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Sample records for rat brain striatal

  1. Effects of isomers of apomorphines on dopamine receptors in striatal and limbic tissue of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, N.S.; Baldessarini, R.J.; Bromley, S.; Neumeyer, J.L.

    1985-09-16

    The optical isomers of apomorphine (APO) and N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) were interacted with three biochemical indices of dopamine (Da) receptors in extrapyramidal and limbic preparations of rat brain tissues. There were consistent isomeric preferences for the R(-) configuration of both DA analogs in stimulation adenylate cyclase (D-1 sites) and in competing for high affinity binding of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol (D-2 sites) and of /sup 3/H-ADTN (DA agonist binding sites) in striatal tissue, with lesser isomeric differences in the limbic tissue. The S(+) apomorphines did not inhibit stimulation of adenylate cyclase by DA. The tendency for greater activity of higher apparent affinity of R(-) apomorphines in striatum may reflect the evidently greater abundance of receptor sites in that region. There were only small regional differences in interactions of the apomorphine isomers with all three receptor sites, except for a strong preference of (-)NPA for striatal D-2 sites. These results do not parallel our recent observations indicating potent and selective antidopaminergic actions of S(+) apomorphines in the rat limbic system. They suggest caution in assuming close parallels between current biochemical functional, especially behavioral, methods of evaluating dopamine receptors of mammalian brain.

  2. In vivo brain microdialysis studies on the striatal dopamine and serotonin release in zitter mutant rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kanji; Nishimura, Akira; Hattori, Hiroyuki; Joyce, Jeffery N; Yoshida, Toshihide; Hioki, Chizuko; Kogure, Akinori; Ueda, Shuichi

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, using in vivo brain microdialysis, we investigated the basal extracellular dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) release in the caudal striatum (cSTR) of young (4-6 months old) and aged (10-12 months old) zitter mutant rats. The basal extracellular levels of DA release in both young and aged zitter rats were significantly lower than that of age-matched Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, whereas only aged zitter rats showed a significant difference in the basal 5-HT release. Dopaminergic neurons were more vulnerable than serotonergic neurons in the cSTR of zitter mutant rats during aging. Perfusion of 60 mM potassium (K+) enhanced the extracellular levels of cSTR DA in the young zitter rats and the extracellular levels of both DA and 5-HT in the cSTR of the aged zitter rats. The firing rate of K+-stimulated monoamine release in the cSTR was significantly higher in the zitter rats than in the age-matched SD rats. These findings suggest that there are innate quantitative differences in the releasable pool and the availability of monoamines in the cSTR of zitter mutant rats.

  3. Involvement of striatal lipid peroxidation and inhibition of calcium influx into brain slices in neurobehavioral alterations in a rat model of short-term oral exposure to manganese.

    PubMed

    Avila, Daiana Silva; Gubert, Priscila; Fachinetto, Roselei; Wagner, Caroline; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes

    2008-11-01

    Manganese is an essential element for biological systems, nevertheless occupational exposure to high levels of Mn can lead to neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by excessive Mn accumulation, especially in astrocytes of basal ganglia and symptoms closely resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate behavioral and biochemical alterations in adult rats exposed for 30 days to 10 and 25mg/mL of MnCl(2) in their drinking water. MnCl(2) intoxicated rats showed impaired locomotor activity in comparison to control animals. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation were increased, delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (delta-ALA-D, an enzyme sensitive to pro-oxidant situations) activity was inhibited and (45)Ca(2+) influx into striatal slices was decreased in rats exposed to 25mg/mL of Mn, indicating that this brain region was markedly affected by short-term Mn exposure. In contrast, Mn exposure was not associated with characteristic extrapyramidal effects and did not modify protein oxidation, suggesting that the striatal damage represents early stages of Mn-induced damage. In addition, treatment with Mn was associated with reduced body weight gain, but there were no discernible alterations in liver and kidney function. In conclusion, Mn caused increased oxidative stress and decreased (45)Ca(2+) influx into the striatum, which are likely linked to impaired locomotor activity, but not with the occurrence of orofacial dyskinesia.

  4. Effects of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH 58621 on cyclooxygenase-2 expression, glial activation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor availability in a rat model of striatal neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Minghetti, Luisa; Greco, Anita; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Pezzola, Antonella; Blum, David; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Popoli, Patrizia

    2007-05-01

    Inhibition of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) is neuroprotective in several experimental models of striatal diseases. However, the mechanisms elicited by A2AR blockade are only partially known, and critical aspects about the potential beneficial effects of A2AR antagonism in models of neurodegeneration still await elucidation. In the present study, we analyzed the influence of the selective A2AR antagonist SCH 58261 in a rat model of striatal excitotoxicity obtained by unilateral intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (QA). We found that SCH 58261 differently affected the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by QA in cortex and striatum. The antagonist enhanced COX-2 expression in cortical neurons and prevented it in striatal microglia-like cells. Similarly, SCH 58261 differently regulated astrogliosis and microglial activation in the 2 brain regions. In addition, the A2AR antagonist prevented the QA-induced increase in striatal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Because COX-2 activity has been linked to excitotoxic processes and because brain-derived neurotrophic factor depletion has been observed in mouse models as well as in patients with Huntington disease, we suggest that the final outcome of A2AR blockade (namely neuroprotection vs neurodegeneration) is likely to depend on the balance among its various and region-specific effects.

  5. Excessive S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine-Dependent Methylation Increases Levels of Methanol, Formaldehyde and Formic Acid in Rat Brain Striatal Homogenates: Possible role in S-adenosyl-L-methionine-induced Parkinson’s disease-like disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Sook; Chen, Hongtao; Hardman, Chadwick; Simm, Anthony; Charlton, Clivel

    2009-01-01

    Aims Excessive methylation may be a precipitating factor for Parkinson’s disease (PD) since S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the endogenous methyl donor, induces PD-like changes when injected into the rat brain. The hydrolysis of the methyl ester bond of the methylated proteins produces methanol. Since methanol is oxidized into formaldehyde, and formaldehyde into formic acid in the body, we investigated the effects of SAM on the production of methanol, formaldehyde and formic acid in rat brain striatal homogenates and the toxicity of these products in PC12 cells. Main methods radio-enzymatic and colorimetric assays, cell viability, Western blot. Key findings SAM increased the formation of methanol, formaldehyde and formic acid in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Concentrations of [3H-methyl]-SAM at 0.17, 0.33, 0.67 and 1.34 nM produced 3.8, 8.0, 18.3 and 34.4 fmol/mg protein/h of [3H] methanol in rat striatal homogenates, respectively. SAM also significantly generated formaldehyde and formic acid in striatal homogenates. Formaldehyde was the most toxic metabolite to differentiated PC12 pheochromocytoma cells in cell culture studies, indicating that formaldehyde formed endogenously may contribute to neuronal damage in excessive methylation conditions. Subtoxic concentration of formaldehyde decreased the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, the limiting factor in dopamine synthesis. Formaldehyde was more toxic to catecholaminergic PC12 cells than C6 glioma cells, indicating that neurons are more vulnerable to formaldehyde than glia cells. Significance We suggest that excessive carboxylmethylation of proteins might be involved in the SAM-induced PD-like changes and in the aging process via the toxic effects of formaldehyde. PMID:18930743

  6. Exercise training reinstates cortico-cortical sensorimotor functional connectivity following striatal lesioning: Development and application of a subregional-level analytic toolbox for perfusion autoradiographs of the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Hao; Heintz, Ryan; Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa; Scremin, Oscar; Maarek, Jean-Michel; Holschneider, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Current rodent connectome projects are revealing brain structural connectivity with unprecedented resolution and completeness. How subregional structural connectivity relates to subregional functional interactions is an emerging research topic. We describe a method for standardized, mesoscopic-level data sampling from autoradiographic coronal sections of the rat brain, and for correlation-based analysis and intuitive display of cortico-cortical functional connectivity (FC) on a flattened cortical map. A graphic user interface “Cx-2D” allows for the display of significant correlations of individual regions-of-interest, as well as graph theoretical metrics across the cortex. Cx-2D was tested on an autoradiographic data set of cerebral blood flow (CBF) of rats that had undergone bilateral striatal lesions, followed by 4 weeks of aerobic exercise training or no exercise. Effects of lesioning and exercise on cortico-cortical FC were examined during a locomotor challenge in this rat model of Parkinsonism. Subregional FC analysis revealed a rich functional reorganization of the brain in response to lesioning and exercise that was not apparent in a standard analysis focused on CBF of isolated brain regions. Lesioned rats showed diminished degree centrality of lateral primary motor cortex, as well as neighboring somatosensory cortex--changes that were substantially reversed in lesioned rats following exercise training. Seed analysis revealed that exercise increased positive correlations in motor and somatosensory cortex, with little effect in non-sensorimotor regions such as visual, auditory, and piriform cortex. The current analysis revealed that exercise partially reinstated sensorimotor FC lost following dopaminergic deafferentation. Cx-2D allows for standardized data sampling from images of brain slices, as well as analysis and display of cortico-cortical FC in the rat cerebral cortex with potential applications in a variety of autoradiographic and histologic

  7. Exercise training reinstates cortico-cortical sensorimotor functional connectivity following striatal lesioning: development and application of a subregional-level analytic toolbox for perfusion autoradiographs of the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Hao; Heintz, Ryan; Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G.; Scremin, Oscar U.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Current rodent connectome projects are revealing brain structural connectivity with unprecedented resolution and completeness. How subregional structural connectivity relates to subregional functional interactions is an emerging research topic. We describe a method for standardized, mesoscopic-level data sampling from autoradiographic coronal sections of the rat brain, and for correlation-based analysis and intuitive display of cortico-cortical functional connectivity (FC) on a flattened cortical map. A graphic user interface “Cx-2D” allows for the display of significant correlations of individual regions-of-interest, as well as graph theoretical metrics across the cortex. Cx-2D was tested on an autoradiographic data set of cerebral blood flow (CBF) of rats that had undergone bilateral striatal lesions, followed by 4 weeks of aerobic exercise training or no exercise. Effects of lesioning and exercise on cortico-cortical FC were examined during a locomotor challenge in this rat model of Parkinsonism. Subregional FC analysis revealed a rich functional reorganization of the brain in response to lesioning and exercise that was not apparent in a standard analysis focused on CBF of isolated brain regions. Lesioned rats showed diminished degree centrality of lateral primary motor cortex, as well as neighboring somatosensory cortex—changes that were substantially reversed in lesioned rats following exercise training. Seed analysis revealed that exercise increased positive correlations in motor and somatosensory cortex, with little effect in non-sensorimotor regions such as visual, auditory, and piriform cortex. The current analysis revealed that exercise partially reinstated sensorimotor FC lost following dopaminergic deafferentation. Cx-2D allows for standardized data sampling from images of brain slices, as well as analysis and display of cortico-cortical FC in the rat cerebral cortex with potential applications in a variety of autoradiographic and histologic

  8. Cortical regulation of striatal projection neurons and interneurons in a Parkinson's disease rat model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-jia; Chen, Si; Ouyang, Li-si; Jia, Yu; Liu, Bing-bing; Mu, Shu-hua; Ma, Yu-xin; Wang, Wei-ping; Wei, Jia-you; Li, You-lan; Chen, Zhi; Lei, Wan-long

    2016-01-01

    Striatal neurons can be either projection neurons or interneurons, with each type exhibiting distinct susceptibility to various types of brain damage. In this study, 6-hydroxydopamine was injected into the right medial forebrain bundle to induce dopamine depletion, and/or ibotenic acid was injected into the M1 cortex to induce motor cortex lesions. Immunohistochemistry and western blot assay showed that dopaminergic depletion results in significant loss of striatal projection neurons marked by dopamine- and cyclic adenosine monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein, molecular weight 32 kDa, calbindin, and μ-opioid receptor, while cortical lesions reversed these pathological changes. After dopaminergic deletion, the number of neuropeptide Y-positive striatal interneurons markedly increased, which was also inhibited by cortical lesioning. No noticeable change in the number of parvalbumin-positive interneurons was found in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats. Striatal projection neurons and interneurons show different susceptibility to dopaminergic depletion. Further, cortical lesions inhibit striatal dysfunction and damage induced by 6-hydroxydopamine, which provides a new possibility for clinical treatment of Parkinson's disease. PMID:28197194

  9. The effects of systemically administered taurine and N-pivaloyltaurine on striatal extracellular dopamine and taurine in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Salimäki, J; Scriba, G; Piepponen, T P; Rautolahti, N; Ahtee, L

    2003-08-01

    The second most abundant cerebral amino acid, taurine, is widely consumed in the so-called "energy drinks". Therefore, its possible actions on the brain are of great interest. In the present experiments taurine was given intraperitoneally to rats in order to study if it can be administered systemically in large enough amounts to alter cerebral dopaminergic transmission or to induce hypothermia. In addition, the effects of subcutaneously administered lipophilic taurine analogue, N-pivaloyltaurine, were studied. The extracellular striatal taurine and dopamine concentrations were estimated using in vivo microdialysis in awake and freely moving rats, and the rectal temperatures were measured. Taurine at the total dose of 45 mmol/kg i.p. led to a maximally 8-fold increased striatal extracellular taurine concentration, induced a long-lasting hypothermia, and significantly reduced the striatal extracellular dopamine concentration. The latter effect was strengthened by co-treatment with reuptake inhibitor nomifensine. N-pivaloyltaurine (15 mmol/kg in total, s.c.) only slightly elevated the striatal extracellular taurine concentration, failed to alter the rectal temperature, and in contrast to taurine somewhat elevated the striatal extracellular dopamine concentration suggesting a different mechanism or locus of action from that of taurine. Finally, our experiments using brain microdialysis confirmed the earlier findings that taurine is slowly eliminated from the brain. The results clearly indicate that systemically given taurine enters the brain in concentrations that induce pharmacological effects.

  10. Striatal and extrastriatal microPET imaging of D2/D3 dopamine receptors in rat brain with [¹⁸F]fallypride and [¹⁸F]desmethoxyfallypride.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu, Cristian C; Coleman, Robert A; Pan, Min-Liang; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we compared two different D(2/3) receptor ligands, [¹⁸F]fallypride and [¹⁸F]desmethoxyfallypride ([¹⁸F]DMFP) with respect to the duration of the scan, visualization of extrastriatal receptors, and binding potentials (BP(ND) ) in the rat brain. In addition, we studied the feasibility of using these tracers following a period of awake tracer uptake, during which the animal may perform a behavioral task. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were imaged with [¹⁸F]fallypride and with [¹⁸F]DMFP in four different studies using microPET. All scans were performed under isoflurane anesthesia. The first (test) and second (retest) study were 150-min baseline scans. No retest scans were performed with [¹⁸F]DMFP. A third study was a 60-min awake uptake of radiotracer followed by a 90-min scan. A fourth study was a 150-min competition scan with haloperidol (0.2 mg/kg) administered via tail vein at 90-min post-[¹⁸F]fallypride injection and 60-min post-[¹⁸F]DMFP. For the test-retest studies, BP(ND) was measured using both Logan noninvasive (LNI) method and the interval ratios (ITR) method. Cerebellum was used as a reference region. For the third study, the binding was measured only with the ITR method, and the results were compared to the baseline results. Studies showed that the average transient equilibrium time in the dorsal striatum (DSTR) was at 90 min for [¹⁸F]fallypride and 30 min for [¹⁸F]DMFP. The average BP(ND) for [¹⁸F]fallypride was 14.4 in DSTR, 6.8 in ventral striatum (VSTR), 1.3 in substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA), 1.4 in colliculi (COL), and 1.5 in central gray area. In the case of [¹⁸F]DMFP, the average BP(ND) values were 2.2 in DSTR, 2.7 in VSTR, and 0.8 in SN/VTA. The haloperidol blockade showed detectable decrease in binding of both tracers in striatal regions with a faster displacement of [¹⁸F]DMFP. No significant changes in BP(ND) of [¹⁸F]fallypride due to the initial awake state of the animal were

  11. Populations of striatal medium spiny neurons encode vibrotactile frequency in rats: modulation by slow wave oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hawking, Thomas G; Gerdjikov, Todor V

    2013-01-01

    Dorsolateral striatum (DLS) is implicated in tactile perception and receives strong projections from somatosensory cortex. However, the sensory representations encoded by striatal projection neurons are not well understood. Here we characterized the contribution of DLS to the encoding of vibrotactile information in rats by assessing striatal responses to precise frequency stimuli delivered to a single vibrissa. We applied stimuli in a frequency range (45-90 Hz) that evokes discriminable percepts and carries most of the power of vibrissa vibration elicited by a range of complex fine textures. Both medium spiny neurons and evoked potentials showed tactile responses that were modulated by slow wave oscillations. Furthermore, medium spiny neuron population responses represented stimulus frequency on par with previously reported behavioral benchmarks. Our results suggest that striatum encodes frequency information of vibrotactile stimuli which is dynamically modulated by ongoing brain state.

  12. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Tanara Vieira; Pedro, Daniela Zótico; de Cordova, Fabiano Mendes; Lopes, Mark William; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Mendes-de-Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel; Walz, Roger; Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old). The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM) caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3) in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain. PMID:24324973

  13. Protective effect of melatonin upon neuropathology, striatal function, and memory ability after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Hartman, Richard; Rojas, Hugo; Manaenko, Anatol; Chen, Wanqiu; Ayer, Robert; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2010-03-01

    Since free radicals play a role in the mechanisms of brain injury after hemorrhagic stroke, the effect of melatonin (a potent antioxidant and free-radical scavenger) on outcomes was investigated after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. ICH was induced by clostridial collagenase infusion into the right caudate putamen, and several time points and doses of melatonin were studied. Brain edema and neurological function at 24 h were unchanged in comparison with vehicle-treated groups, in spite of oxidative stress reductions. Repeated treatment with the lower dose of melatonin (5 mg/kg) given at 1 h and every 24 h thereafter for 3 days after ICH, led to normalization of striatal function and memory ability over the course of 8 weeks, and less brain atrophy 2 weeks later. These results suggest that melatonin is safe for use after ICH, reduces oxidative stress, provides brain protection, and could be used for future investigations of free radical mechanisms after cerebral hemorrhage.

  14. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors with iron deficiency in rats: effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-07-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A(2A) receptors was found in rats fed during 3 weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A(2A) receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS.

  15. Exercise-induced rescue of tongue function without striatal dopamine sparing in a rat neurotoxin model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Schaser, Allison J; Russell, John A

    2013-09-01

    Unilateral lesions to the medial forebrain bundle with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lead to force and timing deficits during a complex licking task. We hypothesized that training targeting tongue force generation during licking would improve timing and force measures and also lead to striatal dopamine sparing. Nine month-old male Fisher344/Brown Norway rats were used in this experiment. Sixteen rats were in the control condition and received tongue exercise (n=8) or no exercise (n=8). Fourteen rats were in the 6-OHDA lesion condition and underwent tongue exercise (n=7) and or no exercise (n=7). Following 4 weeks of training and post-training measures, all animals underwent bilateral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves to measure muscle contractile properties and were then transcardially perfused and brain tissues collected for immunohistochemistry to examine striatal dopamine content. Results demonstrated that exercise animals performed better for maximal force, average force, and press rate than their no-exercise counterparts, and the 6-OHDA animals that underwent exercise performed as well as the Control No Exercise group. Interestingly, there were no group differences for tetanic muscle force, despite behavioral recovery of forces. Additionally, behavioral and neurochemical analyses indicate that there were no differences in striatal dopamine. Thus, targeted exercise can improve tongue force and timing deficits related to 6-OHDA lesions and this exercise likely has a central, versus peripheral (muscle strength) mechanism. However, this mechanism is not related to sparing of striatal dopamine content.

  16. Striatal Enkephalinergic Differences in Rats Selectively Bred for Intrinsic Running Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Derek C.; Holmes, Philip V.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Dishman, Rodney K.

    2014-01-01

    Rats selectively bred for high- and low-capacity for running on a treadmill (HCR; LCR) also differ in wheel-running behavior, but whether wheel-running can be explained by intrinsic or adaptive brain mechanisms is not as yet understood. It is established that motivation of locomotory behavior is driven by dopaminergic transmission in mesolimbic and mesostriatal systems. However, whether voluntary wheel running is associated with enkephalinergic activity in the ventral striatum is not known. Materials & Methods 40 male (20 HCR and 20 LCR) and 40 female (20 HCR and 20 LCR) rats were randomly assigned to 3 weeks of activity wheel exposure or sedentary conditions without wheel access. After 3 weeks of activity-wheel running, rats were decapitated and brains were extracted. Coronal sections were analyzed utilizing in situ hybridization histochemistry for enkephalin (ENK) mRNA in the ventral striatum. Results HCR rats expressed less ENK than LCR rats in the nucleus accumbens among females (p <.01) and in the olfactory tubercle among both females (p <.05) and males (p<.05). There was no effect of wheel running on ENK mRNA expression. Conclusion Line differences in ENK expression in the olfactory tubercle, and possibly the nucleus accumbens, partly explain divergent wheel-running behavior. The lower striatal ENK in the HCR line is consistent with enhanced dopaminergic tone, which may explain the increased motivation for wheel running observed in the HCR line. PMID:24842004

  17. β-asarone and levodopa co-administration increase striatal dopamine level in 6-hydroxydopamine induced rats by modulating P-glycoprotein and tight junction proteins at the blood-brain barrier and promoting levodopa into the brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Ma, Ruanxin; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-06-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is widely considered as one of the most effective drug constituents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of L-dopa is <5%, which causes low efficacy. Neuroprotective effects of β-asarone on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD rats were demonstrated by our previous studies. Co-administration of β-asarone and L-dopa has not been explored until being investigated on PD rats in this study. PD rats were divided into four groups: untreated, L-dopa-treated, β-asarone-treated and co-administered-treated groups. All of the treatments were administered to the rats twice per day for 30 days. The L-dopa, dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), S100β and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels were subsequently determined. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp), zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), claudin-5, occludin and actin expression was also assessed in cortex. Changes in BBB ultrastructure were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the co-administered treatment increased levels of L-dopa, DA, DOPAC and HVA in striatum, and S100β in plasma, but down-regulated NSE, P-gp, ZO-1, occludin, actin and claudin-5 in cortex. Crevices were observed between capillary endothelial cells at intercellular tight junction of the striatum in co-administered-treated group, while the endothelial cells in untreated group were tightly jointing each other. In addition, the correlations of L-dopa or DA and P-gp or tight junction proteins respectively were significantly negative in co-administered- and β-asarone-treated groups. These findings suggest that co-administered treatment may enhance the L-dopa BBB permeability and attenuate brain injury, which may be beneficial to PD treatment.

  18. Striatal astrocytes transdifferentiate into functional mature neurons following ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Duan, Chun-Ling; Liu, Chong-Wei; Shen, Shu-Wen; Yu, Zhang; Mo, Jia-Lin; Chen, Xian-Hua; Sun, Feng-Yan

    2015-09-01

    To determine whether reactive astrocytes stimulated by brain injury can transdifferentiate into functional new neurons, we labeled these cells by injecting a glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) targeted enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid (pGfa2-eGFP plasmid) into the striatum of adult rats immediately following a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and performed immunolabeling with specific neuronal markers to trace the neural fates of eGFP-expressing (GFP(+)) reactive astrocytes. The results showed that a portion of striatal GFP(+) astrocytes could transdifferentiate into immature neurons at 1 week after MCAO and mature neurons at 2 weeks as determined by double staining GFP-expressing cells with βIII-tubulin (GFP(+)-Tuj-1(+)) and microtubule associated protein-2 (GFP(+)-MAP-2(+)), respectively. GFP(+) neurons further expressed choline acetyltransferase, glutamic acid decarboxylase, dopamine receptor D2-like family proteins, and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit R2, indicating that astrocyte-derived neurons could develop into cholinergic or GABAergic neurons and express dopamine and glutamate receptors on their membranes. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that GFP(+) neurons could form synapses with other neurons at 13 weeks after MCAO. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that action potentials and active postsynaptic currents could be recorded in the neuron-like GFP(+) cells but not in the astrocyte-like GFP(+) cells, demonstrating that new GFP(+) neurons possessed the capacity to fire action potentials and receive synaptic inputs. These results demonstrated that striatal astrocyte-derived new neurons participate in the rebuilding of functional neural networks, a fundamental basis for brain repair after injury. These results may lead to new therapeutic strategies for enhancing brain repair after ischemic stroke.

  19. Striatal astrocytes transdifferentiate into functional mature neurons following ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chun‐Ling; Liu, Chong‐Wei; Shen, Shu‐Wen; Yu, Zhang; Mo, Jia‐Lin; Chen, Xian‐Hua

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether reactive astrocytes stimulated by brain injury can transdifferentiate into functional new neurons, we labeled these cells by injecting a glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) targeted enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid (pGfa2‐eGFP plasmid) into the striatum of adult rats immediately following a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and performed immunolabeling with specific neuronal markers to trace the neural fates of eGFP‐expressing (GFP+) reactive astrocytes. The results showed that a portion of striatal GFP+ astrocytes could transdifferentiate into immature neurons at 1 week after MCAO and mature neurons at 2 weeks as determined by double staining GFP‐expressing cells with βIII‐tubulin (GFP+‐Tuj‐1+) and microtubule associated protein‐2 (GFP+‐MAP‐2+), respectively. GFP+ neurons further expressed choline acetyltransferase, glutamic acid decarboxylase, dopamine receptor D2‐like family proteins, and the N‐methyl‐d‐aspartate receptor subunit R2, indicating that astrocyte‐derived neurons could develop into cholinergic or GABAergic neurons and express dopamine and glutamate receptors on their membranes. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that GFP+ neurons could form synapses with other neurons at 13 weeks after MCAO. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that action potentials and active postsynaptic currents could be recorded in the neuron‐like GFP+ cells but not in the astrocyte‐like GFP+ cells, demonstrating that new GFP+ neurons possessed the capacity to fire action potentials and receive synaptic inputs. These results demonstrated that striatal astrocyte‐derived new neurons participate in the rebuilding of functional neural networks, a fundamental basis for brain repair after injury. These results may lead to new therapeutic strategies for enhancing brain repair after ischemic stroke. GLIA 2015;63:1660–1670 PMID:26031629

  20. Adenosine receptor expression and function in rat striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Preston, Z; Lee, K; Widdowson, L; Freeman, T C; Dixon, A K; Richardson, P J

    2000-06-01

    Cholinergic neurons were identified in rat striatal slices by their size, membrane properties, sensitivity to the NK(1) receptor agonist (Sar(9), Met(O(2))(11)) Substance P, and expression of choline acetyltransferase mRNA. A(1) receptor mRNA was detected in 60% of the neurons analysed, and A(2A) receptor mRNA in 67% (n=15). The A(1) receptor agonist R-N(6)-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (R-PIA) hyperpolarized cholinergic neurons in a concentration dependent manner sensitive to the A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 100 nM). In dual stimulus experiments, the A(2A) receptor antagonist 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC, 500 nM) decreased release of [(3)H]-acetylcholine from striatal slices (S2/S1 0.78+/-0.07 versus 0.95+/-0.05 in control), as did adenosine deaminase (S2/S1 ratio 0.69+/-0.05), whereas the A(1) receptor antagonist DPCPX (100 nM) had no effect (S2/S1 1.05+/-0.14). In the presence of adenosine deaminase the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist 2-p-((carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadeno sin e (CGS21680, 10 nM) increased release (S2/S1 ratio 1.03+/-0.05 versus 0.88+/-0.05 in control), an effect blocked by the antagonist CSC (500 nM, S2/S1 0.68+/-0.05, versus 0.73+/-0.08 with CSC alone). The combined superfusion of bicuculline (10 microM), saclofen (1 microM) and naloxone (10 microM) had no effect on the stimulation by CGS21680 (S2/S1 ratio 0.99+/-0.04). The A(1) receptor agonist R-PIA (100 nM) inhibited the release of [(3)H]-acetylcholine (S2/S1 ratio 0.70+/-0.03), an effect blocked by DPCPX (S2/S1 ratio 1.06+/-0.07). It is concluded that both A(1) and A(2A) receptors are expressed on striatal cholinergic neurons where they are functionally active.

  1. Restorative effects of GDNF on striatal dopamine release in rats treated with neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Cass, W A; Manning, M W; Bailey, S L

    2000-09-01

    Repeated methamphetamine (METH) administration to animals can result in long-lasting decreases in striatal dopamine (DA) release and content. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has pronounced effects on dopaminergic systems in vivo, including neuroprotective effects against METH. The present experiments were designed to examine the ability of GDNF to reverse, or accelerate recovery from, METH-induced alterations in striatal DA release. Male Fischer-344 rats were administered METH (5 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline 4 times in one day at 2-hour intervals. Seven days later the animals were anesthetized and given a single injection of 10 microg GDNF, or vehicle, into the right striatum. Three weeks later microdialysis experiments were carried out in both the right and left striata to examine basal and evoked levels of DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA). In animals treated with METH followed by vehicle 7 days later, there were significant reductions in potassium- and amphetamine-evoked overflow of DA, and in basal levels of DOPAC and HVA, compared to control animals. In rats treated with METH followed 7 days later with GDNF, there were significant increases in potassium- and amphetamine-evoked overflow of DA on the right, GDNF-treated, side of the brain compared to the left side. Basal levels of DOPAC and HVA were also elevated on the GDNF-treated side of the brain. These results suggest that GDNF can accelerate recovery of dopaminergic release processes in the striatum of rats treated with neurotoxic doses of METH.

  2. Cell cycle activation in striatal neurons from Huntington's disease patients and rats treated with 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Pelegrí, Carme; Duran-Vilaregut, Joaquim; del Valle, Jaume; Crespo-Biel, Natàlia; Ferrer, Isidre; Pallàs, Mercè; Camins, Antoni; Vilaplana, Jordi

    2008-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the potential role of cell cycle re-entry in an experimental model of Huntington's disease and in human brain samples. We found that after treatment of rats with the mitochondrial neurotoxin 3-nitropropionic acid, the expression of cell cycle markers of G1 phase measured by immunohistochemistry was induced in the striatal brain region. Furthermore, we detected an increase in the nuclear and also cytoplasmatic E2F-1 expression, suggesting that this protein could activate the apoptotic cascade in rat brain. Western blot analysis of post-mortem brain samples from patients also showed an increase in the expression of E2F-1 and cyclin D1 in comparison with control samples. These results indicate that cell cycle re-entry is activated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to the neurodegenerative process.

  3. Chronic treatment with clozapine, unlike haloperidol, does not induce changes in striatal D-2 receptor function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rupniak, N M; Hall, M D; Mann, S; Fleminger, S; Kilpatrick, G; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1985-08-01

    Comparison has been made of the effects on brain dopamine function of chronic administration of haloperidol or clozapine to rats for up to 12 months. In rats treated for 1-12 months with haloperidol (1.4-1.6 mg/kg/day), purposeless chewing jaw movements emerged. These movements were only observed after 12 months' treatment with clozapine (24-27 mg/kg/day). Apomorphine-induced (0.125-0.25 mg/kg) stereotyped behaviour was inhibited during 12 months treatment with haloperidol. Clozapine treatment was without effect. After 12 months, stereotypy induced by higher doses of apomorphine (0.5-1.0 mg/kg) was enhanced in haloperidol, but not clozapine, treated rats. Bmax for striatal 3H-spiperone binding was elevated throughout 12 months of haloperidol administration, but was not altered by clozapine treatment. Bmax for striatal 3H-NPA binding was only elevated after 12 months of haloperidol treatment; clozapine treatment was without effect. Bmax for 3H-piflutixol binding was not altered by haloperidol treatment, but was increased after 9 and 12 months of clozapine treatment. Dopamine (50 microM)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited after 1 month's haloperidol treatment but normal thereafter. Adenylate cyclase activity was not altered by chronic clozapine treatment. Striatal acetylcholine content was increased after 3 and 12 months of haloperidol or clozapine intake. These findings indicate that the chronic administration of the atypical neuroleptic clozapine does not produce changes in brain dopamine function which mirror those of the typical neuroleptic haloperidol. In particular, chronic administration of clozapine, unlike haloperidol, does not appear to induce striatal D-2 receptor supersensitivity. Unexpectedly, clozapine treatment, unlike haloperidol, altered D-1 receptor function.

  4. Protective effects of ginseng saponins on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced striatal degeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Sunoh; Yoon, In-Soo; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Jang, Byung-Jun; Jeong, Sang Min; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Han, Jin-Soo; Oh, Sekwan; Kim, Hyung-Chun; Park, Tae Kyu; Rhim, Hyewhon; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2005-04-01

    The precise cause of neuronal cell death in Huntington's disease (HD) is not known. Systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor, not only induces a cellular ATP depletions but also causes a selective striatal degeneration similar to that seen in HD. Recent accumulating reports have shown that ginseng saponins (GTS), the major active ingredients of Panax ginseng, have protective effects against neurotoxin insults. In the present study, we examined in vitro and in vivo effects of GTS on striatal neurotoxicity induced by repeated treatment of 3-NP in rats. Here, we report that systemic administration of GTS produced significant protections against systemic 3-NP- and intrastriatal malonate-induced lesions in rat striatum with dose-dependent manner. GTS also improved significantly 3-NP-caused behavioral impairment and extended survival. However, GTS itself had no effect on 3-NP-induced inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase activity. To explain the mechanisms underlying in vivo protective effects of GTS against 3-NP-induced striatal degeneration, we examined in vitro effect of GTS against 3-NP-caused cytotoxicity using cultured rat striatal neurons. We found that GTS inhibited 3-NP-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevations. GTS restored 3-NP-caused mitochondrial transmembrane potential reduction in cultured rat striatal neurons. GTS also prevented 3-NP-induced striatal neuronal cell deaths with dose-dependent manner. The EC(50) was 12.6 +/- 0. 7microg/ml. These results suggest that in vivo protective effects of GTS against 3-NP-induced rat striatal degeneration might be achieved via in vitro inhibition of 3-NP-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevations and cytotoxicity of striatal neurons.

  5. Regulation of dopamine synthesis and release in striatal and prefrontal cortical brain slices

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Brain slices were used to investigate the role of nerve terminal autoreceptors in modulating dopamine (DA) synthesis and release in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Accumulation of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) was used as an index of tyrosine hydroxylation in vitro. Nomifensine, a DA uptake blocker, inhibited DOPA synthesis in striatal but not prefrontal slices. This effect was reversed by the DA antagonist sulpiride, suggesting it involved activation of DA receptors by elevated synaptic levels of DA. The autoreceptor-selective agonist EMD-23-448 also inhibited striatal but not prefrontal DOPA synthesis. DOPA synthesis was stimulated in both brain regions by elevated K/sup +/, however only striatal synthesis could be further enhanced by sulpiride. DA release was measured by following the efflux of radioactivity from brain slices prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)-DA. EMD-23-448 and apomorphine inhibited, while sulpiride enhanced, the K/sup +/-evoked overflow of radioactivity from both striatal and prefrontal cortical slices. These findings suggest that striatal DA nerve terminals possess autoreceptors which modulate tyrosine hydroxylation as well as autoreceptors which modulate release. Alternatively, one site may be coupled to both functions through distinct transduction mechanisms. In contrast, autoreceptors on prefrontal cortical terminals appear to regulate DA release but not DA synthesis.

  6. Conditional ablation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-TrkB signaling impairs striatal neuron development.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Yui, Daishi; Luikart, Bryan W; McKay, Renée M; Li, Yanjiao; Rubenstein, John L; Parada, Luis F

    2012-09-18

    Neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are associated with the physiology of the striatum and the loss of its normal functioning under pathological conditions. The role of BDNF and its downstream signaling in regulating the development of the striatum has not been fully investigated, however. Here we report that ablation of Bdnf in both the cortex and substantia nigra depletes BDNF in the striatum, and leads to impaired striatal development, severe motor deficits, and postnatal lethality. Furthermore, striatal-specific ablation of TrkB, the gene encoding the high-affinity receptor for BDNF, is sufficient to elicit an array of striatal developmental abnormalities, including decreased anatomical volume, smaller neuronal nucleus size, loss of dendritic spines, reduced enkephalin expression, diminished nigral dopaminergic projections, and severe deficits in striatal dopamine signaling through DARPP32. In addition, TrkB ablation in striatal neurons elicits a non-cell-autonomous reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase protein level in the axonal projections of substantia nigral dopaminergic neurons. Thus, our results establish an essential function for TrkB in regulating the development of striatal neurons.

  7. Effects of striatal nitric oxide production on regional cerebral blood flow and seizure development in rats exposed to extreme hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Gasier, Heath G; Demchenko, Ivan T; Allen, Barry W; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2015-12-01

    The endogenous vasodilator and signaling molecule nitric oxide has been implicated in cerebral hyperemia, sympathoexcitation, and seizures induced by hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) at or above 3 atmospheres absolute (ATA). It is unknown whether these events in the onset of central nervous system oxygen toxicity originate within specific brain structures and whether blood flow is diverted to the brain from peripheral organs with high basal flow, such as the kidney. To explore these questions, total and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured in brain structures of the central autonomic network in anesthetized rats in HBO2 at 6 ATA. Electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings, cardiovascular hemodynamics, and renal blood flow (RBF) were also monitored. As expected, mean arterial blood pressure and total and regional CBF increased preceding EEG spikes while RBF was unaltered. Of the brain structures examined, the earliest rise in CBF occurred in the striatum, suggesting increased neuronal activation. Continuous unilateral or bilateral striatal infusion of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester attenuated CBF responses in that structure, but global EEG discharges persisted and did not differ from controls. Our novel findings indicate that: 1) cerebral hyperemia in extreme HBO2 in rats does not occur at the expense of renal perfusion, highlighting the remarkable autoregulatory capability of the kidney, and 2) in spite of a sentinel increase in striatal blood flow, additional brain structure(s) likely govern the pathogenesis of HBO2-induced seizures because EEG discharge latency was unchanged by local blockade of striatal nitric oxide production and concomitant hyperemia.

  8. Prepuberal Stimulation of 5-HT7-R by LP-211 in a Rat Model of Hyper-Activity and Attention-Deficit: Permanent Effects on Attention, Brain Amino Acids and Synaptic Markers in the Fronto-Striatal Interface

    PubMed Central

    Treno, Concetta; Gironi Carnevale, Ugo A.; Arra, Claudio; Nieddu, Maria; Pagano, Cristina; Illiano, Placido; Barbato, Fabiana; Carboni, Ezio; Laviola, Giovanni; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Adriani, Walter; Sadile, Adolfo G.

    2014-01-01

    The cross-talk at the prefronto-striatal interface involves excitatory amino acids, different receptors, transducers and modulators. We investigated long-term effects of a prepuberal, subchronic 5-HT7-R agonist (LP-211) on adult behaviour, amino acids and synaptic markers in a model for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Naples High Excitability rats (NHE) and their Random Bred controls (NRB) were daily treated with LP-211 in the 5th and 6th postnatal week. One month after treatment, these rats were tested for indices of activity, non selective (NSA), selective spatial attention (SSA) and emotionality. The quantity of L-Glutamate (L-Glu), L-Aspartate (L-Asp) and L-Leucine (L-Leu), dopamine transporter (DAT), NMDAR1 subunit and CAMKIIα, were assessed in prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal (DS) and ventral striatum (VS), for their role in synaptic transmission, neural plasticity and information processing. Prepuberal LP-211 (at lower dose) reduced horizontal activity and (at higher dose) increased SSA, only for NHE but not in NRB rats. Prepuberal LP-211 increased, in NHE rats, L-Glu in the PFC and L-Asp in the VS (at 0.250 mg/kg dose), whereas (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) it decreased L-Glu and L-Asp in the DS. The L-Glu was decreased, at 0.125 mg/kg, only in the VS of NRB rats. The DAT levels were decreased with the 0.125 mg/kg dose (in the PFC), and increased with the 0.250 mg/kg dose (in the VS), significantly for NHE rats. The basal NMDAR1 level was higher in the PFC of NHE than NRB rats; LP-211 treatment (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) decreased NMDAR1 in the VS of NRB rats. This study represents a starting point about the impact of developmental 5-HT7-R activation on neuro-physiology of attentive processes, executive functions and their neural substrates. PMID:24709857

  9. Prepuberal stimulation of 5-HT7-R by LP-211 in a rat model of hyper-activity and attention-deficit: permanent effects on attention, brain amino acids and synaptic markers in the fronto-striatal interface.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, Lucia A; Treno, Concetta; Gironi Carnevale, Ugo A; Arra, Claudio; Boatto, Gianpiero; Nieddu, Maria; Pagano, Cristina; Illiano, Placido; Barbato, Fabiana; Tino, Angela; Carboni, Ezio; Laviola, Giovanni; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Adriani, Walter; Sadile, Adolfo G

    2014-01-01

    The cross-talk at the prefronto-striatal interface involves excitatory amino acids, different receptors, transducers and modulators. We investigated long-term effects of a prepuberal, subchronic 5-HT7-R agonist (LP-211) on adult behaviour, amino acids and synaptic markers in a model for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Naples High Excitability rats (NHE) and their Random Bred controls (NRB) were daily treated with LP-211 in the 5th and 6th postnatal week. One month after treatment, these rats were tested for indices of activity, non selective (NSA), selective spatial attention (SSA) and emotionality. The quantity of L-Glutamate (L-Glu), L-Aspartate (L-Asp) and L-Leucine (L-Leu), dopamine transporter (DAT), NMDAR1 subunit and CAMKIIα, were assessed in prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal (DS) and ventral striatum (VS), for their role in synaptic transmission, neural plasticity and information processing. Prepuberal LP-211 (at lower dose) reduced horizontal activity and (at higher dose) increased SSA, only for NHE but not in NRB rats. Prepuberal LP-211 increased, in NHE rats, L-Glu in the PFC and L-Asp in the VS (at 0.250 mg/kg dose), whereas (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) it decreased L-Glu and L-Asp in the DS. The L-Glu was decreased, at 0.125 mg/kg, only in the VS of NRB rats. The DAT levels were decreased with the 0.125 mg/kg dose (in the PFC), and increased with the 0.250 mg/kg dose (in the VS), significantly for NHE rats. The basal NMDAR1 level was higher in the PFC of NHE than NRB rats; LP-211 treatment (at 0.125 mg/kg dose) decreased NMDAR1 in the VS of NRB rats. This study represents a starting point about the impact of developmental 5-HT7-R activation on neuro-physiology of attentive processes, executive functions and their neural substrates.

  10. Opiate agonist-induced re-distribution of Wntless, a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein, in rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Reyes, B A S; Vakharia, K; Ferraro, T N; Levenson, R; Berrettini, W H; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2012-01-01

    Wntless (WLS), a mu-opioid receptor (MOR) interacting protein, mediates Wnt protein secretion that is critical for neuronal development. We investigated whether MOR agonists induce re-distribution of WLS within rat striatal neurons. Adult male rats received either saline, morphine or [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) directly into the lateral ventricles. Following thirty minutes, brains were extracted and tissue sections were processed for immunogold silver detection of WLS. In saline-treated rats, WLS was distributed along the plasma membrane and within the cytoplasmic compartment of striatal dendrites as previously described. The ratio of cytoplasmic to total dendritic WLS labeling was 0.70±0.03 in saline-treated striatal tissue. Morphine treatment decreased this ratio to 0.48±0.03 indicating a shift of WLS from the intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane. However, following DAMGO treatment, the ratio was 0.85±0.05 indicating a greater distribution of WLS intracellularly. The difference in the re-distribution of the WLS following different agonist exposure may be related to DAMGO's well known ability to induce internalization of MOR in contrast to morphine, which is less effective in producing receptor internalization. Furthermore, these data are consistent with our hypothesis that MOR agonists promote dimerization of WLS and MOR, thereby preventing WLS from mediating Wnt secretion. In summary, our findings indicate differential agonist-induced trafficking of WLS in striatal neurons following distinct agonist exposure. Adaptations in WLS trafficking may represent a novel pharmacological target in the treatment of opiate addiction and/or pain.

  11. Gastric Bypass Surgery Recruits a Gut PPAR-α-Striatal D1R Pathway to Reduce Fat Appetite in Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Mohammed K; Seyfried, Florian; Hintschich, Constantin A; Diep, Thi-Ai; Kleberg, Karen; Kranz, Mathias; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Tellez, Luis A; Rullmann, Michael; Patt, Marianne; Teichert, Jens; Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama; Brust, Peter; Hansen, Harald S; de Araujo, Ivan E; Krügel, Ute; Fenske, Wiebke K

    2017-02-07

    Bariatric surgery remains the single most effective long-term treatment modality for morbid obesity, achieved mainly by lowering caloric intake through as yet ill-defined mechanisms. Here we show in rats that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB)-like rerouting of ingested fat mobilizes lower small intestine production of the fat-satiety molecule oleoylethanolamide (OEA). This was associated with vagus nerve-driven increases in dorsal striatal dopamine release. We also demonstrate that RYGB upregulates striatal dopamine 1 receptor (D1R) expression specifically under high-fat diet feeding conditions. Mechanistically, interfering with local OEA, vagal, and dorsal striatal D1R signaling negated the beneficial effects of RYGB on fat intake and preferences. These findings delineate a molecular/systems pathway through which bariatric surgery improves feeding behavior and may aid in the development of novel weight loss strategies that similarly modify brain reward circuits compromised in obesity.

  12. Sex-Dependent Changes in Striatal Dopamine Transport in Preadolescent Rats Exposed Prenatally and/or Postnatally to Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Sirova, Jana; Kristofikova, Zdenka; Vrajova, Monika; Fujakova-Lipski, Michaela; Ripova, Daniela; Klaschka, Jan; Slamberova, Romana

    2016-08-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is the most commonly used psychostimulant drug, the chronic abuse of which leads to neurodegenerative changes in the brain. The global use of MA is increasing, including in pregnant women. Since MA can cross both placental and haematoencephalic barriers and is also present in maternal milk, children of chronically abused mothers are exposed prenatally as well as postnatally. Women seem to be more vulnerable to some aspects of MA abuse than men. MA is thought to exert its effects among others via direct interactions with dopamine transporters (DATs) in the brain tissue. Sexual dimorphism of the DAT system could be a base of sex-dependent actions of MA observed in behavioural and neurochemical studies. Possible sex differences in the DATs of preadolescent offspring exposed to MA prenatally and/or postnatally have not yet been evaluated. We examined the striatal synaptosomal DATs (the activity and density of surface expressed DATs and total DAT expression) in preadolescent male and female Wistar rats (31-35-day old animals) exposed prenatally and/or postnatally to MA (daily 5 mg/kg, s.c. to mothers during pregnancy and lactation). To distinguish between specific and nonspecific effects of MA on DATs, we also evaluated the in vitro effects of lipophilic MA on the fluidity of striatal membranes isolated from preadolescent and young adult rats of both sexes. We observed similar changes in the DATs of preadolescent rats exposed prenatally or postnatally (MA-mediated drop in the reserve pool but no alterations in surface-expressed DATs). However, prenatal exposure evoked significant changes in males and postnatal exposure in females. A significant decrease in the activity of surface-expressed DATs was found only in postnatally exposed females sensitized to MA via prenatal exposure. MA applied in vitro increased the fluidity of striatal membranes of preadolescent female but not male rats. In summary, DATs of preadolescent males are more sensitive to

  13. Role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and K(+)-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Zazpe, A; Artaiz, I; Del Río, J

    1994-01-01

    1. The present study was aimed at examining the role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and depolarization-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices. [3H]-dopamine ([3H]-DA) release was measured in both brain regions and endogenous dopamine release from striatal slices was also studied. 2. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist 2-methyl-5-HT (0.5-10 microM) produced a concentration-dependent increase in [3H]-DA efflux evoked by K+ (20 mM) from slices of rat olfactory tubercle. 1-Phenylbiguanide (PBG) and 5-HT also increased K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux. 3. 5-HT (1-100 microM) increased in a concentration-dependent manner basal [3H]-DA release from olfactory tubercle and striatal slices as well as endogenous DA release from striatal slices. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonists 2-methyl-5-HT and 1-phenylbiguanide were weaker releasing agents. In all cases, the release was Ca2+ independent and tetrodotoxin insensitive. 4. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron, granisetron and tropisetron (0.2 microM) significantly blocked the enhanced K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux from rat olfactory tubercle slices induced by 2-methyl-5HT. A ten fold higher concentration of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin was ineffective. 5. Much higher concentrations, up to 50 microM, of the same 5-HT3 receptor antagonists did not block the increase in basal [3H]-DA release from striatal or olfactory tubercle slices induced by 5-HT or the release of endogenous DA induced by 5-HT from striatal slices.2+ off PMID:7858893

  14. Maternal Obesity Caused by Overnutrition Exposure Leads to Reversal Learning Deficits and Striatal Disturbance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting; Deng, Shining; Li, Wei-Guang; Yu, Yongguo; Li, Fei; Mao, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Maternal obesity caused by overnutrition during pregnancy increases susceptibility to metabolic risks in adulthood, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes; however, whether and how it affects the cognitive system associated with the brain remains elusive. Here, we report that pregnant obesity induced by exposure to excessive high fatty or highly palatable food specifically impaired reversal learning, a kind of adaptive behavior, while leaving serum metabolic metrics intact in the offspring of rats, suggesting a much earlier functional and structural defects possibly occurred in the central nervous system than in the metabolic system in the offspring born in unfavorable intrauterine nutritional environment. Mechanically, we found that above mentioned cognitive inflexibility might be associated with significant striatal disturbance including impaired dopamine homeostasis and disrupted leptin signaling in the adult offspring. These collective data add a novel perspective of understanding the adverse postnatal sequelae in central nervous system induced by developmental programming and the related molecular mechanism through which priming of risk for developmental disorders may occur during early life. PMID:24223863

  15. Environmental enrichment brings a beneficial effect on beam walking and enhances the migration of doublecortin-positive cells following striatal lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, S; Hida, H; Masuda, T; Misumi, S; Kim, T-S; Nishino, H

    2007-02-09

    Rats raised in an enriched environment (enriched rats) have been reported to show less motor dysfunction following brain lesions, but the neuronal correlates of this improvement have not been well clarified. The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of chemical brain lesions and environmental enrichment on motor function and lesion-induced neurogenesis. Three week-old, recently weaned rats were divided into two groups: one group was raised in an enriched environment and the other group was raised in a standard cage for 5 weeks. Striatal damage was induced at an age of 8 weeks by injection of the neuro-toxins 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or quinolinic acid (QA) into the striatum, or by injection of 6-OHDA into the substantia nigra (SN), which depleted nigrostriatal dopaminergic innervation. Enriched rats showed better performance on beam walking compared with those raised in standard conditions, but both groups showed similar forelimb use asymmetry in a cylinder test. The number of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled proliferating cells in the subventricular zone was increased by a severe striatal lesion induced by QA injection 1 week after the lesion, but decreased by injection of 6-OHDA into the SN. Following induction of lesions by striatal injection of 6-OHDA or QA, the number of cells positive for doublecortin (DCX) was strongly increased in the striatum; however, there was no change in the number of DCX-positive cells following 6-OHDA injection into the SN. Environmental enrichment enhanced the increase of DCX-positive cells with migrating morphology in the dorsal striatum. In enriched rats, DCX-positive cells traversed the striatal parenchyma far from the corpus callosum and lateral ventricle. DCX-positive cells co-expressed an immature neuronal marker, polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule, but were negative for a glial marker. These data suggest that environmental enrichment improves motor performance on beam walking and enhances neuronal migration toward

  16. Sensitivity to theta-burst timing permits LTP in dorsal striatal adult brain slice

    PubMed Central

    Hawes, Sarah L.; Gillani, Fawad; Evans, Rebekah C.; Benkert, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory afferents to the dorsal striatum likely occurs with learning to encode new skills and habits, yet corticostriatal LTP is challenging to evoke reliably in brain slice under physiological conditions. Here we test the hypothesis that stimulating striatal afferents with theta-burst timing, similar to recently reported in vivo temporal patterns corresponding to learning, evokes LTP. Recording from adult mouse brain slice extracellularly in 1 mM Mg2+, we find LTP in dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum is preferentially evoked by certain theta-burst patterns. In particular, we demonstrate that greater LTP is produced using moderate intraburst and high theta-range frequencies, and that pauses separating bursts of stimuli are critical for LTP induction. By altering temporal pattern alone, we illustrate the importance of burst-patterning for LTP induction and demonstrate that corticostriatal long-term depression is evoked in the same preparation. In accord with prior studies, LTP is greatest in dorsomedial striatum and relies on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. We also demonstrate a requirement for both Gq- and Gs/olf-coupled pathways, as well as several kinases associated with memory storage: PKC, PKA, and ERK. Our data build on previous reports of activity-directed plasticity by identifying effective values for distinct temporal parameters in variants of theta-burst LTP induction paradigms. We conclude that those variants which best match reports of striatal activity during learning behavior are most successful in evoking dorsal striatal LTP in adult brain slice without altering artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Future application of this approach will enable diverse investigations of plasticity serving striatal-based learning. PMID:23926032

  17. Extrasynaptic Neurotransmission in the Modulation of Brain Function. Focus on the Striatal Neuronal–Glial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Rivera, Alicia; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Garriga, Pere; Narváez, José Angel; Ciruela, Francisco; Guescini, Michele; Agnati, Luigi F.

    2012-01-01

    Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT) and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT) and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons, and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal cellular networks

  18. Long-term changes in striatal opioid systems after 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of rat substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Leslie, F M; Broide, R S; Loughlin, S E

    1993-08-01

    The effects of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway on striatal opioid peptides and receptors were determined at different time-intervals, from three days up to 24 weeks, post-lesion. Mu, delta and kappa opioid binding site densities in the ipsilateral caudate-putamen were decreased by 25-50% in rats which exhibited a greater than 90% loss of dopamine uptake sites. Differentiation of radioligand binding to kappa1 and kappa2 subtypes demonstrated a selective loss of kappa2 sites post-lesion. The onset of significant 6-hydroxydopamine lesion-induced changes in striatal opioid binding sites was delayed with respect to the loss of dopamine uptake sites. Furthermore, maximal loss of dopamine uptake sites was apparent within seven days post-lesion, but not until two to four weeks for mu, delta and kappa sites. In animals which exhibited an incomplete loss of dopamine uptake sites (less than 80%) there was no significant change in opioid binding site density. Striatal proenkephalin and prodynorphin messenger RNA levels were increased and decreased, respectively, after complete 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. Modulation of peptide messenger RNA levels was apparent within seven days and was maintained up to 24 weeks post-lesion. In contrast, proenkephalin and prodynorphin messenger RNA levels were unchanged in animals which exhibited an incomplete loss of striatal dopamine uptake sites. Taken together, these observations suggest that the majority of mu, delta and kappa2 opioid binding sites are localized on non-dopaminergic elements in the caudate-putamen, but that substantia nigra innervation plays a role in the control of striatal opioid receptor expression. The 6-hydroxydopamine lesion-induced decreases in striatal opioid binding site density may, in part, be a function of agonist-induced receptor downregulation. Alternatively, both opioid receptor and peptide expression in the caudate-putamen may be directly, but independently, regulated by ventral

  19. Striatal blood-brain barrier permeability in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Madison T; Woulfe, John M

    2015-05-01

    In vivo studies have shown that blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction is involved in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these have lacked either anatomic definition or the ability to recognize minute changes in BBB integrity. Here, using histologic markers of serum protein, iron, and erythrocyte extravasation, we have shown significantly increased permeability of the BBB in the postcommissural putamen of PD patients. The dense innervation of the striatum by PD-affected regions allows for exploitation of this permeability for therapeutic goals. These results are also discussed in the context of the retrograde trans-synaptic hypothesis of PD spread.

  20. Effects of recovery from immobilization stress on striatal preprodynorphin- and kappa opioid receptor-mRNA levels of the male rat.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Louis R; Dragisic, Tina; Duwaerts, Caroline C; Swiatkowski, Michael; Suzuki, Hideo

    2011-10-24

    Previously, we have reported that brain regions that are thought to be involved in motivated behavior are altered in animals undergoing repeated exposures to immobilization stress. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of recovery from this type of stress on these same mesolimbic brain regions. For this purpose, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were initially exposed to immobilization stress either once (2 h) or repeatedly (2 h×10 days). Rats were then either allowed to recover from the stressor for a shorter (2 days) or longer period of time (9 days) in their home cages. At the end of this recovery period, rats were euthanized and trunk blood and brains were processed for serum corticosterone (CORT) and neurochemistry, respectively. Brain mRNA levels were determined via in situ hybridization for the opioid preprodynorphin (DYN) and its cognate receptor (kappa, KOR), in striatal and accumbal subregions. A pattern of selective transcriptional activation emerged in the four resultant treatment conditions where a short recovery from either a single or repeated exposure to immobilization produced increases in KOR-mRNA levels in striatal and nucleus accumbens (Acb) subregions. Relative to controls, these differences were diminished after a longer recovery period. Interestingly, DYN-mRNA levels were unchanged after the shorter recovery period and after single or repeated immobilizations but appeared to be induced after a longer recovery period after repeated immobilizations. A relative amount of weight loss occurred after immobilization following repeated but not single exposure to stress. In addition, only those rats recovering from repeated stress exposures had higher CORT levels compared with non-immobilized controls. These results suggest that recovery from immobilization stress may alter the motivational system after as little as a single immobilization and that a possible dysphoric effect on appetitive behavior may be reflected by an altered

  1. Reduction in Subventricular Zone-Derived Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis in a Rat Model of Huntington’s Disease Is Accompanied by Striatal Invasion of Neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Mahesh; Rosskopf, Michael; Wagner, Katrin; Klein, Barbara; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Stephan, Michael; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Riess, Olaf; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Winkler, Jürgen; von Hörsten, Stephan; Aigner, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an inherited progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded CAG repeat in exon 1 of the huntingtin gene (HTT). The primary neuropathology of HD has been attributed to the preferential degeneration of medium spiny neurons (MSN) in the striatum. Reports on striatal neurogenesis have been a subject of debate; nevertheless, it should be considered as an endogenous attempt to repair the brain. The subventricular zone (SVZ) might offer a close-by region to supply the degenerated striatum with new cells. Previously, we have demonstrated that R6/2 mice, a widely used preclinical model representing an early onset HD, showed reduced olfactory bulb (OB) neurogenesis but induced striatal migration of neuroblasts without affecting the proliferation of neural progenitor cell (NPCs) in the SVZ. The present study revisits these findings, using a clinically more relevant transgenic rat model of late onset HD (tgHD rats) carrying the human HTT gene with 51 CAG repeats and mimicking many of the neuropathological features of HD seen in patients. We demonstrate that cell proliferation is reduced in the SVZ and OB of tgHD rats compared to WT rats. In the OB of tgHD rats, although cell survival was reduced, the frequency of neuronal differentiation was not altered in the granule cell layer (GCL) compared to the WT rats. However, an increased frequency of dopamenergic neuronal differentiation was noticed in the glomerular layer (GLOM) of tgHD rats. Besides this, we observed a selective proliferation of neuroblasts in the adjacent striatum of tgHD rats. There was no evidence for neuronal maturation and survival of these striatal neuroblasts. Therefore, the functional role of these invading neuroblasts still needs to be determined, but they might offer an endogenous alternative for stem or neuronal cell transplantation strategies. PMID:25719447

  2. Specific reactions of different striatal neuron types in morphology induced by quinolinic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiqi; Ma, Yuxin; Mu, Shuhua; Wu, Jiajia; Chen, Si; Ouyang, Lisi; Lei, Wanlong

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurological degenerative disease and quinolinic acid (QA) has been used to establish HD model in animals through the mechanism of excitotoxicity. Yet the specific pathological changes and the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. We aimed to reveal the specific morphological changes of different striatal neurons in the HD model. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to unilaterally intrastriatal injections of QA to mimic the HD model. Behavioral tests, histochemical and immunhistochemical stainings as well as Western blots were applied in the present study. The results showed that QA-treated rats had obvious motor and cognitive impairments when compared with the control group. Immunohistochemical detection showed a great loss of NeuN+ neurons and Darpp32+ projection neurons in the transition zone in the QA group when compared with the control group. The numbers of parvalbumin (Parv)+ and neuropeptide Y (NPY)+ interneurons were both significantly reduced while those of calretinin (Cr)+ and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)+ were not changed notably in the transition zone in the QA group when compared to the controls. Parv+, NPY+ and ChAT+ interneurons were not significantly increased in fiber density while Cr+ neurons displayed an obvious increase in fiber density in the transition zone in QA-treated rats. The varicosity densities of Parv+, Cr+ and NPY+ interneurons were all raised in the transition zone after QA treatment. In conclusion, the present study revealed that QA induced obvious behavioral changes as well as a general loss of striatal projection neurons and specific morphological changes in different striatal interneurons, which may help further explain the underlying mechanisms and the specific functions of various striatal neurons in the pathological process of HD.

  3. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  4. Spike-Dependent Intrinsic Plasticity Increases Firing Probability in Rat Striatal Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Séverine; Casassus, Guillaume; Mulle, Christophe; Charpier, Stéphane

    2003-01-01

    The collision of pre- and postynaptic activity is known to provide a trigger for controlling the gain of synaptic transmission between neurons. Here, using in vivo intracellular recordings of rat striatal output neurons, we analyse the effect of a single action potential, generated by ongoing synaptic activity, on subsequent excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex. This pairing induced a short-term increase in the probability that cortically evoked EPSPs caused striatal cells to fire. This enhanced EPSP-spike coupling was associated with a decrease in the voltage firing threshold with no apparent change in the synaptic strength itself. Antidromic action potentials in striatal cells were also able to induce the facilitation while subthreshold EPSPs were ineffective, indicating that the postsynaptic spike was necessary and sufficient for the induction of the plasticity. A prior spontaneous action potential also enhanced the probability with which directly applied current pulses elicited firing, suggesting that the facilitation originated from changes in the intrinsic electrical properties of the postsynaptic cell. Using whole-cell recordings in cortico-striatal slices, we found that the increase in membrane excitability as well as in EPSP-spike coupling was abolished by low concentration of 4-aminopyridine. This suggests that the intrinsic plasticity results from a time-dependent modulation of a striatal voltage-dependent potassium current available close to the firing threshold. Action potentials thus provide a postsynaptic signal, not only for associative synaptic plasticity but also for activity-dependent intrinsic plasticity, which directly controls the efficacy of coupling between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. PMID:12844508

  5. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning. PMID:26793069

  6. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning.

  7. Region-specific depression of striatal activity in Wistar rat by modest ethanol consumption over a ten-month period.

    PubMed

    Adermark, L; Jonsson, S; Söderpalm, B; Ericson, M

    2013-06-01

    The nucleus accumbens (nAc) is the primary target for the mesolimbic dopamine system and a key brain region for the reinforcing effects displayed by drugs of abuse, including ethanol. During the transition from recreational to compulsive consumption of reinforcing drugs, however, the dorsal striatum seems to be recruited. Understanding how synaptic activity is altered in a sub-region specific manner in the striatum during the course of long-term drug consumption thus could be essential for understanding the long-lasting changes produced by addictive substances, including ethanol. Here we evaluated synaptic activity in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) and ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens, nAc) of single-housed Wistar rats consuming water, or water and ethanol, for up to 10 months. Even though ethanol intake was moderate, it was sufficient to decrease input/output function in response to stimulation intensity in the DLS, while recorded population spike (PS) amplitudes in the nAc were unaffected. Striatal disinhibition induced by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline had a slower onset in rats that had consumed ethanol for 2 months, and was significantly depressed in slices from rats that had consumed ethanol for 4 months. Bicuculline-induced disinhibition in the nAc, on the other hand, was not significantly altered by long-term ethanol intake. Changes in PS amplitude induced by taurine or the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine were not significantly altered by ethanol in any brain region. Even though input/output function was not significantly affected by age, there was a significant decline in antagonist-induced disinhibition in brain slices from aged rats. The data presented here suggest that even modest consumption of ethanol is sufficient to alter neurotransmission in the striatum, while synaptic activity appears to be relatively well-preserved in the nAc during the course of long-term ethanol consumption.

  8. Diminished hippocalcin expression in Huntington's disease brain does not account for increased striatal neuron vulnerability as assessed in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Rudinskiy, Nikita; Kaneko, Yoshio A; Beesen, Ayshe Ana; Gokce, Ozgun; Régulier, Etienne; Déglon, Nicole; Luthi-Carter, Ruth

    2009-10-01

    Hippocalcin is a neuronal calcium sensor protein previously implicated in regulating neuronal viability and plasticity. Hippocalcin is the most highly expressed neuronal calcium sensor in the medium spiny striatal output neurons that degenerate selectively in Huntington's disease (HD). We have previously shown that decreased hippocalcin expression occurs in parallel with the onset of disease phenotype in mouse models of HD. Here we show by in situ hybridization histochemistry that hippocalcin RNA is also diminished by 63% in human HD brain. These findings lead us to hypothesize that diminished hippocalcin expression might contribute to striatal neurodegeneration in HD. We tested this hypothesis by assessing whether restoration of hippocalcin expression would decrease striatal neurodegeneration in cellular models of HD comprising primary striatal neurons exposed to mutant huntingtin, the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid or an excitotoxic concentration of glutamate. Counter to our hypothesis, hippocalcin expression did not improve the survival of striatal neurons under these conditions. Likewise, expression of hippocalcin together with interactor proteins including the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein did not increase the survival of striatal cells in cellular models of HD. These results indicate that diminished hippocalcin expression does not contribute to HD-related neurodegeneration.

  9. Release of taurine, GABA and dopamine from rat striatal slices: mutual interactions and developmental aspects.

    PubMed

    Kontro, P; Oja, S S

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous and potassium-stimulated release of preloaded taurine and GABA from striatal slices of adult and 7-day-old rats were studied using a superfusion system. Particular attention was paid to mutual interactions of taurine and GABA with dopamine in the release processes. Potassium stimulation (50 mM) enhanced taurine release more in the immature than in the adult striatum, whereas the response was the opposite with GABA release. Spontaneous taurine efflux was increased by dopamine and apomorphine, whereas stimulated release was suppressed by these agents in both age groups. This dopamine effect was partially antagonized by haloperidol, suggesting that dopaminergic systems were able to modify taurine release, possibly via dopaminergic receptors. Dopamine and apomorphine had similar but more inconsistent effects on striatal GABA release, which were not, however, mediated through conventional dopamine receptors. Stimulation with 25 mM K+ caused an 11-fold increase in striatal dopamine release: this effect was potentiated by taurine, while the actions of GABA on dopamine release were variable.

  10. Prenatal neuroleptic exposure alters postnatal striatal cholinergic activity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Miller, J C; Friedhoff, A J

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that prenatal exposure to a neuroleptic during a critical period of gestation in the rat results in a marked deficit in the number of striatal dopamine-binding sites and in a diminution of dopamine agonist-induced stereotyped behavior. In the present studies, we examined the effect of prenatal neuroleptic exposure on biochemical parameters of cholinergic activity to determine whether the balance between striatal dopaminergic and cholinergic activity might be altered. The number of muscarinic cholinergic-binding sites and the specific activity of choline acetyltransferase were found to be significantly increased by prenatal treatment with the neuroleptics haloperidol or (+)-butaclamol. From the present studies and previous observations made in our laboratory, it is concluded that the ability of a neuroleptic to affect the number of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in postnatal life may be a result of the phenotypically undifferentiated state of the developing dopamine-binding site. Our findings of increased striatal cholinergic activity accompanied by a marked decrease in dopaminergic activity may have implications for an increased vulnerability to extrapyramidal motor disturbances during postnatal development.

  11. Diazepam blocks striatal lipid peroxidation and improves stereotyped activity in a rat model of acute stress.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Cuesta, Luis A; Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Escobar-Briones, Carolina; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Alvarez-Ruiz, Yarummy; Maldonado, Perla D; Santana, Ricardo A; Santamaría, Abel; Carrillo-Mora, Paul

    2011-11-01

    In this work, the effect of a single dose of diazepam was tested on different markers of oxidative damage in the striatum of rats in an acute model of immobilization (restraint) stress. In addition, the locomotor activity was measured at the end of the restraint period. Immobilization was induced to animals for 24 hr, and then, lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase activity and content, and mitochondrial function were all estimated in striatal tissue samples. Corticosterone levels were measured in serum. Diazepam was given to rats as a pre-treatment (1 mg/kg, i.p.) 20 min. before the initiation of stress. Our results indicate that acute stress produced enhanced striatal levels of lipid peroxidation (73% above the control), decreased superoxide dismutase activity (54% below the control), reduced levels of mitochondrial function (35% below the control) and increased corticosterone serum levels (86% above the control). Pre-treatment of stressed rats with diazepam decreased the striatal lipid peroxidation levels (68% below the stress group) and improved mitochondrial function (18% above the stress group), but only mild preservation of superoxide dismutase activity was detected (17% above the stress group). In regard to the motor assessment, only the stereotyped activity was increased in the stress group with respect to control (46% above the control), and this effect was prevented by diazepam administration (30% below the stress group). The preventive actions of diazepam in this acute model of stress suggest that drugs exhibiting anxiolytic and antioxidant properties might be useful for the design of therapies against early acute phases of physic stress.

  12. Modulation of Corpus Striatal Neurochemistry by Astrocytes and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) in Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Yelkenli, İbrahim Halil; Ulupinar, Emel; Korkmaz, Orhan Tansel; Şener, Erol; Kuş, Gökhan; Filiz, Zeynep; Tunçel, Neşe

    2016-06-01

    The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is widely used in animal models of Parkinson's disease. In various neurodegenerative diseases, astrocytes play direct, active, and critical roles in mediating neuronal survival and functions. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has neurotrophic actions and modulates a number of astrocytic activities. In this study, the effects of VIP on the striatal neurochemistry were investigated in parkinsonian rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into sham-operated, unilaterally 6-OHDA-lesioned, and lesioned + VIP-administered (25 ng/kg i.p.) groups. VIP was first injected 1 h after the intrastriatal 6-OHDA microinjection and then every 2 days throughout 15 days. Extracellular striatal concentration of glutathione (GSH), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (GLU), and lactate were measured in microdialysates by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quantification of GABA and activity dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP)-expressing cells were determined by glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)/ADNP + glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) double immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrated that a 6-OHDA lesion significantly increased the density of astrocytes in the striatum and VIP treatment slightly reduced the gliosis. Extracellular concentration of GABA, GLU, and lactate levels did not change, but GSH level significantly increased in the striatum of parkinsonian rats. VIP treatment reduced GSH level comparable to sham-operated groups, but enhanced GABA and GLU levels. Our double labeling results showed that VIP primarily acts on neurons to increase ADNP and GAD expression for protection. These results suggest that, in the 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration model, astrocytes were possibly activated for forefront defensiveness by modulating striatal neurochemistry.

  13. Morphometric analysis of NADPH diaphorase reactive neurons in a rat model of focal excitotoxic striatal injury.

    PubMed

    Freire, Marco Aurelio M; Guimaraes, Joanilson S; Santos, Jose Ronaldo; Simplício, Hougelle; Gomes-Leal, Walace

    2016-12-01

    Excitotoxicity is the major component in neuropathological conditions, related to harmful action of imbalanced concentrations of glutamate and its agonists in the nervous tissue, ultimately resulting in cell death. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of an acute striatal lesion induced by a focal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) microinjection on the morphometry of NADPH diaphorase-reactive neurons (NADPH-d(+) ), a subset of cells which release nitric oxide (NO) in the brain and are known by its resistance in pathological conditions. Two hundred and forty NADPH-d neurons from NMDA-lesioned striatum and contralateral counterpart were tridimensionally reconstructed at 1, 3 and 7 post-lesion days (PLDs). Cell body and dendritic field areas, length of dendrites by order and fractal dimension were analyzed. There were no significant morphometric differences when NADPH-d(+) neurons from lesioned and control striatal regions were compared among PLDs evaluated. Conversely, a conspicuous pallor in striatal neuropil reactivity was evidenced, especially in latter survival time. In addition, we observed a noticeable inflammatory response induced by NMDA. Our results suggest that NADPH-d(+) neurons were spared from deleterious effects of acute NMDA excitotoxic damage in the striatum, reinforcing the notion that this cell group is selectively resistant to injury in the nervous system.

  14. Striatal Molecular Signature of Subchronic Subthalamic Nucleus High Frequency Stimulation in Parkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lortet, Sylviane; Lacombe, Emilie; Boulanger, Nicolas; Rihet, Pascal; Nguyen, Catherine; Goff, Lydia Kerkerian-Le; Salin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses the molecular mechanisms underlying the action of subthalamic nucleus high frequency stimulation (STN-HFS) in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and its interaction with levodopa (L-DOPA), focusing on the striatum. Striatal gene expression profile was assessed in rats with nigral dopamine neuron lesion, either treated or not, using agilent microarrays and qPCR verification. The treatments consisted in anti-akinetic STN-HFS (5 days), chronic L-DOPA treatment inducing dyskinesia (LIDs) or the combination of the two treatments that exacerbated LIDs. STN-HFS modulated 71 striatal genes. The main biological processes associated with the differentially expressed gene products include regulation of growth, of apoptosis and of synaptic transmission, and extracellular region is a major cellular component implicated. In particular, several of these genes have been shown to support survival or differentiation of striatal or of dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate that STN HFS may induce widespread anatomo-functional rearrangements in the striatum and create a molecular environment favorable for neuroprotection and neuroplasticity. STN-HFS and L-DOPA treatment share very few common gene regulation features indicating that the molecular substrates underlying their striatal action are mostly different; among the common effects is the down-regulation of Adrb1, which encodes the adrenergic beta-1- receptor, supporting a major role of this receptor in Parkinson's disease. In addition to genes already reported to be associated with LIDs (preprodynorphin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, metabotropic glutamate receptor 4, cannabinoid receptor 1), the comparison between DOPA and DOPA/HFS identifies immunity-related genes as potential players in L-DOPA side effects. PMID:23593219

  15. Chronic Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol during Adolescence Differentially Modulates Striatal CB1 Receptor Expression and the Acute and Chronic Effects on Learning in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Weed, Peter F; Filipeanu, Catalin M; Ketchum, Myles J; Winsauer, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether chronic administration of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence would (1) modify any sex-specific effects of THC on learning and (2) affect the development of tolerance to THC as an adult. Male and female rats received daily injections of saline or 5.6 mg/kg of THC from postnatal day 35-75, yielding four groups (female/saline, female/THC, male/saline, and male/THC). Rats were then trained on a procedure that assayed both learning and performance behavior and administered 0.32-18 mg/kg of THC acutely as adults (experiment 1). THC produced rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in both sexes; however, female rats were more sensitive than male rats were to the rate-decreasing effects. Rats were then chronically administered 10 mg/kg of THC (experiment 2). Rats that received THC during adolescence developed tolerance to the rate-decreasing effects more slowly and less completely than did rats that received saline; in addition, females developed tolerance to the error-increasing effects of THC slower than males did. Western blot analysis of brain tissue indicated long-term changes in hippocampal and striatal cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) levels despite levels that were indistinguishable immediately after chronic treatment during adolescence. Striatal CB1R levels were increased in adult rats that received THC during adolescence; hippocampal CB1R levels varied by sex. In summary, female rats were more sensitive than male rats were to the acute and chronic effects of THC, and chronic administration of THC during adolescence produced long-term changes in CB1R levels that correlated with decreased tolerance development to the rate-decreasing effects of THC.

  16. Extrinsic Sources of Cholinergic Innervation of the Striatal Complex: A Whole-Brain Mapping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dautan, Daniel; Hacioğlu Bay, Husniye; Bolam, J. Paul; Gerdjikov, Todor V.; Mena-Segovia, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine in the striatal complex plays an important role in normal behavior and is affected in a number of neurological disorders. Although early studies suggested that acetylcholine in the striatum (STR) is derived almost exclusively from cholinergic interneurons (CIN), recent axonal mapping studies using conditional anterograde tracing have revealed the existence of a prominent direct cholinergic pathway from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei to the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens. The identification of the importance of this pathway is essential for creating a complete model of cholinergic modulation in the striatum, and it opens the question as to whether other populations of cholinergic neurons may also contribute to such modulation. Here, using novel viral tracing technologies based on phenotype-specific fluorescent reporter expression in combination with retrograde tracing, we aimed to define other sources of cholinergic innervation of the striatum. Systematic mapping of the projections of all cholinergic structures in the brain (Ch1 to Ch8) by means of conditional tracing of cholinergic axons, revealed that the only extrinsic source of cholinergic innervation arises in the brainstem pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei. Our results thus place the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal nuclei in a key and exclusive position to provide extrinsic cholinergic modulation of the activity of the striatal systems. PMID:26834571

  17. Opposing effects of narcotic gases and pressure on the striatal dopamine release in rats.

    PubMed

    Balon, Norbert; Kriem, Badreddine; Dousset, Erick; Weiss, Michel; Rostain, Jean-Claude

    2002-08-30

    Nitrogen-oxygen breathing mixtures, for pressures higher than 0.5 MPa, decrease the release of dopamine in the rat striatum, due to the narcotic potency of nitrogen. In contrast, high pressures of helium-oxygen breathing mixtures of more than 1-2 MPa induce an increase of the striatal dopamine release and an enhancement of motor activity, referred to as the high pressure nervous syndrome (HPNS), and attributed to the effect of pressure per se. It has been demonstrated that the effect of pressure could be antagonized by narcotic gas in a ternary mixture, but most of the narcotic gas studies measuring DA release were executed below the threshold for pressure effect. To examine the effect of narcotic gases at pressure on the rat striatal dopamine release, we have used two gases, with different narcotic potency, at sublethargic pressure, nitrogen at 3 MPa and argon at 2 MPa. In addition, to dissociate the effect of the pressure, we have used nitrous oxide at 0.1 MPa to induce narcosis at very low pressure, and helium at 8 MPa to study the effect of pressure per se. In all the narcotic conditions we have recorded a decrease of the striatal dopamine release. In contrast, helium pressure induced an increase of DA release. For the pressures used, the results suggest that the decrease of dopamine release was independent of such an effect of the pressure. However, for the same narcotic gas, the measurements of the extracellular DA performed in the striatum seem to reflect an opposing effect of pressure, since the decrease in DA release is lower with increasing pressure.

  18. Effect of chronic treatment with angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists on striatal dopamine levels in normal rats and in a rat model of Parkinson's disease treated with L-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Meijide, Antonio; Villar-Cheda, Begoña; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Sierrra-Paredes, German; Guerra, Maria J; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L

    2014-01-01

    Beneficial effects of angiotensin type-1 receptor (AT1) inhibition have been observed in a number of brain processes mediated by oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, including Parkinson's disease. However, important counterregulatory interactions between dopamine and angiotensin systems have recently been demonstrated in several peripheral tissues, and it is possible that a decrease in dopamine levels due to AT1 inhibition may interfere with neuroprotective strategies. The present experiments involving rats with normal dopaminergic innervation indicate that chronic treatment with the AT1 antagonist candesartan does not significantly affect striatal levels of dopamine, serotonin or metabolites, as does not significantly affect motor behavior, as evaluated by the rotarod test. Interestingly, chronic administration of candesartan to normal rats induced a marked increase in dopamine D1 and a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor expression. In a rat model of Parkinson's disease treated with L-DOPA, no differences in striatal dopamine and serotonin levels were observed between candesartan-treated rats and untreated, which suggests that chronic treatment with candesartan does not significantly affect the process of L-DOPA decarboxylation and dopamine release in Parkinson's disease patients. Candesartan did not induce any differences in the striatal expression of dopamine D1 and D2 and serotonin 5-HT1B receptors in 6ydroxydopamine-lesioned rats treated with L-DOPA. The results suggest that chronic treatment with AT1 antagonists as a neuroprotective strategy does not significantly affect striatal dopamine release or motor behavior. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'.

  19. Increased dopamine uptake in striatal synaptosomes after treatment of rats with amantadine.

    PubMed

    Page, G; Peeters, M; Maloteaux, J M; Hermans, E

    2000-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of short- and long-term treatments with amantadine on the activity of the neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT) in the rat striatum. For this purpose, the [3H]dopamine uptake was measured in striatal synaptosomes prepared from rats treated for 2, 7 and 14 days with amantadine (40 mg/kg; i.p.). After 7 days of treatment, amantadine increased the apparent V(max) by 30% without modification of the apparent K(m) of dopamine uptake whereas no change in these parameters was observed after 2 and 14 days treatment. Binding assays conducted with [3H]GBR-12935 on membranes prepared from animals treated with amantadine revealed no difference in the density and the affinity of striatal DAT binding sites as compared to control. This indicates that the increased dopamine uptake was not reflecting a modification at the level of the DAT expression. The activity of the DAT is regulated by phosphorylation and one may propose that ionotropic glutamate receptors present on presynaptic terminals directly modulate this phosphorylation. An indirect mechanism would involve presynaptic dopamine receptors that control the activity of the DAT in response to the increased dopamine concentration in the synaptic cleft.

  20. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BR agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.

  1. Dopamine receptor agonists mediate neuroprotection in malonate-induced striatal lesion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Armentero, Marie-Thérèse; Fancellu, Roberto; Nappi, Giuseppe; Blandini, Fabio

    2002-12-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetic defects are involved in neurological disorders associated with neuronal damage in the striatum, such as Huntington's disease and cerebral ischemia. The striatal release of neurotransmitters, in particular dopamine, may contribute to the development of the neuronal damage. Recent studies have shown that dopamine agonists may exert neuroprotective effects via multiple mechanisms, including modulation of dopamine release from nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals. In rats, intrastriatal injection of malonate, a reversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, induces a lesion similar to that observed following focal ischemia or in Huntington's disease. In this study, we used the malonate model to explore the neuroprotective potential of dopamine agonists. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected systemically with increasing concentrations of D(1), D(2), or mixed D(1)/D(2) dopamine agonists prior to malonate intrastriatal insult. Administration of increasing doses of the D(2)-specific agonist quinpirole resulted in increased protection against malonate toxicity. Conversely, the D(1)-specific agonist SKF-38393, as well as the mixed D(1)/D(2) agonist apomorphine, conferred higher neuroprotection at lower than at higher concentrations. Our data suggest that malonate-induced striatal toxicity can be attenuated by systemic administration of dopamine agonists, with D(1) and D(2) agonists showing different profiles of efficacy.

  2. Postnatal functional inactivation of the entorhinal cortex or ventral subiculum has different consequences for latent inhibition-related striatal dopaminergic responses in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F; Peterschmitt, Y; Louilot, A

    2009-05-01

    Latent inhibition has been found to be disrupted in patients with acute schizophrenia. Striatal dopaminergic dysregulation is commonly acknowledged in schizophrenia. This disease may be consecutive to a functional disconnection between integrative regions, stemming from neurodevelopmental failures. Various anomalies suggesting early abnormal brain development have been described in the entorhinal cortex (ENT) and ventral subiculum (SUB) of patients. This study examines the consequences of a neonatal transitory blockade of the left ENT or left SUB for latent inhibition-related dopamine responses in the anterior part of the dorsal striatum using in-vivo voltammetry in freely moving adult rats. Reversible inactivation of both structures in different animals was achieved by local microinjection of tetrodotoxin (TTX) at postnatal day 8. Results obtained during the retention session of a three-stage latent inhibition protocol showed that the functional neonatal disconnection of the ENT or SUB caused the behavioural latent inhibition expression in pre-exposed (PE)-TTX-conditioned adult rats to disappear. After postnatal inactivation of the SUB, PE-TTX-conditioned rats displayed a reversal of the latent inhibition-related striatal dopamine responses, whereas after neonatal blockade of the ENT, dopamine changes in PE-TTX-conditioned rats monitored in the anterior striatum were between those observed in PE-phosphate-buffered-saline-conditioned and non-PE-TTX-conditioned animals. These data suggest that neonatal functional inactivation of the SUB disrupts latent inhibition-related striatal dopamine responses in adult animals more than that of the ENT. They may help improve understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  3. Striatal damage and oxidative stress induced by the mitochondrial toxin malonate are reduced in clorgyline-treated rats and MAO-A deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Maragos, William F; Young, Kristie L; Altman, Chris S; Pocernich, Chava B; Drake, Jennifer; Butterfield, D Allan; Seif, Isabelle; Holschneider, Daniel P; Chen, Kevin; Shih, Jean C

    2004-04-01

    Intrastriatal administration of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) inhibitor malonate produces neuronal injury by a "secondary excitotoxic" mechanism involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent evidence indicates dopamine may contribute to malonate-induced striatal neurodegeneration; infusion of malonate causes a pronounced increase in extracellular dopamine and dopamine deafferentation attenuates malonate toxicity. Inhibition of the catabolic enzyme monoamine oxidase (MAO) also attenuates striatal lesions induced by malonate. In addition to forming 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, metabolism of dopamine by MAO generates H2O2, suggesting that dopamine metabolism may be a source of ROS in malonate toxicity. There are two isoforms of MAO, MAO-A and MAO-B. In this study, we have investigated the role of each isozyme in malonate-induced striatal injury using both pharmacological and genetic approaches. In rats treated with either of the specific MAO-A or -B inhibitors, clorgyline or deprenyl, respectively, malonate lesion volumes were reduced by 30% compared to controls. In knock-out mice lacking the MAO-A isoform, malonate-induced lesions were reduced by 50% and protein carbonyls, an index ROS formation, were reduced by 11%, compared to wild-type animals. In contrast, mice deficient in MAO-B showed highly variable susceptibility to malonate toxicity precluding us from determining the precise role of MAO-B in this form of brain damage. These findings indicate that normal levels of MAO-A participate in expression of malonate toxicity by a mechanism involving oxidative stress.

  4. Rats classified as low or high cocaine locomotor responders: A unique model involving striatal dopamine transporters that predicts cocaine addiction-like behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Dorothy J.; Nelson, Anna M.; Mandt, Bruce H.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Rorabaugh, Jacki M.; Ng, Christopher M.C.; Barcomb, Kelsey M.; Richards, Toni L.; Allen, Richard M.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences are a hallmark of drug addiction. Here, we describe a rat model based on differential initial responsiveness to low dose cocaine. Despite similar brain cocaine levels, individual outbred Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit markedly different magnitudes of acute cocaine-induced locomotor activity and, thereby, can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs). LCRs and HCRs differ in drug-induced, but not novelty-associated, hyperactivity. LCRs have higher basal numbers of striatal dopamine transporters (DATs) than HCRs and exhibit marginal cocaine inhibition of in vivo DAT activity and cocaine-induced increases in extracellular DA. Importantly, lower initial cocaine response predicts greater locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference and greater motivation to self-administer cocaine following low dose acquisition. Further, outbred Long-Evans rats classified as LCRs, versus HCRs, are more sensitive to cocaine’s discriminative stimulus effects. Overall, results to date with the LCR/HCR model underscore the contribution of striatal DATs to individual differences in initial cocaine responsiveness and the value of assessing the influence of initial drug response on subsequent expression of addiction-like behaviors. PMID:23850581

  5. Delayed post-treatment with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells is neurorestorative of striatal medium-spiny projection neurons and improves motor function after neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Stella H; Alwakeel, Amr J; Goddard, Liping; Hobbs, Catherine E; Gowing, Emma K; Barnett, Elizabeth R; Kohe, Sarah E; Sizemore, Rachel J; Oorschot, Dorothy E

    2015-09-01

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia is a major cause of striatal injury and may lead to cerebral palsy. This study investigated whether delayed administration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), at one week after neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia, was neurorestorative of striatal medium-spiny projection neurons and improved motor function. The effect of a subcutaneous injection of a high-dose, or a low-dose, of MSCs was investigated in stereological studies. Postnatal day (PN) 7 pups were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. At PN14, pups received treatment with either MSCs or diluent. A subset of high-dose pups, and their diluent control pups, were also injected intraperitoneally with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), every 24h, on PN15, PN16 and PN17. This permitted tracking of the migration and survival of neuroblasts originating from the subventricular zone into the adjacent injured striatum. Pups were euthanized on PN21 and the absolute number of striatal medium-spiny projection neurons was measured after immunostaining for DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein-32), double immunostaining for BrdU and DARPP-32, and after cresyl violet staining alone. The absolute number of striatal immunostained calretinin interneurons was also measured. There was a statistically significant increase in the absolute number of DARPP-32-positive, BrdU/DARPP-32-positive, and cresyl violet-stained striatal medium-spiny projection neurons, and fewer striatal calretinin interneurons, in the high-dose mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) group compared to their diluent counterparts. A high-dose of MSCs restored the absolute number of these neurons to normal uninjured levels, when compared with previous stereological data on the absolute number of cresyl violet-stained striatal medium-spiny projection neurons in the normal uninjured brain. For the low-dose experiment, in which cresyl violet-stained striatal medium-spiny neurons alone were measured, there was a lower statistically

  6. Intrastriatal taurine increases striatal extracellular dopamine in a tetrodotoxin-sensitive manner in rats.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Ahtee, L

    1996-07-19

    In vivo effects of locally administered taurine on striatal dopamine release and metabolism were studied by microdialysis in freely moving rats. Concentrations of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in striatal dialysates were quantified by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) using electrochemical detection. Infusion of 150 mM taurine into the striatum for 2 h induced a 2.5-fold increase in the extracellular dopamine concentration. Extracellular DOPAC concentration increased nearly 2-fold. Taurine infusion initially decreased HVA to 70% but afterwards increased it to 140% of the control. When taurine was infused simultaneously with 1 microM tetrodotoxin starting 60 min after tetrodotoxin, the output of dopamine did not differ from that in the presence of tetrodotoxin alone. Tetrodotoxin abolished the effects of taurine on dopamine metabolites as well. Tetrodotoxin-sensitivity of the effects of taurine on dopamine and its metabolites suggests that intrastriatal taurine elevates extracellular dopamine by releasing it from neuronal pool.

  7. Differential effects of continuous administration for 1 year of haloperidol or sulpiride on striatal dopamine function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rupniak, N M; Mann, S; Hall, M D; Fleminger, S; Kilpatrick, G; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1984-01-01

    Administration of haloperidol (1.4-1.6 mg/kg/day) for up to 12 months or sulpiride (102-109 mg/kg/day) for between 6 and 12 months increased the frequency of purposeless chewing jaw movements in rats. N,n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) (0.25-2.0 mg/kg SC) did not induce hypoactivity in haloperidol-treated rats at any time; sulpiride treatment for 9 and 12 months caused a reduction in the ability of NPA to induce hypoactivity. Haloperidol, but not sulpiride, treatment enduringly inhibited low dose apomorphine effects (0.125 mg/kg SC). After 12 months, stereotypy induced by high doses of apomorphine (0.5-1.0 mg/kg) was exaggerated in haloperidol-, but not sulpiride-treated rats. Bmax for specific striatal 3H-spiperone binding was increased by haloperidol, but not sulpiride, treatment throughout the study. Bmax for 3H-piflutixol binding was not altered by chronic haloperidol or sulpiride treatment. Striatal dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited for the 1st month of haloperidol treatment, thereafter returning to control levels; dopamine stimulation was increased after 12 months of sulpiride treatment. Striatal acetylcholine content was increased after 3 and 12 months of treatment with haloperidol, but was not affected by sulpiride. Chronic administration of sulpiride does not induce identical changes in striatal dopamine function to those caused by haloperidol.

  8. The effect of venlafaxine on behaviour, body weight and striatal monoamine levels on sleep-deprived female rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ricardo A; Cunha, Geanne M A; Borges, Karla Daisy M; de Bruin, Gabriela S; dos Santos-Filho, Emídio A; Viana, Glauce S B; de Bruin, Veralice M S

    2004-11-01

    Partial sleep deprivation is clinically associated with fatigue, depressive symptoms and reduced memory. Previously, it has been demonstrated that venlafaxine, an atypical antidepressant, increases the levels of noradrenaline and serotonin in rat hippocampus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of venlafaxine on depression, anxiety, locomotor activity and memory in a model of REM sleep (REMs) deprivation in rats. We have also studied the influence of venlafaxine on monoamine levels in the striatum. Six groups of animals (N=20 each) were treated with saline or venlafaxine (1 or 10 mg/kg) during 10 days, submitted or not to REMs deprivation and studied with the forced swimming test of Porsolt (STP), plus-maze, passive avoidance and open-field tests right after sleep deprivation. Animals were also studied for passive avoidance 24 h later (rebound period). Brain samples for monoamine measurements were collected either immediately after REMs deprivation or after 24 h. Both REMs deprivation and venlafaxine showed an antidepressant effect. An anxiolytic effect was also observed after REMs deprivation. Previous treatment with venlafaxine blocked the antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of REMs deprivation. REMs deprivation alone and treatment with venlafaxine 10 mg/kg increased locomotor activity, and this effect was inhibited by venlafaxine in REMs deprived rats. Both venlafaxine treatment and REMs deprivation induced weight loss. Venlafaxine treatment, but not REMs deprivation, induced an increase in striatal dopamine (DA) levels. The combination of REMs deprivation and venlafaxine treatment was associated with an increase in serotonin turnover 24 h after rebound sleep. In this study, venlafaxine treatment hindered most behavioral effects of REMs deprivation and was associated with an interference on dopamine and serotonin systems in the striatum.

  9. Effects of intranigral injection of taurine and GABA on striatal dopamine release monitored voltammetrically in the unanaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, R D

    1986-09-10

    Linear sweep voltammetry with carbon-paste electrodes was used to detect changes in the extracellular concentration of homovanillic acid (HVA) in the striatum of unanaesthetized rats; under the present experimental conditions, changes in the HVA signal were used as an index of striatal dopamine release. The effects of unilateral intranigral infusion of saline, sucrose, taurine, GABA and the putative taurine-receptor antagonist, 6-aminomethyl-3-methyl-4H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxide (TAG), on the HVA signal were monitored in the striatum on the two sides of the brain. Both taurine and GABA caused an increase in the extracellular concentration of HVA which was significantly greater in the striatum on the side of the injection compared with the contralateral side. The effect of TAG varied between animals. The results are discussed in terms of the role of taurine as a possible neuromodulator in the substantia nigra and in the light of the suggestion that different pathways are involved in taurine- and GABA-induced contraversive circling.

  10. Number and type of synapses on the distal dendrite of a rat striatal cholinergic interneuron: a quantitative, ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Sizemore, Rachel J; Reynolds, John N J; Oorschot, Dorothy E

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge of the innervation of interneurons within the striatum is critical to determining their role in the functioning of the striatal network. To this end, the synaptic innervation of a distal dendrite of a rat striatal cholinergic interneuron was quantified for the first time. These synaptic data were compared to three other dendrites from rat striatal interneurons and to published data from dendrites in the mammalian cerebral cortex. To label the cholinergic interneurons and their distal dendrites, a male Wistar rat was perfused and the striatum was double-immunolabelled with an antibody to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and an antibody to m2 muscarinic receptor. After processing for transmission electron microscopy, a cholinergic interneuron was located and an m2-labelled distal dendrite identified by tracing it through serial ultrathin sections to this double-immunolabelled soma. Two interneuronal distal dendrites in the same tissue, and another from a second rat, were used for comparison. The widths and lengths of the four distal dendrites, the total number and type of synapses, and the number of synapses per mum for each distal dendrite were measured. Symmetric synapses were the most common type on all four dendrites. There were 0.73 synapses per mum on the distal dendrite of the identified striatal cholinergic interneuron. Two other interneuronal dendrites that were positive for the m2 muscarinic receptor antibody showed similar synaptic densities of 0.62 and 0.83 synapses per microm of distal dendrite, respectively. On a third unlabelled interneuronal distal dendrite located in the lateral striatum, there were 2.17 synapses per microm. This interneuron was thought to be a parvalbumin interneuron rather than a calretinin interneuron, which would more likely be medially located. These data suggest that the number of synapses per microm on the distal dendrite of the cholinergic interneuron, and possibly two other cholinergic interneurons, is three times

  11. The ionic mechanism of gamma resonance in rat striatal fast-spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Wilson, Charles J

    2011-12-01

    Striatal fast-spiking (FS) cells in slices fire in the gamma frequency range and in vivo are often phase-locked to gamma oscillations in the field potential. We studied the firing patterns of these cells in slices from rats ages 16-23 days to determine the mechanism of their gamma resonance. The resonance of striatal FS cells was manifested as a minimum frequency for repetitive firing. At rheobase, cells fired a doublet of action potentials or doublets separated by pauses, with an instantaneous firing rate averaging 44 spikes/s. The minimum rate for sustained firing was also responsible for the stuttering firing pattern. Firing rate adapted during each episode of firing, and bursts were terminated when firing was reduced to the minimum sustainable rate. Resonance and stuttering continued after blockade of Kv3 current using tetraethylammonium (0.1-1 mM). Both gamma resonance and stuttering were strongly dependent on Kv1 current. Blockade of Kv1 channels with dendrotoxin-I (100 nM) completely abolished the stuttering firing pattern, greatly lowered the minimum firing rate, abolished gamma-band subthreshold oscillations, and slowed spike frequency adaptation. The loss of resonance could be accounted for by a reduction in potassium current near spike threshold and the emergence of a fixed spike threshold. Inactivation of the Kv1 channel combined with the minimum firing rate could account for the stuttering firing pattern. The resonant properties conferred by this channel were shown to be adequate to account for their phase-locking to gamma-frequency inputs as seen in vivo.

  12. Effect of ionizing radiation on in vivo striatal release of dopamine in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Han-Tong Chen; Kandasamy, S.B.

    1996-07-01

    The time-course effect of ionizing radiation on the levels of basal and KCl-stimulated striatal release of dopamine (DA) was examined in vivo using microdialysis techniques. The basal level of extracellular DA in sham-irradiated controls was 0.172 {plus_minus} 0.042 pmol/sample (n = 9), and it increased 7.1-fold after the stimulation by 30 mM KCl (20 {mu}l). However, the release of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), two metabolites of DA, was reduced significantly by 30 mM KCl(P {le} 0.05). In the presence of 10 {mu}M forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, a second stimulation by 30 mM KCl increased the release of DA 6.9-fold. Radiation exposure, at a dose of 10 Gyt at 10 Gy/min, had no significant effect on the levels of either basal or KCl-stimulated release of DA or on the release of DOPAC and HVA. Striatal DA releases increased in response to two consecutive challenges of KCl. However, the release of DA in response to the second challenge of KCl was significantly smaller than that after the first challenge (543 {plus_minus} 110% compared to 794 {plus_minus} 164%, P {le} 0.05; Student`s paired t test). Pretreatment with 10 {mu}M forskolin, which by itself had no significant effect on the level of basal release of DA, prevented the decreased response of DA to the second challenge of KCl. Our results suggest that radiation exposure at the dose we used has no significant effect on the level of the basal release of DA or the release of DA stimulated by 30 mM KCl in the rat striatum, and that a reduced release of DA in response to repeated KCl stimulation might involve the cAMP effector system. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Development of specificity and stereoselectivity of rat brain dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Miller, J C; Friedhoff, A J

    1986-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to the neuroleptic haloperidol has been reported to produce an enduring decrement in the number of dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatum and a persistent diminution of a dopamine dependent behavior, stereotypy. The ontogeny of rat brain dopamine binding sites has been studied in terms of the kinetic properties and phenotypic specificity in rat fetal brain through early postnatal development. Sites showing some properties of the D2 binding site can be found prior to gestational day (GD) 18, can be labeled with [3H]dopamine or [3H]spiroperidol and can be displaced with dopaminergic agonists and antagonists. Saturation kinetics for specific [3H]spiroperidol has previously been found to occur on or about GD 18. It is of interest that the critical period for the prenatal effect of haloperidol to reduce striatal D2 binding sites, GD's 15-18, coincides with the period during which dopamine binding sites lack true specificity, but can be labeled with dopaminergic ligands. In these experiments the development of stereoselectivity of brain dopamine binding sites has been examined. When rat mothers were given either the neuroleptic (+)-butaclamol or its therapeutically inactive isomer (-)-butaclamol during the critical period GD's 15-18, the number of [3H]spiroperidol binding sites in striata of offspring was significantly reduced by both stereoisomers. This is in marked contrast to the postnatal treatment effect by a neuroleptic in which upregulation of striatal D2 binding sites occurs only by treatment with the therapeutically active isomer (+)-butaclamol. In vitro studies of the direct effect of the stereoisomers of butaclamol indicate that the recognition sites detected during fetal brain development with [3H]spiroperidol do not distinguish between the isomers of butaclamol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Copper reduces striatal protein nitration and tyrosine hydroxylase inactivation induced by MPP+ in rats.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Osornio, M; Montes, S; Pérez-Severiano, F; Aguilera, P; Floriano-Sánchez, E; Monroy-Noyola, A; Rubio, C; Ríos, C

    2009-06-01

    Striatal administration of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), the active metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), causes nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway damage similar to that observed in Parkinson's disease. Copper acts as a prosthetic group of several antioxidant enzymes and recent data show that copper attenuated MPP(+)-evoked neurotoxicity. We evaluated the effect of copper (as a supplement) upon proteins nitration (60 kDa) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) inactivation induced by MPP(+) (10 microg/8 microL) injection into the rat striatum. Copper pretreatment (10 micromol/kg i.p.) prevented both MPP(+)-induced proteins nitration and TH inactivation. Copper treatment also prevented the dopamine-depleting effect of MPP(+) injection. Those results were accompanied by a significant reduction of enzymatic activity of the constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS), whereas, the protein levels of the three isoforms of NOS remained unchanged. Results indicate that the effect of copper against MPP(+)-induced proteins nitration and TH inactivation in the striatum of rat may be mediated by a reduction of cNOS activity.

  15. The atypical dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 83959 induces striatal Fos expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Wirtshafter, David; Osborn, Catherine V

    2005-12-28

    The effects of dopamine D1 receptor agonists are often presumed to result from an activation of adenylyl cyclase, but dopamine D1 receptors may also be linked to other signal transduction cascades and the relative importance of these various pathways is currently unclear. SKF 83959 is an agonist at dopamine D1 receptors linked to phospholipase C, but has been reported to be an antagonist at receptors linked to adenylyl cyclase. The current report demonstrates that SKF 83959 induces pronounced, nonpatchy, expression of the immediate-early gene product Fos in the striatum of intact rats which can be converted to a patchy pattern by pretreatment with the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole. In rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions SKF 83959 induces strong behavioral rotation and a greatly potentiated Fos response. All of the responses to SKF 83959, in both intact and dopamine-depleted animals, can be blocked by pretreatment with the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390. In intact subjects, SKF 83959 induced Fos expression less potently than the standard dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 82958, but the two drugs were approximately equipotent in deinnervated animals. These results demonstrate for the first time that possession of full efficacy at dopamine D1 receptors linked to adenylyl cyclase is not a necessary requirement for the induction of striatal Fos expression in intact animals and suggest that alternative signal transduction pathways may play a role in dopamine agonist induced Fos expression, especially in dopamine-depleted subjects.

  16. Effect of neurotoxic lesion of pedunculopontine nucleus in nigral and striatal redox balance and motor performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Martin, J; Blanco-Lezcano, L; González-Fraguela, M E; Díaz-Hung, M-L; Serrano-Sánchez, T; Almenares, J L; Francis-Turner, L

    2015-03-19

    Early degeneration of pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is considered part of changes that characterize premotor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this paper, the effects of unilateral neurotoxic lesion of the PPN in motor execution and in the development of oxidative stress events in striatal and nigral tissues in rats were evaluated. The motor performance was assessed using the beam test (BT) and the cylinder test (CT). Nigral and striatal redox balance, was studied by means of biochemical indicators such as malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and the catalase enzymatic activity (CAT EA). Lesioned rats showed fine motor dysfunction expressed both as an increase in the length (p<0.001) and deviation (p<0.001) of the traveled path and also in the time spent (p<0.01) in the circular small beam (CBS) (p<0.01) in comparison with control groups. In addition, the lesioned rats group presented a right asymmetry index greater than 0.5 which is consistent with a significant increase in the percentage of use of the right forelimb (ipsilateral to the lesion), compared with the control group (p<0.05). Biochemical studies revealed that after 48-h PPN neurotoxic injury, the CAT EA showed a significant increase in the subtantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) (p<0.05). This significant increase of CAT EA persisted in the nigral tissue (p<0.001) and reached the striatal tissue (p<0.001) seven days after PPN injury. Also at seven days post-injury PPN, increased concentrations of MDA (p<0.01) and a tendency to decrease in the concentrations of NO in both structures (SNpc and striatum) were found. The events associated with the generation of free radicals at nigral and striatal levels, can be part of the physiological mechanisms underlying motor dysfunction in rats with unilateral PPN neurotoxic lesion.

  17. Riluzole protects from motor deficits and striatal degeneration produced by systemic 3-nitropropionic acid intoxication in rats.

    PubMed

    Guyot, M C; Palfi, S; Stutzmann, J M; Mazière, M; Hantraye, P; Brouillet, E

    1997-11-01

    The putative neuroprotective effect of riluzole was investigated in a rat model of progressive striatal neurodegeneration induced by prolonged treatment (three weeks, intraperitoneal) with 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase. Quantitative analysis of motor behaviour indicated a significant protective effect (60%) of riluzole (8 mg/kg/day) on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced motor deficits as assessed using two independent motor tests. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of 3-nitropropionic acid-induced lesions indicated a significant 84% decrease in the volume of striatal damage produced by 3-nitropropionic acid, the neuroprotective effect apparently being more pronounced in the posterior striatum and pallidum. In addition, it was checked that this neuroprotective effect of riluzole against systemic 3-nitropropionic acid did not result from a decreased bioavailability of the neurotoxin or a direct action of riluzole on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. We found that riluzole significantly decreased by 48% the size of striatal lesions produced by stereotaxic intrastriatal injection of malonate, a reversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor. Furthermore, the inhibition of cortical and striatal succinate dehydrogenase activity induced by systemic 3-nitropropionic acid was left unchanged by riluzole administration. The present results, consistent with a beneficial effect of riluzole in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, suggest that this compound may be useful in the treatment of chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J.; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A.; Grant, Samuel C.; Gold, Mark S.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  19. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A; Grant, Samuel C; Gold, Mark S; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  20. Protective effect of L-kynurenine and probenecid on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced striatal toxicity in rats: implications of modulating kynurenate as a protective strategy.

    PubMed

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Carrillo-Mora, Paul; González-Herrera, Irma Gabriela; García, Esperanza; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Santamaría, Abel

    2011-01-01

    The neuroactive metabolite at the kynunerine pathway, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a well-known competitive antagonist at the co-agonist glycine site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr), and also decreases the extracellular levels of glutamate by blocking α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAchr) located on glutamatergic terminals. KYNA has been often reported to be neuroprotective in different neurotoxic models. The systemic administration of L-kynurenine (L-KYN)--the precursor of KYNA--together with probenecid (PROB)--an inhibitor of organic acids transport--to rodents increases KYNA levels in the brain in a dose-dependent manner. The striatal infusion of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to rodents is one of the common models used to simulate Parkinson's disease (PD). Different studies have linked PD alterations with excessive glutamatergic transmission in the striatum since NMDAr antagonists exert beneficial effects in PD models. In this work we investigated the effect that a systemic administration of L-KYN+PROB exerted on the toxic model induced by 6-OHDA in rats. PROB (50 mg/kg, i.p.) + L-KYN (75 mg/kg, i.p.) were given to rats for seven consecutive days. On day two of treatment, the animals were infused with a single injection of 6-OHDA (20 μg/2 μl) into the right striatum. Fourteen days post-lesion, rotation behavior was assessed as a marker of motor impairment. The total levels of dopamine (DA) were also estimated in striatal tissue samples of 6-OHDA-treated animals as a neurochemical marker of damage. In addition, twenty eight days post-lesion, the striatal damage was assessed by hematoxylin/eosin staining and immunohistochemistry against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in the same animals. Neurodegeneration was also assessed by Fluoro Jade staining. 6-OHDA infusion increased rotation behavior, striatal reactive gliosis and neurodegeneration, while DA levels were decreased. For all markers evaluated, we observed protective

  1. Effects of delayed treatment with nebracetam on neurotransmitters in brain regions after microsphere embolism in rats

    PubMed Central

    Takeo, Satoshi; Hayashi, Hideki; Miyake, Keiko; Takagi, Kaori; Tadokoro, Mina; Takagi, Norio; Oshikawa, Sayuri

    1997-01-01

    The effects of delayed treatment with nebracetam, a novel nootropic drug, on neurotransmitters of brain regions were examined in rats with microsphere embolism-induced cerebral ischaemia. Cerebral ischaemia was induced by administration of 900 microspheres (48 μm) into the internal carotid artery. The rats with stroke-like symptoms were treated p.o. with 30 mg kg−1 nebracetam twice daily. The levels of acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and their metabolites in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus of animals with microsphere embolism were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.) on the 3rd and 7th days after the operation. Although the microsphere embolism induced significant changes in most of the neurotransmitters and some of their metabolites in the brain regions, the delayed treatment with nebracetam partially restored only the hippocampal 5-HT and the striatal dopamine metabolite contents on the 3rd day. The hippocampal in vivo 5-HT synthesis, but not the striatal dopamine synthesis, was attenuated in rats with microsphere embolism on the 3rd day, but was restored by treatment with nebracetam. In vivo striatal dopamine turnover rate of the rats with microsphere embolism was inhibited on the 3rd day irrespective of treatment with nebracetam. The present study provides evidence for a possible action of nebracetam on 5-HT metabolism in the ischaemic brain. PMID:9179389

  2. Comparison of nitrogen narcosis and helium pressure effects on striatal amino acids: a microdialysis study in rats.

    PubMed

    Vallée, Nicolas; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Boussuges, Alain; Risso, Jean-Jacques

    2009-05-01

    Exposure to nitrogen-oxygen mixture at high pressure induces narcosis, which can be considered as a first step toward general anaesthesia. Narcotic potencies of inert gases are attributed to their lipid solubility. Nitrogen narcosis induces cognitive and motor disturbances that occur from 0.3 MPa in man and from 1 MPa in rats. Neurochemical studies performed in rats up to 3 MPa have shown that nitrogen pressure decreases striatal dopamine release like argon, another inert gas, or nitrous oxide, an anaesthetic gas. Striatal dopamine release is under glutamatergic and other amino acid neurotransmission regulations. The aim of this work was to study the effects of nitrogen at 3 MPa on striatal amino acid levels and to compare to those of 3 MPa of helium which is not narcotic at this pressure, by using a new technique of microdialysis samples extraction under hyperbaric conditions, in freely moving rats. Amino acids were analysed by HPLC coupled to fluorimetric detection in order to appreciate glutamate, aspartate, glutamine and asparagine levels. Nitrogen-oxygen mixture exposure at 3 MPa decreased glutamate, glutamine and asparagine concentrations. In contrast, with helium-oxygen mixture, glutamate and aspartate levels were increased during the compression phase but not during the stay at maximal pressure. Comparison between nitrogen and helium highlighted the narcotic effects of nitrogen at pressure. As a matter of fact, nitrogen induces a reduction in glutamate and in other amino acids that could partly explain the decrease in striatal dopamine level as well as the motor and cognitive disturbances reported in nitrogen narcosis.

  3. Mitochondrial impairment induced by 3-nitropropionic acid is enhanced by endogenous metalloprotease activity inhibition in cultured rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    de Oca Balderas, Pavel Montes; Ospina, Gabriel Gutiérrez; Del Ángel, Abel Santamaría

    2013-06-24

    Metalloproteases from the metzincin family mediate molecule processing at the cell membrane termed ectodomain shedding (ES). This mechanism enables the generation of intracellular and extracellular fragments from cell membrane molecules that exert additional functions involved in cell processes including cell death, beyond those of full length molecules. Micotoxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induces striatal neuronal degeneration in vivo and in vitro through mitochondrial complex II inhibition. In this study, we hypothesized that metalloproteases regulate mitochondrial activity in cultured rat striatal neurons undergoing degeneration. To test this idea, striatal neuronal cultures characterized by NeuN and GAD-67 expression were treated with 3-NP together with the metalloprotease inhibitor GM6001 and their mitochondrial activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Our results showed that metalloprotease inhibition potentiated mitochondrial activity impairment induced by 3-NP whereas the inhibitor alone had no effect. These results indicate that metalloproteases regulate and promote mitochondrial functionality in striatal neurons undergoing degeneration induced by 3-NP. Since NMDA receptor is involved in the excitotoxic neuronal death triggered by 3-NP and is known to undergo ES, we analyzed NMDAR subunit NR1 phenotypic distribution by immunofluorescence. 3-NP and GM6001 induced abnormal perinuclear NR1 accumulation that was not observed with 3-NP or GM6001 alone. This observation suggests that metalloproteases are involved in NR1 cellular reorganization induced by 3-NP, and that their inhibition results in abnormal NR1 distribution. Together results indicate that endogenous metalloproteases are activated during striatal neurodegeneration induced by 3-NP eliciting an adaptative or compensatory response that protects mitochondrial functionality.

  4. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging reveals striatal hypertrophy in a rat model of long-term stimulant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Biezonski, D; Shah, R; Krivko, A; Cha, J; Guilfoyle, D N; Hrabe, J; Gerum, S; Xie, S; Duan, Y; Bansal, R; Leventhal, B L; Peterson, B S; Kellendonk, C; Posner, J

    2016-01-01

    Stimulant treatment is highly effective in mitigating symptoms associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), though the neurobiological underpinnings of this effect have not been established. Studies using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with ADHD have suggested that long-term stimulant treatment may improve symptoms of ADHD in part by stimulating striatal hypertrophy. This conclusion is limited, however, as these studies have either used cross-sectional sampling or did not assess the impact of treatment length on their dependent measures. We therefore used longitudinal anatomical MRI in a vehicle-controlled study design to confirm causality regarding stimulant effects on striatal morphology in a rodent model of clinically relevant long-term stimulant treatment. Sprague Dawley rats were orally administered either lisdexamfetamine (LDX, ‘Vyvanse') or vehicle (N=12 per group) from postnatal day 25 (PD25, young juvenile) until PD95 (young adult), and imaged one day before and one day after the 70-day course of treatment. Our LDX dosing regimen yielded blood levels of dextroamphetamine comparable to those documented in patients. Longitudinal analysis of striatal volume revealed significant hypertrophy in LDX-treated animals when compared to vehicle-treated controls, with a significant treatment by time point interaction. These findings confirm a causal link between long-term stimulant treatment and striatal hypertrophy, and support utility of longitudinal MRI in rodents as a translational approach for bridging preclinical and clinical research. Having demonstrated comparable morphological effects in both humans and rodents using the same imaging technology, future studies may now use this rodent model to identify the underlying cellular mechanisms and behavioral consequences of stimulant-induced striatal hypertrophy. PMID:27598968

  5. Longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging reveals striatal hypertrophy in a rat model of long-term stimulant treatment.

    PubMed

    Biezonski, D; Shah, R; Krivko, A; Cha, J; Guilfoyle, D N; Hrabe, J; Gerum, S; Xie, S; Duan, Y; Bansal, R; Leventhal, B L; Peterson, B S; Kellendonk, C; Posner, J

    2016-09-06

    Stimulant treatment is highly effective in mitigating symptoms associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), though the neurobiological underpinnings of this effect have not been established. Studies using anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with ADHD have suggested that long-term stimulant treatment may improve symptoms of ADHD in part by stimulating striatal hypertrophy. This conclusion is limited, however, as these studies have either used cross-sectional sampling or did not assess the impact of treatment length on their dependent measures. We therefore used longitudinal anatomical MRI in a vehicle-controlled study design to confirm causality regarding stimulant effects on striatal morphology in a rodent model of clinically relevant long-term stimulant treatment. Sprague Dawley rats were orally administered either lisdexamfetamine (LDX, 'Vyvanse') or vehicle (N=12 per group) from postnatal day 25 (PD25, young juvenile) until PD95 (young adult), and imaged one day before and one day after the 70-day course of treatment. Our LDX dosing regimen yielded blood levels of dextroamphetamine comparable to those documented in patients. Longitudinal analysis of striatal volume revealed significant hypertrophy in LDX-treated animals when compared to vehicle-treated controls, with a significant treatment by time point interaction. These findings confirm a causal link between long-term stimulant treatment and striatal hypertrophy, and support utility of longitudinal MRI in rodents as a translational approach for bridging preclinical and clinical research. Having demonstrated comparable morphological effects in both humans and rodents using the same imaging technology, future studies may now use this rodent model to identify the underlying cellular mechanisms and behavioral consequences of stimulant-induced striatal hypertrophy.

  6. Release of (/sup 3/H)-monoamines from superfused rat striatal slices by methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, J.A.; Schmidt, C.J.; Lovenberg, W.

    1986-03-05

    MDMA is a phenylisopropylamine which is reported to have unique behavioral effects in man. Because of its structural similarities to the amphetamines the authors have compared the effects of MDMA and two related amphetamines on the spontaneous release of tritiated dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) from superfused rat striatal slices. At concentrations of 10/sup -7/ - 10/sup -5/M MDMA and the serotonergic neurotoxin, p-chloroamphetamine, were equipotent releasers of (/sup 3/H)5HT being approximately 10x more potent than methamphetamine. However, methamphetamine was the more potent releaser of (/sup 3/H)DA by a factor of approximately 10x. MDMA-induced release of both (/sup 5/H)5HT and (/sup 3/H)DA was Ca/sup 2 +/-independent and inhibited by selective monoamine uptake blockers suggesting a carrier-dependent release mechanism. Synaptosomal uptake experiments with (+)(/sup 3/H)MDMA indicated no specific uptake of the drug further suggesting the effect of uptake blockers may be to inhibit the carrier-mediated export of amines displaced by MDMA.

  7. Striatal cholinergic functional alterations in hypoxic neonatal rats: role of glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Paulose, C S

    2013-10-01

    Molecular processes regulating cholinergic functions play an important role in the control of respiration under hypoxia. Cholinergic alterations and its further complications in respiration due to hypoxic insult in neonatal rats and the effect of glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine resuscitation was evaluated in the present study. Receptor binding and gene expression studies were done in the corpus striatum to analyse the changes in total muscarinic receptors, muscarinic M1, M2, M3 receptors, and the enzymes involved in acetylcholine metabolism, choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase. Neonatal hypoxia decreased total muscarinic receptors with reduced expression of muscarinic M1, M2, and M3 receptor genes. The reduction in acetylcholine metabolism is indicated by the downregulated choline acetyltransferase and upregulated acetyl cholinesterase expression. These cholinergic disturbances were reversed to near control in glucose-resuscitated hypoxic neonates. The adverse effects of immediate oxygenation and epinephrine administration are also reported. The present findings points to the cholinergic alterations due to neonatal hypoxic shock and suggests a proper resuscitation method to ameliorate these striatal changes.

  8. Neural differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells in a rat model of striatal lacunar infarction: light and electron microscopic observations

    PubMed Central

    Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma C.; Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Fernandez, Ana P.; Serrano, Julia; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Vellosillo-Huerta, Lara; Taylor, Julian S.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The increased risk and prevalence of lacunar stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) makes the search for better experimental models an important requirement for translational research. In this study we assess ischemic damage of the nigrostriatal pathway in a model of lacunar stroke evoked by damaging the perforating arteries in the territory of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat after stereotaxic administration of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We hypothesized that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity of differentiating into diverse cell types such as neurons and glia, but with limited proliferation potential, would constitute an alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for lacunar stroke. These cells showed neuritogenic activity in vitro and a high potential for neural differentiation. Light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry was used to characterize GFP-positive neurons derived from the transplants. 48 h after ET-1 injection, we characterized an area of selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons within the nigrostriatal pathway characterized with tissue necrosis and glial scar formation, with subsequent behavioral signs of Parkinsonism. Light microscopy showed that grafted cells within the striatal infarction zone differentiated with a high yield into mature glial cells (GFAP-positive) and neuron types present in the normal striatum. Electron microscopy revealed that NSCs-derived neurons integrated into the host circuitry establishing synaptic contacts, mostly of the asymmetric type. Astrocytes were closely associated with normal small-sized blood vessels in the area of infarct, suggesting a possible role in the regulation of the blood brain barrier and angiogenesis. Our results encourage the use of NSCs as a cell-replacement therapy for the treatment of human vascular Parkinsonism. PMID:22876219

  9. An age-related decline in striatal taurine is correlated with a loss of dopaminergic markers.

    PubMed

    Dawson, R; Pelleymounter, M A; Cullen, M J; Gollub, M; Liu, S

    1999-02-01

    Taurine is present in high concentration in the mammalian brain and is known to decline with aging. The present studies examined the relationship between the loss of striatal neurotransmitters and spatial learning ability in aged male Long-Evans rats. The effects of intrahippocampal infusions of neurotrophic factors-nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-were also examined for their ability to ameliorate the age-related decline in brain amino acid content. Taurine content was found to be significantly reduced in the striatum of aged rats (26 months old) that were impaired in spatial learning performance when compared to young unimpaired rats (5 months old). Aged rats that were behaviorally unimpaired had more modest reductions in taurine. Striatal dopamine content was also significantly reduced in aged learning-impaired rats. There was a significant (p < 0.001) correlation (r=0.61) between the striatal content of taurine and dopamine, but no such correlation was found for other striatal transmitters (glutamate, serotonin, norepinephrine). Treatment with neurotrophins had little effect on the age-related decline in striatal amino acids, although NGF treatment did improve spatial learning. These studies suggest (1) a link between age-related declines in striatal dopamine and taurine and (2) that NGF-induced improvement in spatial learning is not related to mechanisms involving changes in taurine or glutamate content.

  10. Western Diet Chow Consumption in Rats Induces Striatal Neuronal Activation While Reducing Dopamine Levels without Affecting Spatial Memory in the Radial Arm Maze.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jason C D; Ali, Saher F; Kosari, Sepideh; Woodman, Owen L; Spencer, Sarah J; Killcross, A Simon; Jenkins, Trisha A

    2017-01-01

    Rats fed high fat diets have been shown to be impaired in hippocampal-dependent behavioral tasks, such as spatial recognition in the Y-maze and reference memory in the Morris water maze (MWM). It is clear from previous studies, however, that motivation and reward factor into the memory deficits associated with obesity and high-fat diet consumption, and that the prefrontal cortex and striatum and neurotransmitter dopamine play important roles in cognitive performance. In this series of studies we extend our research to investigate the effect of a high fat diet on striatal neurochemistry and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task, a paradigm highly reliant on dopamine-rich brain regions, such as the striatum after high fat diet consumption. Memory performance, neuronal activation and brain dopaminergic levels were compared in rats fed a "Western" (21% fat, 0.15% cholesterol) chow diet compared to normal diet (6% fat, 0.15% cholesterol)-fed controls. Twelve weeks of dietary manipulation produced an increase in weight in western diet-fed rats, but did not affect learning and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task. Concurrently, there was an observed decrease in dopamine levels in the striatum and a reduction of dopamine turnover in the hippocampus in western diet-fed rats. In a separate cohort of rats Fos levels were measured after rats had been placed in a novel arena and allowed to explore freely. In normal rats, this exposure to a unique environment did not affect neuronal activation. In contrast, rats fed a western diet were found to have significantly increased Fos expression in the striatum, but not prefrontal cortex or hippocampus. Our study demonstrates that while western diet consumption in rats produces weight gain and brain neuronal and neurotransmitter changes, it did not affect performance in the delayed spatial win-shift paradigm in the radial arm maze. We conclude that modeling the cognitive decline

  11. Western Diet Chow Consumption in Rats Induces Striatal Neuronal Activation While Reducing Dopamine Levels without Affecting Spatial Memory in the Radial Arm Maze

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jason C. D.; Ali, Saher F.; Kosari, Sepideh; Woodman, Owen L.; Spencer, Sarah J.; Killcross, A. Simon; Jenkins, Trisha A.

    2017-01-01

    Rats fed high fat diets have been shown to be impaired in hippocampal-dependent behavioral tasks, such as spatial recognition in the Y-maze and reference memory in the Morris water maze (MWM). It is clear from previous studies, however, that motivation and reward factor into the memory deficits associated with obesity and high-fat diet consumption, and that the prefrontal cortex and striatum and neurotransmitter dopamine play important roles in cognitive performance. In this series of studies we extend our research to investigate the effect of a high fat diet on striatal neurochemistry and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task, a paradigm highly reliant on dopamine-rich brain regions, such as the striatum after high fat diet consumption. Memory performance, neuronal activation and brain dopaminergic levels were compared in rats fed a “Western” (21% fat, 0.15% cholesterol) chow diet compared to normal diet (6% fat, 0.15% cholesterol)-fed controls. Twelve weeks of dietary manipulation produced an increase in weight in western diet-fed rats, but did not affect learning and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task. Concurrently, there was an observed decrease in dopamine levels in the striatum and a reduction of dopamine turnover in the hippocampus in western diet-fed rats. In a separate cohort of rats Fos levels were measured after rats had been placed in a novel arena and allowed to explore freely. In normal rats, this exposure to a unique environment did not affect neuronal activation. In contrast, rats fed a western diet were found to have significantly increased Fos expression in the striatum, but not prefrontal cortex or hippocampus. Our study demonstrates that while western diet consumption in rats produces weight gain and brain neuronal and neurotransmitter changes, it did not affect performance in the delayed spatial win-shift paradigm in the radial arm maze. We conclude that modeling the cognitive

  12. Marked differences in the number and type of synapses innervating the somata and primary dendrites of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, striatal cholinergic interneurons, and striatal spiny projection neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sizemore, Rachel J; Zhang, Rong; Lin, Naili; Goddard, Liping; Wastney, Timothy; Parr-Brownlie, Louise C; Reynolds, John N J; Oorschot, Dorothy E

    2016-04-01

    Elucidating the link between cellular activity and goal-directed behavior requires a fuller understanding of the mechanisms underlying burst firing in midbrain dopaminergic neurons and those that suppress activity during aversive or non-rewarding events. We have characterized the afferent synaptic connections onto these neurons in the rat substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), and compared these findings with cholinergic interneurons and spiny projection neurons in the striatum. We found that the average absolute number of synapses was three to three and one-half times greater onto the somata of dorsal striatal spiny projection neurons than onto the somata of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc or dorsal striatal cholinergic interneurons. A similar comparison between populations of dopamine neurons revealed a two times greater number of somatic synapses on VTA dopaminergic neurons than SNpc dopaminergic neurons. The percentage of symmetrical, presumably inhibitory, synaptic inputs on somata was significantly higher on spiny projection neurons and cholinergic interneurons compared with SNpc dopaminergic neurons. Synaptic data on the primary dendrites yielded similar significant differences for the percentage of symmetrical synapses for VTA dopaminergic vs. striatal neurons. No differences in the absolute number or type of somatic synapses were evident for dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc of Wistar vs. Sprague-Dawley rat strains. These data from identified neurons are pivotal for interpreting their electrophysiological responses to afferent activity and for generating realistic computer models of neuronal networks of striatal and midbrain dopaminergic function.

  13. Locally infused taurine, GABA and homotaurine alter differently the striatal extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Majasaari, M; Salimäki, J; Ahtee, L

    1998-01-01

    We studied in vivo the effects of locally infused taurine (50, 150, and 450 mM) on the striatal dopamine and its metabolites in comparison with those of GABA and homotaurine, a GABAA receptor agonist, in freely moving rats. The extracellular dopamine concentration was elevated maximally 2.5-, 2- and 4-fold by taurine, GABA and homotaurine, respectively. At 150 mM concentration, at which the maximum effects occurred, homotaurine increased the extracellular dopamine more than taurine or GABA. When taurine and GABA were infused simultaneously with tetrodotoxin the output of dopamine did not differ from that in the presence of tetrodotoxin alone. In comparison, tetrodotoxin did not inhibit the increase in extracellular dopamine caused by homotaurine. Furthermore, omission of calcium from the perfusion fluid inhibited the increase of extracellular dopamine caused by GABA. However, it did not block the increase of dopamine caused by taurine or homotaurine. The present study suggests that the effects of intrastriatal taurine, GABA and homotaurine on the striatal extracellular dopamine differ. Thus, these amino acids seem to affect the striatal dopaminergic neurons via more than one mechanism.

  14. Taurine infused intrastriatally elevates, but intranigrally decreases striatal extracellular dopamine concentration in anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Heikkilä, M; Lillsunde, P; Seppälä, T; Ahtee, L

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we infused taurine (50, 150 or 450 mM, 2 microliters/min for 4h) into the dorsal striatum or into the substantia nigra via microdialysis probe and estimated the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the dorsal striatum of anaesthetised rats. Intrastriatal infusion of taurine elevated striatal dopamine at all concentrations studied. At the 450 mM concentration taurine elevated the extracellular dopamine 10-fold, but only in the first 30 min sample after starting the taurine infusion. At 50 and 150 mM taurine elevated dopamine throughout the 4h infusion maximally up to 3-4-fold the control level. Extracellular DOPAC was increased by 150 and 450 mM taurine (up to about 150-160% of the control level), whereas at all three concentrations taurine decreased HVA to about 85% of the control; however, the decrease caused by 450 mM taurine was short-lasting. At all three concentrations taurine infused into the substantia nigra decreased the extracellular dopamine in the ipsilateral striatum to about 40-50% of the control, and increased extracellular DOPAC and HVA maximally to about 150% and 170% of the control, respectively. These results show that the effects of taurine on the concentrations of extracellular dopamine and its metabolites depend on its administration site on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. It elevates the extracellular dopamine when given into the striatum, but when given into the cell body region of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway it decreases the extracellular dopamine in the ipsilateral striatum.

  15. Probucol increases striatal glutathione peroxidase activity and protects against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced pro-oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Colle, Dirleise; Santos, Danúbia Bonfanti; Moreira, Eduardo Luiz Gasnhar; Hartwig, Juliana Montagna; dos Santos, Alessandra Antunes; Zimmermann, Luciana Teixeira; Hort, Mariana Appel; Farina, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by symptoms attributable to the death of striatal and cortical neurons. The molecular mechanisms mediating neuronal death in HD involve oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, in rodents has been proposed as a useful experimental model of HD. This study evaluated the effects of probucol, a lipid-lowering agent with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on the biochemical parameters related to oxidative stress, as well as on the behavioral parameters related to motor function in an in vivo HD model based on 3-NP intoxication in rats. Animals were treated with 3.5 mg/kg of probucol in drinking water daily for 2 months and, subsequently, received 3-NP (25 mg/kg i.p.) once a day for 6 days. At the end of the treatments, 3-NP-treated animals showed a significant decrease in body weight, which corresponded with impairment on motor ability, inhibition of mitochondrial complex II activity and oxidative stress in the striatum. Probucol, which did not rescue complex II inhibition, protected against behavioral and striatal biochemical changes induced by 3-NP, attenuating 3-NP-induced motor impairments and striatal oxidative stress. Importantly, probucol was able to increase activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an enzyme important in mediating the detoxification of peroxides in the central nervous system. The major finding of this study was that probucol protected against 3-NP-induced behavioral and striatal biochemical changes without affecting 3-NP-induced mitochondrial complex II inhibition, indicating that long-term probucol treatment resulted in an increased resistance against neurotoxic events (i.e., increased oxidative damage) secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction. These data appeared to be of great relevance when

  16. Association between striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors and brain activation during visual attention: effects of sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Volkow, N D

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) disrupts dopamine (DA) signaling and impairs attention. However, the interpretation of these concomitant effects requires a better understanding of dopamine's role in attention processing. Here we test the hypotheses that D2/D3 receptors (D2/D3R) in dorsal and ventral striatum would distinctly regulate the activation of attention regions and that, by decreasing D2/D3, SD would disrupt these associations. We measured striatal D2/D3R using positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride and brain activation to a visual attention (VA) task using 4-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen healthy men were studied during rested wakefulness and also during SD. Increased D2/D3R in striatum (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum) were linearly associated with higher thalamic activation. Subjects with higher D2/D3R in caudate relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in superior parietal cortex and ventral precuneus, and those with higher D2/D3R in putamen relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in anterior cingulate. SD impaired the association between striatal D2/D3R and VA-induced thalamic activation, which is essential for alertness. Findings suggest a robust DAergic modulation of cortical activation during the VA task, such that D2/D3R in dorsal striatum counterbalanced the stimulatory influence of D2/D3R in ventral striatum, which was not significantly disrupted by SD. In contrast, SD disrupted thalamic activation, which did not show counterbalanced DAergic modulation but a positive association with D2/D3R in both dorsal and ventral striatum. The counterbalanced dorsal versus ventral striatal DAergic modulation of VA activation mirrors similar findings during sensorimotor processing (Tomasi et al., 2015) suggesting a bidirectional influence in signaling between the dorsal caudate and putamen and the ventral striatum. PMID:27219347

  17. The effects of apomorphine and D-amphetamine on striatal c-Fos expression in Sprague-Dawley and Long Evans rats and their F1 progeny.

    PubMed

    Saint Marie, Richard L; Neary, Alaina C; Shoemaker, Jody M; Swerdlow, Neal R

    2006-11-13

    We previously reported that Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats are significantly more sensitive than Long Evans (LE) rats to disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex by the dopamine agonists, apomorphine (APO) and D-amphetamine (AMPH). This susceptibility is inherited through F1 (SD x LE) and N2 backcross (F1 x SD) generations via an orderly pattern (SD>N2>F1>LE). Here we examined systemic APO (0.5 mg/kg) and AMPH (4.5 mg/kg) modulation of neural activity in four regions of the striatum suspected to be involved in the dopaminergic regulation of PPI - dorsolateral (dlCPu) and medial (mCPu) caudate/putamen and core (NACc) and medial shell (NACms) regions of nucleus accumbens - under conditions that mimicked those used to assess PPI. Immunohistochemical quantification of c-Fos protein expression was used as the surrogate measure of neural activity in SD and LE rats and their F1 crosses. Vehicle-treatment showed significant regional differences in Fos expression, particularly between the dlCPu and the other three areas, but no strain-related differences were observed. Three of four brain areas examined (dlCPu, mCPu and NACc) exhibited drug-induced changes in Fos expression--APO decreased and AMPH increased Fos expression in each region. The aggregate effect across these three regions revealed Fos expression to be significantly greater in LE compared to SD rats for both drugs, with F1 rats intermediate. This pattern of inheritance (LE>F1>SD) reveals an inverse relationship between striatal Fos expression and PPI sensitivity for these drugs; and a positive relationship with reported heritable differences in D2-linked G-protein binding in the CPu and NACc, and with locomotor activation/suppression by AMPH and APO.

  18. Effect of cocaine on striatal dopamine clearance in a rat model of developmental stress and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Stein, Dan J; Gerhardt, Greg A; Russell, Vivienne A

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and developmental stress are considered risk factors for the development of drug abuse. Though the physiological mechanisms underlying this risk are not yet clear, ADHD, developmental stress and drug abuse are known to share underlying disturbances in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Thus, we hypothesized that clearance of cocaine-induced elevations in striatal dopamine would be prolonged in a rat model of ADHD and that this would be further increased by exposure to developmental stress. In the current study, male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), a well-validated model of ADHD, and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were exposed to either standard rearing (nMS) or a maternal separation (MS) paradigm involving removal of the pups from the dam for 180 min/day over 13 days. This produced a 2 × 2 factorial design (SHR/WKY × nMS/MS) with 5-6 rats/group. Striatal clearance of exogenously applied dopamine was measured via in vivo chronoamperometry, and the difference in dopamine uptake parameters before and after cocaine administration was compared between experimental groups. Cocaine, a potent dopamine transporter inhibitor, reliably increased the clearance time of dopamine though no difference in this parameter was found between SHR and WKY strains. However, developmental stress elevated the cocaine-induced increase in time to clear 50% of exogenously applied dopamine (T50) in SHR but had no effect in WKY rats. These findings suggest that a strain × environment interaction prolongs elevated levels of dopamine thereby potentially increasing the rewarding properties of this drug in SHR.

  19. Stereological assessment of vulnerability of immunocytochemically identified striatal and hippocampal neurons after global cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Larsson, E; Lindvall, O; Kokaia, Z

    2001-09-21

    Detailed quantitative analysis of the vulnerability of different hippocampal and striatal neurons to global forebrain ischemia has not previously been performed. Here we have studied the survival of immunocytochemically identified neurons using an unbiased stereological method in rats subjected to global forebrain ischemia for 30 min and sacrificed 48 h, 1 week or 4 weeks thereafter. Within the hippocampal formation, there was extensive, progressive loss of CA1 pyramidal neurons and dentate hilar neuropeptide Y (NPY)-positive interneurons. In contrast, no reduction of the number of CA3 and CA4 pyramidal neurons or hilar parvalbumin-positive interneurons was detected. In the dorsolateral striatum, the insult caused a major loss of projection neurons immunoreactive to dopamine- and adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein with a molecular weight of 32 kilodalton (DARPP-32). The number of parvalbumin-positive striatal interneurons was significantly reduced, while NPY-positive interneurons were resistant. All striatal cholinergic interneurons survived the ischemic insult. At 48 h following the ischemia, the cholinergic interneurons within the lesioned striatum transiently expressed the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), as shown by double-label immunocytochemistry. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)- and TrkA-immunoreactive interneurons at 4 weeks after the insult. Injections with the cell mitotic division marker BrdU provided no evidence that the elevated cholinergic cell number was due to neurogenesis. Probably, the higher number of ChAT- and TrkA-positive interneurons reflected increased intracellular levels of the corresponding proteins leading to more cells detectable with immunocytochemistry. This study gives the first quantitative description of the vulnerability of defined hippocampal and striatal neurons after global forebrain ischemia. The ischemia-induced increases of p75(NTR), Trk

  20. Dissecting striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions. New clues from rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Sebastião, Ana Maria

    2016-03-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Chiodi et al. () showing that the effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) activation in the striatum are significantly reduced in rats with neuronal over-expression of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). Two hypotheses are derived from that study. Hypothesis A: two subpopulations of pre-synaptic CB1R in corticostriatal glutamatergic terminals exist, one forming and another not forming heteromers with A2AR. Hypothesis B: CB1R are predominantly forming heteromers with A2AR. In the case of hypothesis A, the A2AR might be required for CB1R-A2AR heteromeric signaling, whereas non-heteromeric CB1R activity is inhibited by A2ARs. In the case of hypothesis B, up-regulation of A2ARs may perturb heteromeric stoichiometry, thus reducing CB1R functioning. In any case, pre-synaptic striatal A2AR-CB1R heteromers emerge as important targets of the effects of cannabinoids demonstrated at the neuronal and behavioral level. Read the highlighted article 'Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors' on page 907.

  1. Amelioration of hypoxia-induced striatal 5-HT(2A) receptor, 5-HT transporter and HIF1 alterations by glucose, oxygen and epinephrine in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Paulose, C S

    2011-09-20

    Alterations in neurotransmitters and its receptors expression induce brain injury during neonatal hypoxic insult. Molecular processes regulating the serotonergic receptors play an important role in the control of respiration under hypoxic insult. The present study focused on the serotonergic regulation of neonatal hypoxia and its resuscitation methods. Receptor binding assays and gene expression studies were done to evaluate the changes in 5HT(2A) receptors and its transporter in the corpus striatum of hypoxic neonatal rats and hypoxic rats resuscitated with glucose, oxygen and epinephrine. Total 5HT and 5HT(2A) receptor number was increased in hypoxic neonates along with an up regulation of 5HT(2A) receptor and 5HT transporter gene. The enhanced striatal 5HT(2A) receptors modulate the ventilatory response to hypoxia. Immediate glucose resuscitation was found to ameliorate the receptor and transporter alterations. Hypoxia induced ATP depletion mediated reduction in blood glucose levels can be encountered by glucose administration and oxygenation helps in overcoming the anaerobic condition. The adverse effect of immediate oxygenation and epinephrine supplementation was also reported. This has immense clinical significance in establishing a proper resuscitation for the management of neonatal hypoxia.

  2. Large-Scale, Ion-Current-Based Proteomic Investigation of the Rat Striatal Proteome in a Model of Short- and Long-Term Cocaine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shichen; Jiang, Xiaosheng; Li, Jun; Straubinger, Robert M; Suarez, Mauricio; Tu, Chengjian; Duan, Xiaotao; Thompson, Alexis C; Qu, Jun

    2016-05-06

    Given the tremendous detriments of cocaine dependence, effective diagnosis and patient stratification are critical for successful intervention yet difficult to achieve due to the largely unknown molecular mechanisms involved. To obtain new insights into cocaine dependence and withdrawal, we employed a reproducible, reliable, and large-scale proteomics approach to investigate the striatal proteomes of rats (n = 40, 10 per group) subjected to chronic cocaine exposure, followed by either short- (WD1) or long- (WD22) term withdrawal. By implementing a surfactant-aided precipitation/on-pellet digestion procedure, a reproducible and sensitive nanoLC-Orbitrap MS analysis, and an optimized ion-current-based MS1 quantification pipeline, >2000 nonredundant proteins were quantified confidently without missing data in any replicate. Although cocaine was cleared from the body, 129/37 altered proteins were observed in WD1/WD22 that are implicated in several biological processes related closely to drug-induced neuroplasticity. Although many of these changes recapitulate the findings from independent studies reported over the last two decades, some novel insights were obtained and further validated by immunoassays. For example, significantly elevated striatal protein kinase C activity persisted over the 22 day cocaine withdrawal. Cofilin-1 activity was up-regulated in WD1 and down-regulated in WD22. These discoveries suggest potentially distinct structural plasticity after short- and long-term cocaine withdrawal. In addition, this study provides compelling evidence that blood vessel narrowing, a long-known effect of cocaine use, occurred after long-term but not short-term withdrawal. In summary, this work developed a well-optimized paradigm for ion-current-based quantitative proteomics in brain tissues and obtained novel insights into molecular alterations in the striatum following cocaine exposure and withdrawal.

  3. Functional circuit mapping of striatal output nuclei using simultaneous deep brain stimulation and fMRI.

    PubMed

    Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Albaugh, Daniel L; Salzwedel, Andrew; Vanhove, Christian; Van Holen, Roel; Gao, Wei; Stuber, Garret D; Ian Shih, Yen-Yu

    2017-02-01

    The substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) and external globus pallidus (GPe) constitute the two major output targets of the rodent striatum. Both the SNr and GPe converge upon thalamic relay nuclei (directly or indirectly, respectively), and are traditionally modeled as functionally antagonistic relay inputs. However, recent anatomical and functional studies have identified unanticipated circuit connectivity in both the SNr and GPe, demonstrating their potential as far more than relay nuclei. In the present study, we employed simultaneous deep brain stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging (DBS-fMRI) with cerebral blood volume (CBV) measurements to functionally and unbiasedly map the circuit- and network level connectivity of the SNr and GPe. Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with a custom-made MR-compatible stimulating electrode in the right SNr (n=6) or GPe (n=7). SNr- and GPe-DBS, conducted across a wide range of stimulation frequencies, revealed a number of surprising evoked responses, including unexpected CBV decreases within the striatum during DBS at either target, as well as GPe-DBS-evoked positive modulation of frontal cortex. Functional connectivity MRI revealed global modulation of neural networks during DBS at either target, sensitive to stimulation frequency and readily reversed following cessation of stimulation. This work thus contributes to a growing literature demonstrating extensive and unanticipated functional connectivity among basal ganglia nuclei.

  4. Brain neuronal chromatin responses in acute soman intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Martin, L J; Doebler, J A; Wall, T J; Shih, T M; Anthony, A

    1986-08-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 g) were injected subcutaneously with soman, a potent neuronal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, at doses of 0.5, 0.8 and 1.0 LD50 (1 LD50 = 135 micrograms/kg) before decapitation at 1 and 24 h post-exposure. Correlative data were obtained on the severity of brain AChE inactivation and physicochemical changes in nuclear chromatin of cerebrocortical (layer V) and striatal neurons using Feulgen-DNA (F-DNA) cytophotometry and ocular filar micrometry. Decreased lability of neurons to F-DNA acid hydrolysis (reduced F-DNA yield), nuclear shrinkage and chromatin aggregation (decreased chromophore area) were used as indices of suppression of genomic template activity; conversely, increases in F-DNA yield and chromophore area signify enhanced neuroexcitation. At 1 hr post-soman there was a dose-dependent inactivation of AChE with a moderate increase in chromatin activation, i.e., nuclear hypertrophy and chromatin dispersion. At 24 hr post-soman there was a partial restoration of AChE activity, notably in striatal neurons, with a suppression in chromatin template activity. These data indicate that actions of soman on neuronal functioning are time-dependent. The absence of any dose-related neuronal chromatin changes may signify existence of non-cholinergic mediated events.

  5. Sex differences, learning flexibility, and striatal dopamine D1 and D2 following adolescent drug exposure in rats

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Pozos, Hilda; De La Torre, Adrianna; DeShields, Simone; Cevallos, James; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Stolyarova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal circuitry supports flexible reward learning and emotional behavior from the critical neurodevelopmental stage of adolescence through adulthood. It is still poorly understood how prescription drug exposure in adolescence may impact these outcomes in the long-term. We studied adolescent methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) exposure in rats and their impact on learning and emotion in adulthood. In Experiment 1, male and female rats were administered MPH, FLX, or saline (SAL), and compared with methamphetamine (mAMPH) treatment beginning in postnatal day (PND) 37. The rats were then tested on discrimination and reversal learning in adulthood. In Experiment 2, animals were administered MPH or SAL also beginning in PND 37 and later tested in adulthood for anxiety levels. In Experiment 3, we analyzed striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptor expression in adulthood following either extensive learning (after Experiment 1) or more brief emotional measures (after Experiment 2). We found sex differences in discrimination learning and attenuated reversal learning after MPH and only sex differences in adulthood anxiety. In learners, there was enhanced striatal D1, but not D2, after either adolescent MPH or mAMPH. Lastly, also in learners, there was a sex x treatment group interaction for D2, but not D1, driven by the MPH-pretreated females, who expressed significantly higher D2 levels compared to SAL. These results show enduring effects of adolescent MPH on reversal learning in rats. Developmental psychostimulant exposure may interact with learning to enhance D1 expression in adulthood, and affect D2 expression in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:27091300

  6. Effects of repeated hyperbaric nitrogen-oxygen exposures on the striatal dopamine release and on motor disturbances in rats.

    PubMed

    Lavoute, Cécile; Weiss, Michel; Rostain, Jean-Claude

    2005-09-14

    Previous studies have demonstrated disruptions of motor activities and a decrease of extracellular dopamine level in the striatum of rats exposed to high pressure of nitrogen. Men exposed to nitrogen pressure develop also motor and cognitive disturbances related to inert gas narcosis. After repetitive exposures, adaptation to narcosis was subjectively reported. To study the effects of repetitive exposures to hyperbaric nitrogen-oxygen, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted in the striatum with multifiber carbon dopamine-sensitive electrodes. After recovery from surgery, free-moving rats were exposed for 2 h up to 3 MPa of nitrogen-oxygen mixture before and after one daily exposure to 1 MPa of nitrogen-oxygen, for 5 consecutive days. Dopamine release was measured by differential pulse voltammetry and motor activities were quantified using piezo-electric captor. At the first exposure to 3 MPa, the striatal dopamine level decreased during the compression (-15%) to reach -20% during the stay at 3 MPa. Motor activities were increased during compression (+15%) and the first 60 min at constant pressure (+10%). In contrast, at the second exposure to 3 MPa, an increase of dopamine of +15% was obtained during the whole exposure. However, total motor activities remained unchanged as compared to the first exposure. Our results confirm that nitrogen exposure at 3 MPa led to a decreased striatal dopamine release and increased motor disturbances in naïve rats. Repetitive exposures to 1 MPa of nitrogen induced a reversal effect on the dopamine release which suggests a neurochemical change at the level of the neurotransmitter regulation processes of the basal ganglia. In contrast, motor activity remained quantitatively unchanged, thus suggesting that dopamine is not involved alone in modulating these motor disturbances.

  7. Striatal 5-HT1A receptor stimulation reduces D1 receptor-induced dyskinesia and improves movement in the hemiparkinsonian rat

    PubMed Central

    Dupre, Kristin B.; Eskow, Karen L.; Barnum, Christopher J.; Bishop, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Summary Convergent evidence suggests that serotonin 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) agonists reduce L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia by auto-regulating aberrant release of L-DOPA-derived dopamine (DA) from raphestriatal neurons. However, recent findings indicate that 5-HT1AR stimulation also modifies D1 receptor (D1R)-mediated dyskinesia and rotations implicating a previously unexplored extra-raphe mechanism. In order to characterize the contribution of the striatum to these effects, rats with medial forebrain bundle DA lesions were tested for abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) and rotations following striatal microinfusions of the 5-HT1AR agonist ±8-OH-DPAT and systemic D1R agonist treatment with SKF81297. Additional rats with multi-site striatal DA lesions were tested for motor disability following systemic or intrastriatal ±8-OH-DPAT with or without systemic SKF81297. In rats with medial forebrain bundle lesions, striatal infusions of ±8-OH-DPAT dose-dependently reduced AIMs while conversely increasing rotations. In rats with striatal lesions, ±8-OH-DPAT alone, both systemic and intrastriatal administration, optimally reversed motor disability. Collectively, these results support an important functional interaction between 5-HT1AR and D1R in the striatum with implications for the improved treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:18824001

  8. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mike J F; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-08-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or 'wanting'). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened 'wanting' was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact ('liking') of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal 'hot-spots' that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation.

  9. Epigenetic dysregulation of hairy and enhancer of split 4 (HES4) is associated with striatal degeneration in postmortem Huntington brains

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Cheung, Iris; Shulha, Hennady P.; Coelho, Joana E.; Li, Ping; Dong, Xianjun; Jakovcevski, Mira; Wang, Yumei; Grigorenko, Anastasia; Jiang, Yan; Hoss, Andrew; Patel, Krupal; Zheng, Ming; Rogaev, Evgeny; Myers, Richard H.; Weng, Zhiping; Akbarian, Schahram; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate epigenetic contributions to Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis, we carried out genome-wide mapping of the transcriptional mark, trimethyl-histone H3-lysine 4 (H3K4me3) in neuronal nuclei extracted from prefrontal cortex of HD cases and controls using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep-sequencing. Neuron-specific mapping of the genome-wide distribution of H3K4me3 revealed 136 differentially enriched loci associated with genes implicated in neuronal development and neurodegeneration, including GPR3, TMEM106B, PDIA6 and the Notch signaling genes hairy and enhancer of split 4 (HES4) and JAGGED2, supporting the view that the neuronal epigenome is affected in HD. Importantly, loss of H3K4me3 at CpG-rich sequences on the HES4 promoter was associated with excessive DNA methylation, reduced binding of nuclear proteins to the methylated region and altered expression of HES4 and HES4 targeted genes MASH1 and P21 involved in striatal development. Moreover, hypermethylation of HES4 promoter sequences was strikingly correlated with measures of striatal degeneration and age-of-onset in a cohort of 25 HD brains (r = 0.56, P = 0.006). Lastly, shRNA knockdown of HES4 in human neuroblastoma cells altered MASH1 and P21 mRNA expression and markedly increased mutated HTT-induced aggregates and cell death. These findings, taken together, suggest that epigenetic dysregulation of HES4 could play a critical role in modifying HD disease pathogenesis and severity. PMID:25480889

  10. Effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens and striatal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.A.; Lamm, M.C.; Taljaard, J.J.

    1988-05-01

    Ethanol (10-200 mM) transiently increased tritium overflow from superfused rat nucleus accumbens slices previously incubated with (/sup 3/H)dopamine (DA) and (/sup 14/C)choline. The effect was greater in striatal tissue and did not appear to be a non-specific membrane effect since (/sup 14/C)acetylcholine (ACh) release was not affected. Lack of antagonism by picrotoxin suggested that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors were not involved. Calcium was not a requirement and the DA uptake blocker, nomifensine, was without effect. Ethanol appeared to be causing (/sup 3/H)DA release into the cytoplasm. K+ -stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)DA and (/sup 14/C)ACh from nucleus accumbens and striatal slices was not affected. Clonidine-mediated inhibition of the K+-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)DA remained unaltered. Ethanol attenuated the isoproterenol-induced enhancement of (/sup 3/H)DA release. Ethanol therefore appeared to interact with components of the DA terminal causing a transient increase in the release of neurotransmitter without impairing K+-evoked release but apparently interfering with the isoproterenol-induced effect.

  11. Neuroblast proliferation on the surface of the adult rat striatal wall after focal ependymal loss by intracerebroventricular injection of neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen Gómez-Roldán, María; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Capilla-González, Vivian; Cifuentes, Manuel; Pérez, Juan; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Fernández-Llebrez, Pedro

    2008-04-01

    The subventricular zone of the striatal wall of adult rodents is an active neurogenic region for life. Cubic multiciliated ependyma separates the subventricular zone from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and is involved in the control of adult neurogenesis. By injecting neuraminidase from Clostridium perfringens into the right lateral ventricle of the rat, we provoked a partial detachment of the ependyma in the striatal wall. The contralateral ventricle was never affected and was used as the experimental control. Neuraminidase caused widening of the intercellular spaces among some ependymal cells and their subsequent detachment and disintegration in the CSF. Partial ependymal denudation was followed by infiltration of the CSF with macrophages and neutrophils from the local choroid plexus, which ependymal cells never detached after neuraminidase administration. Inflammation extended toward the periventricular parenchyma. The ependymal cells that did not detach and remained in the ventricle wall never proliferated. The lost ependyma was never recovered, and ependymal cells never behaved as neural stem cells. Instead, a scar formed by overlapping astrocytic processes sealed those regions devoid of ependyma. Some ependymal cells at the border of the denudated areas lost contact with the ventricle and became located under the glial layer. Concomitantly with scar formation, some subependymal cells protruded toward the ventricle through the ependymal breaks, proliferated, and formed clusters of rounded ventricular cells that expressed the phenotype of neuroblasts. Ventricular clusters of neuroblasts remained in the ventricle up to 90 days after injection. In the subventricular zone, adult neurogenesis persisted.

  12. Quantitative gait analysis of long-term locomotion deficits in classical unilateral striatal intracerebral hemorrhage rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Ao, Li Juan; Lu, Gang; Leong, Elizabeth; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xiao Hong; Zhu, Xian Lun; Sun, Tin Fung David; Fei, Zhou; Jiu, Tian; Hu, Xiang; Poon, Wai Sang

    2013-11-15

    Gait analysis is a systematic collection of quantitative information on bodily movements during locomotion. Gait analysis has been employed clinically in stroke patients for their rehabilitation planning. In animal studies, gait analysis has been employed for the assessment of their locomotive disturbances in ischemic stroke, spinal cord injury and Parkinson's disease. The aims of the work reported here were to identify the gait parameters, collected from the computer-generated CatWalk System, that change after unilateral intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the acute stage and long term up to 56 days post-ICH. The results showed that with the collagenase-induced unilateral striatal lesion, the rats displayed a significant contralateral decrease in print and maximum contact area and paw intensity, a diagonal increase in the stance duration of the left front and right hind paws, a significant decrease in the stride length of all four limbs, and foot pattern instability as reflected by the base of support, support on styles, and cadence. These deficits, including those in print area, stance and pressure, were demonstrated throughout the long-term period following ICH. The correlations between the gait parameters, lesion volume and asymmetrical forelimb use were also reported in this paper. This work has provided a systematic description on gait parameters in the classical striatal ICH model, which might become an essential assessment tool in future studies of pathophysiology and the development of novel treatments for experimental unilateral intracerebral hemorrhage with gait deficits.

  13. Inhibition of ( sup 3 H)dopamine uptake into rat striatal slices by quaternary N-methylated nicotine metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Dwoskin, L.P.; Leibee, L.L.; Jewell, A.L.; Fang, Zhaoxia; Crooks, P.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The effects of quaternary N-methylated nicotine derivatives were examined on in vitro uptake of ({sup 3}H)dopamine (({sup 3}H)DA) in rat striatal slices. Striatal slices were incubated with a 10 {mu}M concentration of the following compounds: N-methylnicotinium, N-methylnornicotinium, N-methylcotininium, N,N{prime}-dimethylnicotinium and N{prime}-methylnicotinium salts. The results clearly indicated that significant inhibition of ({sup 3}H)DA uptake occurred with those compounds possessing a N-methylpyridinium group; whereas, compounds that were methylated at the N{prime}-pyrrolidinium position were less effective or exhibited no inhibition of ({sup 3}H)DA uptake. The results suggest that high concentrations of quaternary N-methylated nicotine metabolites which are structurally related to the neurotoxin MPP{sup +}, and which may be formed in the CNS, may protect against Parkinson's Disease and explain the inverse relationship between smoking and Parkinsonism reported in epidemiologic studies.

  14. The rat brain hippocampus proteome.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Michael; Tsangaris, George T; Maris, Antony; Lubec, Gert

    2005-05-05

    The hippocampus is crucial in memory storage and retrieval and plays an important role in stress response. In humans, the CA1 area of hippocampus is one of the first brain areas to display pathology in Alzheimer's disease. A comprehensive analysis of the hippocampus proteome has not been accomplished yet. We applied proteomics technologies to construct a two-dimensional database for rat brain hippocampus proteins. Hippocampus samples from eight months old animals were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The database comprises 148 different gene products, which are in the majority enzymes, structural proteins and heat shock proteins. It also includes 39 neuron specific gene products. The database may be useful in animal model studies of neurological disorders.

  15. The effects of gestational and chronic atrazine exposure on motor behaviors and striatal dopamine in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Jennifer L.; Lansdell, Theresa A.; Lookingland, Keith J.; Baker, Lisa E.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of environmentally relevant gestational followed by continued chronic exposure to the herbicide, atrazine, on motor function, cognition, and neurochemical indices of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) activity in male rats. Dams were treated with 100 µg/kg atrazine, 10 mg/kg atrazine, or vehicle on gestational day 1 through postnatal day 21. Upon weaning, male offspring continued daily vehicle or atrazine gavage treatments for an additional six months. Subjects were tested in a series of behavioral assays, and 24 h after the last treatment, tissue samples from the striatum were analyzed for DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). At 10 mg/kg, this herbicide was found to produce modest disruptions in motor functioning, and at both dose levels it significantly lowered striatal DA and DOPAC concentrations. These results suggest exposures to atrazine have the potential to disrupt nigrostriatal DA neurons and behaviors associated with motor functioning. PMID:26440580

  16. The effects of gestational and chronic atrazine exposure on motor behaviors and striatal dopamine in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jennifer L; Lansdell, Theresa A; Lookingland, Keith J; Baker, Lisa E

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of environmentally relevant gestational followed by continued chronic exposure to the herbicide, atrazine, on motor function, cognition, and neurochemical indices of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) activity in male rats. Dams were treated with 100 μg/kg atrazine, 10mg/kg atrazine, or vehicle on gestational day 1 through postnatal day 21. Upon weaning, male offspring continued daily vehicle or atrazine gavage treatments for an additional six months. Subjects were tested in a series of behavioral assays, and 24h after the last treatment, tissue samples from the striatum were analyzed for DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). At 10mg/kg, this herbicide was found to produce modest disruptions in motor functioning, and at both dose levels it significantly lowered striatal DA and DOPAC concentrations. These results suggest that exposures to atrazine have the potential to disrupt nigrostriatal DA neurons and behaviors associated with motor functioning.

  17. /sup 3/H-imipramine uptake into rat striatal slices and imipramine-induced /sup 3/H-dopamine efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, R.; Kawasaki, K.; Ono, N.; Kamiya, H.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of imipramine on spontaneous efflux of radiolabelled dopamine (DA) from slices of rat striatum was examined by a superfusion method. Imipramine at concentrations of 10 - 100 microM enhanced the efflux of DA accumulated in a high-affinity uptake system in a concentration-dependent manner. This efflux of /sup 3/H-DA was not affected by conditions (Ca/sup 2 +/-free medium, 100 microM bretylium and 30 microM tetrodotoxin) which inhibited the release of /sup 3/H-DA by electrical stimulation. Furthermore, this imipramine-induced /sup 3/H-DA efflux was temperature-dependent. The uptake of /sup 3/H-imipramine into striatal slices was determined. This uptake was concentration- and temperature-dependent and increased linearly. These results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-DA efflux by imipramine is connected with uptake of imipramine.

  18. Effect of gonadectomy of biochemical indices of striatal dopamine D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ receptors, their activity and adaptive response to antipsychotic drug treatment in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, T.L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Endogenous gonadal steroids in male and female rats were removed by gonadectomy (Gnx). Striatal D/sub 1/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding parameters and D/sub 1/ receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Striatal D/sub 2/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters in striatal slices and D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade consisted of the administration of the D/sub 2/ specific antagonist sulpiride (20 mg/kg) or vehicle i.p., 2x daily for 21 days followed by a 3 day drug withdrawal period. Gnx of female rats had no affect on striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity nor on the striatal D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment produced no adaptive changes in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in sham-operated or Gnx female rats. Gnx of male rats produced a statistically significant 10% decrease in striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites with no change in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and no change in striatal(/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment of sham-operated male rats produced a desensitization of the striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with no change in the number of (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites and no change in (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Gnx of male rats blocked the development of the striatal D/sub 1/ receptor desensitization response elicited by sub-chronic sulpiride treatment, without affecting striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 or (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. We have demonstrated that sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade in sham-operated male rats results in the desensitization of striatal D/sub 1/ receptor activity.

  19. Striatal Glutamate and GABA after High Frequency Subthalamic Stimulation in Parkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jin; Shim, Insop; Sung, Jae Hoon; Hong, Jae Taek; Kim, Il sup; Cho, Chul Bum

    2017-01-01

    Objective High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is recognized as an effective treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. However, the neurochemical basis of its effects remains unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of STN HFS in intact and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rat model on changes of principal neurotransmitters, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the striatum. Methods The authors examined extracellular glutamate and GABA change in the striatum on sham group, 6-OHDA group, and 6-OHDA plus deep brain stimulation (DBS) group using microdialysis methods. Results High-pressure liquid chromatography was used to quantify glutamate and GABA. The results show that HFS-STN induces a significant increase of extracellular glutamate and GABA in the striatum of 6-OHDA plus DBS group compared with sham and 6-OHDA group. Conclusion Therefore, the clinical results of STN-HFS are not restricted to the direct STN targets but involve widespread adaptive changes within the basal ganglia. PMID:28264233

  20. Methamphetamine-Induced Dopamine-Independent Alterations in Striatal Gene Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Brannock, Christie; Krasnova, Irina N.; Ladenheim, Bruce; McCoy, Michael T.; Chou, Jenny; Lehrmann, Elin; Wood, William H.; Becker, Kevin G.; Wang, Yun

    2010-01-01

    Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle are used extensively as a model of Parkinson's disease. The present experiments sought to identify genes that were affected in the dopamine (DA)–denervated striatum after 6-hydroxydopamine-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the rat. We also examined whether a single injection of methamphetamine (METH) (2.5 mg/kg) known to cause changes in gene expression in the normally DA-innervated striatum could still influence striatal gene expression in the absence of DA. Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle resulted in METH-induced rotational behaviors ipsilateral to the lesioned side and total striatal DA depletion on the lesioned side. This injection also caused decrease in striatal serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels. DA depletion was associated with increases in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios that were potentiated by the METH injection. Microarray analyses revealed changes (± 1.7-fold, p<0.025) in the expression of 67 genes on the lesioned side in comparison to the intact side of the saline-treated hemiparkinsonian animals. These include follistatin, neuromedin U, and tachykinin 2 which were up-regulated. METH administration caused increases in the expression of c-fos, Egr1, and Nor-1 on the intact side. On the DA-depleted side, METH administration also increased the expression of 61 genes including Pdgf-d and Cox-2. There were METH-induced changes in 16 genes that were common in the DA-innervated and DA-depleted sides. These include c-fos and Nor-1 which show greater changes on the normal DA side. Thus, the present study documents, for the first time, that METH mediated DA-independent changes in the levels of transcripts of several genes in the DA-denervated striatum. Our results also implicate 5-HT as a potential player in these METH-induced alterations in gene expression because the METH injection also

  1. Methamphetamine-induced dopamine-independent alterations in striatal gene expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Brannock, Christie; Krasnova, Irina N; Ladenheim, Bruce; McCoy, Michael T; Chou, Jenny; Lehrmann, Elin; Wood, William H; Becker, Kevin G; Wang, Yun

    2010-12-13

    Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle are used extensively as a model of Parkinson's disease. The present experiments sought to identify genes that were affected in the dopamine (DA)-denervated striatum after 6-hydroxydopamine-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the rat. We also examined whether a single injection of methamphetamine (METH) (2.5 mg/kg) known to cause changes in gene expression in the normally DA-innervated striatum could still influence striatal gene expression in the absence of DA. Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle resulted in METH-induced rotational behaviors ipsilateral to the lesioned side and total striatal DA depletion on the lesioned side. This injection also caused decrease in striatal serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels. DA depletion was associated with increases in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios that were potentiated by the METH injection. Microarray analyses revealed changes (±1.7-fold, p<0.025) in the expression of 67 genes on the lesioned side in comparison to the intact side of the saline-treated hemiparkinsonian animals. These include follistatin, neuromedin U, and tachykinin 2 which were up-regulated. METH administration caused increases in the expression of c-fos, Egr1, and Nor-1 on the intact side. On the DA-depleted side, METH administration also increased the expression of 61 genes including Pdgf-d and Cox-2. There were METH-induced changes in 16 genes that were common in the DA-innervated and DA-depleted sides. These include c-fos and Nor-1 which show greater changes on the normal DA side. Thus, the present study documents, for the first time, that METH mediated DA-independent changes in the levels of transcripts of several genes in the DA-denervated striatum. Our results also implicate 5-HT as a potential player in these METH-induced alterations in gene expression because the METH injection also caused

  2. Effects of taurine, homotaurine and GABA on hypothalamic and striatal dopamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Panula-Lehto, E; Mäkinen, M; Ahtee, L

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the effects of taurine on hypothalamic and striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission we compared its effects to those of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and homotaurine (a GABAA-receptor agonist) on hypothalamic and striatal concentrations of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and, in the case of striatum, 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) in rats. In addition, hypothalamic and striatal 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) und 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, hypothalamic noradrenaline (NA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol sulfate, and pituitary DA concentrations were also measured. The amino acids were injected into the lateral brain ventricles of conscious male rats in doses of 10 and 36 mumol/rat, and rat were sacrificed 15 and 60 min later, respectively. Homotaurine (by 11%) but not the other two amino acids elevated striatal DA, whereas hypothalamic DA was increased by both taurine (36%) and homotaurine (31%). All three amino acids at 36 mumol elevated striatal DOPAC, homotaurine (51%) more than taurine (31%) or GABA (30%), and hypothalamic DOPAC, both taurine (102%) and homotaurine (82%) clearly more than GABA (34%). Neither striatal nor hypothalamic HVA was altered by any of the amino acids. At 10 mumol the amino acids decreased striatal 3-MT by about 40%. At 36 mumol taurine and homotaurine reduced 3-MT by about 70%, whereas increasing the dose of GABA did not further reduce 3-MT. Both taurine and homotaurine at 36 mumol decreased hypothalamic NA content. Neither hypothalamic nor striatal 5-HT metabolism was altered. In the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary gland taurine at 10 mumol but not at 36 mumol slightly (20%) increased DA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. P2Y1 receptor modulation of Ca2+-activated K+ currents in medium-sized neurons from neonatal rat striatal slices

    PubMed Central

    Coppi, E.; Pedata, F.

    2012-01-01

    ATP signaling to neurons and glia in the nervous system occurs via activation of both P2Y and P2X receptors. Here, we investigated the effects of P2Y1 receptor stimulation in developing striatal medium-sized neurons using patch-clamp recordings from acute brain slices of 7- and 28-day-old rats. Application of the selective P2Y1 receptor agonist 2-(Methylthio) ADP trisodium salt (2-MeSADP; 250 nM) increased outward K+ currents evoked by a ramp depolarization protocol in voltage-clamp recordings. This effect was observed in 59 out of 82 cells (72%) and was blocked completely by the P2Y1 antagonist, 2′-deoxy-N6-methyl adenosine 3′,5′-diphosphate. The averaged 2-MeSADP-sensitive conductance was fitted by the sum of a linear conductance and a Boltzmann relation, giving one-half activation voltage of −14.2 mV and an equivalent charge of 2.91. The 2MeSADP-mediated effect was sensitive to submillimolar concentrations of tetraethylammonium (TEA; 200 μM), to 200 nM iberiotoxin and to 100 nM apamin, suggesting the involvement of both big and small potassium (BK and SK, respectively) calcium-activated channels. In current-clamp experiments, 2-MeSADP decreased depolarization-evoked action potential (AP) firing in all 26 cells investigated, and this effect was reversed by TEA and by apamin but not by iberiotoxin. We conclude that the stimulation of P2Y1 receptors in developing striatal neurons leads to activation of calcium-activated potassium channels [IK(Ca)] of both BK and SK subtypes, the latter responsible for decreasing the frequency of AP firing in response to current injection. Therefore, P2Y1 signaling leading to activation of IK(Ca) may be important in regulating the activity of medium-sized neurons in the striatum. PMID:22131374

  4. Triple monoamine inhibitor tesofensine decreases food intake, body weight, and striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; de Bruin, Kora; la Fleur, Susanne E; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The novel triple monoamine inhibitor tesofensine blocks dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake and is a promising candidate for the treatment of obesity. Obesity is associated with lower striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability, which may be related to disturbed regulation of food intake. This study assesses the effects of chronic tesofensine treatment on food intake and body weight in association with changes in striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2/3R) availability of diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Four groups of 15 DIO rats were randomized to one of the following treatments for 28 days: 1. tesofensine (2.0 mg/kg), 2. vehicle, 3. vehicle+restricted diet isocaloric to caloric intake of group 1, and 4. tesofensine (2.0 mg/kg)+ a treatment-free period of 28 days. Caloric intake and weight gain decreased significantly more in the tesofensine-treated rats compared to vehicle-treated rats, which confirms previous findings. After treatment discontinuation, caloric intake and body weight gain gradually increased again. Tesofensine-treated rats showed significantly lower D2/3R availability in nucleus accumbens and dorsal striatum than both vehicle-treated rats and vehicle-treated rats on restricted isocaloric diet. No correlations were observed between food intake or body weight and D2/3R availability. Thus, chronic tesofensine treatment leads to decreased food intake and weight gain. However, this appears not to be directly related to the decreased striatal D2/3R availability, which is mainly a pharmacological effect.

  5. Phase II antioxidant enzyme activities in brain of male and female ACI rats treated chronically with estradiol.

    PubMed

    Stakhiv, Timothy M; Mesia-Vela, Sonia; Kauffman, Frederick C

    2006-08-09

    Activities of Phase II antioxidant enzymes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), glutathione S-transferase (GST), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), and phenol sulfotransferase 1A1 (SULT1A1) were measured in brain of August-Copenhagen Irish (ACI) rats exposed chronically to low doses of estradiol (E(2)). ACI rats were selected for study because this strain is highly responsive to treatment with low doses of E(2) as indexed by a high incidence of E(2)-induced mammary tumors compared to other strains. Rats were exposed chronically to 3 mg E(2) contained in cholesterol pellets implanted subcutaneously for 6 weeks. This treatment increased activities of all four enzymes in the striatum of male but not female ACI rats. Blood E(2) levels at time of sacrifice correlated closely with activities of striatal NQO1, GST, and SULT1A1, but not with striatal UGT. NQO1, GST, and SULT1A1 activities in other brain regions including the cortex, cerebellum, and hippocampus were less sensitive to chronic E(2) treatment. NQO1 was primarily localized in vascular elements and neurons and SULT1A1 primarily in neurons and neuropil of control and E(2)-treated rats. Collectively, these results suggest that enhanced expression of NQO1, GST, and SULT1A1 may contribute to the antioxidant effects of E(2) in the striatum, an area of the brain that may be particularly prone to oxidative stress because of its high content of catecholamines.

  6. Development of dopamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate systems in rat brain: the effect of prenatal phencyclidine exposure.

    PubMed

    Ali, S F; Holson, R R; Newport, G D; Slikker, W; Bowyer, J F

    1993-05-21

    Phencyclidine (PCP) inhibits the uptake of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA), and blocks N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-regulated ion channels. PCP also binds to sigma receptors in vivo and in vitro in rat brain. Prolonged exposure to PCP in adults has been observed to reduce the number of PCP binding sites in brain. We designed these experiments to evaluate whether prolonged prenatal exposure to PCP produces alterations in the development of DA and NMDA systems in brain. To do so, we characterized the normal course of development of basal and stimulated DA release in striatal slices, the ontogeny of striatal DA concentrations, and the development of NMDA receptor channels and associated glutamate binding sites in frontal cortex. We compared these developmental profiles to those in rats exposed to prenatal PCP, in an attempt to characterize the effect of prenatal PCP exposure on the pattern of brain development. Pregnant CD rats were injected s.c. with either 0, 10 or 20 mg/kg PCP daily on gestational days 8 through 20. On postnatal days (PND) 8, 21, 45, or 100, rats were sacrificed and brain tissues isolated for in vitro assessment. In vitro [3H]DA release from striatal slices evoked by either 40 microM glutamate or 15 mM K+ increased over 250% from PND 8 to PND 45, and glutamate-stimulated release was still significantly below adult levels at PND 45. In contrast, D-methamphetamine (D-METH)-evoked [3H]DA release, frontal cortical glutamate binding sites and NMDA channels developed early, reaching adult levels on or before PND 21.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. The BACHD Rat Model of Huntington Disease Shows Signs of Fronto-Striatal Dysfunction in Two Operant Conditioning Tests of Short-Term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Clemensson, Laura Emily; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2017-01-01

    The BACHD rat is a recently developed transgenic animal model of Huntington disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extensive loss of striatal neurons. Cognitive impairments are common among patients, and characterization of similar deficits in animal models of the disease is therefore of interest. The present study assessed the BACHD rats' performance in the delayed alternation and the delayed non-matching to position test, two Skinner box-based tests of short-term memory function. The transgenic rats showed impaired performance in both tests, indicating general problems with handling basic aspects of the tests, while short-term memory appeared to be intact. Similar phenotypes have been found in rats with fronto-striatal lesions, suggesting that Huntington disease-related neuropathology might be present in the BACHD rats. Further analyses indicated that the performance deficit in the delayed alternation test might be due to impaired inhibitory control, which has also been implicated in Huntington disease patients. The study ultimately suggests that the BACHD rats might suffer from neuropathology and cognitive impairments reminiscent of those of Huntington disease patients. PMID:28045968

  8. The BACHD Rat Model of Huntington Disease Shows Signs of Fronto-Striatal Dysfunction in Two Operant Conditioning Tests of Short-Term Memory.

    PubMed

    Clemensson, Erik Karl Håkan; Clemensson, Laura Emily; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu Phuc

    2017-01-01

    The BACHD rat is a recently developed transgenic animal model of Huntington disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extensive loss of striatal neurons. Cognitive impairments are common among patients, and characterization of similar deficits in animal models of the disease is therefore of interest. The present study assessed the BACHD rats' performance in the delayed alternation and the delayed non-matching to position test, two Skinner box-based tests of short-term memory function. The transgenic rats showed impaired performance in both tests, indicating general problems with handling basic aspects of the tests, while short-term memory appeared to be intact. Similar phenotypes have been found in rats with fronto-striatal lesions, suggesting that Huntington disease-related neuropathology might be present in the BACHD rats. Further analyses indicated that the performance deficit in the delayed alternation test might be due to impaired inhibitory control, which has also been implicated in Huntington disease patients. The study ultimately suggests that the BACHD rats might suffer from neuropathology and cognitive impairments reminiscent of those of Huntington disease patients.

  9. Reductions in calcium uptake induced in rat brain synaptosomes by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Howerton, T.C.; Hunt, W.A. )

    1991-02-01

    Gamma irradiation (60Co) reduced KCl-stimulated voltage-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake in whole-brain, cortical, and striatal synaptosomes. The time course (3, 10, 30, and 60 s) of calcium uptake by irradiated (3 Gy) and nonirradiated synaptosomes, as well as the effect of KCl (15-65 mM), was measured in whole-brain synaptosomes. The fastest and highest rate of depolarization-dependent calcium uptake occurred at 3 s with 65 mM KCl. Irradiation reduced calcium uptake at all incubation times and KCl concentrations. Bay K 8644 enhancement of KCl-stimulated calcium influx was also reduced by radiation exposure. Nimodipine binding to dihydropyridine (DHP) L-type calcium channel receptors was not altered following radiation exposure. These results demonstrate an inhibitory effect of ionizing radiation on the voltage-sensitive calcium channels in rat brain synaptosomes that are not mediated by DHP receptors.

  10. Preserving cortico-striatal function: deep brain stimulation in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Sean J; Machado, Andre G; Gale, John T; Lobel, Darlene A; Pandya, Mayur

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an incurable neurodegenerative disease characterized by the triad of chorea, cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disturbances. Since the discovery of the HD gene, the pathogenesis has been outlined, but to date a cure has not been found. Disease modifying therapies are needed desperately to improve function, alleviate suffering, and provide hope for symptomatic patients. Deep brain stimulation (DBS), a proven therapy for managing the symptoms of some neurodegenerative movement disorders, including Parkinson's disease, has been reported as a palliative treatment in select cases of HD with debilitating chorea with variable success. New insights into the mechanism of action of DBS suggest it may have the potential to circumvent other manifestations of HD including cognitive deterioration. Furthermore, because DBS is already widely used, reversible, and has a risk profile that is relatively low, new studies can be initiated. In this article we contend that new clinical trials be considered to test the effects of DBS for HD.

  11. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    DOE PAGES

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; ...

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release inmore » striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.« less

  12. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [(11)C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  13. Nonequilibrium Calcium Dynamics Regulate the Autonomous Firing Pattern of Rat Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua A.; Teagarden, Mark A.; Foehring, Robert C.; Wilson, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons discharge rhythmically in two patterns associated with different afterhyperpolarization timescales, each dictated by a different calcium-dependent potassium current. Single spiking depends on a medium-duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) generated by rapid SK currents that are associated with N-type calcium channels. Periodic bursting is driven by a delayed and slowly decaying afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) current associated with L-type channels. Using calcium imaging we show that the calcium transients underlying these currents exhibit two corresponding timescales throughout the somatodendritic tree. This result is not consistent with spatial compartmentalization of calcium entering through the two calcium channels and acting on the two potassium currents, or with differences in channel gating kinetics of the calcium dependent potassium currents. Instead, we show that nonequilibrium dynamics of calcium redistribution among cytoplasmic binding sites with different calcium binding kinetics can give rise to multiple timescales within the same cytoplasmic volume. The resulting independence of mAHP and sAHP currents allows cytoplasmic calcium to control two different and incompatible firing patterns (single spiking or bursting and pausing), depending on whether calcium influx is pulsatile or sustained. During irregular firing, calcium entry at both timescales can be detected, suggesting that an interaction between the medium and slow calcium-dependent afterhyperpolarizations may underlie this firing pattern. PMID:19571130

  14. Nonequilibrium calcium dynamics regulate the autonomous firing pattern of rat striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joshua A; Teagarden, Mark A; Foehring, Robert C; Wilson, Charles J

    2009-07-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons discharge rhythmically in two patterns associated with different afterhyperpolarization timescales, each dictated by a different calcium-dependent potassium current. Single spiking depends on a medium-duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) generated by rapid SK currents that are associated with N-type calcium channels. Periodic bursting is driven by a delayed and slowly decaying afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) current associated with L-type channels. Using calcium imaging we show that the calcium transients underlying these currents exhibit two corresponding timescales throughout the somatodendritic tree. This result is not consistent with spatial compartmentalization of calcium entering through the two calcium channels and acting on the two potassium currents, or with differences in channel gating kinetics of the calcium dependent potassium currents. Instead, we show that nonequilibrium dynamics of calcium redistribution among cytoplasmic binding sites with different calcium binding kinetics can give rise to multiple timescales within the same cytoplasmic volume. The resulting independence of mAHP and sAHP currents allows cytoplasmic calcium to control two different and incompatible firing patterns (single spiking or bursting and pausing), depending on whether calcium influx is pulsatile or sustained. During irregular firing, calcium entry at both timescales can be detected, suggesting that an interaction between the medium and slow calcium-dependent afterhyperpolarizations may underlie this firing pattern.

  15. Modulation of catecholamine release from rat striatal slices by the fixed combination of aspirin, paracetamol and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Fiebich, Bernd L; Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo; Mantovani, Michela; Heinzmann, Marcus; Akundi, Ravi Shankar; Hüll, Michael; Knörle, Rainer; Schnierle, Peter; Finkenzeller, Günter; Aicher, Bernhard

    2006-04-01

    The fixed combination of aspirin, paracetamol (acetaminophen) and caffeine has been used successfully to treat different kinds of pain including migraine attacks. Even when this formulation has been marketed for a long time, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effectiveness have not been completely elucidated. In the present investigation, we have studied the effects of the fixed combination of aspirin, paracetamol and caffeine (APC) on the release of dopamine and noradrenaline from rat striatal slices in an attempt to find potential new mechanisms of action of this widely used analgesic combination. We found that APC produced a significant reduction in extracellular dopamine and a dramatic increase in norepinephrine release from the slices incubated with different concentrations of APC (dose relationship 1:1:0.2, corresponding to the dose-relationship of Thomapyrin). These findings suggest that the modulation of catecholaminergic neurotransmission is a new pharmacological effect of APC which could explain the mechanism of action of this formulation, considering that the independent effect of either compound alone does not explain the potent antinociceptive properties when observed in combination.

  16. The effects of endomorphins and diprotin A on striatal dopamine release induced by electrical stimulation-an in vitro superfusion study in rats.

    PubMed

    Bagosi, Zsolt; Jászberényi, Miklós; Bujdosó, Erika; Szabó, Gyula; Telegdy, Gyula

    2006-12-01

    The endomorphins (EM1: Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2, and EM2: Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2) are recently discovered endogenous ligands for mu-opioid receptors (MORs) with role of neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in mammals. Cessation of their physiological action may be effected through rapid enzymatic degradation by the dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV) found in the brain synaptic membranes. An in vitro superfusion system was utilized to investigate the actions of EM1, EM2 and specific DPPIV inhibitor diprotin A on the striatal release of dopamine (DA) induced by electrical stimulation in rats. The involvement of the different MORs (MOR1 and MOR2) in this process was studied by pretreatment with MOR antagonists beta-funaltrexamine (a MOR1 and MOR2 antagonist) and naloxonazine (a MOR1 antagonist). EM1 significantly increased the tritium-labelled dopamine DA release induced by electrical stimulation. EM2 was effective only when the slices were pretreated with diprotin A. beta-Funaltrexamine antagonized the stimulatory effects of both EM1 and EM2. The administration of naloxonazine did not appreciably influence the action of EM1, but blocked the action of EM2, at least when the slices were pretreated with diprotin A. These data suggest that both EM1 and EM2 increase DA release from the striatum and, though diprotin A does not affect the action of EM1, it inhibits the enzymatic degradation of EM2. The DA-stimulating action induced by EM1 seems to be mediated by MOR2, while that evoked by EM2 appears to be transmitted by MOR1.

  17. A link between the hippocampal and the striatal memory systems of the brain.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Zinn, Carolina G; Furini, Cristiane; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2006-09-01

    Two major memory systems have been recognized over the years (Squire 1987): the declarative memory system, which is under the control of the hippocampus and related temporal lobe structures, and the procedural or habit memory system, which is under the control of the striatum and its connections. Most if not all learning tasks studied in animals, however, involve either the performance or the suppression of movement; this, if learned well, may be viewed as having become a habit. It is agreed that memory rules change from their first association to those that take place when the task is mastered. Does this change of rules involve a switch from one memory system to another? Here we will comment on: 1) reversal learning in the Morris water maze (MWM), in which the declarative or spatial component of a task is changed but the procedural component (to swim to safety) persists and needs to be re-linked with a different set of spatial cues; and 2) a series of observations on an inhibitory avoidance task that indicate that the brain systems involved change with further learning.

  18. Voltage-dependent membrane potential oscillations of rat striatal fast-spiking interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Bracci, Enrico; Centonze, Diego; Bernardi, Giorgio; Calabresi, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    We used whole-cell recordings to investigate subthreshold membrane potential oscillations and their relationship with intermittent firing in striatal fast-spiking interneurons. During current injections (100–500 pA, 1 s), these cells displayed a highly variable pattern of spike bursts (comprising 1–30 action potentials) interspersed with membrane potential oscillations. The oscillation threshold was −42 ± 10 mV, and coincided with that for action potentials. The oscillation frequency was voltage dependent and ranged between 20 and 100 Hz. Oscillations were unaffected by the calcium channel blockers cadmium and nickel and by blockers of ionotropic glutamate and GABA receptors. Conversely, the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin fully abolished the oscillations and the spike bursts. The first spike of a burst appeared to be triggered by an oscillation, since the timing and rate of rise of the membrane potential in the subthreshold voltage region was similar for the two events. Conversely, the second spike (and the subsequent ones) displayed much faster depolarisations in the subthreshold voltage range, indicating that they were generated by a different mechanism. Consistent with these notions, a small pulse of intracellular current delivered during the oscillation was effective in triggering a burst of action potentials that largely outlasted the pulse. We conclude that fast-spiking interneuron oscillations are generated by an intrinsic membrane mechanism that does not require fast synaptic transmission, and which depends on sodium conductance but not calcium conductance, and that such oscillations are responsible for triggering the intermittent spike bursts that are typical of these neurons. PMID:12665602

  19. Antagonism of quercetin against tremor induced by unilateral striatal lesion of 6-OHDA in rats.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xin; Yuan, Xia; Du, Li-Da; He, Guo-Rong; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid present in many plants, is reported to be effective in models of neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tremor effects of quercetin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of Parkinson's disease. In rats, quercetin had no effect on apomorphine-induced rotations, but it could significantly attenuate muscle tremor of 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Interestingly, quercetin could decrease the burst frequency in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggest that quercetin may have a protective effect on models to mimic muscle tremors of Parkinson's disease. This effect of quercetin may be associated with serotonergic system, but further study is needed.

  20. Differential organization of cortical inputs to striatal projection neurons of the matrix compartment in rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yunping; Lanciego, Jose; Goff, Lydia Kerkerian-Le; Coulon, Patrice; Salin, Pascal; Kachidian, Philippe; Lei, Wanlong; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies, we described the differential organization of corticostriatal and thalamostriatal inputs to the spines of direct pathway (dSPNs) and indirect pathway striatal projection neurons (iSPNs) of the matrix compartment. In the present electron microscopic (EM) analysis, we have refined understanding of the relative amounts of cortical axospinous vs. axodendritic input to the two types of SPNs. Of note, we found that individual dSPNs receive about twice as many axospinous synaptic terminals from IT-type (intratelencephalically projecting) cortical neurons as they do from PT-type (pyramidal tract projecting) cortical neurons. We also found that PT-type axospinous synaptic terminals were about 1.5 times as common on individual iSPNs as IT-type axospinous synaptic terminals. Overall, a higher percentage of IT-type terminals contacted dSPN than iSPN spines, while a higher percentage of PT-type terminals contacted iSPN than dSPN spines. Notably, IT-type axospinous synaptic terminals were significantly larger on iSPN spines than on dSPN spines. By contrast to axospinous input, the axodendritic PT-type input to dSPNs was more substantial than that to iSPNs, and the axodendritic IT-type input appeared to be meager and comparable for both SPN types. The prominent axodendritic PT-type input to dSPNs may accentuate their PT-type responsiveness, and the large size of axospinous IT-type terminals on iSPNs may accentuate their IT-type responsiveness. Using transneuronal labeling with rabies virus to selectively label the cortical neurons with direct input to the dSPNs projecting to the substantia nigra pars reticulata, we found that the input predominantly arose from neurons in the upper layers of motor cortices, in which IT-type perikarya predominate. The differential cortical input to SPNs is likely to play key roles in motor control and motor learning. PMID:25926776

  1. Enhancing effect of taurine in the rat caudate spindle. II. Effect of bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigro-striatal dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Kitsukawa, S; Okuyama, S; Aihara, H

    1988-10-01

    Bilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the medial forebrain bundle of rats resulted in destruction of dopamine (DA) nerve terminals in the striatum. DA contents decreased to 16.8, 15.0 and 13.7% of control values on 3, 5 and 7 days after the lesions, respectively. The time course of the effect of 6-OHDA lesions on apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg, IV)-induced stereotypy was investigated as the index of the development of supersensitivity. Stereotypy was unchanged on 3 days, but was enhanced 5 and 7 days after 6-OHDA lesions. Therefore, the sensitivity of postsynaptic DA receptors for apomorphine did not change 3 days after 6-OHDA lesions, although the striatal DA was depleted. The effects of bilateral injections of taurine into the striatum on the rat caudate spindle were determined 3 days after 6-OHDA lesions. Taurine, at a dose of 30 micrograms, enhanced the spindle in sham-operated rats, but this enhancement was not seen after 6-OHDA lesions. Intravenous administration of apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg) to lesioned rats suppressed the spindle, and this effect was prevented by a lower dose (3 micrograms) of taurine. These results provide further evidence that taurine enhances the spindle, possibly by decreasing the activity of the nigro-striatal DA system at the pre- and postsynaptic sites.

  2. Feeding-associated alterations in striatal neurotransmitter release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acworth, I. N.; Ressler, K.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Published evidence suggests a role for dopaminergic (DA) brain pathways in feeding-associated behaviors. Using the novel technique of brain microdialysis of striatal extracellular fluid (ECF) as an index of DA release, Church et al. described increases in levels of DA when animals had limited access to pellets, but not with free access. Dopamine release from the nucleus accumbens did increase with free access to pellets post starvation or after food reward. We used permanently implanted microdialysis probes to measure ECF levels of DA, DOPAC, HVA, and large neutral amino acids (LNAA) for up to 72 hours after implantation among rats experiencing different dietary regimens.

  3. Failure of MK-801 to suppress D1 receptor-mediated induction of locomotor activity and striatal preprotachykinin mRNA expression in the dopamine-depleted rat.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B M; Kreipke, C W; Walker, P D

    2006-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism exerts suppressive influences over dopamine D1 receptor-mediated striatal gene expression and locomotor behavior in the intact rat. The present study examined the effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 on locomotor activity and striatal preprotachykinin mRNA expression stimulated by the D1 agonist (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide in rats with bilateral dopamine lesions. Two months after neonatal dopamine lesions with 6-hydroxydopamine, rats were challenged with (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (1.0 mg/kg) 15 min after administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg). In the intact rat, MK-801 prevented the induction of striatal preprotachykinin mRNA by D1 agonism. Similarly, direct infusion of (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (3.0 microg) into the intact striatum produced an increase in locomotor activity that was suppressed by MK-801 (1.0 microg) co-infusion. In the dopamine-depleted rat, MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) administered prior to (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (1.0 mg/kg) increased, rather than suppressed, striatal preprotachykinin mRNA levels. Intrastriatal infusion of MK-801 (1.0 microg) failed to inhibit D1-mediated induction of motor activity in dopamine-depleted animals. Together, these data provide further support that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists lose their ability to block D1-mediated behavioral activation following dopamine depletion. The activation, rather than suppression, of tachykinin neurons of the direct striatonigral pathway may play a facilitatory role in this mechanism.

  4. Impairment of striatal mitochondrial function by acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Czerniczyniec, Analía; Lanza, E M; Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are essential for survival. Their primary function is to support aerobic respiration and to provide energy for intracellular metabolic pathways. Paraquat is a redox cycling agent capable of generating reactive oxygen species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in cortical and striatal mitochondrial function in an experimental model of acute paraquat toxicity and to compare if the brain areas and the molecular mechanisms involved were similar to those observed after chronic exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats received paraquat (25 mg/Kg i.p.) or saline and were sacrificed after 24 h. Paraquat treatment decreased complex I and IV activity by 37 and 21 % respectively in striatal mitochondria. Paraquat inhibited striatal state 4 and state 3 KCN-sensitive respiration by 80 % and 62 % respectively, indicating a direct effect on respiratory chain. An increase of 2.2 fold in state 4 and 2.3 fold in state 3 in KCN-insensitive respiration was observed in striatal mitochondria from paraquat animals, suggesting that paraquat redox cycling also consumed oxygen. Paraquat treatment increased hydrogen peroxide production (150 %), TBARS production (42 %) and cardiolipin oxidation/depletion (12 %) in striatal mitochondria. Also, changes in mitochondrial polarization was induced after paraquat treatment. However, no changes were observed in any of these parameters in cortical mitochondria from paraquat treated-animals. These results suggest that paraquat treatment induced a clear striatal mitochondrial dysfunction due to both paraquat redox cycling reactions and impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport, causing oxidative damage. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction could probably lead to alterations in cellular bioenergetics.

  5. Kinetic characterization of l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake inhibition and increase oxidative damage induced by glutaric acid in striatal synaptosomes of rats.

    PubMed

    Magni, Danieli Valnes; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Souza, Mauren Assis; Lunardi, Fabiane; Ferreira, Juliano; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Fighera, Michele Rechia

    2009-02-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I (GA-I) is an inherited metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of glutaric acid (GA) and striatal degeneration. Although growing evidence suggests that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress play central role in the neuropathogenesis of this disease, mechanism underlying striatal damage in this disorder is not well established. Thus, we decided to investigate the in vitro effects of GA 10nM (a low concentration that can be present initial development this disorder) on l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in synaptosomes from striatum of rats. GA reduced l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake in synaptosomes from 1 up to 30min after its addition. Furthermore, we also provided some evidence that GA competes with the glutamate transporter inhibitor l-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (PDC), suggesting a possible interaction of GA with glutamate transporters on synaptosomes. Moreover, GA produced a significant decrease in the V(MAX) of l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake, but did not affect the K(D) value. Although the GA did not show oxidant activity per se, it increased the ROS generation in striatal synaptosomes. To evaluate the involvement of reactive species generation in the GA-induced l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake inhibition, trolox (0.3, 0.6 and 6muM) was added on the incubation medium. Statistical analysis showed that trolox did not decrease inhibition of GA-induced l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake, but decreased GA-induced reactive species formation in striatal synaptosomes (1, 3, 5, 10, 15 and 30min), suggesting that ROS generation appears to occur secondarily to glutamatergic overstimulation in this model of organic acidemia. Since GA induced DCFH oxidation increase, we evaluate the involvement of glutamate receptor antagonists in oxidative stress, showing that CNQX, but not MK-801, decreased the DCFH oxidation increase in striatal synaptosomes. Furthermore, the results presented in this report suggest that excitotoxicity elicited

  6. Microdialysis study of striatal dopamine in MPTP-hemilesioned rats challenged with apomorphine and amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Patricia Andreia; Carvalho, Milene Cristina; Miyoshi, Edmar; Correia, Diego; Bortolanza, Mariza; Dos Santos, Lucélia Mendes; Wietzikoski, Evellyn Claudia; Eckart, Moritz Thede; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Brandão, Marcus Lira; Da Cunha, Claudio

    2010-12-20

    Motor impairments of Parkinson's disease (PD) appear only after the loss of more than 70% of the DAergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). An earlier phase of this disease can be modeled in rats that received a unilateral infusion of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrindine (MPTP) into the SNc. Though these animals do not present gross motor impairments, they rotate towards the lesioned side when challenged with DAergic drugs, like amphetamine and apomorphine. The present study aimed to test whether these effects occur because the drugs disrupt compensatory mechanisms that keep extracellular levels of dopamine in the striatum (DA(E)) unchanged. This hypothesis was tested by an in vivo microdialysis study in awake rats with two probes implanted in the right and left striatum. Undrugged rats did not present turning behaviour and their basal DA(E) did not differ between the lesioned and sham-lesioned sides. However, after apomorphine treatment, DA(E) decreased in both sides, but to a larger extent in the lesioned side at the time the animals started ipsiversive turning behaviour. After amphetamine challenge, DA(E) increased in both sides, becoming significantly higher in the non-lesioned side at the time the animals started ipsiversive turning behaviour. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis that absence of gross motor impairments in this rat model of early phase PD depends on maintenance of extracellular DA by mechanisms that may be disrupted by events demanding its alteration to higher or lower levels.

  7. Persistent impairments in hippocampal, dorsal striatal, and prefrontal cortical function following repeated photoperiod shifts in rats.

    PubMed

    Zelinski, Erin L; Tyndall, Amanda V; Hong, Nancy S; McDonald, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are observed when learned associations are being acquired or retrieved during a period of circadian disruption. However, the extent of the functional impacts on previously acquired associations following circadian rhythm re-entrainment is unknown. The impacts of repeated photoperiod shifts on learning and memory in male and female rats were examined. For these experiments, rats were trained on a spatial version of the Morris water task (MWT) and a visual discrimination task designed for the 8-arm radial maze. Following asymptotic performance on these tasks, rats experienced a repeating photoperiod shift procedure and were then re-entrained. Following circadian re-entrainment, retention of pre-photoperiod-shift-acquired associations was tested. In addition, an extra-dimensional set shift was performed using the 8-arm radial maze. Impaired retention of the MWT platform location was observed in photoperiod-shifted subjects relative to subjects with stable, unmanipulated photoperiods. Repeated photoperiod shifts negatively impacted retention in males and females compared with subjects with stable photoperiods. Retention and the ability to detect extra-dimensional shifts on the visual discrimination task were also impaired, though not consistently by sex or photoperiod condition. Running wheel availability was also included in the analyses to determine whether exercise influenced the effects of photoperiod shifting. The absence of a running wheel produced significant declines in memory retention on both MWT and the visual discrimination task, but only for male rats. The observed impairments indicate that multiple neural systems supporting different learning and memory functions are susceptible to circadian disruption, even if the association is acquired prior to rhythm fragmentation and tested following rhythm re-entrainment.

  8. Characterization of solubilized human and rat brain US -endorphin-receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Helmeste, D.M.; Li, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been solubilized from human striatal and rat whole-brain membranes by use of 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Tritiated human US -endorphin (TH-US /sub h/-EP) binding revealed high-affinity competition by morphine, naloxone, and various US -EP analogues. Lack of high-affinity competition by (+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate (U50-488, Upjohn) indicated that k sites were not labeled by TH-US -/sub h/-EP under these conditions. Affinities were similar in both soluble and membrane preparations except for (Met)enkephalin, which appears to be rapidly degraded by the solubilized extract. Size differences between human and rat solubilized TH-US /sub h/-EP-receptor complexes were revealed by exclusion chromatography.

  9. The effects of endomorphins on striatal [3H]GABA release induced by electrical stimulation: an in vitro superfusion study in rats.

    PubMed

    Bagosi, Zsolt; Jászberényi, Miklós; Telegdy, Gyula

    2009-05-01

    The endomorphins (EM1 and EM2) are selective endogenous ligands for mu-opioid receptors (MOR1 and MOR2) with neurotransmitter and neuromodulator roles in mammals. In the present study we investigated the potential actions of EMs on striatal GABA release and the implication of different MORs in these processes. Rat striatal slices were preincubated with tritium-labelled GABA ([(3)H]GABA), pretreated with selective MOR1 and MOR2 antagonist beta-funaltrexamine and selective MOR1 antagonist naloxonazine and then superfused with the selective MOR agonists, EM1 and EM2. EM1 significantly decreased the striatal [(3)H]GABA release induced by electrical stimulation. Beta-funaltrexamine antagonized the inhibitory action of EM1, but naloxonazine did not affect it considerably. EM2 was ineffective, even in case of specific enzyme inhibitor diprotin A pretreatment. The results demonstrate that EM1 decreases GABA release in the basal ganglia through MOR2, while EM2 does not influence it.

  10. The influence of tomograph sensitivity on kinetic parameter estimation in positron emission tomography imaging studies of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Meikle, S R; Eberl, S; Fulton, R R; Kassiou, M; Fulham, M J

    2000-08-01

    We investigated the influence of tomograph sensitivity on reliability of parameter estimation in positron emission tomography studies of the rat brain. The kinetics of two tracers in rat striatum and cerebellum were simulated. A typical injected dose of 10 MBq and a reduced dose of 1 MBq were assumed. Kinetic parameters were estimated using a region of interest (ROI) analysis and two pixel-by-pixel analyses. Striatal binding potential was estimated as a function of effective tomograph sensitivity (S(eff)) using a simplified reference tissue model. A S(eff) value of > or =1% was required to ensure reliable parameter estimation for ROI analysis and a S(eff) of 3-6% was required for pixel-by-pixel analysis. We conclude that effective tomograph sensitivity of 3% may be an appropriate design goal for rat brain imaging.

  11. Deformation-based brain morphometry in rats.

    PubMed

    Gaser, Christian; Schmidt, Silvio; Metzler, Martin; Herrmann, Karl-Heinz; Krumbein, Ines; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Witte, Otto W

    2012-10-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based morphometry provides in vivo evidence for macro-structural plasticity of the brain. Experiments on small animals using automated morphometric methods usually require expensive measurements with ultra-high field dedicated animal MRI systems. Here, we developed a novel deformation-based morphometry (DBM) tool for automated analyses of rat brain images measured on a 3-Tesla clinical whole body scanner with appropriate coils. A landmark-based transformation of our customized reference brain into the coordinates of the widely used rat brain atlas from Paxinos and Watson (Paxinos Atlas) guarantees the comparability of results to other studies. For cross-sectional data, we warped images onto the reference brain using the low-dimensional nonlinear registration implemented in the MATLAB software package SPM8. For the analysis of longitudinal data sets, we chose high-dimensional registrations of all images of one data set to the first baseline image which facilitate the identification of more subtle structural changes. Because all deformations were finally used to transform the data into the space of the Paxinos Atlas, Jacobian determinants could be used to estimate absolute local volumes of predefined regions-of-interest. Pilot experiments were performed to analyze brain structural changes due to aging or photothrombotically-induced cortical stroke. The results support the utility of DBM based on commonly available clinical whole-body scanners for highly sensitive morphometric studies on rats.

  12. [Comparative analysis of metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate striatal receptors blockade influence on rats locomotor behaviour].

    PubMed

    Iakimovskiĭ, A F; Kerko, T V

    2013-02-01

    The influence of NMDA and metabotropic neostriatal glutamate receptors blockade to avoidance conditioning (in shuttle box) and free locomotor behavior (in open field) in chronic experiments in rats were investigated. The glutamate receptor antagonists were injected bilateral into striatum separately and with the GABA-A receptor antagonist picrotoxin (2 microg), that produced in rats the impairment of avoidance conditioning and choreo-myoklonic hyperkinesis. The most effective in preventing of negative picrotoxin influence on behavior was 5-type metabotropic glutamate receptors antagonist MTEP (3 microg). Separately injected MTEP did not influence on avoidance conditioning and free locomotor behavior. Unlike that, 1-type metabotropic glutamate receptors antagonist EMQMCM (3 microg) impaired normal locomotor behavior and did not prevent the picrotoxin effects. The NMDA glutamate receptors MK 801 (disocilpin--1 and 5 microg) impaired the picrotoxin-induced hyperkinesis, but did not to prevent the negative effects on avoidance conditioning; separately injected MK 801 reduced free locomotor activity. Based on location of investigated receptor types in neostriatal neurons membranes, we proposed that the most effective influence on 5-type metabotropic glutamate receptors is associated with their involvement in "indirect" efferent pathway, suffered in hyperkinetic extrapyramidal motor dysfunction--Huntington's chorea in human.

  13. Striatal and extrastriatal dopamine release in the common marmoset brain measured by positron emission tomography and [(18)F]fallypride.

    PubMed

    Ota, Miho; Ogawa, Shintaro; Kato, Koichi; Masuda, Chiaki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia show greater sensitivity to psychostimulants than healthy subjects. Sensitization to psychostimulants and resultant alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmission in rodents has been suggested as a useful model of schizophrenia. This study sought to examine the use of methylphenidate as a psychostimulant to induce dopamine release and that of [(18)F]fallypride as a radioligand to quantify the release in a primate model of schizophrenia. Four common marmosets were scanned by positron emission tomography twice, before and after methylphenidate challenge, to evaluate dopamine release. Four other marmosets were sensitized by repeated methamphetamine (MAP) administration. Then, they were scanned twice, before and after methylphenidate challenge, to evaluate whether MAP-sensitization induced greater sensitivity to methylphenidate. We revealed a main effect of the methylphenidate challenge but not the MAP pretreatment on the striatal binding potential. These results suggest that methylphenidate-induced striatal dopamine release in the common marmoset could be evaluated by [(18)F]fallypride.

  14. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. II. Active transport

    SciTech Connect

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1991-05-01

    The accumulation of 5 nM d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine (d-({sup 3}H)AMPH) into rat brain synaptosomes was examined using physiological buffer conditions. The accumulation of d-({sup 3}H)AMPH into striatal synaptosomes was saturable, of high affinity, ouabain-sensitive and temperature-dependent, suggesting an active transport phenomenon. Eadee-Hofstee analysis of striatal d-({sup 3}H)AMPH transport (AMT) saturation isotherms indicated an apparent Km of 97 nM and a Vmax of 3.0 fmol/mg tissue/min. Lesion of the striatal dopaminergic innervation led to equivalent decreases of ({sup 3}H) dopamine (DA) transport and AMT, indicating that AMT occurs in DA terminals. Furthermore, AMT was not evident in cerebral cortex, a brain region with a paucity of DA terminals. In competition studies, AMT was stereospecific; d-AMPH (IC50 = 60 nM) was an 8-fold more potent inhibitor of the transport than its I-isomer (IC50 = 466 nM). DA(IC50 = 257 nM), DA uptake blockers and substrates were found to be potent inhibitors of AMT: GBR12909 IC50 = 5 nM; methamphetamine IC50 = 48 nM; methylphenidate IC50 = 53 nM; and cocaine IC50 = 172 nM. In contrast, serotonin was relatively weak in inhibiting AMT (IC50 = 7.9 microM). There was a highly significant (P less than .001; slope = 1.2) linear correlation between the AMT-inhibiting potencies of AMPH analogs and their potencies in stimulating locomotor activity in rodents. AMT may be important in the low dose effects of AMPH such as increased locomotor activity in rodents and stimulant activity in man. Differences between AMT and d-({sup 3}H)AMPH sequestration described earlier, as well as their possible relevance to behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of AMPH administration are also discussed.

  15. Neuroprotective effect of WIN55,212-2 against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced toxicity in the rat brain: involvement of CB1 and NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Maya-López, Marisol; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; de Lima, María Eduarda; Colpo-Ceolin, Ana; Rangel-López, Edgar; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Túnez, Isaac; Luna-López, Armando; Lazzarini-Lechuga, Roberto; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; Posadas-Rodríguez, Pedro; Silva-Palacios, Alejandro; Königsberg, Mina; Santamaría, Abel

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS), and agonists acting on cannabinoid receptors (CBr), are known to regulate several physiological events in the brain, including modulatory actions on excitatory events probably through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activity. Actually, CBr agonists can be neuroprotective. The synthetic CBr agonist WIN55,212-2 acts mainly on CB1 receptor. In turn, the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) produces striatal alterations in rats similar to those observed in the brain of Huntington’s disease patients. Herein, the effects of WIN55,212-2 were tested on different endpoints of the 3-NP-induced toxicity in rat brain synaptosomes and striatal tissue. Motor activity was also evaluated. The 3-NP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation was attenuated by WIN55,212-2 (1 µM) in synaptosomal fractions. The intrastriatal bilateral injection of 3-NP (500 nmol/µL) to rats increased lipid peroxidation and locomotor activity, augmented the rate of cell damage, and decreased the striatal density of neuronal cells. These alterations were accompanied by transcriptional changes in the NMDA (NR1 subunit) content. The administration of WIN55212-2 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) to rats for six consecutive days, before the 3-NP injection, exerted preventive effects on all alterations elicited by the toxin. The prevention of the 3-NP-induced NR1 transcriptional alterations by the CBr agonist together with the increase of CB1 content suggest an early reduction of the excitotoxic process via CBr activation. Our results demonstrate a protective role of WIN55,212-2 on the 3-NP-induced striatal neurotoxicity that could be partially related to the ECS stimulation and induction of NMDAr hypofunction, representing an effective therapeutic strategy at the experimental level for further studies. PMID:28337258

  16. Neuroprotective effect of WIN55,212-2 against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced toxicity in the rat brain: involvement of CB1 and NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Maya-López, Marisol; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Aguilera, Gabriela; de Lima, María Eduarda; Colpo-Ceolin, Ana; Rangel-López, Edgar; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Túnez, Isaac; Luna-López, Armando; Lazzarini-Lechuga, Roberto; González-Puertos, Viridiana Yazmín; Posadas-Rodríguez, Pedro; Silva-Palacios, Alejandro; Königsberg, Mina; Santamaría, Abel

    2017-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS), and agonists acting on cannabinoid receptors (CBr), are known to regulate several physiological events in the brain, including modulatory actions on excitatory events probably through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activity. Actually, CBr agonists can be neuroprotective. The synthetic CBr agonist WIN55,212-2 acts mainly on CB1 receptor. In turn, the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) produces striatal alterations in rats similar to those observed in the brain of Huntington's disease patients. Herein, the effects of WIN55,212-2 were tested on different endpoints of the 3-NP-induced toxicity in rat brain synaptosomes and striatal tissue. Motor activity was also evaluated. The 3-NP (1 mM)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation was attenuated by WIN55,212-2 (1 µM) in synaptosomal fractions. The intrastriatal bilateral injection of 3-NP (500 nmol/µL) to rats increased lipid peroxidation and locomotor activity, augmented the rate of cell damage, and decreased the striatal density of neuronal cells. These alterations were accompanied by transcriptional changes in the NMDA (NR1 subunit) content. The administration of WIN55212-2 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) to rats for six consecutive days, before the 3-NP injection, exerted preventive effects on all alterations elicited by the toxin. The prevention of the 3-NP-induced NR1 transcriptional alterations by the CBr agonist together with the increase of CB1 content suggest an early reduction of the excitotoxic process via CBr activation. Our results demonstrate a protective role of WIN55,212-2 on the 3-NP-induced striatal neurotoxicity that could be partially related to the ECS stimulation and induction of NMDAr hypofunction, representing an effective therapeutic strategy at the experimental level for further studies.

  17. Laser scattering by transcranial rat brain illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2012-06-01

    Due to the great number of applications of Low-Level-Laser-Therapy (LLLT) in Central Nervous System (CNS), the study of light penetration through skull and distribution in the brain becomes extremely important. The aim is to analyze the possibility of precise illumination of deep regions of the rat brain, measure the penetration and distribution of red (λ = 660 nm) and Near Infra-Red (NIR) (λ = 808 nm) diode laser light and compare optical properties of brain structures. The head of the animal (Rattus Novergicus) was epilated and divided by a sagittal cut, 2.3 mm away from mid plane. This section of rat's head was illuminated with red and NIR lasers in points above three anatomical structures: hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal cortex. A high resolution camera, perpendicularly positioned, was used to obtain images of the brain structures. Profiles of scattered intensities in the laser direction were obtained from the images. There is a peak in the scattered light profile corresponding to the skin layer. The bone layer gives rise to a valley in the profile indicating low scattering coefficient, or frontal scattering. Another peak in the region related to the brain is an indication of high scattering coefficient (μs) for this tissue. This work corroborates the use of transcranial LLLT in studies with rats which are subjected to models of CNS diseases. The outcomes of this study point to the possibility of transcranial LLLT in humans for a large number of diseases.

  18. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  19. Activating Developmental Reserve Capacity Via Cognitive Training or Non-invasive Brain Stimulation: Potentials for Promoting Fronto-Parietal and Hippocampal-Striatal Network Functions in Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Passow, Susanne; Thurm, Franka; Li, Shu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Existing neurocomputational and empirical data link deficient neuromodulation of the fronto-parietal and hippocampal-striatal circuitries with aging-related increase in processing noise and declines in various cognitive functions. Specifically, the theory of aging neuronal gain control postulates that aging-related suboptimal neuromodulation may attenuate neuronal gain control, which yields computational consequences on reducing the signal-to-noise-ratio of synaptic signal transmission and hampering information processing within and between cortical networks. Intervention methods such as cognitive training and non-invasive brain stimulation, e.g., transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have been considered as means to buffer cognitive functions or delay cognitive decline in old age. However, to date the reported effect sizes of immediate training gains and maintenance effects of a variety of cognitive trainings are small to moderate at best; moreover, training-related transfer effects to non-trained but closely related (i.e., near-transfer) or other (i.e., far-transfer) cognitive functions are inconsistent or lacking. Similarly, although applying different tDCS protocols to reduce aging-related cognitive impairments by inducing temporary changes in cortical excitability seem somewhat promising, evidence of effects on short- and long-term plasticity is still equivocal. In this article, we will review and critically discuss existing findings of cognitive training- and stimulation-related behavioral and neural plasticity effects in the context of cognitive aging, focusing specifically on working memory and episodic memory functions, which are subserved by the fronto-parietal and hippocampal-striatal networks, respectively. Furthermore, in line with the theory of aging neuronal gain control we will highlight that developing age-specific brain stimulation protocols and the concurrent applications of tDCS during cognitive training may potentially facilitate

  20. Activating Developmental Reserve Capacity Via Cognitive Training or Non-invasive Brain Stimulation: Potentials for Promoting Fronto-Parietal and Hippocampal-Striatal Network Functions in Old Age.

    PubMed

    Passow, Susanne; Thurm, Franka; Li, Shu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Existing neurocomputational and empirical data link deficient neuromodulation of the fronto-parietal and hippocampal-striatal circuitries with aging-related increase in processing noise and declines in various cognitive functions. Specifically, the theory of aging neuronal gain control postulates that aging-related suboptimal neuromodulation may attenuate neuronal gain control, which yields computational consequences on reducing the signal-to-noise-ratio of synaptic signal transmission and hampering information processing within and between cortical networks. Intervention methods such as cognitive training and non-invasive brain stimulation, e.g., transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have been considered as means to buffer cognitive functions or delay cognitive decline in old age. However, to date the reported effect sizes of immediate training gains and maintenance effects of a variety of cognitive trainings are small to moderate at best; moreover, training-related transfer effects to non-trained but closely related (i.e., near-transfer) or other (i.e., far-transfer) cognitive functions are inconsistent or lacking. Similarly, although applying different tDCS protocols to reduce aging-related cognitive impairments by inducing temporary changes in cortical excitability seem somewhat promising, evidence of effects on short- and long-term plasticity is still equivocal. In this article, we will review and critically discuss existing findings of cognitive training- and stimulation-related behavioral and neural plasticity effects in the context of cognitive aging, focusing specifically on working memory and episodic memory functions, which are subserved by the fronto-parietal and hippocampal-striatal networks, respectively. Furthermore, in line with the theory of aging neuronal gain control we will highlight that developing age-specific brain stimulation protocols and the concurrent applications of tDCS during cognitive training may potentially facilitate

  1. Performance of a high-sensitivity dedicated cardiac SPECT scanner for striatal uptake quantification in the brain based on analysis of projection data

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Mi-Ae; Moore, Stephen C.; McQuaid, Sarah J.; Kijewski, Marie Foley; Mueller, Stefan P.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors have previously reported the advantages of high-sensitivity single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) systems for imaging structures located deep inside the brain. DaTscan (Isoflupane I-123) is a dopamine transporter (DaT) imaging agent that has shown potential for early detection of Parkinson disease (PD), as well as for monitoring progression of the disease. Realizing the full potential of DaTscan requires efficient estimation of striatal uptake from SPECT images. They have evaluated two SPECT systems, a conventional dual-head gamma camera with low-energy high-resolution collimators (conventional) and a dedicated high-sensitivity multidetector cardiac imaging system (dedicated) for imaging tasks related to PD. Methods: Cramer-Rao bounds (CRB) on precision of estimates of striatal and background activity concentrations were calculated from high-count, separate acquisitions of the compartments (right striata, left striata, background) of a striatal phantom. CRB on striatal and background activity concentration were calculated from essentially noise-free projection datasets, synthesized by scaling and summing the compartment projection datasets, for a range of total detected counts. They also calculated variances of estimates of specific-to-nonspecific binding ratios (BR) and asymmetry indices from these values using propagation of error analysis, as well as the precision of measuring changes in BR on the order of the average annual decline in early PD. Results: Under typical clinical conditions, the conventional camera detected 2 M counts while the dedicated camera detected 12 M counts. Assuming a normal BR of 5, the standard deviation of BR estimates was 0.042 and 0.021 for the conventional and dedicated system, respectively. For an 8% decrease to BR = 4.6, the signal-to-noise ratio were 6.8 (conventional) and 13.3 (dedicated); for a 5% decrease, they were 4.2 (conventional) and 8.3 (dedicated). Conclusions: This implies that PD can

  2. Relationship Between L-DOPA-Induced Reduction in Motor and Exploratory Activity and Striatal Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Beu, Markus; de Souza Silva, Maria A.; Huston, Joseph P.; Hautzel, Hubertus; Mattern, Claudia; Antke, Christina; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present study assessed the influence of L-DOPA administration on neostriatal dopamine (DA) D2 receptor binding in relation to motor and exploratory behaviors in the rat. Methods: D2 receptor binding was measured in baseline, after challenge with the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor benserazide, and after challenge with either 5 or 10 mg/kg L-DOPA plus benserazide. Additional rats received injections of saline. For baseline and challenges, striatal equilibrium ratios (V3″) were computed as estimation of the binding potential. Motor and exploratory behaviors were assessed for 30 min in an open field prior to administration of [123I]IBZM. D2 receptor binding was measured with small animal SPECT 2 h after radioligand administration for 60 min. Results: Both L-DOPA doses significantly reduced D2 receptor binding relative to baseline and led to significantly less ambulation, less head-shoulder motility, and more sitting relative to saline. Moreover, 10 mg/kg L-DOPA induced less head-shoulder motility, more sitting, and more grooming than 5 mg/kg L-DOPA. Analysis of time-behavior curves showed that L-DOPA-treated animals relative to saline exhibited a faster rate of decrease of ambulation frequency and a slower rate of decrease of both duration and frequency of head-shoulder motility from a lower maximum level. Conclusions: The reductions of striatal D2 receptor binding after L-DOPA may be conceived to reflect elevated concentrations of synaptic DA. L-DOPA-treated animals showed less ambulation and less head-shoulder motility than saline-treated animals, indicating an association between less behavioral activity and increased availability of striatal DA. The faster rate of decrease of ambulation frequency and the lower maximum levels of both head-shoulder motility duration and frequency may be interpreted in terms of influence of increased DA availability on behavioral habituation to a novel environment. PMID:26778989

  3. c-jun expression in substantia nigra neurons following striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, R; O'Shea, R; Thomas, K L; Hunt, S P

    1993-03-01

    The proto-oncogene c-jun is thought to play a role in the control of growth and differentiation of many cell types. It has been demonstrated previously that damage to axons of peripheral motor or sensory neurons resulted within 24 h in substantially increased levels of the c-jun gene in the parent cell bodies. These increased levels of c-jun protein and messenger RNA are maintained if the damaged nerve is ligated, but return to basal levels if the peripheral nerve is allowed to regenerate. We have examined the expression of immediate early genes in central neurons of the rat and now show that a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced axotomy of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway results in a substantial increase in the levels of c-jun (but not c-fos) messenger RNA and protein within neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. However, the central neuronal response differs from the peripheral nerve response in that it becomes maximal at four to eight days post-lesion and is transient, declining to control levels in nigral neurons by 14 days post-lesion. These expression patterns may be related to the differential capacity of central and peripheral neurons to regenerate. The precise role of c-jun in these processes, or in the regenerative response, is unclear but it remains possible that c-jun activation following axon damage leads to an increased expression of genes which are essential for the regenerative response. The nature of the mechanism by which c-jun levels are attenuated in central neurons is also unclear, but inhibitory factors, generated by the central environment, may play a role.

  4. Serotonin 5-HT2A but not 5-HT2C receptor antagonism reduces hyperlocomotor activity induced in dopamine-depleted rats by striatal administration of the D1 agonist SKF 82958.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Christopher; Daut, Gregory S; Walker, Paul D

    2005-09-01

    While recent work has indicated that D1 receptor agonist-induced hyperlocomotion in DA-depleted rats is reduced by striatal 5-HT2 receptor antagonism, the 5-HT receptor(s) subtypes mediating these effects are not yet known. In the present study, we examined the influence(s) of striatal 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors on locomotor behavior induced by D1 agonism in neonatal DA-depleted rats. On postnatal day 3, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=68) were treated with either vehicle or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA; 60 microg) which produced >98% DA depletion. Sixty days later, all rats were fitted with bilateral striatal cannulae. A subset of control and 6-OHDA-lesioned rats (n=20) was tested for locomotor responses to striatal infusion of the D1 agonist SKF 82958 (0, 0.1, 1.0, 10 microg/side). The remaining rats (n=48) were tested for locomotor responses to intrastriatal SKF 82958 (2.0 microg/side) alone or in combination with the 5-HT2A- or 5-HT2C-preferring antagonists M100907 or RS102221 (0.1 or 1.0 microg/side), respectively. Intrastriatal SKF 82958 dose-dependently increased measures of motor activity within DA-depleted rats. This hyperlocomotor activity was suppressed by co-infusion of M100907, but not RS102221. These results indicate that DA depletion strengthens striatal 5-HT2A/D1 receptor interactions and suggest that 5-HT2A receptor antagonists may prove useful in reducing D1-related movements.

  5. Malfunctioning DNA damage response (DDR) leads to the degeneration of nigro-striatal pathway in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kirshner, Michal; Galron, Ronit; Frenkel, Dan; Mandelbaum, Gil; Shiloh, Yosef; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Barzilai, Ari

    2012-03-01

    Pronounced neuropathology is a feature of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), which are both genomic instability syndromes. The Nbs1 protein, which is defective in NBS, is a component of the Mre11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) complex. This complex plays a major role in the early phase of the cellular response to double strand breaks (DSBs) in the DNA. Among others, MRN is required for timely activation of the protein kinase ATM (A-T mutated), which is disrupted in patients with A-T. Earlier reports show that Atm-deficient mice exhibit severe degeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic nigro-striatal neurons and their terminals in the striatum. This cell loss is accompanied by a large reduction in immunoreactivity for the dopamine transporter protein (DAT) in the striatum. To test whether Nbs1 inactivation also affects the integrity of the nigro-striatal pathway, we examined this pathway in a murine model with conditional inactivation of the Nbs1 gene in central nervous system (Nbs1-CNS-Δ). We report that this model has a reduction in TH-positive cells in the substantia nigra. This phenomenon was seen at very early age, while Atm-/- mice showed a progressive age-dependent reduction. Furthermore, we observed an age-dependent increase in the level of TH in the striatum of Atm-/- and Nbs1-CNS-Δ mice. In addition to the altered expression of TH, we also found a reduction of DAT in the striatum of both Atm-/- and Nbs1-CNS-Δ mice at 60 days of age. Finally, microglial recruitment and alterations in the levels of various neurotrophic factors were also observed. These results indicate that malfunctioning DNA damage response severely affects the integrity of the nigro-striatal pathway and suggest a new neurodegenerative pathway in Parkinsonian syndromes.

  6. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Melissa A.; Woods, Catherine A.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Lee, Christian R.; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P.; Jones, Kymry T.; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate–putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices. PMID:26503322

  7. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Woods, Catherine A; Patel, Jyoti C; Lee, Christian R; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P; Jones, Kymry T; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E A; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2015-10-27

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices.

  8. Overlapping patterns of brain activation to food and cocaine cues in cocaine abusers: Association to striatal D2/D3 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene -Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Caparelli, Elisabeth C.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-08-20

    Cocaine, through its activation of dopamine (DA) signaling, usurps pathways that process natural rewards. However, the extent to which there is overlap between the networks that process natural and drug rewards and whether DA signaling associated with cocaine abuse influences these networks have not been investigated in humans. We measured brain activation responses to food and cocaine cues with fMRI, and D2/D3 receptors in the striatum with [11C]raclopride and PET in 20 active cocaine abusers. Compared to neutral cues, food and cocaine cues increasingly engaged cerebellum, orbitofrontal, inferior frontal and premotor cortices and insula and disengaged cuneus and default mode network (DMN). These fMRI signals were proportional to striatal D2/D3 receptors. Surprisingly cocaine and food cues also deactivated ventral striatum and hypothalamus. Compared to food cues, cocaine cues produced lower activation in insula and postcentral gyrus, and less deactivation in hypothalamus and DMN regions. Activation in cortical regions and cerebellum increased in proportion to the valence of the cues, and activation to food cues in somatosensory and orbitofrontal cortices also increased in proportion to body mass. Longer exposure to cocaine was associated with lower activation to both cues in occipital cortex and cerebellum, which could reflect the decreases in D2/D3 receptors associated with chronicity. In conclusion, these findings show that cocaine cues activate similar, though not identical, pathways to those activated by food cues and that striatal D2/D3 receptors modulate these responses, suggesting that chronic cocaine exposure might influence brain sensitivity not just to drugs but also to food cues.

  9. Overlapping patterns of brain activation to food and cocaine cues in cocaine abusers: Association to striatal D2/D3 receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene -Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; ...

    2014-08-20

    Cocaine, through its activation of dopamine (DA) signaling, usurps pathways that process natural rewards. However, the extent to which there is overlap between the networks that process natural and drug rewards and whether DA signaling associated with cocaine abuse influences these networks have not been investigated in humans. We measured brain activation responses to food and cocaine cues with fMRI, and D2/D3 receptors in the striatum with [11C]raclopride and PET in 20 active cocaine abusers. Compared to neutral cues, food and cocaine cues increasingly engaged cerebellum, orbitofrontal, inferior frontal and premotor cortices and insula and disengaged cuneus and default modemore » network (DMN). These fMRI signals were proportional to striatal D2/D3 receptors. Surprisingly cocaine and food cues also deactivated ventral striatum and hypothalamus. Compared to food cues, cocaine cues produced lower activation in insula and postcentral gyrus, and less deactivation in hypothalamus and DMN regions. Activation in cortical regions and cerebellum increased in proportion to the valence of the cues, and activation to food cues in somatosensory and orbitofrontal cortices also increased in proportion to body mass. Longer exposure to cocaine was associated with lower activation to both cues in occipital cortex and cerebellum, which could reflect the decreases in D2/D3 receptors associated with chronicity. In conclusion, these findings show that cocaine cues activate similar, though not identical, pathways to those activated by food cues and that striatal D2/D3 receptors modulate these responses, suggesting that chronic cocaine exposure might influence brain sensitivity not just to drugs but also to food cues.« less

  10. Overlapping patterns of brain activation to food and cocaine cues in cocaine abusers: association to striatal D2/D3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wang, Ruiliang; Caparelli, Elisabeth C.; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine, through its activation of dopamine (DA) signaling, usurps pathways that process natural rewards. However, the extent to which there is overlap between the networks that process natural and drug rewards and whether DA signaling associated with cocaine abuse influences these networks have not been investigated in humans. We measured brain activation responses to food and cocaine cues with fMRI, and D2/D3 receptors in the striatum with [11C]raclopride and PET in 20 active cocaine abusers. Compared to neutral cues, food and cocaine cues increasingly engaged cerebellum, orbitofrontal, inferior frontal and premotor cortices and insula and disengaged cuneus and default mode network (DMN). These fMRI signals were proportional to striatal D2/D3 receptors. Surprisingly cocaine and food cues also deactivated ventral striatum and hypothalamus. Compared to food cues, cocaine cues produced lower activation in insula and postcentral gyrus, and less deactivation in hypothalamus and DMN regions. Activation in cortical regions and cerebellum increased in proportion to the valence of the cues, and activation to food cues in somatosensory and orbitofrontal cortices also increased in proportion to body mass. Longer exposure to cocaine was associated with lower activation to both cues in occipital cortex and cerebellum, which could reflect the decreases in D2/D3 receptors associated with chronicity. These findings show that cocaine cues activate similar, though not identical, pathways to those activated by food cues and that striatal D2/D3 receptors modulate these responses, suggesting that chronic cocaine exposure might influence brain sensitivity not just to drugs but also to food cues. PMID:25142207

  11. Huntington's Disease and Striatal Signaling.

    PubMed

    Roze, Emmanuel; Cahill, Emma; Martin, Elodie; Bonnet, Cecilia; Vanhoutte, Peter; Betuing, Sandrine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's Disease (HD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of polyglutamines (CAG). The main clinical manifestations of HD are chorea, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric disorders. The transmission of HD is autosomal dominant with a complete penetrance. HD has a single genetic cause, a well-defined neuropathology, and informative pre-manifest genetic testing of the disease is available. Striatal atrophy begins as early as 15 years before disease onset and continues throughout the period of manifest illness. Therefore, patients could theoretically benefit from therapy at early stages of the disease. One important characteristic of HD is the striatal vulnerability to neurodegeneration, despite similar expression of the protein in other brain areas. Aggregation of the mutated Huntingtin (HTT), impaired axonal transport, excitotoxicity, transcriptional dysregulation as well as mitochondrial dysfunction, and energy deficits, are all part of the cellular events that underlie neuronal dysfunction and striatal death. Among these non-exclusive mechanisms, an alteration of striatal signaling is thought to orchestrate the downstream events involved in the cascade of striatal dysfunction.

  12. The transfection of BDNF to dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of dopamine D3 receptor agonist recovering the striatal innervation, dendritic spines and motor behavior in an aged rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  13. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined whether there is a differential distribution of PFOS within the brain, and compares adult rats with neonatal rats at an age when formation of the blood-brain barrier is not yet complete (postnatal day 7). Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (60-70 day old, 4/...

  14. Histamine H3 receptor activation stimulates calcium mobilization in a subpopulation of rat striatal neurons in primary culture, but not in synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Ramírez, Nayeli; Montejo-López, Wilber; López-Méndez, María-Cristina; Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Molina-Hernández, Anayansi; García-Hernández, Ubaldo; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2016-12-01

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R) is abundantly expressed in the Central Nervous System where it regulates several functions pre and postsynaptically. H3Rs couple to Gαi/o proteins and trigger or modulate several intracellular signaling pathways, including the cAMP/PKA pathway and the opening of N- and P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In transfected cells, activation of the human H3R of 445 amino acids (hH3R445) results in phospholipase C (PLC) stimulation and release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. In this work we have studied whether H3R activation induces Ca(2+) mobilization from intracellular stores in native systems, either isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) or neurons in primary culture. In rat striatal synaptosomes H3R activation induced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) formation but failed to increase the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). In striatal primary cultures H3R activation resulted in IP3 formation and increased the [Ca(2+)]i in 18 out of 70 cells that responded with an elevation in the [Ca(2+)]i to membrane depolarization with KCl (100 mM) as evaluated by microfluorometry. Confocal microscopy studies corroborated the increase in [Ca(2+)]i induced by H3R activation in a fraction of those cells that were responsive to membrane depolarization. These results indicate that H3R activation stimulates the PLC/IP3/Ca(2+) pathway but only in a subpopulation of striatal neurons.

  15. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Michael; Dhir, Sabine; Amir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease . For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson’s disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms. PMID:27635233

  16. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Dhir, Sabine; Amir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease . For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms.

  17. Regional distribution and subcellular associations of Type II calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Erondu, N.E.

    1986-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies generated against the Type II CaM kinase have been characterized. Two of these antibodies were used to confirm that both alpha and beta subunits were part of the holoenzyme complex. I also developed liquid phase and solid phase radioimmunoassays for the kinase. With the solid phase radioimmunoassay, the distribution of the kinase in rat brain was examined. This study revealed that the concentration of the kinase varies markedly in different brain regions. It is most highly concentrated in the telencephalon where it comprises approximately 2% of total hippocampal protein, 1.3% of cortical protein and 0.7% of striatal protein. It is less concentrated in lower brain regions ranging from 0.3% of hypothalamic protein to 0.1% of protein in the pons/medulla.

  18. Subchronic administration of short-acting naltrexone has no effect on striatal dopamine transporter availability, food intake or body weight gain in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaaijer, Eline R; de Bruin, Kora; la Fleur, Susanne E; Goudriaan, Anna E; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone is successfully used in the treatment of opioid and alcohol dependence. However, questions have been raised about possible anhedonic side effects, because the opioid system is directly involved in hedonic responses to natural rewarding activities, possibly due to its indirect effects on the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT). In order to test this hypothesis, 30 rats were randomized to either a 10-day treatment with 3 mg/kg short-acting naltrexone or vehicle. No significant differences between the groups were found in striatal DAT availability, cumulative food intake (for 48 or 72 h), body weight gain and abdominal fatpad weight. Thus, the results of this study suggest that (sub)chronic treatment with short-acting naltrexone does not induce possible anhedonic effects. However, it cannot be ruled out the anhedonic effect of naltrexone is only short-lived and thus not detected in the current study. Therefore, future studies are needed to study possible acute anhedonic effects at several time points shortly after short-acting naltrexone administration and to directly compare the possible anhedonic effects of long-acting with those of short-acting opioid antagonists.

  19. Effect of structural analogs of butaclamol (a new antipsychotic drug) on striatal homovanillic acid and adenyl cyclase of olfactory tubercle in rats.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, T A; Merker, J; Lippman, W

    1976-08-01

    The 3-isopropyl (I), 3-cyclohexyl (II) and 3-phenyl (III) analogs of the new antipsychotic drug butaclamol, which contains a 3-tertiary butyl group, and their respective (+)-enantiomers, but not (-)-enantiomers, caused a dose related elevation of rat striatal homovanillic acid concentration, indicative of an increased dopamine (DA) turnover; droperidol also exhibited this activity. The order of activity of the (+)-enantiomers was (butaclamol) approximately II greater than I greater than III. A decrease in striatal DA was observed with (+)-I and (+)-III at the highest dose used, but not at one-half the dose. Each analog antagonized the DA-induced increase in adenyl cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) activity of olfactory tubercle homogenates, the order of activity of the racemates (except for II) AND (+)-ENANTIOMERS BEING (BUTACLAMOL) APPROXIMATELY I greater than III greater than II. The (+)-enantiomers of butaclamol and analogs were two to four times more potent than their respective racemates, with (+)-butaclamol and (+)-I displaying activity generally equivalent to fluphenazine. The respective (-)-enantiomers were ineffective indicating a stereochemical specificity for DA-receptor blockade. Such analogs presented should be of value in elucidating dopaminergic mechansims.

  20. Characterization of phenytoin, carbamazepine, vinpocetine and clorgyline simultaneous effects on sodium channels and catecholamine metabolism in rat striatal nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Sitges, María; Aldana, Blanca I; Chiu, Luz M; Nekrassov, Vladimir

    2009-03-01

    The effects of two classic antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine and phenytoin), a potential antiepileptic (vinpocetine) and a monoamine-oxidase inhibitor (clorgyline) on the simultaneous changes (detected by HPLC) on Glu, Asp, dopamine and DOPAC inside and outside striatal isolated nerve endings were investigated. Under resting conditions phenytoin, carbamazepine and clorgyline increased dopamine release. Phenytoin and clorgyline increased internal dopamine and decreased DOPAC formation. Carbamazepine decreased internal dopamine and practically did not change DOPAC formation. Glu and Asp release was unchanged. Neurotransmitter release induced by the Na+ channel opener veratridine was reduced by all the antiepileptic drugs tested, except phenytoin which, like clorgyline, facilitated veratridine-induced dopamine release. We conclude that besides the antagonism exerted by carbamazepine, phenytoin and vinpocetine on excitatory neurotransmitters release triggered by Na+ channel activation, that might importantly contribute to their anticonvulsant action, they exert different actions on striatal dopamine distribution, that might explain their different side effect profiles.

  1. Evidence for neuroprotective effects of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor after global forebrain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Larsson, E; Nanobashvili, A; Kokaia, Z; Lindvall, O

    1999-11-01

    The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) vary between different forebrain areas and show region-specific changes after cerebral ischemia. The present study explores the possibility that the levels of endogenous BDNF determine the susceptibility to ischemic neuronal death. To block BDNF activity the authors used the TrkB-Fc fusion protein, which was infused intraventricularly in rats during 1 week before and 1 week after 5 or 30 minutes of global forebrain ischemia. Ischemic damage was quantified in the striatum and hippocampal formation after 1 week of reperfusion using immunocytochemistry and stereological procedures. After the 30-minute insult, there was a significantly lower number of surviving CA4 pyramidal neurons, neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive dentate hilar neurons, and choline acetyltransferase- and TrkA-positive, cholinergic striatal interneurons in the TrkB-Fc-infused rats as compared to controls. In contrast, the TrkB-Fc treatment did not influence survival of CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neurons or striatal projection neurons. Also, after the mild ischemic insult (5 minutes), neuronal death in the CA1 region was similar in the TrkB-Fc-treated and control groups. These results indicate that endogenous BDNF can protect certain neuronal populations against ischemic damage. It is conceivable, though, that efficient neuroprotection after brain insults is dependent not only on this factor but on the concerted action of a large number of neurotrophic molecules.

  2. Effects of vitamin E supplementation on plasma membrane permeabilization and fluidization induced by chlorpromazine in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Maruoka, Nobuyuki; Murata, Tetsuhito; Omata, Naoto; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Wada, Yuji

    2008-03-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors play a key role in most research on antipsychotic drugs, but little is known about the effects of these drugs on the plasma membrane in the central nervous system. Therefore, we investigated whether chlorpromazine (CPZ), a typical phenothiazine antipsychotic drug, affects the plasma membrane integrity in the rat brain, and if so, whether these membrane alterations can be prevented by dietary supplementation with vitamin E, which has been shown to be an antioxidant and also a membrane-stabilizer. Leakage of [(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([(18)F]FDG)-6-phosphate from rat striatal slices and decrease in 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence anisotropy were used as indexes for plasma membrane permeabilization and fluidization, respectively. CPZ induced leakage of [(18)F]FDG-6-phosphate from striatal slices, and the leakage was delayed in the vitamin E-supplemented group compared to that in the normal diet group. The decrease in plasma membrane anisotropy induced by CPZ was significantly attenuated by vitamin E supplementation. Chronic treatment with alpha-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a free radical scavenger, had no effect on CPZ-induced plasma membrane permeabilization, and the treatment with CPZ did not induce lipid peroxidation. CPZ can reduce plasma membrane integrity in the brain, and this reduction can be prevented by vitamin E via its membrane-stabilizing properties, not via its antioxidant activity.

  3. Iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS) reduces brain cell damage in rats intrastriatally lesioned by quinolinate.

    PubMed

    González-Cortés, Carolina; Salinas-Lara, Citlaltepetl; Gómez-López, Marcos Artemio; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Gómez-Ruiz, Celedonio; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-01-01

    It has been recently demonstrated that the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) is involved in the neurotoxic pattern produced by quinolinic acid in the rat brain [V. Pérez-De La Cruz, C. González-Cortés, S. Galván-Arzate, O.N. Medina-Campos, F. Pérez-Severiano, S.F. Ali, J. Pedraza-Chaverrí, A. Santamaría, Excitotoxic brain damage involves early peroxynitrite formation in a model of Huntington's disease in rats: protective role of iron porphyrinate 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinate iron (III), Neuroscience 135 (2005) 463-474.]. The aim of this work was to investigate whether ONOO(-) can also be responsible for morphological alterations and inflammatory events in the same paradigm. For this purpose, we evaluated the effect of a pre-treatment with the iron porphyrinate Fe(TPPS), a well-known ONOO(-) decomposition catalyst (10 mg/kg, i.p., 120 min before lesion), on the quinolinate-induced striatal cell damage and immunoreactivities to glial-fibrilar acidic protein (GFAP), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), one and seven days after the intrastriatal infusion of quinolinate (240 nmol/microl) to rats. The striatal tissue from animals lesioned by quinolinate showed a significant degree of damage and enhanced immunoreactivities to GFAP, IL-6 and iNOS, both at 1 and 7 days post-lesion. Pre-treatment of rats with Fe(TPPS) significantly attenuated or prevented all these markers at both post-lesion times tested, except for GFAP immunoreactivity at 7 days post-lesion and iNOS immunoreactivity at 1 day post-lesion. Altogether, our results suggest that ONOO(-) is actively participating in triggering inflammatory events and morphological alterations in the toxic model produced by quinolinate, since the use of agents affecting its formation, such as Fe(TPPS), are effective experimental tools to reduce the brain lesions associated to excitotoxic and oxidative damage.

  4. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Co-localization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and wild-type huntingtin in normal and quinolinic acid-lesioned rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Francesca R; Zuccato, Chiara; Tartari, Marzia; Martorana, Alessandro; De March, Zena; Giampà, Carmela; Cattaneo, Elena; Bernardi, Giorgio

    2003-09-01

    Loss of huntingtin-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene transcription has been described in Huntington's disease (HD) [Zuccato et al. (2001) Science, 293, 493-498]. It has been shown that BDNF is synthesized in the pyramidal layer of cerebral cortex and released in the striatum [Altar et al. (1997) Nature, 389, 856-860; Conner et al. (1997) J. Neurosci., 17, 2295-2313]. Here we show the cellular localization of BDNF in huntingtin-containing neurons in normal rat brain; our double-label immunofluorescence study shows that huntingtin and BDNF are co-contained in approximately 99% of pyramidal neurons of motor cortex. In the striatum, huntingtin is expressed in 75% of neurons containing BDNF. In normal striatum we also show that BDNF is contained in cholinergic and in NOS-containing interneurons, which are relatively resistant to HD degeneration. Furthermore, we show a reduction in huntingtin and in BDNF immunoreactivity in cortical neurons after striatal excitotoxic lesion. Our data are confirmed by an ELISA study of BDNF and by a Western blot analysis of huntingtin in cortex of quinolic acid (QUIN)-lesioned hemispheres. In the lesioned striatum we describe that the striatal subpopulation of cholinergic neurons, surviving degeneration, contain BDNF. The finding that BDNF is contained in nearly all neurons that contain huntingtin in the normal cortex, along with the reduced expression of BDNF after QUIN injection of the striatum, shows that huntingtin may be required for BDNF production in cortex.

  6. Effects of NMDA administration in the substantia nigra pars compacta on the striatal dopamine release before and after repetitive exposures to nitrogen narcosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lavoute, C; Weiss, M; Rostain, J C

    2006-01-01

    Hyperbaric nitrogen-oxygen exposure developed in rats a decrement of the striatal dopamine release, which was reversed by repetitive exposures. This dopamine decrease could be the result of the antagonistic effect of nitrogen on NMDA receptors. The increment of the dopamine release, following repetitive exposures to nitrogen, could be attributed to a desensitisation of NMDA receptors to the effects of nitrogen. To test these hypotheses, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with electrodes in the striatum to measure dopamine release by voltammetry and cannula in the substantia nigra pars compacta for NMDA injection. Free-moving rats were exposed up to 3MPa of nitrogen-oxygen mixture before and after 5 exposures to 1MPa. At the first exposure to 3MPa, the dopamine level decreased (-15%) but is counteracted by NMDA administration. In contrast, after repetitive exposure, the second exposure to 3MPa, induces a 10% dopamine increase. NMDA administration significantly potentiated this increase. Our results neither support the hypothesis of an antagonist effect of nitrogen on NMDA receptors at the first exposure, nor that of a NMDA receptor desensitization following repetitive exposures to hyperbaric nitrogen.

  7. Temporal Rewiring of Striatal Circuits Initiated by Nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Adermark, Louise; Morud, Julia; Lotfi, Amir; Danielsson, Klara; Ulenius, Lisa; Söderpalm, Bo; Ericson, Mia

    2016-01-01

    Drug addiction has been conceptualized as maladaptive recruitment of integrative circuits coursing through the striatum, facilitating drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior. The aim of this study was to define temporal neuroadaptations in striatal subregions initiated by 3 weeks of intermittent nicotine exposure followed by protracted abstinence. Enhanced rearing activity was assessed in motor activity boxes as a measurement of behavioral change induced by nicotine (0.36 mg/kg), whereas electrophysiological field potential recordings were performed to evaluate treatment effects on neuronal activity. Dopamine receptor mRNA expression was quantified by qPCR, and nicotine-induced dopamine release was measured in striatal subregions using in vivo microdialysis. Golgi staining was performed to assess nicotine-induced changes in spine density of medium spiny neurons. The data presented here show that a brief period of nicotine exposure followed by abstinence leads to temporal changes in synaptic efficacy, dopamine receptor expression, and spine density in a subregion-specific manner. Nicotine may thus initiate a reorganization of striatal circuits that continues to develop despite protracted abstinence. We also show that the response to nicotine is modulated in previously exposed rats even after 6 months of abstinence. The data presented here suggests that, even though not self-administered, nicotine may produce progressive neuronal alterations in brain regions associated with goal-directed and habitual performance, which might contribute to the development of compulsive drug seeking and the increased vulnerability to relapse, which are hallmarks of drug addiction. PMID:27388328

  8. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  9. Radioiodinated tracers for the evaluation of dopamine receptors in the neonatal rat brain after hypoxic-ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Zouakia, A; Chalon, S; Kung, H F; Dognon, A M; Saliba, E; Besnard, J C; Guilloteau, D

    1994-06-01

    In order to evaluate in vivo single-photon emission tomography (SPET) method of assessing cerebral function after hypoxic-ischemic injury in human neonates, we studied D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in a rat model. Seven-day-old rats underwent permanent unilateral common carotid ligation followed by exposure to 8% O2. Two weeks later, in brains with no visible loss of hemispheric volume, striatal dopaminergic receptors were studied, with [125I]TISCH and [125I]IBZM for the D1 and D2 dopamine receptors, respectively. Using [125I]TISCH, we observed no modifications of D1 receptors, but in contrast, ex vivo and in vitro autoradiographic experiments showed a 40% decrease in the striatal binding of [125I]IBZM on both the ipsilateral and the contralateral side to the carotid ligation. These alterations were detected with IBZM, a D2 dopamine receptor ligand usable for SPET imaging. Therefore, exploration of D2 receptors by SPET in human neonates suffering from perinatal hypoxia-ischemia may be valuable for the diagnosis and follow-up of cerebral function damages.

  10. Mechanism of action of nitrogen pressure in controlling striatal dopamine level of freely moving rats is changed by recurrent exposures to nitrogen narcosis.

    PubMed

    Lavoute, Cécile; Weiss, Michel; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Rostain, Jean-Claude

    2012-03-01

    In rats, a single exposure to 3 MPa nitrogen induces change in motor processes, a sedative action and a decrease in dopamine release in the striatum. These changes due to a narcotic effect of nitrogen have been attributed to a decrease in glutamatergic control and the facilitation of GABAergic neurotransmission involving NMDA and GABA(A) receptors, respectively. After repeated exposure to nitrogen narcosis, a second exposure to 3 MPa increased dopamine levels suggesting a change in the control of the dopaminergic pathway. We investigated the role of the nigral NMDA and GABA(A) receptors in changes in the striatal dopamine levels. Dopamine-sensitive electrodes were implanted into the striatum under general anesthesia, together with a guide-cannula for drug injections into the SNc. Dopamine level was monitored by in vivo voltammetry. The effects of NMDA/GABA(A) receptor agonists (NMDA/muscimol) and antagonists (AP7/gabazine) on dopamine levels were investigated. Rats were exposed to 3 MPa nitrogen before and after five daily exposures to 1 MPa. After these exposures to nitrogen narcosis, gabazine, NMDA and AP7 had no effect on the nitrogen-induced increase in dopamine levels. By contrast, muscimol strongly enhanced the increase in dopamine level induced by nitrogen. Our findings suggest that repeated nitrogen exposure disrupted NMDA receptor function and decreased GABAergic input by modifying GABA(A) receptor sensitivity. These findings demonstrated a change in the mechanism of action of nitrogen at pressure.

  11. Toxicity of the Flame-Retardant BDE-49 on Brain Mitochondria and Neuronal Progenitor Striatal Cells Enhanced by a PTEN-Deficient Background

    PubMed Central

    Giulivi, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) represent an important group of flame retardants extensively used, tonnage of which in the environment has been steadily increasing over the past 25 years. PBDEs or metabolites can induce neurotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction (MD) through a variety of mechanisms. Recently, PBDEs with < 5 Br substitutions (i.e., 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether [BDE-47] and 2,2′,4,5′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether [BDE-49]) have gained interest because of their high bioaccumulation. In particular, congeners such as BDE-49 arise as one of the most biologically active, with concentrations typically lower than those observed for BDE-47 in biological tissues; however, its potential to cause MD at biologically relevant concentrations is unknown. To this end, the effect of BDE-49 was studied in brain mitochondria and neuronal progenitor striatal cells (NPC). BDE-49 uncoupled mitochondria at concentrations < 0.1 nM, whereas at > 1 nM, it inhibited the electron transport at Complex V (mixed type inhibition; IC50 = 6 nM) and Complex IV (noncompetitive inhibition; IC50 = 40 nM). These concentrations are easily achieved in plasma concentrations considering that BDE-49 (this study, 400-fold) and other PBDEs accumulate 1–3 orders of magnitude in the cells, particularly in mitochondria and microsomes. Similar effects were observed in NPC and exacerbated with PTEN (negative modulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway) deficiency, background associated with autism-like behavior, schizophrenia, and epilepsy. PBDE-mediated MD per se or enhanced by a background that confers susceptibility to this exposure may have profound implications in the energy balance of brain. PMID:23288049

  12. Hybridizable ribonucleic acid of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Bondy, S. C.; Roberts, Sidney

    1968-01-01

    1. Cerebral RNA of adult and newborn rats was labelled in vivo by intracervical injection of [5-3H]uridine or [32P]phosphate. Hepatic RNA of similar animals was labelled by intraperitoneal administration of [6-14C]orotic acid. Nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions were isolated and purified by procedures involving extraction with phenol and repeated precipitation with ethanol. 2. The fraction of pulse-labelled RNA from cerebral nuclei that hybridized to homologous DNA exhibited a wide range of turnover values and was heterogeneous in sucrose density gradients. 3. Base composition of the hybridizable RNA was similar to that of the total pulse-labelled material; both were DNA-like. 4. Pulse-labelled cerebral nuclear RNA hybridized to a greater extent than cytoplasmic RNA for at least a week after administration of labelled precursor. This finding suggested that cerebral nuclei contained a hybridizable component that was not transferred to cytoplasm. 5. The rates of decay of the hybridizable fractions of cerebral nuclei and cytoplasm were faster in the newborn animal than in the adult. Presumably a larger proportion of labile messenger RNA molecules was present in the immature brain. 6. Cerebral nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA fractions from newborn or adult rats, labelled either in vivo for periods varying from 4min. to 7 days or in vitro by exposure to [3H]-dimethyl sulphate, uniformly hybridized more effectively than the corresponding hepatic preparation. These data suggested that a larger proportion of RNA synthesis was oriented towards messenger RNA formation in brain than in liver. PMID:5683505

  13. The Transfection of BDNF to Dopamine Neurons Potentiates the Effect of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Recovering the Striatal Innervation, Dendritic Spines and Motor Behavior in an Aged Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F.; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J.; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J.; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  14. Pharmacokinetics and bioactivity of glial cell line-derived factor (GDNF) and neurturin (NTN) infused into the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Hadaczek, Piotr; Johnston, Louisa; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2010-01-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of GDNF and NTN was employed to determine the tissue clearance of these factors from the rat striatum and the response of the dopaminergic system to a single infusion. Two doses of GDNF (15 and 3 μg) and NTN (10 μg and 2 μg) were infused into the rat striatum. Animals were euthanized 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days post-infusion. Brains were processed for ELISA, HPLC, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Both doses of the infused GDNF resulted in a sharp increase in striatal GDNF levels followed by a rapid decrease between day 3 and 7. Interestingly, IHC revealed GDNF in the septum and the base of the brain 14 days after GDNF administration. Dopamine (DA) turnover was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner for more than 7 days after a single GDNF infusion. NTN persisted in the brain for at least two weeks longer than GDNF. It also had more persistent effects on DA turnover, probably due to its precipitation in the brain at neutral pH after infusion. Our data suggest that daily or continuous dosing may not be necessary for delivering growth factors into the CNS. PMID:20153340

  15. Brain adaptation to acute hyponatremia in young rats.

    PubMed

    Silver, S M; Schroeder, B M; Bernstein, P; Sterns, R H

    1999-06-01

    Brain swelling after acute hyponatremia in prepubescent rats, in contrast to adults, has recently been associated with an increase in brain sodium and a high mortality that could be prevented by preadministration of testosterone. To reexamine the effect of acute hyponatremia in young brain, we measured brain water and solute content in prepubescent rats after induction of hyponatremia over 4 h with water and arginine vasopressin. An 18% decrease in plasma sodium was associated with a 13% increase in brain water and a decrease in brain sodium and glutamate contents. No animals died. To assess the effect of sex hormones on brain adaptation, prepubescent rats were pretreated with estrogen or testosterone before acute hyponatremia. Brain sodium and potassium contents were significantly reduced in comparison to normonatremia in testosterone-pretreated but not estrogen-pretreated animals. However, there was no difference between estrogen-pretreated and testosterone-pretreated groups in mortality or in brain contents of water, electrolytes, or major organic osmolytes. In conclusion, we found that brain adaptation to acute hyponatremia in prepubescent rats is similar to that observed in adults.

  16. A review of fronto-striatal and fronto-cortical brain abnormalities in children and adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and new evidence for dysfunction in adults with ADHD during motivation and attention.

    PubMed

    Cubillo, Ana; Halari, Rozmin; Smith, Anna; Taylor, Eric; Rubia, Katya

    2012-02-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has long been associated with abnormalities in frontal brain regions. In this paper we review the current structural and functional imaging evidence for abnormalities in children and adults with ADHD in fronto-striatal, fronto-parieto-temporal, fronto-cerebellar and fronto-limbic regions and networks. While the imaging studies in children with ADHD are more numerous and consistent, an increasing number of studies suggests that these structural and functional abnormalities in fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical networks persist into adulthood, despite a relative symptomatic improvement in the adult form of the disorder. We furthermore present new data that support the notion of a persistence of neurofunctional deficits in adults with ADHD during attention and motivation functions. We show that a group of medication-naïve young adults with ADHD behaviours who were followed up 20 years from a childhood ADHD diagnosis show dysfunctions in lateral fronto-striato-parietal regions relative to controls during sustained attention, as well as in ventromedial orbitofrontal regions during reward, suggesting dysfunctions in cognitive-attentional as well as motivational neural networks. The lateral fronto-striatal deficit findings, furthermore, were strikingly similar to those we have previously observed in children with ADHD during the same task, reinforcing the notion of persistence of fronto-striatal dysfunctions in adult ADHD. The ventromedial orbitofrontal deficits, however, were associated with comorbid conduct disorder (CD), highlighting the potential confound of comorbid antisocial conditions on paralimbic brain deficits in ADHD. Our review supported by the new data therefore suggest that both adult and childhood ADHD are associated with brain abnormalities in fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical systems that mediate the control of cognition and motivation. The brain deficits in ADHD therefore appear to be multi

  17. Polychlorinated biphenyls and methylmercury act synergistically to reduce rat brain dopamine content in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Bemis, J C; Seegal, R F

    1999-01-01

    Consumption of contaminated Great Lakes fish by pregnant women is associated with decreased birth weight and deficits in cognitive function in their infants and children. These fish contain many known and suspected anthropogenic neurotoxicants, making it difficult to determine which contaminant(s) are responsible for the observed deficits. We have undertaken a series of experiments to determine the relevant toxicants by comparing the neurotoxic effects of two of these contaminants--polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and methylmercury (MeHg)--both of which are recognized neurotoxicants. Striatal punches obtained from adult rat brain were exposed to PCBs only, MeHg only, or the two in combination, and tissue and media concentrations of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Exposure to PCBs only reduced tissue DA and elevated media DA in a dose-dependent fashion. Exposure to MeHg only did not significantly affect either measure. However, when striatal punches were simultaneously exposed to PCBs and MeHg, there were significantly greater decreases in tissue DA concentrations and elevations in media DA than those caused by PCBs only, in the absence of changes in media lactate dehydrogenase concentrations. Elevations in both tissue and media 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid concentrations were also observed. We suggest that the significant interactions between these two toxicants may be due to a common site of action (i.e., toxicant-induced increases in intracellular calcium and changes in second messenger systems) that influences DA function. The synergism between these contaminants suggests that future revisions of fish-consumption guidelines should consider contaminant interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:10544155

  18. Effect of Exercise Training on Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in Methamphetamine Users during Behavioral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa J; Rawson, Richard A; Dolezal, Brett A; Cooper, Christopher B; Brown, Amira K; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine use disorder is associated with striatal dopaminergic deficits that have been linked to poor treatment outcomes, identifying these deficits as an important therapeutic target. Exercise attenuates methamphetamine-induced neurochemical damage in the rat brain, and a preliminary observation suggests that exercise increases striatal D2/D3 receptor availability (measured as nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND)) in patients with Parkinson's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether adding an exercise training program to an inpatient behavioral intervention for methamphetamine use disorder reverses deficits in striatal D2/D3 receptors. Participants were adult men and women who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence and were enrolled in a residential facility, where they maintained abstinence from illicit drugs of abuse and received behavioral therapy for their addiction. They were randomized to a group that received 1 h supervised exercise training (n=10) or one that received equal-time health education training (n=9), 3 days/week for 8 weeks. They came to an academic research center for positron emission tomography (PET) using [(18)F]fallypride to determine the effects of the 8-week interventions on striatal D2/D3 receptor BPND. At baseline, striatal D2/D3 BPND did not differ between groups. However, after 8 weeks, participants in the exercise group displayed a significant increase in striatal D2/D3 BPND, whereas those in the education group did not. There were no changes in D2/D3 BPND in extrastriatal regions in either group. These findings suggest that structured exercise training can ameliorate striatal D2/D3 receptor deficits in methamphetamine users, and warrants further evaluation as an adjunctive treatment for stimulant dependence.

  19. Aluminium toxicity in the rat liver and brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Ohashi, H.; Nagai, H.; Kakimi, S.; Ishikawa, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Ishii, K.

    1993-04-01

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, we examined the brain and liver tissue uptake of aluminium 5-75 days after aluminium injection into healthy rats. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the brain and the brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the liver and the liver cell nuclei by PIXE analysis and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The morphological changes of the rat brain examined 75 days after the injection were similar to those which have been reportedly observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. These results support the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells.

  20. 26Al uptake and accumulation in the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Imamura, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Hayashi, K.; Masuda, A.; Kumazawa, H.; Ohashi, H.; Kobayashi, K.

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), 26Al incorporation in the rat brain was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). When 26Al was injected into healthy rats, a considerable amount of 26Al entered the brain (cerebrum) through the blood-brain barrier 5 days after a single injection, and the brain 26Al level remained almost constant from 5 to 270 days. On the other hand, the level of 26Al in the blood decreased remarkably 75 days after injection. Approximately 89% of the 26Al taken in by the brain cell nuclei bound to chromatin. This study supports the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium (Al) in the brain, and brain cell nuclei.

  1. Glutamine triggers long-lasting increase in striatal network activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Wiebke; Theiss, Stephan; Schnitzler, Alfons; Sergeeva, Olga

    2017-04-01

    Accumulation of ammonium and glutamine in blood and brain is a key factor in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) - a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by various cognitive and motor deficits. MRI imaging identified abnormalities notably in the basal ganglia of HE patients, including its major input station, the striatum. While neurotoxic effects of ammonia have been extensively studied, glutamine is primarily perceived as "detoxified" form of ammonia. We applied ammonium and glutamine to striatal and cortical cells from newborn rats cultured on microelectrode arrays. Glutamine, but not ammonium significantly increased spontaneous spike rate with a long-lasting excitation outlasting washout. This effect was more prominent in striatal than in cortical cultures. Calcium imaging revealed that glutamine application caused a rise in intracellular calcium that depended both on system A amino acid transport and activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. This pointed to downstream glutamate release that was triggered by intracellular glutamine. Using an enzymatic assay kit we confirmed glutamine-provoked glutamate release from striatal cells. Real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry demonstrated the presence of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2) necessary for synaptic glutamate release in striatal neurons. We conclude that extracellular glutamine is taken up by neurons, triggers synaptic release of glutamate which is then taken up by astrocytes and again converted to glutamine. This feedback-loop causes a sustained long-lasting excitation of network activity. Thus, apart from ammonia also its "detoxified" form glutamine might be responsible for the neuropsychiatric symptoms in HE.

  2. The connection between the hippocampal and the striatal memory systems of the brain: a review of recent findings.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, I; Bevilaqua, L R M; Rossato, J I; Bonini, J S; Da Silva, W C; Medina, J H; Cammarota, M

    2006-10-01

    Two major memory systems have been recognized over the years (Squire, in Memory and Brain, 1987): the declarative memory system, which is under the control of the hippocampus and related temporal lobe structures, and the procedural or habit memory system, which is under the control of the striatum and its connections (Mishkin et al., in Neurobiology of Learning by G Lynch et al., 1984; Knowlton et al., Science 273:1399, 1996). Most if not all learning tasks studied in animals, however, involve either the performance or the suppression of movement. Animals acquire connections between environmental or discrete sensory cues (conditioned stimuli, CSs) and emotionally or otherwise significant stimuli (unconditioned stimuli, USs). As a result, they learn to perform or to inhibit the performance of certain motor responses to the CS which, when learned well, become what can only be called habits (Mishkin et al., 1984): to regularly walk or swim to a place or away from a place, or to inhibit one or several forms of movement. These responses can be viewed as conditioned responses (CRs) and may sometimes be very complex. This is of course also seen in humans: people learn how to play on a keyboard in response to a mental or written script and perform the piano or write a text; with practice, the performance improves and eventually reaches a high criterion and becomes a habit, performed almost if not completely without awareness. Commuting to school in a big city in the shortest possible time and eschewing the dangers is a complex learning that children acquire to the point of near-perfection. It is agreed that the rules that connect the perception of the CS and the expression of the CR change from their first association to those that take place when the task is mastered. Does this change of rules involve a switch from one memory system to another? Are different brain systems used the first time one plays a sonata or goes to school as compared with the 100th time? Here we

  3. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  4. Effects of 5-HT1A receptor stimulation on striatal and cortical M1 pERK induction by L-DOPA and a D1 receptor agonist in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lindenbach, David; Dupre, Kristin B; Eskow Jaunarajs, Karen L; Ostock, Corinne Y; Goldenberg, Adam A; Bishop, Christopher

    2013-11-06

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease are commonly treated using l-DOPA although long-term treatment usually causes debilitating motor side effects including dyskinesias. A putative source of dyskinesia is abnormally high levels of phosphorylated extracellular-regulated kinase (pERK) within the striatum. In animal models, the serotonin 1A receptor agonist ±8-OH-DPAT reduces dyskinesia, suggesting it may exhibit efficacy through the pERK pathway. The present study investigated the effects of ±8-OH-DPAT on pERK density in rats treated with l-DOPA or the D1 receptor agonist SKF81297. Rats were given a unilateral dopamine lesion with 6-hydroxydopamine and primed with a chronic regimen of l-DOPA, SKF81297 or their vehicles. On the final test day, rats were given two injections: first with ±8-OH-DPAT, the D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 or their vehicles, and second with l-DOPA, SKF81297 or their vehicles. Rats were then transcardially perfused for immunohistological analysis of pERK expression in the striatum and primary motor cortex. Rats showed greater dyskinesia in response to l-DOPA and SKF81297 after repeated injections. Although striatal pERK induction was similar between acute and chronic l-DOPA, SKF81297 caused the largest increase in striatal pERK after the first exposure. Neither compound alone affected motor cortex pERK. Surprisingly, in the ventromedial striatum, ±8-OH-DPAT potentiated l-DOPA-induced pERK; in the motor cortex, ±8-OH-DPAT potentiated pERK with l-DOPA or SKF81297. Our results support previous work that the striatal pERK pathway is dysregulated after dopamine depletion, but call into question the utility of pERK as a biomarker of dyskinesia expression.

  5. Electrically-evoked dopamine and acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices perfused without magnesium: regulation by glutamate acting on NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shaoyu; Fredholm, Bertil B

    1997-01-01

    Rat striatal slices, preincubated with [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-choline, were continuously superfused and electrically stimulated. Electrically evoked release of [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-acetylcholine (ACh) was not significantly changed by elimination of Mg2+ from superfusion buffer, but the basal release of [3H]-dopamine was doubled. Kynurenic acid (100–800  μM) caused, in the absence but not presence of Mg2+, a concentration-dependent decrease in the evoked release of these two transmitters. The addition of glycine reversed the inhibition of the evoked release of both transmitters caused by kynurenic acid (400  μM) in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, glycine increased the evoked release of [3H]-dopamine via a site inhibitable by strychnine (1  μM). Another two antagonists at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and dizocilpine, also decreased significantly the evoked release of the two transmitters in a concentration-dependent manner in the absence, but not presence of Mg2+. By contrast, an antagonist of non-NMDA receptors, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (10  μM) significantly decreased the evoked release of the two transmitters in the presence, but not in the absence of Mg2+. Electrical field stimulation evoked release of endogenous adenosine, and this release tended to be higher in the absence of Mg2+. However, the addition of a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (200 nM) did not influence the evoked release of the two transmitters, showing that the released adenosine is of little importance in controlling ACh and dopamine release from striatal slices. Non-NMDA receptors may play a similar role when Mg2+ ions are present. The results indicate that NMDA receptors activated in the absence of Mg2+ participate in the electrically-evoked release of [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-ACh from the striatum. PMID:9257903

  6. The effect of phencyclidine on [3H]GABA and [3H]flunitrazepam binding in the brain of naive and handling-habituated rats.

    PubMed

    Lillrank, S M; Oja, S S; Saransaari, P

    1995-01-01

    The effects of handling and handling combined with phencyclidine (PCP) treatment on GABAergic neurotransmission were studied in Sprague-Dawley rats. The animal material consisted of handling-habituated (HH, for 11 d), acutely handled (naive, N), handling-habituated and PCP-treated (10 mg kg-1 i.p., HH + PCP) and acutely handled (naive) PCP-treated (N + PCP) and unhandled 'control' rats. The binding of [3H]GABA and [3H]flunitrazepam (FLU) was studied with membranes and the release of [3H]GABA with slices prepared from the striatum and frontal cortex. In the striatum the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) and the binding constant (KD) of [3H]GABA were the same in N and HH rats, but in the frontal cortex KD was lower in N rats. KD constants of [3H]FLU were significantly lower in both brain areas in N rats than in HH rats. After PCP treatment both Bmax and KD for [3H]FLU increased in these two brain areas in handling-habituated rats, whereas Bmax of [3H]GABA diminished. Neither handling nor PCP had any effect on [3H]GABA release from striatal and frontal cortical slices. Handling prior to killing thus affects differently the GABAergic parameters studied and modulates the PCP-induced effects.

  7. Transcranial Photoacoustic Measurements of Cold-Injured Brains in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Sato, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shima, Katsuji; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-09-01

    We performed transcranial photoacoustic measurements of cold-injured brains in rats. Before inducing injury, a signal peak was observed at two locations corresponding to the surfaces of the skull and brain, while after injury, a third peak appeared at a location corresponding to the back surface of the skull; the third peak was found to be caused by subdural hematoma. The signal peak for the brain surface shifted to a deeper region with elapse of time after injury, indicating deformation of the brain. These findings suggest that small hemorrhage and morphological change of the brain can be transcranially detected by photoacoustic measurement.

  8. Blood-brain transfer and metabolism of 6-( sup 18 F)fluoro-L-dopa in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Reith, J.; Dyve, S.; Kuwabara, H.; Guttman, M.; Diksic, M.; Gjedde, A. )

    1990-09-01

    In a study designed to reveal the rates of blood-brain transfer and decarboxylation of fluoro-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (FDOPA), we discovered a major discrepancy between the DOPA decarboxylase activity reported in the literature and the rate of FDOPA decarboxylation measured in the study. Donor rats received intravenous injections of 6 mCi fluorine-18-labeled FDOPA. The donor rats synthesized methyl-FDOPA. Arterial plasma, containing both FDOPA and methyl-FDOPA, was sampled from the donor rats at different times and reinjected into recipient rats in which it circulated for 20 s. The blood-brain clearance of the mixture of labeled tracers in the plasma was determined by an integral method. The individual permeabilities were determined by linear regression analysis, according to which the average methyl-FDOPA permeability in the blood-brain barrier was twice that of FDOPA, which averaged 0.037 ml g-1 min-1. The permeability ratio was used to determine the fractional clearance from the brain of FDOPA (and hence of methyl-FDOPA), which averaged 0.081 min-1. In the striatum, the measured average FDOPA decarboxylation rate constant (kD3) was 0.010 min-1, or no more than 1% of the rate of striatal decarboxylation of DOPA measured in vitro and in vivo. We interpreted this finding as further evidence in favor of the hypothesis that striatum has two dopamine (DA) pools, of which only DA in the large pool is protected from metabolism. Hence, no more than 1% of the quantity of fluoro-DA theoretically synthesized was actually retained in striatum.

  9. Persistent behavioral impairments and alterations of brain dopamine system after early postnatal administration of thimerosal in rats.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Mieszko; Duszczyk, Michalina; Mierzejewski, Pawel; Meyza, Ksenia; Majewska, Maria Dorota

    2011-09-30

    The neurotoxic organomercurial thimerosal (THIM), used for decades as vaccine preservative, is a suspected factor in the pathogenesis of some neurodevelopmental disorders. Previously we showed that neonatal administration of THIM at doses equivalent to those used in infant vaccines or higher, causes lasting alterations in the brain opioid system in rats. Here we investigated neonatal treatment with THIM (at doses 12, 240, 1440 and 3000 μg Hg/kg) on behaviors, which are characteristically altered in autism, such as locomotor activity, anxiety, social interactions, spatial learning, and on the brain dopaminergic system in Wistar rats of both sexes. Adult male and female rats, which were exposed to the entire range of THIM doses during the early postnatal life, manifested impairments of locomotor activity and increased anxiety/neophobia in the open field test. In animals of both sexes treated with the highest THIM dose, the frequency of prosocial interactions was reduced, while the frequency of asocial/antisocial interactions was increased in males, but decreased in females. Neonatal THIM treatment did not significantly affect spatial learning and memory. THIM-exposed rats also manifested reduced haloperidol-induced catalepsy, accompanied by a marked decline in the density of striatal D₂ receptors, measured by immunohistochemical staining, suggesting alterations to the brain dopaminergic system. Males were more sensitive than females to some neurodisruptive/neurotoxic actions of THIM. These data document that early postnatal THIM administration causes lasting neurobehavioral impairments and neurochemical alterations in the brain, dependent on dose and sex. If similar changes occur in THIM/mercurial-exposed children, they could contribute do neurodevelopmental disorders.

  10. Brain manganese accumulation is inversely related to gamma-amino butyric acid uptake in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel G; Cooney, Paula T; Erikson, Keith M

    2007-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential trace metal involved in numerous cellular processes. Iron deficiency (ID) is reported as the most prevalent nutritional problem worldwide. Increasing evidence suggests that ID is associated with altered neurotransmitter metabolism and a risk factor for manganese (Mn) neurotoxicity. Though recent studies have established differences in which the female brain responds to ID-related neurochemical alterations versus the male brain, little is known about the interactions of dietary ID, Mn exposure, and sex on gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four dietary treatment groups: control (CN), control/Mn supplemented, ID, and ID/Mn supplemented. After 6 weeks of treatment, both ID diets caused a highly significant decrease in Fe concentrations across all brain regions compared to CN in both sexes. Both ID and Mn supplementation led to significant accumulation of Mn across all brain regions in both sexes. There was no main effect of sex on Fe or Mn accumulation. Striatal synaptosomes were utilized to examine the effect of dietary intervention on (3)H-GABA uptake. At 4 weeks, there was a significant correlation between Fe concentration and (3)H-GABA uptake in male rats (p < 0.05). At 6 weeks, there was a significant inverse correlation between Mn concentration and (3)H-GABA uptake in male and female rats and a postitive correlation between Fe concentration and (3)H-GABA uptake in female rats (p < 0.05). In conclusion, ID-associated Mn accumulation is similar in both sexes, with Mn levels affecting GABA uptake in both sexes in a comparable fashion.

  11. Cannabinoid receptor agonists reduce the short-term mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress linked to excitotoxicity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Rangel-López, E; Colín-González, A L; Paz-Loyola, A L; Pinzón, E; Torres, I; Serratos, I N; Castellanos, P; Wajner, M; Souza, D O; Santamaría, A

    2015-01-29

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is involved in a considerable number of physiological processes in the Central Nervous System. Recently, a modulatory role of cannabinoid receptors (CBr) and CBr agonists on the reduction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) activation has been demonstrated. Quinolinic acid (QUIN), an endogenous analog of glutamate and excitotoxic metabolite produced in the kynurenine pathway (KP), selectively activates NMDAr and has been shown to participate in different neurodegenerative disorders. Since the early pattern of toxicity exerted by this metabolite is relevant to explain the extent of damage that it can produce in the brain, in this work we investigated the effects of the synthetic CBr agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and other agonists (anandamide or AEA, and CP 55,940 or CP) on early markers of QUIN-induced toxicity in rat striatal cultured cells and rat brain synaptosomes. WIN, AEA and CP exerted protective effects on the QUIN-induced loss of cell viability. WIN also preserved the immunofluorescent signals for neurons and CBr labeling that were decreased by QUIN. The QUIN-induced early mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation were also partially or completely prevented by WIN pretreatment, but not when this CBr agonist was added simultaneously with QUIN to brain synaptosomes. These findings support a neuroprotective and modulatory role of cannabinoids in the early toxic events elicited by agents inducing excitotoxic processes.

  12. Actin purification from a gel of rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Peron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1984-01-01

    Actin, 99% pure, has been recovered from rat brain with a high yield (greater than 15 mg/100 g brain). We have shown that: 1. a low ionic strength extract from rat brain tissue is capable of giving rise to a gel; 2. actin is the main gel component and its proportion is one order of magnitude higher than in the original extract; 3. actin can be isolated from this extract by a three-step procedure involving gelation, dissociation of the gel in 0.6 M KCl, followed by one or two depolymerization-polymerization cycles.

  13. Spatial Discrimination Reversal Learning in Weanling Rats Is Impaired by Striatal Administration of an NMDA-Receptor Antagonist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Deborah J.; Stanton, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    The striatum plays a major role in both motor control and learning and memory, including executive function and "behavioral flexibility." Lesion, temporary inactivation, and infusion of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist into the dorsomedial striatum (dmSTR) impair reversal learning in adult rats. Systemic administration of MK-801…

  14. Effects of photoradiation therapy on normal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.K.; McKean, J.; Boisvert, D.; Tulip, J.; Mielke, B.W.

    1984-12-01

    Laser photoradiation of the brain via an optical fiber positioned 5 mm above a burr hole was performed after the injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) in 33 normal rats and 6 rats with an intracerebral glioma. Normal rats received HpD, 5 or 10 mg/kg of body weight, followed by laser exposure at various doses or were exposed to a fixed laser dose after the administration of HpD, 2.5 to 20 mg/kg. One control group received neither HpD nor laser energy, and another was exposed to laser energy only. The 6 rats bearing an intracranial 9L glioma were treated with HpD, 5 mg/kg, followed by laser exposure at various high doses. The temperature in the cortex or tumor was measured with a probe during laser exposure. The rats were killed 72 hours after photoradiation, and the extent of necrosis of cerebral tissue was measured microscopically. In the normal rats, the extent of brain damage correlated with increases in the dose of both the laser and the HpD. In all 6 glioma-bearing rats, the high laser doses produced some focal necrosis in the tumors but also damaged adjacent normal brain tissue. The authors conclude that damage to normal brain tissue may be a significant complication of high dose photoradiation therapy for intracranial tumors.

  15. Striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate methamphetamine-induced cortical Fos expression

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Noah B.; Marshall, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (mAMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that increases extracellular levels of monoamines throughout the brain. It has previously been observed that a single injection of mAMPH increases immediate early gene (IEG) expression in both the striatum and cerebral cortex. Moreover, this effect is modulated by dopamine and glutamate receptors since systemic administration of dopamine or glutamate antagonists has been found to alter mAMPH-induced striatal and cortical IEG expression. However, because dopamine and glutamate receptors are found in extra-striatal as well as striatal brain regions, studies employing systemic injection of dopamine or glutamate antagonists fail to localize the effects of mAMPH-induced activation. In the present experiments, the roles of striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors in mAMPH-induced gene expression in the striatum and cerebral cortex were examined. The nuclear expression of Fos, the protein product of the IEG c-fos, was quantified in both the striatum and the cortex of animals receiving intrastriatal dopamine or glutamate antagonist administration. Intrastriatal infusion of dopamine (D1 or D2) or glutamate [N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)] antagonists affected not only mAMPH-induced striatal, but also cortical, Fos expression. Overall, the effects of the antagonists occurred dose-dependently, in both the infused and non-infused hemispheres, with greater influences occurring in the infused hemisphere. Finally, unilateral intrastriatal infusion of dopamine or glutamate antagonists changed the behavior of the rats from characteristic mAMPH-induced stereotypy to rotation ipsilateral to the infusion. These results demonstrate that mAMPH’s actions on striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate the widespread cortical activation induced by mAMPH. It is hypothesized that dopamine release from nigrostriatal terminals modulates activity within striatal

  16. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sam V; Limbocker, Ryan A; Gehringer, Rachel C; Divis, Jenny L; Osterhaus, Gregory L; Newby, Maxwell D; Sofis, Michael J; Jarmolowicz, David P; Newman, Brooke D; Mathews, Tiffany A; Johnson, Michael A

    2016-06-15

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as "chemobrain", is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  17. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as “chemobrain”, is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  18. Induction of oxidative stress in rat brain by acrylonitrile (ACN).

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Xu, Y; Klaunig, J E

    1998-12-01

    Chronic treatment with acrylonitrile (ACN) has been shown to produce a dose-related increase in glial cell tumors (astrocytomas) in rats. The mechanism(s) for ACN-induced carcinogenicity remains unclear. While ACN has been reported to induce DNA damage in a number of short-term systems, evidence for a genotoxic mechanism of tumor induction is the brain is not strong. Other toxic mechanisms appear to participate in the induction of tumor or induce the astrocytomas solely. In particular, nongenotoxic mechanisms of carcinogen induction have been implicated in this ACN-induced carcinogenic effect in the rat brain. One major pathway of ACN metabolism is through glutathione (GSH) conjugation. Extensive utilization and depletion of GSH, an important intracellular antioxidant, by ACN may lead to cellular oxidative stress. The present study examined the ability of ACN to induce oxidative stress in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were administered ACN at concentrations of 0, 5, 10, 100, or 200 ppm in the drinking water and sampled after 14, 28, or 90 days of continuous treatment. Oxidative DNA damage indicated by the presence of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (OH8dG) and lipid peroxidation indicated by the presence of malondialdehyde (MDA), a lipid peroxidation product, in rat brains and livers were examined. The levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were also determined in different rat tissues. Both the levels of nonenzymatic antioxidants (GSH, vitamin E) and the activities of enzymatic antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) in rat brains and livers were measured. Increased levels of OH8dG, MDA, and ROS were found in the brains of ACN-treated rats. Decreased levels of GSH and activities of catalase and SOD were also observed in the brains of ACN-treated rats compared to the control group. Interestingly, there were no changes of these indicators of oxidative stress in the livers of ACN-treated rats. Rat liver is not a target for ACN

  19. Effect of Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction on striatal glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid levels detected using microdialysis in a rat model of Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Wei, Li; Yu, Wenjing; Cui, Xia; Liu, Xiaofang; Wang, Qian; Wang, Sumei

    2016-01-01

    Background Jian-Pi-Zhi-Dong Decoction (JPZDD) is a dedicated treatment of Tourette syndrome (TS). The balance of neurotransmitters in the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical network is crucial to the occurrence of TS and related to its severity. This study evaluated the effect of JPZDD on glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and their receptors in a TS rat model. Materials and methods Rats were divided into four groups (n=12 each). TS was induced in three of the groups by injecting them with 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile for 7 consecutive days. Two model groups were treated with tiapride (Tia) or JPZDD, while the control and the remaining model group were gavaged with saline. Behavior was assessed by stereotypic score and autonomic activity. Striatal Glu and GABA contents were detected using microdialysis. Expressions of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 and GABAA receptor (GABAAR) were observed using Western blot and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Tia and JPZDD groups had decreased stereotypy compared with model rats; however, the JPZDD group showed a larger decrease in stereotypy than the Tia group at a 4-week time point. In a spontaneous activity test, the total distance of the JPZDD and Tia groups was significantly decreased compared with the model group. The Glu levels of the model group were higher than the control group and decreased with Tia or JPZDD treatment. The GABA level was higher in the model group than the control group. Expressions of GABAAR protein in the model group were higher than in the control group. Treatment with Tia or JPZDD reduced the expression of GABAAR protein. In the case of the mRNA expression, only Tia reduced the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1, compared with the model group. Conclusion JPZDD could alleviate impairments in behavior and dysfunctional signaling by downregulating GABAAR in the striatum. We suggest that this acts to maintain the balance of Glu and GABA. PMID:27279743

  20. Arc mRNA induction in striatal efferent neurons associated with response learning.

    PubMed

    Daberkow, D P; Riedy, M D; Kesner, R P; Keefe, K A

    2007-07-01

    The dorsal striatum is involved in motor-response learning, but the extent to which distinct populations of striatal efferent neurons are differentially involved in such learning is unknown. Activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) protein is an effector immediate-early gene implicated in synaptic plasticity. We examined arc mRNA expression in striatopallidal vs. striatonigral efferent neurons in dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum of rats engaged in reversal learning on a T-maze motor-response task. Male Sprague-Dawley rats learned to turn right or left for 3 days. Half of the rats then underwent reversal training. The remaining rats were yoked to rats undergoing reversal training, such that they ran the same number of trials but ran them as continued-acquisition trials. Brains were removed and processed using double-label fluorescent in situ hybridization for arc and preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA. In the reversal, but not the continued-acquisition, group there was a significant relation between the overall arc mRNA signal in dorsomedial striatum and the number of trials run, with rats reaching criterion in fewer trials having higher levels of arc mRNA expression. A similar relation was seen between the numbers of PPE(+) and PPE(-) neurons in dorsomedial striatum with cytoplasmic arc mRNA expression. Interestingly, in behaviourally activated animals significantly more PPE(-) neurons had cytoplasmic arc mRNA expression. These data suggest that Arc in both striatonigral and striatopallidal efferent neurons is involved in striatal synaptic plasticity mediating motor-response learning in the T-maze and that there is differential processing of arc mRNA in distinct subpopulations of striatal efferent neurons.

  1. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sean Austin O.; Kang, Un Jung; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh). Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI), which comprises only about 1–2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction. PMID:25374536

  2. Huntington’s Disease and Striatal Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roze, Emmanuel; Cahill, Emma; Martin, Elodie; Bonnet, Cecilia; Vanhoutte, Peter; Betuing, Sandrine; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is the most frequent neurodegenerative disease caused by an expansion of polyglutamines (CAG). The main clinical manifestations of HD are chorea, cognitive impairment, and psychiatric disorders. The transmission of HD is autosomal dominant with a complete penetrance. HD has a single genetic cause, a well-defined neuropathology, and informative pre-manifest genetic testing of the disease is available. Striatal atrophy begins as early as 15 years before disease onset and continues throughout the period of manifest illness. Therefore, patients could theoretically benefit from therapy at early stages of the disease. One important characteristic of HD is the striatal vulnerability to neurodegeneration, despite similar expression of the protein in other brain areas. Aggregation of the mutated Huntingtin (HTT), impaired axonal transport, excitotoxicity, transcriptional dysregulation as well as mitochondrial dysfunction, and energy deficits, are all part of the cellular events that underlie neuronal dysfunction and striatal death. Among these non-exclusive mechanisms, an alteration of striatal signaling is thought to orchestrate the downstream events involved in the cascade of striatal dysfunction. PMID:22007160

  3. Transport of 3-hydroxybutyrate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Stevenson, J.H.; Couto, R.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Studies by a number of investigators have shown that 3-hydroxybutyrate is a preferred energy substrate for brain during early development. Since recent studies by the authors group suggest that the utilization of oxidizable substrates by brain may be regulated in part by transport across the plasma membrane, the authors investigated the transport of ({sup 3}H) D- and L-3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxy-(3-{sup 14}C) butyrate by primary cultures of rat brain astrocytes. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that 3-hydroxybutyrate is taken up into cultured rat brain astrocytes by both diffusion and a carrier mediated transport system, and further support the concept that transport at the cellular level contributes to the regulation of substrate utilization by brain cells.

  4. 3- and 4-O-sulfoconjugated and methylated dopamine: highly reduced binding affinity to dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Werle, E; Lenz, T; Strobel, G; Weicker, H

    1988-07-01

    The binding properties of 3- and 4-O-sulfo-conjugated dopamine (DA-3-O-S, DA-4-O-S) as well as 3-O-methylated dopamine (MT) to rat striatal dopamine D2 receptors were investigated. 3H-spiperone was used as a radioligand in the binding studies. In saturation binding experiments (+)butaclamol, which has been reported to bind to dopaminergic D2 and serotoninergic 5HT2 receptors, was used in conjunction with ketanserin and sulpiride, which preferentially label 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively, in order to discriminate between 3H-spiperone binding to D2 and to 5HT2 receptors. Under our particular membrane preparation and assay conditions, 3H-spiperone binds to D2 and 5HT2 receptors with a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 340 fmol/mg protein in proportions of about 75%:25% with similar dissociation constants KD (35 pmol/l; 43 pmol/l). This result was verified by the biphasic competition curve of ketanserin, which revealed about 20% high (KD = 24 nmol/l) and 80% low (KD = 420 nmol/l) affinity binding sites corresponding to 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively. Therefore, all further competition experiments at a tracer concentration of 50 pmol/l were performed in the presence of 0.1 mumol/l ketanserin to mask the 5HT2 receptors. DA competition curves were best fitted assuming two binding sites, with high (KH = 0.12 mumol/l) and low (KL = 18 mumol/l) affinity, present in a ratio of 3:1. The high affinity binding sites were interconvertible by 100 mumol/l guanyl-5-yl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p], resulting in a homogenous affinity state of DA receptors (KD = 2.8 mumol/l).2+ off

  5. Non-signalling energy use in the developing rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Engl, Elisabeth; Jolivet, Renaud; Hall, Catherine N

    2016-01-01

    Energy use in the brain constrains its information processing power, but only about half the brain's energy consumption is directly related to information processing. Evidence for which non-signalling processes consume the rest of the brain's energy has been scarce. For the first time, we investigated the energy use of the brain's main non-signalling tasks with a single method. After blocking each non-signalling process, we measured oxygen level changes in juvenile rat brain slices with an oxygen-sensing microelectrode and calculated changes in oxygen consumption throughout the slice using a modified diffusion equation. We found that the turnover of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, followed by lipid synthesis, are significant energy drains, contributing 25%, 22% and 18%, respectively, to the rate of oxygen consumption. In contrast, protein synthesis is energetically inexpensive. We assess how these estimates of energy expenditure relate to brain energy use in vivo, and how they might differ in the mature brain. PMID:27170699

  6. Non-signalling energy use in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Engl, Elisabeth; Jolivet, Renaud; Hall, Catherine N; Attwell, David

    2017-03-01

    Energy use in the brain constrains its information processing power, but only about half the brain's energy consumption is directly related to information processing. Evidence for which non-signalling processes consume the rest of the brain's energy has been scarce. For the first time, we investigated the energy use of the brain's main non-signalling tasks with a single method. After blocking each non-signalling process, we measured oxygen level changes in juvenile rat brain slices with an oxygen-sensing microelectrode and calculated changes in oxygen consumption throughout the slice using a modified diffusion equation. We found that the turnover of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton, followed by lipid synthesis, are significant energy drains, contributing 25%, 22% and 18%, respectively, to the rate of oxygen consumption. In contrast, protein synthesis is energetically inexpensive. We assess how these estimates of energy expenditure relate to brain energy use in vivo, and how they might differ in the mature brain.

  7. Effect of carnosine on rats under experimental brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Gallant, S; Kukley, M; Stvolinsky, S; Bulygina, E; Boldyrev, A

    2000-06-01

    The effect of dietary carnosine on the behavioral and biochemical characteristics of rats under experimental ischemia was studied. Carnosine was shown to improve the animals orientation and learning in "Open Field" and "T-Maze" tests, and this effect was accompanied with an increase in glutamate binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in brain synaptosomes. Long-term brain ischemia induced by both sides' occlusion of common carotid arteries resulted in 55% mortality of experimental rats, and those who survived were characterized by partial suppression of orientation in T-maze. In the group of rats treated with carnosine, mortality after ischemic attack was decreased (from 55% to 17%) and most of the learning parameters were kept at the pre-ischemic level. Monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) activity in brain of the carnosine treated rats was not changed by ischemia significantly (compared to that of ischemic untreated rats) but NMDA binding to brain synaptosomal membranes being increased by ischemic attack was significantly suppressed and reached the level characteristic of normal brain. The suggestion was made that carnosine possesses a dual effect on NMDA receptors resulting in increase in their amount after long-term treatment but decrease the capacity to bind NMDA after ischemic attack.

  8. SEROTONIN BINDING TO PREPARATIONS FROM RAT BRAIN,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    BRAIN , SEROTONIN, SEROTONIN, OXIDOREDUCTASES, LYSERGIC ACIDS, RESERPINE, CHLORPROMAZINE, ACETYLCHOLINE, FATTY ACIDS, NOREPINEPHRINE, LEARNING, PERMEABILITY, MITOCHONDRIA, MORPHOLOGY(BIOLOGY), DRUGS, PHYSIOLOGY.

  9. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Scatton, B.; Dubois, A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Zahniser, N.R.; Fage, D.

    1985-03-04

    The distribution of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in the rat brain has been studied by quantitative autoradiography. The binding of /sup 3/H-nomifensine to caudate putamen sections was saturable, specific, of a highly affinity (Kd = 56 nM) and sodium-dependent. The dopamine uptake inhibitors benztropine, nomifensine, cocaine, bupropion and amfonelic acid were the most potent competitors of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding to striatal sections. The highest levels of (benztropine-displaceable) /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites were found in the caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle and the nucleus accumbens. 6-Hydroxy-dopamine-induced lesion of the ascending dopaminergic bundle resulted in a marked decrease in the /sup 3/H-ligand binding in these areas. Moderately high concentrations of the /sup 3/H-ligand were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the anteroventral thalamic nucleus, the cingulate cortex, the lateral septum, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the zona incerta and some hypothalamic nuclei. There were low levels of binding sites in the habenula, the dorsolateral geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the ventral tegmental area and the periaqueductal gray matter. These autoradiographic data are consistent with the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-nomifensine binds primarily to the presynaptic uptake site for dopamine but also labels the norepinephrine uptake site. 33 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. Hydrogen-rich water attenuates brain damage and inflammation after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Runfa; Hou, Zonggang; Hao, Shuyu; Wu, Weichuan; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaogang; Lu, Te; Liu, Baiyun

    2016-04-15

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are the two major causes of apoptosis after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Most previous studies of the neuroprotective effects of hydrogen-rich water on TBI primarily focused on antioxidant effects. The present study investigated whether hydrogen-rich water (HRW) could attenuate brain damage and inflammation after traumatic brain injury in rats. A TBI model was induced using a controlled cortical impact injury. HRW or distilled water was injected intraperitoneally daily following surgery. We measured survival rate, brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and neurological dysfunction in all animals. Changes in inflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cells and Cho/Cr metabolites in brain tissues were also detected. Our results demonstrated that TBI-challenged rats exhibited significant brain injuries that were characterized by decreased survival rate and increased BBB permeability, brain edema, and neurological dysfunction, while HRW treatment ameliorated the consequences of TBI. HRW treatment also decreased the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and HMGB1), inflammatory cell number (Iba1) and inflammatory metabolites (Cho) and increased the levels of an anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in the brain tissues of TBI-challenged rats. In conclusion, HRW could exert a neuroprotective effect against TBI and attenuate inflammation, which suggests HRW as an effective therapeutic strategy for TBI patients.

  11. Proinflammatory cytokines in injured rat brain following perinatal asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Maślińska, Danuta; Laure-Kamionowska, Milena; Kaliszek, Agnieszka; Makarewicz, Dorota

    2002-01-01

    In contrast to astrogliosis, which is common to injuries of the adult CNS, in the developing brain this process is minimal. Reasons postulated for this include the relative immaturity of the immune system and the consequent insufficient production of cytokines to evoke astrogliosis. To explore this hypothesis, the study was undertaken to detect the presence of some proinflammatory cytokines in the injured rat brain following perinatal asphyxia (ischaemia/hypoxia). The localisation of TNF-alpha, IL-15, IL-17 and IL-17 receptors was visualised by means of immunohistochemistry. In numerous neurones of the rat brain, the IL-17 appeared to be constitutively expressed. In the early period of inflammation the IL-15 was produced mainly by the blood cells penetrating the injured brain but later it was synthesised also by reactive astrocytes surrounding brain cysts and forming dense astrogliosis around necrotic brain regions. The direct effect on astrogliosis of other estimated cytokines seems to be negligible. All the results lead to the conclusion that from all cytokines identified in the injured immature rat brain the IL-15 plays the most important role during inflammatory response and participates in the gliosis of reactive astrocytes.

  12. Thermal imaging of brain tumors in a rat glioma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Thanassis; Thompson, Reid C.; Kateb, Babak; Sorokoumov, Oleg; Grundfest, Warren S.; Black, Keith L.

    2002-05-01

    We have explored the capability of thermal imaging for the detection of brain tumors in a rat glioma mode. Fourteen Wistar rats were injected stereotactically with 100,000 C6 glioma cells. Approximately one and two weeks post implantation, the rats underwent bilateral craniotomy and the exposed brain surface was imaged with a short wave thermal camera. Thermal images were obtained at both low (approximately 28.7 degree(s)C) and high (approximately 38 degree(s)C) core temperatures. Temperature gradients between the tumor site and the contralateral normal brain were calculated. Overall, the tumors appeared cooler than normal brain, for both high and low core temperatures. Average temperature difference between tumor and normal brain were maximal in more advanced tumors (two weeks) and at higher core temperatures. At one week (N equals 6), the average temperature gradient between tumor and normal sites was 0.1 degree(s)C and 0.2 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P(greater than)0.05). At two weeks (N equals 8), the average temperature gradient was 0.3 degree(s)C and 0.7 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P<0.05). We conclude that thermal imaging can detect temperature differences between tumor and normal brain tissue in this model, particularly in more advanced tumors. Thermal imaging may provide a novel means to identify brain tumors intraoperatively.

  13. Differences between high-affinity forskolin binding sites in dopamine-riche and other regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Poat, J.A.; Cripps, H.E.; Iversen, L.L.

    1988-05-01

    Forskolin labelled with (/sup 3/H) bound to high- and low-affinity sites in the rat brain. The high-affinity site was discretely located, with highest densities in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercule, substantia nigra, hippocampus, and the molecular layers of the cerebellum. This site did not correlate well with the distribution of adenylate cyclase. The high-affinity striatal binding site may be associated with a stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Thus, the number of sites was increased by the addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. Cholera toxin stereotaxically injected into rat striatum increased the number of binding sites, and no further increase was noted following the subsequent addition of guanyl nucleotide. High-affinity forskolin binding sites in non-dopamine-rich brain areas (hippocampus and cerebullum) were modulated in a qualitatively different manner by guanyl nucleotides. In these areas the number of binding sites was significantly reduced by the addition of guanyl nucleotide. These results suggest that forskolin may have a potential role in identifying different functional/structural guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

  14. Transcriptional activity of novel ALDH1L1 promoters in the rat brain following AAV vector-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mudannayake, Janitha M; Mouravlev, Alexandre; Fong, Dahna M; Young, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1, member L1 (ALDH1L1) is a recently characterized pan-astrocytic marker that is more homogenously expressed throughout the brain than the classic astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein. We generated putative promoter sequence variants of the rat ALDH1L1 gene for use in adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer, with an aim to achieve selective regulation of transgene expression in astrocytes in the rat brain. Unexpectedly, ALDH1L1 promoter variants mediated transcriptional activity exclusively in neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta as assessed by luciferase reporter expression at 3 weeks postvector infusion. This selectivity for neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta also persisted in the context of adeno-associated viral serotype 5, 8 or 9 vector-mediated gene delivery. An in vivo promoter comparison showed the highest performing ALDH1L1 promoter variant mediated higher transgene expression than the neuronal-specific synapsin 1 and tyrosine hydroxylase promoters. The ALDH1L1 promoter was also transcriptionally active in dentate granule neurons following intrahippocampal adeno-associated viral vector infusion, whereas transgene expression was detected in both striatal neurons and astrocytes following vector infusion into the striatum. Our results demonstrate the potential suitability of the ALDH1L1 promoter as a new tool in the development of gene therapy and disease modelling applications. PMID:27990448

  15. Dopamine receptor alterations in female rats with diet-induced decreased brain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): interactions with reproductive status

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Paul F.; Ozias, Marlies K.; Carlson, Susan E.; Reed, Gregory A.; Winter, Michelle K.; McCarson, Kenneth E.; Levant, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Decreased tissue levels of n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are implicated in the etiologies of non-puerperal and postpartum depression. This study examined the effects of a diet-induced loss of brain DHA content and concurrent reproductive status on dopaminergic parameters in adult female Long–Evans rats. An α-linolenic acid-deficient diet and breeding protocols were used to produce virgin and parous female rats with cortical phospholipid DHA levels 20–22% lower than those fed a control diet containing adequate α-linolenic acid. Decreased brain DHA produced a significant main effect of decreased density of ventral striatal D2-like receptors. Virgin females with decreased DHA also exhibited higher density of D1-like receptors in the caudate nucleus than virgin females with normal DHA. These receptor alterations are similar to those found in several rodent models of depression, and are consistent with the proposed hypodopaminergic basis for anhedonia and motivational deficits in depression. PMID:20670471

  16. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of {sup 3}H-inulin and {sup 14}C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients.

  17. Brain endocannabinoid system is involved in fluoxetine-induced anorexia.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Jon; Churruca, Itziar; Pascual, Jesús; Casis, Luis; Sallés, Joan; Echevarría, Enrique

    2008-06-01

    In order to describe the effects of chronic fluoxetine administration on the brain endocannabinoid system in lean and obese Zucker rats, brain immunostaining for the CB1 and CB1-phosphorylated cannabinoid receptors was carried out. Obese Zucker rats showed significantly increased the numbers of neural cells positively immunostained for the CB1-phosphorylated receptor in the striatum, compared to their lean litter-mates. Chronic fluoxetine administration decreased the number of neural cells immunostained for CB1-phosphorylated receptor in several striatal and hippocampal regions of obese Zucker rats, compared to controls treated with saline. In contrast, no change in CB1-phosphorylated receptor immunostaining was observed in fluoxetine-treated lean rats, with respect to controls. Taken together, these results suggest the involvement of the hippocampal and striatal endocannabinoid receptor system in fluoxetine-induced anorexia in lean and obese Zucker rats.

  18. Dysfunction and Dysconnection in Cortical–Striatal Networks during Sustained Attention: Genetic Risk for Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder and its Impact on Brain Network Function

    PubMed Central

    Diwadkar, Vaibhav A.; Bakshi, Neil; Gupta, Gita; Pruitt, Patrick; White, Richard; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in the brain’s attention network may represent early identifiable neurobiological impairments in individuals at increased risk for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Here, we provide evidence of dysfunctional regional and network function in adolescents at higher genetic risk for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder [henceforth higher risk (HGR)]. During fMRI, participants engaged in a sustained attention task with variable demands. The task alternated between attention (120 s), visual control (passive viewing; 120 s), and rest (20 s) epochs. Low and high demand attention conditions were created using the rapid presentation of two- or three-digit numbers. Subjects were required to detect repeated presentation of numbers. We demonstrate that the recruitment of cortical and striatal regions are disordered in HGR: relative to typical controls (TC), HGR showed lower recruitment of the dorsal prefrontal cortex, but higher recruitment of the superior parietal cortex. This imbalance was more dramatic in the basal ganglia. There, a group by task demand interaction was observed, such that increased attention demand led to increased engagement in TC, but disengagement in HGR. These activation studies were complemented by network analyses using dynamic causal modeling. Competing model architectures were assessed across a network of cortical–striatal regions, distinguished at a second level using random-effects Bayesian model selection. In the winning architecture, HGR were characterized by significant reductions in coupling across both frontal–striatal and frontal–parietal pathways. The effective connectivity analyses indicate emergent network dysconnection, consistent with findings in patients with schizophrenia. Emergent patterns of regional dysfunction and dysconnection in cortical–striatal pathways may provide functional biological signatures in the adolescent risk-state for psychiatric illness. PMID:24847286

  19. Accumulation of neurotoxic thioether metabolites of 3,4-(+/-)-methylenedioxymethamphetamine in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Erives, Gladys V; Lau, Serrine S; Monks, Terrence J

    2008-01-01

    The serotonergic neurotoxicity of 3,4-(+/-)-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) appears dependent upon systemic metabolism because direct injection of MDMA into the brain fails to reproduce the neurotoxicity. MDMA is demethylenated to the catechol metabolite N-methyl-alpha-methyldopamine (N-Me-alpha-MeDA). Thioether (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine) metabolites of N-Me-alpha-MeDA are neurotoxic and are present in rat brain following s.c. injection of MDMA. Because multidose administration of MDMA is typical of drug intake during rave parties, the present study was designed to determine the effects of multiple doses of MDMA on the concentration of neurotoxic thioether metabolites in rat brain. Administration of MDMA (20 mg/kg s.c.) at 12-h intervals for a total of four injections led to a significant accumulation of the N-Me-alpha-MeDA thioether metabolites in striatal dialysate. The area under the curve (AUC)(0-300 min) for 5-(glutathion-S-yl)-N-Me-alpha-MeDA increased 33% between the first and fourth injections and essentially doubled for 2,5-bis-(glutathion-S-yl)-N-Me-alpha-MeDA. Likewise, accumulation of the mercapturic acid metabolites was reflected by increases in the AUC(0-300 min) for both 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-N-Me-alpha-MeDA (35%) and 2,5-bis-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-N-Me-alpha-MeDA (85%), probably because processes for their elimination become saturated. Indeed, the elimination half-life of 5-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-N-Me-alpha-MeDA and 2,5-bis-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-N-Me-alpha-MeDA increased by 53 and 28%, respectively, between the first and third doses. Finally, although the C(max) values for the monothioether conjugates were essentially unchanged after each injection, the values increased by 38 and approximately 50% for 2,5-bis-(glutathion-S-yl)-N-Me-alpha-MeDA and 2,5-bis-(N-acetylcystein-S-yl)-N-Me-alpha-MeDA, respectively, between the first and fourth injections. The data indicate that neurotoxic metabolites of MDMA may accumulate in brain after

  20. D1 dopamine receptors of NS20Y neuroblastoma cells are functionally similar to rat striatal D1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lovenberg, T W; Roth, R H; Nichols, D E; Mailman, R B

    1991-11-01

    Dopamine or agonists with D1 receptor potency stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation in whole cell preparations of NS20Y neuroblastoma cells. The accumulation of cAMP after D1 stimulation was rapid and linear for 3 min. Both dopamine and the novel D1 receptor agonist dihydrexidine stimulated cAMP accumulation two- to three-fold over baseline. The pseudo-Km for dopamine was approximately 2 microM, whereas for dihydrexidine it was approximately 30 nM. The effects of both drugs were blocked by either the D1-selective antagonist SCH23390 (Ki, 0.3 nM) or the nonselective antagonist (+)-butaclamol (Ki, 5 nM). Both (-)-butaclamol and the D2-selective antagonist (-)-sulpiride were ineffective (Ki greater than 3 microM). Forskolin (10 microM), prostaglandin E1 (1 microM), and adenosine (10 microM) also stimulated cAMP accumulation, but none were antagonized by SCH23390 (1 microM). Finally, muscarinic receptor stimulation (100 microM carbachol) inhibited both D1- and forskolin-stimulated increases in cAMP accumulation by 80%. The present results indicate that NS20Y neuroblastoma cells have D1 receptors that are coupled to adenylate cyclase, and that these receptors have a pharmacological profile similar to that of the D1 receptor(s) found in rat striatum.

  1. Nicotinamide reduces hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yangzheng; Paul, Ian A; LeBlanc, Michael H

    2006-03-31

    Nicotinamide reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. Can similar brain protection be seen in newborn animals? Seven-day-old rat pups had the right carotid artery permanently ligated followed by 2.5 h of 8% oxygen. Nicotinamide 250 or 500 mg/kg was administered i.p. 5 min after reoxygenation, with a second dose given at 6 h after the first. Brain damage was evaluated by weight deficit of the right hemisphere at 22 days following hypoxia. Nicotinamide 500 mg/kg reduced brain weight loss from 24.6 +/- 3.6% in vehicle pups (n = 28) to 11.9 +/- 2.6% in the treated pups (n = 29, P < 0.01), but treatment with 250 mg/kg did not affect brain weight. Nicotinamide 500 mg/kg also improved behavior in rotarod performance. Levels of 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha measured in the cortex by enzyme immune assay 16 h after reoxygenation was 115 +/- 7 pg/g in the shams (n = 6), 175 +/- 17 pg/g in the 500 mg/kg nicotinamide treated (n = 7), and 320 +/- 79 pg/g in the vehicle treated pups (n = 7, P < 0.05 versus sham, P < 0.05 versus nicotinamide). Nicotinamide reduced the increase in caspase-3 activity caused by hypoxic ischemia (P < 0.01). Nicotinamide reduces brain injury in the neonatal rat, possibly by reducing oxidative stress and caspase-3 activity.

  2. Nicotinamide reduces hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the newborn rat

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yangzheng; Paul, Ian A.; LeBlanc, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Nicotinamide reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. Can similar brain protection be seen in newborn animals? Seven-day-old rat pups had the right carotid artery permanently ligated followed by 2.5 h of 8% oxygen. Nicotinamide 250 or 500 mg/kg was administered i.p. 5 min after reoxygenation, with a second dose given at 6 h after the first. Brain damage was evaluated by weight deficit of the right hemisphere at 22 days following hypoxia. Nicotinamide 500 mg/kg reduced brain weight loss from 24.6 ± 3.6% in vehicle pups (n = 28) to 11.9 ± 2.6% in the treated pups (n = 29, P < 0.01), but treatment with 250 mg/kg did not affect brain weight. Nicotinamide 500 mg/kg also improved behavior in rotarod performance. Levels of 8-isoprostaglandin F2α measured in the cortex by enzyme immune assay 16 h after reoxygenation was 115 ± 7 pg/g in the shams (n = 6), 175 ± 17 pg/g in the 500 mg/kg nicotinamide treated (n = 7), and 320 ± 79 pg/g in the vehicle treated pups (n = 7, P < 0.05 versus sham, P < 0.05 versus nicotinamide). Nicotinamide reduced the increase in caspase-3 activity caused by hypoxic ischemia (P < 0.01). Nicotinamide reduces brain injury in the neonatal rat, possibly by reducing oxidative stress and caspase-3 activity. PMID:16533659

  3. Propentophylline increases striatal dopamine release but dampens methamphetamine-induced dopamine dynamics: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Gough, B; Pereira, F C; Fontes Ribeiro, C A; Ali, S F; Binienda, Z K

    2014-10-01

    While there are currently no medications approved for methamphetamine (METH) addiction, it has been shown that propentofylline (PPF), an atypical methylxanthine, can suppress the rewarding effects of methamphetamine (METH) in mice. This experiment studied the interactions of PPF with METH in striatal dopaminergic transmission. Herein, the impact of PPF (10-40mM, intrastriatally perfused (80min) on the effect of METH (5mg/kg, i.p.) on striatal dopamine (DA) release was evaluated using brain microdialysis in Sprague-Dawley adult rats. METH was injected at the 60min time point of the 80min PPF perfusion. The extracellular levels of DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were determined using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED). PPF induced a concentration-dependent increase in DA release beginning 30min after the onset of PPF perfusion. DA peak levels evoked by 40mM PPF were similar to those induced by 5mg/kg METH i.p. Only the highest concentration of PPF decreased the METH-induced DA peak (circa 70%). The significant decreases in extracellular levels of DOPAC and HVA evoked by METH were partially blocked by 10 and 20mM PPF. Although 40mM of PPF also partially blocked the METH-induced DOPAC decrease, it completely blocked HVA depletion after a transient increase in HVA levels in METH-treated rats. Data indicates for the first time that while PPF increases presynaptic striatal DA dynamics it attenuates METH-induced striatal DA release and metabolism.

  4. Isatin, regional distribution in rat brain and tissues.

    PubMed

    Watkins, P; Clow, A; Glover, V; Halket, J; Przyborowska, A; Sandler, M

    1990-01-01

    Isatin has recently been identified in rat tissues and normal human urine, where it forms the major proportion of the endogenous monoamine oxidase inhibitor, tribulin. In this paper, we show that isatin, measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, has a distinct regional distribution in rat tissues, with highest concentrations in seminal vesicles (1.6 ?g/g) and vas deferens (3.4 ?g/g). There was also a discontinuous distribution within rat brain, concentrations being highest in the hippocampus (0.13 ?g/g).

  5. Extracellular matrix molecules and synaptic plasticity: immunomapping of intracellular and secreted Reelin in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Moreno, Tania; Galazo, Maria J; Porrero, Cesar; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Clascá, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Reelin, a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is secreted by several neuron populations in the developing and adult rodent brain. Secreted Reelin triggers a complex signaling pathway by binding lipoprotein and integrin membrane receptors in target cells. Reelin signaling regulates migration and dendritic growth in developing neurons, while it can modulate synaptic plasticity in adult neurons. To identify which adult neural circuits can be modulated by Reelin-mediated signaling, we systematically mapped the distribution of Reelin in adult rat brain using sensitive immunolabeling techniques. Results show that the distribution of intracellular and secreted Reelin is both very widespread and specific. Some interneuron and projection neuron populations in the cerebral cortex contain Reelin. Numerous striatal neurons are weakly immunoreactive for Reelin and these cells are preferentially located in striosomes. Some thalamic nuclei contain Reelin-immunoreactive cells. Double-immunolabeling for GABA and Reelin reveals that the Reelin-immunoreactive cells in the visual thalamus are the intrinsic thalamic interneurons. High local concentrations of extracellular Reelin selectively outline several dendrite spine-rich neuropils. Together with previous mRNA data, our observations suggest abundant axoplasmic transport and secretion in pathways such as the retino-collicular tract, the entorhino-hippocampal ('perforant') path, the lateral olfactory tract or the parallel fiber system of the cerebellum. A preferential secretion of Reelin in these neuropils is consistent with reports of rapid, activity-induced structural changes in adult brain circuits.

  6. Oxidative damage to rat brain in iron and copper overloads.

    PubMed

    Musacco-Sebio, Rosario; Ferrarotti, Nidia; Saporito-Magriñá, Christian; Semprine, Jimena; Fuda, Julián; Torti, Horacio; Boveris, Alberto; Repetto, Marisa G

    2014-08-01

    This study reports on the acute brain toxicity of Fe and Cu in male Sprague-Dawley rats (200 g) that received 0 to 60 mg kg(-1) (ip) FeCl2 or CuSO4. Brain metal contents and time-responses were determined for rat survival, in situ brain chemiluminescence and phospholipid and protein oxidation products. Metal doses hyperbolically defined brain metal content. Rat survival was 91% and 60% after Fe and Cu overloads. Brain metal content increased from 35 to 114 μg of Fe per g and from 3.6 to 34 μg of Cu per g. Brain chemiluminescence (10 cps cm(-2)) increased 3 and 2 times after Fe and Cu overloads, with half maximal responses (C50) of 38 μg of Fe per g of brain and 15 μg of Cu per g of brain, and with half time responses (t1/2) of 12 h for Fe and 20 h for Cu. Phospholipid peroxidation increased by 56% and 31% with C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 20 μg of Cu per g and with t1/2 of 9 h and 14 h. Protein oxidation increased by 45% for Fe with a C50 of 40 μg of Fe per g and 18% for Cu with a C50 of 10 μg of Cu per g and a t1/2 of 12 h for both metals. Fe and Cu brain toxicities are likely mediated by Haber-Weiss type HO˙ formation with subsequent oxidative damage.

  7. CREB phosphorylation regulates striatal transcriptional responses in the self-administration model of methamphetamine addiction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Krasnova, Irina N; Chiflikyan, Margarit; Justinova, Zuzana; McCoy, Michael T; Ladenheim, Bruce; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; Quintero, Cynthia; Brannock, Christie; Barnes, Chanel; Adair, Jordan E; Lehrmann, Elin; Kobeissy, Firas H; Gold, Mark S; Becker, Kevin G; Goldberg, Steven R; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2013-10-01

    Neuroplastic changes in the dorsal striatum participate in the transition from casual to habitual drug use and might play a critical role in the development of methamphetamine (METH) addiction. We examined the influence of METH self-administration on gene and protein expression that may form substrates for METH-induced neuronal plasticity in the dorsal striatum. Male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered METH (0.1mg/kg/injection, i.v.) or received yoked saline infusions during eight 15-h sessions and were euthanized 2h, 24h, or 1month after cessation of METH exposure. Changes in gene and protein expression were assessed using microarray analysis, RT-PCR and Western blots. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by PCR was used to examine epigenetic regulation of METH-induced transcription. METH self-administration caused increases in mRNA expression of the transcription factors, c-fos and fosb, the neurotrophic factor, Bdnf, and the synaptic protein, synaptophysin (Syp) in the dorsal striatum. METH also caused changes in ΔFosB, BDNF and TrkB protein levels, with increases after 2 and 24h, but decreases after 1month of drug abstinence. Importantly, ChIP-PCR showed that METH self-administration caused enrichment of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), but not of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3), on promoters of c-fos, fosb, Bdnf and Syp at 2h after cessation of drug intake. These findings show that METH-induced changes in gene expression are mediated, in part, by pCREB-dependent epigenetic phenomena. Thus, METH self-administration might trigger epigenetic changes that mediate alterations in expression of genes and proteins serving as substrates for addiction-related synaptic plasticity.

  8. Striatal mRNA expression patterns underlying peak dose L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in the 6-OHDA hemiparkinsonian rat.

    PubMed

    Smith, L M; Parr-Brownlie, L C; Duncan, E J; Black, M A; Gemmell, N J; Dearden, P K; Reynolds, J N J

    2016-06-02

    L-DOPA is the primary pharmacological treatment for relief of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). With prolonged treatment (⩾5 years) the majority of patients will develop abnormal involuntary movements as a result of L-DOPA treatment, known as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of dyskinesia is a crucial step toward developing treatments for this debilitating side effect. We used the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD treated with a three-week dosing regimen of L-DOPA plus the dopa decarboxylase inhibitor benserazide (4 mg/kg and 7.5 mg/kgs.c., respectively) to induce dyskinesia in 50% of individuals. We then used RNA-seq to investigate the differences in mRNA expression in the striatum of dyskinetic animals, non-dyskinetic animals, and untreated parkinsonian controls at the peak of dyskinesia expression, 60 min after L-DOPA administration. Overall, 255 genes were differentially expressed; with significant differences in mRNA expression observed between all three groups. In dyskinetic animals 129 genes were more highly expressed and 14 less highly expressed when compared with non-dyskinetic and untreated parkinsonian controls. In L-DOPA treated animals 42 genes were more highly expressed and 95 less highly expressed when compared with untreated parkinsonian controls. Gene set cluster analysis revealed an increase in expression of genes associated with the cytoskeleton and phosphoproteins in dyskinetic animals compared with non-dyskinetic animals, which is consistent with recent studies documenting an increase in synapses in dyskinetic animals. These genes may be potential targets for drugs to ameliorate L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia or as an adjunct treatment to prevent their occurrence.

  9. Ontogenetic development of the striatal [3H]spiperone binding: regulation by sodium and guanine nucleotide in rats.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Oki, K; Segawa, T

    1982-04-01

    Ontogenetic development of specific [3H]spiperone binding to crude synaptic membranes and its regulation by Na+ and GTP was investigated in the rat striatum. (d)-Butaclamol more effectively inhibited [3H]spiperone binding than (l)-butaclamol. The ratio of inhibitory activity of (d)- and (l)-butaclamol for [3H]spiperone binding was not different between 1-, 7-, and 70-day-old animals but eight- to ninefold lower at 18 days of gestation than during the postnatal period. A Scatchard plot of specific binding indicated the presence of two types of binding: low-affinity (KD = 1.51 nM) and high-affinity (KD = 0.09 nM) binding on day 70. Only one component (KD = 0.075 nM) was observed on days 1 and 7 and both types of binding were found on day 15. Bmax gradually increased with age and reached a peak on day 30, followed by a decline on days 70 and 360. Na+, 100 mM, significantly increased specific binding on days 1, 7, 15, and 70. GTP, 50 microM, completely reversed the Na+-induced decrease in IC50 of apomorphine on both days 15 and 70, but not on day 7. It is suggested that receptors could recognize ligand stereospecificity on day 1. The density in dopamine receptors in the striatum reaches a peak on day 30, followed by a decrease on days 70 and 360. In addition, regulation by Na+ and GTP in agonist binding to dopamine receptors seems to become functional between 1 and 2 weeks after birth.

  10. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  11. Demonstration of endogenous imipramine like material in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rehavi, M.; Ventura, I.; Sarne, Y.

    1985-02-18

    The extraction and partial purification of an endogenous imipramine-like material from rat brain is described. The endogenous factor obtained after gel filtration and silica chromatography inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine specific binding and mimics the inhibitory effect of imipramine on (/sup 3/H) serotonin uptake in both brain and platelet preparations. The effects of the endogenous material are dose-dependent and it inhibits (/sup 3/H) imipramine binding in a competitive fashion. The factor is unevenly distributed in the brain with high concentration in the hypothalamus and low concentration in the cerebellum.

  12. Intraneuronal accumulation and persistence of radiolabel in rat brain following in vivo administration of [3H]-chlorisondamine.

    PubMed Central

    el-Bizri, H.; Rigdon, M. G.; Clarke, P. B.

    1995-01-01

    1. Chlorisondamine (CHL), a bisquaternary amine, produces a remarkably long-lasting blockade of central responses to nicotine. The mechanism underlying this blockade is not known. The main aim of this study was to test for possible accumulation of [3H]-CHL in rat brain during the period of chronic blockade. 2. Rats received CHL, either systemically (10 mg kg-1) or centrally (10 micrograms i.c.v.). Seven days later, striatal synaptosomes prepared from these animals were tested for nicotine-induced [3H]-dopamine release. This experiment showed that i.c.v. administration of CHL was as effective as systemic administration in producing ex vivo blockade of central nicotinic receptors. 3. Rats received bilateral i.c.v. infusions of [3H]-CHL (10 micrograms) and radioactivity was subsequently quantified in dissected cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, midbrain and cerebellum. Radiolabel was detected at all three survival times (1, 7, and 21 days). Regional heterogeneity was apparent at 7 and 21 days survival. Radiolabel was almost exclusively confined to the insoluble subcellular fraction in all areas sampled. 4. The anatomical distribution of radiolabel was also visualized in brain sections. Rats received bilateral i.c.v. infusions of [3H]-CHL (10 micrograms) and were killed at 1, 7, 21 or 84 days. Immediately before they were killed, all rats were tested behaviourally, and central nicotinic blockade was demonstrated at 1, 7 and 21 days; partial recovery was observed at 84 days. Particularly at longer survival times, tritium was found to be heavily concentrated in the substantia nigra pars compacta, ventral tegmental area, dorsal raphé nucleus, and the granular layer of the cerebellum. 5. The possibility of retrograde axonal transport of radiolabel was then examined. Rats received a unilateral intrastriatal infusion of [3H]-CHL (0.34 or 0.034 micrograms) one week before they were killed. Autoradiographic labelling was largely confined to the site of infusion and to

  13. Antioxidant-Rich Fraction of Urtica dioica Mediated Rescue of Striatal Mito-Oxidative Damage in MPTP-Induced Behavioral, Cellular, and Neurochemical Alterations in Rats.

    PubMed

    Bisht, Rohit; Joshi, Bhuwan Chandra; Kalia, Ajudhiya Nath; Prakash, Atish

    2016-09-13

    Parkinson's disease (PD) having a complex and multi-factorial neuropathology includes mainly the degeneration of the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway, which is a cumulative effect of depleted endogenous antioxidant enzymes, increased oxidative DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, and neuroinflammation. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect of a potent antioxidant from Urtica dioica in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) model of parkinsonism. MPTP was administered intranigrally for the induction of PD in male Wistar rats. Behavioral alterations were assessed in between the study period. Animals were sacrificed immediately after behavioral session, and different biochemical, cellular, and neurochemical parameters were measured. Intranigrally repeated administration of MPTP showed significant impairment of motor co-ordination and marked increase of mito-oxidative damage and neuroinflammation in rats. Intranigral MPTP significantly decreases the dopamine and its metabolites with impairment of dopaminergic cell density in rat brain. However, post-treatment with the potent antioxidant fraction of Urtica dioica Linn. (UD) (20, 40, 80 mg/kg) improved the motor function, mito-oxidative defense alteration significantly and dose dependently in MPTP-treated rats. In addition, the potent antioxidant fraction of UD attenuated the pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-β) and restored the level of dopamine and its metabolites in MPTP-induced PD in rats. Moreover, minocycline (30 mg/kg) with lower dose of UD (20 mg/kg) had significantly potentiated the protective effect of minocycline as compared to its effect with other individual drug-treated groups. In conclusion, Urtica dioica protected the dopaminergic neurons probably by reducing mito-oxidative damage, neuroinflammation, and cellular alteration along with enhanced neurotrophic potential. The above results revealed that the antioxidant rich

  14. Waxholm Space atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain.

    PubMed

    Papp, Eszter A; Leergaard, Trygve B; Calabrese, Evan; Johnson, G Allan; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2014-08-15

    Three-dimensional digital brain atlases represent an important new generation of neuroinformatics tools for understanding complex brain anatomy, assigning location to experimental data, and planning of experiments. We have acquired a microscopic resolution isotropic MRI and DTI atlasing template for the Sprague Dawley rat brain with 39 μm isotropic voxels for the MRI volume and 78 μm isotropic voxels for the DTI. Building on this template, we have delineated 76 major anatomical structures in the brain. Delineation criteria are provided for each structure. We have applied a spatial reference system based on internal brain landmarks according to the Waxholm Space standard, previously developed for the mouse brain, and furthermore connected this spatial reference system to the widely used stereotaxic coordinate system by identifying cranial sutures and related stereotaxic landmarks in the template using contrast given by the active staining technique applied to the tissue. With the release of the present atlasing template and anatomical delineations, we provide a new tool for spatial orientation analysis of neuroanatomical location, and planning and guidance of experimental procedures in the rat brain. The use of Waxholm Space and related infrastructures will connect the atlas to interoperable resources and services for multi-level data integration and analysis across reference spaces.

  15. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) is an environmentally persistent chemical that has been detected in humans and wildlife. PFOS is primarily distributed in liver and blood. The current study evaluated the level of PFOS in the adult and neonatal rat brain and determined whether t...

  16. Experimental induction of corpora amylacea in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Schipper, H M

    1998-10-01

    Corpora amylacea (CA) are glycoproteinaceous inclusions that accumulate in astroglia and other brain cells as a function of advancing age and, to an even greater extent, in several human neurodegenerative conditions. The mechanisms responsible for their biogenesis and their subcellular origin(s) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that the sulfhydryl agent, cysteamine (CSH), promotes the accumulation of CA-like inclusions in cultured rat astroglia. In the present study, we show that subcutaneous administration of CSH to adult rats (150 mg/kg for 6 weeks followed by a 5-week drug-washout period) elicits the accumulation of CA in many cortical and subcortical brain regions. As in the aging human brain and in CSH-treated rat astrocyte cultures, the inclusions are periodic acid-Schiff -positive and are consistently immunostained with antibodies directed against mitochondrial epitopes and ubiquitin. Our findings support our contention that mitochondria are important structural precursors of CA, and that CSH accelerates aging-like processes in rat astroglia both in vitro and in the intact brain.

  17. Thyroid insufficiency in developing rat brain: A genomic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency in the Developing Rat Brain: A Genomic Analysis. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption (ED) is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Severe deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels have bee...

  18. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  19. Intrinsic excitability varies by sex in prepubertal striatal medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dorris, David M.; Cao, Jinyan; Willett, Jaime A.; Hauser, Caitlin A.

    2014-01-01

    Sex differences in neuron electrophysiological properties were traditionally associated with brain regions directly involved in reproduction in adult, postpubertal animals. There is growing acknowledgement that sex differences can exist in other developmental periods and brain regions as well. This includes the dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen), which shows robust sex differences in gene expression, neuromodulator action (including dopamine and 17β-estradiol), and relevant sensorimotor behaviors and pathologies such as the responsiveness to drugs of abuse. Here we examine whether these sex differences extend to striatal neuron electrophysiology. We test the hypothesis that passive and active medium spiny neuron (MSN) electrophysiological properties in prepubertal rat dorsal striatum differ by sex. We made whole cell recordings from male and females MSNs from acute brain slices. The slope of the evoked firing rate to current injection curve was increased in MSNs recorded from females compared with males. The initial action potential firing rate was increased in MSNs recorded from females compared with males. Action potential after-hyperpolarization peak was decreased, and threshold was hyperpolarized in MSNs recorded from females compared with males. No sex differences in passive electrophysiological properties or miniature excitatory synaptic currents were detected. These findings indicate that MSN excitability is increased in prepubertal females compared with males, providing a new mechanism that potentially contributes to generating sex differences in striatal-mediated processes. Broadly, these findings demonstrate that sex differences in neuron electrophysiological properties can exist prepuberty in brain regions not directly related to reproduction. PMID:25376786

  20. Striatal degeneration in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Erdohazi, M; Marshall, P

    1979-01-01

    The clinical features, and the radiological and neuropathological findings of 3 unrelated children with striatal degeneration are presented. In one case the father had recently developed choreiform movements while in the other two the family history was negative for neurological disorders. Two patients had juvenile onset of psychiatric symptoms, seizures, and rigidity. The 3rd child presented with focal seizures at 9 weeks of age. The neuropathological findings are virtually identical in all 3 cases. The classification of striatal degeneration in childhood is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:434899

  1. FACS purification of immunolabeled cell types from adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Guez-Barber, Danielle; Fanous, Sanya; Harvey, Brandon K; Zhang, Yongqing; Lehrmann, Elin; Becker, Kevin G; Picciotto, Marina R; Hope, Bruce T

    2012-01-15

    Molecular analysis of brain tissue is greatly complicated by having many different classes of neurons and glia interspersed throughout the brain. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) has been used to purify selected cell types from brain tissue. However, its use has been limited to brain tissue from embryos or transgenic mice with promoter-driven reporter genes. To overcome these limitations, we developed a FACS procedure for dissociating intact cell bodies from adult wild-type rat brains and sorting them using commercially available antibodies against intracellular and extracellular proteins. As an example, we isolated neurons using a NeuN antibody and confirmed their identity using microarray and real time PCR of mRNA from the sorted cells. Our FACS procedure allows rapid, high-throughput, quantitative assays of molecular alterations in identified cell types with widespread applications in neuroscience.

  2. Prenatal ethanol exposure increases brain cholesterol content in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Wold, Loren E; Ren, Jun; Murphy, Eric J

    2013-11-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most severe expression of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Although alterations in fetal and neonate brain fatty acid composition and cholesterol content are known to occur in animal models of FASD, the persistence of these alterations into adulthood is unknown. To address this question, we determined the effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on individual phospholipid class fatty acid composition, individual phospholipid class mass, and cholesterol mass in brains from 25-week-old rats that were exposed to ethanol during gestation beginning at gestational day 2. While total phospholipid mass was unaffected, phosphatidylinositol and cardiolipin mass was decreased 14 and 43 %, respectively. Exposure to prenatal ethanol modestly altered brain phospholipid fatty acid composition, and the most consistent change was a significant 1.1-fold increase in total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), in the n-3/n-6 ratio, and in the 22:6n-3 content in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and in phosphatidylserine. In contrast, prenatal ethanol consumption significantly increased brain cholesterol mass 1.4-fold and the phospholipid to cholesterol ratio was significantly increased 1.3-fold. These results indicate that brain cholesterol mass was significantly increased in adult rats exposed prenatally to ethanol, but changes in phospholipid mass and phospholipid fatty acid composition were extremely limited. Importantly, suppression of postnatal ethanol consumption was not sufficient to reverse the large increase in cholesterol observed in the adult rats.

  3. Perinatal manganese exposure and hydroxyl radical formation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bałasz, Michał; Szkilnik, Ryszard; Brus, Ryszard; Malinowska-Borowska, Jolanta; Kasperczyk, Sławomir; Nowak, Damian; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Nowak, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of pre- and postnatal manganese (Mn) exposure on hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) formation in the brains of dopamine (DA) partially denervated rats (Parkinsonian rats). Wistar rats were given tap water containing 10,000 ppm manganese chloride during the duration of pregnancy and until the time of weaning. Control rat dams consumed tap water without added Mn. Three days after birth, rats of both groups were treated with 6-hydroxydopamine at one of three doses (15, 30, or 67 µg, intraventricular on each side), or saline vehicle. We found that Mn content in the brain, kidney, liver, and bone was significantly elevated in dams exposed to Mn during pregnancy. In neonates, the major organs that accumulated Mn were the femoral bone and liver. However, Mn was not elevated in tissues in adulthood. To determine the possible effect on generation of the reactive species, HO(•) in Mn-induced neurotoxicity, we analyzed the contents of 2.3- and 2.5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (spin trap products of salicylate; HO(•) being an index of in vivo HO(•) generation), as well as antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoenzymes and glutathione S-transferase (GST). 6-OHDA-depletion of DA produced enhanced HO(•) formation in the brain tissue of newborn and adulthood rats that had been exposed to Mn, and the latter effect did not depend on the extent of DA denervation. Additionally, the extraneuronal, microdialysate, content of HO(•) in neostriatum was likewise elevated in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Interestingly, there was no difference in extraneuronal HO(•) formation in the neostriatum of Mn-exposed versus control rats. In summary, findings in this study indicate that Mn crosses the placenta but in contrast to other heavy metals, Mn is not deposited long term in tissues. Also, damage to the dopaminergic system acts as a "trigger mechanism," initiating a cascade of adverse events leading to a protracted increase in

  4. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Brain Serotonergic Neurons of Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tews, Björn; Bartsch, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP), in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system. PMID:22140568

  5. Anesthesia-induced neurodegeneration in fetal rat brains

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shouping; Peretich, Kelly; Zhao, Yifan; Liang, Ge; Meng, Qingcheng; Wei, Huafeng

    2011-01-01

    Summary We investigated the extent of isoflurane induced neurodegeneration on the fetuses of pregnant rats exposed in utero. Pregnant rats at gestational day 21 were divided into three experimental groups. Rats in the control group spontaneously breathed 100% oxygen for one hour. Rats in the treatment groups breathed either 1.3% or 3% isoflurane in 100% oxygen through an endotracheal tube with mechanical ventilation for one hour. Rat pups were delivered by Caesarian section six hours after treatment and fetal blood was sampled from the left ventricle of each fetal heart and evaluated for S100β. Fetal brains were then evaluated for apoptosis using caspase-3 immunohistochemistry in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and the retrosplenial cortex (RS). The 3% isoflurane treatment group showed significantly higher levels of S100β levels and significantly increased average densities of total caspase-3 positive cells in the CA1 hippocampus and RS cortex as compared to the control and 1.3% isoflurane groups. There were no differences in S100β levels or densities of caspase-3 positive cells between the control and 1.3% isoflurane groups. Isoflurane at a concentration of 3% for one hour increased neurodegeneration in the hippocampal CA1 area and the retrosplenial cortex in the developing brain of fetal rats. PMID:20016413

  6. Pharmacological modulation of blood-brain barrier increases permeability of doxorubicin into the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Iacopo; la Marca, Giancarlo; Cardellicchio, Stefania; Giunti, Laura; Malvagia, Sabrina; Genitori, Lorenzo; Massimino, Maura; de Martino, Maurizio; Giovannini, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    Our group recently demonstrated in a rat model that pretreatment with morphine facilitates doxorubicin delivery to the brain in the absence of signs of increased acute systemic toxicity. Morphine and other drugs such as dexamethasone or ondansetron seem to inhibit MDR proteins localized on blood-brain barrier, neurons and glial cells increasing the access of doxorubicin to the brain by efflux transporters competition. We explored the feasibility of active modification of the blood-brain barrier protection, by using morphine dexamethasone or ondansetron pretreatment, to allow doxorubicin accumulation into the brain in a rodent model. Rats were pretreated with morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) or ondansetron (2 mg/kg, i.p.) before injection of doxorubicin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Quantitative analysis of doxorubicin was performed by mass spectrometry. Acute hearth and kidney damage was analyzed by measuring doxorubicin accumulation, LDH activity and malondialdehyde plasma levels. The concentration of doxorubicin was significantly higher in all brain areas of rats pretreated with morphine (P < 0.001) or ondansetron (P < 0.05) than in control tissues. The concentration of doxorubicin was significantly higher in cerebral hemispheres and brainstem (P < 0.05) but not in cerebellum of rats pretreated with dexamethasone than in control tissues. Pretreatment with any of these drugs did not increase LDH activity or lipid peroxidation compared to controls. Our data suggest that morphine, dexamethasone or ondansetron pretreatment is able to allow doxorubicin penetration inside the brain by modulating the BBB. This effect is not associated with acute cardiac or renal toxicity. This finding might provide the rationale for clinical applications in the treatment of refractory brain tumors and pave the way to novel applications of active but currently inapplicable chemotherapeutic drugs.

  7. Reward cues in space: commonalities and differences in neural coding by hippocampal and ventral striatal ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Lansink, Carien S.; Jackson, Jadin; Lankelma, Jan V.; Ito, Rutsuko; Robbins, Trevor W.; Everitt, Barry J.; Pennartz, Cyriel M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Forming place-reward associations critically depends on the integrity of the hippocampal-ventral striatal system. The ventral striatum receives a strong hippocampal input conveying spatial-contextual information, but it is unclear how this structure integrates this information to invigorate reward-directed behavior. Neuronal ensembles in rat hippocampus and ventral striatum were simultaneously recorded during a conditioning task in which navigation depended on path integration. In contrast to hippocampus, ventral striatal neurons showed low spatial selectivity, but rather coded behavioral task phases towards reaching goal sites. Outcome-predicting cues induced a remapping of firing patterns in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in episodic memory. Ventral striatum remapped in conjunction with the hippocampus, indicating that remapping can take place in multiple brain regions engaged in the same task. Subsets of ventral striatal neurons showed a “flip” from high activity when cue lights were illuminated to low activity in intertrial intervals, or vice versa. The cues induced an increase in spatial information transmission and sparsity in both structures. These effects were paralleled by an enhanced temporal specificity of ensemble coding and a more accurate reconstruction of the animal’s position from population firing patterns. Altogether, the results reveal strong differences in spatial processing between hippocampal area CA1 and ventral striatum, but indicate similarities in how discrete cues impact on this processing. PMID:22956836

  8. Age-dependence of malonate-induced striatal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, A; Page, K J; Everitt, B J; Dunnett, S B

    2000-10-01

    Malonate is an inhibitor of cellular metabolism, which, following intrastriatal injection, induces a striatal pathology similar to that seen in Huntington's disease. In two parallel studies, we have investigated the suggested relationship between the neuronal vulnerability to metabolic toxicity and the decline in metabolic function with increasing age. The first experiment investigated malonate-induced neuronal loss in animals aged from 6 weeks up to 27 months, and the second assessed the activities of two mitochondrial enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase (CYTOX) in animals aged 6 weeks, 3, 8 and 18 months. In the first study, male Lister-Hooded rats received intrastriatal stereotaxic injections of malonate (0.5 or 1.0 M). Animals were killed 10 days after surgery, and the brains were stained with cresyl violet and processed for NADPH-diaphorase activity and glial fibrillary-acidic-protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry. Animals aged 6 months and older exhibited over 60% striatal neuronal loss. However, the degree of neuronal loss did not show any age-related increase in rats between 6 and 27 months of age, indicating that the extent of malonate-induced toxicity does not increase with age in animals older than 6 months. Infusion of 0.5 M malonate produced smaller lesions, which also demonstrated a consistent extent of neuronal loss from 6 months onwards. Metabolic enzyme activities were decreased in the striatum with increasing age, although this effect was only significant for CYTOX activity. Thus, the pattern of malonate-induced neuronal loss in aged animals partially reflects the changes in metabolic activity during ageing.

  9. Rat umbilical cord blood cells attenuate hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Keiko; Sato, Yoshiaki; Mizutani, Yuka; Ito, Miharu; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Higashi, Yujiro

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that human umbilical cord blood cells (hUCBC) have a favorable effect on hypoxic–ischemic (HI) brain injury. However, the efficacy of using hUCBCs to treat this injury has been variable and the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we investigated its effectiveness using stereological analysis in an allogeneic system to examine whether intraperitoneal injection of cells derived from UCBCs of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats could ameliorate brain injury in neonatal rats. Three weeks after the HI event, the estimated residual brain volume was larger and motor function improved more in the cell-injected rats than in the control (PBS-treated) rats. The GFP-positive cells were hardly detectable in the brain (0.0057% of injected cells) 9 days after injection. Although 60% of GFP-positive cells in the brain were Iba1-positive, none of these were positive for NeuroD or DCX. While the number of proliferating cells increased in the hippocampus, that of activated microglia/macrophages decreased and a proportion of M2 microglia/macrophages increased in the ipsilateral hemisphere of cell-injected rats. These results suggest that intraperitoneal injection of cells derived from UCBCs could ameliorate HI injury, possibly through an endogenous response and not by supplying differentiated neurons derived from the injected stem cells. PMID:28281676

  10. Effects of environmental tobacco smoke on adult rat brain biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Brian F; Gold, Mark S; Wang, Kevin K W; Ottens, Andrew K

    2010-05-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) has been linked to deleterious health effects, particularly pulmonary and cardiac disease; yet, the general public considers ETS benign to brain function in adults. In contrast, epidemiological data have suggested that ETS impacts the brain and potentially modulates neurodegenerative disease. The present study begins to examine yet unknown biochemical effects of ETS on the adult mammalian brain. In the developed animal model, adult male rats were exposed to ETS 3 h a day for 3 weeks. Biochemical data showed altered glial fibrillary acid protein levels as a main treatment effect of ETS, suggestive of reactive astrogliosis. Yet, markers of oxidative and cell stress were unaffected by ETS exposure in the brain regions examined. Increased proteolytic degradation of alphaII-spectrin by caspase-3 and the dephosphorylation of serine(116) on PEA-15 indicated greater apoptotic cell death modulated by the extrinsic pathway in the brains of ETS-exposed animals. Further, beta-synuclein was upregulated by ETS, a neuroprotective protein previously reported to exhibit anti-apoptotic and anti-fibrillogenic properties. These findings demonstrate that ETS exposure alters the neuroproteome of the adult rat brain, and suggest modulation of inflammatory and cell death processes.

  11. Rapamycin suppresses brain aging in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats.

    PubMed

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Vitovtov, Anton O; Muraleva, Natalia A; Akulov, Andrey E; Stefanova, Natalia A; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-06-01

    Cellular and organismal aging are driven in part by the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and rapamycin extends life span inC elegans, Drosophila and mice. Herein, we investigated effects of rapamycin on brain aging in OXYS rats. Previously we found, in OXYS rats, an early development of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to several geriatric disorders in humans, including cerebral dysfunctions. Behavioral alterations as well as learning and memory deficits develop by 3 months. Here we show that rapamycin treatment (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg as a food mixture daily from the age of 1.5 to 3.5 months) decreased anxiety and improved locomotor and exploratory behavior in OXYS rats. In untreated OXYS rats, MRI revealed an increase of the area of hippocampus, substantial hydrocephalus and 2-fold increased area of the lateral ventricles. Rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities, erasing the difference between OXYS and Wister rats (used as control). All untreated OXYS rats showed signs of neurodegeneration, manifested by loci of demyelination. Rapamycin decreased the percentage of animals with demyelination and the number of loci. Levels of Tau and phospho-Tau (T181) were increased in OXYS rats (compared with Wistar). Rapamycin significantly decreased Tau and inhibited its phosphorylation in the hippocampus of OXYS and Wistar rats. Importantly, rapamycin treatment caused a compensatory increase in levels of S6 and correspondingly levels of phospo-S6 in the frontal cortex, indicating that some downstream events were compensatory preserved, explaining the lack of toxicity. We conclude that rapamycin in low chronic doses can suppress brain aging.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging as a tool to image neuroinflammation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease--phagocyte influx to the brain is promoted by bilberry-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Virel, Ana; Rehnmark, Anna; Orädd, Greger; Olmedo-Díaz, Sonia; Faergemann, Erik; Strömberg, Ingrid

    2015-11-01

    Neuroinflammation is a chronic event in neurodegenerative disorders. In the rat model of Parkinson's disease, including a striatal injection of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), antioxidant treatment affects the inflammatory process. Despite a heavy accumulation of microglia early after the injury, dopamine nerve fibre regeneration occurs. It remains unclear why this heavy accumulation of microglia is found early after the lesion in antioxidant-treated animals, or even more, what is the origin of these microglia. In this study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to elucidate whether the inflammatory response was generated from the blood or from activated brain microglia. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were injected intravenously prior to a striatal 6-OHDA injection to tag phagocytes in the blood. Rats were fed either with bilberry-enriched or control diet. T2*-weighted MRI scans were performed 1 week after the lesion, and hypointense areas were calculated from T2*-weighted images, to monitor the presence of SPIO particles. The results revealed that feeding the animals with bilberries significantly promoted accumulation of blood-derived immune cells. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI demonstrated no difference in leakage of the blood-brain barrier independent of diets. To conclude, bilberry-enriched diet promotes an influx of periphery-derived immune cells to the brain early after injury.

  13. Alterations of amino Acid level in depressed rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei; Li, Xuechun; Ni, Jian; Tian, Jingchen; Jing, Fu; Qu, Changhai; Lin, Longfei; Zhang, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Amino-acid neurotransmitter system dysfunction plays a major role in the pathophysiology of depression. Several studies have demonstrated the potential of amino acids as a source of neuro-specific biomarkers could be used in future diagnosis of depression. Only partial amino acids such as glycine and asparagine were determined from certain parts of rats' brain included hippocampi and cerebral cortex in previous studies. However, according to systematic biology, amino acids in different area of brain are interacted and interrelated. Hence, the determination of 34 amino acids through entire rats' brain was conducted in this study in order to demonstrate more possibilities for biomarkers of depression by discovering other potential amino acids in more areas of rats' brain. As a result, 4 amino acids (L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine and γ-amino-n-butyric acid) among 34 were typically identified as potentially primary biomarkers of depression by data statistics. Meanwhile, an antidepressant called Fluoxetine was employed to verify other potential amino acids which were not identified by data statistics. Eventually, we found L-α-amino-adipic acid could also become a new potentially secondary biomarker of depression after drug validation. In conclusion, we suggested that L-aspartic acid, L-glutamine, taurine, γ-amino-n-butyric acid and L-α-amino-adipic acid might become potential biomarkers for future diagnosis of depression and development of antidepressant.

  14. Human and rat brain lipofuscin proteome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of an autofluorescent pigment called lipofuscin in neurons is an invariable hallmark of brain aging. So far, this material has been considered to be waste material without particular relevance for cellular pathology. However, two lines of evidence argue that lipofuscin may have yet ...

  15. Alcohol induced changes in phosphoinositide signaling system in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S.; Piano, M.; Schwertz, D.; Davis, J.; Pandey, G. )

    1991-03-11

    Agonist-induced phosphoinositide break down functions as a signal generating system in a manner similar to the C-AMP system. In order to examine if the changes produced by chronic ethanol treatment on membrane lipid composition and metabolism effect the cellular functions of the neuron, the authors have examined the effect of chronic ethanol exposure on norepinephrine (NE) serotonin (5HT) and calcium ionophore (CI) stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat cortical slices. Rats were maintained on liber-decarli diet alcohol and control liquid diet containing isocaloric sucrose substitute for two months. They were then sacrificed and brain was removed for determination of PI turnover. 5HT stimulated {sup 3}H- inositol monophosphate ({sup 3}H-IPI) formation was significantly lower in the cortex of alcohol treated rats as compared to control rats. However, neither CI nor NE stimulated IP1 formation was significantly different from control rats. The results thus indicate that chronic exposure to ethanol decreases 5HT induced PI breakdown in rat cortex. In order to examine if this decrease is related to a decrease in 5HT2 receptors, or decreased in coupling of receptor to the effector pathway, the authors are currently determining the number and affinity of 5HT2 receptors in alcohol treated rats.

  16. Regional development of glutamate dehydrogenase in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Leong, S F; Clark, J B

    1984-07-01

    The development of glutamate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in rat brain regions has been followed from the late foetal stage to the adult and through to the aged (greater than 2 years) adult. In the adult brain the enzyme activity was greatest in the medulla oblongata and pons greater than midbrain = hypothalamus greater than cerebellum = striatum = cortex. In the aged adult brain, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in the medulla oblongata and pons when compared to the 90-day-old adult value, but not in other regions. The enzyme-specific activity of nonsynaptic (free) mitochondria purified from the medulla oblongata and pons of 90-day-old animals was about twice that of mitochondria purified from the striatum and the cortex. The specific activity of the enzyme in synaptic mitochondria purified from the above three brain regions, however, remained almost constant.

  17. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  18. Effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cano-Ramírez, D; Torres-Vargas, C E; Guerrero-Castillo, S; Uribe-Carvajal, S; Hernández-Pando, R; Pedraza-Chaverri, J; Orozco-Ibarra, M

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enhances the neural vulnerability to excitotoxicity both in vivo and in vitro through an unknown mechanism possibly related to mitochondrial failure. However, as the effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in brain has not been studied, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of glycolysis inhibition induced by iodoacetate on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in brain. Mitochondria were isolated from brain cortex, striatum and cerebellum of rats treated systemically with iodoacetate (25 mg/kg/day for 3 days). Oxygen consumption, ATP synthesis, transmembrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, lipoperoxidation, glutathione levels, and aconitase activity were assessed. Oxygen consumption and aconitase activity decreased in the brain cortex and striatum, showing that glycolysis inhibition did not trigger severe mitochondrial impairment, but a slight mitochondrial malfunction and oxidative stress were present.

  19. Determination of boron distribution in rat's brain, kidney and liver.

    PubMed

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Behnam; Zargar, Maysam

    2009-07-01

    To determine relative boron distribution in rat's brain, liver and kidney, a mixture of boric acid and borax, was used. After transcardial injection of the solution, the animals were sacrificed and the brain, kidney and liver were removed. The coronal sections of certain areas of the brain were prepared by freezing microtome. The slices were sandwiched within two pieces of CR-39. The samples were bombarded in a thermal neutron field of the TRR pneumatic facility. The alpha tracks are registered on CR-39 after being etched in NaOH. The boron distribution was determined by counting these alpha tracks CR-39 plastics. The distribution showed non-uniformity in brain, liver and kidney.

  20. Suppressed Fat Appetite after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Surgery Associates with Reduced Brain μ-opioid Receptor Availability in Diet-Induced Obese Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hankir, Mohammed K.; Patt, Marianne; Patt, Jörg T. W.; Becker, Georg A.; Rullmann, Michael; Kranz, Mathias; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Schischke, Kristin; Seyfried, Florian; Brust, Peter; Hesse, Swen; Sabri, Osama; Krügel, Ute; Fenske, Wiebke K.

    2017-01-01

    Brain μ-opioid receptors (MORs) stimulate high-fat (HF) feeding and have been implicated in the distinct long term outcomes on body weight of bariatric surgery and dieting. Whether alterations in fat appetite specifically following these disparate weight loss interventions relate to changes in brain MOR signaling is unknown. To address this issue, diet-induced obese male rats underwent either Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sham surgeries. Postoperatively, animals were placed on a two-choice diet consisting of low-fat (LF) and HF food and sham-operated rats were further split into ad libitum fed (Sham-LF/HF) and body weight-matched (Sham-BWM) to RYGB groups. An additional set of sham-operated rats always only on a LF diet (Sham-LF) served as lean controls, making four experimental groups in total. Corresponding to a stage of weight loss maintenance for RYGB rats, two-bottle fat preference tests in conjunction with small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies with the selective MOR radioligand [11C]carfentanil were performed. Brains were subsequently collected and MOR protein levels in the hypothalamus, striatum, prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex were analyzed by Western Blot. We found that only the RYGB group presented with intervention-specific changes: having markedly suppressed intake and preference for high concentration fat emulsions, a widespread reduction in [11C]carfentanil binding potential (reflecting MOR availability) in various brain regions, and a downregulation of striatal and prefrontal MOR protein levels compared to the remaining groups. These findings suggest that the suppressed fat appetite caused by RYGB surgery is due to reduced brain MOR signaling, which may contribute to sustained weight loss unlike the case for dieting. PMID:28133443

  1. Pituitary and brain D2 receptor density measured in vitro and in vivo in EEDQ treated male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ekman, A.; Eriksson, E. )

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the alkylating compound N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) on dopamine D2 receptor density in rat pituitary and brain was measured using in vitro and in vivo radioligand binding techniques. In the in vitro radioligand binding experiments EEDQ was found to reduce the density (B{sub max}) of ({sup 3}H)-spiperone binding sites in the striatum by 86% while in the pituitary the corresponding decrease was only 37%. The affinity (K{sub D}) of the remaining striatal and pituitary D2 receptors was not different in EEDQ treated animals as compared to controls. When D2 receptor density was measured in vivo the effect of EEDQ was less pronounced. Thus, in rats given EEDQ the specific binding of either of the two D2 ligands ({sup 3}H)-raclopride or ({sup 3}H)-spiperone in striatum and in the limbic forebrain was reduced by 45-62%; moreover, no significant decrease in pituitary D2 receptor density was observed. The data are discussed in relation to the finding that the same dose of EEDQ that failed to influence pituitary D2 receptor density as measured in vivo effectively antagonizes the prolactin decreasing effect of the partial D2 agonist (-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-n-propyl-piperidine ((-)-3-PPP).

  2. Excitotoxic damage, disrupted energy metabolism, and oxidative stress in the rat brain: antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Herrera-Mundo, María Nieves; Mendoza-Macedo, Karina; Villeda-Hernández, Juana; Binienda, Zbigniew; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2008-05-01

    Excitotoxicity and disrupted energy metabolism are major events leading to nerve cell death in neurodegenerative disorders. These cooperative pathways share one common aspect: triggering of oxidative stress by free radical formation. In this work, we evaluated the effects of the antioxidant and energy precursor, levocarnitine (L-CAR), on the oxidative damage and the behavioral, morphological, and neurochemical alterations produced in nerve tissue by the excitotoxin and free radical precursor, quinolinic acid (2,3-pyrindin dicarboxylic acid; QUIN), and the mitochondrial toxin, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). Oxidative damage was assessed by the estimation of reactive oxygen species formation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in synaptosomal fractions. Behavioral, morphological, and neurochemical alterations were evaluated as markers of neurotoxicity in animals systemically administered with L-CAR, chronically injected with 3-NP and/or intrastriatally infused with QUIN. At micromolar concentrations, L-CAR reduced the three markers of oxidative stress stimulated by both toxins alone or in combination. L-CAR also prevented the rotation behavior evoked by QUIN and the hypokinetic pattern induced by 3-NP in rats. Morphological alterations produced by both toxins (increased striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactivity for QUIN and enhanced neuronal damage in different brain regions for 3-NP) were reduced by L-CAR. In addition, L-CAR prevented the synergistic action of 3-NP and QUIN to increase motor asymmetry and depleted striatal GABA levels. Our results suggest that the protective properties of L-CAR in the neurotoxic models tested are mostly mediated by its characteristics as an antioxidant agent.

  3. The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate: A mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate in the striatum has become the highlight of several theories of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia. Using in vivo brain imaging in humans, alterations in dopamine and glutamate concentrations have been observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear a priori how alterations in striatal dopamine should modulate glutamate concentrations in the basal ganglia. In this selective mini-review, we examine the consequence of reducing striatal dopamine functioning on glutamate concentrations in the striatum and cortex; regions of interest heavily examined in the human brain imaging studies. We examine the predictions of the classical model of the basal ganglia, and contrast it with findings in humans and animals. The review concludes that chronic dopamine depletion (>4 months) produces decreases in striatal glutamate levels which are consistent with the classical model of the basal ganglia. However, acute alterations in striatal dopamine functioning, specifically at the D2 receptors, may produce opposite affects. This has important implications for models of the basal ganglia and theorizing about neurochemical alterations in neuropsychiatric diseases. Moreover, these findings may help guide a priori hypotheses for 1H-MRS studies measuring glutamate changes given alterations in dopaminergic functioning in humans. PMID:26334687

  4. Differential expression of sirtuins in the aging rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Braidy, Nady; Poljak, Anne; Grant, Ross; Jayasena, Tharusha; Mansour, Hussein; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; Smythe, George; Sachdev, Perminder; Guillemin, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Although there are seven mammalian sirtuins (SIRT1-7), little is known about their expression in the aging brain. To characterize the change(s) in mRNA and protein expression of SIRT1-7 and their associated proteins in the brain of “physiologically” aged Wistar rats. We tested mRNA and protein expression levels of rat SIRT1-7, and the levels of associated proteins in the brain using RT-PCR and western blotting. Our data shows that SIRT1 expression increases with age, concurrently with increased acetylated p53 levels in all brain regions investigated. SIRT2 and FOXO3a protein levels increased only in the occipital lobe. SIRT3-5 expression declined significantly in the hippocampus and frontal lobe, associated with increases in superoxide and fatty acid oxidation levels, and acetylated CPS-1 protein expression, and a reduction in MnSOD level. While SIRT6 expression declines significantly with age acetylated H3K9 protein expression is increased throughout the brain. SIRT7 and Pol I protein expression increased in the frontal lobe. This study identifies previously unknown roles for sirtuins in regulating cellular homeostasis and healthy aging. PMID:26005404

  5. Rat brains also have a default mode network

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hanbing; Zou, Qihong; Gu, Hong; Raichle, Marcus E.; Stein, Elliot A.; Yang, Yihong

    2012-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) in humans has been suggested to support a variety of cognitive functions and has been implicated in an array of neuropsychological disorders. However, its function(s) remains poorly understood. We show that rats possess a DMN that is broadly similar to the DMNs of nonhuman primates and humans. Our data suggest that, despite the distinct evolutionary paths between rodent and primate brain, a well-organized, intrinsically coherent DMN appears to be a fundamental feature in the mammalian brain whose primary functions might be to integrate multimodal sensory and affective information to guide behavior in anticipation of changing environmental contingencies. PMID:22355129

  6. HEPES prevents edema in rat brain slices.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, D G; Chesler, M; Rice, M E

    2001-05-11

    Brain slices gain water when maintained in bicarbonate-buffered artificial cerebro-spinal fluid (ACSF) at 35 degrees C. We previously showed that this edema is linked to glutamate receptor activation and oxidative stress. An additional factor that may contribute to swelling is acidosis, which arises from high CO2 tension in brain slices. To examine the role of acidosis in slice edema, we added N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) to osmotically balanced ACSF (HEPES-ACSF), thereby increasing buffering capacity beyond that provided by bicarbonate/CO2. Water gain was markedly inhibited in HEPES-ACSF. After 3 h incubation in HEPES-ACSF at 35 degrees C, water gain was limited to that of fresh slices after 1 h recovery in ACSF at room temperature. The effect of HEPES in decreasing slice water gain was concentration dependent from 0.3 to 20 mM. The inhibition of water gain by HEPES suggests that tissue acidosis is a contributing factor in brain slice edema.

  7. Dissection and culture of mouse dopaminergic and striatal explants in three-dimensional collagen matrix assays.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ewoud R E; Morello, Francesca; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2012-03-23

    Midbrain dopamine (mdDA) neurons project via the medial forebrain bundle towards several areas in the telencephalon, including the striatum(1). Reciprocally, medium spiny neurons in the striatum that give rise to the striatonigral (direct) pathway innervate the substantia nigra(2). The development of these axon tracts is dependent upon the combinatorial actions of a plethora of axon growth and guidance cues including molecules that are released by neurites or by (intermediate) target regions(3,4). These soluble factors can be studied in vitro by culturing mdDA and/or striatal explants in a collagen matrix which provides a three-dimensional substrate for the axons mimicking the extracellular environment. In addition, the collagen matrix allows for the formation of relatively stable gradients of proteins released by other explants or cells placed in the vicinity (e.g. see references 5 and 6). Here we describe methods for the purification of rat tail collagen, microdissection of dopaminergic and striatal explants, their culture in collagen gels and subsequent immunohistochemical and quantitative analysis. First, the brains of E14.5 mouse embryos are isolated and dopaminergic and striatal explants are microdissected. These explants are then (co)cultured in collagen gels on coverslips for 48 to 72 hours in vitro. Subsequently, axonal projections are visualized using neuronal markers (e.g. tyrosine hydroxylase, DARPP32, or βIII tubulin) and axon growth and attractive or repulsive axon responses are quantified. This neuronal preparation is a useful tool for in vitro studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of mesostriatal and striatonigral axon growth and guidance during development. Using this assay, it is also possible to assess other (intermediate) targets for dopaminergic and striatal axons or to test specific molecular cues.

  8. Cloning and expression of a rat brain GABA transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.; Czyzyk, L.; Davidson, N.; Lester, H.A. ); Nelson, N.; Nelson, H.; Miedel, M.C. ); Keynan, S.; Kanner, B.I. )

    1990-09-14

    A complementary DNA clone (designated GAT-1) encoding a transporter for the neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has been isolated from rat brain, and its functional properties have been examined in Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes injected with GAT-1 synthetic messenger RNA accumulated ({sup 3}H)GABA to levels above control values. The transporter encoded by GAT-1 has a high affinity for GABA, is sodium- and chloride-dependent, and is pharmacologically similar to neuronal GABA transporters. The GAT-1 protein shares antigenic determinants with a native rat brain GABA transporter. The nucleotide sequence of GAT-1 predicts a protein of 599 amino acids with a molecular weight of 67 kilodaltons. Hydropathy analysis of the deduced protein suggests multiple transmembrane regions, a feature shared by several cloned transporters; however, database searches indicate that GAT-1 is not homologous to any previously identified proteins. Therefore, GAT-1 appears to be a member of a previously uncharacterized family of transport molecules.

  9. Effect of long term amineptine treatment on pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, A.; Garattini, S.; Gobbi, M.; Mennini, T.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of amineptine and its two metabolites on monoamine uptake, release and receptor binding was studied in vitro. Amineptine and its two metabolites did not displace labelled ligands for known neurotransmitters and drug receptor sites. Amineptine and its two metabolites did not influence [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]-5-HT) uptake or release by rat brain synaptosomes. Amineptine inhibited [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA) accumulation, with IC50 values of 1.4 and 10 microM, respectively. The effect was retained, though with lower efficacy, by the two metabolites. Amineptine released [3H]-dopamine from preloaded synaptosomes. Metabolite 1 had no effect on catecholamine release, and metabolite 2 was about half as active as the parent compound on [3H]-dopamine release. The releasing effect of amineptine on [3H]-dopamine was potentiated by reserpine pretreatment, suggesting that the drug acts on the cytoplasmic neurotransmitter pool. Chronic treatment with amineptine (20 mg kg-1, twice daily for 15 days followed by a 3 days drug withdrawal period) resulted in a decrease of [3H]-spiperone binding sites in striatum, and of [3H]-dihyroalprenolol and [3H]-clonidine in cortex. Chronic treatment with amineptine reduced basal [3H]-dopamine accumulation in striatal synaptosomes, without affecting [3H]-NA or [3H]-5-HT accumulation. The adaptive changes in the pre- and postsynaptic dopamine mechanisms observed after long term treatment with amineptine are consistent with the drug acting as an indirect dopamine agonist. The down regulation of beta- and alpha 2-noradrenoceptors observed after long term amineptine treatment may play a role in the antidepressant activity of the drug. PMID:3708219

  10. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. I. Saturable sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; Goldberg, H.; Mccann, D.J.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Previous studies have identified a saturable site of d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine sequestration (AMSEQ) in rat brain synaptosomes. The present study characterized AMSEQ with respect to its subcellular, neuronal and regional distributions, ontogenetic development, pharmacological specificity and factors required for its maintenance. Although AMSEQ was reduced when assays were performed in Krebs' buffer incubated at 37{degree}C as compared to assays performed in isotonic Tris-sucrose buffer incubated at room temperature, the pharmacological profiles of AMSEQ were virtually identical under both conditions. AMSEQ was negligible in tissues outside the central nervous system, enriched in synaptosomes and partially reduced by striatal kainic acid lesion, indicating neuronal localization. The distribution of AMSEQ in the central nervous system was heterogenous. Highest levels were present in hypothalamus with progressively lower levels noted in parietal cortex, frontal cortex, striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum, pons-medulla and spinal cord. With regard to its ontogeny, AMSEQ increased early in neonatal life, reaching adult levels by postnatal day 14. Although the effects of amphetamine to abolish the transynaptosomal pH gradient suggest a possible role for this gradient in the maintenance of AMSEQ, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicates that other factors are involved. An interaction with an intrasynaptosomal acid, such as N-acetylaspartate, may account for AMSEQ maintenance. AMSEQ did not possess a stereospecific preference for either d-(IC50 = 177 microM) or I-amphetamine (IC50 = 173 microM). However, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicated structural specificity with antidepressants being relatively potent inhibitors. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Changes in the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3 in rat brain after exposure to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Kerdsan, Walailuk; Thanoi, Samur; Nudmamud-Thanoi, Sutisa

    2012-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an addictive psychostimulant, can induce glutamate release in several brain areas such as cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Excess glutamate is ordinarily removed from the synaptic cleft by glutamate transporters for maintaining homoeostasis. EAAT3, a subtype of glutamate transporter expressed mainly by neurons, is a major glutamate transporter in the hippocampus and cortex. Therefore, this study examined the effects of acute and sub-acute METH administration on the expression of the EAAT3 in the hippocampal formation, striatum and frontal cortex. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received vehicle injections (i.p.) for 13 days followed by one injection of METH (8 mg/kg, i.p.) on day 14 in acute group. Animals received METH (4 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle for 14 days in sub-acute and control groups, respectively. EAAT3 immunoreactivity was determined by western blotting followed by measurement of the integrated optical density. A significant increase in EAAT3 was found in the hippocampal formation after sub-acute, but not acute, METH administration. Conversely, a significant decrease in EAAT3 in striatum was observed in both acute and sub-acute groups. A trend towards a decrease in EAAT3 was also found in frontal cortex in the sub-acute group. Our results of decreased EAAT3 in striatum and frontal cortex suggest deficits of cortico-striatal glutamatergic synapses after METH exposure. Increased EAAT3 expression in the hippocampus may be a compensatory response to possible deficits of glutamatergic neurotransmission induced by METH. Moreover, our findings provide further support for glutamatergic dysfunction with abnormalities involving a transporter important in the regulation of neuronal glutamate.

  12. Neuroprotection of Selective Brain Cooling After Penetrating Ballistic-like Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Guo; Lu, Xi-Chun M; Shear, Deborah A; Yang, Xiaofang; Tortella, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    Induced hypothermia has been reported to provide neuroprotection against traumatic brain injury. We recently developed a novel method of selective brain cooling (SBC) and demonstrated its safety and neuroprotection efficacy in a rat model of ischemic brain injury. The primary focus of the current study was to evaluate the potential neuroprotective efficacy of SBC in a rat model of penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) with a particular focus on the acute cerebral pathophysiology, neurofunction, and cognition. SBC (34°C) was induced immediately after PBBI, and maintained for 2 hours, followed by a spontaneous re-warming. Intracranial pressure (ICP) and regional cerebral blood flow were monitored continuously for 3 hours, and the ICP was measured again at 24 hours postinjury. Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier permeability, intracerebral hemorrhage, lesion size, and neurological status were assessed at 24 hours postinjury. Cognitive abilities were evaluated in a Morris water maze task at 12-16 days postinjury. Results showed that SBC significantly attenuated PBBI-induced elevation of ICP (PBBI = 33.2 ± 10.4; PBBI + SBC = 18.8 ± 6.7 mmHg) and reduced brain swelling, blood-brain barrier leakage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and lesion volume by 40%-45% for each matrix, and significantly improved neurologic function. However, these acute neuroprotective benefits of SBC did not translate into improved cognitive performance in the Morris water maze task. These results indicate that 34°C SBC is effective in protecting against acute brain damage and related neurological dysfunction. Further studies are required to establish the optimal treatment conditions (i.e., duration of cooling and/or combined therapeutic approaches) needed to achieve significant neurocognitive benefits.

  13. [Effect of phenibut on interhemispheric transmission in the rat brain].

    PubMed

    Borodkina, L E; Molodavkin, G M; Tiurenkov, I N

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the nootropic drug phenibut on the transcallosal potential amplitude in the sensomotor brain cortex have been studied in rats. It is established that a single administration of phenibut in a dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.) increases the transcallosal response amplitude, thus improving the interhemispheric transmission. This effect, being an objective evidence of the nootrope activity, confirms the drug status and corroborates the positive action of phenibut on the learning and memory processes.

  14. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor.

  15. Oxidative changes in brain of aniline-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kakkar, P.; Awasthi, S.; Viswanathan, P.N. )

    1992-10-01

    Oxidative stress in rat cerebellum, cortex and brain stem after a short-term high-dose exposure to aniline vapors under conditions akin to those after major chemical accidents, was studied. Significant increases in superoxide dismutase isozyme activities and formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive material along with depletion of ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl content suggest impairment of antioxidant defenses 24 h after single exposure to 15,302 ppm aniline vapors for 10 min.

  16. Multiple opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The characteristics of ..mu.., delta and kappa -opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were determined using the receptor binding assays. The ligands used were /sup 3/H-naltrexone (..mu..), /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC, kappa) and /sup 3/H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr (DSTLE, delta). Since EKC binds to ..mu.. and delta receptors in addition to kappa, the binding was done in the presence of 100 nM each of DAGO and DADLE to suppress ..mu.. and delta sites, respectively. All three ligands bound to brain membranes of WKY rats at a single high affinity site with the following B/sub max/ (fmol/mg protein) and K/sub d/ (nM) values: /sup 3/H-naltrexone (130.5; 0.43) /sup 3/H-EKC (19.8, 1.7) and /sup 3/H-DSTLE (139, 2.5). The binding of /sup 3/H-naltrexone and /sup 3/H-DSTLE in the brain of WKY and SH did not differ. A consistent increase (22%) in B/sub max/ of /sup 3/H-EKC was found in SHR compared to WKY rats. However, the K/sub d/ values did not differ. The increase in B/sub max/ was due to increases in hypothalamus and cortex. It is concluded that SH rats have higher density of kappa-opiate receptors, particularly in hypothalamus and cortex, compared to WKY rats, and that kappa-opiate receptors may be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  17. Gelation and fodrin purification from rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Péron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1986-06-03

    Extracts from rat brain tissue have been shown to give rise to a gel which exhibits the following features. It is mainly enriched in actin and in a high-molecular-weight protein with polypeptide chains of 235 and 240 kDa, which we identified as fodrin. Tubulin is also a major component of the gel but it appears to be trapped non-specifically during the gelation process. Gelation is pH-, ionic strength- and Ca2+-concentration-dependent, and is optimal under the conditions which promote the interaction between polymerized actin and fodrin. In a similar way to that described for the purification of rat brain actin (Levilliers, N., Péron-Renner, M., Coffe, G. and Pudles, J. (1984) Biochimie 66, 531-537), we used the gelation system as a selective means of recovering fodrin from the mixture of a low-ionic-strength extract from whole rat brain and a high-ionic-strength extract of the particulate fraction. From this gel, fodrin was purified with a good yield by a simple procedure involving gel dissociation in 0.5 M KCl and depolymerization in 0.7 M KI, Bio-Gel A-15m chromatography, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation.

  18. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  19. Brain oxidative stress induced by obstructive jaundice in rats.

    PubMed

    Chroni, Elisabeth; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Karageorgos, Nikolaos; Konstantinou, Dimitris; Georgiou, Christos

    2006-02-01

    The effect of experimental obstructive jaundice on the oxidative status of brain tissues in rats was examined. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: Group I was the control, group II was the sham operated, and groups III and IV were bile duct ligated and killed on the 5th and the 10th day, respectively. Oxidative stress was assessed by measuring the thiol redox state (protein and nonprotein components) and lipid peroxidation level variations in samples from the cerebral cortex, midbrain, and cerebellar tissue in all animals. Results indicated the presence of oxidative stress in the jaundiced animals that was more pronounced on the 10th day as indicated by a decrease in reduced glutathione and protein thiol and an increase in protein disulphide and lipid peroxidation. A dramatic elevation of the level of total nonprotein mixed disulphide level was found specifically in the midbrain in the 10th day group. This suggests an accumulation of nonprotein disulfides other than oxidized glutathione, which remained unchanged, in this particular brain area. This study showed a correlation between experimental obstructive jaundice and the oxidative stress in the rats' brain, implying that a similar pathogenetic mechanism may play a key role in cholestatic liver disease, resulting in hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  20. Intrinsic optical signals of brains in rats during loss of tissue viability: effect of brain temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2007-07-01

    Noninvasive, real-time monitoring of brain tissue viability is crucial for the patients with stroke, traumatic brain injury, etc. For this purpose, measurement of intrinsic optical signal (IOS) is attractive because it can provide direct information about the viability of brain tissue noninvasively. We performed simultaneous measurements of IOSs that are related to morphological characteristics, i.e., light scattering, and energy metabolism for rat brains during saline infusion as a model with temporal loss of brain tissue viability. The results showed that the scattering signal was steady in an initial phase but showed a drastic, triphasic change in a certain range of infusion time, during which the reduction of CuA in cytochrome c oxidase started and proceeded rapidly. The start time of triphasic scattering change was delayed for about 100 s by lowering brain temperature from 29°C to 24°C, demonstrating the optical detection of cerebroprotection effect by brain cooling. Electron microscopic observation showed morphological changes of dendrite and mitochondria in the cortical surface tissue after the triphasic scattering change, which was thought to be associated with the change in light scattering we observed. These findings suggest that the simultaneous measurement of the intrinsic optical signals related to morphological characteristics and energy metabolism is useful for monitoring tissue viability in brain.

  1. Dynamic Changes of Striatal and Extrastriatal Abnormalities in Glutaric Aciduria Type I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harting, Inga; Neumaier-Probst, Eva; Seitz, Angelika; Maier, Esther M.; Assmann, Birgit; Baric, Ivo; Troncoso, Monica; Muhlhausen, Chris; Zschocke, Johannes; Boy, Nikolas P. S.; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Garbade, Sven F.; Kolker, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    In glutaric aciduria type I, an autosomal recessive disease of mitochondrial lysine, hydroxylysine and tryptophan catabolism, striatal lesions are characteristically induced by acute encephalopathic crises during a finite period of brain development (age 3-36 months). The frequency of striatal injury is significantly less in patients diagnosed as…

  2. Association between Age and Striatal Volume Stratified by CAG Repeat Length in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, Elizabeth; Mills, James; Liu, Dawei; Nopoulos, Peggy; Ross, Christopher A.; Pierson, Ronald; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Longer CAG repeat length is associated with faster clinical progression in Huntington disease, although the effect of higher repeat length on brain atrophy is not well documented. Method: Striatal volumes were obtained from MRI scans of 720 individuals with prodromal Huntington disease. Striatal volume was plotted against age separately for groups with CAG repeat lengths of 38–39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, and 47–54. Results: Slopes representing the association between age and striatal volume were significantly steeper as CAG repeat length increased. Discussion: Although cross-sectional, these data suggest that striatal atrophy, like clinical progression, may occur faster with higher CAG repeat lengths. PMID:21593963

  3. Encoding-based brain-computer interface controlled by non-motor area of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Lang, Yiran; Du, Ping; Shin, Hyung-Cheul

    2011-09-01

    As the needs of disabled patients are increasingly recognized in society, researchers have begun to use single neuron activity to construct brain-computer interfaces (BCI), designed to facilitate the daily lives of individuals with physical disabilities. BCI systems typically allow users to control computer programs or external devices via signals produced in the motor or pre-motor areas of the brain, rather than producing actual motor movements. However, impairments in these brain areas can hinder the application of BCI. The current paper demonstrates the feasibility of a one-dimensional (1D) machine controlled by rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons using an encoding method. In this novel system, rats are able to quench thirst by varying neuronal firing rate in the PFC to manipulate a water dish that can rotate in 1D. The results revealed that control commands generated by an appropriate firing frequency in rat PFC exhibited performance improvements with practice, indicated by increasing water-drinking duration and frequency. These results demonstrated that it is possible for rats to understand an encoding-based BCI system and control a 1D machine using PFC activity to obtain reward.

  4. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    PubMed Central

    Brøchner, Christian B.; Holst, Camilla B.; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6–21st weeks post-conception) and adults using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antibodies against claudin-11, BLBP, collagen 1, SSEA-4, MAP2, YKL-40, and its receptor IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were used to describe morphological characteristics and functional aspects of the outer brain barriers. Claudin-11 was a reliable marker of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces: blood-CSF barrier across arachnoid barrier cell layer, blood-CSF barrier across pial microvessels, and outer CSF-brain barrier comprising glial end feet layer/pial surface layer. PMID:25852456

  5. Comparison of Extracellular Striatal Acetylcholine and Brain Seizure Activity Following Acute Exposure to the Nerve Agents Cyclosarin and Tabun in Freely Moving Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    ment, blood (0.25–0.5 ml) was drawn using the toe nail clip method (Vallejo-Freire 1951) for determination of baseline ChE activity. The animal...Dills C, Levy RM. 1998. Changes in blood-brain barrier permeability asso- ciated with insertion of brain cannulas and microdialysis probes. Brain Res

  6. A 3D digital map of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Toga, A W; Santori, E M; Hazani, R; Ambach, K

    1995-01-01

    A three dimensional (3D) computerized map of rat brain anatomy created with digital imaging techniques is described. Six male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 270-320 g, were used in the generation of this atlas. Their heads were frozen, and closely spaced cryosectional images were digitally captured. Each serial data set was organized into a digital volume, reoriented into a flat skull position, and brought into register with each other. A volume representative of the group following registration was chosen based on its anatomic correspondence with the other specimens as measured by image correlation coefficients and landmark matching. Mean positions of lambda, bregma, and the interaural plane of the group within the common coordinate system were used to transform the representative volume into a 3D map of rat neuroanatomy. images reconstructed from this 3D map are available to the public via Internet with an anonymous file transfer protocol (FTP) and World Wide Web. A complete description of the digital map is provided in a comprehensive set of sagittal planes (up to 0.031 mm spacing) containing stereotaxic reference grids. Sets of coronal and horizontal planes, resampled at the same increment, also are included. Specific anatomic features are identified in a second collection of images. Stylized anatomic boundaries and structural labels were incorporated into selected orthogonal planes. Electronic sharing and interactive use are benefits afforded by a digital format, but the foremost advantage of this 3D map is its whole brain integrated representation of rat in situ neuroanatomy.

  7. Iron-56 irradiation diminishes muscarinic but not {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos-Molina, R.; Joseph, J.A.; Rabin, B.M.; Kandasamy, S.B.; Dalton, T.K.; Roth, G.S.

    1994-12-01

    Initial findings from our laboratory have indicated that muscarinic enhancement of K{sup +}-evoked release of dopamine from perifused striatal slices is reduced after exposure to {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. This finding suggested that there is a radiation-induced deficit in muscarinic receptor sensitivity. Subsequent findings have indicated that at least part of the loss in sensitivity may occur as a result of alterations in the initial steps of the signal transduction process and involve muscarinic receptor-G protein coupling/uncoupling. The present study was carried out to localize this deficit further by determining carbachol-stimulated low-K{sub m} guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activity in striatal and hippocampal tissue obtained from rats exposed to 0, 0.1 or 1.0 Gy of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation. In addition, to examine the specificity of the effect of {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation, {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase activity was also examined in these tissues. The results showed that there was a high degree of specificity in the effects of {sup 56}Fe particles. Decrements were observed in muscarinic-stimulated low-K{sub m} GTPase in striatum but not in hippocampus, and {sup 56}Fe-particle irradiation did not affect {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenergic low-K{sub m} GTPase activity in either brain tissue. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Alterations in CaS -dependent and CaS -independent release of catecholamines in preparations of rat brain produced by ethanol treatment in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.A.; Pagonis, C.; Samuel, D.; Littleton, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Compared to preparations from control animals, superfused striatal slice preparations from brains of rats treated chronically with ethanol released a significantly greater fraction of stored (TH) dopamine on depolarisation in 40 mM K . Similarly, the electrically-evoked release of (TH)-norepinephrine from cortical slices and of (TH)-dopamine from striatal slices is also increased, although with this mechanism of depolarisation the change is significant only in the case of (TH) norepinephrine release. In contrast to this tendency to enhancement of CaS -dependent depolarisation-induced release, a reduced fraction of stored (TH)-catecholamines was released from these preparations by the indirect sympathomimetics tyramine and (+)-amphetamine. The catecholamine release induced by these indirect sympathomimetics is largely independent of external CaS and the results are interpreted as suggesting that chronic alcohol treatment changes the distribution of catecholamine neurotransmitters between storage pools in the nerve terminal which do or do not require CaS entry for release.

  9. Long-term, calorie-restricted intake of a high-fat diet in rats reduces impulse control and ventral striatal D2 receptor signalling - two markers of addiction vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Adams, Wendy K; Sussman, Jacob L; Kaur, Sukhbir; D'souza, Anna M; Kieffer, Timothy J; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2015-12-01

    High impulsivity, mediated through ventral striatal dopamine signalling, represents an established risk factor for substance abuse, and may likewise confer vulnerability to pathological overeating. Mechanistically, the assumption is that trait impulsivity facilitates the initiation of maladaptive eating styles or choices. However, whether consumption of appetitive macronutrients themselves causes deficits in impulse control and striatal signalling, thereby contributing to cognitive changes permissive of overeating behaviour, has yet to be considered. We examined the effects of chronic maintenance on restricted equicaloric, but high-fat or high-sugar, diets (48 kcal/day; 60 kcal% fat or sucrose) on rats' performance in the five-choice serial reaction time task, indexing impulsivity and attention. Markers of dopamine signalling in the dorsal and ventral striatum, and plasma insulin and leptin levels, were also assessed. Rats maintained on the high-fat diet (HFD) were more impulsive, whereas the high-sugar diet (HSD) did not alter task performance. Importantly, body weight and hormone levels were similar between groups when behavioural changes were observed. Maintenance on HFD, but not on HSD, reduced the levels of dopamine D2 receptor (D2 R), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphophorylated CREB (Ser133) proteins in the ventral, but not dorsal, striatum. D2 R expression in the ventral striatum also negatively correlated with impulsive responding, independently of diet. These data indicate that chronic exposure to even limited amounts of high-fat foods may weaken impulse control and alter neural signalling in a manner associated with vulnerability to addictions - findings that have serious implications for the propagation of uncontrolled eating behaviour in obesity and binge-eating disorder.

  10. Simultaneous determination of biogenic monoamines in rat brain dialysates using capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with photoluminescence following electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moon Chul; Shi, Guoyue; Borland, Laura; Michael, Adrian C; Weber, Stephen G

    2006-03-15

    Simultaneous determination of biogenic monoamines such as dopamine, serotonin, and 3-methoxytyramine in brain is important in understanding neurotransmitter activity. This study presents a sensitive determination of biogenic monoamines in rat brain striatum microdialysates using capillary high-performance liquid chromatography with the photoluminescence following electron-transfer detection technique. Separation conditions were optimized by changing the concentration of an ion-interaction agent and the percentage of an organic modifier. The high concentration of ion-interaction agent enabled the amines as a class to be separated from interfering acids, but also made the separation very long. To shorten the separation time, 10% (v/v) acetonitrile was used as the organic modifier. Eight chromatographic runs during a 3-h period were analyzed in terms of retention times, peak heights, and peak widths. Chromatograms are very reproducible, with less than 1% changes in peak height over 3 h. Typical concentration detection limits at the optimum separation conditions were less than 100 pM for metabolic acids and approximately 200 pM for monoamines. The injection volume of the sample was 500 nL. Thus, the mass detection limits were less than 50 amol for metabolic acids and approximately 100 amol for monoamines. Typical separation time was less than 10 min. To validate the technique, the separation method was applied to the observation of drug-induced changes of monoamine concentrations in rat brain microdialysis samples. Local perfusion of tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, into the striatum of an anesthetized rat decreased dopamine, 3-methoxytyramine, and serotonin concentrations in dialysates. Successive monitoring of striatal dialysates at a temporal resolution of 7.7 min showed that the injection of nomifensine transiently increased dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine concentrations in rat brain dialysate.

  11. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 μm and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  12. Occupancy of dopamine D2/3 receptors in rat brain by endogenous dopamine measured with the agonist positron emission tomography radioligand [11C]MNPA.

    PubMed

    Seneca, Nicholas; Zoghbi, Sami S; Skinbjerg, Mette; Liow, Jeih-San; Hong, Jinsoo; Sibley, David R; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer; Innis, Robert B

    2008-10-01

    Estimates of dopamine D(2/3) receptor occupancy by endogenous dopamine using positron emission tomography (PET) in animals have varied almost threefold. This variability may have been caused by incomplete depletion of dopamine or by the use of antagonist radioligands, which appear less sensitive than agonist radioligands to changes in endogenous dopamine. PET scans were performed in rats with the agonist PET radioligand [(11)C]MNPA ([O-methyl-(11)C]2-methoxy-N-propylnorapomorphine). [(11)C]MNPA was injected as a bolus plus constant infusion to achieve steady-state concentration in the body and equilibrium receptor binding in the brain. Radioligand binding was compared at baseline and after treatment with reserpine plus alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, which cause approximately 95% depletion of endogenous dopamine. Depletion of dopamine increased radioligand binding in striatum but had little effect in cerebellum. Striatal [(11)C]MNPA binding potential was 0.93 +/- 0.12 at baseline and increased to 1.99 +/- 0.25 after dopamine depletion. Occupancy of D(2/3) receptors by endogenous dopamine at baseline was calculated to be approximately 53%. Striatal binding was displaceable with raclopride, but not with BP 897 (a selective D(3) compound), thus confirming the D(2) receptor specificity of [(11)C]MNPA binding. Radioactivity extracted from rat brain contained only 8-10% radiometabolites and was insignificantly altered by administration of reserpine plus alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine. Hence, dopamine depletion did not increase the PET measurements via an effect on radiotracer metabolism. Our in vivo estimate of dopamine's occupancy of D(2/3) receptors at baseline is higher than that previously reported using antagonist radioligands and PET, but is similar to that reported using agonist radioligands and ex vivo measurements.

  13. Global profiling of influence of intra-ischemic brain temperature on gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Megumi Sugahara; Asai, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Koichi; Nishida, Yayoi; Nagata, Toshihito; Takahashi, Yasuo

    2008-06-01

    Mild to moderate differences in brain temperature are known to greatly affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. The impact of brain temperature on ischemic disorders has been mainly evaluated through pathological analysis. However, no comprehensive analyses have been conducted at the gene expression level. Using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray, we screened 24000 genes in the hippocampus under hypothermic (32 degrees C), normothermic (37 degrees C), and hyperthermic (39 degrees C) conditions in a rat ischemia-reperfusion model. When the ischemic group at each intra-ischemic brain temperature was compared to a sham-operated control group, genes whose expression levels changed more than three-fold with statistical significance could be detected. In our screening condition, thirty-three genes (some of them novel) were obtained after screening, and extensive functional surveys and literature reviews were subsequently performed. In the hypothermic condition, many neuroprotective factor genes were obtained, whereas cell death- and cell damage-associated genes were detected as the brain temperature increased. At all intra-ischemic brain temperatures, multiple molecular chaperone genes were obtained. The finding that intra-ischemic brain temperature affects the expression level of many genes related to neuroprotection or neurotoxicity coincides with the different pathological outcomes at different brain temperatures, demonstrating the utility of the genetic approach.

  14. Effects of tetrahydrocannabinol on glucose uptake in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Miederer, I; Uebbing, K; Röhrich, J; Maus, S; Bausbacher, N; Krauter, K; Weyer-Elberich, V; Lutz, B; Schreckenberger, M; Urban, R

    2017-02-20

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the psychoactive component of the plant Cannabis sativa and acts as a partial agonist at cannabinoid type 1 and type 2 receptors in the brain. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of THC on the cerebral glucose uptake in the rat brain. 21 male Sprague Dawley rats (12-13 w) were examined and received five different doses of THC ranging from 0.01 to 1 mg/kg. For data acquisition a Focus 120 small animal PET scanner was used and 24.1-28.0 MBq of [(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose were injected. The data were acquired for 70 min and arterial blood samples were collected throughout the scan. THC, THC-OH and THC-COOH were determined at 55 min p.i. Nine volumes of interest were defined, and the cerebral glucose uptake was calculated for each brain region. Low blood THC levels of < 1 ng/ml (injected dose: ≤ 0.01 mg/kg) corresponded to an increased glucose uptake (6-30 %), particularly in the hypothalamus (p = 0.007), while blood THC levels > 10 ng/ml (injected dose: ≥ 0.05 mg/kg) coincided with a decreased glucose uptake (-2 to -22 %), especially in the cerebellar cortex (p = 0.008). The effective concentration in this region was estimated 2.4 ng/ml. This glucose PET study showed that stimulation of CB1 receptors by THC affects the glucose uptake in the rat brain, whereby the effect of THC is regionally different and dependent on dose - an effect that may be of relevance in behavioural studies.

  15. Light-sheet microscopy imaging of a whole cleared rat brain with Thy1-GFP transgene

    PubMed Central

    Stefaniuk, Marzena; Gualda, Emilio J.; Pawlowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Matryba, Paweł; Koza, Paulina; Konopka, Witold; Owczarek, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and optically cleared tissue is a new, rapidly developing research field. Whereas successful attempts to clear and image mouse brain have been reported, a similar result for rats has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we report on creating novel transgenic rat harboring fluorescent reporter GFP under control of neuronal gene promoter. We then present data on clearing the rat brain, showing that FluoClearBABB was found superior over passive CLARITY and CUBIC methods. Finally, we demonstrate efficient imaging of the rat brain using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27312902

  16. Long-Term Supplementation with Beta Serum Concentrate (BSC), a Complex of Milk Lipids, during Post-Natal Brain Development Improves Memory in Rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian; MacGibbon, Alastair; Fong, Bertram; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Karen; Rowan, Angela; McJarrow, Paul

    2015-06-05

    We have previously reported that the supplementation of ganglioside-enriched complex-milk-lipids improves cognitive function and that a phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipid prevents age-related cognitive decline in rats. This current study evaluated the effects of post-natal supplementation of ganglioside- and phospholipid-enriched complex-milk-lipids beta serum concentrate (BSC) on cognitive function in young rats. The diet of male rats was supplemented with either gels formulated BSC (n = 16) or blank gels (n = 16) from post-natal day 10 to day 70. Memory and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated using the Morris water maze, dark-light boxes, and elevated plus maze tests. Neuroplasticity and white matter were measured using immunohistochemical staining. The overall performance in seven-day acquisition trials was similar between the groups. Compared with the control group, BSC supplementation reduced the latency to the platform during day one of the acquisition tests. Supplementation improved memory by showing reduced latency and improved path efficiency to the platform quadrant, and smaller initial heading error from the platform zone. Supplemented rats showed an increase in striatal dopamine terminals and hippocampal glutamate receptors. Thus BSC supplementation during post-natal brain development improved learning and memory, independent from anxiety. The moderately enhanced neuroplasticity in dopamine and glutamate may be biological changes underlying the improved cognitive function.

  17. Plasmalogen Augmentation Reverses Striatal Dopamine Loss in MPTP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miville-Godbout, Edith; Bourque, Mélanie; Morissette, Marc; Al-Sweidi, Sara; Smith, Tara; Mochizuki, Asuka; Senanayake, Vijitha; Jayasinghe, Dushmanthi; Wang, Li; Goodenowe, Dayan; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Plasmalogens are a class of glycerophospholipids shown to play critical roles in membrane structure and function. Decreased plasmalogens are reported in the brain and blood of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. The present study investigated the hypothesis that augmenting plasmalogens could protect striatal dopamine neurons that degenerate in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in mice, a PD model. First, in a pre-treatment experiment male mice were treated for 10 days with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-plasmalogen precursor PPI-1011 (10, 50 and 200 mg/kg). On day 5 mice received MPTP and were killed on day 11. Next, in a post-treatment study, male mice were treated with MPTP and then received daily for 5 days PPI-1011 (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg). MPTP treatment reduced serum plasmalogen levels, striatal contents of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, serotonin, DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). Pre-treatment with PPI-1011 (10 and 50 mg/kg) prevented all MPTP-induced effects. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding. Post-treatment with PPI-1011 prevented all MPTP-induced effects at 50 mg/kg but not at lower doses. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding in the post-treatment experiment. PPI-1011 treatment (10 days at 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg) of intact mice left unchanged striatal biogenic amine contents. These data demonstrate that treatment with a plasmalogen precursor is capable of protecting striatal dopamine markers in an animal model of PD. PMID:26959819

  18. Changes in endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain structures following cocaine self-administration and extinction training.

    PubMed

    Bystrowska, Beata; Smaga, Irena; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-04-03

    Preclinical investigations have demonstrated that drugs of abuse alter the levels of lipid-based signalling molecules, including endocannabinoids (eCBs) and N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), in the rodent brain. In addition, several drugs targeting eCBs and/or NAEs are implicated in reward and/or seeking behaviours related to the stimulation of dopamine systems in the brain. In our study, the brain levels of eCBs (anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)) and NAEs (oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA)) were analyzed via an LC-MS/MS method in selected brain structures of rats during cocaine self-administration and after extinction training according to the "yoked" control procedure. Repeated (14days) cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion) self-administration and yoked drug delivery resulted in a significant decrease (ca. 52%) in AEA levels in the cerebellum, whereas levels of 2-AG increased in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the cerebellum and decreased in the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. In addition, we detected increases (>150%) in the levels of OEA and PEA in the limbic areas in both cocaine treated groups, as well as an increase in the tissue levels of OEA in the dorsal striatum in only the yoked cocaine group and increases in the tissue levels of PEA in the dorsal striatum (both cocaine groups) and the nucleus accumbens (yoked cocaine group only). Compared to the yoked saline control group, extinction training (10days) resulted in a potent reduction in AEA levels in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the nucleus accumbens and in 2-AG levels in the hippocampus, the dorsal striatum and the cerebellum. The decreases in the limbic and subcortical areas were more apparent for rats that self-administered cocaine. Following extinction, there was a region-specific change in the levels of NAEs in rats previously injected with cocaine; a potent increase (ca. 100%) in the levels of OEA and PEA was detected in the prefrontal cortex and the

  19. Bupropion inhibits nicotine-evoked [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine and from rat hippocampal slices preloaded with [(3)H]norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Sumithran, Sangeetha P; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2002-09-01

    Bupropion, an efficacious antidepressant and smoking cessation agent, inhibits dopamine and norepinephrine transporters (DAT and NET, respectively). Recently, bupropion has been reported to noncompetitively inhibit alpha3beta2, alpha3beta4, and alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes or established cell lines. The present study evaluated bupropion-induced inhibition of native alpha3beta2* and alpha3beta4* nAChRs using functional neurotransmitter release assays, nicotine-evoked [(3)H]overflow from superfused rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine ([(3)H]DA), and nicotine-evoked [(3)H]overflow from hippocampal slices preloaded with [(3)H]norepinephrine ([(3)H]NE). The mechanism of inhibition was evaluated using Schild analysis. To eliminate the interaction of bupropion with DAT or NET, nomifensine or desipramine, respectively, was included in the superfusion buffer. A high bupropion concentration (100 microM) elicited intrinsic activity in the [(3)H]DA release assay. However, none of the concentrations (1 nM-100 microM) examined evoked [(3)H]NE overflow and, thus, were without intrinsic activity in this assay. Moreover, bupropion inhibited both nicotine-evoked [(3)H]DA overflow (IC(50) = 1.27 microM) and nicotine-evoked [(3)H]NE overflow (IC(50) = 323 nM) at bupropion concentrations well below those eliciting intrinsic activity. Results from Schild analyses suggest that bupropion competitively inhibits nicotine-evoked [(3)H]DA overflow, whereas evidence for receptor reserve was obtained upon assessment of bupropion inhibition of nicotine-evoked [(3)H]NE overflow. Thus, bupropion acts as an antagonist at alpha3beta2* and alpha3beta4* nAChRs in rat striatum and hippocampus, respectively, across the same concentration range that inhibits DAT and NET function. The combination of nAChR and transporter inhibition produced by bupropion may contribute to its clinical efficacy as a smoking cessation agent.

  20. Comparison of extracellular striatal acetylcholine and brain seizure activity following acute exposure to the nerve agents cyclosarin and tabun in freely moving guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, John C; Acon-Chen, Cindy; McDonough, John H; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2010-11-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents like cyclosarin and tabun are potent cholinesterase inhibitors. The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, which is responsible for breaking down acetylcholine (ACh) at the synapse and neuromuscular junction, leads to a build-up of extracellular ACh and a series of toxic consequences including hypersecretion, tremor, convulsion/seizure, respiratory distress, coma, and death. This study employed simultaneous and continuous electroencephalographic recording and striatal microdialysis collection for quantification of ACh changes (via subsequent HPLC analysis) during acute exposure to a 1.0 × LD(50) subcutaneous dose of either cyclosarin or tabun to investigate differences in cholinergic and behavioral effects. Information about the unique mechanisms and consequences of different nerve agents is intended to aid in the development of broad-spectrum medical countermeasures for nerve agents. At the dose administered, non-seizure and sustained seizure responses were observed in both agent groups and in the tabun-exposed group some subjects experienced an unsustained seizure response. Significant extracellular ACh increases were only observed in seizure groups. Cyclosarin and tabun were found to exhibit some unique cholinergic and ictogenic characteristics. Lethality only occurred in subjects experiencing sustained seizure, and there was no difference in lethality between agent groups that progressed to sustained seizure.

  1. Gonadal steroid action and brain sex differentiation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Y

    2009-03-01

    Gonadal steroids that establish sexually dimorphic characteristics of brain morphology and physiology act at a particular stage of ontogeny. Testosterone secreted by the testes during late gestational and neonatal periods causes significant brain sexual dimorphism in the rat. This results in both sex-specific behaviour and endocrinology in adults. Sexual differentiation may be due to neurogenesis, migration or survival. Each mechanism appears to be uniquely regulated in a site-specific manner. Thus, the volume of an aggregate of neurones in the rat medial preoptic area (POA), termed the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the POA (SDN-POA), is larger in males than in females. The anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) is packed with neurones containing oestrogen receptor (ER)beta in female rats but, in males, ERbeta-positive neurones scatter into the more lateral portion of the POA. POA neurones are born up to embryonic days 16-17 and not after parturition. Therefore, neurogenesis is unlikely to contribute to the larger SDN-POA in males. DNA microarray analysis for oestrogen-responsive genes and western blotting demonstrated site-specific regulation of apoptosis- and migration-related genes in the SDN-POA and AVPV.

  2. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  3. Relationships among rat ultrasonic vocalizations, behavioral measures of striatal dopamine loss, and striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity at acute and chronic time points following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Grant, Laura M; Barnett, David G; Doll, Emerald J; Leverson, Glen; Ciucci, Michelle

    2015-09-15

    Voice deficits in Parkinson disease (PD) emerge early in the disease process, but do not improve with standard treatments targeting dopamine. Experimental work in the rat shows that severe and chronic unilateral nigrostriatal dopamine depletion with 6-OHDA results in decreased intensity, bandwidth, and complexity of ultrasonic vocalizations. However, it is unclear if mild/acute dopamine depletion, paralleling earlier stages of PD, results in vocalization deficits, or to what degree vocalization parameters are correlated with other dopamine-dependent indicators of lesion severity or percent of tyrosine hydroxylase (%TH) loss. Here, we assayed ultrasonic vocalizations, forelimb asymmetry, and apomorphine rotations in rats with a range of unilateral dopamine loss resulting from 6-OHDA or vehicle control infusions to the medial forebrain bundle at acute (72 h) and chronic (4 weeks) time points post-infusion. The %TH loss was evaluated at 4 weeks. At 72 h, forelimb asymmetry and %TH loss were significantly correlated, while at 4 weeks, all measures of lesion severity were significantly correlated with each other. Call complexity was significantly correlated with all measures of lesion severity at 72 h but only with %TH loss at 4 weeks. Bandwidth was correlated with forelimb asymmetry at both time points. Duration was significantly correlated with all dopamine depletion measures at 4 weeks. Notably, not all parameters were affected universally or equally across time. These results suggest that vocalization deficits may be a sensitive index of acute and mild catecholamine loss and further underscores the need to characterize the neural mechanisms underlying vocal deficits in PD.

  4. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F A; Quirion, R; Saavedra, J M; Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1984-01-01

    The 125I-labeled agonist analog [1-sarcosine]-angiotensin II ( [Sar1]AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (Ka = 2 X 10(9) M-1) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6324205

  5. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  6. Striatal prediction error modulates cortical coupling.

    PubMed

    den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Daunizeau, Jean; Roiser, Jonathan; Friston, Karl J; Stephan, Klaas E

    2010-03-03

    Both perceptual inference and motor responses are shaped by learned probabilities. For example, stimulus-induced responses in sensory cortices and preparatory activity in premotor cortex reflect how (un)expected a stimulus is. This is in accordance with predictive coding accounts of brain function, which posit a fundamental role of prediction errors for learning and adaptive behavior. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and recent advances in computational modeling to investigate how (failures of) learned predictions about visual stimuli influence subsequent motor responses. Healthy volunteers discriminated visual stimuli that were differentially predicted by auditory cues. Critically, the predictive strengths of cues varied over time, requiring subjects to continuously update estimates of stimulus probabilities. This online inference, modeled using a hierarchical Bayesian learner, was reflected behaviorally: speed and accuracy of motor responses increased significantly with predictability of the stimuli. We used nonlinear dynamic causal modeling to demonstrate that striatal prediction errors are used to tune functional coupling in cortical networks during learning. Specifically, the degree of striatal trial-by-trial prediction error activity controls the efficacy of visuomotor connections and thus the influence of surprising stimuli on premotor activity. This finding substantially advances our understanding of striatal function and provides direct empirical evidence for formal learning theories that posit a central role for prediction error-dependent plasticity.

  7. Chronic systemic complex I inhibition induces a hypokinetic multisystem degeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Günter U; Féger, Jean; Prigent, Annick; Michel, Patrick P; Parain, Karine; Champy, Pierre; Ruberg, Merle; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Hirsch, Etienne C

    2003-02-01

    In Parkinson's disease, nigral dopaminergic neurones degenerate, whereas post-synaptic striatal target neurones are spared. In some atypical parkinsonian syndromes, both nigral and striatal neurones degenerate. Reduced activity of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been implicated in both conditions, but it remains unclear if this affects the whole organism or only the degenerating brain structures. We therefore investigated the differential vulnerability of various brain structures to generalized complex I inhibition. Male Lewis rats infused with rotenone, a lipophilic complex I inhibitor [2.5 mg/kg/day intraveneously (i.v.) for 28 days], were compared with vehicle-infused controls. They showed reduced locomotor activity and loss of striatal dopaminergic fibres (54%), nigral dopaminergic neurones (28.5%), striatal serotoninergic fibres (34%), striatal DARPP-32-positive projection neurones (26.5%), striatal cholinergic interneurones (22.1%), cholinergic neurones in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (23.7%) and noradrenergic neurones in the locus ceruleus (26.4%). Silver impregnation revealed pronounced degeneration in basal ganglia and brain stem nuclei, whereas the hippocampus, cerebellum and cerebral cortex were less affected. These data suggest that a generalized mitochondrial failure may be implicated in atypical parkinsonian syndromes but do not support the hypothesis that a generalized complex I inhibition results in the rather selective nigral lesion observed in Parkinson's disease.

  8. Levels of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid after i.v. heroin administration to freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Gottås, A; Øiestad, E L; Boix, F; Vindenes, V; Ripel, Å; Thaulow, C H; Mørland, J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Heroin, with low affinity for μ-opioid receptors, has been considered to act as a prodrug. In order to study the pharmacokinetics of heroin and its active metabolites after i.v. administration, we gave a bolus injection of heroin to rats and measured the concentration of heroin and its metabolites in blood and brain extracellular fluid (ECF). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH After an i.v. bolus injection of heroin to freely moving Sprague–Dawley rats, the concentrations of heroin and metabolites in blood samples from the vena jugularis and in microdialysis samples from striatal brain ECF were measured by ultraperformance LC-MS/MS. KEY RESULTS Heroin levels decreased very fast, both in blood and brain ECF, and could not be detected after 18 and 10 min respectively. 6-Monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) increased very rapidly, reaching its maximal concentrations after 2.0 and 4.3 min, respectively, and falling thereafter. Morphine increased very slowly, reaching its maximal levels, which were six times lower than the highest 6-MAM concentrations, after 12.6 and 21.3 min, with a very slow decline during the rest of the experiment and only surpassing 6-MAM levels at least 30 min after injection. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS After an i.v. heroin injection, 6-MAM was the predominant opioid present shortly after injection and during the first 30 min, not only in the blood but also in rat brain ECF. 6-MAM might therefore mediate most of the effects observed shortly after heroin intake, and this finding questions the general assumption that morphine is the main and most important metabolite of heroin. PMID:23865556

  9. Detection of cocaine induced rat brain activation by photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) was used to detect the progressive changes on the cerebral cortex of Sprague Dawley rats after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Different concentrations (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution were injected into Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. Cerebral cortex images of the animals were continuously acquired by PAT. For continuous observation, PAT system used multi-transducers to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The obtained photoacoustic images were compared with each other and confirmed that changes in blood volume were induced by cocaine hydrochloride injection. The results demonstrate that PAT may be used to detect the effects of drug abuse-induced brain activation. PMID:21163301

  10. Pathophysiology of microwave radiation: effect on rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kesari, Kavindra Kumar; Kumar, Sanjay; Behari, Jitendra

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of 2.45 GHz microwave radiation on Wistar rats. Rats of 35 days old with 130 ± 10 g body weight were selected for this study. Animals were divided into two groups: sham exposed and experimental (six animals each). Animals were exposed for 2 h a day for 45 days at 2.45 GHz frequency (power density, 0.21 mW/cm(2)). The whole body specific absorption rate was estimated to be 0.14 W/kg. Exposure took place in a ventilated plexiglas cage and kept in an anechoic chamber under a horn antenna. After completion of the exposure period, rats were killed, and pineal gland and whole brain tissues were isolated for the estimation of melatonin, creatine kinase, caspase 3, and calcium ion concentration. Experiments were performed in a blind manner and repeated. A significant decrease (P < 0.05) was recorded in the level of pineal melatonin of exposed group as compared with sham exposed. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in creatine kinase, caspase 3, and calcium ion concentration was observed in whole brain of exposed group of animals as compared to sham exposed. One-way analysis of variance method was adopted for statistical analysis. The study concludes that a reduction in melatonin or an increase in caspase-3, creatine kinase, and calcium ion may cause significant damage in brain due to chronic exposure of these radiations. These biomarkers clearly indicate possible health implications of such exposures.

  11. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  12. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  13. 2-hydroxyestradiol modifies serotonergic processes in the male rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalik, S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic (5 day) 2-hydroxyestradiol or estradiol on catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons in the male rat brain were studied. The results indicate estrogen to be specific is inducing changes in dopaminergic systems; whereas its hydroxymetabolite appears to have a preference for serotonergic processes. In particular, in vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol appears to be a potent inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in brain; this inhibition is especially potent in the cortex, where it is equal in potency to serotonin. However, unlike serotonin, which is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine, 2-hydroxyestradiol is an uncompetitive inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in cortex and hypothalamus and a noncompetitive inhibitor in the striatum; this suggests that the inhibition of binding takes place at a point other than the site of serotonin uptake. In vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol also appears to increase the uptake of serotonin into these tissues, a change which would be expected if the imipramine binding is blocked.

  14. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) reveals brain circuitry involved in responding to an acute novel stress in rats with a history of repeated social stress

    PubMed Central

    Bangasser, Debra A.; Lee, Catherine S.; Cook, Philip A.; Gee, James C.; Bhatnagar, Seema; Valentino, Rita J.

    2013-01-01

    Responses to acute stressors are determined in part by stress history. For example, a history of chronic stress results in facilitated responses to a novel stressor and this facilitation is considered to be adaptive. We previously demonstrated that repeated exposure of rats to the resident-intruder model of social stress results in the emergence of two subpopulations that are characterized by different coping responses to stress. The submissive subpopulation failed to show facilitation to a novel stressor and developed a passive strategy in the Porsolt forced swim test. Because a passive stress coping response has been implicated in the propensity to develop certain psychiatric disorders, understanding the unique circuitry engaged by exposure to a novel stressor in these subpopulations would advance our understanding of the etiology of stress-related pathology. An ex vivo functional imaging technique, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI), was used to identify and distinguish brain regions that are differentially activated by an acute swim stress (15 min) in rats with a history of social stress compared to controls. Specifically, Mn2+ was administered intracerebroventricularly prior to swim stress and brains were later imaged ex vivo to reveal activated structures. When compared to controls, all rats with a history of social stress showed greater activation in specific striatal, hippocampal, hypothalamic, and midbrain regions. The submissive subpopulation of rats was further distinguished by significantly greater activation in amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and septum, suggesting that these regions may form a circuit mediating responses to novel stress in individuals that adopt passive coping strategies. The finding that different circuits are engaged by a novel stressor in the two subpopulations of rats exposed to social stress implicates a role for these circuits in determining individual strategies for responding to

  15. Neuroanatomical distribution of galectin-3 in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hong-Il; Kim, Eu-Gene; Lee, Eun-Jin; Hong, Sung-Young; Yoon, Chi-Sun; Hong, Min-Ju; Park, Sang-Jin; Woo, Ran-Sook; Baik, Tai-Kyoung; Song, Dae-Yong

    2017-04-01

    Galectin-3 is a member of the lectin subfamily that enables the specific binding of β-galactosides. It is expressed in a broad spectrum of species and organs, and is known to have various functions related to cell adhesion, signal transduction, and proinflammatory responses. Although, expression of galectin-3 in some activated neuroglia under neuroinflammation has been well documented in the central nervous system, little is known about the neuronal expression and distribution of galectin-3 in normal brain. To describe the cellular and neuroanatomical expression map of galectin-3, we performed galectin-3 immunohistochemistry on the entire normal rat brain and subsequently analyzed the neuronal distribution. Galectin-3 expression was observed not only in some neuroglia but also in neurons. Neuronal expression of galectin-3 was observed in many functional parts of the cerebral cortex and various other subcortical nuclei in the hypothalamus and brainstem. Neuroanatomical analysis revealed that robust galectin-3 immuno-signals were present in many hypothalamic nuclei related to a variety of physiological functions responsible for mediating anxiety responses, energy balance, and neuroendocrine regulation. In addition, the regions highly connected with these hypothalamic nuclei also showed intense galectin-3 expression. Moreover, multiple key regions involved in regulating autonomic functions exhibited high levels of galectin-3 expression. In contrast, the subcortical nuclei responsible for the control of voluntary motor functions and limbic system exhibited no galectin-3 immunoreactivity. These observations suggest that galectin-3 expression in the rat brain seems to be regulated by developmental cascades, and that functionally and neuroanatomically related brain nuclei constitutively express galectin-3 in adulthood.

  16. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  17. 19-Hydroxylation of androgens in the rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, E F; Miyairi, S; Fishman, J

    1985-01-01

    Aromatization of androgens in the central nervous system is linked with sexual differentiation of the brain and, thus, determines the nature of sexual behavior and the control of gonadotropin secretion. The process of aromatization, as determined in the human placenta, proceeds through two successive hydroxylations at C-19, the products of which are then virtually completely converted via a third hydroxylation at C-2 to estrogens. We now report that in the rat brain, 19-hydroxylation of androgens greatly exceeds aromatization and the 19-hydroxy- and 19-oxoandrogen products accumulate in quantities 5 times greater than the estrogens. This relationship implies that the aromatization sequence in the brain is deficient in the terminal hydroxylase, and the process is distinct from that in other tissues. The function of 19-hydroxy- and 19-oxotestosterone in the central nervous system is unknown but, unlike the reduced or aromatized metabolites of the male hormone, these substances cannot be delivered from the circulation and their presence in the brain is totally dependent on in situ formation, making them logical candidates for modulators of neuronal functions. PMID:3857612

  18. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  19. Neuroprotection of striatal neurons against kainate excitotoxicity by neurotrophins and GDNF family members.

    PubMed

    Gratacòs, E; Pérez-Navarro, E; Tolosa, E; Arenas, E; Alberch, J

    2001-09-01

    Neurotrophic factors are regarded as potential therapeutic tools in neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we analysed the protective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and neurturin against the excitotoxic damage induced by kainate in striatal neurons in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that the decrease in the number of cultured striatal calbindin-positive neurons induced by kainate was prevented by treatment with any of these factors. To characterize their protective effects in vivo, cell lines overexpressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor or neurturin were grafted into the striatum. We found that the numbers of striatal projection neurons (calbindin-positive) and striatal interneurons (parvalbumin- or choline acetyltransferase-positive) were differentially decreased after kainate lesion. These neurotrophic factors prevented the loss of striatal projection neurons and interneurons with differing efficiency: brain-derived neurotrophic factor was the most efficient, whereas neurturin was the least. Our findings show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and neurturin have specific neuroprotective profiles in striatal neurons and indicate that they are specific modulators of the survival of distinct subsets of striatal neurons in pathophysiological conditions.

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and NMDA-potentiating effects are blunted in the striatum of aged rats: a possible additional mechanism in striatal senescence.

    PubMed

    Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Pintor, Annita; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Gaudi, Simona; Grò, Maria Cristina; Passarelli, Francesca; Reggio, Rosaria; Galluzzo, Mariangela; Massotti, Marino; Popoli, Patrizia

    2003-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to verify whether an impairment of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated neurotransmission did occur in the aged striatum. To this end, the ability of the subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine, to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis and to potentiate N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced effects in striatal slices from young (3 months) and aged (24 months) rats was compared. The ability of RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine to induce maximal phosphoinositide turnover and to potentiate N-methyl-d-aspartate effects was significantly reduced in slices from old vs. young rats. These changes were associated with a significant reduction in the expression of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor protein (-28.8%) and phospholipase C-beta1 (-55.8%) in old striata, while receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression was unchanged. These results show that the signalling associated with subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors undergoes significant age-related changes and that a reduced expression of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors and, more importantly, phospholipase C-beta1 may account for the functional decline of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  1. Correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain exposed to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Light scattering signal is a potential indicator of tissue viability in brain because cellular and subcellular structural integrity should be associated with cell viability in brain tissue. We previously performed multiwavelength diffuse reflectance measurement for a rat global ischemic brain model and observed a unique triphasic change in light scattering at a certain time after oxygen and glucose deprivation. This triphasic scattering change (TSC) was shown to precede cerebral ATP exhaustion, suggesting that loss of brain tissue viability can be predicted by detecting scattering signal. In the present study, we examined correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain in vivo. We performed transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement for rat brain; under spontaneous respiration, hypoxia was induced for the rat by nitrogen gas inhalation and reoxygenation was started at various time points. We observed a TSC, which started at 140 +/- 15 s after starting nitrogen gas inhalation (mean +/- SD, n=8). When reoxygenation was started before the TSC, all rats survived (n=7), while no rats survived when reoxygenation was started after the TSC (n=8). When reoxygenation was started during the TSC, rats survived probabilistically (n=31). Disability of motor function was not observed for the survived rats. These results indicate that TSC can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue reversibility in brains, providing useful information on the critical time zone for treatment to rescue the brain.

  2. Brain transcription factor gene expression, neurotransmitter levels, and novelty response behaviors: alterations during rat amphetamine withdrawal and following chronic injection stress.

    PubMed

    Persico, A M; Schindler, C W; Zaczek, R; Brannock, M T; Uhl, G R

    1995-03-01

    Transcription factors are known to act as gene expression regulators, possibly linking extracellular stimuli to long-term modifications at the neuronal level. Such modifications may potentially underlie chronic psychostimulant- and stress-induced behavioral alterations. This study illustrates how a 2 week, twice daily 7.5 mg/kg d-amphetamine or saline regimen alters rat brain regional expression of transcription factor genes, including c-fos, fos-B, jun-B, c-jun, and zif 268, and seeks potential correlations between those changes and alterations in neurotransmitter levels and behavioral novelty responses. Amphetamine withdrawal-induced decreases in transcription factor mRNA levels, assessed using Northern blot analysis, appear most prominent in prefrontal cortex, begin approximately 12 h after the last injection, and largely recover to control levels by 54 h. Prefrontal cortical and striatal dopamine content, assessed using HPLC, decrease and recover over a similar time course. Behavioral "stereotypy time" manifest by animals exposed to a novel environment, a measure sensitive to psychostimulant withdrawal, also decreases beginning 12 h after the last injection, is still significantly reduced at 54 h, and recovers at 72 h. Chronic saline injections are followed by a consistent decrease in transcription factor gene expression, observed 6 h after the last injection, followed by a "rebound" increase at 12 h. These changes are accompanied by dramatic, mostly biphasic alterations in prefrontal cortical biogenic amines and by a short-lived increase in striatal dopamine turnover. At the same time, rats display much longer-lasting decreases in locomotor responses when exposed to a novel environment, with recovery occurring only 54 h after the last injection. The delayed recovery of behavioral responses to novelty is consistent with potential involvement of changes in transcription factor-mediated gene expression in neurochemical mechanisms underlying psychostimulant

  3. Oral branched-chain amino acid supplements that reduce brain serotonin during exercise in rats also lower brain catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sujean; Disilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-11-01

    Exercise raises brain serotonin release and is postulated to cause fatigue in athletes; ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), by competitively inhibiting tryptophan transport into brain, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis and release in rats, and reputedly in humans prevents exercise-induced increases in serotonin and fatigue. This latter effect in humans is disputed. But BCAA also competitively inhibit tyrosine uptake into brain, and thus catecholamine synthesis and release. Since increasing brain catecholamines enhances physical performance, BCAA ingestion could lower catecholamines, reduce performance and thus negate any serotonin-linked benefit. We therefore examined in rats whether BCAA would reduce both brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Sedentary and exercising rats received BCAA or vehicle orally; tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis rates were measured 1 h later in brain. BCAA reduced brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations, and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. These reductions in tyrosine concentrations and catecholamine synthesis, but not tryptophan or serotonin synthesis, could be prevented by co-administering tyrosine with BCAA. Complete essential amino acid mixtures, used to maintain or build muscle mass, were also studied, and produced different effects on brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Since pharmacologically increasing brain catecholamine function improves physical performance, the finding that BCAA reduce catecholamine synthesis may explain why this treatment does not enhance physical performance in humans, despite reducing serotonin synthesis. If so, adding tyrosine to BCAA supplements might allow a positive action on performance to emerge.

  4. Functional MRI during Hippocampal Deep Brain Stimulation in the Healthy Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Vanhove, Christian; Descamps, Benedicte; Dauwe, Ine; van Mierlo, Pieter; Vonck, Kristl; Keereman, Vincent; Raedt, Robrecht; Boon, Paul; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. The mechanism of action and the effects of electrical fields administered to the brain by means of an electrode remain to be elucidated. The effects of DBS have been investigated primarily by electrophysiological and neurochemical studies, which lack the ability to investigate DBS-related responses on a whole-brain scale. Visualization of whole-brain effects of DBS requires functional imaging techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which reflects changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses throughout the entire brain volume. In order to visualize BOLD responses induced by DBS, we have developed an MRI-compatible electrode and an acquisition protocol to perform DBS during BOLD fMRI. In this study, we investigate whether DBS during fMRI is valuable to study local and whole-brain effects of hippocampal DBS and to investigate the changes induced by different stimulation intensities. Seven rats were stereotactically implanted with a custom-made MRI-compatible DBS-electrode in the right hippocampus. High frequency Poisson distributed stimulation was applied using a block-design paradigm. Data were processed by means of Independent Component Analysis. Clusters were considered significant when p-values were <0.05 after correction for multiple comparisons. Our data indicate that real-time hippocampal DBS evokes a bilateral BOLD response in hippocampal and other mesolimbic structures, depending on the applied stimulation intensity. We conclude that simultaneous DBS and fMRI can be used to detect local and whole-brain responses to circuit activation with different stimulation intensities, making this technique potentially powerful for exploration of cerebral changes in response to DBS for both preclinical and clinical DBS. PMID:26193653

  5. NO-Tryptophan: A New Small Molecule Located in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Mangas, A.; Yajeya, J.; González, N.; Duleu, S.; Geffard, M.; Coveñas, R.

    2016-01-01

    A highly specific monoclonal antibody directed against nitric oxide-tryptophan (NO-W) with good affinity (10-9 M) and specificity was developed. In the rat brain, using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, cell bodies containing NO-W were exclusively found in the intermediate and dorsal parts of the lateral septal nucleus. No immunoreactive fibres were found in the rat brain. This work reports the first visualization and the morphological characteristics of cell bodies containing NO-W in the mammalian brain. The restricted distribution of NO-W in the rat brain suggests that this molecule could be involved in specific physiological mechanisms. PMID:27734994

  6. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Pimpinella anisum in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Essential oil of Pimpinella anisum L. Apiaceae (anise oil) has been widely used in traditional Persian medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including some neurological disorders. This study was aimed to test the possible anti-seizure and anti-hypoxia effects of anise oil. Methods The effects of different concentrations of anise oil were tested on seizure attacks induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection and neuronal hypoxia induced by oxygen withdrawal as well as on production of dark neurons and induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in in vivo and in vitro experimental models of rat brain. Results Anise oil significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the amplitude and duration of epileptiform burst discharges induced by injection of intraperitoneal PTZ. In addition, anise oil significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the brain in epileptic rats. Anise oil also significantly enhanced the duration of the appearance of anoxic terminal negativity induced by oxygen withdrawal and inhibited induction of LTP in hippocampal slices. Conclusions Our data indicate the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of anise oil, likely via inhibition of synaptic plasticity. Further evaluation of anise oil to use in the treatment of neurological disorders is suggested. PMID:22709243

  7. New protein extraction/solubilization protocol for gel-based proteomics of rat (female) whole brain and brain regions.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Misato; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Jwa, Nam-Soo; Iwahashi, Hitoshi; Masuo, Yoshinori

    2006-08-31

    The rat is an accepted model for studying human psychiatric/neurological disorders. We provide a protocol for total soluble protein extraction using trichloroacetic acid/acetone (TCA/A) from rat (female) whole brain, 10 brain regions and the pituitary gland, and show that two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) using pre-cast immobilized pH (4-7) gradient (IPG) strip gels (13 cm) in the first dimension yields clean silver nitrate stained protein profiles. Though TCA/A precipitation may not be "ideal", the important choice here is the selection of an appropriate lysis buffer (LB) for solubilizing precipitated proteins. Our results reveal enrichment of protein spots by use of individual brain regions rather than whole brain, as well as the presence of differentially expressed spots in their proteomes. Thus individual brain regions provide improved protein coverage and are better suited for differential protein detection. Moreover, using a phosphoprotein-specific dye, in-gel detection of phosphoproteins was demonstrated. Representative high-resolution silver nitrate stained proteome profiles of rat whole brain total soluble protein are presented. Shortcomings apart (failure to separate membrane proteins), gel-based proteomics remains a viable option, and 2-DGE is the method of choice for generating high-resolution proteome maps of rat brain and brain regions.

  8. Anterograde delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to striatum via nigral transduction of recombinant adeno-associated virus increases neuronal death but promotes neurogenic response following stroke.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Elin; Andsberg, Gunnar; Darsalia, Vladimer; Mohapel, Paul; Mandel, Ronald J; Kirik, Deniz; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2003-06-01

    To explore the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for survival and generation of striatal neurons after stroke, recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors carrying brain-derived neurotrophic factor or green fluorescent protein genes were injected into right rat substantia nigra 4-5 weeks prior to 30 min ipsilateral of middle cerebral artery occlusion. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor-recombinant adeno-associated viral transduction markedly increased the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein by nigral cells. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was transported anterogradely to the striatum and released in biologically active form, as revealed by the hypertrophic response of striatal neuropeptide Y-positive interneurons. Animals transduced with brain-derived neurotrophic factor-recombinant adeno-associated virus also exhibited abnormalities in body posture and movements, including tilted body to the right, choreiform movements of left forelimb and head, and spontaneous, so-called 'barrel' rotation along their long axis. The continuous delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor had no effect on the survival of striatal projection neurons after stroke, but exaggerated the loss of cholinergic, and parvalbumin- and neuropeptide Y-positive, gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic interneurons. The high brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the animals subjected to stroke also gave rise to an increased number of striatal cells expressing doublecortin, a marker for migrating neuroblasts, and cells double-labelled with the mitotic marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-5'monophosphate, and early neuronal (Hu) or striatal neuronal (Meis2) markers. Our findings indicate that long-term anterograde delivery of high levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases the vulnerability of striatal interneurons to stroke-induced damage. Concomitantly, brain-derived neurotrophic factor potentiates the stroke-induced neurogenic response, at least at early stages.

  9. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier transport and CNS drug metabolism in diseased and control brain after intravenous L-DOPA in a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) functionality have been implicated in Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to investigate BBB transport of L-DOPA transport in conjunction with its intra-brain conversion, in both control and diseased cerebral hemispheres in the unilateral rat rotenone model of Parkinson's disease. Methods In Lewis rats, at 14 days after unilateral infusion of rotenone into the medial forebrain bundle, L-DOPA was administered intravenously (10, 25 or 50 mg/kg). Serial blood samples and brain striatal microdialysates were analysed for L-DOPA, and the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA. Ex-vivo brain tissue was analyzed for changes in tyrosine hydroxylase staining as a biomarker for Parkinson's disease severity. Data were analysed by population pharmacokinetic analysis (NONMEM) to compare BBB transport of L-DOPA in conjunction with the conversion of L-DOPA into DOPAC and HVA, in control and diseased cerebral hemisphere. Results Plasma pharmacokinetics of L-DOPA could be described by a 3-compartmental model. In rotenone responders (71%), no difference in L-DOPA BBB transport was found between diseased and control cerebral hemisphere. However, in the diseased compared with the control side, basal microdialysate levels of DOPAC and HVA were substantially lower, whereas following L-DOPA administration their elimination rates were higher. Conclusions Parkinson's disease-like pathology, indicated by a huge reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase as well as by substantially reduced levels and higher elimination rates of DOPAC and HVA, does not result in changes in BBB transport of L-DOPA. Taking the results of this study and that of previous ones, it can be concluded that changes in BBB functionality are not a specific characteristic of Parkinson's disease, and cannot account for the decreased benefit of L-DOPA at later stages of Parkinson's disease. PMID:22316420

  10. Anticancer and antioxidant properties of terpinolene in rat brain cells.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Elanur; Türkez, Hasan; Taşdemir, Sener

    2013-09-01

    Terpinolene (TPO) is a natural monoterpene present in essential oils of many aromatic plant species. Although various biological activities of TPO have been demonstrated, its neurotoxicity has never been explored. In this in vitro study we investigated TPO's antiproliferative and/or cytotoxic properties using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, genotoxic damage potential using the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), and oxidative effects through total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidative stress (TOS) in cultured primary rat neurons and N2a neuroblastoma cells. Dose-dependent effects of TPO (at 10 mg L(-1), 25 mg L(-1), 50 mg L(-1), 100 mg L(-1), 200 mg L(-1), and 400 mg L(-1)) were tested in both cell types. Significant (P<0.05) decrease in cell proliferation were observed in cultured primary rat neurons starting with the dose of 100 mg L(-1) and in N2a neuroblastoma cells starting with 50 mg L(-1). TPO was not genotoxic in either cell type. In addition, TPO treatment at 10 mg L(-1), 25 mg L(-1), and 50 mg L(-1) increased TAC in primary rat neurons, but not in N2a cells. However, at concentrations above 50 mg L(-1) it increased TOS in both cell types. Our findings clearly demonstrate that TPO is a potent antiproliferative agent for brain tumour cells and may have potential as an anticancer agent, which needs to be further studied.

  11. Brain polyphosphoinositide metabolism during focal ischemia in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.N.; Liu, T.H.; Xu, J.; Hsu, C.Y.; Sun, G.Y. )

    1991-04-01

    Using a rat model of stroke, we examined the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the metabolism of polyphosphoinositides by injecting {sup 32}Pi into both the left and right cortices. After equilibration of the label for 2-3 hours, ischemia induced a significant decrease (p less than 0.001) in the concentrations of labeled phosphatidyl 4,5-bisphosphates (66-78%) and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (64-67%) in the right middle cerebral artery cortex of four rats. The phospholipid labeling pattern in the left middle cerebral artery cortex, which sustained only mild ischemia and no permanent tissue damage, was not different from that of two sham-operated controls. However, when {sup 32}Pi was injected 1 hour after the ischemic insult, there was a significant decrease (p less than 0.01) in the incorporation of label into the phospholipids in both cortices of four ischemic rats compared with four sham-operated controls. Furthermore, differences in the phospholipid labeling pattern were observed in the left cortex compared with the sham-operated controls. The change in labeling pattern was attributed to the partial reduction in blood flow following ligation of the common carotid arteries. We provide a sensitive procedure for probing the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the polyphosphoinositide signaling pathway in the brain, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of tissue injury.

  12. Dopamine Promotes Striatal Neuronal Apoptotic Death via ERK Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Rusnak, Milan; Lombroso, Paul J.; Sidhu, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Although the mechanisms underlying striatal neurodegeneration are poorly understood, we have shown that striatal pathogenesis may be initiated by high synaptic levels of extracellular dopamine (DA). Here we investigated in rat striatal primary neurons the mobilization of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways after treatment with DA. Instead of observing an elevation of the archetypical pro-cytotoxic MAPKs, p-JNK and p-p38 MAPK, we found that DA, acting through D1 DA receptors, induced a sustained stimulation of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) via a cAMP/PKA/Rap1/B-Raf/MEK pathway. Blockade of D2 DA receptors, β-adrenergic receptors or NMDA receptors with receptor-specific antagonists had no significant effect on this process. Activation of D1 DA receptors and PKA by DA caused phosphorylation and inactivation of the striatal–enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), an important phosphatase for the dephosphorylation and subsequent inactivation of p-ERK in striatum. Interestingly p-ERK was primarily retained in the cytoplasm, with only low amounts translocated to the nucleus. The scaffold protein β-arrestin2 interacted with both p-ERK and D1 DA receptor, triggering the cytosolic retention of p-ERK and inducing striatal neuronal apoptotic death. These data provide unique insight into a novel role of p-ERK in striatal neurodegeneration. PMID:19200235

  13. Gene Expression Profiling during Pregnancy in Rat Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Phyllis E.

    2014-01-01

    The neurophysiological changes that occur during pregnancy in the female mammal have led to the coining of the phrases “expectant brain” and “maternal brain”. Although much is known of the hormonal changes during pregnancy, alterations in neurotransmitter gene expression have not been well-studied. We examined gene expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) during pregnancy based on the fact that this nucleus not only modulates the physiological changes that occur during pregnancy but is also involved in the development of maternal behavior. This study was designed to identify genes that are differentially expressed between mid- and late-pregnancy in order to determine which genes may be associated with the onset and display of maternal behavior and the development of the maternal brain. A commercially available PCR array containing 84 neurotransmitter receptor and regulator genes (RT2 Profiler PCR array) was used. Brains were harvested from rats on days 12 and 21 of gestation, frozen, and micropunched to obtain the VMH. Total RNA was extracted, cDNA prepared, and SYBR Green qPCR was performed. In the VMH, expression of five genes were reduced on day 21 of gestation compared to day 12 (Chrna6, Drd5, Gabrr2, Prokr2, and Ppyr1) whereas Chat, Chrm5, Drd4, Gabra5, Gabrg2, LOC289606, Nmu5r2, and Npy5r expression was elevated. Five genes were chosen to be validated in an additional experiment based on their known involvement in maternal behavior onset. This experiment confirmed that gene expression for both the CCK-A receptor and the GABAAR γ2 receptor increases at the end of pregnancy. In general, these results identify genes possibly involved in the establishment of the maternal brain in rats and indicate possible new genes to be investigated. PMID:24961703

  14. Striatal dopamine release in the rat during a cued lever-press task for food reward and the development of changes over time measured using high-speed voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Taizo

    2005-09-01

    Substantia nigra dopamine neuronal activity in the primate is thought to be related to the error in predicting reward delivery. Dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens has been shown to increase in relation to drug/food-seeking behaviour. It is not known how the release of dopamine in the striatum corresponds to the many distinct steps of a rewarded, cued task (e.g. recognizing the cue, executing the behaviour, anticipating the reward, receiving the reward) and how dopamine release then changes over time as task performance improves. To investigate dopamine release during a rewarded, cued task and the development of changes in dopamine release over time, changes in extracellular striatal dopamine concentration during a rewarded, cued lever-press task were measured a few days every week for 5 months using high-speed in vivo voltammetry. Rats were trained to press a lever after a tone to obtain a food reward. The reaction time for the lever press decreased gradually as training continued. Changes in dopamine concentration were measured in the anterior striatum (ventral portion) during the task performance after an initial 6-day familiarization period, in which the animals learned that a lever press yielded food, and a 5-week period for surgery, recovery, and electrode preparation. During the task performance, dopamine concentration started to increase just after the cue, peaked near the time of the lever press, and returned to basal levels 1-2 s after the lever press. This pattern of changes in dopamine concentration was observed over the 5 months of testing, the peak dopamine concentration increasing steadily until peaking at week 7, at which time the task performance had not yet improved significantly from week 2. By week 13, task performance had significantly improved and peak dopamine concentration had begun to subside. Thus, the increase in dopamine concentration after the cue was highest while the task was not yet perfected and subsided toward the end of the

  15. Citrobacter koseri brain abscess in the neonatal rat: survival and replication within human and rat macrophages.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Stacy M; Pollack, Harvey A; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Badger, Julie L

    2003-10-01

    A unique feature of Citrobacter koseri is the extremely high propensity to initiate brain abscesses during neonatal meningitis. Previous clinical reports and studies on infant rats have documented many Citrobacter-filled macrophages within the ventricles and brain abscesses. It has been hypothesized that intracellular survival and replication within macrophages may be a mechanism by which C. koseri subverts the host response and elicits chronic infection, resulting in brain abscess formation. In this study, we showed that C. koseri causes meningitis and brain abscesses in the neonatal rat model, and we utilized histology and magnetic resonance imaging technology to visualize brain abscess formation. Histology and electron microscopy (EM) revealed that macrophages (and not fibroblasts, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, or neurons) were the primary target for long-term C. koseri infection. To better understand C. koseri pathogenesis, we have characterized the interactions of C. koseri with human macrophages. We found that C. koseri survives and replicates within macrophages in vitro and that uptake of C. koseri increases in the presence of human pooled serum in a dose-dependent manner. EM studies lend support to the hypothesis that C. koseri uses morphologically different methods of uptake to enter macrophages. FcgammaRI blocking experiments show that this receptor primarily facilitates the entry of opsonized C. koseri into macrophages. Further, confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrates that C. koseri survives phagolysosomal fusion and that more than 90% of intracellular C. koseri organisms are colocalized within phagolysosomes. The ability of C. koseri to survive phagolysosome fusion and replicate within macrophages may contribute to the establishment of chronic central nervous system infection including brain abscesses.

  16. Quantitative Cortical Mapping of Fractional Anisotropy in Developing Rat Brains

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Yamamoto, Akria; Hossain, Mir Ahamed; Younes, Laurent; Mori, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Cortical development is associated with a series of events that involve axon and dendrite growth and synaptic formation. Although these developmental processes have been investigated in detail with histology, three-dimensional and quantitative imaging methods for rodent brains may be useful for genetic and pharmacological studies in which cortical developmental abnormalities are suspected. It has been shown that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can delineate the columnar organization of the fetal and early neonatal cortex based on a high degree of diffusion anisotropy along the columnar structures. This anisotropy is known to decrease during brain development. In this study, we applied DTI to developing rat brains at five developmental stages, postnatal days 0, 3, 7, 11 and 19, and used diffusion anisotropy as an index to characterize the structural change. Statistical analysis reveals four distinctive cortical areas that demonstrate a characteristic time course of anisotropy loss. This method may provide a means to delineate specific cortical areas and a quantitative method to detect abnormalities in cortical development in rodent pathological models. PMID:18256263

  17. Actin- and myosin-like filaments in rat brain pericytes.

    PubMed

    Le Beux, Y J; Willemot, J

    1978-04-01

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) labeling was used to identify the nature of the filaments which form bundles in the cytoplasm of the pericytes in brain tissue. Rat brain tissue pieces were incubated in glycerol solutions at 4 degrees and then transferred into buffer (pH 7.0), (1) without HMM, (2) with HMM, (3) with HMM + 5 mM ATP, and (4) with HMM + 2.5 mM Na+ pyrophosphate. In pericytes from untreated tissue, smooth-surfaced microfilaments, averaging 6 nm in diameter, appear to branch and anastomose and to anchor on the plasma membrane. After exposure to HMM, the number and the density of the microfilaments are strikingly increased. These tightly-packed microfilaments are now heavily coated with exogeneous HMM thus increasing in width to 18-20 mm. They intertwine in closely-woven networks. After incubation in HMM solutions containing ATP or Na+ phosphate, they are no longer coated with thick sidearms. It can thus be concluded that these microfilaments are of actin-like nature. In addition, after incubation in ATP, they are intermingled with, and converge onto the surfaces of, thick, tapered filaments, which we have tentatively identified as of myosin-like nature. Thus, it appears that certain of the major elements necessary for contraction are present in brain pericytes.

  18. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  19. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  20. Continuous and simultaneous electrochemical measurements of glucose, lactate, and ascorbate in rat brain following brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuqing; Yu, Ping; Hao, Jie; Wang, Yuexiang; Ohsaka, Takeo; Mao, Lanqun

    2014-04-15

    Developing new tools and technologies to enable recording the dynamic changes of multiple neurochemicals is the essence of better understanding of the molecular basis of brain functions. This study demonstrates a microfluidic chip-based online electrochemical system (OECS) for in vivo continuous and simultaneous monitoring of glucose, lactate, and ascorbate in rat brain. To fabricate the microfluidic chip-based detecting system, a microfluidic chip with patterned channel is developed into an electrochemical flow cell by incorporating the chip with three surface-modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes as working electrodes, a Ag/AgCl wire as reference electrode, and a stainless steel tube as counter electrode. Selective detection of ascorbate is achieved by the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to largely facilitate the electrochemical oxidation of ascorbate, while a dehydrogenase-based biosensing mechanism with methylene green (MG) adsorbed onto SWNTs as an electrocatalyst for the oxidation of dihydronicotiamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is employed for biosensing of glucose and lactate. To avoid the crosstalk among three sensors, the sensor alignment is carefully designed with the SWNT-modified electrode in the upstream channel and paralleled glucose and lactate biosensors in the downstream channels. With the microfluidic chip-based electrochemical flow cell as the detector, an OECS is successfully established by directly integrating the microfluidic chip-based electrochemical flow cell with in vivo microdialysis. The OECS exhibits a good linear response toward glucose, lactate, and ascorbate with less crosstalk. This property, along with the high stability and selectivity, enables the OECS for continuously monitoring three species in rat brain following brain ischemia.

  1. Striatal Circuits as a Common Node for Autism Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Fuccillo, Marc V.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by two seemingly unrelated symptom domains—deficits in social interactions and restrictive, repetitive patterns of behavioral output. Whether the diverse nature of ASD symptomatology represents distributed dysfunction of brain networks or abnormalities within specific neural circuits is unclear. Striatal dysfunction is postulated to underlie the repetitive motor behaviors seen in ASD, and neurological and brain-imaging studies have supported this assumption. However, as our appreciation of striatal function expands to include regulation of behavioral flexibility, motivational state, goal-directed learning, and attention, we consider whether alterations in striatal physiology are a central node mediating a range of autism-associated behaviors, including social and cognitive deficits that are hallmarks of the disease. This review investigates multiple genetic mouse models of ASD to explore whether abnormalities in striatal circuits constitute a common pathophysiological mechanism in the development of autism-related behaviors. Despite the heterogeneity of genetic insult investigated, numerous genetic ASD models display alterations in the structure and function of striatal circuits, as well as abnormal behaviors including repetitive grooming, stereotypic motor routines, deficits in social interaction and decision-making. Comparative analysis in rodents provides a unique opportunity to leverage growing genetic association data to reveal canonical neural circuits whose dysfunction directly contributes to discrete aspects of ASD symptomatology. The description of such circuits could provide both organizing principles for understanding the complex genetic etiology of ASD as well as novel treatment routes. Furthermore, this focus on striatal mechanisms of behavioral regulation may also prove useful for exploring the pathogenesis of other neuropsychiatric diseases, which display overlapping behavioral deficits with ASD

  2. Striatal Circuits as a Common Node for Autism Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fuccillo, Marc V

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by two seemingly unrelated symptom domains-deficits in social interactions and restrictive, repetitive patterns of behavioral output. Whether the diverse nature of ASD symptomatology represents distributed dysfunction of brain networks or abnormalities within specific neural circuits is unclear. Striatal dysfunction is postulated to underlie the repetitive motor behaviors seen in ASD, and neurological and brain-imaging studies have supported this assumption. However, as our appreciation of striatal function expands to include regulation of behavioral flexibility, motivational state, goal-directed learning, and attention, we consider whether alterations in striatal physiology are a central node mediating a range of autism-associated behaviors, including social and cognitive deficits that are hallmarks of the disease. This review investigates multiple genetic mouse models of ASD to explore whether abnormalities in striatal circuits constitute a common pathophysiological mechanism in the development of autism-related behaviors. Despite the heterogeneity of genetic insult investigated, numerous genetic ASD models display alterations in the structure and function of striatal circuits, as well as abnormal behaviors including repetitive grooming, stereotypic motor routines, deficits in social interaction and decision-making. Comparative analysis in rodents provides a unique opportunity to leverage growing genetic association data to reveal canonical neural circuits whose dysfunction directly contributes to discrete aspects of ASD symptomatology. The description of such circuits could provide both organizing principles for understanding the complex genetic etiology of ASD as well as novel treatment routes. Furthermore, this focus on striatal mechanisms of behavioral regulation may also prove useful for exploring the pathogenesis of other neuropsychiatric diseases, which display overlapping behavioral deficits with ASD.

  3. Striatal glutamate antagonism induces contralateral neglect.

    PubMed

    Schuller, J J; Tran, D D; Marshall, J F

    1998-03-30

    To assess the role of striatal glutamatergic synapses in mediating sensorimotor orientation behavior, glutamate receptor antagonists were infused into the left striatum of awake rats and behavioral orientation to contralateral and ipsilateral stimuli were quantified. The AMPA-kainate antagonist, DNQX, and the NMDA antagonist, CPP, both induced a large asymmetry in responding, such that the rats oriented much less to stimuli presented contralateral to the antagonist infusions. Furthermore, intrastriatal glutamate antagonist infusions increased the occurrence of incorrect responses, or turning away from a contralaterally-presented stimulus. In a separate experiment, intrastriatal DNQX was shown to block kainic acid (KA)-induced Fos expression in the striatum, but not in adjacent cerebral cortex, suggesting that the diffusion of this drug is restricted to the striatum.

  4. Reduction in brain immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Hattori, T.; Murakami, K.; Suemaru, S.; Kawada, Y.; Kageyama, J.; Ota, Z.

    1985-02-18

    The brain CRF concentration of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was examined by rat CRF radioimmunoassay. Anti-CRF serum was developed by immunizing rabbits with synthetic rat CRF. Synthetic rat CRF was also used as tracer and standard. The displacement of /sup 125/I-rat CRF by serially diluted extracts of male Wistar rats hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and neurointermediate lobe was parallel to the displacement of synthetic rat CRF. In both WKY and SHR the highest levels of CRF immunoreactivity were shown by the hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe, and considerable CRF immunoreactivity was also detected in other brain regions. The CRF immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus, neurointermediate lobe, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex was significantly reduced in SHR and it may suggest that CRF abnormality may be implicated in the reported abnormalities in the pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic response and behavior of SHR.

  5. Dietary choline deprivation impairs rat brain mitochondrial function and behavioral phenotype.

    PubMed

    Pacelli, Consiglia; Coluccia, Addolorata; Grattagliano, Ignazio; Cocco, Tiziana; Petrosillo, Giuseppe; Paradies, Giuseppe; De Nitto, Emanuele; Massaro, Antonio; Persichella, Michele; Borracci, Pietro; Portincasa, Piero; Carratù, Maria Rosaria

    2010-06-01

    Dietary choline deprivation (CD) is associated with behavioral changes, but mechanisms underlying these detrimental effects are not well characterized. For instance, no literature data are available concerning the CD effects on brain mitochondrial function related to impairment in cognition. Therefore, we investigated brain mitochondrial function and redox status in male Wistar rats fed a CD diet for 28 d. Moreover, the CD behavioral phenotype was characterized. Compared with rats fed a control diet (CTRL), CD rats showed lower NAD-dependent mitochondrial state III and state IV respiration, 40% lower complex I activity, and significantly higher reactive oxygen species production. Total glutathione was oxidatively consumed more in CD than in CTRL rats and the rate of protein oxidation was 40% higher in CD than in CTRL rats, reflecting an oxidative stress condition. The mitochondrial concentrations of cardiolipin, a phospholipid required for optimal activity of complex I, was 20% lower in CD rats than in CTRL rats. Compared with CTRL rats, the behavioral phenotype of CD rats was characterized by impairment in motor coordination and motor learning assessed with the rotarod/accelerod test. Furthermore, compared with CTRL rats, CD rats were less capable of learning the active avoidance task and the number of attempts they made to avoid foot shock was fewer. The results suggest that CD-induced dysfunction in brain mitochondria may be responsible for impairment in cognition and underline that, similar to the liver, the brain also needs an adequate choline supply for its normal functioning.

  6. Striatal Activity and Reward Relativity: Neural Signals Encoding Dynamic Outcome Valuation

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Emily S.; Mankin, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The striatum is a key brain region involved in reward processing. Striatal activity has been linked to encoding reward magnitude and integrating diverse reward outcome information. Recent work has supported the involvement of striatum in the valuation of outcomes. The present work extends this idea by examining striatal activity during dynamic shifts in value that include different levels and directions of magnitude disparity. A novel task was used to produce diverse relative reward effects on a chain of instrumental action. Rats (Rattus norvegicus) were trained to respond to cues associated with specific outcomes varying by food pellet magnitude. Animals were exposed to single-outcome sessions followed by mixed-outcome sessions, and neural activity was compared among identical outcome trials from the different behavioral contexts. Results recording striatal activity show that neural responses to different task elements reflect incentive contrast as well as other relative effects that involve generalization between outcomes or possible influences of outcome variety. The activity that was most prevalent was linked to food consumption and post-food consumption periods. Relative encoding was sensitive to magnitude disparity. A within-session analysis showed strong contrast effects that were dependent upon the outcome received in the immediately preceding trial. Significantly higher numbers of responses were found in ventral striatum linked to relative outcome effects. Our results support the idea that relative value can incorporate diverse relationships, including comparisons from specific individual outcomes to general behavioral contexts. The striatum contains these diverse relative processes, possibly enabling both a higher information yield concerning value shifts and a greater behavioral flexibility. PMID:27822506

  7. Striatal Activity and Reward Relativity: Neural Signals Encoding Dynamic Outcome Valuation.

    PubMed

    Webber, Emily S; Mankin, David E; Cromwell, Howard C

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is a key brain region involved in reward processing. Striatal activity has been linked to encoding reward magnitude and integrating diverse reward outcome information. Recent work has supported the involvement of striatum in the valuation of outcomes. The present work extends this idea by examining striatal activity during dynamic shifts in value that include different levels and directions of magnitude disparity. A novel task was used to produce diverse relative reward effects on a chain of instrumental action. Rats (Rattus norvegicus) were trained to respond to cues associated with specific outcomes varying by food pellet magnitude. Animals were exposed to single-outcome sessions followed by mixed-outcome sessions, and neural activity was compared among identical outcome trials from the different behavioral contexts. Results recording striatal activity show that neural responses to different task elements reflect incentive contrast as well as other relative effects that involve generalization between outcomes or possible influences of outcome variety. The activity that was most prevalent was linked to food consumption and post-food consumption periods. Relative encoding was sensitive to magnitude disparity. A within-session analysis showed strong contrast effects that were dependent upon the outcome received in the immediately preceding trial. Significantly higher numbers of responses were found in ventral striatum linked to relative outcome effects. Our results support the idea that relative value can incorporate diverse relationships, including comparisons from specific individual outcomes to general behavioral contexts. The striatum contains these diverse relative processes, possibly enabling both a higher information yield concerning value shifts and a greater behavioral flexibility.

  8. Delayed cytokine expression in rat brain following experimental contusion.

    PubMed

    Holmin, S; Schalling, M; Höjeberg, B; Nordqvist, A C; Skeftruna, A K; Mathiesen, T

    1997-03-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines mediate brain injury in experimental studies. This study was undertaken to analyze the production of proinflammatory cytokines in experimental contusion. A brain contusion causing delayed edema was mimicked experimentally in rats using a weight-drop model. Intracerebral expression of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), IL-6, and interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) was studied by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The animals were killed at 6 hours or 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 16 days postinjury. In the injured area, no messenger (m)RNA expression was seen during the first 2 days after the trauma. On Days 4 to 6 posttrauma, however, strong IL-1 beta, TNF alpha, and IL-6 mRNA expression was detected in mononuclear cells surrounding the contusion. Expression of IFN gamma was not detected. Immunohistochemical double labeling confirmed the in situ hybridization results and demonstrated that mononuclear phagocytes and astrocytes produced IL-1 beta and that mainly astrocytes produced TNF alpha. The findings showed, somewhat unexpectedly, a late peak of intracerebral cytokine production in the injured area and in the contralateral corpus callosum, allowing for both local and global effects on the brain. An unexpected difference in the cellular sources of TNF alpha and IL-1 beta was detected. The cytokine pattern differs from that seen in other central nervous system inflammatory diseases and trauma models, suggesting that the intracerebral immune response is not a uniform event. The dominance of late cytokine production indicates that many cytokine effects are late events in an experimental contusion: Different pathogenic mechanisms may thus be operative at different times after brain injury.

  9. GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles decrease striatal neuronal degeneration and motor deficits during liver injury.

    PubMed

    Shilpa, J; Paulose, C S

    2014-07-01

    The metabolic alterations resulted from hepatic injury and cell loss lead to synaptic defects and neurodegeneration that undoubtedly contribute motor deficits. In the present study, GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles mediated liver cell proliferation influenced by growth factor and cytokines and neuronal survival in corpus striatum of partially hepatectomised rats was evaluated. Liver cell proliferation was initiated and progressed by the combined effect of increased expression of growth factor, insulin like growth factor-1 and decreased expressions of cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α and Akt-1. This was confirmed by the extent of incorporation of thymidine analogue, BrdU, in the DNA of rapidly dividing cells. Inappropriate influx of compounds to corpus striatum resulting from incomplete metabolism elevated GABAB and 5-HT2A neurotransmissions compared to those treated with nanoparticles. This directly influenced cyclic AMP response element binding protein, glial cell derived neurotrophic factor and brain derived neurotrophic factor in the corpus striatum that facilitate neurogenesis, neuronal survival, development, differentiation and neuroprotection. Motor deficits due to liver injury followed striatal neuronal damage were scored by grid walk and rotarod studies, which confirmed the regain of motor activity by GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticle treatment. The present study revealed the therapeutic significance of GABA and 5-HT chitosan nanoparticles in liver based diseases and related striatal neuronal damage that influenced by GABA and 5-HT.

  10. Estrogenic modulation of delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol effects on nigrostriatal dopaminergic activity in the female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, A; Ferández-Ruiz, J J; Martín, M; De Fonseca, F R; De Miguel, R; Ramos, J A

    1992-08-01

    In this work we studied the possible estrogenic modulation of the effects of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on nigrostriatal dopaminergic activity. Thus, we examined the effects of an acute dose of this cannabinoid: (i) during the three phases of the estrous cycle; (ii) after ovariectomy, chronic estrogen replacement, and/or tamoxifen (TMX)-induced blockade of cytosolic estrogenic receptors; and (iii) combined with a single and physiological injection of estradiol to ovariectomized rats, whose effects were measured early, with no time for genomic induction. THC increased the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase in the striatum of ovariectomized rats implanted with estradiol-filled Silastic capsules or ovariectomized rats. This effect: (i) depended on the presence of an intact estrogenic receptor mechanism, because it was prevented by pretreatment with TMX, and (ii) did not appear when THC was coadministered with estradiol, suggesting an inhibitory modulation of cannabinoid effect by the nongenomic mechanism of action of this steroid. The striatal content of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and its ratio with dopamine content, which can be used as an index of neuronal activity, also increased following acute THC administration. However, this effect was seen only in ovariectomized rats without estrogen replacement. The administration of THC in combination with a single estradiol injection or to estradiol-implanted ovariectomized rats was ineffective for both parameters. All these effects appeared after ovariectomy with/without estrogen replacement. However, we did not observe any statistically significant effects when THC was administered to normal cycling rats during each phase of the estrous cycle. This observation might be related to the fact that the affinity of striatal cannabinoid receptors, which are the main candidates to mediate cannabinoid effects on this area, significantly increased after ovariectomy compared with that measured in normal cycling rats. In

  11. Localization and labeling of rat brain in MR image based on Paxinos-Watson atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jie; Cai, Chao; Ding, Mingyue; Zhou, Chengping

    2006-03-01

    Localization and labeling of function regions in brain is an important topic in experimental brain sciences because the huge amount of data collected by neuroscientists will become meaningless if we cannot give them a precise description of their locations. In this paper, we proposed a localization and labelling method of 3D MR image of rat brain based on Paxinos-Watson atlas. Our objective is to use the specific atlas to accomplish localization and labeling of specified tissue of interest (TOI) to mimic a veteran expert such that invisible or unclear anatomic function regions in the MR images of rat brain can be automatically identified and marked. We proposed a multi-step method to locate and label the TOIs from the MR image of rat brain. Firstly, pre-processing. It aims at the digitization and 3D reconstruction of the atlas and MRI of rat brain. Secondly, two-step registration. The global registration is to eliminate the big misalign and section angle offset as well as the scale between the MRI and atlas. We can choose some unambiguous and characteristic points manually, and based on these correspondences a coarse registration is obtained using affine model. The local registration is to address individual variability of rat brain that can be performed by using Snake model. Thirdly, post-processing. The goal is to locate and label the TOIs in the selected MR image of rat brain slice guided by well-registered atlas. The experiments demonstrated the feasibility of our method.

  12. Connexin expression in electrically coupled postnatal rat brain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Venance, Laurent; Rozov, Andrei; Blatow, Maria; Burnashev, Nail; Feldmeyer, Dirk; Monyer, Hannah

    2000-01-01

    Electrical coupling by gap junctions is an important form of cell-to-cell communication in early brain development. Whereas glial cells remain electrically coupled at postnatal stages, adult vertebrate neurons were thought to communicate mainly via chemical synapses. There is now accumulating evidence that in certain neuronal cell populations the capacity for electrical signaling by gap junction channels is still present in the adult. Here we identified electrically coupled pairs of neurons between postnatal days 12 and 18 in rat visual cortex, somatosensory cortex, and hippocampus. Notably, coupling was found both between pairs of inhibitory neurons and between inhibitory and excitatory neurons. Molecular analysis by single-cell reverse transcription–PCR revealed a differential expression pattern of connexins in these identified neurons. PMID:10944183

  13. Kinetic characteristics of nitric oxide synthase from rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, R G; Palacios, M; Palmer, R M; Moncada, S

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the rate of synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and guanylate cyclase stimulation was used to characterize the kinetics of the NO synthase from rat forebrain and of some inhibitors of this enzyme. The NO synthase had an absolute requirement for L-arginine and NADPH and did not require any other cofactors. The enzyme had a Vmax. of 42 pmol of NO formed.min-1.mg of protein-1 and a Km for L-arginine of 8.4 microM. Three analogues of L-arginine, namely NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, NG-nitro-L-arginine and NG-iminoethyl-L-ornithine inhibited the brain NO synthase. All three compounds were competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with Ki values of 0.7, 0.4 and 1.2 microM respectively. PMID:1695842

  14. Cholecystokinin octapeptide-like immunoreactivity: histochemical localization in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Innis, R B; Corrêa, F M; Uhl, G R; Schneider, B; Snyder, S H

    1979-01-01

    Cholecystokinin octapeptide-like (CCK-OP-like) immunoreactivity was localized in the rat brain by using the indirect immunofluorescence method. Specificity in immunohistochemical studies was demonstrated by the virtual elimination of staining with either preimmune sera or sera preadsorbed with CCK-OP and by the achievement of similar fluorescent patterns with two different primary anti-CCK-OP sera. CCK-OP-like fluorescence was localized in neuronal cell bodies, fibers, and varicose terminals. The most dense collections of CCK-OP cells occurred in the periaqueductal gray and in the dorsomedial hypothalamus. Substantial numbers of cells and fibers also were present in the medial/dorsal and perirhinal cortex; more limited groups of cells were found in the pyramidal layer of the hippocampus and in the dorsal raphe. Images PMID:284371

  15. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  16. Antioxidant effects of calcium antagonists in rat brain homogenates.

    PubMed

    Yao, K; Ina, Y; Nagashima, K; Ohmori, K; Ohno, T

    2000-06-01

    We studied the antioxidant activities of calcium antagonists against autoxidation in rat brain homogenates. The homogenates were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with or without a calcium antagonist and subsequently assayed for lipid peroxide content. Percent inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was used as an index of the antioxidant effect. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists exhibited concentration-dependent (3-300 micromol/l) inhibitory effects against lipid peroxidation. The relative order of antioxidant potency and associated IC50 values (micromol/l) of the calcium antagonists for inhibition of the lipid peroxidation were as follows: nifedipine (51.5)>barnidipine (58.6)>benidipine (71.2)>nicardipine (129.3)>amlodipine (135.5)>nilvadipine (167.3)>nitrendipine (252.1)> diltiazem (>300)=verapamil (>300). These results suggest that some dihydropyridine calcium antagonists show antioxidant properties. The antioxidant effects of the calcium antagonists may contribute to their pharmacological actions.

  17. The effects in rats of lisdexamfetamine in combination with olanzapine on mesocorticolimbic dopamine efflux, striatal dopamine D2 receptor occupancy and stimulus generalization to a D-amphetamine cue.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Peter H; Rowley, Helen L; Gosden, James; Kulkarni, Rajiv S; Slater, Nigel; Love, Patrick L; Wang, Yiyun; Heal, David

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia is poorly understood and two principle hypotheses have dominated the field. Firstly, that subcortical dopamine function is enhanced while cortical dopamine function is reduced and secondly, that cortical glutamate systems are dysfunctional. It is also widely accepted that currently used antipsychotics have essentially no impact on cognitive deficits and persistent negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Reduced dopamine transmission via dopamine D1 receptors in the prefrontal cortex has been hypothesized to be involved in the aetiology of these symptom domains and enhancing cortical dopamine transmission within an optimal window has been suggested to be potentially beneficial. In these pre-clinical studies we have determined that combined administration of the d-amphetamine pro-drug, lisdexamfetamine and the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine increased dopamine efflux in the rat prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens to an extent greater than either drug given separately without affecting olanzapine's ability to block striatal dopamine D2 receptors which is important for its antipsychotic activity. Furthermore, in an established rodent model used to compare the subjective effects of novel compounds the ability of lisdexamfetamine to generalize to a d-amphetamine cue was dose-dependently attenuated when co-administered with olanzapine suggesting that lisdexamfetamine may produce less marked subjective effects when administered adjunctively with olanzapine.

  18. Purification of the high-Km aldehyde reductase from rat brain and liver and from ox brain.

    PubMed Central

    Rivett, A J; Smith, I L; Tipton, K F

    1981-01-01

    A procedure is described that yields an apparently homogeneous preparation of the high-Km aldehyde reductase from rat brain. This procedure is also applicable to the purification of this enzyme from rat liver and ox brain. In the latter case, however, the purified preparation could be resolved into two protein bands, both of which had enzyme activity, by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Since a sample of the ox brain enzyme from an earlier step in the purification procedure only showed the presence of a single band of activity after electrophoresis, this apparent multiplicity probably results from modification of the enzyme, possibly by oxidation, during the final step of the purification. A number of properties of the rat brain enzyme were determined and these were compared with those of the enzyme from rat liver. The two preparations were similar in their stabilities, behaviour during purification, kinetic properties, electrophoretic mobilities and amino acid compositions. Antibodies to the rat liver enzyme cross-reacted with that from brain and the inhibition of both these preparations by the antiserum was similar, further supporting the view that the enzymes from these two sources were closely similar if not identical. PMID:6798966

  19. SCH 23390 may alter dopamine-mediated motor behaviour via striatal D-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Boyce, S; Kelly, E; Davis, A; Fleminger, S; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1985-05-15

    SCH 23390 potently displaced the specific binding of 3H-piflutixol to D-1 sites in striatal membranes but haloperidol was only weakly effective. SCH 23390 weakly displaced specific 3H-spiperone binding to D-2 sites, but haloperidol was potent. SCH 23390 was more effective than haloperidol in inhibiting dopamine stimulated striatal adenylate cyclase activity. These results confirm the D-1 selectivity of SCH 23390. However, SCH 23390 inhibited apomorphine-induced stereotypy and climbing behaviour in rats with equal potency to haloperidol. Haloperidol dose-dependently increased striatal HVA and DOPAC concentrations without altering dopamine content. Low doses of SCH 23390 elevated striatal DOPAC concentrations but higher doses were without effect; striatal dopamine and HVA overall was unaffected by administration of SCH 23390. Haloperidol did not affect basal 3H-acetylcholine release from striatal slices but reversed the apomorphine-induced inhibition of 3H-acetylcholine release. SCH 23390 did not affect basal 3H-acetylcholine release nor did it reverse the apomorphine-induced inhibition of 3H-acetylcholine release. The ability of SCH 23390 to inhibit motor behaviour in the rat may be due to its action on D-1 receptors since the drug does not cause typical changes in parameters of striatal D-2 receptor function.

  20. Methylglyoxal can mediate behavioral and neurochemical alterations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; Pandolfo, Pablo; Galland, Fabiana; Torres, Felipe Vasconcelos; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Batassini, Cristiane; Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with loss of cognitive function and increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are elevated in diabetes and AD and have been suggested to act as mediators of the cognitive decline observed in these pathologies. Methylglyoxal (MG) is an extremely reactive carbonyl compound that propagates glycation reactions and is, therefore, able to generate AGEs. Herein, we evaluated persistent behavioral and biochemical parameters to explore the hypothesis that elevated exogenous MG concentrations, induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion, lead to cognitive decline in Wistar rats. A high and sustained administration of MG (3μmol/μL; subdivided into 6days) was found to decrease the recognition index of rats, as evaluated by the object-recognition test. However, MG was unable to impair learning-memory processes, as shown by the habituation in the open field (OF) and Y-maze tasks. Moreover, a single high dose of MG induced persistent alterations in anxiety-related behavior, diminishing the anxiety-like parameters evaluated in the OF test. Importantly, MG did not alter locomotion behavior in the different tasks performed. Our biochemical findings support the hypothesis that MG induces persistent alterations in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex, related to glyoxalase 1 activity, AGEs content and glutamate uptake. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100B content, as well as S100B secretion (astroglial-related parameters of brain injury), were not altered by ICV MG administration. Taken together, our data suggest that MG interferes directly in brain function and that the time and the levels of exogenous MG determine the different features that can be seen in diabetic patients.

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of the GABA transporter in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Radian, R; Ottersen, O P; Storm-Mathisen, J; Castel, M; Kanner, B I

    1990-04-01

    Polyclonal antibodies were raised against the GABA transporter (GABA-Tp) purified from rat brain tissue (Radian et al., 1986) and used for immunocytochemical localization of the antigen in several rat brain areas, including the cerebellum, hippocampus, substantia nigra, and cerebral cortex. Light microscopic studies with the peroxidase-antiperoxidase and biotin-avidin-peroxidase techniques suggested that GABA-Tp is localized in the same types of axons and terminals that contain endogenous GABA, as judged by comparison with parallel sections incubated with antibodies against glutaraldehyde-conjugated GABA. However, as expected from biochemical results, different neurons differed in their relative contents of GABA-Tp and GABA; thus, GABA-Tp was relatively low in striatonigral and Purkinje axon terminals and relatively high in nerve plexus around the bases of cerebellar Purkinje cells and hippocampal pyramidal and granule cells. The GABA-Tp antiserum did not produce detectable labeling of nerve cell bodies. Electron microscopic studies supported the light microscopic observations and provided direct evidence of cellular co-localization of GABA-Tp and GABA (as visualized by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique and postembedding immunogold labeling, respectively). The ultrastructural studies indicated the presence of GABA-Tp also in glial processes but not in glial cell bodies. The relative intensity of the neuronal and glial staining varied among regions: glial staining predominated over neuronal staining in the substantia nigra, whereas the converse was true in the cerebellum and hippocampus. The present immunocytochemical data demonstrate directly what has previously been inferred from biochemical and autoradiographic evidence: that the mechanisms for high-affinity GABA uptake is selectively and differentially localized in GABAergic neurons and in glial cells.

  2. Sleep deprivation has a neuroprotective role in a traumatic brain injury of the rat.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Vargas, Marina; Estrada Rojo, Francisco; Tabla-Ramon, Erika; Navarro-Argüelles, Hilda; Ortiz-Lailzon, Nathan; Hernández-Chávez, Alejandro; Solis, Barbara; Martínez Tapia, Ricardo; Perez Arredondo, Adan; Morales-Gomez, Julio; Gonzalez-Rivera, Ruben; Nava-Talavera, Karen; Navarro, Luz

    2012-11-07

    During the process of a brain injury, responses to produce damage and cell death are activated, but self-protective responses that attempt to maintain the integrity and functionality of the brain are also activated. We have previously reported that the recovery from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is better in rats if it occurs during the dark phase of the diurnal cycle when rats are in the waking period. This suggests that wakefulness causes a neuroprotective role in this type of injury. Here we report that 24h of total sleep deprivation after a TBI reduces the morphological damage and enhances the recovery of the rats, as seen on a neurobiological scale.

  3. Effects of beta-hydroxybutyrate on brain vascular permeability in rats with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Nurcan; Ugur Yilmaz, Canan; Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Ahishali, Bulent; Kucuk, Mutlu; Arican, Nadir; Elmas, Imdat; Gürses, Candan; Kaya, Mehmet

    2016-01-15

    This study investigates the effect of beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity during traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Evans blue (EB) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were used as determinants of BBB permeability. Glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated in the right (injury side) cerebral cortex of animals. The gene expression levels for occludin, glucose transporter (Glut)-1, aquaporin4 (AQP4) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) were performed, and Glut-1 and NF-κB activities were analyzed. BHB treatment decreased GSH and MDA levels in intact animals and in those exposed to TBI (P<0.05). Glut-1 protein levels decreased in sham, BHB and TBI plus BHB groups (P<0.05). NF-κB protein levels increased in animals treated with BHB and/or exposed to TBI (P<0.05). The expression levels of occludin and AQP4 did not significantly change among experimental groups. Glut-1 expression levels increased in BHB treated and untreated animals exposed to TBI (P<0.05). While NF-κB expression levels increased in animals in TBI (P<0.01), a decrease was noticed in these animals upon BHB treatment (P<0.01). In animals exposed to TBI, EB extravasation was observed in the ipsilateral cortex regardless of BHB treatment. Ultrastructurally, BHB attenuated but did not prevent the presence of HRP in brain capillary endothelial cells of animals with TBI; moreover, the drug also led to the observation of the tracer when used in intact rats (P<0.01). Altogether, these results showed that BHB not only failed to provide overall protective effects on BBB in TBI but also led to BBB disruption in healthy animals.

  4. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol differently affects striatal c-Fos expression following haloperidol or clozapine administration.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Giorgio; Sanna, Angela; Casu, Gianluca; Casti, Paola; Spada, Gabriele Pinna; Ruiu, Stefania; Pani, Luca

    2008-11-19

    It was previously shown that haloperidol, but not clozapine, induced intense rat catalepsy when co-administered with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. The present study investigated whether similar alterations could be observed on striatal c-Fos immunoreactivity after administration of the same drug combinations. Western Blot and immunocytochemistry stereological analyses indicated that delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (0.5 mg/kg) increased striatal c-Fos immunoreactivity induced by haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg). Conversely, no significant alterations of striatal c-Fos immunoreactivity were observed after injections of clozapine (10 mg/kg)+vehicle, clozapine+delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol or vehicle+delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. The present results indicate that the behavioral effects induced by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in haloperidol- and clozapine-treated rats are associated with different striatal c-Fos expressions.

  5. Upregulation of Gene Expression in Reward-Modulatory Striatal Opioid Systems by Sleep Loss

    PubMed Central

    Baldo, Brian A; Hanlon, Erin C; Obermeyer, William; Bremer, Quentin; Paletz, Elliott; Benca, Ruth M

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a link between sleep loss and the obesity ‘epidemic,' and several observations indicate that sleep curtailment engenders positive energy balance via increased palatable-food ‘snacking.' These effects suggest alterations in reward-modulatory brain systems. We explored the effects of 10 days of sleep deprivation in rats on the expression of striatal opioid peptide (OP) genes that subserve food motivation and hedonic reward, and compared effects with those seen in hypothalamic energy balance-regulatory systems. Sleep-deprived (Sleep-Dep) rats were compared with yoked forced-locomotion apparatus controls (App-Controls), food-restricted rats (Food-Restrict), and unmanipulated controls (Home-Cage). Detection of mRNA levels with in situ hybridization revealed a subregion-specific upregulation of striatal preproenkephalin and prodynorhin gene expression in the Sleep-Dep group relative to all other groups. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and throughout neocortex was also robustly upregulated selectively in the Sleep-Dep group. In contrast, parallel gene expression changes were observed in the Sleep-Dep and Food-Restrict groups in hypothalamic energy-sensing systems (arcuate nucleus NPY was upregulated, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript was downregulated), in alignment with leptin suppression in both groups. Together, these results reveal a novel set of sleep deprivation-induced transcriptional changes in reward-modulatory peptide systems, which are dissociable from the energy-balance perturbations of sleep loss or the potentially stressful effects of the forced-locomotion procedure. The recruitment of telencephalic food-reward systems may provide a feeding drive highly resistant to feedback control, which could engender obesity through the enhancement of palatable feeding. PMID:23864029

  6. Upregulation of gene expression in reward-modulatory striatal opioid systems by sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Baldo, Brian A; Hanlon, Erin C; Obermeyer, William; Bremer, Quentin; Paletz, Elliott; Benca, Ruth M

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a link between sleep loss and the obesity 'epidemic,' and several observations indicate that sleep curtailment engenders positive energy balance via increased palatable-food 'snacking.' These effects suggest alterations in reward-modulatory brain systems. We explored the effects of 10 days of sleep deprivation in rats on the expression of striatal opioid peptide (OP) genes that subserve food motivation and hedonic reward, and compared effects with those seen in hypothalamic energy balance-regulatory systems. Sleep-deprived (Sleep-Dep) rats were compared with yoked forced-locomotion apparatus controls (App-Controls), food-restricted rats (Food-Restrict), and unmanipulated controls (Home-Cage). Detection of mRNA levels with in situ hybridization revealed a subregion-specific upregulation of striatal preproenkephalin and prodynorhin gene expression in the Sleep-Dep group relative to all other groups. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and throughout neocortex was also robustly upregulated selectively in the Sleep-Dep group. In contrast, parallel gene expression changes were observed in the Sleep-Dep and Food-Restrict groups in hypothalamic energy-sensing systems (arcuate nucleus NPY was upregulated, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript was downregulated), in alignment with leptin suppression in both groups. Together, these results reveal a novel set of sleep deprivation-induced transcriptional changes in reward-modulatory peptide systems, which are dissociable from the energy-balance perturbations of sleep loss or the potentially stressful effects of the forced-locomotion procedure. The recruitment of telencephalic food-reward systems may provide a feeding drive highly resistant to feedback control, which could engender obesity through the enhancement of palatable feeding.

  7. Expression of GABA receptor rho subunits in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Boue-Grabot, E; Roudbaraki, M; Bascles, L; Tramu, G; Bloch, B; Garret, M

    1998-03-01

    The GABA receptor rho1, rho2, and rho3 subunits are expressed in the retina where they form bicuculline-insensitive GABA(C) receptors. We used northern blot, in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR analysis to study the expression of rho subunits in rat brains. In situ hybridization allowed us to detect rho-subunit expression in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the cerebellar Purkinje cells. RT-PCR experiments indicated that (a) in retina and in domains that may contain functional GABA(C) receptors, rho2 and rho1 subunits are expressed at similar levels; and (b) in domains and in tissues that are unlikely to contain GABA(C) receptors, rho2 mRNA is enriched relative to rho1 mRNA. These results suggest that both rho1 and rho2 subunits are necessary to form a functional GABA(C) receptor. The use of RT-PCR also showed that, except in the superior colliculus, rho3 is expressed along with rho1 and rho2 subunits. We also raised an antibody against a peptide sequence unique to the rho1 subunit. The use of this antibody on cerebellum revealed the rat rho1 subunit in the soma and dendrites of Purkinje neurons. The allocation of GABA(C) receptor subunits to identified neurons paves the way for future electrophysiological studies.

  8. Action of AF64A on rat brain muscarinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Eva, C.; Costa, E.

    1986-03-01

    ICV administration of compound AF64A (ethylcholine mustard aziridium ion) induces a long-term selective cholinergic hypofunction; however, it does not modify the characteristics of muscarinic receptors. In brain muscarinic receptor activation can either stimulate phosphoinositide turnover or inhibit adenylate cyclase. ICV infusion of AF64A (5 nmol/side/2.5 ..mu..l) reduced the hippocampal ACh content 10 or 30 days after the treatment to 75% of the control values. Under these conditions neither in the striatum nor in the frontal cortex ACh levels were decreased. The carbachol dose-dependent stimulation in hippocampal slices differed from that observed in control rats. The carbachol efficacy was increased but its potency was unchanged by AF64A. In contrast, ICV administration of AF64A failed to alter the oxotremorine efficacy or potency in inhibiting the forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat hippocampal membranes. These results suggest the two transducer systems coupled to muscarinic receptors may be differentially regulatable by cholinergic input.

  9. [Lipids from gray and white rat brain matter in autolysis].

    PubMed

    Gribanov, G A; Il'iashenko, D V

    1993-01-01

    A decrease in relative content of phospholipids and cholesterol simultaneously with increase in cholesterol esters and free fatty acids were detected in tissues of rat brain gray and white matters during autolysis at 37 degrees within 6-7 min, 1, 4 and 24 hrs; the most distinct alterations were observed in lipids of the gray matter especially at early (6-7 min) and late (24 hrs) stages of autolysis. In the gray matter, relative content of all the lipid fractions studied was restored to initial level within 4 hrs of incubation. In the white matter, during autolysis the content of cholesterol varied, the content of phospholipids was only slightly increased, while the level of free fatty acids was increased only at 24 hrs of incubation with synchronous decrease in content of triacylglycerols, cholesterol and, partially, phospholipids. These experimental data are of importance in resuscitation. Both common and dissimilar mechanisms of these lipid alterations are discussed. Not only the complex of hydrolase reactions but also that of transacylase and other reactions, involved in the degradation and biotransformation of brain lipids in autolysis, were noted.

  10. Are soluble and membrane-bound rat brain acetylcholinesterase different

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, C.; el Mourabit, M.; Stutz, C.; Mark, J.; Waksman, A. )

    1990-11-01

    Salt-soluble and detergent-soluble acetylcholinesterases (AChE) from adult rat brain were purified to homogeneity and studied with the aim to establish the differences existing between these two forms. It was found that the enzymatic activities of the purified salt-soluble AChE as well as the detergent-soluble AChE were dependent on the Triton X-100 concentration. Moreover, the interaction of salt-soluble AChE with liposomes suggests amphiphilic behaviour of this enzyme. Serum cholinesterase (ChE) did not bind to liposomes but its activity was also detergent-dependent. Detergent-soluble AChE remained in solution below critical micellar concentrations of Triton X-100. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified, Biobeads-treated and iodinated detergent-soluble 11 S AChE showed, under non reducing conditions, bands of 69 kD, 130 kD and greater than 250 kD corresponding, respectively, to monomers, dimers and probably tetramers of the same polypeptide chain. Under reducing conditions, only a 69 kD band was detected. It is proposed that an amphiphilic environment stabilizes the salt-soluble forms of AChE in the brain in vivo and that detergent-soluble Biobeads-treated 11 S AChE possess hydrophobic domain(s) different from the 20 kD peptide already described.

  11. The turnover of protein in discrete areas of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Lawrence; Lowry, Oliver H.; Brown, Joseph G.; Carter, Joyce G.

    1972-01-01

    1. Rats were injected serially with [14C]glucose to obtain a constant specific radioactivity of brain amino acids. Measurements with this system for periods of up to 8h gave an apparent mean half-life for protein in whole brain of 85h (indicating the presence of a protein fraction with much more rapid turnover than this). 2. The half-lives of proteins in the granule-cell, molecular and white-matter layers of cerebellum were also determined. These had values of 33, 59 and 136h respectively. In addition, the incorporation into protein in six layers of the cerebral cortex, subjacent white matter and five layers of Ammon's horn was studied. All cell-body layers incorporated amino acids at about the same rate irrespective of location, and these rates were considerably higher than those for incorporation into proteins in areas rich in dendrites or fibre tracts. 3. A new method for measuring small amounts of glutamate with a cyclic enzyme system is presented. PMID:4341911

  12. Dual ameliorative effects of Ningdong granule on dopamine in rat models of Tourette's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Li, Anyuan

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key neuromodulator in the brain that supports motor and cognitive functions. Here, we use apomorphine (Apo) and 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) to develop two rat models of Tourette's syndrome (TS), a common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by stereotyped repetitive involuntary tics. The models enabled the assessment of unique ameliorative effects of Ningdong granule (NDG), a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) preparation dedicated to the treatment of TS, on the striatal DA content of rats. By using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), we found that long-term administration of NDG could, at least partially, restore the striatal dopamine alterations, either by increasing them after IDPN treatment or by decreasing them after Apo treatment. Taken together, our data indicated that NDG could ameliorate the abnormal striatal DA content dually, and the unique therapeutic property may be meaningful for the treatment of TS. PMID:25592875

  13. Brain Metabolic Changes in Rats following Acoustic Trauma.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Zhu, Yejin; Aa, Jiye; Smith, Paul F; De Ridder, Dirk; Wang, Guangji; Zheng, Yiwen

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic trauma is the most common cause of hearing loss and tinnitus in humans. However, the impact of acoustic trauma on system biology is not fully understood. It has been increasingly recognized that tinnitus caused by acoustic trauma is unlikely to be generated by a single pathological source, but rather a complex network of changes involving not only the auditory system but also systems related to memory, emotion and stress. One obvious and significant gap in tinnitus research is a lack of biomarkers that reflect the consequences of this interactive "tinnitus-causing" network. In this study, we made the first attempt to analyse brain metabolic changes in rats following acoustic trauma using metabolomics, as a pilot study prior to directly linking metabolic changes to tinnitus. Metabolites in 12 different brain regions collected from either sham or acoustic trauma animals were profiled using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics platform. After deconvolution of mass spectra and identification of the molecules, the metabolomic data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis showed that metabolic patterns varied among different brain regions; however, brain regions with similar functions had a similar metabolite composition. Acoustic trauma did not change the metabolite clusters in these regions. When analyzed within each brain region using the orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis sub-model, 17 molecules showed distinct separation between control and acoustic trauma groups in the auditory cortex, inferior colliculus, superior colliculus, vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), and cerebellum. Further metabolic pathway impact analysis and the enrichment overview with network analysis suggested the primary involvement of amino acid metabolism, including the alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolic pathways, the arginine and proline metabolic pathways and the purine

  14. Brain Metabolic Changes in Rats following Acoustic Trauma

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun; Zhu, Yejin; Aa, Jiye; Smith, Paul F.; De Ridder, Dirk; Wang, Guangji; Zheng, Yiwen

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic trauma is the most common cause of hearing loss and tinnitus in humans. However, the impact of acoustic trauma on system biology is not fully understood. It has been increasingly recognized that tinnitus caused by acoustic trauma is unlikely to be generated by a single pathological source, but rather a complex network of changes involving not only the auditory system but also systems related to memory, emotion and stress. One obvious and significant gap in tinnitus research is a lack of biomarkers that reflect the consequences of this interactive “tinnitus-causing” network. In this study, we made the first attempt to analyse brain metabolic changes in rats following acoustic trauma using metabolomics, as a pilot study prior to directly linking metabolic changes to tinnitus. Metabolites in 12 different brain regions collected from either sham or acoustic trauma animals were profiled using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics platform. After deconvolution of mass spectra and identification of the molecules, the metabolomic data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis showed that metabolic patterns varied among different brain regions; however, brain regions with similar functions had a similar metabolite composition. Acoustic trauma did not change the metabolite clusters in these regions. When analyzed within each brain region using the orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis sub-model, 17 molecules showed distinct separation between control and acoustic trauma groups in the auditory cortex, inferior colliculus, superior colliculus, vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), and cerebellum. Further metabolic pathway impact analysis and the enrichment overview with network analysis suggested the primary involvement of amino acid metabolism, including the alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolic pathways, the arginine and proline metabolic pathways and the purine

  15. Housing conditions influence motor functions and exploratory behavior following focal damage of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gornicka-Pawlak, Elzbieta; Jabłońska, Anna; Chyliński, Andrzej; Domańska-Janik, Krystyna

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated influence of housing conditions on motor functions recovery and exploratory behavior following ouabain focal brain lesion in the rat. During 30 days post-surgery period rats were housed individually in standard cages (IS) or in groups in enriched environment (EE) and behaviorally tested. The EE lesioned rats showed enhanced recovery from motor impairments in walking beam task, comparing with IS animals. Contrarily, in the open field IS rats (both lesioned and control) traveled a longer distance, showed less habituation and spent less time resting at the home base than the EE animals. Unlike the EE lesioned animals, the lesioned IS rats, presented a tendency to hyperactivity in postinjury period. Turning tendency was significantly affected by unilateral brain lesion only in the EE rats. We can conclude that housing conditions distinctly affected the rat's behavior in classical laboratory tests.

  16. Garlic extract attenuates brain mitochondrial dysfunction and cognitive deficit in obese-insulin resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Pintana, Hiranya; Sripetchwandee, Jirapas; Supakul, Luerat; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress in the obese-insulin resistant condition has been shown to affect cognitive as well as brain mitochondrial functions. Garlic extract has exerted a potent antioxidant effect. However, the effects of garlic extract on the brain of obese-insulin resistant rats have never been investigated. We hypothesized that garlic extract improves cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats induced by long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption. Male Wistar rats were fed either normal diet or HFD for 16 weeks (n = 24/group). At week 12, rats in each dietary group received either vehicle or garlic extract (250 and 500 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) for 28 days. Learning and memory behaviors, metabolic parameters, and brain mitochondrial function were determined at the end of treatment. HFD led to increased body weight, visceral fat, plasma insulin, cholesterol, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, indicating the development of insulin resistance. Furthermore, HFD rats had cognitive deficit and brain mitochondrial dysfunction. HFD rats treated with both doses of garlic extract had decreased body weight, visceral fat, plasma cholesterol, and MDA levels. Garlic extract also improved cognitive function and brain mitochondrial function, which were impaired in obese-insulin resistant rats caused by HFD consumption.

  17. Yawning and Stretching Predict Brain Temperature Changes in Rats: Support for the Thermoregulatory Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Shoup-Knox, Melanie L.; Gallup, Andrew C.; Gallup, Gordon G.; McNay, Ewan C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research suggests that yawning is an adaptive behavior that functions to promote brain thermoregulation among homeotherms. To explore the relationship between brain temperature and yawning we implanted thermocoupled probes in the frontal cortex of rats to measure brain temperature before, during and after yawning. Temperature recordings indicate that yawns and stretches occurred during increases in brain temperature, with brain temperatures being restored to baseline following the execution of each of these behaviors. The circulatory changes that accompany yawning and stretching may explain some of the thermal similarities surrounding these events. These results suggest that yawning and stretching may serve to maintain brain thermal homeostasis. PMID:21031034

  18. Protein-energy malnutrition during pregnancy alters caffeine's effect on brain tissue of neonate rats.

    PubMed

    Mori, M; Wilber, J F; Nakamoto, T

    1984-12-17

    We studied whether protein-energy malnutrition changed brain susceptibility to a small dose of caffeine in newborn rats. Since we had demonstrated previously that caffeine intake during lactation increased the brain neuropeptide on newborns, we investigated further the effects of the prenatal administration of caffeine on TRH and cyclo (His-Pro). From day 13 of gestation to delivery day, pregnant rats in one group were fed either a 20% or a 6% protein diet ad libitum, and those in the other group were pair-fed with each protein diet supplemented with caffeine at an effective dose of 2 mg/100 g body weight. Upon delivery, brain weight, brain protein, RNA, DNA and the neuropeptides thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and cyclo (His-Pro) were measured in the newborn rats. A 6% protein without caffeine diet caused reductions in brain weights and brain protein, RNA and DNA contents, but did not alter brain TRH and cyclo (His-Pro) concentrations in the newborn animals. In the offspring from dams fed a 6% protein diet, caffeine administration significantly elevated brain weights and brain contents of protein, RNA and DNA. In contrast, these values were similar between noncaffeine and caffeine-supplemented animals in a 20% protein diet group. Brain TRH and cyclo (His-Pro) concentrations were not changed by caffeine administration. These data suggest that caffeine augments protein synthesis in the newborn rat brain when malnourished, but that the same dose of caffeine did not affect protein synthesis in brains of newborn rats from normally nourished dams. Therefore, the present findings indicate that the nutritional status of mothers during pregnancy has important implication in the impact of caffeine on their offspring's brains.

  19. [The effect of various amines on TRH contents in rat brain (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mitsuma, T; Hirooka, Y; Nihei, N

    1976-08-20

    To study the effect of vatious amines on TRH contents in rat brain, various amines or inhibitor of synthesis of amines were injected into rat through i.v. or i.p.. Rats were decapitated and brain was frozen in dry ice and aceton. TRH contents in hypothalamus(H), cerebrum(C) and cerebellum and brain stem (C and S) were measured by TRH radioimmunoassay. TRH contents in normal rats were 3.9+/-0.5ng in H, 2.6+/-0.5NG IN C and 1.6+/-0.3ng in C and S. TRH contents in all parts of brain were increased in L-DOPA treated group and did not change in T3 or T4 treated group. TRH contents in all parts of brain were decreased in alpha-methyl-DOPA, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, fusaric acid and 5-HTP treated groups. In D,L-p-chlorophenylalanine treated group TRH contents in brain were increased only in hypothalamus. In L-DOPA or 5-HTP treated group with T4 or T3 preadministration, TRH contents in all parts of brain were same levels of L-DOPA or 5-HTP treated group. The above data suggested the TRH contents in rat brain were increased with increase of dopamine level in rat brain and decreased with increase of serotonine level or decrease of noradrenaline level in rat brain and inhibitory effect of T4 or T3 on TRH release might be mediated through dopaminergic and serotonergic mechanism.

  20. Short-term nutritional folate deficiency in rats has a greater effect on choline and acetylcholine metabolism in the peripheral nervous system than in the brain, and this effect escalates with age

    PubMed Central

    Crivello, Natalia A.; Blusztajn, Jan K.; Joseph, James A.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Smith, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study is that a folate-deficient diet (FD) has a greater effect on cholinergic system in the peripheral nervous system than in the brain, and that this effect escalates with age. It was tested by comparing choline and acetylcholine levels in male Sprague Dawley rats fed either control or folate-deficient diets for 10 weeks, starting at age 4 weeks (the young group) or 9 months (the adult group). FD consumption resulted in depletion of plasma folate in both age groups. In young folate-deficient rats, liver and lung choline levels were significantly lower than those in the respective controls. No other significant effects of FD on choline and acetylcholine metabolism were found in young rats. In adult rats, FD consumption markedly decreased choline levels in the liver, kidneys, and heart; furthermore, choline levels in the cortex and striatum were moderately elevated, although hippocampal choline levels were not affected. Acetylcholine levels were higher in the heart, cortex, and striatum but lower in the hippocampus in adult folate-deficient rats, as compared to controls. Higher acetylcholine levels in the striatum in adult folate-deficient rats were also associated with higher dopamine release in the striatal slices. Thus, both age groups showed higher cholinergic metabolic sensitivity to FD in the peripheral nervous system than in the brain. However, compensatory abilities appeared to be better in the young group, implicating the adult group as a preferred model for further investigation of folate-choline-acetylcholine interactions and their role in brain plasticity and cognitive functions. PMID:21056288

  1. Changing numbers of neuronal and non-neuronal cells underlie postnatal brain growth in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Fabiana; Lent, Roberto; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2009-01-01

    The rat brain increases >6× in mass from birth to adulthood, presumably through the addition of glial cells and increasing neuronal size, without the addition of neurons. To test this hypothesis, here we investigate quantitatively the postnatal changes in the total number of neuronal and non-neuronal cells in the developing rat brain, and examine how these changes correlate with brain growth. Total numbers of cells were determined with the isotropic fractionator in the brains of 53 Wistar rats, from birth to young adulthood. We find that at birth, >90% of the cells in the rat brain are neurons. Following a dormant period of ≈3 days after birth, the net number of neurons in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and remaining tissue (excluding cerebellum and olfactory bulb) doubles during the first week, then is reduced by 70% during the second postnatal week, concurrently with net gliogenesis. A second round of net addition of 6 million neurons is observed in the cerebral cortex over the following 2 weeks. During the first postnatal week, brain growth relates mainly to increased numbers of neurons of larger average size. In the second and third weeks, it correlates with increased numbers of non-neuronal cells that are smaller in size than the preexisting neurons. Postnatal rat brain development is thus characterized by dramatic changes in the cellular composition of the brain, whose growth is governed by different combinations of cell addition and loss, and changes in average cell size during the first months after birth. PMID:19666520

  2. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  3. Rate of utilization of glucose and `compartmentation' of α-oxoglutarate and glutamate in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Gaitonde, M. K.

    1965-01-01

    1. The rate of incorporation of 14C into pyruvate, α-oxoglutarate, lactate and glucose of rat tissues was measured after the subcutaneous injection of uniformly labelled glucose. 2. In rat brain the specific radioactivities of lactate and glucose were similar to that of alanine. In liver the specific radioactivity of glucose was considerably higher than that of lactate or alanine. 3. The specific radioactivities of α-oxo acids of rat brain were lower than those of corresponding amino acids, alanine and glutamate. These findings have been explained in relation to metabolic compartments in vivo. 4. The approximate estimated rate of glucose utilization in rat brain in vivo is 0·96μmole/g. of brain/min. PMID:14342519

  4. Neonatal hypothyroidism affects the adenine nucleotides metabolism in astrocyte cultures from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Braganhol, Elizandra; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Bavaresco, Luci; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal hypothyroidism is associated with multiple and severe brain alterations. We recently demonstrated a significant increase in hydrolysis of AMP to adenosine in brain of hypothyroid rats at different ages. However, the origin of this effect was unclear. Considering the effects of adenine nucleotides to brain functions and the harmful effects of neonatal hypothyroidism to normal development of the central nervous system, in this study we investigated the metabolism of adenine nucleotides in hippocampal, cortical and cerebellar astrocyte cultures from rats submitted to neonatal hypothyroidism. ATP and AMP hydrolysis were enhanced by 52 and 210%, respectively, in cerebellar astrocytes from hypothyroid rats. In hippocampus of hypothyroid rats, the 47% increase in AMP hydrolysis was significantly reverted when the astrocytes were treated with T3. Therefore, the imbalance in the ATP and adenosine levels in astrocytes, during brain development, may contribute to some of the effects described in neonatal hypothyroidism.

  5. Expression of aquaporin-4 and pathological characteristics of brain injury in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, CHENGCHENG; CHEN, JIANQIANG; LU, HONG

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is a widely distributed membrane protein, which is found in glial cells, ependymocytes and capillary endothelial cells in the brain, and particularly in the choroid plexus. AQP4 is a key regulator of water metabolism, and changes in its expression following brain injury are associated with pathological changes in the damaged side of the brain; however, the effects of brain injury on AQP4 and injury-induced pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and changes in brain water content, the expression of AQP4 expression and pathological characteristics in the damaged and contralateral non-damaged sides of the brain were examined. In the damaged side of the brain, vasogenic edema appeared first, followed by cellular edema. The aggravated cellular edema in the damaged side of the brain resulted in two periods of peak edema severity. Pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain occurred later than those in the damaged side; cellular edema appeared first, followed by vasogenic edema, which was alleviated earlier than the cellular edema. AQP4 was downregulated during vasogenic edema, and upregulated during cellular edema. Taken together, these results suggested that the downregulation of AQP4 was a result of vasogenic edema and that the upregulation of AQP4 may have induced cellular edema. PMID:26459070

  6. The inhibition of 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) biosynthesis, rather than enhancing striatal damage, protects striatal neurons from malonate-induced death: a potential role of cyclooxygenase-2-dependent metabolism of 2-AG.

    PubMed

    Valdeolivas, S; Pazos, M R; Bisogno, T; Piscitelli, F; Iannotti, F A; Allarà, M; Sagredo, O; Di Marzo, V; Fernández-Ruiz, J

    2013-10-17

    The cannabinoid CB2 receptor, which is activated by the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), protects striatal neurons from apoptotic death caused by the local administration of malonate, a rat model of Huntington's disease (HD). In the present study, we investigated whether endocannabinoids provide tonic neuroprotection in this HD model, by examining the effect of O-3841, an inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipases, the enzymes that catalyse 2-AG biosynthesis, and JZL184 or OMDM169, two inhibitors of 2-AG inactivation by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). The inhibitors were injected in rats with the striatum lesioned with malonate, and several biochemical and morphological parameters were measured in this brain area. Similar experiments were also conducted in vitro in cultured M-213 cells, which have the phenotypic characteristics of striatal neurons. O-3841 produced a significant reduction in the striatal levels of 2-AG in animals lesioned with malonate. However, surprisingly, the inhibitor attenuated malonate-induced GABA and BDNF deficiencies and the reduction in Nissl staining, as well as the increase in GFAP immunostaining. In contrast, JZL184 exacerbated malonate-induced striatal damage. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was induced in the striatum 24 h after the lesion simultaneously with other pro-inflammatory responses. The COX-2-derived 2-AG metabolite, prostaglandin E2 glyceryl ester (PGE2-G), exacerbated neurotoxicity, and this effect was antagonized by the blockade of PGE2-G action with AGN220675. In M-213 cells exposed to malonate, in which COX-2 was also upregulated, JZL184 worsened neurotoxicity, and this effect was attenuated by the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib or AGN220675. OMDM169 also worsened neurotoxicity and produced measurable levels of PGE2-G. In conclusion, the inhibition of 2-AG biosynthesis is neuroprotective in rats lesioned with malonate, possibly through the counteraction of the formation of pro-neuroinflammatory PGE2-G, formed from COX-2

  7. Vasopressin induces dopamine release and cyclic AMP efflux from the brain of water-deprived rats: inhibitory effect of vasopressin V2 receptor-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, M G; Handa, R K; Stephen, P M; Bapna, J S

    1998-01-01

    The neurohypophyseal hormone vasopressin (AVP) is widely distributed throughout the central nervous system. It acts as an excitatory transmitter in the CNS and plays an important physiological role in water and electrolyte homeostasis. However, water deprivation has been shown to induce changes in the levels of monoamines, but there is little knowledge about the influence of AVP on monoamine levels after water deprivation. In this study, we investigated the effect of AVP and its receptor antagonists on alterations in dopamine (DA) release and cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) efflux from rat brain slices following water deprivation. Striatal brain slices (500 microm thick) were incubated in a medium with or without AVP (0. 1-1.0 microM) for 30 min. After 2 h of washout in normal medium, high KCl (40 mM)-evoked DA release and cAMP efflux from the rat brain slices were examined. In the brain slices of euhydrated animals, treatment with AVP slightly altered DA release and cAMP efflux from the brain. This increase in DA release and cAMP efflux was not significantly affected by the addition of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, calcineurin (20 microM), to the incubation medium or either by a V1 or V2 AVP receptor antagonist. In contrast, AVP significantly increased the DA release and enhanced the cAMP efflux from the brain slices of water-deprived animals. The AVP-induced increase of brain response in the water-deprived animals was significantly attenuated by a V2 receptor antagonist, partially by calcineurin, but not by a V1 receptor antagonist. The present results suggest that AVP may play a role in water-deprivation-induced DA release and cAMP efflux, which is possibly mediated through the activation of the V2 receptor. The V2 receptor action is attenuated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent dephosphorlyation of some cellular proteins critical for signal transduction.

  8. A Search for Mitochondrial Damage in Alzheimer’s Disease Using Isolated Rat Brain Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Faizi, Mehrdad; Seydi, Enayatollah; Abarghuyi, Sadegh; Salimi, Ahmad; Nasoohi, Sanaz; Pourahmad, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects regions of the brain that control cognition, memory, language, speech and awareness to one’s physical surroundings. The pathological initiation and progression of AD is highly complex and its prevalence is on the rise. In his study, Alzheimer's disease was induced with single injection of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides (30ng, by stereotaxy) in each hemisphere of the Wistar rat brain. Then memory dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by Aβ peptide were investigated on isolated brain mitochondria obtained from infected rat. Our results showed memory impairment in rats after receiving an Aβ peptide. We also found significant rise (P<0.05) at ROS formation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, mitochondria swelling, cytochrome c release and significant decrease in ATP/ADP ratio on mitochondria isolated from brain of these memory impaired rats compared with those of untreated control rat group. Activation of caspase-3 the final mediator of apoptosis in the brain homogenate of the memory impaired rats was another justification for occurrence of neuron loss in the experimental model of AD. Our results suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondria mediated apoptosis in brain neurons play very important role in initiation of AD. PMID:28228816

  9. Population-averaged diffusion tensor imaging atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain.

    PubMed

    Veraart, Jelle; Leergaard, Trygve B; Antonsen, Bjørnar T; Van Hecke, Wim; Blockx, Ines; Jeurissen, Ben; Jiang, Yi; Van der Linden, Annemie; Johnson, G Allan; Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan

    2011-10-15

    Rats are widely used in experimental neurobiological research, and rat brain atlases are important resources for identifying brain regions in the context of experimental microsurgery, tissue sampling, and neuroimaging, as well as comparison of findings across experiments. Currently, most available rat brain atlases are constructed from histological material derived from single specimens, and provide two-dimensional or three-dimensional (3D) outlines of diverse brain regions and fiber tracts. Important limitations of such atlases are that they represent individual specimens, and that finer details of tissue architecture are lacking. Access to more detailed 3D brain atlases representative of a population of animals is needed. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a unique neuroimaging modality that provides sensitive information about orientation structure in tissues, and is widely applied in basic and clinical neuroscience investigations. To facilitate analysis and assignment of location in rat brain neuroimaging investigations, we have developed a population-averaged three-dimensional DTI atlas of the normal adult Sprague Dawley rat brain. The atlas is constructed from high resolution ex vivo DTI images, which were nonlinearly warped into a population-averaged in vivo brain template. The atlas currently comprises a selection of manually delineated brain regions, the caudate-putamen complex, globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra, external capsule, corpus callosum, internal capsule, cerebral peduncle, fimbria of the hippocampus, fornix, anterior commisure, optic tract, and stria terminalis. The atlas is freely distributed and potentially useful for several purposes, including automated and manual delineation of rat brain structural and functional imaging data.

  10. Glutaric acid moderately compromises energy metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    da C Ferreira, Gustavo; Viegas, Carolina M; Schuck, Patrícia F; Latini, Alexandra; Dutra-Filho, Carlos S; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Vargas, Carmen R; Wajner, Moacir

    2005-12-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I is an inherited metabolic disorder biochemically characterized by tissue accumulation of predominantly glutaric acid (GA). Affected patients present frontotemporal hypotrophy, as well as caudate and putamen injury following acute encephalopathic crises. Considering that the underlying mechanisms of basal ganglia damage in this disorder are poorly known, in the present study we tested the effects of glutaric acid (0.2-5mM) on critical enzyme activities of energy metabolism, namely the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, succinate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase in midbrain of developing rats. Glutaric acid significantly inhibited creatine kinase activity (up to 26%) even at the lowest dose used in the assays (0.2mM). We also observed that CK inhibition was prevented by pre-incubation of the homogenates with reduced glutathione, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of GA was possibly mediated by oxidation of essential thiol groups of the enzyme. In addition, the activities of the respiratory chain complex I-III and of succinate dehydrogenase were also significantly inhibited by 20 and 30%, respectively, at the highest glutaric acid concentration tested (5mM). In contrast, complexes II-III and IV activities of the electron transport chain were not affected by the acid. The effect of glutaric acid on the rate of oxygen consumption in intact mitochondria from the rat cerebrum was also investigated. Glutaric acid (1mM) significantly lowered the respiratory control ratio (state III/state IV) up to 40% in the presence of the respiratory substrates glutamate/malate or succinate. Moreover, state IV respiration linked to NAD and FAD substrates was significantly increased in GA-treated mitochondria while state III was significantly diminished. The results indicate that the major metabolite accumulating in glutaric acidemia type I moderately compromises brain energy metabolism in vitro.

  11. Lipid mapping of the rat brain for models of disease.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gardeazabal, J; González de San Román, E; Moreno-Rodríguez, M; Llorente-Ovejero, A; Manuel, I; Rodríguez-Puertas, R

    2017-02-21

    Lipids not only constitute the primary component of cellular membranes and contribute to metabolism but also serve as intracellular signaling molecules and bind to specific membrane receptors to control cell proliferation, growth and convey neuroprotection. Over the last several decades, the development of new analytical techniques, such as imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), has contributed to our understanding of their involvement in physiological and pathological conditions. IMS allows researchers to obtain a wide range of information about the spatial distribution and abundance of the different lipid molecules that is crucial to understand brain functions. The primary aim of this study was to map the spatial distribution of different lipid species in the rat central nervous system (CNS) using IMS to find a possible relationship between anatomical localization and physiology. The data obtained were subsequently applied to a model of neurological disease, the 192IgG-saporin lesion model of memory impairment. The results were obtained using a LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer in positive and negative ionization modes and analyzed by ImageQuest and MSIReader software. A total of 176 different molecules were recorded based on the specific localization of their intensities. However, only 34 lipid species in negative mode and 51 in positive were assigned to known molecules with an error of 5ppm. These molecules were grouped by different lipid families, resulting in: Phosphatidylcholines (PC): PC (34: 1)+K(+) and PC (32: 0)+K(+) distributed primarily in gray matter, and PC (36: 1)+K(+) and PC (38: 1)+Na(+) distributed in white matter. Phosphatidic acid (PA): PA (38: 3)+K(+) in white matter, and PA (38: 5)+K(+) in gray matter and brain ventricles. Phosphoinositol (PI): PI (18: 0/20: 4)-H(+) in gray matter, and PI (O-30: 1) or PI (P-30: 0)-H(+) in white matter. Phosphatidylserines (PS): PS (34: 1)-H(+) in gray matter, and PS (38: 1)-H(+) in white matter. Sphingomyelin (SM

  12. Effect of Cyclosporin A on the Uptake of D3-Selective PET Radiotracers in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Li, Shihong; Xu, Jinbin; Chu, Wenhua; Jones, Lynne A.; Luedtke, Robert R.; Mach, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Four benzamide analogs having a high affinity and selectivity for D3 versus D2 receptors were radiolabeled with 11C or 18F for in vivo evaluation. Methods Precursors were synthesized and the four D3 selective benzamide analogs were radiolabeled. The tissue distribution and brain uptake of the four compounds were evaluated in control rats and rats pretreated with cyclosporin A, a modulator of P-glycoprotein and an inhibitor of other ABC efflux transporters that contribute to the blood brain barrier. MicroPET imaging was carried out for [11C]6 in a control and a cyclosporin A pre-treated rat. Results All four compounds showed low brain uptake in control rats at 5 and 30 min post-injection; despite recently reported rat behavioral studies conducted on analogs 6 (WC-10) and 7 (WC-44). Following administration of cyclosporin A, increased brain uptake was observed with all four PET radiotracers at both 5 and 30 min post-i.v. injection. An increase in brain uptake following modulation/inhibition of the ABC transporters was also observed in the microPET study. Conclusions These data suggest that D3 selective conformationally-flexible benzamide analogs which contain a N-2-methoxyphenylpiperazine moiety are substrates for P-glycoprotein or other ABC transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier, and that PET radiotracers containing this pharmacophore may display low brain uptake in rodents due to the action of these efflux transporters. PMID:21718948

  13. Structural and functional effects of social isolation on the hippocampus of rats with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Khodaie, Babak; Lotfinia, Ahmad Ali; Ahmadi, Milad; Lotfinia, Mahmoud; Jafarian, Maryam; Karimzadeh, Fariba; Coulon, Philippe; Gorji, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Social isolation has significant long-term psychological and physiological consequences. Both social isolation and traumatic brain injury (TBI) alter normal brain function and structure. However, the influence of social isolation on recovery from TBI is unclear. This study aims to evaluate if social isolation exacerbates the anatomical and functional deficits after TBI in young rats. Juvenile male rats were divided into four groups; sham operated control with social contacts, sham control with social isolation, TBI with social contacts, and TBI with social isolation. During four weeks after brain injury in juvenile rats, we evaluated the animal behaviors by T-maze and open-field tests, recorded brain activity with electrocorticograms and assessed structural changes by histological procedures in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, CA1, and CA3 areas. Our findings revealed significant memory impairments and hyperactivity conditions in rats with TBI and social isolation compared to the other groups. Histological assessments showed an increase of the mean number of dark neurons, apoptotic cells, and caspase-3 positive cells in all tested areas of the hippocampus in TBI rats with and without social isolation compared to sham rats. Furthermore, social isolation significantly increased the number of dark cells, apoptotic neurons, and caspase-3 positive cells in the hippocampal CA3 region in rats with TBI. This study indicates the harmful effect of social isolation on anatomical and functional deficits induced by TBI in juvenile rats. Prevention of social isolation may improve the outcome of TBI.

  14. Cortical Control of Striatal Dopamine Transmission via Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Kosillo, Polina; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal regulation of striatal dopamine (DA) transmission has long been postulated, but ionotropic glutamate receptors have not been localized directly to DA axons. Striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) are emerging as major players in striatal function, and can govern DA transmission by activating nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) on DA axons. Cortical inputs to ChIs have historically been perceived as sparse, but recent evidence indicates that they strongly activate ChIs. We explored whether activation of M1/M2 corticostriatal inputs can consequently gate DA transmission, via ChIs. We reveal that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-expressing corticostriatal axons can drive striatal DA release detected with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and requires activation of nAChRs on DA axons and AMPA receptors on ChIs that promote short-latency action potentials. By contrast, DA release driven by optogenetic activation of intralaminar thalamostriatal inputs involves additional activation of NMDA receptors on ChIs and action potential generation over longer timescales. Therefore, cortical and thalamic glutamate inputs can modulate DA transmission by regulating ChIs as gatekeepers, through ionotropic glutamate receptors. The different use of AMPA and NMDA receptors by cortical versus thalamic inputs might lead to distinct input integration strategies by ChIs and distinct modulation of the function of DA and striatum. PMID:27566978

  15. Brain and Serum Androsterone Is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Servatius, Richard J.; Marx, Christine E.; Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Kilts, Jason D.; Naylor, Jennifer C.; Pang, Kevin C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs) in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM). ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs) 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34), PID 35 (S35), on both days (2S), or the experimental context (CON). Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG), allopregnanolone (ALLO), and androsterone (ANDRO) were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30, and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT) levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration. PMID:27616978

  16. Brain and Serum Androsterone Is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Servatius, Richard J; Marx, Christine E; Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Kilts, Jason D; Naylor, Jennifer C; Pang, Kevin C H

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs) in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM). ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs) 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34), PID 35 (S35), on both days (2S), or the experimental context (CON). Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG), allopregnanolone (ALLO), and androsterone (ANDRO) were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30, and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT) levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration.

  17. Cell-free DNA as a marker for prediction of brain damage in traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohayon, Sharon; Boyko, Matthew; Saad, Amit; Douvdevani, Amos; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Melamed, Israel; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2012-01-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and early predictors of neurological outcomes are of great clinical importance. Cell free DNA (CFD), a biomarker used for the diagnosis and monitoring of several diseases, has been implicated as a possible prognostic indicator after TBI. The purpose of this study was to determine the pattern and timing of CFD levels after TBI, and whether a relationship exists between the level of CFD and brain edema and neurological outcomes. Thirty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups: rats in group 1 (sham group) were anesthetized and had a scalp incision without TBI, and rats in group 2 were anesthetized and had a scalp incision with TBI, which was induced by using a weight drop model that causes diffuse brain injury. A neurological severity score (NSS) was assessed at 1, 24, and 48 h after TBI. CFD was measured via blood samples drawn at t=0 (baseline), 12, 24, 48, 72, and 120 h after TBI. At 48 h after TBI, brain edema was determined in a subgroup of 11 rats by calculating the difference between rats' wet and dry brain weight. The significance of comparisons between and within groups (CFD levels, brain water content, and NSS) were determined using the Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Student t test. The correlation between CFD levels and the NSS, as well as between CFD levels and the extent of brain edema, was calculated using the Spearman and Pearson tests, respectively. Compared with baseline levels, the CFD levels in rats subjected to TBI were significantly increased at 24 and 48 h after TBI (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). A positive correlation was demonstrated between CFD levels 24 h following TBI and the extent of brain edema (r=0.63, p<0.05), as well as between CFD levels and the NSS (r=0.79, p<0.005). In this study, we demonstrated an increase in CFD levels after TBI, as well as a correlation between CFD levels and brain edema and NSS. CFD levels may provide a

  18. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Using internal illumination with an optical fiber in the oral cavity, we demonstrate, for the first time, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) of the deep brain of rats in vivo. The experiment was performed on a full-ring-array PACT system, with the capability of providing high-speed cross-sectional imaging of the brain. Compared with external illumination through the cranial skull, internal illumination delivers more light to the base of the brain. Consequently, in vivo photoacoustic images clearly reveal deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  19. Diabetes negatively affects cortical and striatal GABAergic neurons: an effect that is partially counteracted by exendin-4

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Martin; Lietzau, Grazyna; Nathanson, David; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Mallard, Carina; Johansson, Maria E.; Nyström, Thomas; Patrone, Cesare; Darsalia, Vladimer

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients often develop early cognitive and sensorimotor impairments. The pathophysiological mechanisms behind these problems are largely unknown. Recent studies demonstrate that dysfunctional γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) neurons are involved in age-related cognitive decline. We hypothesized that similar, but earlier dysfunction is taking place under T2D in the neocortex and striatum (two brain areas important for cognition and sensorimotor functions). We also hypothesized that the T2D-induced effects are pharmacologically reversible by anti-diabetic drugs targeting the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R). We determined the effect of T2D on cortical and striatal GABAergic neurons positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67), calbindin (CB), parvalbumin (PV) and calretinin (CR) by using immunohistochemistry and quantitative microscopy. Young and middle-aged T2D Goto-Kakizaki (GK) (a model of spontaneous T2D) and Wistar rats were used. Furthermore, we determined the therapeutic potential of the GLP1-R agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) by treating middle-aged GK rats for 6 weeks with 0.1 μg/kg Ex-4 twice daily. We show that T2D reduced the density of GAD67-positive neurons in the striatum and of CB-positive neurons in both striatum and neocortex. T2D also increased the average volume of PV-positive interneurons in the striatum. Ex-4 treatment increased the density of CB-positive neurons in the striatum of GK rats. Our data demonstrate that T2D negatively affects GAD67 and CB-positive GABAergic neurons in the brain during aging, potentially identifying some of the pathophysiological mechanisms to explain the increased prevalence of neurological complications in T2D. We also show a specific, positive effect of Ex-4 on striatal CB-positive neurons, which could be exploited in therapeutic perspective. PMID:27780892

  20. Enzymatic activities in brains of diabetic rats treated with vanadyl sulphate and sodium tungstate.

    PubMed

    Lemberg, A; Fernández, M A; Ouviña, G; Rodríguez, R R; Peredo, H A; Susemihl, C; Villarreal, I; Filinger, E J

    2007-12-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that diabetes mellitus might affect brain metabolism. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, treated with vanadyl sulphate (V) and sodium tungstate (T) were employed to observe the aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities in brain homogenates. Significant increases in AST, ALT and CK activities were found in diabetic brain homogenates against controls, suggesting increments of transamination in brain and/or increases in cell membrane permeability to these enzymes. The increase in brain CK possibly expresses alterations in energy production. The decrease in CK activity caused by V and T treatment in diabetic rats suggests that both agents tend to normalize energy consumption. It is also possible that V and T-induced hypoglycemic effects cause metabolic alterations in brain.

  1. Striatal Volume Predicts Level of Video Game Skill Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Kirk I.; Boot, Walter R.; Basak, Chandramallika; Neider, Mark B.; Prakash, Ruchika S.; Voss, Michelle W.; Simons, Daniel J.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2010-01-01

    Video game skills transfer to other tasks, but individual differences in performance and in learning and transfer rates make it difficult to identify the source of transfer benefits. We asked whether variability in initial acquisition and of improvement in performance on a demanding video game, the Space Fortress game, could be predicted by variations in the pretraining volume of either of 2 key brain regions implicated in learning and memory: the striatum, implicated in procedural learning and cognitive flexibility, and the hippocampus, implicated in declarative memory. We found that hippocampal volumes did not predict learning improvement but that striatal volumes did. Moreover, for the striatum, the volumes of the dorsal striatum predicted improvement in performance but the volumes of the ventral striatum did not. Both ventral and dorsal striatal volumes predicted early acquisition rates. Furthermore, this early-stage correlation between striatal volumes and learning held regardless of the cognitive flexibility demands of the game versions, whereas the predictive power of the dorsal striatal volumes held selectively for performance improvements in a game version emphasizing cognitive flexibility. These findings suggest a neuroanatomical basis for the superiority of training strategies that promote cognitive flexibility and transfer to untrained tasks. PMID:20089946

  2. Striatal volume predicts level of video game skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Kirk I; Boot, Walter R; Basak, Chandramallika; Neider, Mark B; Prakash, Ruchika S; Voss, Michelle W; Graybiel, Ann M; Simons, Daniel J; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Kramer, Arthur F

    2010-11-01

    Video game skills transfer to other tasks, but individual differences in performance and in learning and transfer rates make it difficult to identify the source of transfer benefits. We asked whether variability in initial acquisition and of improvement in performance on a demanding video game, the Space Fortress game, could be predicted by variations in the pretraining volume of either of 2 key brain regions implicated in learning and memory: the striatum, implicated in procedural learning and cognitive flexibility, and the hippocampus, implicated in declarative memory. We found that hippocampal volumes did not predict learning improvement but that striatal volumes did. Moreover, for the striatum, the volumes of the dorsal striatum predicted improvement in performance but the volumes of the ventral striatum did not. Both ventral and dorsal striatal volumes predicted early acquisition rates. Furthermore, this early-stage correlation between striatal volumes and learning held regardless of the cognitive flexibility demands of the game versions, whereas the predictive power of the dorsal striatal volumes held selectively for performance improvements in a game version emphasizing cognitive flexibility. These findings suggest a neuroanatomical basis for the superiority of training strategies that promote cognitive flexibility and transfer to untrained tasks.

  3. Presynaptic localization of histamine H3-receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, K.; Mizuguchi, H.; Fukui, H.; Wada, H. )

    1991-06-28

    The localization of histamine H3-receptors in subcellular fractions from the rat brain was examined in a (3H) (R) alpha-methylhistamine binding assay and compared with those of histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1- and alpha 2-receptors. Major (3H)(R) alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities ((3H)ligand binding vs. protein amount) were recovered from the P2 fraction by differential centrifugation. Minor (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding sites with increased specific activities were also detected in the P3 fraction. Further subfractionation of the P2 fraction by discontinuous sucrose density gradient centrifugation showed major recoveries of (3H)(R)alpha-methylhistamine binding in myelin (MYE) and synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) fractions. A further increase in specific activity was observed in the MYE fraction, but the SPM fraction showed no significant increase in specific activity. Adrenaline alpha 2-receptors, the pre-synaptic autoreceptors, in a (3H) yohimbine binding assay showed distribution patterns similar to histamine H3-receptors. On the other hand, post-synaptic histamine H1- and adrenaline alpha 1-receptors were closely localized and distributed mainly in the SPM fraction with increased specific activity. Only a negligible amount was recovered in the MYE fraction, unlike the histamine H3- and adrenaline alpha 2-receptors.

  4. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K.; Sendhil Velan, S.; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  5. Presence of corticotropin in brain of normal and hypophysectomized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, D T; Liotta, A; Brownstein, M J

    1977-01-01

    Immunoreactive and bioreactive corticotropin (ACTH-like) activities have been detected in the median eminence and remaining medial basal hypothalamus of both normal and hypophysectomized adult male rats: bioreactive ACTH (pg/100 mug of protein) 1028 in median eminence and 1289 in medial basal hypothalamus; immunoreactive ACTH (midportion ACTH antibody), 1554 in median eminence and 1887 in medial basal hypothalamus. By use of appropriate antibodies and bioassay, it was demonstrated that immunoreactivity was not due solely to alpha-melanotropin, which has previously been reported to be present in the brain of hypophysectomized animals. The Sephadex G-50 gel filtration patterns determined by immunoassay of column eluates obtained from hypothalamic extracts of normal or hypophysectomized animals were similar but were not identical to the pattern derived from whole pituitary. Immunoreactive (midportion ACTH antibody) ACTH concentrations (pg/100 mug of protein) of other central nervous system areas in normal animals were: cerebellum 34.3, cortex 46.3, thalamus 23.8, and hippocampus 116.3. The total amount of bioreactive ACTH present in the median eminence and medial basal hypothalamus is approximately 1% of that present in the pituitary. The present data suggest that such ACTH may have a diencephalic rather than pituitary origin and raise the question of the functional significance of such ACTH. Images PMID:191820

  6. Xenon preconditioning reduces brain damage from neonatal asphyxia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Daqing; Hossain, Mahmuda; Pettet, Garry K J; Luo, Yan; Lim, Ta; Akimov, Stanislav; Sanders, Robert D; Franks, Nicholas P; Maze, Mervyn

    2006-02-01

    Xenon attenuates on-going neuronal injury in both in vitro and in vivo models of hypoxic-ischaemic injury when administered during and after the insult. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether the neuroprotective efficacy of xenon can be observed when administered before an insult, referred to as 'preconditioning'. In a neuronal-glial cell coculture, preexposure to xenon for 2 h caused a concentration-dependent reduction of lactate dehydrogenase release from cells deprived of oxygen and glucose 24 h later; xenon's preconditioning effect was abolished by cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor. Preconditioning with xenon decreased propidium iodide staining in a hippocampal slice culture model subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. In an in vivo model of neonatal asphyxia involving hypoxic-ischaemic injury to 7-day-old rats, preconditioning with xenon reduced infarction size when assessed 7 days after injury. Furthermore, a sustained improvement in neurologic function was also evident 30 days after injury. Phosphorylated cAMP (cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate)-response element binding protein (pCREB) was increased by xenon exposure. Also, the prosurvival proteins Bcl-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were upregulated by xenon treatment. These studies provide evidence for xenon's preconditioning effect, which might be caused by a pCREB-regulated synthesis of proteins that promote survival against neuronal injury.

  7. (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the /sup 3/H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo.

  8. Antenatal taurine supplementation for improving brain ultrastructure in fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Liu, L; Chen, H

    2011-05-05

    Changes in brain ultrastructure of fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) were explored and the effects of antenatal taurine supplementation on their brain ultrastructure were determined. Fifteen pregnant rats were randomly divided into three groups: control group, IUGR model group and IUGR group given antenatal taurine supplements. Taurine was added to the diet of the taurine group at a dose of 300 mg/kg/d from 12 days after conception until natural delivery. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes in the brains of the newborn rats. At the same time, brain cellular apoptosis was detected using TUNEL, and the changes in protein expression of neuron specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that: 1) The average body weight and cerebral weight were significantly lower in the IUGR group than in the control group (p<0.01) and both of them were less so after taurine was supplemented (p<0.01). 2) Transmission electron microscopy revealed that brain cortex structures were sparse IUGR rats, showing many scattered apoptotic cells, decreased numbers of synapses, lower glial cell proliferation, and fewer neurons, more sparsely arranged, while these factors were significantly improved with taurine supplementation. 3) The results of TUNEL showed that the counts of apoptotic brain cells in IUGR groups were significantly increased from those in control groups and that taurine could significantly decrease brain cell apoptosis (p<0.001). 4) The results of immunohistochemistry showed that antenatal taurine-supplementation could significantly increase the counts of neuron specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive cells in fetal rats with IUGR (p<0.001). It can be concluded that it IUGR has a significant detrimental influence on the development of fetal rat brains, and antenatal supplement of taurine can significantly improve the IUGR

  9. [Semax prevents elevation of nitric oxide generation caused by incomplete global ischemia in the rat brain].

    PubMed

    Fadiukova, O E; Alekseev, A A; Bashkatova, V G; Tolordava, I A; Kuzenkov, V S; Mikoian, V D; Vanin, A F; Koshelev, V B; Raevskiĭ, K S

    2001-01-01

    A twofold increase in the nitric oxide (NO) production and a moderate increase in the content of secondary products of lipid peroxidation was observed in Wistar rats with incomplete global ischemia model induced by the bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries. A clear correlation was observed between the NO content in the rat brain and the level of neurological disturbance manifestations in the ischemized animals. The synthetic peptide semax (a fragment of ACTH4-7 Pro-Gly-Pro) in a dose of 0.3 mg/kg prevented from the development of both neurological disturbances and excess NO production in the rat brain cortex.

  10. Effect of three anorectic drugs on brain GABA levels and synthesis in the Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Orosco, M; Bremond, J; Jacquot, C; Cohen, Y

    1983-01-01

    1. Genetically obese Zucker rats and their lean littermates were submitted to a subchronic treatment with fenfluramine, mazindol and amphetamine. GABA levels and synthesis index were measured in different brain areas. 2. GABA levels, similar in obese and lean controls, were not changed after the three treatments. 3. A higher synthesis index of GABA was found in lean rats, in the striatum after mazindol and in the hypothalamus after amphetamine. 4. The three drugs increased the synthesis index of GABA in the remainder of the brain of both obese and lean rats.

  11. Role of 6-monoacetylmorphine in the acute release of striatal dopamine induced by intravenous heroin.

    PubMed

    Gottås, A; Boix, F; Øiestad, E L; Vindenes, V; Mørland, J

    2014-09-01

    After injection, heroin is rapidly metabolized to 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and further to morphine. As morphine has been shown to increase striatal dopamine, whereas 6-MAM has not been studied in this respect, we gave i.v. injections of 3 μmol 6-MAM, morphine or heroin to rats. Opioids were measured in blood, and dopamine and opioids in microdialysate from brain striatal extracellular fluid (ECF), by UPLC-MS/MS. After 6-MAM injection, 6-MAM ECF concentrations increased rapidly, and reached Cmax of 4.4 μM after 8 min. After heroin injection, 6-MAM increased rapidly in blood and reached Cmax of 6.4 μM in ECF after 8 min, while ECF Cmax for heroin was 1.2 μM after 2 min. T max for morphine in ECF was 29 and 24 min following 6-MAM and heroin administration, respectively, with corresponding Cmax levels of 1 and 2 μM. Dopamine levels peaked after 8 and 14 min following 6-MAM and heroin administration, respectively. The dopamine responses were equal, indicating no dopamine release by heroin per se. Furthermore, 6-MAM, and not morphine, appeared to mediate the early dopamine response, whereas morphine administration, giving rise to morphine ECF concentrations similar to those observed shortly after 6-MAM injection, did not increase ECF dopamine. 6-MAM appeared accordingly to be the substance responsible for the early increase in dopamine observed after heroin injection. As 6-MAM was formed rapidly from heroin in blood, and was the major substance reaching the brain after heroin administration, this also indicates that factors influencing blood 6-MAM concentrations might change the behavioural effects of heroin.

  12. Effects of Acyzol on Zinc Content in Rat Brain and Blood Plasma.

    PubMed

    Yakimoskii, A F; Shantyr, I I; Vlasenko, M A; Yakovleva, M V

    2017-01-01

    Zinc level in the blood plasma and brain of rats was studied by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Maximum amount of zinc was observed in the cerebellum (15.0±5.5 μg/mg wet tissue). Single intraperitoneal administration of a zinc donor acyzol (24 mg/kg) did not change the content of this element in the tissues. Repeated injections of acyzol (7 injections over 14 days) significantly increased zinc level in rat plasma and brain. This elevation was most pronounced in the forebrain (cortex and subcortical structures). The rise in zinc concentration in blood plasma correlated with its level in the brain.

  13. Effect of domoic acid on metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Arias, B; Arufe, M; Alfonso, M; Duran, R

    1995-04-01

    Domoic acid (Dom) is a neurotoxic secondary amino acid that interacts with the glutamate receptors, producing neurological problems. In the present work, we study the effects of Dom on the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in discrete rat brain regions. The effects of Dom on the brain metabolism of serotonin are also discussed in this paper. Dom stimulates the rat brain serotoninergic system, increasing differentially the synthesis and the catabolism of 5-HT and the elimination of 5-HIAA.

  14. Initiation of calorie restriction in middle-aged male rats attenuates aging-related motoric decline and bradykinesia without increased striatal dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Michael F.; Terrebonne, Jennifer; Fields, Victoria; Nodurft, Danielle; Runfalo, Cori; Latimer, Brian; Ingram, Donald K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related bradykinesia affects ~15% of those reaching age 65 and 50% of those reaching their 80s. Given this high risk and lack of pharmacological therapeutics, non-invasive lifestyle strategies should be identified to diminish its risk and identify the neurobiological targets to reduce aging-related bradykinesia. Early-life, long-term calorie restriction (CR) attenuates aging-related bradykinesia in rodents. Here, we addressed whether CR initiation at middle age could attenuate aging-related bradykinesia and motoric decline measured as rotarod performance. A 30% CR regimen was implemented for 6 months duration in 12-month old male Brown-Norway Fischer 344 F1 hybrid rats after establishing individual baseline locomotor activities. Locomotor capacity was assessed every 6 weeks thereafter. The ad libitum (AL) group exhibited predictably decreased locomotor activity, except movement speed, out to 18 months of age. In contrast, in the CR group, movement number and horizontal activity did not decrease during the 6-month trial and aging-related decline in rotarod performance was attenuated. The response to CR was influenced by baseline locomotor activity. The lower the locomotor activity level at baseline, the greater the response to CR. Rats in the lower 50th percentile surpassed their baseline level of activity, whereas rats in the top 50th percentile decreased at 6 weeks and then returned to baseline by 12 weeks of CR. We hypothesized that nigrostriatal dopamine tissue content would be greater in the CR group and observed a modest increase only in substantia nigra with no group differences in striatum, nucleus accumbens, or ventral tegmental area. These results indicate initiation of CR at middle age may reduce aging-related bradykinesia and, furthermore, subjects with below average locomotor activity may increase baseline activity. Sustaining nigral DA neurotransmission may be one component of preserving locomotor capabilities during aging. PMID:26610387

  15. Effects of nanoparticle zinc oxide on emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Amara, Salem; Slama, Imen Ben; Omri, Karim; El Ghoul, Jaber; El Mir, Lassaad; Rhouma, Khemais Ben; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    Over recent years, nanotoxicology and the potential effects on human body have grown in significance, the potential influences of nanosized materials on the central nervous system have received more attention. The aim of this study was to determine whether zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) exposure cause alterations in emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. Rats were treated by intraperitoneal injection of ZnO NPs (20-30 nm) at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight. Sub -: acute ZnO NPs treatment induced no significant increase in the zinc content in the homogenate brain. Statistically significant decreases in iron and calcium concentrations were found in rat brain tissue compared to control. However, sodium and potassium contents remained unchanged. Also, there were no significant changes in the body weight and the coefficient of brain. In the present study, the anxiety-related behavior was evaluated using the plus-maze test. ZnO NPs treatment modulates slightly the exploratory behaviors of rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the anxious index between ZnO NP-treated rats and the control group (p > 0.05). Interestingly, our results demonstrated minimal effects of ZnO NPs on emotional behavior of animals, but there was a possible alteration in trace elements homeostasis in rat brain.

  16. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption enhances the delivery of cytarabine to the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Han-Qing; Lü, Lin; Wang, Feng; Luo, Yun; Lou, Shi-Feng

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles for targeted delivery of cytarabine to the brain. Sprague-Dawly rats (weighing 200-250 g) received focused ultrasound with intravenous injection microbubbles. At 0, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours (n=5 for each time point) after sonication, animals received intravenous administration of cytarabine at a normal dose of 4 mg/kg body weight. Additional five rats were given with a high dose (50 mg/kg body weight) of cytarabine alone. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral cytarabine were determined. FUS in conjunction with microbubbles caused a transient BBB opening. Sonication exposure promoted cytarabine accumulation at the sonicated site. Animals injected with a normal dose of cytarabine 2 hours after sonication had similar concentrations of cerebral cytarabine compared to those with higher cytarabine without sonication. FUS can temporarily open the BBB and thus facilitate the penetration of systemic cytarabine into the brain.

  17. Corticostriatal interactions in the generation of tic-like behaviors after local striatal disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, Vladimir; Xu, Meiyu; Smith, Haleigh R; Buchanan, Gordon F; Pittenger, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    The pathophysiology of the tics that define Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (TS) is not well understood. Local disinhibition within the striatum has been hypothesized to play a pathogenic role. In support of this, experimental disinhibition by local antagonism of GABA-A receptors within the striatum produces tic-like phenomenology in monkey and rat. We replicated this effect in mice via local picrotoxin infusion into the dorsal striatum. Infusion of picrotoxin into sensorimotor cortex produced similar movements, accompanied by signs of behavioral activation; higher-dose picrotoxin in the cortex produced seizures. Striatal inhibition with local muscimol completely abolished tic-like movements after either striatal or cortical picrotoxin, confirming their dependence on the striatal circuitry; in contrast, cortical muscimol attenuated but did not abolish movements produced by striatal picrotoxin. Striatal glutamate blockade eliminated tic-like movements after striatal picrotoxin, indicating that glutamatergic afferents are critical for their generation. These studies replicate and extend previous work in monkey and rat, providing additional validation for the local disinhibition model of tic generation. Our results reveal a key role for corticostriatal glutamatergic afferents in the generation of tic-like movements in this model.

  18. Carnosine pretreatment protects against hypoxia-ischemia brain damage in the neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Song, Lili; Cheng, Xiuyong; Yang, Yi; Luan, Bin; Jia, Liting; Xu, Falin; Zhang, Zhan

    2011-09-30

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in neonates and lacks an effective treatment thus far. Carnosine has been demonstrated to play a neuroprotective role in the adult brain injuries. However, there is no information available concerning its neuroprotective role in the immature brains after hypoxia-ischemia insults. Therefore, we investigated whether carnosine could also confer neuroprotective effects in a neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia model. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced in rats on postnatal day 7 (P7). Carnosine (250 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally, 30 min prior to hypoxia-ischemia induction. Morphological brain injury and biochemical markers of apoptosis and oxidative stress were evaluated 24 h after hypoxia-ischemia induction. Cognitive performance was evaluated by the Morris Water Maze test on P28-P33. We found that pretreatment with carnosine significantly reduced the infarct volume and the number of terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the hypoxia-ischemia brain. Carnosine also inhibited mRNA expression of apoptosis-inducing factor(AIF) and caspase-3, which was accompanied by an increase in superoxide dismutase(SOD)activity and a decrease in the malondialdehyde(MDA)level in carnosine-treated rats. Furthermore, carnosine also improved the spatial learning and memory abilities of rats declined due to hypoxia-ischemia. These results demonstrate that carnosine can protect rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by antioxidation.

  19. Oxidative damage is ameliorated by curcumin treatment in brain and sciatic nerve of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Acar, Abdullah; Akil, Esref; Alp, Harun; Evliyaoglu, Osman; Kibrisli, Erkan; Inal, Ali; Unan, Fatma; Tasdemir, Nebahat

    2012-07-01

    To date, there have not been enough studies about the effects of curcumin against oxidative stress on sciatic nerves caused by streptozotocin (STZ) in diabetic rats. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine whether curcumin, by virtue of its antioxidant properties, could affect the oxidant/antioxidant balance in the sciatic nerve and brain tissues of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. A total of 28 rats were randomly divided into four groups of seven rats each: normal controls, only curcumin treated, diabetic controls, and diabetics treated with curcumin. Biomarkers-malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and NO levels-for oxidative stress in the brain and sciatic nerve tissues of the rats were measured. We found a significant increase in MDA, NO, TOS, and O