collisions up to 40 mi/h (64 km/h).

  7. Plagiarism: Can It Be Stopped?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, G. Jay

    2011-01-01

    Plagiarism can be controlled, not stopped. The more appropriate question to ask is: What can be done to encourage students to "cheat" correctly by doing the assignment the way it was intended? Cheating by college students continues to reach epidemic proportions on selected campuses, as witnessed by the recent episode at Central Florida University,…

  8. Uses for Free Film Cans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batoff, Mitchell E.; Harmen, Jerry

    1973-01-01

    Describes multiple uses of empty film cans for equipping an elementary school science classroom. Instructional units in which film cans may be useful include buoyancy, mobiles, growing seeds, peas and particles, rocks and minerals, structures, field studies, sound, balancing, electricity, pedulums, chemical change, and optics, light, color. (PS)

  9. Resource heterogeneity can facilitate cooperation.

    PubMed

    Kun, Ádám; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Although social structure is known to promote cooperation, by locally exposing selfish agents to their own deeds, studies to date assumed that all agents have access to the same level of resources. This is clearly unrealistic. Here we find that cooperation can be maintained when some agents have access to more resources than others. Cooperation can then emerge even in populations in which the temptation to defect is so strong that players would act fully selfishly if their resources were distributed uniformly. Resource heterogeneity can thus be crucial for the emergence and maintenance of cooperation. We also show that resource heterogeneity can hinder cooperation once the temptation to defect is significantly lowered. In all cases, the level of cooperation can be maximized by managing resource heterogeneity.

  10. Profiles in garbage: Steel cans

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.

    1998-02-01

    Steel mills are the largest market for steel cans. Integrated mills use the basic oxygen process to manufacture tinplate, appliances, car bodies, and steel framing. Electric arc furnaces use 100% scrap to produce steel shapes such as railroad ties and bridge spans. Electric arc furnaces are more geographically diverse and tend to have smaller capacities than basic oxygen furnaces. Detinners remove the tin from steel cans for resale to tin using industries. With less tin use in steel cans, the importance of the detinning market has declined substantially. Foundries use scrap as a raw material in making castings and molds for industrial users.

  11. The Handicapped Can Dance Too!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Marcia L.

    1978-01-01

    A program of dance therapy activities can offer handicapped individuals positive experiences in such areas as body image, spatial awareness, self-confidence, hand-eye/foot-eye coordination, visual focusing, balance and social relations. (Author/MJB)

  12. Can This Marriage Be Saved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wysong, H. Eugene

    1972-01-01

    A successful marriage between counseling and testing must be based on mutual beliefs and expectations. AMEG can provide test users and test specialists with a means for agreement on some realistic expectations for the marriage between counseling and testing. (Author)

  13. Beginning Chemistry Can Be Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, James F.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews ways of applying laboratory work in general and analytical chemistry to supermarket products. Describes ways water and air pollution analysis can illustrate acid-base reactions, redox reactions, precipitimetry, and colorimetry. (PR)

  14. Can Vulvar Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be spread during sex -- including vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, and oral sex -- but sex doesn't ... by not letting others have contact with your anal or genital area, but even then there could ...

  15. Can Vaginal Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be spread during sex – including vaginal intercourse, anal intercourse, and oral sex – but sex doesn’t ... not letting others come in contact with your anal or genital area, but even then there could ...

  16. Sleep Can Affect Male Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161569.html Sleep Can Affect Male Fertility Study found too little ... appears to be 7 to 8 hours of sleep a night, said study author Lauren Wise, a ...

  17. Equilibrium Constants You Can Smell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Michael; Buckley, Amy

    1996-01-01

    Presents a simple experiment involving the sense of smell that students can accomplish during a lecture. Illustrates the important concepts of equilibrium along with the acid/base properties of various ions. (JRH)

  18. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Can loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-01-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, inspecting the cans, loading the cans into magazines, loading magazines into Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and transporting the canisters to the DWPF. The DWPF fills the canister with a mixture of high level radioactive waste and glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment must perform PIP operations in a contained environment.

  19. Summer Science Can Strengthen Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Ava F.; Smith, Ruby

    1989-01-01

    Described are 22 activities which can be done by students outside of school. Topics include the seashore, shadows, restaurants, water, amusement parks, factories, museums, camping, weather, animals, photography, plants, food, and exercise. (CW)

  20. Can Kaposi Sarcoma Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... early? Can Kaposi sarcoma be prevented? Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is caused by the Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus ( ... to protect people against KSHV. For now, preventing KS depends on reducing the chance of becoming infected ...

  1. You can't argue with statistics - or can you?

    PubMed

    Scott, Graham

    2016-03-01

    The results of two major surveys were released last week and laid bare the extent to which nurses are overstretched and undervalued. Both the annual NHS staff survey and an investigation by the BBC provided further proof that there are not enough staff around to ensure that nurses can deliver safe and effective care. PMID:26932605

  2. Can nanotechnology potentiate photodynamic therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Dai, Tianhong; Chung, Hoon; Yaroslavsky, Anastasia; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Chiang, Long Y.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic dyes and harmless visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that can kill cancer cells and infectious microorganisms. Due to the tendency of most photosensitizers (PS) to be poorly soluble and to form nonphotoactive aggregates, drug-delivery vehicles have become of high importance. The nanotechnology revolution has provided many examples of nanoscale drug-delivery platforms that have been applied to PDT. These include liposomes, lipoplexes, nanoemulsions, micelles, polymer nanoparticles (degradable and nondegradable), and silica nanoparticles. In some cases (fullerenes and quantum dots), the actual nanoparticle itself is the PS. Targeting ligands such as antibodies and peptides can be used to increase specificity. Gold and silver nanoparticles can provide plasmonic enhancement of PDT. Two-photon excitation or optical upconversion can be used instead of one-photon excitation to increase tissue penetration at longer wavelengths. Finally, after sections on in vivo studies and nanotoxicology, we attempt to answer the title question, “can nano-technology potentiate PDT?” PMID:26361572

  3. Selenium Digestibility and Bioactivity in Dogs: What the Can Can, the Kibble Can't.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, Mariëlle; Hesta, Myriam; Gray, Kerry; Beech, Karen; Cools, An; Alexander, Lucille G; Du Laing, Gijs; Janssens, Geert P J

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing concern for the long-term health effects of selenium (Se) over- or underfeeding. The efficiency of utilization of dietary Se is subject to many factors. Our study in dogs evaluated the effect of diet type (canned versus kibble) and dietary protein concentration on Se digestibility and bioactivity. Canned and kibble diets are commonly used formats of dog food, widely ranging in protein concentration. Twenty-four Labrador retrievers were used and four canned and four kibble diets were selected with crude protein concentrations ranging from 10.1 to 27.5 g/MJ. Crude protein concentration had no influence on the digestibility of Se in either canned or kibble diets, but a lower Se digestibility was observed in canned compared to kibble diets. However, the biological activity of Se, as measured by whole blood glutathione peroxidase, was higher in dogs fed the canned diets than in dogs fed the kibble diets and decreased with increasing crude protein intake. These results indicate that selenium recommendations in dog foods need to take diet type into account. PMID:27043433

  4. Cryopumping field joint can testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Wesley; Fesmire, James; Meneghelli, Barry

    2012-06-01

    For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

  5. Beyond the Canned Food Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Brandi

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how some educators are turning to service-learning projects for charitable activities--and helping to foster connections between students and the human beings they aim to serve. The author highlights a program called Kids Can Make a Difference, also known simply as KIDS, as an example of how to turn food…

  6. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Michael D.; Klapperick, Robert L.; Bell, Chris

    1993-01-01

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The ice punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container.

  7. Cryopumping Field Joint Can Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Meneghelli, Barry E.

    2011-01-01

    For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

  8. How PTAs Can Celebrate Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jor'dan, Jamilah R.

    1990-01-01

    Parent Teacher Associations can promote acceptance and appreciation of cultural differences by commemorating ethnic observances. Background information and suggested activities are presented for Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday; Chinese New Year and Tet; Black History Month; Pan American Day; Cinco de Mayo; Asian-Pacific American Heritage Week;…

  9. Science Can Be Wheel Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how teachers can use wheels of tricycles, bicycles, and trains to stimulate children with mathematics, relative position, and engineering concepts. Techniques are offered for measuring circumference of a bicycle wheel, gear ratios, and pedal wheel circumferences. Comparative data are given for various sized wheels. (Author/SA)

  10. Can Thyroid Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... look for the gene mutations found in familial medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Because of this, most of the familial cases of MTC can be prevented or treated early by removing the thyroid gland. Once the disease is discovered in a family, the rest of ...

  11. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... doesn't matter whether you consider your skin light, dark, or somewhere in between. You are at risk for skin cancer. Being in the sun can damage your skin. Sunlight causes damage through ultraviolet, or UV rays, (they make up just one part of ...

  12. Color Wheels Can Be Creative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    1999-01-01

    Explains that creating color wheels is an appropriate assignment in the art classroom for students of all ages, including high school students, because it still offers older students a challenge. Discusses how students can create color wheels and lists the materials that are needed. (CMK)

  13. Major Depression Can Be Prevented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Ricardo F.; Beardslee, William R.; Leykin, Yan

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 Institute of Medicine report on prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders (National Research Council & Institute of Medicine, 2009b) presented evidence that major depression can be prevented. In this article, we highlight the implications of the report for public policy and research. Randomized controlled trials have shown…

  14. Scholarship can help ideas flourish.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-03-01

    Scholarships from the Florence Nightingale Foundation are providing nurses with the financial means to put innovative ideas into practice. Nurses from all four countries of the UK can apply for leadership, travel and research scholarships to support their career development and help improve patient care. PMID:26959448

  15. Can Creativity Predict Cognitive Reserve?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive reserve relies on the ability to effectively cope with aging and brain damage by using alternate processes to approach tasks when standard approaches are no longer available. In this study, the issue if creativity can predict cognitive reserve has been explored. Forty participants (mean age: 61 years) filled out: the Cognitive Reserve…

  16. Here's How You Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This "Afterschool Action Kit" contains tips on what the community can do to support afterschool programs. The kit is a useful tool for parents, community members or practitioners, and gives advice on finding or starting a quality program, identifying program needs and what resources to tap for help. The kit notes that Americans agree that…

  17. Enhancing What Students Can Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poel, Elissa Wolfe

    2007-01-01

    The Human Function Model, as described in the University of Kentucky Assistive Technology Project, places assistive technology in its proper perspective, as an external support that can enhance an individual's ability to function within the environment. The National Assistive Technology Research Institute groups assistive technology and related…

  18. What Can Teacher Education Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleeter, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Teachers bring to their work assumptions that shape how they think about globalization. To prepare children to analyze globalization perceptively, teachers must stretch their assumptions and knowledge; teacher education can help. First, if teacher candidates have not already had substantive interaction with people whose backgrounds and…

  19. Can Children Read Evolutionary Trees?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainsworth, Shaaron; Saffer, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Representations of the "tree of life" such as cladograms show the history of lineages and their relationships. They are increasingly found in formal and informal learning settings. Unfortunately, there is evidence that these representations can be challenging to interpret correctly. This study explored the question of whether children aged 7-11…

  20. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, M.D.; Klapperick, R.L.; Bell, C.

    1993-12-21

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The device punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container. 7 figures.

  1. How Can I Stop Cutting?

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can try: draw or scribble designs on paper using a red pen or paint on white paper — if it helps, make the paint drip write ... hurt, anger, or pain using a pen and paper draw the pain compose songs or poetry to ...

  2. Libraries Can Learn from Banks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Gail H.

    1983-01-01

    The experiences of banks introducing computerized services to the public are described to provide some idea of what libraries can expect when they introduce online systems. Volume of use of Automated Teller Machines, types of users, introduction of machines, and user acceptance are highlighted. Thirty-two references are cited. (EJS)

  3. Can Tag Help Schools Teach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Elementary schools are faced with a challenge: boosting student learning in an era when students face far more than schoolwork-related difficulties. Too often today, kids enter the classroom contending with issues ranging from bullying and emotional trauma to family instability and economic hardship--which can lead to behavioral problems that…

  4. Can Children Really Create Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereiter, Carl; Scardamalia, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Can children genuinely create new knowledge, as opposed to merely carrying out activities that resemble those of mature scientists and innovators? The answer is yes, provided the comparison is not to works of genius but to standards that prevail in ordinary research communities. One important product of knowledge creation is concepts and tools…

  5. Can Teachers Really Be Leaders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Ann

    2011-01-01

    This is a wonderfully provocative question that might be answered simply: Yes, teachers can be leaders! Much more complicated and interesting, though, are the specifics of how teachers become leaders and the different ways teachers lead. Before considering how teachers become leaders, there is a need to understand the context within which teachers…

  6. Infants Can Study Air Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan

    1983-01-01

    Provided are activities and demonstrations which can be used to teach infants about the nature of air, uses of air, and objects that fly in the air. The latter include airships, hot-air balloons, kites, parachutes, airplanes, and Hovercraft. (JN)

  7. Can I see some ID?

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Lauren; Holtzapfel, Brenda

    2005-08-01

    Patient registration and insurance verification are the first key processes in a practice's revenue cycle, and can significantly affect its entire performance. Therefore, it's usually worthwhile to dedicate time and resources to improve the registration and verification processes. A variety of options exist to evaluate and fix problems.

  8. Together We Can Do It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, David R.

    Cooperation between state associations and state educational agencies depends on information transfer, individual and group process, and cooperative planning activities. Cooperative planning between the two groups can be accomplished through: (1) access to information relevant to the development of sound media programs, (2) the generation of…

  9. "It Can Change Your Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosley, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Everyone knows that lack of internet access can reinforce the social and economic disadvantages already facing some older people. Recognising the divisive nature of digital exclusion, the government has invested 2.8 million British Pounds in Get Digital, a project that will enable sheltered housing residents to develop computer and internet…

  10. Can Teacher Evaluation Improve Teaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The answer to the question, Can evaluation improve teaching? is a qualified yes. Teacher evaluation has changed and the role of the principal has changed as well; the focus now is on evidence, not merely good judgment. With the right tools, systems, and support, it should be possible to help improve teaching performance and student learning…

  11. Can environmental perceptions tell us what models can't?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakimdavar, Raha

    2014-05-01

    Many developing regions lack the sufficient long term, reliable data required to create and calibrate hydrologic models. Short term data collection regimes and satellites can be used to obtain some or all of the parameters required for modeling, however, these data are often limited in their spatial and temporal coverage. In recent decades there has been a movement to integrate local knowledge into such studies, but there are questions as to how representative this social information can be. This study aims to explore this question through a case study of floods in southwest Haiti. By creating a spatial flood extent map for the region using remote sensing and matching it to environmental risk perceptions survey information, we aim to better understand whether social science field methods could be successfully integrated into engineering based studies of flooding. The number of floods and their durations are calculated from satellite observations of surface reflectance taken from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments operated by NASA. Supplementary flood information regarding the number of people killed, the number of people displaced, and the total economic damage done by flooding is obtained from the Dartmouth Flood Observatory. The survey information is based on a 2012 household survey by Columbia University's Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN). The results from this research are expected to lead to more comprehensive studies in Haiti and in other similar regions regarding environmental data collection using local knowledge. More specifically, we hope that the findings can help to assess whether historical flood information could be collected using social science field methods and used to supplement gaps in physical data in the region.

  12. Can we hear ventricle dyssynchrony? Yes, we can.

    PubMed

    Jurak, P; Halamek, J; Plesinger, F; Reichlova, T; Vondra, V; Viscor, I; Leinveber, P

    2015-08-01

    This study introduces a method for detection of ventricular depolarization activity and the transfer of this activity into an audible stereo audio signal. Heart potentials are measured by an ultra-high-frequency high-dynamic-range electrocardiograph (UHF-ECG) with a 25-kHz sampling rate. Averaged and prolonged UHF amplitude envelopes of V1-3 and V4-6 leads at a frequency range of 500-1000 Hz are used as a modulating function for two carrier audio frequencies. The right speaker makes it possible to listen to the depolarization of the septum and right ventricle (V1-3) and the left speaker the left ventricle lateral wall (V4-6). In the healthy heart, both speakers can be heard simultaneously. A delayed L or R speaker represents the dyssynchronous electrical activation of the ventricles. Examples of the normal heart, right bundle branch block and left bundle branch block can be heard at www.medisig.com/uhfecg. PMID:26737788

  13. Can coffee improve image guidance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirz, Raul; Lathrop, Ray A.; Godage, Isuru S.; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica; Russell, Paul T.; Webster, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    Anecdotally, surgeons sometimes observe large errors when using image guidance in endonasal surgery. We hypothesize that one contributing factor is the possibility that operating room personnel might accidentally bump the optically tracked rigid body attached to the patient after registration has been performed. In this paper we explore the registration error at the skull base that can be induced by simulated bumping of the rigid body, and find that large errors can occur when simulated bumps are applied to the rigid body. To address this, we propose a new fixation method for the rigid body based on granular jamming (i.e. using particles like ground coffee). Our results show that our granular jamming fixation prototype reduces registration error by 28%-68% (depending on bump direction) in comparison to a standard Brainlab reference headband.

  14. How far can Tarzan jump?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    The tree-based rope swing is a popular recreational facility, often installed in outdoor areas. Hanging from a rope, users drop from a high platform and then swing at great speed like ‘Tarzan’, finally jumping ahead to land on the ground. The question naturally arises, how far can Tarzan jump using the swing? In this paper, I present an introductory analysis of the mechanics of the Tarzan swing, a large pendulum-like swing with Tarzan himself attached as weight. This enables determination of how much further forward Tarzan can jump using a given swing apparatus. The discussion is based on elementary mechanics and is, therefore, expected to provide rich opportunities for investigations using analytic and numerical methods.

  15. Can research influence clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan Pablo

    2007-06-01

    After briefly reviewing the unfavourable reception accorded empirical research by parts of the psychoanalytic community, as well as some of the benefits to clinical practice of analysts being involved in research activities, the author examines whether the findings of process and outcome research in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis can help identify the most appropriate forms of intervention for producing therapeutic change, given the specific condition of the patient and the relationship that the individual establishes with the analyst. He argues that research findings can influence clinical practice on various levels and in different areas, and goes on to examine a number of related issues: the specificity of therapeutic interventions versus the relevance of common curative factors; the dyadic conception of technique and ways of understanding the therapeutic action of the treatment alliance; and the strategic or heuristic conception in psychoanalytic therapy. Finally, the author presents clinical material with the aim of illustrating how the knowledge acquired through research can be applied to psychoanalytic treatment. PMID:17537698

  16. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    SciTech Connect

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    A mixer pump used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump.

  17. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.; Nyilas, Charles P.; Denmeade, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  18. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.

    1997-10-07

    A mixer pump is described used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump. 10 figs.

  19. HERMES travels by CAN bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Lewis G.; Shortridge, Keith; Farrell, Tony J.; Vuong, Minh; Muller, Rolf; Sheinis, Andrew I.

    2014-07-01

    The new HERMES spectrograph represents the first foray by AAO into the use of commercial off-the-shelf industrial field bus technology for instrument control, and we regard the final system, with its relatively simple wiring requirements, as a great success. However, both software and hardware teams had to work together to solve a number of problems integrating the chosen CANopen/CAN bus system into our normal observing systems. A Linux system running in an industrial PC chassis ran the HERMES control software, using a PCI CAN bus interface connected to a number of distributed CANopen/CAN bus I/O devices and servo amplifiers. In the main, the servo amplifiers performed impressively, although some experimentation with homing algorithms was required, and we hit a significant hurdle when we discovered that we needed to disable some of the encoders used during observations; we learned a lot about how servo amplifiers respond when their encoders are turned off, and about how encoders react to losing power. The software was based around a commercial CANopen library from Copley Controls. Early worries about how this heavily multithreaded library would work with our standard data acquisition system led to the development of a very low-level CANopen software simulator to verify the design. This also enabled the software group to develop and test almost all the control software well in advance of the construction of the hardware. In the end, the instrument went from initial installation at the telescope to successful commissioning remarkably smoothly.

  20. Can Ice Prevent Frost Growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Saurabh; Hansen, Ryan; Murphy, Kevin R.; Retterer, Scott; Collier, Patrick; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team; CenterNanophase Materials Sciences Team

    2015-11-01

    So-called icephobic surfaces that exhibit special wettability characteristics can delay the onset of ice nucleation in supercooled water. However, to date no icephobic surface has been able to passively prevent frost growth once ice nucleates. Here, we demonstrate that the growth rate of frost can be tuned and even halted with a chemically patterned surface that controls the spatial distribution of supercooled condensation. The success and speed of inter-droplet frost growth is found to depend upon two primary factors: the extent of spacing between hydrophilic regions where liquid nucleation occurs and the time allowed for condensation growth prior to the initial freezing event. Instead of delaying the onset of freezing, we initiate freezing as early as possible. This creates a ``dry zone'' where no frost and condensation can occur. The underlying mechanism behind the ``dry zone'' involves the saturation vapor pressure over ice that is lower than that over water at the same temperature, causing ice to behave like a passive humidity sink. Thus, quite remarkably it appears that ice itself may be the solution to the frosting problem.

  1. Diversity and Community Can Coexist.

    PubMed

    Stivala, Alex; Robins, Garry; Kashima, Yoshihisa; Kirley, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We examine the (in)compatibility of diversity and sense of community by means of agent-based models based on the well-known Schelling model of residential segregation and Axelrod model of cultural dissemination. We find that diversity and highly clustered social networks, on the assumptions of social tie formation based on spatial proximity and homophily, are incompatible when agent features are immutable, and this holds even for multiple independent features. We include both mutable and immutable features into a model that integrates Schelling and Axelrod models, and we find that even for multiple independent features, diversity and highly clustered social networks can be incompatible on the assumptions of social tie formation based on spatial proximity and homophily. However, this incompatibility breaks down when cultural diversity can be sufficiently large, at which point diversity and clustering need not be negatively correlated. This implies that segregation based on immutable characteristics such as race can possibly be overcome by sufficient similarity on mutable characteristics based on culture, which are subject to a process of social influence, provided a sufficiently large "scope of cultural possibilities" exists. PMID:27217326

  2. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-08-19

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

  3. Child poverty can be reduced.

    PubMed

    Plotnick, R D

    1997-01-01

    Child poverty can be reduced by policies that help families earn more and supplement earned income with other sources of cash. A comprehensive antipoverty strategy could use a combination of these approaches. This article reviews recent U.S. experience with these broad approaches to reducing child poverty and discusses lessons from abroad for U.S. policymakers. The evidence reviewed suggests that, although policies to increase earned incomes among low-wage workers can help, these earnings gains will not be sufficient to reduce child poverty substantially. Government income support programs, tax policy, and child support payments from absent parents can be used to supplement earned incomes of poor families with children. Until recently, Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) was the main government assistance program for low-income families with children. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) has recently replaced AFDC. This article explains why TANF benefits are likely to be less than AFDC benefits. The article also examines the effects of Social Security and Supplemental Security Income on child poverty. The most encouraging recent development in antipoverty policy has been the decline in the federal tax burden on poor families, primarily as a result of the expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), now the largest cash assistance program for families with children. In 1995, government transfer programs (including the value of cash, food, housing, medical care, and taxes) decreased child poverty by 38% (from 24.2% to 14.2% of children under 18). Child poverty may also be reduced by policies that increase contributions from absent single parents to support their children. Overall, evidence from the United States and other developed countries suggests that a variety of approaches to reducing child poverty are feasible. Implementation of effective programs will depend, however, on the nation's political willingness to devote more resources to

  4. Can one trust quantum simulators?

    PubMed

    Hauke, Philipp; Cucchietti, Fernando M; Tagliacozzo, Luca; Deutsch, Ivan; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2012-08-01

    Various fundamental phenomena of strongly correlated quantum systems such as high-T(c) superconductivity, the fractional quantum-Hall effect and quark confinement are still awaiting a universally accepted explanation. The main obstacle is the computational complexity of solving even the most simplified theoretical models which are designed to capture the relevant quantum correlations of the many-body system of interest. In his seminal 1982 paper (Feynman 1982 Int. J. Theor. Phys. 21 467), Richard Feynman suggested that such models might be solved by 'simulation' with a new type of computer whose constituent parts are effectively governed by a desired quantum many-body dynamics. Measurements on this engineered machine, now known as a 'quantum simulator,' would reveal some unknown or difficult to compute properties of a model of interest. We argue that a useful quantum simulator must satisfy four conditions: relevance, controllability, reliability and efficiency. We review the current state of the art of digital and analog quantum simulators. Whereas so far the majority of the focus, both theoretically and experimentally, has been on controllability of relevant models, we emphasize here the need for a careful analysis of reliability and efficiency in the presence of imperfections. We discuss how disorder and noise can impact these conditions, and illustrate our concerns with novel numerical simulations of a paradigmatic example: a disordered quantum spin chain governed by the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. We find that disorder can decrease the reliability of an analog quantum simulator of this model, although large errors in local observables are introduced only for strong levels of disorder. We conclude that the answer to the question 'Can we trust quantum simulators?' is … to some extent.

  5. Can water float on oil?

    PubMed

    Phan, Chi M; Allen, Benjamin; Peters, Luke B; Le, Thu N; Tade, Moses O

    2012-03-13

    The floatability of water on oil surface was studied. A numerical model was developed from the Young-Laplace equation on three interfaces (water/oil, water/air, and oil/air) to predict the theoretical equilibration conditions. The model was verified successfully with an oil/water system. The stability of the floating droplet depends on the combination of three interface tensions, oil density, and water droplet volume. For practical purposes, however, the equilibrium contact angle has to be greater than 5° so the water droplet can effectively float. This result has significant applications for biodegrading oil wastes. PMID:22352678

  6. Can GM sorghum impact Africa?

    PubMed

    Botha, Gerda M; Viljoen, Christopher D

    2008-02-01

    It is said that genetic modification (GM) of grain sorghum has the potential to alleviate hunger in Africa. To this end, millions of dollars have been committed to developing GM sorghum. Current developments in the genetic engineering of sorghum are similar to efforts to improve cassava and other traditional African crops, as well as rice in Asia. On closer analysis, GM sorghum is faced with the same limitations as 'Golden Rice' (GM rice) in the context of combating vitamin A deficiency (VAD) efficiently and sustainably. Thus, it is questionable whether the cost of developing GM sorghum can be justified when compared to the cost of investing in sustainable agricultural practice in Africa.

  7. Dark antiatoms can explain DAMA

    SciTech Connect

    Wallemacq, Quentin; Cudell, Jean-René E-mail: jr.cudell@ulg.ac.be

    2015-02-01

    We show that the existence of a sub-dominant form of dark matter, made of dark ''antiatoms'' of mass m∼ 1 TeV and size a-dot {sub 0}∼ 3 fm, can explain the results of direct detection experiments, with a positive signal in DAMA/NaI and DAMA/LIBRA and no signal in other experiments. The signal comes from the binding of the dark antiatoms to thallium, a dopant in DAMA, and is not present for the constituent atoms of other experiments. The dark antiatoms are made of two particles oppositely charged under a dark U(1) symmetry and can bind to terrestrial atoms because of a kinetic mixing between the photon and the massless dark photon, such that the dark particles acquire an electric millicharge ∼ ± 5.10{sup −4}e. This millicharge enables them to bind to high-Z atoms via radiative capture, after they thermalize in terrestrial matter through elastic collisions.

  8. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    PubMed Central

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Troiani, Francesca; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet, one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other than the standard Euclidean plane. PMID:25948611

  9. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  10. Can site response be predicted?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    Large modifications of seismic waves are produced by variations of material properties near the Earth's surface and by both surface and buried topography. These modifications, usually referred to as "site response", in general lead to larger motions on soil sites than on rock-like sites. Because the soil amplifications can be as large as a factor of ten, they are important in engineering applications that require the quantitative specification of ground motions. This has been recognised for years by both seismologists and engineers, and it is hard to open an earthquake journal these days without finding an article on site response. What is often missing in these studies, however, are discussions of the uncertainty of the predicted response. A number of purely observational studies demonstrate that ground motions have large site-to-site variability for a single earthquake and large earthquake-location- dependent variability for a single site. This variability makes site-specific, earthquake-specific predictions of site response quite uncertain, even if detailed geotechnical and geological information is available near the site. Predictions of site response for average classes of sites exposed to the motions from many earthquakes can be made with much greater certainty if sufficient empirical observations are available.

  11. Can Faces Prime a Language?

    PubMed

    Woumans, Evy; Martin, Clara D; Vanden Bulcke, Charlotte; Van Assche, Eva; Costa, Albert; Hartsuiker, Robert J; Duyck, Wouter

    2015-09-01

    Bilinguals have two languages that are activated in parallel. During speech production, one of these languages must be selected on the basis of some cue. The present study investigated whether the face of an interlocutor can serve as such a cue. Spanish-Catalan and Dutch-French bilinguals were first familiarized with certain faces, each of which was associated with only one language, during simulated Skype conversations. Afterward, these participants performed a language production task in which they generated words associated with the words produced by familiar and unfamiliar faces displayed on-screen. When responding to familiar faces, participants produced words faster if the faces were speaking the same language as in the previous Skype simulation than if the same faces were speaking a different language. Furthermore, this language priming effect disappeared when it became clear that the interlocutors were actually bilingual. These findings suggest that faces can prime a language, but their cuing effect disappears when it turns out that they are unreliable as language cues. PMID:26209531

  12. Can measles be eradicated globally?

    PubMed Central

    de Quadros, Ciro A.

    2004-01-01

    Measles is one of the most infectious diseases. Before measles vaccine was introduced, nearly everyone contracted the disease at some point in childhood. By the late 1980s, most countries had incorporated measles vaccine into their routine immunization programmes. Globally, about 800 000 children nevertheless still die from measles annually, half of them in Africa. Eradicating measles would therefore play an important role in improving children's survival. The 24th Pan American Sanitary Conference in 1994 established a goal of eradicating measles from the Americas. Progress to date has been remarkable and the disease is no longer endemic in the Americas, with most countries having documented interruption of transmission. As of November 2003, 12 months had elapsed since the last indigenous case was detected in Venezuela. This experience shows that measles transmission can be interrupted, and that this can be sustained over a long period of time. Global eradication is feasible if an appropriate strategy is implemented. Even under a new paradigm in which immunization is not discontinued after measles is eradicated, eradication will be a good investment to avoid expensive epidemics and save the lives of almost one million children annually. A world free of measles by 2015 is not a dream. PMID:15042236

  13. How physical activity can work?

    PubMed

    Fogelholm, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    This review examines how physical activity can work for health during childhood and adolescence. Special emphasis is put on weight control and prevention of obesity-related morbidity. Both low sedentary and high exercise activities contribute to increased energy expenditure, improved weight control and prevention of obesity. Exercise, if intensity is at least moderate, has also a positive effect on fat distribution by decreasing the proportion of abdominal or visceral fat. The prevalence of clustered (multiple) cardiovascular risk factors is lower in children and adolescents, who are physically active or fit. However, the risks of obesity are greater than those from being sedentary, i.e., high physical activity reduces, but does not totally offset risks related to obesity. Good health in youth is easily lost by an unhealthy lifestyle in adulthood. An additional benefit of childhood physical activity is that it increases the likelihood of physical activity later in adulthood. PMID:18278627

  14. Can we prevent road rage?

    PubMed

    Asbridge, Mark; Smart, Reginald G; Mann, Robert E

    2006-04-01

    Road rage has become a serious concern in many countries, and preventive efforts are required. This article reviews what can be done to prevent road rage by exploring potential prevention avenues in five areas. First, legal changes aimed at increasing the penalties for road rage behavior could be instituted, drawing on models from aggressive-driving or impaired-driving laws. A second approach would involve the adoption of court programs for convicted road ragers. Third, car redesign offers a means of reducing crime through environmental design. Fourth, mass media education could be implemented to inform drivers of the risk from road rage and how to avoid situations that facilitate road rage. Finally, prevention efforts could be directed to long-term societal changes that emphasize structural modifications, such as reducing congestion on the roads, reduced driver stress, or promoting public transportation. The strengths and weaknesses of these strategies are discussed.

  15. Can bacterial interference prevent infection?

    PubMed

    Reid, G; Howard, J; Gan, B S

    2001-09-01

    The concept that one bacterial species can interfere with the ability of another to colonize and infect the host has at its foundation the prerequisite that bacteria must attach to biological surfaces to cause infection. Although this is an over-simplification of pathogenesis, it has led to studies aimed at creating vaccines that block adhesion events. Arguably, the use of commensal bacteria (also referred to as "normal flora", "indigenous" or "autochthonous" microorganisms) to inhibit pathogens has even greater potential than vaccine use, because these bacteria are natural competitors of pathogens and their action does not require host immune stimulation. Exogenous application of commensal organisms (probiotics) has been shown to reduce the risk of infections in the gut, urogenital tract and wound sites. To manipulate and optimize these effects, further studies are required to understand cell signaling amongst commensals and pathogens within biofilms adherent to host tissues. The potential for new therapeutic regimens using probiotics is significant and worthy of further study.

  16. Can Reaction Mechanisms Be Proven?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskirk, Allen; Baradaran, Hediyeh

    2009-05-01

    "Can Reaction Mechanisms Be Proven?" generated spirited responses from its reviewers. The reviews were approximately evenly divided, and all were of very high quality. The authors agreed with the editor’s proposal that the reviewers convert their reviews into rebuttals or affirmations of the authors’ position for publication along with the article, which has been revised based on the reviews. Most agreed to such a process and their comments appear here. We hope that publication of this paper and well-reasoned rebuttals such as those provided here will initiate a wide-ranging discussion. JCE will provide an online forum for further discussion of the issue. Our hope is that both faculty and students will contribute their opinions and ideas to this discussion. See Reviewer Comments: Brown Lewis Yoon Wade

  17. Volcanoes can muddle the greenhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    As scientists and politicians anxiously eye signs of global greenhouse warming, climatologists are finding the best evidence yet that a massive volcanic eruption can temporarily bring the temperature down a notch or two. Such a cooling could be enough to set the current global warming back more than a decade, confusing any efforts to link it to the greenhouse effect. By effectively eliminating some nonvolcanic climate changes from the record of the past 100 years, researchers have detected drops in global temperature of several tenths of a degree within 1 to 2 years of volcanic eruptions. Apparently, the debris spewed into the stratosphere blocked sunlight and caused the temperature drops. For all their potential social significance, the climate effects of volcanoes have been hard to detect. The problem has been in identifying a volcanic cooling among the nearly continuous climate warmings and coolings of a similar size that fill the record. The paper reviews how this was done.

  18. Can corals be harvested sustainably?

    PubMed

    Harriott, Vicki J

    2003-03-01

    The international trade in corals has been identified as a potential cause of localized depletion of coral populations in the major coral-exporting countries. The international coral trade is regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) agreement, which requires that export of corals is not detrimental to the species. The primary coral importing regions (USA and Europe) have threatened to limit or ban coral imports unless sustainable practices can be demonstrated. The spatial and temporal scale at which sustainability is defined is important in evaluating sustainability, e.g. at geological, regional or local scales. Other major issues are: the ecology of the target species; management options including provision of no-take areas; and the potential for coral culture. Implementation of practices that enhance ecological sustainability in the coral harvest fishery is possible, but may be difficult in some developing countries because of limited natural-resource management capacity.

  19. How Hot Can Venus Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Mark A.; Grinspoon, David H.

    2001-11-01

    The powerful greenhouse effect on Venus exists because pressure-broadened CO2 absorption bands, interlaced with water absorption features, effectively block most of the upwelling thermal radiation coming from the surface. The sulfuric acid clouds and small amounts of SO2, OCS, CO, HCl and HF are responsible for some absorption of radiation at wavelengths greater than 2 μ m. In particular, these constituents of Venus' atmosphere absorb thermal radiation in a crucial part of the spectrum -- the 2.1 to 2.6 μ m range where the CO2-H2O thermal absorption conspiracy is weak. Much of the radiation on the short-wavelength side of Venus' surface blackbody curve (which has a peak at 4 μ m), leaves the planet through this window. Variations in the abundance of the trace atmospheric species have a large effect on the efficacy of this window, both directly through their infrared absorption, and indirectly through their effect on clouds. Increased atmospheric absorption, say through an increase in atmospheric water abundance, can heat the surface. However, as the surface of Venus heats up, the peak of its Planck function moves towards the 2.1 to 2.6 μ m window, allowing more direct thermal radiation loss to space. This high temperature shift of radiative loss into the window will act as a thermostat. For moderate perturbations in atmospheric trace species therefore, such as those expected from volcanism or large impacts, there is a limit to how hot the surface of Venus can get. Using a one-dimensional, non-gray coupled cloud/radiative transfer model, we will show what the theoretical limits on the surface temperature of Venus are. We will discuss the fairly broad constraints on these conclusions, and make some general predictions for terrestrial planets with CO2-H2O atmospheres in other solar systems. These results may be relevant for models of tectonic and convective history of Venus and other planets.

  20. High Integrity Can Design Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shaber, E.L.

    1998-08-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is chartered with facilitating the disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel to allow disposal at a geologic repository. This is done through coordination with the repository program and by assisting DOE Site owners of SNF with needed information, standardized requirements, packaging approaches, etc. The High Integrity Can (HIC) will be manufactured to provide a substitute or barrier enhancement for normal fuel geometry and cladding. The can would be nested inside the DOE standardized canister which is designed to interface with the repository waste package. The HIC approach may provide the following benefits over typical canning approaches for DOE SNF. (a) It allows ready calculation and management of criticality issues for miscellaneous. (b) It segments and further isolates damaged or otherwise problem materials from normal SNF in the repository package. (c) It provides a very long term corrosion barrier. (d) It provides an extra internal pressure barrier for particulates, gaseous fission products, hydrogen, and water vapor. (e) It delays any potential release of fission products to the repository environment. (f) It maintains an additional level of fuel geometry control during design basis accidents, rock-fall, and seismic events. (g) When seal welded, it could provide the additional containment required for shipments involving plutonium content in excess of 20 Ci. (10 CFR 71.63.b) if integrated with an appropriate cask design. Long term corrosion protection is central to the HIC concept. The material selected for the HIC (Hastelloy C-22) has undergone extensive testing for repository service. The most severe theoretical interactions between iron, repository water containing chlorides and other repository construction materials have been tested. These expected chemical species have not been shown capable of corroding the selected HIC material. Therefore, the HIC should provide a significant barrier to DOE SNF dispersal

  1. Can Global Warming be Stopped?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luria, M.

    2013-12-01

    Earlier this year, the CO2 levels exceeded the 400 ppm level and there is no sign that the 1-2 ppm annual increase is going to slow down. Concerns regarding the danger of global warming have been reported in numerous occasions for more than a generation, ever since CO2 levels reached the 350 ppm range in the mid 1980's. Nevertheless, all efforts to slow down the increase have showed little if any effect. Mobile sources, including surface and marine transportation and aviation, consist of 20% of the global CO2 emission. The only realistic way to reduce the mobile sources' CO2 signature is by improved fuel efficiency. However, any progress in this direction is more than compensated by continuous increased demand. Stationary sources, mostly electric power generation, are responsible for the bulk of the global CO2 emission. The measurements have shown, that the effect of an increase in renewable sources, like solar wind and geothermal, combined with conversion from coal to natural gas where possible, conservation and efficiency improvement, did not compensate the increased demand mostly in developing countries. Increased usage of nuclear energy can provide some relief in carbon emission but has the potential of even greater environmental hazard. A major decrease in carbon emission can be obtained by either significant reduction in the cost of non-carbon based energy sources or by of carbon sequestration. The most economical way to make a significant decrease in carbon emission is to apply carbon sequestration technology at large point sources that use coal. Worldwide there are about 10,000 major sources that burn >7 billion metric tons of coal which generate the equivalent of 30 trillion kwh. There is a limited experience in CO2 sequestration of such huge quantities of CO2, however, it is estimated that the cost would be US$ 0.01-0.1 per kwh. The cost of eliminating this quantity can be estimated at an average of 1.5 trillion dollars annually. The major emitters, US

  2. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Supernovae enormous explosions associated with the end of a stars life come in a variety of types with different origins. A new study has examined how the brightest supernovae in the Universe are produced, and what limits might be set on their brightness.Ultra-Luminous ObservationsRecent observations have revealed many ultra-luminous supernovae, which haveenergies that challenge our abilities to explain them usingcurrent supernova models. An especially extreme example is the 2015 discovery of the supernova ASASSN-15lh, which shone with a peak luminosity of ~2*1045 erg/s, nearly a trillion times brighter than the Sun. ASASSN-15lh radiated a whopping ~2*1052 erg in the first four months after its detection.How could a supernova that bright be produced? To explore the answer to that question, Tuguldur Sukhbold and Stan Woosley at University of California, Santa Cruz, have examined the different sources that could produce supernovae and calculated upper limits on the potential luminosities ofeach of these supernova varieties.Explosive ModelsSukhbold and Woosley explore multiple different models for core-collapse supernova explosions, including:Prompt explosionA stars core collapses and immediately explodes.Pair instabilityElectron/positron pair production at a massive stars center leads to core collapse. For high masses, radioactivity can contribute to delayed energy output.Colliding shellsPreviously expelled shells of material around a star collide after the initial explosion, providing additional energy release.MagnetarThe collapsing star forms a magnetar a rapidly rotating neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field at its core, which then dumps energy into the supernova ejecta, further brightening the explosion.They then apply these models to different types of stars.Setting the LimitThe authors show that the light curve of ASASSN-15lh (plotted in orange) can be described by a model (black curve) in which a magnetar with an initial spin period of 0.7 ms

  3. Can cirrus clouds produce glories?

    PubMed

    Sassen, K; Arnott, W P; Barnett, J M; Aulenbach, S

    1998-03-20

    A vague glory display was photographed over central Utah from an airplane beginning its descent through a cirrus cloud layer with an estimated cloud top temperature of -45 and -55 degrees C. Photographic analysis reveals a single reddish-brown ring of 2.5-3.0 degrees radius around the antisolar point, although a second ring appeared visually to have been present over the brief observation period. Mie and approximate nonspherical theory scattering simulations predict a population of particles with modal diameters between 9 and 15 mum. Although it is concluded that multiple-ringed glories can be accounted for only through the backscattering of light from particles that are strictly spherical in shape, the poor glory colorization in this case could imply the presence of slightly aspherical ice particles. The location of this display over mountainous terrain suggests that it was generated by an orographic wave cloud, which we speculate produced numerous frozen cloud droplets that only gradually took on crystalline characteristics during growth.

  4. Can One Hear Whistler Waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheverry, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this article is to propose a mathematical framework giving access to a better understanding of whistler-mode chorus emissions in space plasmas. There is a general agreement that the emissions of whistler waves involve a mechanism of wave-particle interaction that can be described in the framework of the relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations. In dimensionless variables, these equations involve a penalized skew-symmetric term where the inhomogeneity of the strong exterior magnetic field plays an essential part. The description of the related phenomena is achieved in two stages. The first is based on a new approach allowing one to extend in longer times the classical insights on fast rotating fluids [Chemin et al. (Mathematical geophysics, volume 32 of Oxford Lecture Series in Mathematics and its Applications. The Clarendon Press Oxford UniversityPress, Oxford, 2006), Cheverry et al. (Duke Math J 161(5):845-892, 2012), Frénod and Sonnendrücker (Math Models Methods Appl Sci 10(4):539-553, 2000), Gallagher and Saint-Raymond (SIAM J Math Anal 36(4):1159-1176, 2005)]; it justifies the existence and the validity of long time gyro-kinetic equations; it furnishes criterions to impose on a magnetic field in order to obtain the long time dynamical confinement of plasmas. The second stage is based on a study of oscillatory integrals implying special phases; it deals with the problem of the creation of light inside plasmas.

  5. Can markets alter gender relations?

    PubMed

    Banerjee, N

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines how and to what extent gender relations can become more favorable to women of countries undergoing economic development with a globalized perspective. The study also briefly reviews past debates on the interactions between market forces and women's subordination and links them with the current dynamics as revealed by a comparative analysis of the country studies. This paper has three parts: 1) revisits the earlier theoretical discussions in order to contextualize the questions that are raised; 2) highlights some features of women's experiences of economic development in these countries; and 3) is a quantitative measure of the present position of gender relations in each of these countries against the background of their experience of economic development. To assume that women are the most flexible section of the labor force also shows a lack of understanding of the various forces that affect gender countries. In Asian countries, capital has seldom challenged the existing patriarchal traditions, instead it has harnessed them to its own benefit. However, gender relations have changed to an extent in the households, through state intervention and through women's own changing perceptions. Finally, the author has constructed an index of patriarchy which shows that while development does improve women's gender position, it is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for that.

  6. Radon levels can be predicted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainger, Lisa A.

    Scientists doing a yearlong study of radon levels in houses have identified several major factors that affect concentrations and have developed a method for predicting indoor radon levels before a house is built. Douglas Mose and George Mushrush (George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.) studied 1500 homes in northern Virginia and central Maryland near Washington, D.C.Radon is a radioactive decay product of uranium that occurs in many rock types. The gas can accumulate in buildings and pose a serious health hazard. Results from the Washington-area study show that ˜35% of the houses had average yearly radon concentrations above 4 pico-Curies per liter (pCi/L), the level at which the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) suggests that a homeowner should take steps to reduce radon concentrations. At a level of 4-10 pCi/L an estimated 13-120 lung cancer deaths would be expected for every 1000 people exposed. Such a risk is comparable to having 200 chest X rays per year, according to EPA statistics.

  7. Can lies be detected unconsciously?

    PubMed Central

    Moi, Wen Ying; Shanks, David R.

    2015-01-01

    People are typically poor at telling apart truthful and deceptive statements. Based on the Unconscious Thought Theory, it has been suggested that poor lie detection arises from the intrinsic limitations of conscious thinking and can be improved by facilitating the contribution of unconscious thought (UT). In support of this hypothesis, Reinhard et al. (2013) observed improved lie detection among participants engaging in UT. The present study aimed to replicate this UT advantage using a similar experimental procedure but with an important improvement in a key control condition. Specifically, participants judged the truthfulness of eight video recordings in three thinking modes: immediately after watching them or after a period of unconscious or conscious deliberation. Results from two experiments (combined N = 226) failed to reveal a significant difference in lie detection accuracy between the thinking modes, even after efforts were made to facilitate the occurrence of an UT advantage in Experiment 2. The results imply that the UT advantage in deception detection is not a robust phenomenon. PMID:26379575

  8. Can you feminise a crustacean?

    PubMed

    Ford, Alex T

    2008-07-30

    The ability of anthropogenic chemicals to cause reproductive disorders has been the focus of toxicologists for many years. Whilst the focus of endocrine disrupting chemicals has mainly been associated with vertebrate groups, there have been continued calls for more research on the invertebrates. Surprisingly, within the Crustacea, many studies have focussed on female or growth/moulting related endpoints despite many of the vertebrate studies highlighting male related effects such as abnormal male reproductive development. Furthermore, a large number of the invertebrate studies have focussed on vertebrate estrogens or their mimics. Considering the biology of the crustacean endocrine systems, this paper shall argue that unlike the vertebrates, it is a lot more difficult to feminise a crustacean than it is to de-masculinise one. Consequently, crustacean toxicologists, by following the tact of vertebrate biologists, may have been trying to address the right questions, but in the wrong way. Studies have shown that intersexuality in crustaceans may arise through the masculinisation of heterogametic (WZ) females or the de-masculinisation of males through aberrations in male androgenic gland activity. It is recommended that the focus be put on understanding the mechanisms of sex determination in Crustacea, and the expression of male secondary sexual characteristics at the molecular, biochemical and physiological level are fully explored so that appropriate assessments can be made as to whether sexual endocrine disruption is occurring in this ecologically important group.

  9. Can SOHO SWAN detect CMEs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.Cyr, O. C.; Malayeri, M. L.; Yashiro, S.; Quernerais, E.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Howard, Russ

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility that the Solar Wind Anisotropies (SWAN) remote sensing instrument on SOHO may be able to detect coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in neutral Hydrogen Lyman-? emission. We have identified CMEs near the Sun in observations by the SOHO LASCO white-light coronagraphs and in extreme ultraviolet emissions using SOHO E n . There are very few methods of tracking CMEs after they leave the coronagraph's field-of-view, so this is an important topic to study. The primary science goal of the SWAN investigation is the measurement of large-scale structures in the solar wind, and these are obtained by detecting intensity fluctuations in Lyman-?. SWAN consists of a pair of Sensors on opposite panels of SOHO. The instantaneous field-of-view of each sensor unit is a So x So square, divided into lo pixels. A gimbaled periscope system allows each sensor to map the intensity distribution of Lyman-?, and the entire sky can be scanned in less than one day. This is the typical mode of operation for this instrument.

  10. New microbe can make ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    Researchers have created a bacterium that converts all of the sugars from inedible vegetable waste and other woody material into ethanol by inserting the genes of the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis into Escherichia coli. The resulting bacterium converts 90% -95% of the main forms of sugar in biomass into 4% - 6% concentrations of ethanol. The goal is to reach a 7% to 8% concentration. Current ethanol production from corn in a yeast-fermentation process yields a 10% - 12% ethanol concentration, but the conversion rate is less efficient than with the new bacterium. Zymomonas, found in cactus plants and used by the Aztecs to make alcohol, was selected for its known conversion efficiency. Providing the engineering challenges can be overcome, there could be several pilot plants running in 3-5 years. Even though it is not currently profitable to make ethanol from vegetable waste, if the fact that this new process reduces the total material by 90% were taken into account, perhaps a landfill reduction credit based on current tipping fees would make the actual costs both more realistic and more attractive.

  11. Can human populations be stabilized?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Stephen G.

    2015-02-01

    Historical examples of demographic change, in China, Italy, Nigeria, Utah, Easter Island, and elsewhere, together with simple mathematics and biological principles, show that stabilizing world population before it is limited by food supply will be more difficult than is generally appreciated. United Nations population projections are wrong because they assume, in spite of the absence of necessary feedbacks, that all nations will converge rapidly to replacement-level fertility and thereafter remain at that level. Education of women and provision of contraceptives have caused dramatic reductions in fertility, but many groups, including some that are well-educated, maintain high fertility. Small groups with persistent high fertility can grow to supplant low-fertility groups, resulting in continued growth of the total population. The global average fertility rate could rise even if each country's fertility rate is falling. In some low-fertility European countries where deaths exceed births, the population continues to grow because of immigration. Producing more than two offspring is normal for all animal species with stable populations because their populations are limited by resources or predation rather than birth control. It may therefore be appropriate to view the growth of human population as the result not of excess fertility but rather of excess food.

  12. Can Science Test Supernatural Worldviews?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Yonatan I.

    2009-06-01

    Several prominent scientists, philosophers, and scientific institutions have argued that science cannot test supernatural worldviews on the grounds that (1) science presupposes a naturalistic worldview (Naturalism) or that (2) claims involving supernatural phenomena are inherently beyond the scope of scientific investigation. The present paper argues that these assumptions are questionable and that indeed science can test supernatural claims. While scientific evidence may ultimately support a naturalistic worldview, science does not presuppose Naturalism as an a priori commitment, and supernatural claims are amenable to scientific evaluation. This conclusion challenges the rationale behind a recent judicial ruling in the United States concerning the teaching of “Intelligent Design” in public schools as an alternative to evolution and the official statements of two major scientific institutions that exert a substantial influence on science educational policies in the United States. Given that science does have implications concerning the probable truth of supernatural worldviews, claims should not be excluded a priori from science education simply because they might be characterized as supernatural, paranormal, or religious. Rather, claims should be excluded from science education when the evidence does not support them, regardless of whether they are designated as ‘natural’ or ‘supernatural’.

  13. Places Only Sails Can Go

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E., IV; Heaton, Andrew F.; Garbe, Gregory P.

    2003-01-01

    Solar sails are a near term, low thrust, propellantless propulsion technology suitable for orbital maneuvering, station keeping, and attitude control applications for small payloads. Furthermore, these functions can be highly integrated, reducing mass, cost and complexity. The solar sail concept is based on momentum exchange with solar flux reflected from a large, deployed thin membrane. Thrust performance increases as the square of the distance to the sun. In comparison to conventional chemical systems, there are missions where solar sails are vastly more and less economical. The less attractive applications involve large payloads, outer solar system transfers, and short trip times. However, for inclination changes and station keeping at locations requiring constant thrust, the solar sail is the only economical option for missions of more than a few weeks duration. We compare the location and energies required for these applications between solar sails, advanced electric propulsion, and conventional rockets. We address the effect on mass fraction to understand solar sail mission cost and capability. Finally, the benefit of potential applications to near term science missions is reported.

  14. How can tropical cyclones survive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi

    2013-04-01

    How can tropical cyclones survive? It is important for understanding the development of tropical cyclones to be able to quantify the exchange of enthalpy and momentum between air and water. Air-sea fluxes are often formulated as drag CD and enthalpy CK exchange coefficients. Emanuel, 1986, derived an expression for potential intensity that depends on local environment parameters and is proportional to the ratio of enthalpy and drag coefficients. This ratio should be larger than 0.75 for a cyclone to develop. There are no direct surface measurements of CK/ CD under hurricane conditions and extrapolation from most open-ocean measurements at 25 m/s gives values of CK/ CD< 0.75 and in that case no cyclone could survive and Emanuel's theory must be wrong. However there are measurements of CK taken over the Baltic Sea and Lake Ontario showing increasing values of CK up to 2.5 for wind speeds around 12 m/s. If this can be implemented for hurricane conditions the ratio CK/ CD>0.75 is in accordance with Emanuel's prediction. The high CK values are observed during situations when there is a regime shift of the structure of turbulence in the boundary layer. From spectral analysis it was found that as the boundary layer approaches neutral stratification, smaller-scale eddies become increasingly important in the turbulent transport of humidity and sensible heat and thus enhance the exchange coefficient CK. This turbulence regime is called the UVCN regime and require high wind speed, small temperature difference between air and water, sufficiently strong wind gradients and growing sea condition ( Smedman et al., 2007, Sahlee et al., 2008). What is the difference between world oceans and enclosed seas? The answer is the waves. The wave field over the open oceans is swell dominated but in enclosed seas and coastal areas swell is restricted mainly to low wind speed conditions, and swell is short lived because of short distances to the shores. When swell is present the MABL will be

  15. Can we improve patient safety?

    PubMed

    Corbally, Martin Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Despite greater awareness of patient safety issues especially in the operating room and the widespread implementation of surgical time out World Health Organization (WHO), errors, especially wrong site surgery, continue. Most such errors are due to lapses in communication where decision makers fail to consult or confirm operative findings but worryingly where parental concerns over the planned procedure are ignored or not followed through. The WHO Surgical Pause/Time Out aims to capture these errors and prevent them, but the combination of human error and complex hospital environments can overwhelm even robust safety structures and simple common sense. Parents are the ultimate repository of information on their child's condition and planned surgery but are traditionally excluded from the process of Surgical Pause and Time Out, perhaps to avoid additional stress. In addition, surgeons, like pilots, are subject to the phenomenon of "plan-continue-fail" with potentially disastrous outcomes. If we wish to improve patient safety during surgery and avoid wrong site errors then we must include parents in the Surgical Pause/Time Out. A recent pilot study has shown that neither staff nor parents found it added to their stress, but, moreover, 100% of parents considered that it should be a mandatory component of the Surgical Pause nor does it add to the stress of surgery. Surgeons should be required to confirm that the planned procedure is in keeping with the operative findings especially in extirpative surgery and this "step back" should be incorporated into the standard Surgical Pause. It is clear that we must improve patient safety further and these simple measures should add to that potential. PMID:25279366

  16. Population growth can be checked.

    PubMed

    Shukla, J P

    Since independence, India's population size has doubled. The rate of growth was 2.5% during 1971-81, an increase from the rate of 2.15% observed during the 1951-61 period. The increase indicated that efforts to decrease population growth have not succeeded. The implications with respect to food, housing, clothing, education, and health facilities, which are fundamental to improving the physical quality of life, are severe. This demographic trend is a serious impediment to progress. The population growth is due to a constant birthrate and a sharp decline in mortality. Reducing the birthrate is necessary to reduce the rate of growth. An attitudinal change adopting the norm of family limitation should be encouraged through propaganda, socioeconomic programs, and religious and cultural organizations. Other measures to bring about a decline in the birthrate include: increasing the marriage age, and expanding educational and employment opportunities for women and girls. These measures will require substantial effort and time. Incentives may show more immediate effects. Monetary incentives are not desired because of the possibility of misuse. However the government could assume responsibility for the education and guarantee employment of children of couples who have only one child, and provide free education to children of couples with only 2 children. These incentives are not likely to be misused, can be available to all segments of the population, and involve no immediate large financial burden on the government. In addition, scholarships to the Harijan students should be limited to 2 per family. If these measures are accepted, they could quickly reduce the birth rate. PMID:12311944

  17. Can Violence cause Eating Disorders?

    PubMed

    Juli, Maria Rosaria

    2015-09-01

    The origin and course of eating disorders and nutrition have a multifactorial etiology and should therefore take into consideration: psychological factors, evolutionary, biological and socio-cultural (Juli 2012). Among the psychological factors we will focus on violence (in any form) and in particular on the consequences that they have on women, which vary in severity. Recent studies show that women get sick more than men, both from depression and eating disorders, with a ratio of 2:1; this difference begins in adolescence and continues throughout the course of life (Niolu 2010). The cause of this difference remains unclear. Many studies agree that during adolescence girls have negative feelings more frequently and for a longer duration caused by stressful life events and difficult circumstances, such as abuse or violence. This results in an increased likelihood of developing a symptom that will be connected to eating disorders and/or depression. As far as the role of food is concerned in eating disorders, it has a symbolic significance and offers emotional comfort. Eating means to incorporate and assimilate, and even in an ideal sense, the characteristics of the foods become part of the individual. Feelings that lead to binges with food are normally a result of feelings related to abuse or violence and lead to abnormal behavior which leads to binging and the final result being that the person is left feeling guilty and ashamed. Research confirms that 30% of patients who have been diagnosed with eating disorders, especially bulimia, have a history of sexual abuse during childhood. Ignoring the significance of this factor can result in the unleashing of this disease as the patient uses the disorder as his expressive theater (Mencarelli 2008). Factors that contribute to the possibility of developing an eating disorder are both the age of the patient at the time of the abuse and the duration of the abuse. The psychological effects that follow may include dissociative

  18. Evaluating mercury biomagnification in fish from a tropical marine environment using stable isotopes (delta13C and delta15N).

    PubMed

    Al-Reasi, Hassan A; Ababneh, Fuad A; Lean, David R

    2007-08-01

    Concentrations of total mercury (T-Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) were measured in zooplankton and 13 fish species from a coastal food web of the Gulf of Oman, an arm of the Arabian Sea between Oman and Iran. Stable isotope ratios (delta13C and delta15N) also were determined to track mercury biomagnification. The average concentration of T-Hg in zooplankton was 21 +/- 8.0 ng g(-1) with MeHg accounting 10% of T-Hg. Total mercury levels in fish species ranged from 3.0 ng g(-1) (Sardinella longiceps) to 760 ng g(-1) (Rhizoprionodon acutus) with relatively lower fraction of MeHg (72%) than that found in other studies. The average trophic difference (Deltadelta13C) between zooplankton and planktivorous fish (Selar crumenopthalmus, Rastrelliger kanagurta, and S. longiceps) was higher (3.4 per thousandth) than expected, suggesting that zooplankton may not be the main diet or direct carbon source for these fish species. However, further sampling would be required to compensate for temporal changes in zooplankton and the influence of their lipid content. Trophic position inferred by delta15N and and slopes of the regression equations (log10[T-Hg] = 0.13[delta15N] - 3.57 and log10[MeHg] = 0.14[delta15N] - 3.90) as estimates of biomagnification indicate that biomagnification of T-Hg and MeHg was lower in this tropical ocean compared to what has been observed in arctic and temperate ecosystems and tropical African lakes. The calculated daily intake of methylmercury in the diet of local people through fish consumption was well below the established World Health Organization (WHO) tolerable daily intake threshold for most of the fish species except Euthynnus affinis, Epinephelus epistictus, R. acutus, and Thunnus tonggol, illustrating safe consumption of the commonly consumed fish species.

  19. Occurrence and Molecular Identification of Anisakis Dujardin, 1845 from Marine Fish in Southern Makassar Strait, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Sriwulan; Freeman, Mark A.; Ogawa, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Anisakis spp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) parasitize a wide range of marine animals, mammals serving as the definitive host and different fish species as intermediate or paratenic hosts. In this study, 18 fish species were investigated for Anisakis infection. Katsuwonus pelamis, Euthynnus affinis, Caranx sp., and Auxis thazard were infected with high prevalence of Anisakis type I, while Cephalopholis cyanostigma and Rastrelliger kanagurta revealed low prevalence. The mean intensity of Anisakis larvae in K. pelamis and A. thazard was 49.7 and 5.6, respectively. A total of 73 Anisakis type I larvae collected from K. pelamis and A. thazard were all identified as Anisakis typica by PCR-RFLP analysis. Five specimens of Anisakis from K. pelamis and 15 specimens from A. thazard were sequenced using ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and 6 specimens from A. thazard and 4 specimens from K. pelamis were sequenced in mtDNA cox2 region. Alignments of the samples in the ITS region showed 2 patterns of nucleotides. The first pattern (genotype) of Anisakis from A. thazard had 100% similarity with adult A. typica from dolphins from USA, whereas the second genotype from A. thazard and K. pelamis had 4 base pairs different in ITS1 region with adult A. typica from USA. In the mtDNA cox2 regions, Anisakis type I specimens from A. thazard and K. pelamis showed similarity range from 94% to 99% with A. typica AB517571/DQ116427. The difference of 4 bp nucleotides in ITS1 regions and divergence into 2 subgroups in mtDNA cox2 indicating the existence of A. typica sibling species in the Makassar Strait. PMID:24623876

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Bagless Transfer Can Size Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.; Stokes, M.; Rogers, L.; Ward, C.

    1998-02-01

    This report identifies and documents the most appropriate bagless transfer can size to support Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading operations. Also, this report considers can diameter, can wall thickness, and can length.

  1. Halting Hypothermia: Cold Can Be Dangerous

    MedlinePlus

    ... who spends much time outdoors in very cold weather can get hypothermia. But hypothermia can happen anywhere— ... just outside and not just in bitter winter weather. It can strike when temperatures are cool—for ...

  2. Foods - fresh vs. frozen or canned

    MedlinePlus

    Frozen foods vs. fresh or canned; Fresh foods vs. frozen or canned; Frozen vegetables versus fresh ... a well-balanced diet. Many people wonder if frozen and canned vegetables are as healthy for you ...

  3. The Physics of the Imploding Can Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz

    2010-01-01

    One of the popular demonstrations of atmospheric pressure in introductory physics courses is the "crushing can" or "imploding can" experiment. In this demonstration, which has also been extensively discussed on the Internet, a small amount of water is placed in a soda can and heated until it boils and water vapor almost entirely fills the can. The…

  4. 21 CFR 145.180 - Canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned pineapple. 145.180 Section 145.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.180 Canned pineapple....

  5. 21 CFR 145.180 - Canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned pineapple. 145.180 Section 145.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.180 Canned pineapple....

  6. 21 CFR 145.180 - Canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned pineapple. 145.180 Section 145.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.180 Canned pineapple....

  7. 21 CFR 145.180 - Canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned pineapple. 145.180 Section 145.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.180 Canned pineapple....

  8. 21 CFR 145.180 - Canned pineapple.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned pineapple. 145.180 Section 145.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CANNED FRUITS Requirements for Specific Standardized Canned Fruits § 145.180 Canned pineapple....

  9. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Preliminary Specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1998-11-25

    This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading preliminary equipment specifications and includes a process block diagram, process description, equipment list, preliminary equipment specifications, plan and elevation sketches, and some commercial catalogs. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.

  10. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-05-13

    'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

  11. How Can Overweight and Obesity Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Overweight and Obesity Be Prevented? Following a healthy lifestyle can help ... Human Services. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Obesity happens one pound at a time. So does ...

  12. Can I prevent Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pelvic Organ Prolapse POP Symptoms & Types Can I Prevent POP? POP Diagnosis POP Treatments 3 Resources + More Bladder Control UI Symptoms & Types Can I Prevent UI? UI Diagnosis UI Treatments 3 Resources + More ...

  13. How Can You Prevent Rabies in Animals?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Compartir How can you prevent rabies in animals? There are several things you can do to ... properly cared for or vaccinated regularly. Finally, call animal control to remove all stray animals from your ...

  14. Beverage Cans Used for Sediment Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studlick, Joseph R. J.; Trautman, Timothy A.

    1979-01-01

    Beverage cans are well suited for sediment collection and storage containers. Advantages include being free, readily available, and the correct size for many samples. Instruction for selection, preparation, and use of cans in sediment collection and storage is provided. (RE)

  15. Online health information - what can you trust?

    MedlinePlus

    ... health, you may look it up on the Internet. You can find accurate health information on many sites. But, you are also likely to run across a lot of questionable, even false content. How can you tell the difference? To ...

  16. How Stereochemistry Considerations can Improve Pesticide Safety

    EPA Science Inventory

    About 30% of pesticides are chiral molecules and therefore exist as two or more stereoisomers, which can differ significantly in their toxicity, biodegradation, and persistence. Such differences can impact their relative safety to humans and environmental species. Enantiomers, mi...

  17. Can Suicide Be a Good Death?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    2006-01-01

    The issue of whether suicide can be a good death was separated into two different questions: (1) can suicide be an appropriate death, and (2) can suicide be a rational death? Several definitions of an "appropriate" death were proposed, and suicide was seen as potentially appropriate. Similarly, several criteria for rationality were proposed and…

  18. Spirulina: The Alga That Can End Malnutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Ripley D.

    1985-01-01

    One approach to eliminating malnutrition worldwide is to grow spirulina in recycled village wastes. Spirulina is a blue-green alga and a natural concentrated food. Spirulina can give poor villages a nutritional food supplement they can grow themselves and can reduce infectious disease at the same time. (Author/RM)

  19. Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? KidsHealth > For Kids > Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Print A A A Text ... up? Oh! You want to know if loud music can hurt your ears . Are you asking because ...

  20. How Can I Live with Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... me? Should I stay in bed? ©2015, American Heart Association Multi-language Fact Sheet Topics Heart-related Conditions What is Angina? What is an ... a Coronary Angiogram? How Can I Recover From Heart Surgery? What is Carotid ... Do I Understand "Nutrition Facts" Labels? How Can I Quit Smoking? How Can ...

  1. CanTrilBat_ThermalBattery

    2013-09-24

    CanTrilBat applications solves transient problems involving batteries. It is a 1-D application that represents 3-D physical systems that can be reduced using the porous flow approximation for the anode, cathode, and separator. CanTrilBat_ThermalBattery adds constitutive models on top of the CanTrilBat framework. CanTrilBat_ThermalBattery contains constitutive models for the electrode behavior when more than one electrode heterogeneous surface is reacting. This is a novel capability within the battery community. These models are named as the “Electrode_MultiPlateau”more » model.« less

  2. Natural selection can favour 'irrational' behaviour.

    PubMed

    McNamara, J M; Trimmer, P C; Houston, A I

    2014-01-01

    Understanding decisions is the fundamental aim of the behavioural sciences. The theory of rational choice is based on axiomatic principles such as transitivity and independence of irrelevant alternatives (IIA). Empirical studies have demonstrated that the behaviour of humans and other animals often seems irrational; there can be a lack of transitivity in choice and seemingly irrelevant alternatives can alter decisions. These violations of transitivity and IIA undermine rational choice theory. However, we show that an individual that is maximizing its rate of food gain can exhibit failure of transitivity and IIA. We show that such violations can be caused because a current option may disappear in the near future or a better option may reappear soon. Current food options can be indicative of food availability in the near future, and this key feature can result in apparently irrational behaviour.

  3. Teaching Geology with Bottles and Cans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yochelson, Ellis L.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses ways in which student exercises with disposable beverage containers can illustrate, by analogy, such things as rock surveys, animal territoriality, energy conservation, and mechanical weathering. (MLH)

  4. What can Robots Do? Towards Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nogueira, Monica

    1997-01-01

    Robots have become more and more sophisticated. Every robot has its limits. If we face a task that existing robots cannot solve, then, before we start improving these robots, it is important to check whether it is, in principle, possible to design a robot for this task or not. For that, it is necessary to describe what exactly the robots can, in principle, do. A similar problem - to describe what exactly computers can do - has been solved as early as 1936, by Turing. In this paper, we describe a framework within which we can, hopefully, formalize and answer the question of what exactly robots can do.

  5. Can Musical Transformations Be Implicitly Learned?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dienes, Zoltan; Longuet-Higgins, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The dominant theory of what people can learn implicitly is that they learn chunks of adjacent elements in sequences. A type of musical grammar that goes beyond specifying allowable chunks is provided by serialist or 12-tone music. The rules constitute operations over variables and could not be appreciated as such by a system that can only chunk…

  6. How mindfulness can benefit nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Brass, Elaine

    Mindfulness is becoming more widely recognised and increasing thought is devoted to how it, along with compassion, can benefit health professionals. This article explores the concepts of mindfulness and compassion and the positive effect they may have on staff and patients. It outlines how nurses can practise these activities, and presents a case study highlighting the benefits that have been reported.

  7. Educational Neuroscience: What Can We Learn?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in interest, research, and publications exploring ways in which educational practices might be influenced by neuroscience. The idea that a greater understanding of how the brain works can improve teaching and learning is very seductive, but what can teachers and other professionals working in education learn from…

  8. Becoming Heroes: Teachers Can Help Abused Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Teachers can provide an effective counterbalance to the effects of an abusive home. They should not allow their skeptical attitudes, fear of liability, defensiveness about discipline, or religious and political affiliations to cloud their perceptions. Teachers can help hurting children by attending to their basic needs for warmth and security,…

  9. Kids Do Well If They Can

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Ross

    2008-01-01

    Viewing challenging behavior as the result of lagging skills (kids do well if they can) rather than as poor motivation (kids do well if they want to) has significant ramifications for how adults interact with kids with behavioral challenges and try to help them. A wide range of lagging skills can set the stage for challenging behavior. Challenging…

  10. Can physicians help curb adolescent violence?

    PubMed

    Prothrow-Stith, D

    1992-06-15

    Some of the factors associated with such violence, notably racism and poverty, clearly demand societal solutions. Other factors, however, may respond to public health intervention strategies. Emergency room workers can practice secondary intervention, as they do with victims of child abuse, sexual assault, or attempted suicide. Family physicians can refer adolescents for appropriate help.

  11. Commentary: Can This Evaluation Be Saved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsberg, Pauline E.

    2004-01-01

    Can this evaluation be saved? More precisely, can this evaluation be saved in such a way that both evaluator and client feel satisfied that their points of view were respected and both agree that the evaluation itself provides valid information obtained in a principled manner? Because the scenario describes a preliminary discussion and no contract…

  12. Computers Can Be a Real Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Computers Can Be a Real Pain KidsHealth > For Kids > Computers Can Be a Real Pain Print A A ... kids, you probably spend time sitting at the computer, doing schoolwork or playing games. But whether you' ...

  13. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Equipment Review

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.; Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.

    1998-05-01

    This report lists the operations required to complete the Can Loading steps on the Pu Immobilization Plant Flow Sheets and evaluates the equipment options to complete each operation. This report recommends the most appropriate equipment to support Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading operations.

  14. Can Inferentialism Contribute to Social Epistemology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derry, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that Robert Brandom's work can be used to develop ideas in the area of social epistemology. It suggests that this work, precisely because it was influenced by Hegel, can make a significant contribution with philosophical anthropology at its centre. The argument is developed using illustrations from education: the first, from…

  15. Can the Weather Affect My Child's Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... who participate in winter sports are especially susceptible. Dry, windy weather can stir up pollen and mold in the ... in the dryer (hanging clothes or sheets to dry can allow mold or pollen to ... action plan should list weather triggers and ways to manage them, including any ...

  16. What Can Readers Read after Graded Readers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Nation (2014) concluded that most of the vocabulary one needs to read challenging texts in English can be acquired incidentally through voluminous reading. This study examines possible texts that second language (L2) readers can use to move from controlled-vocabulary materials such as graded readers, which go up through approximately the…

  17. Creative Energy Management Can Save Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Patricia

    1984-01-01

    Schools can launch energy conservation programs with simple money-saving measures like improving boiler maintenance, recalibrating utility meters, and obtaining preferred utility rates. Becoming more assertive in the marketplace and using "creative financing" when needed, they can then reinvest their savings in more extensive projects. (MCG)

  18. Can False Memories Prime Problem Solutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Garner, Sarah R.; Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Ball, Linden J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that false memories can prime performance on related implicit and explicit memory tasks. The present research examined whether false memories can also be used to prime higher order cognitive processes, namely, insight-based problem solving. Participants were asked to solve a number of compound remote associate task…

  19. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  20. Technology: Learning Can Be Fun and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del

    2015-01-01

    Video games can provide cognitive, motivational, emotional, and social benefits to students when properly implemented in the classroom. Teachers who are well versed in their curriculum can use games to differentiate instruction for gifted and talented students. This article discusses the benefits of gaming in education settings and provides…

  1. 21 CFR 161.145 - Canned oysters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned oysters. 161.145 Section 161.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... oysters. (a) Identity. (1) Canned oysters is the food prepared from one or any mixture of two or all...

  2. 21 CFR 145.120 - Canned berries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned berries. 145.120 Section 145.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Identity—(1) Ingredients. Canned berries is the food prepared from any suitable variety of one of...

  3. 21 CFR 161.145 - Canned oysters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned oysters. 161.145 Section 161.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... oysters. (a) Identity. (1) Canned oysters is the food prepared from one or any mixture of two or all...

  4. 21 CFR 145.145 - Canned grapefruit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned grapefruit. 145.145 Section 145.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... grapefruit. (a) Identity—(1) Product identification. Canned grapefruit is the food prepared from one of...

  5. 21 CFR 155.190 - Canned tomatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned tomatoes. 155.190 Section 155.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... tomatoes. (a) Identity—(1) Description. (i) Canned tomatoes is the food prepared from mature...

  6. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  7. 21 CFR 155.201 - Canned mushrooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned mushrooms. 155.201 Section 155.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... mushrooms. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned mushrooms is the food properly prepared from the caps...

  8. 21 CFR 145.145 - Canned grapefruit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned grapefruit. 145.145 Section 145.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... grapefruit. (a) Identity—(1) Product identification. Canned grapefruit is the food prepared from one of...

  9. 21 CFR 145.120 - Canned berries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned berries. 145.120 Section 145.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Identity—(1) Ingredients. Canned berries is the food prepared from any suitable variety of one of...

  10. 21 CFR 161.145 - Canned oysters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned oysters. 161.145 Section 161.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... oysters. (a) Identity. (1) Canned oysters is the food prepared from one or any mixture of two or all...

  11. 21 CFR 145.120 - Canned berries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned berries. 145.120 Section 145.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Identity—(1) Ingredients. Canned berries is the food prepared from any suitable variety of one of...

  12. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  13. 21 CFR 155.190 - Canned tomatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned tomatoes. 155.190 Section 155.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... tomatoes. (a) Identity—(1) Description. (i) Canned tomatoes is the food prepared from mature...

  14. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  15. 21 CFR 145.145 - Canned grapefruit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned grapefruit. 145.145 Section 145.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... grapefruit. (a) Identity—(1) Product identification. Canned grapefruit is the food prepared from one of...

  16. 21 CFR 155.190 - Canned tomatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned tomatoes. 155.190 Section 155.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... tomatoes. (a) Identity—(1) Description. (i) Canned tomatoes is the food prepared from mature...

  17. 21 CFR 155.201 - Canned mushrooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned mushrooms. 155.201 Section 155.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... mushrooms. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned mushrooms is the food properly prepared from the caps...

  18. 21 CFR 145.145 - Canned grapefruit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned grapefruit. 145.145 Section 145.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... grapefruit. (a) Identity—(1) Product identification. Canned grapefruit is the food prepared from one of...

  19. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  20. 21 CFR 145.120 - Canned berries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned berries. 145.120 Section 145.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Identity—(1) Ingredients. Canned berries is the food prepared from any suitable variety of one of...

  1. 21 CFR 161.145 - Canned oysters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned oysters. 161.145 Section 161.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... oysters. (a) Identity. (1) Canned oysters is the food prepared from one or any mixture of two or all...

  2. 21 CFR 155.190 - Canned tomatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned tomatoes. 155.190 Section 155.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... tomatoes. (a) Identity—(1) Description. (i) Canned tomatoes is the food prepared from mature...

  3. 21 CFR 145.145 - Canned grapefruit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned grapefruit. 145.145 Section 145.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... grapefruit. (a) Identity—(1) Product identification. Canned grapefruit is the food prepared from one of...

  4. 21 CFR 155.201 - Canned mushrooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned mushrooms. 155.201 Section 155.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... mushrooms. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned mushrooms is the food properly prepared from the caps...

  5. 21 CFR 155.170 - Canned peas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned peas. 155.170 Section 155.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN.... (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned peas is the food prepared from fresh or frozen succulent seeds...

  6. 21 CFR 145.120 - Canned berries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned berries. 145.120 Section 145.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...) Identity—(1) Ingredients. Canned berries is the food prepared from any suitable variety of one of...

  7. 21 CFR 155.190 - Canned tomatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned tomatoes. 155.190 Section 155.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... tomatoes. (a) Identity—(1) Description. (i) Canned tomatoes is the food prepared from mature...

  8. 21 CFR 161.145 - Canned oysters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned oysters. 161.145 Section 161.145 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... oysters. (a) Identity. (1) Canned oysters is the food prepared from one or any mixture of two or all...

  9. 21 CFR 155.201 - Canned mushrooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned mushrooms. 155.201 Section 155.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... mushrooms. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned mushrooms is the food properly prepared from the caps...

  10. 21 CFR 155.201 - Canned mushrooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned mushrooms. 155.201 Section 155.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... mushrooms. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned mushrooms is the food properly prepared from the caps...

  11. Giving Kids a Can Do Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Nadine

    2011-01-01

    The question going into this action research was, "How can a language teacher encourage more positive attitudes toward language learning while building a learning community?" After incorporating "I Can" statements into the curriculum, more than 100 third grade students were surveyed. The survey asked what they thought they could do in Spanish.…

  12. "All Children Can Learn": Facts and Fallacies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Donald; Bainbridge, William L.

    2001-01-01

    "All children can learn" has become a simplistic mantra leading to practices that can be harmful to students and unfair to schools. Unintended consequences include establishing accountability based on state-developed tests, downplaying poor children's need for early intervention, and using punishment to motivate school improvement. (MLH)

  13. Fiber optics can improve borehole measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, Eric O.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow in boreholes can give scientists important information about hydrogeological processes deep beneath the surface. Most studies measure flow using heat pulse, electromagnetic, and impeller flowmeters, but these methods are time-consuming and can actually obstruct the fluid being measured.

  14. Can "Word Choices" Compromise a Woman's Career?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    A letter of recommendation can catapult a woman into the next phase of the interview process for a particular job--or land her in the slush pile. Word choice in describing this female candidate can make or break her career. Letters of recommendation--especially when a reference's word choice paints a negative, less than stellar picture of the…

  15. How Can I Deal with My Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who Cuts? How Can I Deal With My Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > How Can I Deal With My Asthma? Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Tips en español ¿Cómo puedo afrontar mi asma? Asthma is more common these days than it used ...

  16. Seasonal issues can chill powerplant profits

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, R.

    1996-07-01

    Profitable operation requires minimizing the seasonal constraints imposed by weather. This article describes how forward-thinking operators review their plans for winterization and hot-weather operation--before the thermometer darts toward either extreme. new cooling towers (CTs) are no longer oversized, leaving little room for fouling that can shoot up in hot weather. Also, powerplants are no longer being designed with surplus heat exchangers and redundant pumps--features that can help a plant get through extreme temperatures. And at a growing list of plants, the CTs are eliminated altogether, in favor of air-cooled (AC) condensers--which can have their own trouble holding condenser vacuum when the outdoor thermometer skyrockets; and, like their CT cousins, can suffer serious failures if improperly operated in winter`s freeze. Although design margins are being stretched thin, seasoned operations and maintenance (O and M) teams can minimize the constraints imposed by mother nature.

  17. CAN Bus on ExoMars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortosa López, F.; Furano, G.; Winton, A.; Montagna, M.; Caramia, M.; Dean, B.; Bhana, M.

    2009-05-01

    This paper focuses on the implementation of CAN Bus for the EXOMars project, both on the technical aspects of the physical layer, the CAN protocol, and the higher layer protocol, and on the methodology aspects related to the procurement of multiple heterogeneous units, which need to provide a standard interface to the CAN Bus. We will present the ExoMars tailoring and technical choices using the current draft of the CAN ECSS-E50- xx-v2_1 ([5]), and we will present our conclusions regarding the use of CANopen and the draft standard. The Exomars project has successfully applied the previous efforts of CAN WG, and has established a clear implementation methodology that will provide very useful inputs for the finalization of the ECSS standardization process within next year.

  18. 21 CFR 155.120 - Canned green beans and canned wax beans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Vegetables § 155.120 Canned green beans and canned wax beans. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned green beans and canned wax beans are the foods prepared from succulent pods of fresh green bean or wax bean plants... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned green beans and canned wax beans....

  19. 21 CFR 155.120 - Canned green beans and canned wax beans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Vegetables § 155.120 Canned green beans and canned wax beans. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned green beans and canned wax beans are the foods prepared from succulent pods of fresh green bean or wax bean plants... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned green beans and canned wax beans....

  20. 21 CFR 155.120 - Canned green beans and canned wax beans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Vegetables § 155.120 Canned green beans and canned wax beans. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned green beans and canned wax beans are the foods prepared from succulent pods of fresh green bean or wax bean plants... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned green beans and canned wax beans....

  1. 21 CFR 155.120 - Canned green beans and canned wax beans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Vegetables § 155.120 Canned green beans and canned wax beans. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned green beans and canned wax beans are the foods prepared from succulent pods of fresh green bean or wax bean plants... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned green beans and canned wax beans....

  2. 21 CFR 155.120 - Canned green beans and canned wax beans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Vegetables § 155.120 Canned green beans and canned wax beans. (a) Identity—(1) Definition. Canned green beans and canned wax beans are the foods prepared from succulent pods of fresh green bean or wax bean plants... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned green beans and canned wax beans....

  3. Advanced CAN (Controller Area Network) Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, D.J.

    2000-03-17

    The CAN interface cards that are currently in use are PCMCIA based and use a microprocessor and CAN chip that are no longer in production. The long-term support of the SGT CAN interface is of concern due to this issue along with performance inadequacies and technical support. The CAN bus is at the heart of the SGT trailer. If the CAN bus in the SGT trailer cannot be maintained adequately, then the trailer itself cannot be maintained adequately. These concerns led to the need for a CRADA to help develop a new product that would be called the ''Gryphon'' CAN tool. FM and T provided manufacturing expertise along with design criteria to ensure SGT compatibility and long-term support. FM and T also provided resources for software support. Dearborn provided software and hardware design expertise to implement the necessary requirements. Both partners worked around heavy internal workloads to support completion of the project. This CRADA establishes a US source for an item that is very critical to support the SGT project. The Dearborn Group had the same goal to provide a US alternative to German suppliers. The Dearborn Group was also interested in developing a CAN product that has performance characteristics that place the Gryphon in a class by itself. This enhanced product not only meets and exceeds SGT requirements; it has opened up options that were not even considered before the project began. The cost of the product is also less than the European options.

  4. Americans Can Help End Apartheid: Disinvest Now!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinn, Kenneth S.

    1985-01-01

    An increasing number of Americans are waking up to the horror of apartheid, South Africa's system of racial domination. How Americans can promote political freedom and economic justice in South America and yet minimize the bloodshed is discussed. (RM)

  5. [CanMEDS 2015: better doctors?].

    PubMed

    Borleffs, J C C; Mourits, M J E; Scheele, F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the CanMEDS model, which forms the basis for competency-based learning in both undergraduate and postgraduate training, has been renewed by the introduction of CanMEDS 2015. The most prominent change is the emphasis on leadership skills, which is also reflected by the name change for the role of 'manager' to 'leader'. The addition of milestones provides clearly defined targets for learning and assessment, which facilitates the monitoring of the progression in competence. Furthermore, CanMEDS 2015 strongly focusses on the overall coherence of the separate competencies. CanMEDS, designed as a model that helps to train young doctors to become good doctors, also helps us - the trainers - to become better doctors ourselves. PMID:27438391

  6. What Can I Do For You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training and Development Journal, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Walt Disney has proved that, with the "Disney Way," motivators can aid in overcoming apathy and minimum productivity. These motivators help the employees maintain pride in his or her organization. (BP)

  7. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate cancer early detection What tests can detect prostate cancer early? The tests discussed below are used to ... also found in the blood. Most men without prostate cancer have PSA levels under 4 nanograms per milliliter ( ...

  8. Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160574.html Fast Action Can Prevent Sepsis Death: CDC Know the signs of extreme response to ... treated long before it causes severe illness or death, U.S. health officials report. Sepsis, or septicemia, occurs ...

  9. Industry and Academe Can Work Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Keith; Westgaard, Odin

    1982-01-01

    Through a cooperative arrangement, Advanced Systems Incorporated employees can earn a master's degree in instructional technology from Northern Illinois University. The program is mutually beneficial to the university and the corporation. (Author/WD)

  10. Awards and Incentives Can Help Speed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blomgren, George W.; Thiss, Thomas N.

    1976-01-01

    Describes efforts in the banking industry to combine the reward elements of incentive programs with training activities. Concludes that incentive programs can be combined effectively with learning activities so that training is reinforced and learned behavior is also practiced. (WL)

  11. Healthy Weight: You Can Do It, Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... I wanted to understand the underlying biology and psychology of my obesity. Self-understanding is a very ... niddk.nih.gov/ We Can! national program on children's weight, exercise, and diet wecan.nhlbi.nih.gov ...

  12. Biogeochemistry: Soil carbon in a beer can

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Eric A.

    2015-10-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter could be an important positive feedback to climate change. Geochemical properties of soils can help determine what fraction of soil carbon may be protected from climate-induced decomposition.

  13. Energy Retrofits Can Ease the Budget Squeeze.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordeen, Howard

    1983-01-01

    Computer-based building management systems can cut the energy costs of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in school buildings. Administrators are advised on how to choose the best system. (MLF)

  14. Can Ovarian Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer Can ovarian cancer be found early? About 20% of ovarian cancers ... cancer in its earliest stage. Ways to find ovarian cancer early Regular women's health exams During a pelvic ...

  15. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed? Taking action to control ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  16. Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Website of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help? This fact sheet ... with The Society of Reproductive Surgeons What is endometriosis? When tissue like the tissue that that normally ...

  17. Can Exercise Offset Alcohol's Damaging Effects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160853.html Can Exercise Offset Alcohol's Damaging Effects? Even gardening, brisk walking may reduce ... study says moderate exercise may offset some of alcohol's harmful effects. Normally, drinking raises the risk of ...

  18. Can HF heating generate ESF bubbles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawdie, K. A.; Huba, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of powerful HF waves into the ionosphere can lead to strong electron heating followed by a pressure perturbation which can locally reduce the plasma density. In the postsunset equatorial ionosphere, density perturbations can provide the seed to generate equatorial spread F (ESF) bubbles. In this paper, a modified version of the SAMI3/ESF ionosphere code is used to model the density depletions created by HF heating and to determine if ESF bubbles can be artificially generated. It is found that HF heating primarily redistributes plasma along the geomagnetic field and does not significantly perturb the flux tube integrated conductivities. Thus, HF heating does not appear to be a viable method to seed or generate ESF bubbles.

  19. Frisbees, Can Lids, and Gyroscopic Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crane, H. Richard

    1983-01-01

    Provides an explanation for the observed motion of frisbees, can lids, "clay pidgeons," and flat stones when these objects are thrown through the air. Explanation focuses on forces (gravity and air), torque, and gyroscopic precession. (JN)

  20. Depression Can Stalk Families Through Generations

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160354.html Depression Can Stalk Families Through Generations People whose parents, ... News) -- People whose parents and grandparents suffered from depression are at much higher risk of developing the ...

  1. Some Sleep Drugs Can Impair Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Some Sleep Drugs Can Impair Driving Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... OTC) drugs. back to top Most Widely Used Sleep Drug Zolpidem—which has been on the market ...

  2. What Can I Do About Smell Loss?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... To diagnose smell disorders, there's a number of tests that are being done both in your physician's ... that can help to diagnose disorders. Narrator: Another test, an endoscopy, lets the doctor look in the ...

  3. Vision Trouble Can Dim Life's Prospects

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160136.html Vision Trouble Can Dim Life's Prospects But it's not ... THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with vision problems may face a higher risk of unemployment, ...

  4. Can Stress Lower a Woman's Fertility?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161057.html Can Stress Lower a Woman's Fertility? Greatest impact is around ... HealthDay News) -- New research seems to confirm that stress lowers a woman's chances of becoming pregnant, particularly ...

  5. How Can Spirituality Affect Your Family's Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... some take a second look. Studies show that religion and faith can help to promote good health ... surgery who received strength and comfort from their religion were three times more likely to survive than ...

  6. How Can I Lose Weight Safely?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Muscle burns more calories than fat. So adding strength training to your exercise routine can help you reach ... good, well-balanced fitness routine includes aerobic workouts, strength training, and flexibility exercises. Forgive yourself. So you were ...

  7. Payroll: A Headache You Can Cure!

    PubMed

    Miller, Rita J; Mattern, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Payroll is not only an expense for your practice; it can be a headache for you or your practice manager. Payroll is also a major scope of audit procedures. Don't rely on the word of anyone else that your taxes were processed and remitted. Demand to see proof. By outsourcing your human resources and payroll functions to one company, you can free up valuable time to concentrate on your area of expertise, leaving the administrative hassles to the staffing firm.

  8. Electrolytic decontamination of the 3013 inner can

    SciTech Connect

    Wedman, D.E.; Nelson, T.O.; Rivera, Y.; Weisbrod, K.; Martinez, H.E.; Limback, S.

    1998-12-31

    Disposition of plutonium recovered from nuclear weapons or production residues must be stored in a manner that ensures safety. The criteria that has been established to assure the safety of stored materials for a minimum of 50 years is DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies both the requirements for containment and furthermore specifies that the inner container be decontaminated to a level of {le}20 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} swipable and {le}500 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} direct alpha such that a failure of the outer containment barrier will have a lower probability of resulting in a spread of contamination. The package consists of an optional convenience (food pack) can, a welded type 304L stainless steel inner (primary) can, and a welded type 304L stainless steel outer (secondary) can. Following the welding process, the can is checked for leaks and then sent down the line for decontamination. Once decontaminated, the sealed primary can may be removed from the glove box line. Welding of the secondary container takes place outside the glove box line. The highly automated decontamination process that has been developed to support the packaging of Special Nuclear Materials is based on an electrolytic process similar to the wide spread industrial technique of electropolishing. The can is placed within a specially designed stainless steel fixture built within a partition of a glove box. The passage of current through this electrolytic cell results in a uniform anodic dissolution of the surface metal layers of the can. This process results in a rapid decontamination of the can. The electrolyte is fully recyclable, and the separation of the chromium from the actinides results in a compact, non RCRA secondary waste product.

  9. Defectors Can Create Conditions That Rescue Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Adam James; Cannistra, Caroline; Shou, Wenying

    2015-01-01

    Cooperation based on the production of costly common goods is observed throughout nature. This is puzzling, as cooperation is vulnerable to exploitation by defectors which enjoy a fitness advantage by consuming the common good without contributing fairly. Depletion of the common good can lead to population collapse and the destruction of cooperation. However, population collapse implies small population size, which, in a structured population, is known to favor cooperation. This happens because small population size increases variability in cooperator frequency across different locations. Since individuals in cooperator-dominated locations (which are most likely cooperators) will grow more than those in defector-dominated locations (which are most likely defectors), cooperators can outgrow defectors globally despite defectors outgrowing cooperators in each location. This raises the possibility that defectors can lead to conditions that sometimes rescue cooperation from defector-induced destruction. We demonstrate multiple mechanisms through which this can occur, using an individual-based approach to model stochastic birth, death, migration, and mutation events. First, during defector-induced population collapse, defectors occasionally go extinct before cooperators by chance, which allows cooperators to grow. Second, empty locations, either preexisting or created by defector-induced population extinction, can favor cooperation because they allow cooperator but not defector migrants to grow. These factors lead to the counterintuitive result that the initial presence of defectors sometimes allows better survival of cooperation compared to when defectors are initially absent. Finally, we find that resource limitation, inducible by defectors, can select for mutations adaptive to resource limitation. When these mutations are initially present at low levels or continuously generated at a moderate rate, they can favor cooperation by further reducing local population size

  10. Uncoupled Dark States Can Inherit Polaritonic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Ballestero, Carlos; Feist, Johannes; Gonzalo Badía, Eduardo; Moreno, Esteban; Garcia-Vidal, Francisco J.

    2016-10-01

    When a collection of quantum emitters interacts with an electromagnetic field, the whole system can enter into the collective strong coupling regime in which hybrid light-matter states, i.e., polaritons can be created. Only a small portion of excitations in the emitters are coupled to the light field, and there are many dark states that, in principle, retain their pure excitonic nature. Here we theoretically demonstrate that these dark states can have a delocalized character, which is inherent to polaritons, despite the fact that they do not have a photonic component. This unexpected behavior only appears when the electromagnetic field displays a discrete spectrum. In this case, when the main loss mechanism in the hybrid system stems from the radiative losses of the light field, dark states are even more efficient than polaritons in transferring excitations across the structure.

  11. Can proton pump inhibitors accentuate skin aging?

    PubMed

    Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Jowkar, Farideh

    2010-02-01

    Skin aging has long been important to human beings and in recent years this field has received tremendous attention by both researchers and the general population. Cutaneous aging includes two distinct phenomena, intrinsic aging and photoaging, and is characterized mainly by the loss of collagen fibers from dermis. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely prescribed gastric acid-reducing agents that are usually consumed for long periods in some conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease. We suggest that PPIs can accentuate skin aging by two mechanisms. First, through increasing intralysosomal PH, PPIs can suppress transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) processing and consequently decrease its secretion. Second, through inhibiting MNK, a P-type ATPase with steady-state localization at the trans-Golgi network, PPIs can hamper copper transport and consequently curb lysyl oxidase activity. PMID:20470945

  12. Factors that can influence mentorship relationships.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Beverly

    2009-07-01

    Mentorship is an integral part of the qualified nurse role that supports learning and development. The quality of the relationship between mentor and mentee can affect learning, particularly any disparity in their expectations. A fictitious scenario is used in this article to highlight the effect of different perceptions of the mentorship relationship, with a particular focus on the nursing student and qualified nurse. Factors that can have a negative influence on mentoring include poor communication, differing expectations between mentor and mentee, lack of trust and lack of appreciation of everyday life circumstances that affects each person. The use of learning contracts, formulation of ground rules, use of information in student handbooks and discussion of the expectations of the mentor and mentee can help prevent or counteract problems in the relationship. PMID:19623801

  13. Love number can be hard to measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    The waveform phase for a neutron star binary can be split into point-particle terms and finite-size terms (characterized by the Love number) that account for equation-of-state effects. The latter first enter at fifth post-Newtonian (5PN) order (i.e., proportional to the tenth power of the orbital velocity), but the former are only known completely to 3.5PN order, with higher-order terms only known to leading order in the mass ratio. We here find that not including point-particle terms at 4PN order to leading and first order in the mass ratio in the template model can severely deteriorate our ability to measure the equation of state. This problem can be solved if one uses numerical waveforms once their own systematic errors are under control.

  14. What Can Metaphors Tell Us about Personality?

    PubMed Central

    Fetterman, Adam K.; Robinson, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Theorists propose that metaphors are not mere figures of speech, but can actively shape one’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Social psychologists have supported this claim over the past 10 years. Personality psychologists, though, have only recently begun investigating how metaphors can inform our understanding of what makes us different from each other. This review focuses on projects demonstrating links between metaphor and personality. As an example, people have been asked whether they locate the self in the head or the heart. Head people are (more) rational and cold, whereas heart people are emotional and warm. In addition, an individual differences approach can reveal what it is that metaphoric thinking does to and for people. Overall, individual difference approaches to common metaphors are shown to be informative not only in understanding how people differ from each other but also in extending the metaphor literature. PMID:25328559

  15. Combustion air can become a problem

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Improper air combustion in a well-sealed house can result in an inadequate supply of oxygen and dangerous or fatal carbon monoxide levels. An opening for outside combustion air can prevent ''air starvation'' and if properly located and sized, can save energy by improving the furnace efficiency. This opening will also keep cold outside air from entering when the furnace is not in use, and prevent a blockage when in use, if properly designed. Possible indicators of inadequate combustion air in oil-fueled homes are: chimney smoke is black-colored, fuel smell in house, soot accumulation, popping, banging, or late ignition in the furnace. In natural gas-fueled homes: excessive moisture collecting on windows and walls, frequent headaches, burning feeling in nose and eyes. (JMT)

  16. Enzyme clustering can induce metabolic channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellana, Michele

    2015-03-01

    Direct channeling of intermediates via a physical tunnel between enzyme active sites is an established mechanism to improve metabolic efficiency. In this talk, I will present a theoretical model that demonstrates that coclustering multiple enzymes into proximity can yield the full efficiency benefits of direct channeling. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with the spacing between coclusters in yeast and mammalian cells. The model also predicts that enzyme agglomerates can regulate steady-state flux division at metabolic branch points: we experimentally test this prediction for a fundamental branch point in Escherichia coli, and the results confirm that enzyme colocalization within an agglomerate can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation.

  17. Cervical cancer: Can it be prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Pakhee

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer prevention requires a multipronged approach involving primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. The key element under primary prevention is human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination. So far, only prophylactic HPV vaccines which prevent HPV infection by one or more subtypes are commercially available. Therapeutic HPV vaccines which aid in clearing established infection are still under trial. Secondary prevention entails early detection of precancerous lesions and its success is determined by the population coverage and the efficacy of the screening technique. A number of techniques are in use, including cytology, visual inspection (using the naked eye, magnivisualizer, acetic acid and Lugol’s iodine), HPV testing and a combination of these methods. Updated screening guidelines have been advocated by the American Cancer Society in light of the role of HPV on cervical carcinogenesis. Recent research has also focussed on novel biomarkers that can predict progression to cancer in screen positive women and help to differentiate those who need treatment from those who can be left for follow-up. Last but not the least, effective treatment of precancerous lesions can help to reduce the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and this constitutes tertiary prevention. A combination of these approaches can help to prevent the burden of cervical cancer and its antecedent morbidity and mortality, but all of these are not feasible in all settings due to resource and allocation constraints. Thus, all countries, especially low and middle income ones, have to determine their own cocktail of approaches that work before we can say with certainty that yes, cervical cancer can be prevented. PMID:25302177

  18. [Can we prevent pain becoming chronic?].

    PubMed

    Hagelberg, Nora; Haanpää, Maija

    2015-01-01

    Central aspects in the prevention of pain from becoming chronic are good management of acute pain, early recognition of risk factors and a multidisciplinary working approach. Postherpetic neuralgia can probably be prevented with a vaccine and medication. In the prevention of prolonged postoperative pains there is some evidence of the effect of local anesthetics and ketamine, but their clinical significance is unclear. Multidisciplinary therapeutic and rehabilitative actions can be taken to prevent prolongation and recurrence of lower back pain especially in patients having an increased risk of chronic pain. PMID:26245075

  19. Schwarzschild black holes can wear scalar wigs.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Alcubierre, Miguel; Núñez, Darío; Sarbach, Olivier

    2012-08-24

    We study the evolution of a massive scalar field surrounding a Schwarzschild black hole and find configurations that can survive for arbitrarily long times, provided the black hole or the scalar field mass is small enough. In particular, both ultralight scalar field dark matter around supermassive black holes and axionlike scalar fields around primordial black holes can survive for cosmological times. Moreover, these results are quite generic in the sense that fairly arbitrary initial data evolve, at late times, as a combination of those long-lived configurations.

  20. Can evolution be directional without being teleological?

    PubMed

    McGhee, George R

    2016-08-01

    Convergent evolution reveals to us that the number of possibilities available for contingent events is limited, that historically contingent evolution is constrained to occur within a finite number of limited pathways, and that contingent evolution is thus probabilistic and predictable. That is, the phenomenon of convergence proves that truly contingent evolutionary processes can repeatedly produce the same, or very similar, organic designs in nature and that evolution is directional in these cases. For this reason it is argued in this paper that evolution can be directional without being teleological, and that the dichotomy that evolution must either be directionless and unpredictable or directional and predetermined (teleological) is false. PMID:26754619

  1. Can electronic stability control replace studded tyres?

    PubMed

    Elvik, Rune

    2015-12-01

    Based on recent studies, this paper examines whether an increased use of electronic stability control can replace studded tyres. A re-analysis of a study that evaluated the effects on accidents of changes in the use of studded tyres in major cities in Norway is presented. It is found that if all cars have electronic stability control, the use of studded tyres can be reduced to about 15 percent before any increase in the number of accidents occurs. Even if studded tyres were eliminated entirely, any increase in the number of accidents is likely to be considerably smaller than it would have been if electronic stability control had never been invented.

  2. Payroll: A Headache You Can Cure!

    PubMed

    Miller, Rita J; Mattern, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Payroll is not only an expense for your practice; it can be a headache for you or your practice manager. Payroll is also a major scope of audit procedures. Don't rely on the word of anyone else that your taxes were processed and remitted. Demand to see proof. By outsourcing your human resources and payroll functions to one company, you can free up valuable time to concentrate on your area of expertise, leaving the administrative hassles to the staffing firm. PMID:26856025

  3. Global monopoles can change Universe's topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marunović, Anja; Prokopec, Tomislav

    2016-05-01

    If the Universe undergoes a phase transition, at which global monopoles are created or destroyed, topology of its spatial sections can change. More specifically, by making use of Myers' theorem, we show that, after a transition in which global monopoles form, spatial sections of a spatially flat, infinite Universe becomes finite and closed. This implies that global monopoles can change the topology of Universe's spatial sections (from infinite and open to finite and closed). Global monopoles cannot alter the topology of the space-time manifold.

  4. When can preheating affect the CMB?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujikawa, Shinji; Bassett, Bruce A.

    2002-05-01

    We discuss the principles governing the selection of inflationary models for which preheating can affect the CMB. This is a (fairly small) subset of those models which have nonnegligible entropy/isocurvature perturbations on large scales during inflation. We study new models which belong to this class-two-field inflation with negative nonminimal coupling and hybrid/double/supernatural inflation models where the tachyonic growth of entropy perturbations can lead to the variation of the curvature perturbation, /R, on super-Hubble scales. Finally, we present evidence against recent claims for the variation of /R in the absence of substantial super-Hubble entropy perturbations.

  5. What Can Vampires Teach Us about Immunology?

    PubMed

    Schneider, David S

    2016-04-01

    Speculative fiction examines the leading edge of science and can be used to introduce ideas into the classroom. For example, most students are already familiar with the fictional infectious diseases responsible for vampire and zombie outbreaks. The disease dynamics of these imaginary ailments follow the same rules we see for real diseases and can be used to remind students that they already understand the basic rules of disease ecology and immunology. By engaging writers of this sort of fiction in an effort to solve problems in immunology we may be able to perform a directed evolution experiment where we follow the evolution of plots rather than genetic traits.

  6. Schwarzschild Black Holes can Wear Scalar Wigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Alcubierre, Miguel; Núñez, Darío; Sarbach, Olivier

    2012-08-01

    We study the evolution of a massive scalar field surrounding a Schwarzschild black hole and find configurations that can survive for arbitrarily long times, provided the black hole or the scalar field mass is small enough. In particular, both ultralight scalar field dark matter around supermassive black holes and axionlike scalar fields around primordial black holes can survive for cosmological times. Moreover, these results are quite generic in the sense that fairly arbitrary initial data evolve, at late times, as a combination of those long-lived configurations.

  7. What Can Vampires Teach Us about Immunology?

    PubMed

    Schneider, David S

    2016-04-01

    Speculative fiction examines the leading edge of science and can be used to introduce ideas into the classroom. For example, most students are already familiar with the fictional infectious diseases responsible for vampire and zombie outbreaks. The disease dynamics of these imaginary ailments follow the same rules we see for real diseases and can be used to remind students that they already understand the basic rules of disease ecology and immunology. By engaging writers of this sort of fiction in an effort to solve problems in immunology we may be able to perform a directed evolution experiment where we follow the evolution of plots rather than genetic traits. PMID:26968492

  8. Cyberbullying: Six Things Administrators Can Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Kate D.; Bynum, Yvette P.

    2014-01-01

    Blogging, social networks, e-mails, instant messaging, and web-forums are different ways that today's technologically savvy culture can communicate with others all across the world. Although beneficial, some have used these popular online forms of communication to harm others, thus termed cyberbullying. The purpose of this paper is to define…

  9. Cataloging the Net: Can We Do It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    1998-01-01

    Discusses possibilities for cataloging Internet resources and the role that the library profession can play. Topics include the Dublin Core metadata; public library projects (Michigan Electronic Library "MEL" and Librarians' Index to the Internet "LII"); academic library projects (INFOMINE, Scout Report); commercial sites (Yahoo, LookSmart,…

  10. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling

    PubMed Central

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D.; Schaefer, H. Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer–resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism. PMID:24068354

  11. Plutonium Immobilization Program: Can-in-Canister

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, D.T.

    1999-07-14

    'The end of the cold war brought about a potential new danger, the existence of surplus weapons grade plutonium in the U.S. and Russia. Bilateral disposition programs provide the preferred long-term solution. This paper presents an overview of the U.S. approach to plutonium immobilization using the Can-in-Canister technology.'

  12. Bribery and extortion: can restaurants help?

    PubMed

    Zucker, A

    2000-04-01

    Examples of tipping suggest that the distinction between tipping, bribery and extortion can be questioned. Some well known ideas about bribery will not work if extended to tipping and, indeed, these analyses may founder whether or not tipping, bribery and extortion merge. I suggest that more case study analysis as well as a discussion of the relationship between character and actions are needed.

  13. Can Public Education Coexist with Participatory Culture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losh, Elizabeth; Jenkins, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Participatory culture has many mechanisms to support peer-to-peer learning as young people enter interest-driven and friendship-driven networks. In this article, the authors argue that school librarians can help bridge the gap between the excitement of having students experiment with new forms of social learning and new digital-media practices,…

  14. How big can a black hole grow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    I show that there is a physical limit to the mass of a black hole, above which it cannot grow through luminous accretion of gas, and so cannot appear as a quasar or active galactic nucleus (AGN). The limit is Mmax ≃ 5 × 1010 M⊙ for typical parameters, but can reach Mmax ≃ 2.7 × 1011 M⊙ in extreme cases (e.g. maximal prograde spin). The largest black hole masses so far found are close to but below the limit. The Eddington luminosity ≃6.5 × 1048 erg s-1 corresponding to Mmax is remarkably close to the largest AGN bolometric luminosity so far observed. The mass and luminosity limits both rely on a reasonable but currently untestable hypothesis about AGN disc formation, so future observations of extreme supermassive black hole masses can therefore probe fundamental disc physics. Black holes can in principle grow their masses above Mmax by non-luminous means such as mergers with other holes, but cannot become luminous accretors again. They might nevertheless be detectable in other ways, for example through gravitational lensing. I show further that black holes with masses ˜Mmax can probably grow above the values specified by the black-hole-host-galaxy scaling relations, in agreement with observation.

  15. What Can Teachers Learn from Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noddings, Nel

    2009-01-01

    After many years as a high school mathematics teacher, administrator, university professor, and philosopher of education, the author's inclination in answering this question (what can teachers learn from research?) is to say, "not much." If one is looking for a recipe-like answer to questions about how to teach fractions, reading, spelling, or…

  16. Coping with Cancer. Can Exercise Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courneya, Kerry S.; Mackey, John R.; Jones, Lee W.

    2000-01-01

    Exercise can positively affect a broad range of quality of life parameters in people with cancer. The general exercise prescription is moderate-intensity exercise 3-5 days per week. Conditions that warrant prescription modification include fatigue during treatment, acute or chronic physical impairments, and presence of bone cancer. Research…

  17. Can Economic Development Programs Be Evaluated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartik, Timothy J.; Bingham, Richard D.

    The question of whether economic development programs can be evaluated seems simple, but the answer is not simple because of the nature of evaluation. Determining a program's effectiveness requires the evaluator to distinguish changes due to the program from changes due to nonprogram factors. The evaluator must focus on outcomes caused by the…

  18. "What Can I Do with This Degree?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wartel, Max

    2015-01-01

    As long as the question of what recent graduates can do with their degree is being asked, the need for comprehensive and trustworthy data will exist. Between the White House College Scorecard, the Rubio-Wyden-Warner Student Right to Know Before You Go Act, the USDOE's Title IV Federal Student Aid Programs: Gainful Employment in a Recognized…

  19. How streamlining telecommunications can cut IT expense.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Greg

    2016-02-01

    Hospitals and health systems can save IT expenses by implementing more efficient processes in accordance with the principles of effective telecommunications expense management. This approach involves three primary steps: Inventory of existing infrastructure. Charge verification. Optimization of rates and design for continual improvement. PMID:26999980

  20. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... to talk to your doctor. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart - You know you should be more physically active. But are you confused, concerned, or just can't get started? This guide uses science-based information to help adults develop a safe ...

  1. Can Universities Become True Learning Organizations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Judith; Weathersby, Rita

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Aims to assess whether a university can become a true learning organization. Design/methodology/approach: Focuses on the need for, and challenges of, transforming universities into true learning organizations. Findings: Observes that few of the underlying values that serve as the underpinnings of the learning organizations are actually…

  2. Good Work, If You Can Get It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla; Silverberg, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Highlights how research on volunteerism can assist parks and recreation organizations with recruiting and promoting volunteerism in their organizations, focusing on: reasons for volunteering, volunteers and social capital, and effective volunteer management. Two sidebars present Web resources for information on volunteerism and research-based…

  3. How Can I Get It All Done?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truby, Dana; Trierweiler, Hannah

    2005-01-01

    Between holiday concerts and grades due, finding perfect presents and the rush to fit in required lessons, the few weeks before break can seem like a season of suffering rather than a season of cheer. In this article, the authors present several time-saving solutions for shortening a teacher's December to-do list.

  4. What Can We Learn from Students' Questions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commeyras, Michelle

    1995-01-01

    Creating opportunities and encouraging student-centered questioning requires a special teacher-student dynamic. Students need to be empowered to ask questions. The article explores what teachers can learn from questions students ask, focusing on learning outcomes for teachers, and using a second-grade lesson on Harriet Tubman as an example. (SM)

  5. Helicopter Parents Can Be a Good Thing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiltz, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Helicopter parents get a bad rap. Teachers and administrators should view them as a resource--not a nuisance. By encouraging open communication, teachers can begin to understand the motivations of these parents and find creative ways to connect them with opportunities to promote their students' academic success and the school's overall…

  6. Research You Can Use: Marketing to Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Virginia A.

    1994-01-01

    Examines marketing literature for profit-oriented organizations and discusses how those principles can be applied to public library services for children. Topics addressed include children as a source of revenue; market research; product development; promotion; retailing; and implications for public libraries, including population trends and…

  7. Reviewing practice procedure can improve bottom line.

    PubMed

    Gambill, C

    1998-01-01

    Anecdotal and statistical sources attest that many hospital-owned physician practices are either losing money or breaking even. This is alarming for not only hospital-owned practices, but stand-alone practices, too. However, careful review of standard billing and coding practice procedures and policies, among other things, can help reverse that trend. PMID:10181639

  8. Causal Indicators Can Help to Interpret Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentler, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    The latent factor in a causal indicator model is no more than the latent factor of the factor part of the model. However, if the causal indicator variables are well-understood and help to improve the prediction of individuals' factor scores, they can help to interpret the meaning of the latent factor. Aguirre-Urreta, Rönkkö, and Marakas (2016)…

  9. Teaching Science. The Soup-Can Olympics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Presents classroom science activities to illustrate concepts of inertia, linear momentum, and friction. Students or teachers conduct races down a slope, using cans containing soups varying in mass, mass distribution, and viscosity. Students predict outcomes, compare speeds, and identify variables affecting the results. (KDFB)

  10. Assessment Can Support Reasoning and Sense Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suurtam, Christine

    2012-01-01

    "Reasoning and sense making should occur in every classroom every day," states "Focus in High School Mathematics: Reasoning and Sense Making" (NCTM 2009, p. 5). As this book suggests, reasoning can take many forms, including explorations and conjectures as well as explanations and justifications of student thinking. Sense making, on the other…

  11. Computer Review Can Cut HVAC Energy Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized review of construction bidding documents, usually done by a consulting engineer, can reveal how much money it will cost to operate various alternative types of HVAC equipment over a school's lifetime. The review should include a computerized load calculation, energy systems flow diagram, control system analysis, and a computerized…

  12. Can Intelligence Be Taught? Fastback 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sexton, Thomas G.; Poling, Donald R.

    This booklet cites evidence indicating that intelligence can be trained, given a physiologically normal student and an intensely persistant tutor. Methodologies for increasing mental efficiency have in common the principle of coordination of physical and mental processes, whether achieved by simple relaxation training, brain polarization, or…

  13. Can Interactive Working Memory Training Improve Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alloway, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Working memory is linked to learning outcomes and there is emerging evidence that training working memory can yield gains in working memory and fluid intelligence. Aims: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether interactive working memory training would transfer to acquired cognitive skills, such as vocabulary and…

  14. Being All that We Can Be

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Harold R.

    2005-01-01

    The author's career path can best be described as "unconventional" or "non-traditional" for a senior student affairs administrator. Being a first-generation college graduate, the author's focus was on what he characterizes as a "clear cut career path" for a Myers Briggs Extraverted Sensing Thinking Judging (ESTJ): management and banking. In this…

  15. How Strategic PR Can Pay Off.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilley, J. Wade; Ackerman, Helen

    1988-01-01

    With careful public relations planning and a willingness to be involved, boards can enhance the stature of an institution. George Mason University's public relations strategy has paid off in public recognition, which has accelerated the flow of resources to the institution. (MLW)

  16. Programmed Instruction CAN Teach Children To Read

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ide, Edward A.

    1974-01-01

    The great hope for permanent change in the below-norms reading performance of children lies in accomplishing the task of bringing first graders above national norms and holding them there as they move up the grades. Some form of programed learning can accomplish these goals. (Author)

  17. Can Sex Education Delay Early Sexual Debut?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erkut, Sumru; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Frye, Alice A.; Ceder, Ineke; Charmaraman, Linda; Tracy, Allison J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine whether a nine-lesson sex education intervention, "Get Real: Comprehensive Sex Education That Works," implemented in sixth grade, can reduce the number of adolescents who might otherwise become "early starters" of sexual activity (defined as heterosexual intercourse) by seventh grade. Participants were…

  18. You Can Lose What You Never Had

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Cam

    2016-01-01

    An often-used idiom states: "you can't lose what you never had." Yet contrary to this expression, it "is" possible to lose what you never had--at least when special education support is concerned. In Ontario, as in other jurisdictions, special education exists as a codified system. An ever-changing nexus of discourses and…

  19. How streamlining telecommunications can cut IT expense.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Greg

    2016-02-01

    Hospitals and health systems can save IT expenses by implementing more efficient processes in accordance with the principles of effective telecommunications expense management. This approach involves three primary steps: Inventory of existing infrastructure. Charge verification. Optimization of rates and design for continual improvement.

  20. Can Emphasising Cognitive Development Improve Academic Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasnak, Robert; Kidd, Julie K.; Gadzichowski, Marinka K.; Gallington, Deborah A.; Saracina, Robin P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Children ordinarily begin their formal education at the age when the great majority of them are capable of understanding the role of addition and subtraction in changing number. In determining critical differences they can apply the oddity principle--the first "pure" abstraction that children ever develop--understanding that when all…

  1. Can Testicular Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... staged? Testicular cancer survival rates Previous Topic Can testicular cancer be prevented? Next Topic Signs and symptoms of testicular cancer ... 2016 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Testicular ... Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Testicular Cancer ...

  2. How Physical Design Can Influence Copyright Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Meghan

    2007-01-01

    Most school librarians do not think of copyright compliance and facilities planning in the same breath. Yet the design of space--physical and virtual--can discourage or promote compliance, or even help police it. Placement of and access to equipment, traffic patterns, signage, and student workspace all may influence copyright-compliance behavior…

  3. Safety Tips: Peroxides Can Be Treacherous.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Miriam C.

    1984-01-01

    Peroxides are unstable, shock-, thermal-, and friction-sensitive compounds whose sensitivity increases with concentration. In addition, peroxides can form in aging organic solvents and stored alkali metals. Cautions related to storage, use, and disposal of peroxides in the secondary school chemistry laboratory are discussed. (JN)

  4. Can Mathematics be Justified by Natural Logic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Lothar; Sommer, Hanns

    2010-11-01

    Charles Darwin claimed that the forms and the behaviour of living beings can be explained from their will to survive. But what are the consequences of this idea for humans knowledge, their theories of nature and their mathematics?. We discuss the view that even Plato's objective world of mathematical objects does not exist absolutely, without the intentions of mathematicians. Using Husserl's Phenomenological Method, cognition can be understood as a process by which meaning is deduced from empirical data relative to intentions. Thereby the essential structure of any cognition process can be detected and this structure is mirrored in logic. A natural logic becomes the direct result of cognition. Only in a second step, mathematics is obtained by abstraction from natural logic. In this way mathematics gains a well-defined foundation and is no longer part of a dubious 'a-priori knowledge' (Kant). This access to mathematics offers a new look on many old problems, e.g. the Petersburg problem and the problem 'P = NP?'. We demonstrate that this new justification of mathematics has also important applications in Artificial Intelligence. Our method provides a procedure to construct an adequate logic to solve most efficiently the problems of a given problem class. Thus, heuristics can be tailor-made for the necessities of applications.

  5. Yes! You Can Build a Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzberg, Carol

    2001-01-01

    With specially formatted templates or simple Web page editors, teachers can lay out text and graphics in a work space resembling the interface of a word processor. Several options are presented to help teachers build Web sites. ree templates include Class Homepage Builder, AppliTools: HomePage, MySchoolOnline.com, and BigChalk.com. Web design…

  6. Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS Sites Bookstore ACS CAN Shop Cancer Atlas Global Health Finish the Fight Press Room Mobile Site Help Site Map Privacy Accessibility Terms of Use State Fundraising Notices Site Comments Better Business Bureau Health On The Net National Health Council © ...

  7. For Professors, "Friending" Can Be Fraught

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    People connect on Facebook by asking to "friend" one another. A typical user lists at least 100 such connections, while newbies are informed, "You don't have any friends yet." A humbling statement. It might make one want to find some. But friending students can be even dicier than befriending them. In the real world, casual professors may ask…

  8. Mathematical Lens: How Much Can You Bench?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolognese, Chris A.

    2013-01-01

    "How Much Can You Bench?" appears in the "Mathematical Lens" section of "Mathematics Teacher." "Mathematical Lens" uses photographs as a springboard for mathematical inquiry and appears in every issue of "Mathematics Teacher." This month the mathematics behind the photograph includes finding areas…

  9. Understanding How the Arts Can Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magsamen, Susan H.; Battro, Antonio M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how the arts can enhance learning has long been discussed and debated among educators, students, parents, artists, art historians, and philosophers. Many anecdotal examples reference the value and benefits of the arts in a range of fields and learning domains. Emerging methodologies in the brain sciences have added new perspectives…

  10. Can Distributional Approximations Give Exact Answers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Some mathematical activities and investigations for the classroom or the lecture theatre can appear rather contrived. This cannot, however, be levelled at the idea given here, since it is based on a perfectly sensible question concerning distributional approximations that was posed by an undergraduate student. Out of this simple question, and…

  11. Extendible column can be stowed on drum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holtz, G. M.; Howard, E. A.

    1965-01-01

    Column formed from a series of segments held together by an internal spring or cable can be coiled on a drum or extended into a rigid structure. This storable coil is useful in boring for soil samples and supporting electrical and optical sensors.

  12. Drummer Syndrome: How Can It Be Cured?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Distefano, Don

    1998-01-01

    Provides guidelines to assist band directors in teaching beginning drummers. Includes auditioning prospective drummers and using an instructional method that has mallet and snare drum techniques taught concurrently in one book. Observes that by devoting time and effort to percussionist players, directors can eliminate "drummer syndrome" from their…

  13. How Can We Improve School Safety Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astor, Ron Avi; Guerra, Nancy; Van Acker, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this article consider how education researchers can improve school violence and school safety research by (a) examining gaps in theoretical, conceptual, and basic research on the phenomena of school violence; (b) reviewing key issues in the design and evaluation of evidence-based practices to prevent school violence; and (c)…

  14. Can Student Surveys Measure Teaching Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Primary and secondary school students spend hundreds more hours in each classroom than any observer ever will. But, until now, school improvement efforts have seldom sought systematic student feedback at the classroom level. One impediment has been the doubt that students can provide valid and reliable responses about the quality of the teaching…

  15. What Can Be Learnt from Teaching Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machura, Ludmila

    While it is commonly assumed that teaching children is unrelated to teaching at the advanced level, the two kinds of teaching are closely related and mutually effective. The experience of teaching young learners can benefit the instruction of college students of English as a second language. In both cases, providing motivation is a challenge.…

  16. Literacy Matters: Strategies Every Teacher Can Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Scores of children across the country do not read with comprehension, and literacy has become a national priority. This book defines and reviews 15 practical literacy approaches that teachers can use across all content areas and grade levels to help students develop essential literacy skills. This user-friendly resource provides strategies for…

  17. Can We Teach Parenting in Our Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noddings, Nel

    2014-01-01

    The quality of parenting is a crucial factor in children's school success, and yet the schools teach almost nothing about parenting. This essay suggests ways in which we can teach about parenting without risking indoctrination or adding special courses.

  18. Can Sales Tax Revenue Equitably Finance Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Anicca C.

    In 1988, 66 of Tennessee's rural school districts brought suit against the state government claiming that the school funding system of a local option sales tax discriminates against rural areas. This study examines the effects of increased reliance on local sales tax revenue on Tennessee's school expenditures. Not every county can support a major…

  19. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  20. Can Education Expenditures Reduce Income Inequality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylwester, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Examines whether devoting more resources to education can positively affect the distribution of income within a country. Finds that public-education expenditures appear to be associated with a subsequent decrease in the level of income inequality. Finding is robust to the inclusion of various control variables and appears to be larger in…

  1. Can cognitive science create a cognitive economics?

    PubMed

    Chater, Nick

    2015-02-01

    Cognitive science can intersect with economics in at least three productive ways: by providing richer models of individual behaviour for use in economic analysis; by drawing from economic theory in order to model distributed cognition; and jointly to create more powerful 'rational' models of cognitive processes and social interaction. There is the prospect of moving from behavioural economics to a genuinely cognitive economics.

  2. Incredible Edibles: Science You Can Eat!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckbee, Susan J.; And Others

    This book is designed to be a guide for a hands-on science experience for students in grades 3 through 6. Over 200 students can participate at the same time, moving from one station to another. The activities have been selected to encourage experimentation, creativity, higher-order thinking and fun with science. All activities use multi-modality…

  3. How mobile technology can improve healthcare.

    PubMed

    Drayton, Kathryn

    This article reports the key findings of the national Mobile Health Worker Project. The project involved services across a variety of locations and the results provide a clear picture of how mobile devices could benefit health professionals and the care that can be offered to patients. PMID:23596769

  4. Can Library Use Enhance Intercultural Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pihl, Joron

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the questions to what extent educational research addresses library use in education and how the library can contribute to intercultural education. The focus is primarily on elementary education in Europe. Analysis of research publications was based on searches for peer-reviewed journals in international databases, literary…

  5. Can the dead be brought into disrepute?

    PubMed

    Masterton, Malin; Hansson, Mats G; Höglund, Anna T; Helgesson, Gert

    2007-01-01

    Queen Christina of Sweden was unconventional in her time, leading to hypotheses on her gender and possible hermaphroditic nature. If genetic analysis can substantiate the latter claim, could this bring the queen into disrepute 300 years after her death? Joan C. Callahan has argued that if a reputation changes, this constitutes a change only in the group of people changing their views and not in the person whose reputation it is. Is this so? This paper analyses what constitutes change and draws out the implications to the reputation of the dead. It is argued that a reputation is a relational property which can go through changes. The change is "real" for the group changing their views on Queen Christina and of a Cambridge kind for the long dead queen herself. Cambridge changes result in new properties being acquired, some of which can be of significance. Although the dead cannot go through any non-relational changes, it is possible for the dead to change properties through Cambridge changes. In this sense changes in reputation do affect the dead, and thus Queen Christina can acquire a new property, in this case possibly a worse reputation. PMID:17549606

  6. What Game Stats Can Reveal about Winning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Ree K.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for evaluating the relationship between game statistics and outcomes of contests is proposed. The technique can be used to determine the relationship between selected game factors and winning or to determine how often various results of certain instances of play occur in a contest. (PP)

  7. The Neglected Tools Can Work for You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Mac M.

    2012-01-01

    Of all the resources and techniques available to the classroom teacher of English as a second or foreign language, none are more neglected than audiovisual aids. Properly planned, constructed, and employed, such aids can help not only to improve the overall language program but also to enhance the classroom atmosphere and to ensure greater student…

  8. Can the US afford a lunar base

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    Establishing a lunar base will require steady funding for a decade or two. The question addressed here is whether such a large space project is affordable at this time. The relevant facts and methodology are presented so that the reader may formulate independent answers. It is shown that a permanent lunar base can be financed without increasing NASA's historical budgetary trends.

  9. Can We Make Sense of Learning Theory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebron, Chris de Winter

    1983-01-01

    A variety of recent learning theories are discussed, and the possible integration of the models is examined. It is suggested that despite problems of terminology, development of separate schools of research, and commonality of concerns, each theory contains certain key concepts from which one can produce a meta-model. (MSE)

  10. Can There Be Reliability without "Reliability?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    An "Educational Researcher" article by Pamela Moss (1994) asks the title question, "Can there be validity without reliability?" Yes, she answers, if by reliability one means "consistency among independent observations intended as interchangeable" (Moss, 1994, p. 7), quantified by internal consistency indices such as KR-20 coefficients and…

  11. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned corn. 155.130 Section 155.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... ingredients set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section. Such food is processed by heat, in an...

  12. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned corn. 155.130 Section 155.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... ingredients set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section. Such food is processed by heat, in an...

  13. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned corn. 155.130 Section 155.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... ingredients set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section. Such food is processed by heat, in an...

  14. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned corn. 155.130 Section 155.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... ingredients set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section. Such food is processed by heat, in an...

  15. 21 CFR 155.130 - Canned corn.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned corn. 155.130 Section 155.130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... ingredients set forth in paragraph (a)(3) of this section. Such food is processed by heat, in an...

  16. How Learning Environments Can Stimulate Student Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Chaoyun; Hsu, Yuling; Huang, Yinghsiu; Chen, Sheng-Chih

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate an array of environmental factors that can stimulate imagination and explore how these factors manifest in different design phases. The participants of this study were students in the field of educational technology from four universities across Taiwan. The instructional design process was divided into…

  17. Can donated media placements reach intended audiences?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer; Polonec, Lindsey

    2013-09-01

    Donated media placements for public service announcements (PSAs) can be difficult to secure, and may not always reach intended audiences. Strategies used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign (SFL) to obtain donated media placements include producing a diverse mix of high-quality PSAs, co-branding with state and tribal health agencies, securing celebrity involvement, monitoring media trends to identify new distribution opportunities, and strategically timing the release of PSAs. To investigate open-ended recall of PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, CDC conducted 12 focus groups in three U.S. cities with men and women either nearing age 50 years, when screening is recommended to begin, or aged 50-75 years who were not in compliance with screening guidelines. In most focus groups, multiple participants recalled exposure to PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, and most of these individuals reported having seen SFL PSAs on television, in transit stations, or on the sides of public buses. Some participants reported exposure to SFL PSAs without prompting from the moderator, as they explained how they learned about the disease. Several participants reported learning key campaign messages from PSAs, including that colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 50 years and screening can find polyps so they can be removed before becoming cancerous. Donated media placements can reach and educate mass audiences, including millions of U.S. adults who have not been screened appropriately for colorectal cancer. PMID:23720533

  18. Ist Ethik Lehrbar (Can Ethics Be Taught)?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Discusses from a skeptical, transcendental-critical viewpoint the question of whether the expectations connected with a German ethics course are well-founded, and which assumptions have been made that have led to the conclusion that ethics can be taught. Argues that it is impossible to give a definitely positive answer. (DSK)

  19. Employee rewards can pay off for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bice, M

    1990-06-20

    For many of us, a performance appraisal has all the appeal of a trip to the dentist, especially when the review isn't a positive one. Yet when performance reviews are conducted in an atmosphere of trust and open exchange, they can cement relationships, enhance commitment, and reinforce new behaviors.

  20. Can Pedagogical Concerns Eclipse Mathematical Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creager, Mark A.; Jacobson, Erik; Aydeniz, Fetiye

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) is often thought of as a transformed, mutually-influencing mixture of content and pedagogy. However when individuals' MKT does not integrate content and pedagogy, one type of knowledge can supersede the other, sometimes unconsciously. We exemplify this with Emma, a prospective elementary teacher, whose…

  1. Key financial ratios can foretell hospital closures.

    PubMed

    Lynn, M L; Wertheim, P

    1993-11-01

    An analysis of various financial ratios sampled from open and closed hospitals shows that certain leverage, liquidity, capital efficiency, and resource availability ratios can predict hospital closure up to two years in advance of the closure with an accuracy of nearly 75 percent.

  2. Credit Traps Can Hurt Your Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Tom, Ed.; Sandlin, Jenny, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This document, which was written for adult educators in Georgia, offers instructional plans and practical strategies for helping students in adult literacy, adult basic education (ABE), General Educational Development, and English-as-a-second-language (ESL) programs understand the credit traps that can hurt them. The document begins with a…

  3. How Solar Energy Can Work for You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iker, Sam

    1978-01-01

    The future of solar heated homes looks bright. The increase in availability of solar hardware and information along with tax credits point to an increase in both solar water and space heating. Solar systems can add to the value of a house. (BB)

  4. What We Can Learn from the Suits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses what colleges and universities can learn from Uncle Sam and corporate America when it comes to designing secure networks and ensuring privacy. After all, schools face many of the same privacy and information security challenges seen in the business and government sectors. The fact of the matter is, in the age of cyber crime…

  5. Can Online Peer Assessment Be Trusted?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouzidi, L'hadi; Jaillet, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The excessive workload generated by the assessment of exam papers in large classes and the need to give feedback in time often constitute a rather heavy burden for teachers. The online peer assessment can contribute to reduce this workload and, possibly, to improve learning quality by assigning the assessment task to students. However, this raises…

  6. Signal verification can promote reliable signalling.

    PubMed

    Broom, Mark; Ruxton, Graeme D; Schaefer, H Martin

    2013-11-22

    The central question in communication theory is whether communication is reliable, and if so, which mechanisms select for reliability. The primary approach in the past has been to attribute reliability to strategic costs associated with signalling as predicted by the handicap principle. Yet, reliability can arise through other mechanisms, such as signal verification; but the theoretical understanding of such mechanisms has received relatively little attention. Here, we model whether verification can lead to reliability in repeated interactions that typically characterize mutualisms. Specifically, we model whether fruit consumers that discriminate among poor- and good-quality fruits within a population can select for reliable fruit signals. In our model, plants either signal or they do not; costs associated with signalling are fixed and independent of plant quality. We find parameter combinations where discriminating fruit consumers can select for signal reliability by abandoning unprofitable plants more quickly. This self-serving behaviour imposes costs upon plants as a by-product, rendering it unprofitable for unrewarding plants to signal. Thus, strategic costs to signalling are not a prerequisite for reliable communication. We expect verification to more generally explain signal reliability in repeated consumer-resource interactions that typify mutualisms but also in antagonistic interactions such as mimicry and aposematism.

  7. Girls Can! Community Coalitions Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Univ. Women Educational Foundation, Washington, DC.

    It is possible that the materials presented in this manual were used in implementing community action projects supported by the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Educational Foundation. These projects, part of the Girls Can! initiative, were intended to address the disparity between the educational experiences of girls and boys in…

  8. Congruent sound can modulate odor pleasantness.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han-Seok; Lohse, Franziska; Luckett, Curtis R; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to determine 1) whether certain background sounds can be matched with specific odors and 2) whether the background sounds can increase pleasantness for their congruent odors. In Experiment 1, congruent sounds increased odor pleasantness, but not odor intensity, significantly more than incongruent sounds. Experiment 2 demonstrated that certain background sounds can be paired with specific odors. For example, cinnamon, clove, and orange odors were rated significantly more congruent with a Christmas carol compared with the sound of brushing teeth and/or the beach sound. The congruent sounds increased odor pleasantness significantly more than incongruent sounds. Similarly, the congruent sound-induced odor pleasantness was observed in Experiment 3. As participants judged the pair of odor and sound to be more congruent, they rated the odor significantly more pleasant. Congruent sound assisted participants in identifying and in being familiar with the odor, thereby leading to an increase in odor pleasantness. However, the congruent sound-induced odor pleasantness was not obtained in all odors. In conclusion, this study provides new empirical evidence that pleasantness ratings for odors can increase in the presence of their congruent sounds.

  9. FBL Outer Can Welder Acquisition Software

    2004-01-16

    The Outer Can Welder Data Acquisition Software (OCWDAS) was originally developed by SRTC for use at Hanford to assist in the storage of their excess plutonium in the DOE standard 3013 containers until it can be properly dispositioned using one of the approved DOE methods. After Hanford OCWDAS software was the starting point for the new version developed for FB-Line. New graphical display formats and features were added to this software to make it moremore » robust and operator friendly. Several hardware changes were also made at this time and the software was modified to accommodate these as well. During the welding process, critical weld parameters such as weld current and voltage, can give valuable information about the weld. In the past, weld data from the TIG welding process, such as the bagless transfer system in FB-Line, has been monitored using strip chart recorders. The data from the weld process, recorded on the strip chart recorder traces, are reviewed to analyze the weld. The OCWDAS improves this technology by digitizing the weld data which allows for automation of the analysis process. The OCWDAS performs the necessary functions to perform the data acquisition functions during the 3013 Outer Can Welding Process. It is important to monitor the critical weld parameters, current and voltage, during a weld as they can be used to set acceptance criteria for weld acceptance. The software monitors and records the weld current, voltage, and RPM data. It also records the absolute position of the weld head during the weld process from a quadrature encoder. Digital handshaking between the AMI Welding unit and the OCWDAS ensure that both systems are operational and ready prior to the weld initiation taking place.« less

  10. How market smarts can protect property rights.

    PubMed

    Anand, Bharat; Galetovic, Alexander

    2004-12-01

    Intellectual property comprises an ever-increasing fraction of corporate wealth, but what's the good of that if an ever-increasing fraction of the property is copied or stolen? Faced with developing countries' limited and inadequately enforced patent and copyright laws, some companies are resorting to market-based strategies to protect their intellectual property. These include preempting or threatening competitors, embedding intellectual property in environments that can be protected, bundling insecure intellectual property with its more secure cousins, and actually entering the businesses that pose a threat. The authors urge companies coping with weak property rights to follow a decision tree when choosing which strategies to use and when: Start by thinking of the strategies that will protect your business's core. If, for example, a first-mover advantage is within reach, making yourself more committed to intellectual property could be the answer. If you and your rivals are equally matched, ask yourself, "Can those that threaten me with copying be copied in turn?" The knowledge that each of you can hurt the other may dampen the competitive intensity or even lead to voluntary sharing of property. If these solutions fail or don't apply, try forging a connection with a product or business closely related to your own. Doing so may prevent a valued asset from falling into a rival's hands or make the asset harder to misappropriate. This approach can even help you expand your piece of the market pie or reduce the cost of making the threatened product, perhaps to the point where you can compete against pirated goods. Finally, if there still doesn't seem to be a way of making money from your threatened product, you may choose to move into the very business that has hurt your own. Such strategies are behind the economics of successful companies like Intel and NBC, say the authors.

  11. What can biologists say about galaxy evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraix-Burnet, Didier; Choler, Philippe; Douzery, Emmanuel

    2003-04-01

    It is possible to borrow from a topic of biology called phylogenetic systematics, concepts and tools for a logical and objective classification of galaxies. It is based on observable properties of objects characters either qualitative (like morphology) or quantitative (like luminosity, mass or spectrum). Distance analysis can readily be performed using a method called phenetics and based on characters. But the most promising approach is cladistics. It makes use of characters that can exist in at least two states, one being ancestral and the other one derived. Objects are gathered depending on the derived states they share. We illustrate a first application of this method to astrophysics, that we name astrocladistics, with dwarf galaxies from the Local Group.

  12. The pursuit of happiness can be lonely.

    PubMed

    Mauss, Iris B; Savino, Nicole S; Anderson, Craig L; Weisbuch, Max; Tamir, Maya; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2012-10-01

    Few things seem more natural and functional than wanting to be happy. We suggest that, counter to this intuition, valuing happiness may have some surprising negative consequences. Specifically, because striving for personal gains can damage connections with others and because happiness is usually defined in terms of personal positive feelings (a personal gain) in western contexts, striving for happiness might damage people's connections with others and make them lonely. In 2 studies, we provide support for this hypothesis. Study 1 suggests that the more people value happiness, the lonelier they feel on a daily basis (assessed over 2 weeks with diaries). Study 2 provides an experimental manipulation of valuing happiness and demonstrates that inducing people to value happiness leads to relatively greater loneliness, as measured by self-reports and a hormonal index (progesterone). In each study, key potential confounds, such as positive and negative affect, were ruled out. These findings suggest that wanting to be happy can make people lonely.

  13. Momentum kill procedure can quickly control blowouts

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.D. ); Moore, P. )

    1993-08-30

    The momentum kill method can help in quickly regaining control of a blowing well, providing the blowing well rate and fluid properties can be estimated reasonably. The momentum of the kill fluid counteracts and overcomes the flowing momentum of formation fluids. In other words, sufficient mud density pumped at a sufficient rate is directed into the flow stream to force the escaping fluid column back into the well bore. Sufficient kill fluid hydrostatic pressure must be stacked'' in the hole so that the well remains dead after the operation. The momentum kill is not a panacea for all blowouts. An assessment must be made of the potential problems unique to this method, and certain requirements must be met if the technique is to be successful. The paper discusses some of the considerations for evaluating the use of the momentum kill method.

  14. Macroscopically local correlations can violate information causality.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Daniel; Salles, Alejo; Scarani, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    Although quantum mechanics is a very successful theory, its foundations are still a subject of intense debate. One of the main problems is that quantum mechanics is based on abstract mathematical axioms, rather than on physical principles. Quantum information theory has recently provided new ideas from which one could obtain physical axioms constraining the resulting statistics one can obtain in experiments. Information causality (IC) and macroscopic locality (ML) are two principles recently proposed to solve this problem. However, none of them were proven to define the set of correlations one can observe. In this study, we show an extension of IC and study its consequences. It is shown that the two above-mentioned principles are inequivalent: if the correlations allowed by nature were the ones satisfying ML, IC would be violated. This gives more confidence in IC as a physical principle, defining the possible correlation allowed by nature. PMID:21266986

  15. Boundaries can steer active Janus spheres

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sambeeta; Garg, Astha; Campbell, Andrew I.; Howse, Jonathan; Sen, Ayusman; Velegol, Darrell; Golestanian, Ramin; Ebbens, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of autonomous self-propulsion has instigated research towards making colloidal machines that can deliver mechanical work in the form of transport, and other functions such as sensing and cleaning. While much progress has been made in the last 10 years on various mechanisms to generate self-propulsion, the ability to steer self-propelled colloidal devices has so far been much more limited. A critical barrier in increasing the impact of such motors is in directing their motion against the Brownian rotation, which randomizes particle orientations. In this context, here we report directed motion of a specific class of catalytic motors when moving in close proximity to solid surfaces. This is achieved through active quenching of their Brownian rotation by constraining it in a rotational well, caused not by equilibrium, but by hydrodynamic effects. We demonstrate how combining these geometric constraints can be utilized to steer these active colloids along arbitrary trajectories. PMID:26627125

  16. Boundaries can steer active Janus spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sambeeta; Garg, Astha; Campbell, Andrew I.; Howse, Jonathan; Sen, Ayusman; Velegol, Darrell; Golestanian, Ramin; Ebbens, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    The advent of autonomous self-propulsion has instigated research towards making colloidal machines that can deliver mechanical work in the form of transport, and other functions such as sensing and cleaning. While much progress has been made in the last 10 years on various mechanisms to generate self-propulsion, the ability to steer self-propelled colloidal devices has so far been much more limited. A critical barrier in increasing the impact of such motors is in directing their motion against the Brownian rotation, which randomizes particle orientations. In this context, here we report directed motion of a specific class of catalytic motors when moving in close proximity to solid surfaces. This is achieved through active quenching of their Brownian rotation by constraining it in a rotational well, caused not by equilibrium, but by hydrodynamic effects. We demonstrate how combining these geometric constraints can be utilized to steer these active colloids along arbitrary trajectories.

  17. Quantifying creativity: can measures span the spectrum?

    PubMed

    Simonton, Dean Keith

    2012-03-01

    Because the cognitive neuroscientists have become increasingly interested in the phenomenon of creativity, the issue arises of how creativity is to be optimally measured. Unlike intelligence, which can be assessed across the full range of intellectual ability creativity measures tend to concentrate on different sections of the overall spectrum. After first defining creativity in terms of the three criteria of novelty, usefulness, and surprise, this article provides an overview of the available measures. Not only do these instruments vary according to whether they focus on the creative process, person, or product, but they differ regarding whether they tap into "little-c" versus "Big-C" creativity; only productivity and eminence measures reach into genius-level manifestations of the phenomenon. The article closes by discussing whether various alternative assessment techniques can be integrated into a single measure that quantifies creativity across the full spectrum.

  18. When can social media lead financial markets?

    PubMed

    Zheludev, Ilya; Smith, Robert; Aste, Tomaso

    2014-02-27

    Social media analytics is showing promise for the prediction of financial markets. However, the true value of such data for trading is unclear due to a lack of consensus on which instruments can be predicted and how. Current approaches are based on the evaluation of message volumes and are typically assessed via retrospective (ex-post facto) evaluation of trading strategy returns. In this paper, we present instead a sentiment analysis methodology to quantify and statistically validate which assets could qualify for trading from social media analytics in an ex-ante configuration. We use sentiment analysis techniques and Information Theory measures to demonstrate that social media message sentiment can contain statistically-significant ex-ante information on the future prices of the S&P500 index and a limited set of stocks, in excess of what is achievable using solely message volumes.

  19. Can An Evolutionary Process Create English Text?

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.

    2008-10-29

    Critics of the conventional theory of biological evolution have asserted that while natural processes might result in some limited diversity, nothing fundamentally new can arise from 'random' evolution. In response, biologists such as Richard Dawkins have demonstrated that a computer program can generate a specific short phrase via evolution-like iterations starting with random gibberish. While such demonstrations are intriguing, they are flawed in that they have a fixed, pre-specified future target, whereas in real biological evolution there is no fixed future target, but only a complicated 'fitness landscape'. In this study, a significantly more sophisticated evolutionary scheme is employed to produce text segments reminiscent of a Charles Dickens novel. The aggregate size of these segments is larger than the computer program and the input Dickens text, even when comparing compressed data (as a measure of information content).

  20. Marine reserves can enhance ecological resilience.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Lewis A K; Baskett, Marissa L

    2015-12-01

    The goals of ecosystem-based management (EBM) include protecting ecological resilience, the magnitude of a perturbation that a community can withstand and remain in a given state. As a tool to achieve this goal, no-take marine reserves may enhance resilience by protecting source populations or reduce it by concentrating fishing in harvested areas. Here, we test whether spatial management with marine reserves can increase ecological resilience compared to non-spatial (conventional) management using a dynamic model of a simplified fish community with structured predation and competition that causes alternative stable states. Relative to non-spatial management, reserves increase the resilience of the desired (predator-dominated) equilibrium state in both stochastic and deterministic environments, especially under intensive fishing. As a result, spatial management also increases the feasibility of restoring degraded (competitor-dominated) systems, particularly if combined with culling of competitors or stock enhancement of adult predators.

  1. How physician stress can hurt your practice.

    PubMed

    1998-08-01

    Physicians are under increasing pressure to see more patients, take on more management responsibilities, and still provide the best care. That is leading to a variety of problems--everything from general malaise and burnout to early retirement and unionization. Stressed-out physicians can have a disastrous effect on the bottom line of practices. Productivity drops, staff become demoralized, turnover increases, and patients become less satisfied with the care they receive--both from the physician and support staff. There are clear warning signs of physicians under too much pressure. There are also some simple steps a practice can take to minimize the occurrence of burnout and deal with it effectively when it occurs.

  2. Can Technology Improve the Quality of Colonoscopy?

    PubMed

    Thirumurthi, Selvi; Ross, William A; Raju, Gottumukkala S

    2016-07-01

    In order for screening colonoscopy to be an effective tool in reducing colon cancer incidence, exams must be performed in a high-quality manner. Quality metrics have been presented by gastroenterology societies and now include higher adenoma detection rate targets than in the past. In many cases, the quality of colonoscopy can often be improved with simple low-cost interventions such as improved procedure technique, implementing split-dose bowel prep, and monitoring individuals' performances. Emerging technology has expanded our field of view and image quality during colonoscopy. We will critically review several technological advances in the context of quality metrics and discuss if technology can really improve the quality of colonoscopy.

  3. When Can Social Media Lead Financial Markets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Ilya; Smith, Robert; Aste, Tomaso

    2014-02-01

    Social media analytics is showing promise for the prediction of financial markets. However, the true value of such data for trading is unclear due to a lack of consensus on which instruments can be predicted and how. Current approaches are based on the evaluation of message volumes and are typically assessed via retrospective (ex-post facto) evaluation of trading strategy returns. In this paper, we present instead a sentiment analysis methodology to quantify and statistically validate which assets could qualify for trading from social media analytics in an ex-ante configuration. We use sentiment analysis techniques and Information Theory measures to demonstrate that social media message sentiment can contain statistically-significant ex-ante information on the future prices of the S&P500 index and a limited set of stocks, in excess of what is achievable using solely message volumes.

  4. Pelvic meningocele can be missed during laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Vincent Y T; Rosenthal, David M

    2006-01-01

    Pelvic meningocele is an uncommon condition and is frequently asymptomatic. The diagnosis easily can be mistaken as ovarian cyst on pelvic sonography. In many reported cases, the diagnosis was made during laparotomy for presumed ovarian cysts. Myelography, computerized tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful for definitive diagnosis. A 49-year-old woman, who had a normal diagnostic laparoscopy 3 years prior, was referred for a persistent ovarian cyst. Repeat laparoscopy revealed a retroperitoneal cyst in the left pelvic sidewall. Both ovaries and fallopian tubes were normal. Subsequent CT and MRI were used to diagnose pelvic meningocele. We speculate that pelvic meningoceles can be missed during laparoscopy due to the increased intraperitoneal pressure and the potential reduction in the cerebrospinal fluid pressure at the lumbosacral level.

  5. Can electronic stability control replace studded tyres?

    PubMed

    Elvik, Rune

    2015-12-01

    Based on recent studies, this paper examines whether an increased use of electronic stability control can replace studded tyres. A re-analysis of a study that evaluated the effects on accidents of changes in the use of studded tyres in major cities in Norway is presented. It is found that if all cars have electronic stability control, the use of studded tyres can be reduced to about 15 percent before any increase in the number of accidents occurs. Even if studded tyres were eliminated entirely, any increase in the number of accidents is likely to be considerably smaller than it would have been if electronic stability control had never been invented. PMID:26436487

  6. Autopoiesis + extended cognition + nature = can buildings think?

    PubMed Central

    Dollens, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    To incorporate metabolic, bioremedial functions into the performance of buildings and to balance generative architecture's dominant focus on computational programming and digital fabrication, this text first discusses hybridizing Maturana and Varela's biological theory of autopoiesis with Andy Clark's hypothesis of extended cognition. Doing so establishes a procedural protocol to research biological domains from which design could source data/insight from biosemiotics, sensory plants, and biocomputation. I trace computation and botanic simulations back to Alan Turing's little-known 1950s Morphogenetic drawings, reaction-diffusion algorithms, and pioneering artificial intelligence (AI) in order to establish bioarchitecture's generative point of origin. I ask provocatively, Can buildings think? as a question echoing Turing's own, "Can machines think?" PMID:26478784

  7. EAGLE can do Efficient LTL Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barringer, Howard; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Sen, Koushik

    2003-01-01

    We briefly present a rule-based framework, called EAGLE, that has been shown to be capable of defining and implementing finite trace monitoring logics, including future and past time temporal logic, extended regular expressions, real-time logics, interval logics, forms of quantified temporal logics, and so on. In this paper we show how EAGLE can do linear temporal logic (LTL) monitoring in an efficient way. We give an upper bound on the space and time complexity of this monitoring.

  8. Leasing can add flexibility to asset management.

    PubMed

    Conbeer, G P

    1990-07-01

    Better management of high-technology assets begins with an understanding of a healthcare organization's goals and the equipment it needs to meet them. Under the right conditions, leasing can shift economic and technological risks of equipment obsolescence from healthcare organizations to leasing companies. Steps involved in a leasing decision include reviewing a hospital's equipment acquisition plans; conducting cost-benefit analyses, determining useful and product lives of desired equipment; and watching the market for potential technology changes.

  9. Can Supersaturation Affect Protein Crystal Quality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    In quiescent environments (microgravity, capillary tubes, gels) formation of a depletion zone is to be expected, due either to limited sedimentation, density driven convection or a combination of both. The formation of a depletion zone can: Modify solution supersaturation near crystal; Give rise to impurity partitioning. It is conjectured that both supersaturation and impurity partitioning affect protein crystal quality and size. Further detailed investigations on various proteins are needed to assess above hypothesis.

  10. Can Silicon Carbide Nanotubes Sense Carbon Dioxide?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-Xiang; Ding, Yi-Hong

    2009-04-14

    Detection of carbon dioxide (CO2) is very important in environmental, biological, and industrial processes. Recent experiment showed that carbon nanotubes can act as chemical sensors for detecting certain gaseous molecules such as NH3, NO2, and O2. Unfortunately, the intrinsic stability of CO2 makes its sensing by CNTs unsuccessful due to the rather weak adsorption energy on the tube surface. In the present Article, we study the CO2 adsorption on various zigzag (n,0) (n = 6, 8, 10, 12, and 18) single-walled SiC nanotubes to explore the possibility of the SiC tube as potential gas sensors for CO2-detection by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is found that tube diameter and CO2 coverage play important roles in the tube-CO2 interaction. A single CO2 can be chemisorbed to the Si-C bonds of SiCNT with appreciable adsorption energy and can draw significant charge transfer from the SiCNT. The adsorption energy decreases gradually with increased tube diameter. The addition of more CO2 molecules in different patterns has been considered for the exemplified (8,0) tube, and CO2 molecules prefer to be as far from each other as possible. With the increase of CO2 coverage, the interaction between CO2 molecules and tube becomes weaker, and up to eight CO2 molecules can be adsorbed on the tube. In addition, we find that the band gap is lowered to a different degree due to the different adsorption. Because of the sufficient charge transfer and high concentration of CO2, SiCNT could be a perfect material for efficiently detecting the CO2 molecule.

  11. Renewable Energy Can Help Reduce Oil Dependency

    ScienceCinema

    Arvizu, Dan

    2016-07-12

    In a speech to the Economic Club of Kansas City on June 23, 2010, NREL Director Dan Arvizu takes a realistic look at how renewable energy can help reduce America's dependence on oil, pointing out that the country gets as much energy from renewable sources now as it does from offshore oil production. For a transcript, visit http://www.nrel.gov/director/pdfs/energy_overview_06_10.pdf

  12. Charge reviews can beef up bottom lines.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, M C

    1991-03-01

    Traditionally, healthcare organizations have been reluctant to pursue charge reviews until pressed to do so by third-party challenges to their charges. But a hospital pursuing either a concurrent or retrospective review may realize significant revenue enhancement--and not only from correcting undercharges on charge-based accounts. Charge reviews can lead to smoothed patient documentation, better cost accounting, more appropriate Medicare payment, and, ultimately, an improved bottom line.

  13. Can infants' object concepts be trained?

    PubMed

    Scholl, Brian J

    2004-02-01

    Decades of research and debate on the origins of object permanence in infancy have contrasted various types of learning with possible innate contributions. A recent paper by Johnson et al. adds a new perspective to this debate by reporting that even very brief training periods can dramatically influence infants' persisting object representations. Such training studies have the potential to constrain 'nature versus nurture' debates in novel ways, although important challenges remain. PMID:15588805

  14. Can Attention be Divided Between Perceptual Groups?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCann, Robert S.; Foyle, David C.; Johnston, James C.; Hart, Sandra G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Previous work using Head-Up Displays (HUDs) suggests that the visual system parses the HUD and the outside world into distinct perceptual groups, with attention deployed sequentially to first one group and then the other. New experiments show that both groups can be processed in parallel in a divided attention search task, even though subjects have just processed a stimulus in one perceptual group or the other. Implications for models of visual attention will be discussed.

  15. Perennial CBL centering problem can be minimized

    SciTech Connect

    Pilkington, P.E.

    1987-11-30

    The cement bond log (CBL) has been plagued by the problem of poor tool centering since it was introduced to the oil industry. There are reasons why poor tool centering continues to cause problems, and there are steps that operators and service companies can take to minimize this unnecessary phenomenon. Before going into these proposed solutions, some case histories are presented to illustrate the problem.

  16. Bribery and extortion: can restaurants help?

    PubMed

    Zucker, A

    2000-04-01

    Examples of tipping suggest that the distinction between tipping, bribery and extortion can be questioned. Some well known ideas about bribery will not work if extended to tipping and, indeed, these analyses may founder whether or not tipping, bribery and extortion merge. I suggest that more case study analysis as well as a discussion of the relationship between character and actions are needed. PMID:11273447

  17. Can You Find the Rat Holes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Using its rock abrasion tool, otherwise known as 'Rat,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity dotted the slope of 'Endurance Crater' with dimples that give scientists a glimpse into its layered geologic history. This image from the rover's navigation camera, taken on sol 169 (July 15, 2004), highlights the prolific work of the robotic 'rodent.' How many Rat holes can you identify? You will be able to check your answer against an image to be posted soon with all the holes identified.

  18. Predictive analytics can support the ACO model.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul

    2012-04-01

    Predictive analytics can be used to rapidly spot hard-to-identify opportunities to better manage care--a key tool in accountable care. When considering analytics models, healthcare providers should: Make value-based care a priority and act on information from analytics models. Create a road map that includes achievable steps, rather than major endeavors. Set long-term expectations and recognize that the effectiveness of an analytics program takes time, unlike revenue cycle initiatives that may show a quick return.

  19. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  20. Relative errors can cue absolute visuomotor mappings.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Loes C J; Ernst, Marc O

    2015-12-01

    When repeatedly switching between two visuomotor mappings, e.g. in a reaching or pointing task, adaptation tends to speed up over time. That is, when the error in the feedback corresponds to a mapping switch, fast adaptation occurs. Yet, what is learned, the relative error or the absolute mappings? When switching between mappings, errors with a size corresponding to the relative difference between the mappings will occur more often than other large errors. Thus, we could learn to correct more for errors with this familiar size (Error Learning). On the other hand, it has been shown that the human visuomotor system can store several absolute visuomotor mappings (Mapping Learning) and can use associated contextual cues to retrieve them. Thus, when contextual information is present, no error feedback is needed to switch between mappings. Using a rapid pointing task, we investigated how these two types of learning may each contribute when repeatedly switching between mappings in the absence of task-irrelevant contextual cues. After training, we examined how participants changed their behaviour when a single error probe indicated either the often-experienced error (Error Learning) or one of the previously experienced absolute mappings (Mapping Learning). Results were consistent with Mapping Learning despite the relative nature of the error information in the feedback. This shows that errors in the feedback can have a double role in visuomotor behaviour: they drive the general adaptation process by making corrections possible on subsequent movements, as well as serve as contextual cues that can signal a learned absolute mapping. PMID:26280315

  1. How language choice can affect HCAI prevention.

    PubMed

    Cole, Mark

    The financial and human costs of healthcare-associated infections have prompted many local and national policies/guidelines aimed at controlling or preventing infection. However, the language used in the discourse of this are of practice tends to lack objectivity and may make unachievable demands of staff. This article explores how such language can negatively affect staff behaviour and drive poor practice underground. PMID:27089754

  2. What can we do about it?

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1994-02-15

    The requirements for intercept have been defined. Most can be met with existing technology. Them are significant uncertainties in coupling efficiency and fragmentation limits. The best approach depends on warning, NEO size and composition, and cost. Optimal defenses generally involve both detection and defense. They are effective to large diameters and justify expenditures on the order of $50-100M/yr. Flyby and landing precursor experiments are scientifically justified. Coupling and deflection experiments are also needed and feasible.

  3. Renewable Energy Can Help Reduce Oil Dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, Dan

    2010-01-01

    In a speech to the Economic Club of Kansas City on June 23, 2010, NREL Director Dan Arvizu takes a realistic look at how renewable energy can help reduce America's dependence on oil, pointing out that the country gets as much energy from renewable sources now as it does from offshore oil production. For a transcript, visit http://www.nrel.gov/director/pdfs/energy_overview_06_10.pdf

  4. Can a macroscopic gyroscope feel torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.; Yasskin, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    We demonstrate that for a large class of Lagrangian-based torsion theories a macroscopic gyroscope is insensitive to the torsion field: there can be no coupling of the torsion to the gyroscope's angular momentum of rotation. To detect torsion a polarized system with a net elementary particle spin is needed. These conclusions are evident from the conservation laws, which form the basis for deriving the equations of motion.

  5. Hyperthermia: How Can It Be Used?

    PubMed

    Behrouzkia, Zhaleh; Joveini, Zahra; Keshavarzi, Behnaz; Eyvazzadeh, Nazila; Aghdam, Reza Zohdi

    2016-03-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) is a method used to treat tumors by increasing the temperature of the cells. The treatment can be applied in combination with other verified cancer treatments using several different procedures. We sought to present an overview of the different HT tumor treatment, recent advances in the field, and combinational treatment sequences and outcomes. We used a computer-aided search to identify articles that contained the keywords hyperthermia, cancer treatment, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, nanoparticle, and cisplatin. There are three types of HT treatment, which each need the use of applicators that are in contact with or in the proximity of the patient for the purpose of heating. Heating can be achieved using different types of energy (including microwaves, radio waves, and ultrasound). However, the source of energy will depend on the cancer type and location. The temperature used will also vary. HT is rarely used alone, and can be combined with other cancer treatments. When used in combination with other treatments, improved survival rates have been observed. However, despite in vitro and in vivo studies that support the use of concurrent hypothermia treatments, contradictory results suggest there is a need for more studies to identify other hidden effects of HT. PMID:27168918

  6. Evidence that patients can understand and use?

    PubMed

    Santesso, Nancy; Glenton, Claire; Lang, Britta

    2008-01-01

    The impact that research evidence can have on patients making decisions about their own care is often overlooked. Regardless of whether patients want to lead or fully participate in their care, it appears that patients still want to be informed. We have health information that patients could benefit from knowing, a growing body of evidence and experiences about how to translate this information to patients. The Cochrane Collaboration, an organisation that produces and disseminates systematic reviews of healthcare interventions, translates the evidence from their reviews into summaries for the public. Research is presently being conducted to test a format for the plain language summaries. Principles such as presenting evidence in standard qualitative statements, as relative and absolute risks, as natural frequencies, and in tables are being incorporated into the format. Groups within the Collaboration are also translating the evidence for use by patients and the public. Effective strategies are being used to target patients directly and via their physicians, such as dissemination on specific patient group websites and decision aids. Research evidence and experiences can feed into the creation of evidence that patients can understand and use. PMID:19216198

  7. What population studies can do for business.

    PubMed

    Hugo, G

    1991-05-01

    This paper examines how specific skills essential to demography, the scientific study of human populations, can be useful in private and public sector planning. Over the past 2 decades, Australia's population has undergone profound transformations -- a shift to below replacement level fertility and a change in ethnic composition, to name a few. And these changes have reshaped the markets for goods, services, and labor. Because demography seeks to analyze and explain changes in the size, composition, and spatial distribution of people, this discipline requires certain skills that can be particularly valuable to both private and public sector planning. These skills include: 1) a sound knowledge of why and how populations change over time; 2) a wide range of concepts (the "cohort," for example) which allow demographers to analyze the dynamics of change in a population; 3) statistical techniques; and 4) life tables techniques. Having named the specific skills of demographers, the author identifies the areas of business and public administration where these skills can be most useful, areas that include the following: strategic long-term planning, marketing, market segmentation, small area analysis, household and family level analysis, projections and estimates, human resources analysis, and international population trends. Finally, the author discusses the implications of applied population analysis on the training of demographers in Australia, emphasizing the role of the Australian Population Association in improving the status of demography as an important planning tool.

  8. Love or fear: can punishment promote cooperation?

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Sebestian

    2014-01-01

    Cooperation is a paradox: Why should one perform a costly behavior only to increase the fitness of another? Human societies, in which individuals cooperate with genetically unrelated individuals on a considerably larger scale than most mammals do, are especially puzzling in this regard. Recently, the threat of punishment has been given substantial attention as one of the mechanisms that could help sustain human cooperation in such situations. Nevertheless, using punishment to explain cooperation only leads to further questions: Why spend precious resources to penalize free-riders, especially if others can avoid this investment and cheaters can punish you back? Here, it is argued that current evidence supports punishment as an efficient means for the maintenance of cooperation, and that the gravity of proposed limitations of punishment for maintaining cooperation may have been overestimated in previous studies due to the features of experimental design. Most notably, the importance of factors as characteristic of human societies as reputation and language has been greatly neglected. Ironically, it was largely the combination of the two that enabled humans to shape costly punishment into numerous low-cost and less detrimental strategies that clearly can promote human cooperation. PMID:25627084

  9. Polyploidy can drive rapid adaptation in yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmecki, Anna M.; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Richmond, Phillip A.; Guillet, Marie; Shoresh, Noam; Sorenson, Amber L.; de, Subhajyoti; Kishony, Roy; Michor, Franziska; Dowell, Robin; Pellman, David

    2015-03-01

    Polyploidy is observed across the tree of life, yet its influence on evolution remains incompletely understood. Polyploidy, usually whole-genome duplication, is proposed to alter the rate of evolutionary adaptation. This could occur through complex effects on the frequency or fitness of beneficial mutations. For example, in diverse cell types and organisms, immediately after a whole-genome duplication, newly formed polyploids missegregate chromosomes and undergo genetic instability. The instability following whole-genome duplications is thought to provide adaptive mutations in microorganisms and can promote tumorigenesis in mammalian cells. Polyploidy may also affect adaptation independently of beneficial mutations through ploidy-specific changes in cell physiology. Here we perform in vitro evolution experiments to test directly whether polyploidy can accelerate evolutionary adaptation. Compared with haploids and diploids, tetraploids undergo significantly faster adaptation. Mathematical modelling suggests that rapid adaptation of tetraploids is driven by higher rates of beneficial mutations with stronger fitness effects, which is supported by whole-genome sequencing and phenotypic analyses of evolved clones. Chromosome aneuploidy, concerted chromosome loss, and point mutations all provide large fitness gains. We identify several mutations whose beneficial effects are manifest specifically in the tetraploid strains. Together, these results provide direct quantitative evidence that in some environments polyploidy can accelerate evolutionary adaptation.

  10. Can computational goals inform theories of vision?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barton L

    2015-04-01

    One of the most lasting contributions of Marr's posthumous book is his articulation of the different "levels of analysis" that are needed to understand vision. Although a variety of work has examined how these different levels are related, there is comparatively little examination of the assumptions on which his proposed levels rest, or the plausibility of the approach Marr articulated given those assumptions. Marr placed particular significance on computational level theory, which specifies the "goal" of a computation, its appropriateness for solving a particular problem, and the logic by which it can be carried out. The structure of computational level theory is inherently teleological: What the brain does is described in terms of its purpose. I argue that computational level theory, and the reverse-engineering approach it inspires, requires understanding the historical trajectory that gave rise to functional capacities that can be meaningfully attributed with some sense of purpose or goal, that is, a reconstruction of the fitness function on which natural selection acted in shaping our visual abilities. I argue that this reconstruction is required to distinguish abilities shaped by natural selection-"natural tasks" -from evolutionary "by-products" (spandrels, co-optations, and exaptations), rather than merely demonstrating that computational goals can be embedded in a Bayesian model that renders a particular behavior or process rational. PMID:25772207

  11. Can natural selection favour altruism between species?

    PubMed

    Wyatt, G A K; West, S A; Gardner, A

    2013-09-01

    Darwin suggested that the discovery of altruism between species would annihilate his theory of natural selection. However, it has not been formally shown whether between-species altruism can evolve by natural selection, or why this could never happen. Here, we develop a spatial population genetic model of two interacting species, showing that indiscriminate between species helping can be favoured by natural selection. We then ask if this helping behaviour constitutes altruism between species, using a linear-regression analysis to separate the total action of natural selection into its direct and indirect (kin selected) components. We show that our model can be interpreted in two ways, as either altruism within species, or altruism between species. This ambiguity arises depending on whether or not we treat genes in the other species as predictors of an individual's fitness, which is equivalent to treating these individuals as agents (actors or recipients). Our formal analysis, which focuses upon evolutionary dynamics rather than agents and their agendas, cannot resolve which is the better approach. Nonetheless, because a within-species altruism interpretation is always possible, our analysis supports Darwin's suggestion that natural selection does not favour traits that provide benefits exclusively to individuals of other species.

  12. Pannexin 1 deficiency can induce hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Bo; Zhu, Yan; Liang, Chun; Chen, Jin

    Gap junctions play a critical role in hearing. Connexin gap junction gene mutations can induce a high incidence of hearing loss. Pannexin (Panx) gene also encodes gap junction proteins in vertebrates. Panx1 is a predominant pannexin isoform and has extensive expression in the cochlea. Here, we report that deletion of Panx1 in the cochlea could produce a progressive hearing loss. The auditory brainstem response (ABR) recording showed that hearing loss was moderate to severe and severe at high-frequencies. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE), which reflects the activity of active cochlear mechanics that can amply acoustic stimulation to enhance hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity, was also reduced. We further found that Panx1 deficiency could activate Caspase-3 cell apoptotic pathway in the cochlea to cause hair cells and other types of cells degeneration. These data indicate that like connexins Panx1 deficiency can also induce hearing loss. These data also suggest that pannexins play important rather than redundant roles in the cochlea and hearing.

  13. Aerosol can puncture device operational test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1994-05-03

    Puncturing of aerosol cans is performed in the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 (WRAP 1) process as a requirement of the waste disposal acceptance criteria for both transuranic (TRU) waste and low-level waste (LLW). These cans have contained such things as paints, lubricating oils, paint removers, insecticides, and cleaning supplies which were used in radioactive facilities. Due to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Fire Protection concerns of the baseline system`s fire/explosion proof characteristics, a study was undertaken to compare the baseline system`s design to commercially available puncturing devices. While the study found no areas which might indicate a risk of fire or explosion, WHC Fire Protection determined that the puncturing system must have a demonstrated record of safe operation. This could be obtained either by testing the baseline design by an independent laboratory, or by substituting a commercially available device. As a result of these efforts, the commercially available Aerosolv can puncturing device was chosen to replace the baseline design. Two concerns were raised with the system. Premature blinding of the coalescing/carbon filter, due to its proximity to the puncture and draining operation; and overpressurization of the collection bottle due to its small volume and by blinding of the filter assembly. As a result of these concerns, testing was deemed necessary. The objective of this report is to outline test procedures for the Aerosolv.

  14. Ergonomics Designs of Aluminum Beverage Cans & Bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing; Itoh, Ryouiti; Yamazaki, Koetsu; Nishiyama, Sadao; Shinguryo, Takuro

    2005-08-01

    This paper introduced the finite element analyses into the ergonomics designs to evaluate the human feelings numerically and objectively. Two design examples in developing aluminum beverage cans & bottles are presented. The first example describes a design of the tab of the can with better finger access. A simulation of finger pulling up the tab of the can has been performed and a pain in the finger has been evaluated by using the maximum value of the contact stress of a finger model. The finger access comparison of three kinds of tab ring shape designs showed that the finger access of the tab that may have a larger contact area with finger is better. The second example describes a design of rib-shape embossed bottles for hot vending. Analyses of tactile sensation of heat have been performed and the amount of heat transmitted from hot bottles to finger was used to present the hot touch feeling. Comparison results showed that the hot touch feeling of rib-shape embossed bottles is better than that of cylindrical bottles, and that the shape of the rib also influenced the hot touch feeling.

  15. How Accurately can we Calculate Thermal Systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D; Blomquist, R N; Dean, C; Heinrichs, D; Kalugin, M A; Lee, M; Lee, Y; MacFarlan, R; Nagaya, Y; Trkov, A

    2004-04-20

    I would like to determine how accurately a variety of neutron transport code packages (code and cross section libraries) can calculate simple integral parameters, such as K{sub eff}, for systems that are sensitive to thermal neutron scattering. Since we will only consider theoretical systems, we cannot really determine absolute accuracy compared to any real system. Therefore rather than accuracy, it would be more precise to say that I would like to determine the spread in answers that we obtain from a variety of code packages. This spread should serve as an excellent indicator of how accurately we can really model and calculate such systems today. Hopefully, eventually this will lead to improvements in both our codes and the thermal scattering models that they use in the future. In order to accomplish this I propose a number of extremely simple systems that involve thermal neutron scattering that can be easily modeled and calculated by a variety of neutron transport codes. These are theoretical systems designed to emphasize the effects of thermal scattering, since that is what we are interested in studying. I have attempted to keep these systems very simple, and yet at the same time they include most, if not all, of the important thermal scattering effects encountered in a large, water-moderated, uranium fueled thermal system, i.e., our typical thermal reactors.

  16. Love or fear: can punishment promote cooperation?

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Sebestian

    2014-01-01

    Cooperation is a paradox: Why should one perform a costly behavior only to increase the fitness of another? Human societies, in which individuals cooperate with genetically unrelated individuals on a considerably larger scale than most mammals do, are especially puzzling in this regard. Recently, the threat of punishment has been given substantial attention as one of the mechanisms that could help sustain human cooperation in such situations. Nevertheless, using punishment to explain cooperation only leads to further questions: Why spend precious resources to penalize free-riders, especially if others can avoid this investment and cheaters can punish you back? Here, it is argued that current evidence supports punishment as an efficient means for the maintenance of cooperation, and that the gravity of proposed limitations of punishment for maintaining cooperation may have been overestimated in previous studies due to the features of experimental design. Most notably, the importance of factors as characteristic of human societies as reputation and language has been greatly neglected. Ironically, it was largely the combination of the two that enabled humans to shape costly punishment into numerous low-cost and less detrimental strategies that clearly can promote human cooperation.

  17. Polyploidy can drive rapid adaptation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Selmecki, Anna; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Richmond, Phillip A.; Guillet, Marie; Shoresh, Noam; Sorenson, Amber; De, Subhajyoti; Kishony, Roy; Michor, Franziska; Dowell, Robin; Pellman, David

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidy is observed across the tree of life, yet its influence on evolution remains incompletely understood1–4. Polyploidy, usually whole genome duplication (WGD), is proposed to alter the rate of evolutionary adaptation. This could occur through complex effects on the frequency or fitness of beneficial mutations 2,5–7. For example, in diverse cell types and organisms, immediately after a WGD, newly formed polyploids missegregate chromosomes and undergo genetic instability8–13. The instability following WGDs is thought to provide adaptive mutations in microorganisms13,14 and can promote tumorigenesis in mammalian cells11,15. Polyploidy may also affect adaptation independent of beneficial mutations through ploidy-specific changes in cell physiology16. Here, we performed in vitro evolution experiments to directly test whether polyploidy can accelerate evolutionary adaptation. Compared to haploids and diploids, tetraploids underwent significantly faster adaptation. Mathematical modeling suggested that rapid adaptation of tetraploids was driven by higher rates of beneficial mutations with stronger fitness effects, which was supported by whole-genome sequencing and phenotypic analyses of evolved clones. Chromosome aneuploidy, concerted chromosome loss, and point mutations all provided large fitness gains. We identified several mutations whose beneficial effects were manifest specifically in the tetraploid strains. Together, these results provide direct quantitative evidence that in some environments polyploidy can accelerate evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25731168

  18. Can Economics Provide Insights into Trust Infrastructure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishik, Claire

    Many security technologies require infrastructure for authentication, verification, and other processes. In many cases, viable and innovative security technologies are never adopted on a large scale because the necessary infrastructure is slow to emerge. Analyses of such technologies typically focus on their technical flaws, and research emphasizes innovative approaches to stronger implementation of the core features. However, an observation can be made that in many cases the success of adoption pattern depends on non-technical issues rather than technology-lack of economic incentives, difficulties in finding initial investment, inadequate government support. While a growing body of research is dedicated to economics of security and privacy in general, few theoretical studies in this area have been completed, and even fewer that look at the economics of “trust infrastructure” beyond simple “cost of ownership” models. This exploratory paper takes a look at some approaches in theoretical economics to determine if they can provide useful insights into security infrastructure technologies and architectures that have the best chance to be adopted. We attempt to discover if models used in theoretical economics can help inform technology developers of the optimal business models that offer a better chance for quick infrastructure deployment.

  19. Hyperthermia: How Can It Be Used?

    PubMed Central

    Behrouzkia, Zhaleh; Joveini, Zahra; Keshavarzi, Behnaz; Eyvazzadeh, Nazila; Aghdam, Reza Zohdi

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) is a method used to treat tumors by increasing the temperature of the cells. The treatment can be applied in combination with other verified cancer treatments using several different procedures. We sought to present an overview of the different HT tumor treatment, recent advances in the field, and combinational treatment sequences and outcomes. We used a computer-aided search to identify articles that contained the keywords hyperthermia, cancer treatment, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, nanoparticle, and cisplatin. There are three types of HT treatment, which each need the use of applicators that are in contact with or in the proximity of the patient for the purpose of heating. Heating can be achieved using different types of energy (including microwaves, radio waves, and ultrasound). However, the source of energy will depend on the cancer type and location. The temperature used will also vary. HT is rarely used alone, and can be combined with other cancer treatments. When used in combination with other treatments, improved survival rates have been observed. However, despite in vitro and in vivo studies that support the use of concurrent hypothermia treatments, contradictory results suggest there is a need for more studies to identify other hidden effects of HT. PMID:27168918

  20. Byproducts can make coal plants green

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, B.

    2007-07-15

    Co-locating ethanol plants at coal-burning sites, along with the use of biomass gasification to boost coal-fired plant output, can have positive economic and environmental benefits. Adding a biomass gasifier to an older coal-fired plant would inject gas with up to 10% of the fuel value in the coal and increase steam generation by the same amount. Sawdust can be injected as a reburn fuel without the need for gasification. A pre-scrubber would be added before the existing SO{sub 2} scrubber and waste heat from the boiler in the form of low-pressure steam would be sent to a co-located ethanol plant. This would lead to a decrease in emissions of NOx, mercury and SO{sub 2}, less mercury in the gypsum, a large greenhouse gas reduction, reduced net fuel cost, and revenue from hydrochloric acid by- product and from selling low-pressure steam to the ethanol plant. The Blue Flint Ethanol facility uses waste heat from Grand River Energy's 1,100 MW Coal Creek Station in South Jordan, Utah. The new generation of US ethanol plants is likely to use switchgrass and other cellulosic materials as feedstock. Straw and other forms of biomass have high chlorine content. PVC waste can be added to optimise the chlorine content of the scrubber. A chlorine pre-scrubber before the SO{sub 2} scrubber would capture HCl. 1 fig., 1 photo.

  1. Aneurysm strength can decrease under calcification.

    PubMed

    Volokh, Konstantin Y; Aboudi, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Aneurysms are abnormal dilatations of vessels in the vascular system that are prone to rupture. Prediction of the aneurysm rupture is a challenging and unsolved problem. Various factors can lead to the aneurysm rupture and, in the present study, we examine the effect of calcification on the aneurysm strength by using micromechanical modeling. The calcified tissue is considered as a composite material in which hard calcium particles are embedded in a hyperelastic soft matrix. Three experimentally calibrated constitutive models incorporating a failure description are used for the matrix representation. Two constitutive models describe the aneurysmal arterial wall and the third one - the intraluminal thrombus. The stiffness and strength of the calcified tissue are simulated in uniaxial tension under the varying amount of calcification, i.e. the relative volume of the hard inclusion within the periodic unit cell. In addition, the triaxiality of the stress state, which can be a trigger for the cavitation instability, is tracked. Results of the micromechanical simulation show an increase of the stiffness and a possible decrease of the strength of the calcified tissue as compared to the non-calcified one. The obtained results suggest that calcification (i.e. the presence of hard particles) can significantly affect the stiffness and strength of soft tissue. The development of refined experimental techniques that will allow for the accurate quantitative assessment of calcification is desirable. PMID:26717251

  2. Cloud Absorption Radiometer Autonomous Navigation System - CANS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, Duncan; Gatebe, Charles; McCune, Bill; Hellwig, Dustan

    2013-01-01

    CAR (cloud absorption radiometer) acquires spatial reference data from host aircraft navigation systems. This poses various problems during CAR data reduction, including navigation data format, accuracy of position data, accuracy of airframe inertial data, and navigation data rate. Incorporating its own navigation system, which included GPS (Global Positioning System), roll axis inertia and rates, and three axis acceleration, CANS expedites data reduction and increases the accuracy of the CAR end data product. CANS provides a self-contained navigation system for the CAR, using inertial reference and GPS positional information. The intent of the software application was to correct the sensor with respect to aircraft roll in real time based upon inputs from a precision navigation sensor. In addition, the navigation information (including GPS position), attitude data, and sensor position details are all streamed to a remote system for recording and later analysis. CANS comprises a commercially available inertial navigation system with integral GPS capability (Attitude Heading Reference System AHRS) integrated into the CAR support structure and data system. The unit is attached to the bottom of the tripod support structure. The related GPS antenna is located on the P-3 radome immediately above the CAR. The AHRS unit provides a RS-232 data stream containing global position and inertial attitude and velocity data to the CAR, which is recorded concurrently with the CAR data. This independence from aircraft navigation input provides for position and inertial state data that accounts for very small changes in aircraft attitude and position, sensed at the CAR location as opposed to aircraft state sensors typically installed close to the aircraft center of gravity. More accurate positional data enables quicker CAR data reduction with better resolution. The CANS software operates in two modes: initialization/calibration and operational. In the initialization/calibration mode

  3. Rotating Stars Can Help Planets Become Habitable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    What characteristics must a terrestrial planet exhibit to have the potential to host life? Orbiting within the habitable zone of its host star is certainly a good start, but theres another important aspect: the planet has to have the right atmosphere. A recent study has determined how host stars can help their planets to lose initial, enormous gaseous envelopes and become more Earth-like.Collecting An EnvelopeWhen a terrestrial planet forms inside a gaseous protoplanetary disk, it can accumulate a significant envelope of hydrogen gas causing the planet to bear more similarity to a mini-Neptune than to Earth. Before the planet can become habitable, it must shed this enormous, primordial hydrogen envelope, so that an appropriate secondary atmosphere can form.So what determines whether a planet can get rid of its protoatmosphere? The dominant process for shedding a hydrogen atmosphere is thermal mass loss: as the planets upper atmosphere is heated by X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from the host star, the envelope evaporates.A Critical DependenceIn a recent study led by Colin Johnstone (University of Vienna), a team of scientists has developed models of this evaporation process for hydrogen planetary atmospheres. In particular, Johnstone and collaborators examine how the host stars initial rotation rate which strongly impacts the stars level of XUV activity affects the degree to which the planets hydrogen atmosphere is evaporated, and the rate at which the evaporation occurs.The authors findings can be illustrated with the example of an Earth-mass planet located in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. In this case, the authors find four interesting regimes (shown in the plot to the right):Evolution of the hydrogen protoatmosphere of an Earth-mass planet in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. The four lettered cases describe different initial atmospheric masses. The three curves for each case describe the stellar rotation rate: slow (red

  4. The future of robotics can be ours.

    PubMed

    Eckberg, E

    1998-05-01

    As the use of robotic aides increases the possibility of telesurgery, the perioperative scope of practice could include using patients' homes or other nontraditional settings as surgical sites. Even mobile surgical vans could be used. To perform telesurgery, the health care industry actively must define the role of the health care professional with the patient who can make an incision and insert a laparoscope. This may create an opportune time to promote the RN first assistant (RNFA) role--a goal that will involve expanding our state nurse practice acts to allow RNFAs to perform various functions for true advanced practice in nontraditional settings. Additionally, it will mean defining what functions and personnel must be available in these new creative settings. Current experiments have focused on using nonlicensed assistants, which can lead to legal and moral concerns. Legal and moral concerns include not only appropriate personnel, but also patient privacy. In telesurgery, patient information would be transmitted over communication lines, possibly seriously jeopardizing patient privacy. Perioperative nurses must be vigilant regarding patient privacy and continue to be patient advocates. Additional concerns relate to the possible complications or emergencies that can occur in any procedure, such as bleeding, cardiac arrest, or malignant hyperthermia. As this field is being developed, these concerns must be addressed, and possible complications and emergencies must be prepared for. All patients deserve highly trained individuals to care for them. It is a concern that unlicensed personnel are being considered to manage these potentially serious situations. It is now more important than ever that perioperative nurses stay on top of technologic advances. One surgeon stated that perioperative nurses are at a point in history in which they can make a difference--a potentially lifesaving difference. Nurses will have to be comfortable with new technology, know when it is

  5. The future of robotics can be ours.

    PubMed

    Eckberg, E

    1998-05-01

    As the use of robotic aides increases the possibility of telesurgery, the perioperative scope of practice could include using patients' homes or other nontraditional settings as surgical sites. Even mobile surgical vans could be used. To perform telesurgery, the health care industry actively must define the role of the health care professional with the patient who can make an incision and insert a laparoscope. This may create an opportune time to promote the RN first assistant (RNFA) role--a goal that will involve expanding our state nurse practice acts to allow RNFAs to perform various functions for true advanced practice in nontraditional settings. Additionally, it will mean defining what functions and personnel must be available in these new creative settings. Current experiments have focused on using nonlicensed assistants, which can lead to legal and moral concerns. Legal and moral concerns include not only appropriate personnel, but also patient privacy. In telesurgery, patient information would be transmitted over communication lines, possibly seriously jeopardizing patient privacy. Perioperative nurses must be vigilant regarding patient privacy and continue to be patient advocates. Additional concerns relate to the possible complications or emergencies that can occur in any procedure, such as bleeding, cardiac arrest, or malignant hyperthermia. As this field is being developed, these concerns must be addressed, and possible complications and emergencies must be prepared for. All patients deserve highly trained individuals to care for them. It is a concern that unlicensed personnel are being considered to manage these potentially serious situations. It is now more important than ever that perioperative nurses stay on top of technologic advances. One surgeon stated that perioperative nurses are at a point in history in which they can make a difference--a potentially lifesaving difference. Nurses will have to be comfortable with new technology, know when it is

  6. Can CMB Experiments Find Planet Nine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have identified signs of an unseen, distant ninth planet in our solar system. How might we find the elusive Planet Nine? A team of scientists suggests the key might be cosmology experiments.AHypothetical PlanetOrbits of six distant Kuiper-belt objects. Their clustered perihelia and orbital orientations suggest they may have been shepherded by a massive object, hypothesized to be Planet Nine. [Caltech/Robert Hurt]Early this year, a study was published that demonstrated that the clustered orbits of distant Kuiper belt objects (and several other features of our solar system) can be explained by the gravitational tug of a yet-undiscovered planet. This hypothetical Planet Nine is predicted to be a giant planet similar to Neptune or Uranus, with a mass of more than ~10 Earthmasses, currently orbiting ~700 AU away.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Nicolas Cowan (McGill University in Canada) has estimated the blackbody emission expected from Planet Nine. The team proposes how we might be able to search for this distant body using its heat signature.Heat from an Icy WorldCowan and collaborators first estimate Planet Nines effective temperature, based on the solar flux received at ~700 AU and assuming its internal heating is similar to Uranus or Neptune. They find that Planet Nines effective temperature would likely be an icy ~3050 K, corresponding to a blackbody peak at 50100 micrometers.Search space for Planet Nine. Based on its millimeter flux and annual parallax motion, several current and future cosmology experiments may be able to detect it. Experiments resolution ranges are shown with blue boxes. [Cowan et al. 2016]How can we detect an object withemission that peaks in this range? Intriguingly, cosmology experiments monitoring the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation are optimized for millimeter flux. At a wavelength of 1mm, Cowan and collaborators estimate that Planet Nine would have a very detectable flux level of ~30 mJy. The

  7. How behavioral science can advance digital health.

    PubMed

    Pagoto, Sherry; Bennett, Gary G

    2013-09-01

    The field of behavioral science has produced myriad data on health behavior change strategies and leveraged such data into effective human-delivered interventions to improve health. Unfortunately, the impact of traditional health behavior change interventions has been heavily constrained by patient and provider burden, limited ability to measure and intervene upon behavior in real time, variable adherence, low rates of implementation, and poor third-party coverage. Digital health technologies, including mobile phones, sensors, and online social networks, by being available in real time, are being explored as tools to increase our understanding of health behavior and to enhance the impact of behavioral interventions. The recent explosion of industry attention to the development of novel health technologies is exciting but has far outpaced research. This Special Section of Translational Behavioral Medicine, Smartphones, Sensors, and Social Networks: A New Age of Health Behavior Change features a collection of studies that leverage health technologies to measure, change, and/or understand health behavior. We propose five key areas in which behavioral science can improve the impact of digital health technologies on public health. First, research is needed to identify which health technologies actually impact behavior and health outcomes. Second, we need to understand how online social networks can be leveraged to impact health behavior on a large scale. Third, a team science approach is needed in the developmental process of health technologies. Fourth, behavioral scientists should identify how a balance can be struck between the fast pace of innovation and the much slower pace of research. Fifth, behavioral scientists have an integral role in informing the development of health technologies and facilitating the movement of health technologies into the healthcare system.

  8. Can quasigeostrophic turbulence be modeled stochastically?

    SciTech Connect

    DelSole, T.

    1996-06-01

    Numerically generated data of quasigeostrophic turbulence in an equilibrated shear flow are analyzed to determine the extent to which they can be modeled by a Markov model. The time lagged covariances are collected into a matrix, C{sub {tau}}, and are substituted into the fluctuation-dissipation relation for a first-order Markov model with white noise forcing, C{sub {tau}}C{sub o}{sup {minus}1} = exp(A{tau}), to determine whether the relation is satisfied for a single dynamic operator A. The dynamic operator obtained by inverting the relation was found to depend on time lag. In particular, for small time lags ({tau} < 1 day), the eigenvectors and imaginary eigenvalues were independent of time lag, while the damping rates increased linearly with time lag. It is shown analytically that precisely this discrepancy occurs when the relation is applied to data generated by a red noise Markov model using a time lag that is small compared to the decorrelation time of the noise. Although a fourth-order Markov model with white noise can more accurately reproduce the covariances, the result of inverting the fluctuation-dissipation relation for such a model implies that the spectrum of the noise involves a superposition of stochastic processes of different spectral characteristics, in which case the effective dissipation and stochastic excitation cannot be completely solved by inverting such generalized fluctuation-dissipation relations. Projecting the data onto the dominant EOFs can distort the dynamic operator and introduce discrepancies even when the underlying data rigorously satisfies the fluctuation-dissipation relation. Despite this confounding factor, the consistency of the results at each order suggests that the effective dissipation is composed of low-order cross-stream gradients of streamfunction and that the excitation is correlated in the cross-stream direction within only a few Rossby radii. 23 rfs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Robots that can adapt like animals.

    PubMed

    Cully, Antoine; Clune, Jeff; Tarapore, Danesh; Mouret, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-05-28

    Robots have transformed many industries, most notably manufacturing, and have the power to deliver tremendous benefits to society, such as in search and rescue, disaster response, health care and transportation. They are also invaluable tools for scientific exploration in environments inaccessible to humans, from distant planets to deep oceans. A major obstacle to their widespread adoption in more complex environments outside factories is their fragility. Whereas animals can quickly adapt to injuries, current robots cannot 'think outside the box' to find a compensatory behaviour when they are damaged: they are limited to their pre-specified self-sensing abilities, can diagnose only anticipated failure modes, and require a pre-programmed contingency plan for every type of potential damage, an impracticality for complex robots. A promising approach to reducing robot fragility involves having robots learn appropriate behaviours in response to damage, but current techniques are slow even with small, constrained search spaces. Here we introduce an intelligent trial-and-error algorithm that allows robots to adapt to damage in less than two minutes in large search spaces without requiring self-diagnosis or pre-specified contingency plans. Before the robot is deployed, it uses a novel technique to create a detailed map of the space of high-performing behaviours. This map represents the robot's prior knowledge about what behaviours it can perform and their value. When the robot is damaged, it uses this prior knowledge to guide a trial-and-error learning algorithm that conducts intelligent experiments to rapidly discover a behaviour that compensates for the damage. Experiments reveal successful adaptations for a legged robot injured in five different ways, including damaged, broken, and missing legs, and for a robotic arm with joints broken in 14 different ways. This new algorithm will enable more robust, effective, autonomous robots, and may shed light on the principles

  10. Estrogens Can Disrupt Amphibian Mating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Frauke; Kloas, Werner

    2012-01-01

    The main component of classical contraceptives, 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), has high estrogenic activity even at environmentally relevant concentrations. Although estrogenic endocrine disrupting compounds are assumed to contribute to the worldwide decline of amphibian populations by adverse effects on sexual differentiation, evidence for EE2 affecting amphibian mating behaviour is lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that EE2 exposure at five different concentrations (0.296 ng/L, 2.96 ng/L, 29.64 ng/L, 2.96 µg/L and 296.4 µg/L) can disrupt the mating behavior of adult male Xenopus laevis. EE2 exposure at all concentrations lowered male sexual arousal, indicated by decreased proportions of advertisement calls and increased proportions of the call type rasping, which characterizes a sexually unaroused state of a male. Additionally, EE2 at all tested concentrations affected temporal and spectral parameters of the advertisement calls, respectively. The classical and highly sensitive biomarker vitellogenin, on the other hand, was only induced at concentrations equal or higher than 2.96 µg/L. If kept under control conditions after a 96 h EE2 exposure (2.96 µg/L), alterations of male advertisement calls vanish gradually within 6 weeks and result in a lower sexual attractiveness of EE2 exposed males toward females as demonstrated by female choice experiments. These findings indicate that exposure to environmentally relevant EE2 concentrations can directly disrupt male mate calling behavior of X. laevis and can indirectly affect the mating behavior of females. The results suggest the possibility that EE2 exposure could reduce the reproductive success of EE2 exposed animals and these effects might contribute to the global problem of amphibian decline. PMID:22355410

  11. Robots that can adapt like animals.

    PubMed

    Cully, Antoine; Clune, Jeff; Tarapore, Danesh; Mouret, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-05-28

    Robots have transformed many industries, most notably manufacturing, and have the power to deliver tremendous benefits to society, such as in search and rescue, disaster response, health care and transportation. They are also invaluable tools for scientific exploration in environments inaccessible to humans, from distant planets to deep oceans. A major obstacle to their widespread adoption in more complex environments outside factories is their fragility. Whereas animals can quickly adapt to injuries, current robots cannot 'think outside the box' to find a compensatory behaviour when they are damaged: they are limited to their pre-specified self-sensing abilities, can diagnose only anticipated failure modes, and require a pre-programmed contingency plan for every type of potential damage, an impracticality for complex robots. A promising approach to reducing robot fragility involves having robots learn appropriate behaviours in response to damage, but current techniques are slow even with small, constrained search spaces. Here we introduce an intelligent trial-and-error algorithm that allows robots to adapt to damage in less than two minutes in large search spaces without requiring self-diagnosis or pre-specified contingency plans. Before the robot is deployed, it uses a novel technique to create a detailed map of the space of high-performing behaviours. This map represents the robot's prior knowledge about what behaviours it can perform and their value. When the robot is damaged, it uses this prior knowledge to guide a trial-and-error learning algorithm that conducts intelligent experiments to rapidly discover a behaviour that compensates for the damage. Experiments reveal successful adaptations for a legged robot injured in five different ways, including damaged, broken, and missing legs, and for a robotic arm with joints broken in 14 different ways. This new algorithm will enable more robust, effective, autonomous robots, and may shed light on the principles

  12. FBL Outer Can Welder Analysis Software

    2003-04-21

    The Outer Can Welder Analysis Software (OCWAS) was originally developed by SRTC for use at Hanford to assist in the storage of their excess plutonium in the DOE standard 3013 containers until it can be properly dispositioned using one of the approved DOE methods. After that development effort, SRS funded SRTC to develop a similar system for FB-Line for use with 3013 canister welding at SRS. More robust analysis routines and techniques were used withmore » this new version as well as enhanced graphical representation of the data. During the welding process, critical weld parameters such as weld current and voltage, can give valuable information about the weld. In the past, weld data from the TIG welding process, has been monitored using strip chart recorders. The data from the weld process, recorded on the strip chart recorder traces, are reviewed to analyze the weld. To improve this process, another software package developed by SRTC, the OCW DAS, digitizes the weld data and stores the data in a file. The OCWAS automates the weld analysis process by analyzing the data obtained during the weld process. The OCWAS reads a data file that was previously collected using the OCW DAS software. The software will read the file and parse the data. The user is first prompted to enter the file name. The file is then opened and the operator name, canister identification, and Date/Time of Acquisition are read from the file and displayed on the screen. The binary weld data is then read from the file into an array until the end of the file is reached. The current, voltage, and position data are displayed on the screen in graphical format on the front panel. The weld power and resistance are calculated and are also displayed in graphical format on the front panel.« less

  13. Robots that can adapt like animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cully, Antoine; Clune, Jeff; Tarapore, Danesh; Mouret, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-05-01

    Robots have transformed many industries, most notably manufacturing, and have the power to deliver tremendous benefits to society, such as in search and rescue, disaster response, health care and transportation. They are also invaluable tools for scientific exploration in environments inaccessible to humans, from distant planets to deep oceans. A major obstacle to their widespread adoption in more complex environments outside factories is their fragility. Whereas animals can quickly adapt to injuries, current robots cannot `think outside the box' to find a compensatory behaviour when they are damaged: they are limited to their pre-specified self-sensing abilities, can diagnose only anticipated failure modes, and require a pre-programmed contingency plan for every type of potential damage, an impracticality for complex robots. A promising approach to reducing robot fragility involves having robots learn appropriate behaviours in response to damage, but current techniques are slow even with small, constrained search spaces. Here we introduce an intelligent trial-and-error algorithm that allows robots to adapt to damage in less than two minutes in large search spaces without requiring self-diagnosis or pre-specified contingency plans. Before the robot is deployed, it uses a novel technique to create a detailed map of the space of high-performing behaviours. This map represents the robot's prior knowledge about what behaviours it can perform and their value. When the robot is damaged, it uses this prior knowledge to guide a trial-and-error learning algorithm that conducts intelligent experiments to rapidly discover a behaviour that compensates for the damage. Experiments reveal successful adaptations for a legged robot injured in five different ways, including damaged, broken, and missing legs, and for a robotic arm with joints broken in 14 different ways. This new algorithm will enable more robust, effective, autonomous robots, and may shed light on the principles

  14. Improved patient pathways can prevent overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Emeny, Russell; Vincent, Connolly

    2013-03-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is a common problem throughout the western world. Not only does crowding create a miserable environment for patients, and to considerable stress and poor job satisfaction among staff, it can also lead EDs to breach the four-hour standard and other care quality indicators. In addition, crowding in EDs correlates with increases in patient mortality, rates of admission, lengths of inpatient stay and costs. This article argues that crowding is best tackled by the consistent application of eight principles, derived from various guidance, to emergency patient pathways, particularly those in acute settings. PMID:23586168

  15. On being green: can flow chemistry help?

    PubMed

    Ley, Steven V

    2012-08-01

    The principles of Green Chemistry are important but challenging drivers for most modern synthesis programs. To meet these challenges new flow chemistry tools are proving to be very effective by providing improved heat/mass transfer opportunities, lower solvent usage, less waste generation, hazardous compound containment, and the possibility of a 24/7 working regime. This machine-assisted approach can be used to effect repetitive or routine scale-up steps or when combined with reagent and scavenger cartridges, to achieve multi-step synthesis of complex natural products and pharmaceutical agents. PMID:22711555

  16. Can we assure quality without stifling innovation?

    PubMed

    Miller, Linda

    2014-12-01

    The emergence of regenerative medicine raises new questions about the best ways to ensure the safety and efficacy of stem cell therapies for patients. The Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT) believes minimum requirements for cellular therapy for regenerative medicine will promote patient safety, protect the research environment, and aid in the swift advancement of regenerative therapies from bench to bedside. The standards development process has demonstrated that consensus on minimum requirements advances the field. FACT's accreditation process and newly established "Common Standards for Cellular Therapies" can help meet unmet needs in regenerative medicine that will drive commercialization of new cell therapies.

  17. [Working as a sandblaster can cause silicosis].

    PubMed

    Schelde, Jacob; Authried, Georg; Madsen, Helle Dall; Perch, Michael; Sherson, David Lee

    2015-01-26

    Silicosis is a common occupational disease worldwide. It is caused by the inhalation of crystalline silicon dioxide, i.e. silica. Quartz is a common form of silica and occurs in sandstone and granite. Occupational exposure can occur e.g. in mining, quarrying and sandblasting. The inhaled silica triggers an inflammatory response when phagocytosed which eventually causes fibrosis. We present a 45-year-old male Danish sandblaster who developed silicosis, and due to rapid decline in lung function received a lung transplant with an excellent result. PMID:25612962

  18. Can rewiring strategy control the epidemic spreading?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chao; Yin, Qiuju; Liu, Wenyang; Yan, Zhijun; Shi, Tianyu

    2015-11-01

    Relation existed in the social contact network can affect individuals' behaviors greatly. Considering the diversity of relation intimacy among network nodes, an epidemic propagation model is proposed by incorporating the link-breaking threshold, which is normally neglected in the rewiring strategy. The impact of rewiring strategy on the epidemic spreading in the weighted adaptive network is explored. The results show that the rewiring strategy cannot always control the epidemic prevalence, especially when the link-breaking threshold is low. Meanwhile, as well as strong links, weak links also play a significant role on epidemic spreading.

  19. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Veronesi, Luciano; Raimondi, ALbert A.

    1989-01-01

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid.

  20. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOEpatents

    Veronesi, L.; Raimondi, A.A.

    1989-12-12

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid. 5 figs.

  1. What can history do for bioethics?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Duncan

    2013-05-01

    This article details the relationship between history and bioethics. I argue that historians' reluctance to engage with bioethics rests on a misreading of the field as solely reducible to applied ethics, and overlooks previous enthusiasm for historical perspectives. I claim that seeing bioethics as its practitioners see it - as an interdisciplinary meeting ground - should encourage historians to collaborate in greater numbers. I conclude by outlining how bioethics might benefit from new histories of the field, and how historians can lend a fresh perspective to bioethical debates.

  2. Can Bohmian mechanics be made relativistic?

    PubMed Central

    Dürr, Detlef; Goldstein, Sheldon; Norsen, Travis; Struyve, Ward; Zanghì, Nino

    2014-01-01

    In relativistic space–time, Bohmian theories can be formulated by introducing a privileged foliation of space–time. The introduction of such a foliation—as extra absolute space–time structure—would seem to imply a clear violation of Lorentz invariance, and thus a conflict with fundamental relativity. Here, we consider the possibility that, instead of positing it as extra structure, the required foliation could be covariantly determined by the wave function. We argue that this allows for the formulation of Bohmian theories that seem to qualify as fundamentally Lorentz invariant. We conclude with some discussion of whether or not they might also qualify as fundamentally relativistic. PMID:24511259

  3. Can Bohmian mechanics be made relativistic?

    PubMed

    Dürr, Detlef; Goldstein, Sheldon; Norsen, Travis; Struyve, Ward; Zanghì, Nino

    2014-02-01

    In relativistic space-time, Bohmian theories can be formulated by introducing a privileged foliation of space-time. The introduction of such a foliation-as extra absolute space-time structure-would seem to imply a clear violation of Lorentz invariance, and thus a conflict with fundamental relativity. Here, we consider the possibility that, instead of positing it as extra structure, the required foliation could be covariantly determined by the wave function. We argue that this allows for the formulation of Bohmian theories that seem to qualify as fundamentally Lorentz invariant. We conclude with some discussion of whether or not they might also qualify as fundamentally relativistic. PMID:24511259

  4. WHAT CAN HISTORY DO FOR BIOETHICS?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    This article details the relationship between history and bioethics. I argue that historians' reluctance to engage with bioethics rests on a misreading of the field as solely reducible to applied ethics, and overlooks previous enthusiasm for historical perspectives. I claim that seeing bioethics as its practitioners see it – as an interdisciplinary meeting ground – should encourage historians to collaborate in greater numbers. I conclude by outlining how bioethics might benefit from new histories of the field, and how historians can lend a fresh perspective to bioethical debates. PMID:22150828

  5. Can Primary Care Sleep Medicine Integration Work?

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Thomas D.; Herr, Adam; Thuras, Paul; Cook, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders are common in the veteran population. There is an increasing need for sleep medicine services in returning veterans. Primary care providers are uncomfortable diagnosing and treating sleep disorders. Patients often have to wait several days before they can be seen by a sleep clinician. This pilot project evaluated the feasibility of providing sleep medicine services to patients in a primary care setting. Primary care providers were involved in decision-making, resulting in improved satisfaction with sleep medicine services among primary care clinicians. PMID:25133050

  6. Forgetfulness can help you win games.

    PubMed

    Burridge, James; Gao, Yu; Mao, Yong

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple game model where agents with different memory lengths compete for finite resources. We show by simulation and analytically that an instability exists at a critical memory length, and as a result, different memory lengths can compete and coexist in a dynamical equilibrium. Our analytical formulation makes a connection to statistical urn models, and we show that temperature is mirrored by the agent's memory. Our simple model of memory may be incorporated into other game models with implications that we briefly discuss.

  7. Forgetfulness can help you win games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, James; Gao, Yu; Mao, Yong

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple game model where agents with different memory lengths compete for finite resources. We show by simulation and analytically that an instability exists at a critical memory length, and as a result, different memory lengths can compete and coexist in a dynamical equilibrium. Our analytical formulation makes a connection to statistical urn models, and we show that temperature is mirrored by the agent's memory. Our simple model of memory may be incorporated into other game models with implications that we briefly discuss.

  8. Conservation: can we live better on less

    SciTech Connect

    Gore, R.

    1981-02-01

    Americans are looking for more-efficient ways to live and conduct their business without lowering their living standard. New building designs, intensive gardening, new energy sources, and vanpooling are among the pioneering efforts. Conservation also requires innovative ways to raise capital to handle nontraditional projects. A new industry of house doctors audits the energy efficiency of buildings and creates more-conserving designs and materials. Other industries will develop renewable and synthetic energy sources. Reports of changing attitudes and a growing interest in decentralized energy management are signs that conservation can become a way of life. (DCK)

  9. Children's voices: can we hear them?

    PubMed

    McPherson, G; Thorne, S

    2000-02-01

    This article addresses an important but often neglected notion in the care of children--the notion of voice. Recognizing that a crucial role for pediatric nurses is that of advocate for the child, this article poses the questions of how children's voices can be heard and how nurses know whose voice they represent when they act in an advocacy capacity. Drawing on contributions from psychology, sociology, and feminist studies, the analysis narrows our focus to the special challenge created for pediatric nurses when they recognize the importance of voice in caring for children, and examines the complexities inherent in attending to voice in pediatric nursing practice.

  10. Clinical nursing research: you can do it!

    PubMed

    Zadinsky, J K; Broome, M E

    1989-01-01

    Nurses can use clinical nursing research to strengthen the knowledge base of their practice and to develop effective nursing interventions. When planning and implementing their studies, nurses must anticipate and deal with important issues concerning the realities of clinical nursing research. These issues include developing the research question, planning for an optimal sample size, passing the Institutional Review Committee, managing conflicts between clinical and research roles, selecting instruments to measure the variables, collecting data in a clinical setting, analyzing and interpreting the data, funding the proposed study, and ensuring administrative support.

  11. Engineering plastics can cut fuel system cost

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K.W.

    1983-03-01

    Examines the use of small nylon, acetal, and polyester resin parts in carbureted and continuous (throttle body) fuel injection (CFI) systems as well as port fuel injected (PFI) systems. Points out that conversions of larger castings offer car manufacturers more substantial cost savings. Reveals that heat-stabilized glass- and mineral-reinforced nylons can replace sand-cast and die-cast aluminium in injection systems. Concludes that 40% of the cost of a fuel system may be saved via maximum use of the capabilities of engineering plastic materials.

  12. On being green: can flow chemistry help?

    PubMed

    Ley, Steven V

    2012-08-01

    The principles of Green Chemistry are important but challenging drivers for most modern synthesis programs. To meet these challenges new flow chemistry tools are proving to be very effective by providing improved heat/mass transfer opportunities, lower solvent usage, less waste generation, hazardous compound containment, and the possibility of a 24/7 working regime. This machine-assisted approach can be used to effect repetitive or routine scale-up steps or when combined with reagent and scavenger cartridges, to achieve multi-step synthesis of complex natural products and pharmaceutical agents.

  13. How We Can Constrain Aerosol Type Globally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In addition to aerosol number concentration, aerosol size and composition are essential attributes needed to adequately represent aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) in models. As the nature of ACI varies enormously with environmental conditions, global-scale constraints on particle properties are indicated. And although advanced satellite remote-sensing instruments can provide categorical aerosol-type classification globally, detailed particle microphysical properties are unobtainable from space with currently available or planned technologies. For the foreseeable future, only in situ measurements can constrain particle properties at the level-of-detail required for ACI, as well as to reduce uncertainties in regional-to-global-scale direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). The limitation of in situ measurements for this application is sampling. However, there is a simplifying factor: for a given aerosol source, in a given season, particle microphysical properties tend to be repeatable, even if the amount varies from day-to-day and year-to-year, because the physical nature of the particles is determined primarily by the regional environment. So, if the PDFs of particle properties from major aerosol sources can be adequately characterized, they can be used to add the missing microphysical detail the better sampled satellite aerosol-type maps. This calls for Systematic Aircraft Measurements to Characterize Aerosol Air Masses (SAM-CAAM). We are defining a relatively modest and readily deployable, operational aircraft payload capable of measuring key aerosol absorption, scattering, and chemical properties in situ, and a program for characterizing statistically these properties for the major aerosol air mass types, at a level-of-detail unobtainable from space. It is aimed at: (1) enhancing satellite aerosol-type retrieval products with better aerosol climatology assumptions, and (2) improving the translation between satellite-retrieved aerosol optical properties and

  14. As Far as Opportunity's Eye Can See

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for As Far as Opportunity's Eye Can See (QTVR)

    This expansive view of the martian real estate surrounding the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is the first 360 degree, high-resolution color image taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The airbag marks, or footprints, seen in the soil trace the route by which Opportunity rolled to its final resting spot inside a small crater at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The exposed rock outcropping is a future target for further examination. This image mosaic consists of 225 individual frames.

  15. Can there be an ethics of care?

    PubMed Central

    Allmark, P

    1995-01-01

    There is a growing body of writing, for instance from the nursing profession, espousing an approach to ethics based on care. I suggest that this approach is hopelessly vague and that the vagueness is due to an inadequate analysis of the concept of care. An analysis of 'care' and related terms suggests that care is morally neutral. Caring is not good in itself, but only when it is for the right things and expressed in the right way. 'Caring' ethics assumes wrongly that caring is good, thus it can tell us neither what constitutes those right things, nor what constitutes the right way. PMID:7776342

  16. Can cosmic structure form without dark matter?

    PubMed

    Dodelson, Scott; Liguori, Michele

    2006-12-01

    One of the prime pieces of evidence for dark matter is the observation of large overdense regions in the Universe. To account for this observation, perturbations had to have grown since recombination by a factor greater than (1+z*) approximately 1180 where z* is the epoch of recombination. This enhanced growth does not happen in general relativity, and so dark matter is needed in the standard theory. We show here that enhanced growth can occur in alternatives to general relativity, in particular, in Bekenstein's relativistic version of modified Newtonian dynamics. PMID:17280192

  17. [Working as a sandblaster can cause silicosis].

    PubMed

    Schelde, Jacob; Authried, Georg; Madsen, Helle Dall; Perch, Michael; Sherson, David Lee

    2015-01-26

    Silicosis is a common occupational disease worldwide. It is caused by the inhalation of crystalline silicon dioxide, i.e. silica. Quartz is a common form of silica and occurs in sandstone and granite. Occupational exposure can occur e.g. in mining, quarrying and sandblasting. The inhaled silica triggers an inflammatory response when phagocytosed which eventually causes fibrosis. We present a 45-year-old male Danish sandblaster who developed silicosis, and due to rapid decline in lung function received a lung transplant with an excellent result.

  18. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: can hearts really break?

    PubMed

    Farris, Cindy; McEnroe-Petitte, Denise; Kanayama, Tiffanie

    2014-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM), or broken-heart syndrome, is a form of cardiomyopathy (CM) that is significantly different from other common types. This form of CM occurs spontaneously and can be easily reversed. TCM is seen primarily in postmenopausal women with a recent stressful event. Patients with TCM often present with symptoms suggestive of a myocardial infarction. Home health-care and hospice clinicians interact frequently with caregivers and other family members who are living under stressful circumstances. It is important that home care clinicians be familiar with TCM and understand the relationship that may exist between stress, stressful events, triggers, and TCM. PMID:24978575

  19. MWD can improve well safety, control

    SciTech Connect

    Fontenot, J.E.; Rao, M.V.

    1988-02-15

    Measuring while drilling (MWD) can help improve well safety and at the same time reduce trouble and total drilling costs. Detection of geologically overpressured zones with the technique is now commonplace, but virtually no advance has been made in the art of detection of influx of formation fluids into the wellbore. This third of five articles in a series describes the most recently available MWD techniques of pressure prediction and discusses the need for influx detection and possible means for realizing this in the future.

  20. Can Two-Dimensional Boron Superconduct?

    PubMed

    Penev, Evgeni S; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2016-04-13

    Two-dimensional boron is expected to exhibit various structural polymorphs, all being metallic. Additionally, its small atomic mass suggests strong electron-phonon coupling, which in turn can enable superconducting behavior. Here we perform first-principles analysis of electronic structure, phonon spectra, and electron-phonon coupling of selected 2D boron polymorphs and show that the most stable structures predicted to feasibly form on a metal substrate should also exhibit intrinsic phonon-mediated superconductivity, with estimated critical temperature in the range of Tc ≈ 10-20 K.

  1. Can technological artefacts be moral agents?

    PubMed

    Peterson, Martin; Spahn, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    In this paper we discuss the hypothesis that, 'moral agency is distributed over both humans and technological artefacts', recently proposed by Peter-Paul Verbeek. We present some arguments for thinking that Verbeek is mistaken. We argue that artefacts such as bridges, word processors, or bombs can never be (part of) moral agents. After having discussed some possible responses, as well as a moderate view proposed by Illies and Meijers, we conclude that technological artefacts are neutral tools that are at most bearers of instrumental value.

  2. Crisis management can leave residual effects.

    PubMed

    Margolis, G L; DeMuro, P R

    1991-10-01

    A healthcare organization that once suffered from poor financial performance may fail to correct recovery methods that can cause lingering legal and accounting problems. A crisis management style is prone to creating problems with an organization's debt structure, Medicare and Medicaid payment, tax issues, labor relations, licensing and accreditation, compliance with fraud and abuse rules, and accounting for charity care. After stabilizing a worrisome financial situation, a healthcare organization should conduct an internal audit to ensure that its legal and accounting practices remain above board.

  3. Can scientists and policy makers work together?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, B.; Pang, T.; Lin, V.; Puska, P.; Sherman, G.; Goddard, M.; Ackland, M.; Sainsbury, P.; Stachenko, S.; Morrison, H.; Clottey, C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses a fundamental question in evidence based policy making—can scientists and policy makers work together? It first provides a scenario outlining the different mentalities and imperatives of scientists and policy makers, and then discusses various issues and solutions relating to whether and how scientists and policy makers can work together. Scientists and policy makers have different goals, attitudes toward information, languages, perception of time, and career paths. Important issues affecting their working together include lack of mutual trust and respect, different views on the production and use of evidence, different accountabilities, and whether there should be a link between science and policy. The suggested solutions include providing new incentives to encourage scientists and policy makers to work together, using knowledge brokers (translational scientists), making organisational changes, defining research in a broader sense, re-defining the starting point for knowledge transfer, expanding the accountability horizon, and finally, acknowledging the complexity of policy making. It is hoped that further discussion and debate on the partnership idea, the need for incentives, recognising the incompatibility problems, the role of civil society, and other related themes will lead to new opportunities for further advancing evidence based policy and practice. PMID:16020638

  4. Can the adult skeleton recover lost bone?

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, A; Schneider, V

    1991-01-01

    The loss of bone mineral with aging and subsequent development of osteoporosis is a common problem in elderly women, and as life expectancy increases, in elderly men as well. Space flight also causes bone loss and could be a limiting factor for long duration missions, such as, a Mars expedition or extended occupation of a space station. Before effective countermeasures can be devised, a thorough knowledge of the extent, location, and rate of bone loss during weightlessness is needed from actual space flight data or ground-based disuse models. In addition, the rate and extent that these losses are reversed after return from space flight are of primary importance. Although the mechanisms are not likely to be the same in aging and space flight, there are common elements. For example, strategies developed to prevent disuse bone loss or to enhance the rate of recovery following space flight might have direct applicability to clinical medicine. For various reasons, little attention has been given to recovery of bone mass following space flight. As a prelude to the design of strategies to enhance recovery of bone, this paper reviews published literature related to bone recovery in the adult. We conclude that recovery can be expected, but the rate and extent will be individual and bone site dependent. The development of strategies to encourage or enhance bone formation following space flight may be as important as implementing countermeasures during flight.

  5. How can you capture cultural dynamics?

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Cross-cultural comparison is a critical method by which we can examine the interaction between culture and psychological processes. However, comparative methods tend to overlook cultural dynamics – the formation, maintenance, and transformation of cultures over time. The present article gives a brief overview of four different types of research designs that have been used to examine cultural dynamics in the literature: (1) cross-temporal methods that trace medium- to long-term changes in a culture; (2) cross-generational methods that explore medium-term implications of cultural transmission; (3) experimental simulation methods that investigate micro-level mechanisms of cultural dynamics; and (4) formal models and computer simulation methods often used to investigate long-term and macro-level implications of micro-level mechanisms. These methods differ in terms of level of analysis for which they are designed (micro vs. macro-level), scale of time for which they are typically used (short-, medium-, or long-term), and direction of inference (deductive vs. empirical method) that they imply. The paper describes examples of these methods, discuss their strengths and weaknesses, and point to their complementarity in inquiries about cultural change. Because cultural dynamics research is about meaning over time, issues deriving from interpretation of meaning and temporal distance between researchers and objects of inquiry can pose threats to the validity of the research and its findings. The methodological question about hermeneutic circle is recalled and further inquiries are encouraged. PMID:25309476

  6. Can Rhesus Monkey Learn Executive Attention?

    PubMed Central

    Bramlett-Parker, Jessica; Washburn, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of data indicates that, compared to humans, rhesus monkeys perform poorly on tasks that assess executive attention, or voluntary control over selection for processing, particularly under circumstances in which attention is attracted elsewhere by competing stimulus control. In the human-cognition literature, there are hotly active debates about whether various competencies such as executive attention, working memory capacity, and fluid intelligence can be improved through training. In the current study, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) completed an attention-training intervention including several inhibitory-control tasks (a Simon task, numerical Stroop task, global/local interference task, and a continuous performance task) to determine whether generalized improvements would be observed on a version of the Attention Network Test (ANT) of controlled attention, which was administered before and after the training intervention. Although the animals demonstrated inhibition of prepotent responses and improved in executive attention with practice, this improvement did not generalize to the ANT at levels consistently better than were observed for control animals. Although these findings fail to encourage the possibility that species differences in cognitive competencies can be ameliorated through training, they do advance our understanding of the competition between stimulus-control and cognitive-control in performance by nonhuman and human primates. PMID:27304969

  7. When can the magnetosphere support cavity modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartinger, Michael; Ridley, Aaron; Moldwin, Mark; Welling, Daniel

    The Earth’s magnetosphere supports several types of Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves; these include trapped fast mode waves often referred to as cavity modes, waveguide modes, and tunneling modes/virtual resonance. All trapped fast mode waves require a stable outer boundary to sustain wave activity. The magnetopause, often treated as the outer boundary for cavity/waveguide modes in the dayside magnetosphere, is often not stable, particularly during geomagnetic storms. It is usually not possible to treat moving boundary condition problems analytically, and thus no previous analytic models have studied the effect of magnetopause boundary motion on cavity modes. However, simulations that can treat boundary motion in a self-consistent manner can address this problem. We examine how magnetopause motion affects the magnetosphere’s ability to sustain trapped fast mode waves on the dayside using idealized simulations obtained from the BATSRUS global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code. We present the first observations of cavity modes in BATSRUS, replicating results from other global MHD codes. We further show how varying solar wind conditions - in particular, increasing density and dynamic pressure fluctuations - affect magnetopause motion and, in turn, trapped fast mode waves.

  8. What variables can influence clinical reasoning?

    PubMed Central

    Ashoorion, Vahid; Liaghatdar, Mohammad Javad; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-01-01

    Background: Clinical reasoning is one of the most important competencies that a physician should achieve. Many medical schools and licensing bodies try to predict it based on some general measures such as critical thinking, personality, and emotional intelligence. This study aimed at providing a model to design the relationship between the constructs. Materials and Methods: Sixty-nine medical students participated in this study. A battery test devised that consist four parts: Clinical reasoning measures, personality NEO inventory, Bar-On EQ inventory, and California critical thinking questionnaire. All participants completed the tests. Correlation and multiple regression analysis consumed for data analysis. Results: There is low to moderate correlations between clinical reasoning and other variables. Emotional intelligence is the only variable that contributes clinical reasoning construct (r=0.17-0.34) (R2 chnage = 0.46, P Value = 0.000). Conclusion: Although, clinical reasoning can be considered as a kind of thinking, no significant correlation detected between it and other constructs. Emotional intelligence (and its subscales) is the only variable that can be used for clinical reasoning prediction. PMID:23853636

  9. Measurement Can't Influence the Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Pankaj

    2006-04-01

    Science does not govern the nature rather it has been laid to describe the various facts of the nature. This straightly leads us to state some ``categorical'' facts/clarification about the nature. 1) The speed of light (even in vacuum) has not the same constant value in each frame of reference. It encourages us to think uniformity of physical laws in all inertial frames, constancy of speed of light and/or Maxwellian laws of electromagnetism are incoherent. 2) All natural processes do have same consequences in all inertial frames of reference. It's only law of Physics which may have different-different forms depending on frames of reference. 3) Measurement can't influence the natural processes! Different measurements after all can be considered only as different rates of the happening of the nature. 4) Kinetic Energy of a particle is same in each inertial frame of reference and is ``truly'' defined by classical mechanics. The total energy of a particle is defined as Ei = K.E. + P.E. + Work done 5) Energy and entity of a particle are equivalent, i.e., they are just two modes of existence - in a particular sort of conditions we see a particle existing in forms of energy or with entity-features or in both. We strongly feel that the postulates of `Special Theory of Relativity' are totally wrong and only ``willful'' assumptions.

  10. Coevolution can reverse predator-prey cycles.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Michael H; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-05-20

    A hallmark of Lotka-Volterra models, and other ecological models of predator-prey interactions, is that in predator-prey cycles, peaks in prey abundance precede peaks in predator abundance. Such models typically assume that species life history traits are fixed over ecologically relevant time scales. However, the coevolution of predator and prey traits has been shown to alter the community dynamics of natural systems, leading to novel dynamics including antiphase and cryptic cycles. Here, using an eco-coevolutionary model, we show that predator-prey coevolution can also drive population cycles where the opposite of canonical Lotka-Volterra oscillations occurs: predator peaks precede prey peaks. These reversed cycles arise when selection favors extreme phenotypes, predator offense is costly, and prey defense is effective against low-offense predators. We present multiple datasets from phage-cholera, mink-muskrat, and gyrfalcon-rock ptarmigan systems that exhibit reversed-peak ordering. Our results suggest that such cycles are a potential signature of predator-prey coevolution and reveal unique ways in which predator-prey coevolution can shape, and possibly reverse, community dynamics.

  11. How nanotechnology can enhance docetaxel therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Na

    2013-01-01

    Docetaxel has been recognized as one of the most efficient anticancer drugs over the past decade; however, its poor water solubility and systemic toxicity have greatly limited its clinical application. In recent decades, the emergence of nanotechnology has provided new drug delivery systems for docetaxel, which can improve its water solubility, minimize the side effects and increase the tumor-targeting distribution by passive or active targeting. This review focuses on the research progress in nanoformulations related to docetaxel delivery – such as polymer-based, lipid-based, and lipid-polymer hybrid nanocarriers, as well as inorganic nanoparticles – addressing their structures, characteristics, preparation, physicochemical properties, methods by which drugs are loaded into them, and their in vitro and in vivo efficacies. Further, the targeted ligands used in the docetaxel nanoformulations, such as monoclonal antibodies, peptides, folic acid, transferrin, aptamers and hyaluronic acid, are described. The issues to overcome before docetaxel nanoformulations can be used in clinical and commercial applications are also discussed. PMID:23950643

  12. Auricular Acupressure Can Modulate Pain Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Antonietta; Nori, Stefania Lucia; Lorusso, Letizia; Secondulfo, Carmine; Monda, Marcellino; Viggiano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of our study was to investigate if auriculotherapy (AT) can modulate pain threshold. In our experiments, AT consisted of placing Vaccaria seeds over the “fingers point” of one ear. Two groups of healthy volunteers were enrolled for the study. Each subject was asked to perform an autoalgometric test developed by our group on three occasions: before, 1 hour after, AT and 24 hours after AT. Participants of the first group received a 2-minute long session of AT, while participants of the second group received a 2-minute long session of sham treatment, consisting of a puncture/massage above the skin of the neck. The autoalgometric test consisted of applying an increasing pressure with the finger-tips and finger-backs of four fingers by the subjects themselves (i.e., eight sites were evaluated) against a round-shaped needle for two times: until a minimum pain sensation (first time, minimal test) or a maximally tolerable pain sensation (second time, maximal test). Our results showed a significant higher pain threshold in the maximal test at 24 hours after AT compared to sham treatment. This result indicates for the first time that AT can increase pain tolerability, rather than affecting the minimal pain threshold. PMID:26236378

  13. Can the adult skeleton recover lost bone?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Adrian; Schneider, Victor

    1991-01-01

    The loss of bone mineral with aging and subsequent development of osteoporosis is a common problem in elderly women, and as life expectancy increases, in elderly men as well. Space flight also causes bone loss and could be a limiting factor for long duration missions, such as, a Mars expedition or extended occupation of a Space Station. Before effective countermeasures can be devised, a thorough knowledge of the extent, location, and rate of bone loss during weightlessness is needed from actual space flight data or ground-based disuse models. In addition, the rate and extent that these losses are reversed after return from space flight are of primary importance. Although the mechanisms are not likely to be the same in aging and space flight, there are common elements. For example, strategies developed to prevent disuse bone loss or to enhance the rate of recovery following space flight might have direct applicability to clinical medicine. For various reasons, little attention has been given to recovery of bone mass following space flight. As a prelude to the design of strategies to enhance recovery of bone, this paper reviews published literature related to bone recovery in the adult. We conclude that recovery can be expected, but the rate and extent will be individual and bone site dependent. The development of strategies to encourage or enhance bone formation following space flight may be as important as implementing countermeasures during flight.

  14. Can price controls induce optimal physician behavior?

    PubMed

    Wedig, G; Mitchell, J B; Cromwell, J

    1989-01-01

    Recently, budget-conscious policymakers have shifted their attention to the physician services market and have begun to consider a wide variety of price regulatory schemes for moderating expenditures in this market. In a recent article in this journal, Feldman and Sloan warned that price controls on physician services may cause undesirable declines in service quality, independent of their budgetary ramifications. Our aim in this article is to reconsider the effects of price controls in the broader context of insurance coverage and moral hazard. Our ultimate goal is to assess the benefits of price controls independent of specific assumptions about the controversial issues of demand inducement and income targeting. Using a simple extension of the Feldman/Sloan model, we find that price controls can be and almost certainly are welfare-improving as long as consumers are sufficiently well insured, regardless of where one stands on the inducement issue. The salutary effects of price controls, on the other hand, can be compromised by income-targeting behavior on the part of physicians. We also introduce evidence from Medicare's recent fee freeze to evaluate the possibility of income-targeting behavior empirically. While formal studies of income targeting suggest that its magnitude is small in cross-section, we warn that its effects may be larger over time; this is what our descriptive evidence suggests. We conclude that more dramatic short-term progress on physician fee inflation will require stronger measures, such as putting physicians at risk for consumer expenditures.

  15. Can scientists and policy makers work together?

    PubMed

    Choi, Bernard C K; Pang, Tikki; Lin, Vivian; Puska, Pekka; Sherman, Gregory; Goddard, Michael; Ackland, Michael J; Sainsbury, Peter; Stachenko, Sylvie; Morrison, Howard; Clottey, Clarence

    2005-08-01

    This paper addresses a fundamental question in evidence based policy making--can scientists and policy makers work together? It first provides a scenario outlining the different mentalities and imperatives of scientists and policy makers, and then discusses various issues and solutions relating to whether and how scientists and policy makers can work together. Scientists and policy makers have different goals, attitudes toward information, languages, perception of time, and career paths. Important issues affecting their working together include lack of mutual trust and respect, different views on the production and use of evidence, different accountabilities, and whether there should be a link between science and policy. The suggested solutions include providing new incentives to encourage scientists and policy makers to work together, using knowledge brokers (translational scientists), making organisational changes, defining research in a broader sense, re-defining the starting point for knowledge transfer, expanding the accountability horizon, and finally, acknowledging the complexity of policy making. It is hoped that further discussion and debate on the partnership idea, the need for incentives, recognising the incompatibility problems, the role of civil society, and other related themes will lead to new opportunities for further advancing evidence based policy and practice. PMID:16020638

  16. How wealth accumulation can promote cooperation.

    PubMed

    Chadefaux, Thomas; Helbing, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Explaining the emergence and stability of cooperation has been a central challenge in biology, economics and sociology. Unfortunately, the mechanisms known to promote it either require elaborate strategies or hold only under restrictive conditions. Here, we report the emergence, survival, and frequent domination of cooperation in a world characterized by selfishness and a strong temptation to defect, when individuals can accumulate wealth. In particular, we study games with local adaptation such as the prisoner's dilemma, to which we add heterogeneity in payoffs. In our model, agents accumulate wealth and invest some of it in their interactions. The larger the investment, the more can potentially be gained or lost, so that present gains affect future payoffs. We find that cooperation survives for a far wider range of parameters than without wealth accumulation and, even more strikingly, that it often dominates defection. This is in stark contrast to the traditional evolutionary prisoner's dilemma in particular, in which cooperation rarely survives and almost never thrives. With the inequality we introduce, on the contrary, cooperators do better than defectors, even without any strategic behavior or exogenously imposed strategies. These results have important consequences for our understanding of the type of social and economic arrangements that are optimal and efficient. PMID:21048947

  17. Coevolution can reverse predator-prey cycles.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Michael H; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-05-20

    A hallmark of Lotka-Volterra models, and other ecological models of predator-prey interactions, is that in predator-prey cycles, peaks in prey abundance precede peaks in predator abundance. Such models typically assume that species life history traits are fixed over ecologically relevant time scales. However, the coevolution of predator and prey traits has been shown to alter the community dynamics of natural systems, leading to novel dynamics including antiphase and cryptic cycles. Here, using an eco-coevolutionary model, we show that predator-prey coevolution can also drive population cycles where the opposite of canonical Lotka-Volterra oscillations occurs: predator peaks precede prey peaks. These reversed cycles arise when selection favors extreme phenotypes, predator offense is costly, and prey defense is effective against low-offense predators. We present multiple datasets from phage-cholera, mink-muskrat, and gyrfalcon-rock ptarmigan systems that exhibit reversed-peak ordering. Our results suggest that such cycles are a potential signature of predator-prey coevolution and reveal unique ways in which predator-prey coevolution can shape, and possibly reverse, community dynamics. PMID:24799689

  18. How can single sensory neurons predict behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Pitkow, Xaq; Liu, Sheng; Angelaki, Dora E.; DeAngelis, Gregory C.; Pouget, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Summary Single sensory neurons can be surprisingly predictive of behavior in discrimination tasks. We propose this is possible because sensory information extracted from neural populations is severely restricted, either by near-optimal decoding of a population with information-limiting correlations or suboptimal decoding that is blind to correlations. These have different consequences for choice correlations, the correlations between neural responses and behavioral choices. In the vestibular and cerebellar nuclei and the dorsal medial superior temporal area, we found that choice correlations during heading discrimination are consistent with near-optimal decoding of neuronal responses corrupted by information-limiting correlations. In the ventral intraparietal area, the choice correlations are also consistent with the presence of information-limiting correlations, but this area does not appear to influence behavior although the choice correlations are particularly large. These findings demonstrate how choice correlations can be used to assess the efficiency of the downstream read-out and detect the presence of information-limiting correlations. PMID:26182422

  19. Can Asteroid Airbursts Cause Dangerous Tsunami?.

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, Mark B.

    2015-10-01

    I have performed a series of high-resolution hydrocode simulations to generate “source functions” for tsunami simulations as part of a proof-of-principle effort to determine whether or not the downward momentum from an asteroid airburst can couple energy into a dangerous tsunami in deep water. My new CTH simulations show enhanced momentum multiplication relative to a nuclear explosion of the same yield. Extensive sensitivity and convergence analyses demonstrate that results are robust and repeatable for simulations with sufficiently high resolution using adaptive mesh refinement. I have provided surface overpressure and wind velocity fields to tsunami modelers to use as time-dependent boundary conditions and to test the hypothesis that this mechanism can enhance the strength of the resulting shallow-water wave. The enhanced momentum result suggests that coupling from an over-water plume-forming airburst could be a more efficient tsunami source mechanism than a collapsing impact cavity or direct air blast alone, but not necessarily due to the originally-proposed mechanism. This result has significant implications for asteroid impact risk assessment and airburst-generated tsunami will be the focus of a NASA-sponsored workshop at the Ames Research Center next summer, with follow-on funding expected.

  20. Can -omics inform a food safety assessment?

    PubMed

    Chassy, Bruce M

    2010-12-01

    Omic technologies can in principle allow visualization of the all of changes that take place when the genetics, nutrition or environment of an organism is altered. Targeted compositional analysis is today a key component of the food safety assessment paradigm in which known nutrients, anti-nutrients, toxicants, allergens, and other molecules of potential biological importance to humans or animals are quantitatively analyzed. This allows safety assessors to compare the composition and safety of one food with closely related counterparts. Omic technologies measure many analytes-some of which are unidentified-but the analysis often sacrifices one or more of the characteristics of validated analytical methods currently used for food analysis. Databases that would allow the safety assessor to interpret differences are not currently available. There is also no reason to believe that the targeted compositional analysis in use today does not provide the evidence needed to ensure food safety, nor is there any current reason to believe that omics can add value to the safety assessment process. The regulation of transgenic crops is far more rigorous than is justified since they present no new risks compared with traditional breeding, and are more precisely defined and better understood than their non-transgenic equivalent.