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Sample records for rat colitis model

  1. Ozone enema: a model of microscopic colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Rachmilewitz, D; Cohen, P; Zimran, A

    2001-11-01

    Ozone is one of the most powerful oxidants available, with many applications in industry and medicine. Medically relevant features of ozone include bacterial and virucidal properties, disinfection, sterilization, circulatory stimulation, and disruption of malignant cells. Ozone therapy is administered in various ways, including intravenously, intramuscularly, and intrarectally. The latter modality is used for the treatment of colitis and hepatitis. Our aim was to examine the effect of ozone water enema on normal and inflamed rat colonic mucosa. Ozone water (20 microg/ml) was prepared via ozone generator and administered intrarectally (0.5 ml) daily. Rats were killed one, three, and seven days after rectal ozone water administration, and their colons resected, rinsed, and weighed (grams per 10 cm). Damage was assessed macro- and microscopically and tissue processed for myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide synthase activity. Rats receiving saline served as controls. In an additional experiment colitis was induced by intrarectal iodoacetamide. Ozone therapy caused no macroscopic damage. Ozone therapy induced microscopic colitis, which lasted for at least a week and was accompanied by increase in segmental weight, myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide activity, and prostaglandin E2 generation. Ozone therapy had no protective effect on inflamed mucosa. In conclusion, ozone water therapy had a deleterious effect on normal colonic mucosa, suggesting intrarectal administration be reevaluated. Ozone water enema may serve as a model of microscopic colitis.

  2. Effects of garlicin on apoptosis in rat model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xi-Ming; Yu, Jie-Ping; He, Xiao-Fei; Li, Jun-Hua; Yu, Liang-Liang; Yu, Hong-Gang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of garlicin on apoptosis and expression of bcl-2 and bax in lymphocytes in rat model of ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: Healthy adult Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes, weighing 180±30 g, were employed in the present study. The rat model of UC was induced by 2,4,6-trinitr-obenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) enema. The experimental animals were randomly divided into garlicin treatment group (including high and low concentration), model control group, and normal control group. Rats in garlicin treatment group and model control group received intracolic garlicin daily at doses of 10.0 and 30.0 mg/kg and equal amount of saline respectively 24 h after colitis model was induced by alcohol and TNBS co-enema. Rats in normal control group received neither alcohol nor only TNBS but only saline enema in this study. On the 28th d of the experiment, rats were executed, the expression of bcl-2 and bax protein was determined immunohistochemically and the apoptotic cells were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate fluorescence nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. At the same time, the rat colon mucosal damage index (CMDI) was calculated. RESULTS: In garlicin treatment group, the positive expression of bcl-2 in lymphocytes decreased and the number of apoptotic cells was more than that in model control group, CMDI was lower than that in model control group. The positive expression of bax in lymphocytes had no significant difference. CONCLUSION: Garlicin can protect colonic mucosa against damage in rat model of UC induced by TNBS enema. PMID:16052692

  3. Effects of garlicin on apoptosis in rat model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xi-Ming; Yu, Jie-Ping; He, Xiao-Fei; Li, Jun-Hua; Yu, Liang-Liang; Yu, Hong-Gang

    2005-08-07

    To investigate the effects of garlicin on apoptosis and expression of bcl-2 and bax in lymphocytes in rat model of ulcerative colitis (UC). Healthy adult Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes, weighing 180+/-30 g, were employed in the present study. The rat model of UC was induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) enema. The experimental animals were randomly divided into garlicin treatment group (including high and low concentration), model control group, and normal control group. Rats in garlicin treatment group and model control group received intracolic garlicin daily at doses of 10.0 and 30.0 mg/kg and equal amount of saline respectively 24 h after colitis model was induced by alcohol and TNBS co-enema. Rats in normal control group received neither alcohol nor only TNBS but only saline enema in this study. On the 28th d of the experiment, rats were executed, the expression of bcl-2 and bax protein was determined immunohistochemically and the apoptotic cells were detected by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate fluorescence nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. At the same time, the rat colon mucosal damage index (CMDI) was calculated. In garlicin treatment group, the positive expression of bcl-2 in lymphocytes decreased and the number of apoptotic cells was more than that in model control group, CMDI was lower than that in model control group. The positive expression of bax in lymphocytes had no significant difference. Garlicin can protect colonic mucosa against damage in rat model of UC induced by TNBS enema.

  4. Differential immune and genetic responses in rat models of Crohn's colitis and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Winston, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are clinically, immunologically, and morphologically distinct forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, smooth muscle function is impaired similarly in both diseases, resulting in diarrhea. We tested the hypothesis that differential cellular, genetic, and immunological mechanisms mediate smooth muscle dysfunction in two animal models believed to represent the two diseases. We used the rat models of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)- and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colonic inflammations, which closely mimic the clinical and morphological features of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, respectively. DSS inflammation induced oxidative stress initially in mucosa/submucosa, which then propagated to the muscularis externa to impair smooth muscle function. The muscularis externa showed no increase of cytokines/chemokines. On the other hand, TNBS inflammation almost simultaneously induced oxidative stress, recruited or activated immune cells, and generated cytokines/chemokines in both mucosa/submucosa and muscularis externa. The generation of cytokines/chemokines did not correlate with the recruitment and activation of immune cells. Consequently, the impairment of smooth muscle function in DSS inflammation was primarily due to oxidative stress, whereas that in TNBS inflammation was due to both oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines. The impairment of smooth muscle function in DSS inflammation was due to suppression of Gαq protein of the excitation-contraction coupling. In TNBS inflammation, it was due to suppression of the α1C1b subunit of Cav1.2b channels, CPI-17 and Gαq. TNBS inflammation increased IGF-1 and TGF-β time dependently in the muscularis externa. IGF-1 induced smooth muscle hyperplasia; both IGF-1 and TGF-β induced hypertrophy. In conclusion, both TNBS and DSS induce transmural inflammation, albeit with different types of inflammatory mediators. The recruitment or activation of

  5. Effectiveness of Saccharomyces boulardii in a rat model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Soyturk, Mujde; Saygili, Saba Mukaddes; Baskin, Huseyin; Sagol, Ozgul; Yilmaz, Osman; Saygili, Fatih; Akpinar, Hale

    2012-11-28

    To investigate the effects of Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) in an experimental rat model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Thirty-two Wistar albino female rats were categorized into five groups. On the first day of the study, 50 mg TNBS was administered via a rectal catheter in order to induce colitis in all rats, except those in the control group. For 14 d, the rats were fed a standard diet, without the administration of any additional supplements to either the control or TNBS groups, in addition to 1 mg/kg per day S. boulardii to the S. boulardii group, 1 mg/kg per day methyl prednisolone (MP) to the MP group. The animals in the S. boulardii + MP group were coadministered these doses of S. boulardii and MP. During the study, weight loss, stool consistency, and the presence of obvious blood in the stool were evaluated, and the disease activity index (DAI) for colitis was recorded. The intestines were examined and colitis was macro- and microscopically scored. The serum and tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) were determined, and fungemia was evaluated in the blood samples. The mean DAI scores for the MP and S. boulardii + MP groups was significantly lower than the TNBS group (3.69 ± 0.61 vs 4.46 ± 0.34, P = 0.018 and 3.77 ± 0.73 vs 4.46 ± 0.34, P = 0.025, respectively). While no significant differences between the TNBS and the S. boulardii or MP groups could be determined in terms of serum NO levels, the level of serum NO in the S. boulardii + MP group was significantly higher than in the TNBS and S. boulardii groups (8.12 ± 4.25 μmol/L vs 3.18 ± 1.19 μmol/L, P = 0.013; 8.12 ± 4.25 μmol/L vs 3.47 ± 1.66 μmol/L, P = 0.012, respectively). The tissue NO levels in the S. boulardii, MP and S. boulardii + MP groups were significantly lower than the TNBS group (16.62 ± 2.27 μmol/L vs 29.72 ± 6.10 μmol/L, P = 0.002; 14.66 ± 5.18 μmol/L vs 29.72 ± 6.10 μmol/L, P = 0.003; 11.95 ± 2

  6. Effectiveness of Saccharomyces boulardii in a rat model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Soyturk, Mujde; Saygili, Saba Mukaddes; Baskin, Huseyin; Sagol, Ozgul; Yilmaz, Osman; Saygili, Fatih; Akpinar, Hale

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) in an experimental rat model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. METHODS: Thirty-two Wistar albino female rats were categorized into five groups. On the first day of the study, 50 mg TNBS was administered via a rectal catheter in order to induce colitis in all rats, except those in the control group. For 14 d, the rats were fed a standard diet, without the administration of any additional supplements to either the control or TNBS groups, in addition to 1 mg/kg per day S. boulardii to the S. boulardii group, 1 mg/kg per day methyl prednisolone (MP) to the MP group. The animals in the S. boulardii + MP group were coadministered these doses of S. boulardii and MP. During the study, weight loss, stool consistency, and the presence of obvious blood in the stool were evaluated, and the disease activity index (DAI) for colitis was recorded. The intestines were examined and colitis was macro- and microscopically scored. The serum and tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) were determined, and fungemia was evaluated in the blood samples. RESULTS: The mean DAI scores for the MP and S. boulardii + MP groups was significantly lower than the TNBS group (3.69 ± 0.61 vs 4.46 ± 0.34, P = 0.018 and 3.77 ± 0.73 vs 4.46 ± 0.34, P = 0.025, respectively). While no significant differences between the TNBS and the S. boulardii or MP groups could be determined in terms of serum NO levels, the level of serum NO in the S. boulardii + MP group was significantly higher than in the TNBS and S. boulardii groups (8.12 ± 4.25 μmol/L vs 3.18 ± 1.19 μmol/L, P = 0.013; 8.12 ± 4.25 μmol/L vs 3.47 ± 1.66 μmol/L, P = 0.012, respectively). The tissue NO levels in the S. boulardii, MP and S. boulardii + MP groups were significantly lower than the TNBS group (16.62 ± 2.27 μmol/L vs 29.72 ± 6.10 μmol/L, P = 0.002; 14.66 ± 5.18 μmol/L vs 29.72 ± 6.10 μmol/L, P

  7. The antioxidant effect of Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea in rat colitis model induced by acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Z; Ergul, B; Sarikaya, M; Filik, L; Gonultas, M Alparslan; Hucumenoglu, S; Can, M

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the colon, and reactive oxidative metabolites (ROMs) play an important role in its pathogenesis. Alternative therapies such as herbal remedies are increasingly being used in the treatment of ulcerative colitis for better clinical outcome of ulcerative colitis and less adverse effects. Echinacea has many features including antioxidant and wound-healing properties. Hence, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of Echinacea spp. on experimental colitis model induced by acetic acid in Wistar albino rats. Acute colitis was induced by intrarectal administration of acetic acid. Rats were divided into four groups, namely control, Echinacea-administered, Echinacea-administered-colitis and colitis. Malondialdehyde and total antioxidant status were assayed in tissue samples. Histopathological evaluation was also performed. Macroscopic and microscopic scores were significantly higher in colitis group compared to control, Echinacea and Echinacea-colitis groups (p < 0.001). There was no significant differences in respect of macroscopic and microscopic scores between control, Echinacea and Echinacea-colitis groups (p > 0.3, p > 0.22). Malondialdehyde levels were elevated in colitis group compared to other groups (p < 0.001). Total antioxidant status was significantly higher in Echinacea group compared with other groups and also significantly higher in Echinacea-colitis group compared with colitis group (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). Echinacea may possibly have some therapeutic usefulness in the management of ulcerative colitis (Tab. 2, Fig. 4, Ref. 35).

  8. Sensory and inflammatory colonic changes induced by vincristine in distinct rat models of colitis.

    PubMed

    Viana-Cardoso, K V; Silva, M T B; Peixoto-Junior, A A; Marinho, L S; Matias, N S; Soares, P M G; Santos, A A; Brito, G A C; Rola, F H; Gondim, F de A A

    2015-04-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies show that gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation can evoke sensory changes occasionally far from the original inflammatory site. Animal models of colitis with either trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) or mustard oil (MO) produce distinct patterns of somatic and visceral sensory changes. We evaluated the effects of four doses of i.v. vincristine 150 μg kg(-1) (total of 600 μg kg(-1) ) treatment on the somatic (thermal nociceptive threshold) and colonic (morphological) changes induced by TNBS or MO in rats. TNBS and MO groups were further submitted to vincristine or saline pretreatments. TNBS induced somatic hypersensitivity, while MO induced somatic hyposensitivity (P < 0.05) when compared to the saline and ethanol control groups. Vincristine per se induced somatic hypersensitivity (P < 0.05). This effect was enhanced by TNBS and reversed by MO treatments. Although vincristine increased the colitis area (colonic weight length(-1) ratio) and the Morris' score in TNBS-treated rats, it did not alter the colitis area and even lowered the Morris' score in MO-treated rats. Compared to the saline (control) group, vincristine did not alter the colonic microscopic pattern. However, such lesions scores are higher (P < 0.05) in colitis groups induced by TNBS and MO, pretreated or not with vincristine. In conclusion, the somatic changes induced by different models of experimental colitis are diverse and modulated differently by vincristine.

  9. The protective effect of Echinacea spp. (Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea) in a rat colitis model induced by acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Zeynal; Ergul, Bilal; Sarikaya, Murat; Filik, Levent; Gonultaş, Mehmet Alparslan; Hucumenoglu, Sema; Can, Murat

    2014-11-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic disease that causes an inflammatory condition in the colon. Several cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) are crucial components of these inflammatory pathways. New therapeutic strategies are needed for improved clinical outcomes in UC and with less adverse effects. That is why alternative therapies such as herbal remedies are increasingly being used with favorable effects in the treatment of UC. Hence, in the present study, we aimed to evaluate the protective effect of Echinacea spp in an experimental rat colitis model induced by acetic acid (AA). Acetic acid was given via a rectal route to induce acute colitis in rats. Rats were placed in four groups: control, Echinacea, Echinacea-colitis and colitis. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1β and TGF-β levels were measured. Histopathological comparison of the groups was also performed. The disease activity index (DAI) was significantly higher in the colitis group compared to the control, Echinacea and Echinacea-colitis groups (p<0.001). There was no significant difference between the DAI of control, Echinacea and Echinacea-colitis groups (p>0.07). The inflammatory mediators IL-1β and TNF-α were significantly elevated in the colitis group compared to the other groups (p<0.007, <0.001 respectively). Therefore, Echinacea spp. may likely have some therapeutic favorable effects in the management of UC.

  10. Effect of Boswellia serrata on antioxidant status in an experimental model of colitis rats induced by acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Renata Minuzzo; Morgan Martins, Maria Isabel; Tieppo, Juliana; Fillmann, Henrique Sarubbi; Marroni, Norma Possa

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the antioxidant effect of an extract of the plant Boswellia serrata in an experimental model of acute ulcerative colitis induced by administration of acetic acid (AA) in rats. The extract of B. serrata (34.2 mg/kg/day) was administered orally by gavage for 2 days before and after induction of colitis with AA diluted to 4 % and in a volume of 4 ml. The anal sphincter pressure in the groups treated with B. serrata showed a significant increase compared to the colitis group (P < 0.001). Histological analysis of treated animals showed less edema with preservation of mucosal crypts. Lipid peroxidation showed a significant decrease in the treated groups compared to the colitis group (P < 0.001). The superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme activity showed a significant reduction in the treated groups compared to the colitis group (P < 0.001), the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) significantly increased in the treated groups compared to colitis group (P < 0.05), and the same was the result for enzyme activity glutathione (GSH; P < 0.05). The extract of B. serrata has active antioxidant substances that exert protective effects in acute experimental colitis.

  11. Salvianolic Acid B Restored Impaired Barrier Function via Downregulation of MLCK by microRNA-1 in Rat Colitis Model.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yongjian; Wang, Jingyu; Chu, Hongwei; Chen, Dapeng; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is isolated from the traditional Chinese medical herb Salvia miltiorrhiza and is reported to have a wide range of therapeutic benefits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Sal B on epithelial barrier dysfunction in rat colitis and to uncover related mechanisms. Rat colitis model was established by intracolonic administration of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The intestinal barrier function was evaluated by measuring the serum recovery of fluorescein isothiocyanate-4 kD dextran in vivo and transepithelial electrical resistance in vitro respectively. The protein expression related to intestinal barrier function was studied using western blotting. The effects of Sal B on inflammatory responses, oxidative damage and colitis recurrence were also studied in this study. The intestinal barrier dysfunction in colitis was reversed by Sal B, accompanied with the decrease of tight junction proteins, and the effect could be blocked by microRNA-1(miR-1) inhibition. The inflammatory responses, oxidative damage and colitis recurrence were also decreased by Sal B. The colitis symptoms and recurrences were ameliorated by Sal B, and restoration of impaired barrier function via downregulation of MLCK by miR-1 maybe involved in this effect. This study provides some novel insights into both of the pathological mechanisms and treatment alternatives of inflammatory bowel disease.

  12. Salvianolic Acid B Restored Impaired Barrier Function via Downregulation of MLCK by microRNA-1 in Rat Colitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yongjian; Wang, Jingyu; Chu, Hongwei; Chen, Dapeng; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is isolated from the traditional Chinese medical herb Salvia miltiorrhiza and is reported to have a wide range of therapeutic benefits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Sal B on epithelial barrier dysfunction in rat colitis and to uncover related mechanisms. Rat colitis model was established by intracolonic administration of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The intestinal barrier function was evaluated by measuring the serum recovery of fluorescein isothiocyanate-4 kD dextran in vivo and transepithelial electrical resistance in vitro respectively. The protein expression related to intestinal barrier function was studied using western blotting. The effects of Sal B on inflammatory responses, oxidative damage and colitis recurrence were also studied in this study. The intestinal barrier dysfunction in colitis was reversed by Sal B, accompanied with the decrease of tight junction proteins, and the effect could be blocked by microRNA-1(miR-1) inhibition. The inflammatory responses, oxidative damage and colitis recurrence were also decreased by Sal B. The colitis symptoms and recurrences were ameliorated by Sal B, and restoration of impaired barrier function via downregulation of MLCK by miR-1 maybe involved in this effect. This study provides some novel insights into both of the pathological mechanisms and treatment alternatives of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27303297

  13. Protective effects of glycyrrhizic acid by rectal treatment on a TNBS-induced rat colitis model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xiang, Jin; Liu, Min; Wang, Shi; Lee, Robert J; Ding, Hong

    2011-03-01

    The research compared rectal and oral treatments with glycyrrhizic acid for trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups: one normal and six with colitis, including TNBS, glycyrrhizic acid (2, 10 and 50 mg/kg, rectally treated and 10 mg/kg, orally treated) and sulfasalazine (positive control, 225 mg/kg rectally treated) groups. Colitis was induced by colonic administration of TNBS in 30% ethanol. There were significant pathological changes in colon in TNBS-treated groups, and rectal glycyrrhizic acid significantly attenuated colitis. Myeloperoxidase, tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β of colon tissue or serum in the rectal glycyrrhizic acid groups were markedly reduced when compared with the TNBS group, and lower than in the orally treated glycyrrhizic acid group. It was further noted that, in vitro, glycyrrhizic acid (up to 100 µg/ml) inhibited interleukin-6 and elevated interleukin-10 production in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages, and significantly inhibited proliferation of spleen lymphocytes, suggesting the immunoregulatory function of glycyrrhizic acid. Rectally administered glycyrrhizic acid has significant protective effects against TNBS-induced colitis in rats, and the rectal route may be a complementary treatment for inflammatory bowel disease. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Experimental and Pathalogical study of Pistacia atlantica, butyrate, Lactobacillus casei and their combination on rat ulcerative colitis model.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Mahdi; Ghasemi-Niri, Seyedeh Farnaz; Maqbool, Faheem; Baeeri, Maryam; Memariani, Zahra; Pousti, Iraj; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Pistacia atlantica (P. atlantica), butyrate, Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) and especially their combination therapy on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat colitis model. Rats were divided into seven groups. Four groups received oral P. atlantica, butyrate, L. casei and the combination of three agents for 10 consecutive days. The remaining groups were negative and positive controls and a sham group. Macroscopic and histopathological examinations were carried out along with determination of the specific biomarker of colonic oxidative stress, the myeloperoxidase (MPO). Compared with controls, the combination therapy exhibited a significant alleviation of colitis in terms of pathological scores and reduction of MPO activity (55%, p=0.0009). Meanwhile, the macroscopic appearance such as stool consistency, tissue and histopathological scores (edema, necrosis and neutrophil infiltration) were improved. Although single therapy by each P. atlantica, butyrate, and L. casei was partially beneficial in reduction of colon oxidative stress markers, the combination therapy was much more effective. In conclusion, the combination therapy was able to reduce the severity of colitis that is clear from biochemical markers. Future studies have to focus on clinical effects of this combination in management of human ulcerative colitis. Further molecular and signaling pathway studies will help to understand the mechanisms involved in the treatment of colitis and inflammatory diseases.

  15. [Expression and correlation analysis between inflammatory cytokines and calprotectin in the rat model of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Xuan, Xiumin; Wang, Lian; Tong, Ling; Huang, Qi; Zhu, Limin; Ruan, Hailing

    2014-03-01

    To observe the changes of inflammatory cytokines and calprotectin (CP) in the rat model of ulcerative colitis (UC) and investigate the mechanism of the inflammatory response. Twenty rats were randomly divided into normal control (NC) group and model (MC) group, with 10 rats in each group. The rats of MC group were given through the intestinal tract the mixed solution of 2, 4, 6 trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)/ethanol to induce UC. The rats of NC group were given normal saline instead. Three weeks after modeling, the changes of colon tissue morphology were observed with HE staining. The levels of interferon gamma (INF-γ), interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-12 and CP in serum were detected by ELISA. The expressions of INF-γ, IL-4, CP of colon tissue were detected by Western blotting. Indicators of inflammatory activity were significantly elevated, and colon tissue injury was seen in MC group. Compared with the NC group, the expressions of INF-γ, IL-12 and CP of serum increased in the MC group (P<0.05 or P<0.01). The expressions of IL-4 and IL-10 in the MC group were lower than those in the NC group (P<0.01). Compared with the NC group, the expressions of INF-γ and CP of colon tissue significantly increased (P<0.01 or P<0.05), and the expression of IL-4 decreased in the MC group (P<0.05). Correlation analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between CP and IFN-γ, and a negative correlation between CP and IL-4 (P<0.05). Increased CP in UC rats can promote the expression of inflammatory factors, lead to the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cells, and enhance inflammatory responses. These factors promote the occurrence and development of UC.

  16. Effect of aqueous and particulate silk fibroin in a rat model of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nogales, A; Lozano-Pérez, A A; Aznar-Cervantes, S D; Algieri, F; Garrido-Mesa, J; Garrido-Mesa, N; Vezza, T; Utrilla, M P; Cenis, J L; Rodríguez-Cabezas, M E; Gálvez, J

    2016-09-10

    Silk fibroin (SF) has anti-inflammatory properties and promotes wound healing. Moreover, SF particles act as carriers of active drugs against intestinal inflammation due to their capacity to deliver the compound to the damaged colonic tissue. The present work assesses the effect of SF in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis that resembles human intestinal inflammation. SF (8mg/kg) was administered in aqueous solution orally and in two particulate formats by intrarectal route, following two technologies: spray drying to make microparticles and desolvation in organic solvent to produce nanoparticles. SF treatments ameliorated the colonic damage, reduced neutrophil infiltration and improved the compromised oxidative status of the colon. They also reduced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Moreover, they improved the intestinal wall integrity by increasing the gene expression of some of its markers (villin, trefoil factor-3 and mucins), thus accelerating the healing. The immunomodulatory properties of SF particles were also tested in vitro in macrophages: they activated the immune response in basal conditions without increasing it after a pro-inflammatory insult. In conclusion, SF particles could be useful as carriers to deliver active drugs to the damaged intestinal colon with additional anti-inflammatory and healing properties.

  17. Oral administration of curcumin attenuates visceral hyperalgesia through inhibiting phosphorylation of TRPV1 in rat model of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Wang, Juan; Yang, Chunxue; Han, Hongxiu; Rong, Weifang; Zhang, Guohua

    2017-01-01

    Background Curcumin has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects. The present study was designed to explore the potential therapeutic effects of curcumin on visceral hyperalgesia and inflammation in a rat model of ulcerative colitis. We observed the effects of orally administered curcumin on the disease activity index, histological change in colon, colorectal distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex, the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and phosphorylated TRPV1 in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis rats. In addition, a HEK293 cell line stably expressing human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) was used to examine the effects of curcumin on the change in membrane expression of TRPV1 induced by phorbol myristate acetate (a protein kinase C activator). Results Repeated oral administration of curcumin inhibited the increase in abdominal withdrawal reflex score induced by dextran sulfate sodium without affecting dextran sulfate sodium-induced histological change of colon and the disease activity index. A significant increase in colonic expression of TRPV1 and pTRPV1 was observed in dextran sulfate sodium-treated rats and this was reversed by oral administration of curcumin. TRPV1 expression in L6-S1 dorsal root ganglion was increased in the small- to medium-sized isolectin B4-positive non-peptidergic and calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive peptidergic neurons in dextran sulfate sodium-treated rats and oral administration of curcumin mitigated such changes. In the HEK293 cell line stably expressing hTRPV1, curcumin (1, 3 µm) inhibited phorbol myristate acetate-induced upregulation of membrane TRPV1. Conclusion Oral administration of curcumin alleviates visceral hyperalgesia in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis rats. The anti-hyperalgesic effect is partially through downregulating the colonic expression and phosphorylation of TRPV1 on the afferent fibers projected from peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptive

  18. Kefir treatment ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Senol, Altug; Isler, Mehmet; Sutcu, Recep; Akin, Mete; Cakir, Ebru; Ceyhan, Betul M; Kockar, M Cem

    2015-12-14

    To investigate the preventive effect of kefir on colitis induced with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in rats. Twenty-four male Wistar-albino rats were randomized into four groups: normal control, kefir-control, colitis, and kefir-colitis groups. Rats in the normal and kefir-control groups were administered tap water as drinking water for 14 d. Rats in the colitis and kefir-colitis groups were administered a 3% DSS solution as drinking water for 8-14 d to induce colitis. Rats in the kefir-control and kefir-colitis groups were administered 5 mL kefir once a day for 14 d while rats in the normal control and colitis group were administered an identical volume of the placebo (skim milk) using an orogastric feeding tube. Clinical colitis was evaluated with reference to the disease activity index (DAI), based on daily weight loss, stool consistency, and presence of bleeding in feces. Rats were sacrificed on the 15(th) day, blood specimens were collected, and colon tissues were rapidly removed. Levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, malondialdehyde, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were measured in colon tissue. The DAI was lower in the kefir-colitis group than in the colitis group (on the 3(rd) and 5(th) days of colitis induction; P < 0.01). The DAI was also significantly higher in the colitis group between days 2 and 6 of colitis induction when compared to the normal control and kefir-control groups. The DAI was statistically higher only on the 6(th) day in the kefir-colitis group when compared to that in the normal control groups. Increased colon weight and decreased colon length were observed in colitis-induced rats. Mean colon length in the colitis group was significantly shorter than that of the kefir-control group. Kefir treatment significantly decreased histologic colitis scores (P < 0.05). MPO activity in the colitis group was significantly higher than in the kefir-control group (P < 0.05). Kefir treatment

  19. Kefir treatment ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Senol, Altug; Isler, Mehmet; Sutcu, Recep; Akin, Mete; Cakir, Ebru; Ceyhan, Betul M; Kockar, M Cem

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the preventive effect of kefir on colitis induced with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in rats. METHODS: Twenty-four male Wistar-albino rats were randomized into four groups: normal control, kefir-control, colitis, and kefir-colitis groups. Rats in the normal and kefir-control groups were administered tap water as drinking water for 14 d. Rats in the colitis and kefir-colitis groups were administered a 3% DSS solution as drinking water for 8-14 d to induce colitis. Rats in the kefir-control and kefir-colitis groups were administered 5 mL kefir once a day for 14 d while rats in the normal control and colitis group were administered an identical volume of the placebo (skim milk) using an orogastric feeding tube. Clinical colitis was evaluated with reference to the disease activity index (DAI), based on daily weight loss, stool consistency, and presence of bleeding in feces. Rats were sacrificed on the 15th day, blood specimens were collected, and colon tissues were rapidly removed. Levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, malondialdehyde, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were measured in colon tissue. RESULTS: The DAI was lower in the kefir-colitis group than in the colitis group (on the 3rd and 5th days of colitis induction; P < 0.01). The DAI was also significantly higher in the colitis group between days 2 and 6 of colitis induction when compared to the normal control and kefir-control groups. The DAI was statistically higher only on the 6th day in the kefir-colitis group when compared to that in the normal control groups. Increased colon weight and decreased colon length were observed in colitis-induced rats. Mean colon length in the colitis group was significantly shorter than that of the kefir-control group. Kefir treatment significantly decreased histologic colitis scores (P < 0.05). MPO activity in the colitis group was significantly higher than in the kefir-control group (P < 0

  20. Bioefficacy of budesonide loaded crosslinked polyelectrolyte microparticles in rat model of induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Crcarevska, M Simonoska; Dodov, M Glavas; Petrusevska, G; Gjorgoski, I; Goracinova, K

    2009-12-01

    A targeted delivery system for inflammatory bowel diseases, chitosan-Ca-alginate microparticles efficiently loaded with budesonide (BDS), were designed using one-step spray-drying process. They were eudragit-coated and examined for in vivo efficacy. Experimental colitis was induced by rectal instillation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) into male Wistar rats. Drugs were administered by oral gavage daily for 5 days. Colon/body weight ratio, gross morphological and histological evaluation, and clinical activity score were determined as inflammatory indices. Individual clinical and histological evaluation showed that colitis severity was suppressed the most greatly in order BDS < BDS/C-Ca-A < E-BDS/C-Ca-A. Clinical activity score decreased in the same order. Statistical analyses of total score points indicate that the incorporation of BDS in microparticles had significant differences in favor of efficacy of designed delivery system with mucoadhesive and controlled release properties (one-way ANOVA, P < 0.05). The results established the prediction by previous in vitro studies.

  1. In Vivo Evaluation of 5-ASA Colon-Specific Tablets Using Experimental-Induced Colitis Rat Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Sawarkar, Sujata P; Deshpande, S G; Bajaj, A N; Nikam, V S

    2015-12-01

    Colonic drug delivery is intended not only for local treatment in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but also for systemic delivery of therapeutics. Intestinal myeloperoxidase (MPO) determination could be used to estimate the average level of inflammation in colon as well as to determine the efficacy of drugs to be used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases or study the specificity of dosage forms to be used for colonic targeting of anti-inflammatory drugs. Colonic prodrug sulfasalazine (SASP) gets metabolized to give 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the active portion of SASP. However, when given orally, 5-ASA is absorbed in upper part of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and not made available in colon. In the present study, colon-targeted delivery of 5-ASA was achieved by formulating tablets with two natural polymers namely guar gum and pectin using compression coating method. Colonic specificity of 5-ASA tablets (prepared using guar gum and pectin as polymers) was evaluated in vitro using simulated fluids mimicking in vivo environment as well as in vivo method using chemically (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and acetic acid)-induced colitis rat model. Both colon-specific formulations of 5-ASA (guar gum and pectin) were observed to be more effective in reducing inflammation in chemically induced colitis rat models when compared to colon-specific prodrug sulfasalazine as well as conventional 5-ASA administered orally.

  2. Intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of calcium pyruvate in the TNBS model of rat colitis: Comparison with ethyl pyruvate.

    PubMed

    Algieri, F; Rodriguez-Nogales, A; Garrido-Mesa, J; Camuesco, D; Vezza, T; Garrido-Mesa, N; Utrilla, P; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M E; Pischel, I; Galvez, J

    2016-03-01

    Pyruvate is a key intermediate of the carbohydrate metabolism with endogenous scavenger properties. However, it cannot be used in clinics due to its instability. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) has shown better stability as well as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Calcium pyruvate monohydrate (CPM) is another stable pyruvate derivative that could also provide the benefits from calcium, fundamental for bone health. Considering everything, we propose CPM as a therapeutic strategy to treat diseases with an immune component in which there is also a significant dysregulation of the skeletal homeostasis. This could be applicable to inflammatory bowel disease, which is characterized by over-production of pro-inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites that induces intestinal mucosal damage and chronic inflammation, and extra-intestinal symptoms like osteopenia and osteoporosis. The effects of CPM and EP (20, 40 and 100mg/kg) were evaluated on the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of colitis in rats, after a 7-day oral treatment, with main focus on colonic histology and inflammatory mediators. Both pyruvates showed intestinal anti-inflammatory effects in the TNBS-induced colitis. They were evident both histologically, with a recovery of the mucosal cytoarchitecture and a reduction of the neutrophil infiltration, and through the profile of inflammatory mediators (IL-1, IL-6, IL-17, IL-23, iNOS). However, CPM appeared to be more effective than ethyl pyruvate. In conclusion, CPM exerts intestinal anti-inflammatory effect on the TNBS-induced colitis in rats, although further experiments are needed to explore its beneficial effects on bone health and osteoporosis.

  3. Protective effect of hydroalcoholic olive leaf extract on experimental model of colitis in rat: involvement of nitrergic and opioidergic systems.

    PubMed

    Fakhraei, Nahid; Abdolghaffari, Amir Hossein; Delfan, Bahram; Abbasi, Ata; Rahimi, Nastaran; Khansari, Azadeh; Rahimian, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the possible protective effect of dry olive leaf extract (OLE) against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats, as well as the probable modulatory effect of nitrergic and opioidergic systems on this protective impact. Olive leaf extract was administered (250, 500 and 750 mg/kg) orally for two successive days, starting from the colitis induction. To assess the involvement of nitrergic and opioidergic systems in the possible protective effect of OLE, L-NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester (10 mg/kg) and naltrexone (5 mg/kg) intraperitoneal (i.p.) were applied 30 min before administration of the extract for two successive days, respectively. Colonic status was investigated 48 h following induction through macroscopic, histological and biochemical analyses. Olive leaf extract dose-dependently attenuated acetic acid-provoked chronic intestinal inflammation. The extract significantly reduces the severity of the ulcerative lesions and ameliorated macroscopic and microscopic scores. These observations were accompanied by a significant reduction in the elevated amounts of TNF-α and interlukin-2 markers. Moreover, both systems blockage reversed protective effects of OLE in the rat inflammatory bowel disease model. These finding demonstrated, for the first time, a possible role for nitrergic and opioidergic systems in the aforementioned protective effect, and the extract probably exerted its impact increasing nitric oxide and opioid tones.

  4. Oligosaccharides isolated from goat milk reduce intestinal inflammation in a rat model of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Lara-Villoslada, Federico; Debras, Elisabeth; Nieto, Ana; Concha, Angel; Gálvez, Julio; López-Huertas, Eduardo; Boza, Julio; Obled, Christiane; Xaus, Jordi

    2006-06-01

    There is increased interest in the study of manipulation of the flora with pro- and prebiotics regarding inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of oligosaccharides from goat milk in a rat model of dextran sodium sulfate- (DSS-) induced colitis. Twenty rats were fed the same diet but with different sources of fiber (5% of the diet): cellulose or a mixture of goat's milk oligosaccharides (GMO) and cellulose. DSS treatment was used to induce a colonic inflammation. Several clinical and inflammatory parameters, as well as intestinal micorbiota and gene expression by DNA microarray technology, were evaluated. DSS induced a decrease in body weight which was not observed in rats fed the GMO (decrease of 21+/-11% in control rats vs increase of 5.2+/-8.6 in GMO rats, P<0.05). DSS also caused an acute colonic inflammatory process which was weaker in rats fed the GMO, as shown by colon myeloperoxidase activity (0.53+/-0.16 vs 0.14+/-0.07U/mg of protein, P<0.05), as well as clinical symptoms measured by a scoring system (1.25+/-1.14 vs 0.4+/-0.07, P<0.05). GMO rats also showed less severe colonic lesions and a more favorable intestinal microbiota. The expression of genes involved in intestinal function, such as mucine-3, was down-regulated in DSS-control rats but returned to normal values in GMO rats. GMO reduce intestinal inflammation and contribute to the recovery of damaged colonic mucosa.

  5. Evaluating [(11)C]PBR28 PET for Monitoring Gut and Brain Inflammation in a Rat Model of Chemically Induced Colitis.

    PubMed

    Kurtys, E; Doorduin, J; Eisel, U L M; Dierckx, R A J O; de Vries, E F J

    2017-02-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon that affects an increasing number of patients. High comorbidity is observed between UC and other diseases in which inflammation may be involved, including brain diseases such as cognitive impairment, mental disorders, anxiety, and depression. To investigate the increased occurrence of these brain diseases in patients with UC, non-invasive methods for monitoring peripheral and central inflammation could be applied. Therefore, the goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of monitoring gut and brain inflammation in a rat model of chemically induced colitis by positron emission tomography (PET) with [(11)C]PBR28, a tracer targeting the translocator protein (TSPO), which is upregulated when microglia and macrophages are activated. Colitis was induced in rats by intra-rectal injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Rats with colitis and healthy control animals were subjected to [(11)C]PBR28 PET of the abdomen followed by ex vivo biodistribution in order to assess whether inflammation in the gut could be detected. Another group of rats with colitis underwent repetitive [(11)C]PBR28 PET imaging of the brain to investigate the development of neuroinflammation. Eleven days after TNBS injection, ex vivo biodistribution studies demonstrated increased [(11)C]PBR28 uptake in the inflamed cecum and colon of rats with colitis as compared to healthy controls, whereas PET imaging did not show any difference between groups at any time. Similarly, repetitive PET imaging of the brain did not reveal any neuroinflammation induced by the TNBS administration in the colon. In contrast, significantly increased [(11)C]PBR28 uptake in cerebellum could be detected in ex vivo biodistribution studies on day 11. Inflammation in both the gut and the brain of rats with chemically induced colitis was observed by ex vivo biodistribution. However, these effects could not be detected by [(11)C]PBR28 PET imaging

  6. Intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of oligosaccharides derived from lactulose in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis.

    PubMed

    Algieri, Francesca; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Vezza, Teresa; Garrido-Mesa, José; Utrilla, M Pilar; Montilla, Antonia; Cardelle-Cobas, Alejandra; Olano, Agustín; Corzo, Nieves; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2014-05-14

    Intestinal microbiota modulation is becoming an interesting approach to manage inflammatory bowel disease and can be achieved by the administration of prebiotics. Previous studies showed the intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of the prebiotic lactulose. The aim of the present study was to test the preventative effects of oligosaccharides derived from lactulose with prebiotic properties (OsLu) in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis and compare them with those of lactulose. Both treatments modified bacterial profile in intestinal contents, increasing the bifidobacteria and lactobacilli counts and up-regulating the production of short-chain fatty acids, although OsLu generated a larger amount. OsLu also inhibited to a greater extent different pro-inflammatory markers such as interleukins (IL) 1, 6, 12, and 23 and chemokines (MCP-1 and CINC-1). However, both prebiotics equally restored colonic epithelial integrity, evaluated both with a histological score (OsLu, 9.8 ± 2.2; and lactulose, 12.1 ± 2.1, vs colitic control, 27.3 ± 3.3) and by measuring several key proteins of the mucosal barrier (MUC-2, MUC-3, and TTF-3). OsLu effect was also associated with an inhibition of iNOS expression and a reduction of Th17 cell activity in the inflamed tissue that facilitated the intestinal mucosa barrier recovery. In conclusion, OsLu showed a better anti-inflammatory profile than lactulose in this model of experimental colitis.

  7. Intestinal Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Baccharis dracunculifolia in the Trinitrobenzenesulphonic Acid Model of Rat Colitis.

    PubMed

    Cestari, Sílvia Helena; Bastos, Jairo Kennup; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Baccharis dracunculifolia DC (Asteraceae) is a Brazilian medicinal plant popularly used for its antiulcer and anti-inflammatory properties. This plant is the main botanical source of Brazilian green propolis, a natural product incorporated into food and beverages to improve health. The present study aimed to investigate the chemical profile and intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of B. dracunculifolia extract on experimental ulcerative colitis induced by trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid (TNBS). Colonic damage was evaluated macroscopically and biochemically through its evaluation of glutathione content and its myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alkaline phosphatase activities. Additional in vitro experiments were performed in order to test the antioxidant activity by inhibition of induced lipid peroxidation in the rat brain membrane. Phytochemical analysis was performed by HPLC using authentic standards. The administration of plant extract (5 and 50 mg kg(-1)) significantly attenuated the colonic damage induced by TNBS as evidenced both macroscopically and biochemically. This beneficial effect can be associated with an improvement in the colonic oxidative status, since plant extract prevented glutathione depletion, inhibited lipid peroxidation and reduced MPO activity. Caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, aromadendrin-4-O-methyl ether, 3-prenyl-p-coumaric acid, 3,5-diprenyl-p-coumaric acid and baccharin were detected in the plant extract.

  8. Acute experimental distal colitis alters colonic transit in rats.

    PubMed

    Myers, B S; Dempsey, D T; Yasar, S; Martin, J S; Parkman, H P; Ryan, J P

    1997-04-01

    Data from humans with active distal colitis suggest that the proximal colon exhibits increased contractile activity and delayed transit, whereas the distal colon shows decreased contractile activity and rapid transit. The present study used the acetic acid rat model of experimental colitis to determine the effect of distal colitis on total and regional colonic transit in vivo and on the in vitro contractility of circular smooth muscle from the proximal and distal colon. Distal colitis was induced in rats by intracolonic administration of 4% acetic acid; sham control rats received saline enemas. Control and colitic rats were studied 2 days postenemas. Total colon transit was determined by calculating the geometric center of distribution of a radiolabeled marker (51Cr) instilled into the proximal colon. Regional transit was assessed by expressing the radioactivity in the cecum, proximal and distal colon, and excreted stool as a percent of total radioactivity. Muscle strips from the proximal and distal colon were stimulated with 100 microM acetylcholine (ACh) and 60 mM KCl and the tension was expressed as kilograms per square centimeter. Distal colitis was characterized by decreased total colon transit, increased retention of marker in the cecum and proximal colon, and decreased retention of marker in the distal colon. In vitro contractility studies revealed that distal colitis increased proximal colon circular smooth muscle contractility and decreased distal colon circular smooth muscle contractility to both ACh and potassium. Distal colitis is associated with regional differences in colonic circular smooth muscle contractility, which may contribute to delayed transit in the proximal colon and rapid transit in the distal colon.

  9. Apical leptin induces chloride secretion by intestinal epithelial cells and in a rat model of acute chemotherapy-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Hoda, Raschid M.; Scharl, Michael; Keely, Stephen J.; McCole, Declan F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether luminal leptin alters ion transport properties of the intestinal epithelium under acute inflammatory conditions. Monolayers of human intestinal T84 epithelial cells and a rat model of chemotherapy-induced enterocolitis were used. Cells were treated with leptin and mounted in Ussing chambers to measure basal and secretagogue-induced changes in transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc). Furthermore, the role of MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathways in mediating responses to leptin was investigated. Acute colitis in Sprague-Dawley rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 40 mg/kg methotrexate. Leptin (100 ng/ml) induced a time-dependent increase in basal Isc in T84 intestinal epithelial cells (P < 0.01). Moreover, pretreatment of T84 cells with leptin for up to 1 h significantly potentiated carbachol- and forskolin-induced increases in Isc. Pretreatment with an inhibitor of MAPK abolished the effect of leptin on basal, carbachol- and forskolin-induced chloride secretion (P < 0.05). However, the PI3K inhibitor, wortmannin, only blunted the effect of leptin on forskolin-induced increases in Isc. Furthermore, leptin treatment evoked both ERK1/2 and Akt1 phosphorylation in T84 cells. In the rat model, luminal leptin induced significant increases in Isc across segments of proximal and, to a lesser extent, distal colon (P < 0.05). We conclude that luminal leptin is likely an intestinal chloride secretagogue, particularly when present at elevated concentrations and/or in the setting of inflammation. Our findings may provide a mechanistic explanation, at least in part, for the clinical condition of secretory diarrhea both in hyperleptinemic obese patients and in patients with chemotherapy-induced intestinal inflammation. PMID:20203064

  10. Oral Feeding of Probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis: Colonic Morphological Changes in Rat Model of TNBS-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Najma H.; Alsahly, Musaad B.; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. It has been proposed that modifying the bacterial flora in intestine with probiotics may decrease the inflammatory process and prevent relapses in UC. We investigated the possible protective and therapeutic effects of a single strand of probiotic, Bifidobacterium infantis (BI), on colonic inflammation, in rats with regular feedings. Two groups of Lewis rats were prepared (n = 8). The first group was the control, sham-fed group (n = 4). The other group was the experimental BI-fed group (n = 4). Colitis was induced in both groups by intrarectal administration of TNBS under light anesthesia. The sham-fed colitis induced groups received a daily oral gavage feeding of 1.0 mL distilled water, whereas the B. infantis-fed group received 0.205 g of B. infantis dissolved in 1.0 mL distilled water daily. The change in body weight and food and water intake was recorded over the course of each study and analyzed. The rats were euthanized and tissues from the descending colon were harvested and analyzed microscopically and histologically. Results of our study indicated significant reduction in inflammation, mucosal damage, and preservation of goblet cells, as compared to the control animals. Modulation of gastrointestinal (GI) flora suggests a promising field in developing strategies for prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases by dietary modifications. PMID:27127686

  11. Telmisartan decreases inflammation by modulating TNF-α, IL-10, and RANK/RANKL in a rat model of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Gerlane C B; Araújo, Aurigena A; Lira, George A; Melo, Maryanne N; Souto, Késia K O; Fernandes, Daline; Silva, Arthur L; Araújo Júnior, Raimundo F

    2015-06-01

    Telmisartan is an antihypertensive angiotensin II receptor blocker. This antihypertensive shows antiinflammatory activity. In this study, the antiinflammatory activity of telmisartan was tested in an acetic acid (10%) model of ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats. Rats were given 1, 3, and 5mg/kg/day of telmisartan orally for 3 days before induction of UC. The same doses were also administered 2 and 24h after induction. Rats from the non-colitis and non-treated colitis groups were administered vehicle (saline, 5 ml/kg) orally and another group received sulfasalazine (50mg/kg/day). Colons tissue was analyzed by macroscopic, by histopathology, by the immunohistochemical examination of RANKL/RANK pathway; by ELISA analysis of the levels of IL-10, TNF-α, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malonaldehyde (MDA). Telmisartan at 5mg/kg reduced levels of MPO, MDA, TNF-α and increased of IL-10 (p<0.05). Additionally, telmisartan reduced macroscopic damage, number of ulcers, and inflammatory and histopathological processes such as neutrophil infiltration, changes in cytoarchitecture, and necrosis. Immunohistochemistry revealed down-regulation of nuclear factor-kappaB receptor/nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANK/RANKL) in groups treated with sulfasalazine or telmisartan. Telmisartan exerts beneficial effects in an acetic acid model of colitis in rats. These effects may be due to accelerated termination of the acute inflammatory phase, indicated by decreased TNF-α and increased production of IL-10 and low expression of RANKL and RANK. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Intervention effects of QRZSLXF, a Chinese medicinal herb recipe, on the DOR-β-arrestin1-Bcl2 signal transduction pathway in a rat model of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Heng; Liu, Xing-xing; Zhang, Li-juan; Hu, Hui; Tang, Qing; Duan, Xue-yun; Zhong, Min; Shou, Zhe-xing

    2014-05-28

    Qingre Zaoshi Liangxue Fang (QRZSLXF) is a Chinese medicinal herb recipe that is commonly prescribed for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. It includes 5 quality assured herbs: Sophora flavescens Aiton., Baphicacanthus cusia (Nees) Bremek., Bletilla striata Rchb.f., Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. and Coptis chinensis Franch. The main phytochemical ingredient of QRZSLXF includes ammothamnine, sophocarpidine, liquiritin, berberine and indirubin. QRZSLXF has been clinically proven for use in the treatment of ulcerative colitis for over twenty years. In the past ten years, research has confirmed the therapeutic effect of QRZSLXF in ulcerative colitis and partially revealed its mechanism of action. Here, we further reveal the therapeutic mechanism of QRZSLXF in ulcerative colitis. To investigate the role of the DOR-β-arrestin1-Bcl-2 signal transduction pathway in ulcerative colitis and to determine the effects of QRZSLXF on this signal transduction pathway. Eighty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal control group, model group, mesalazine group, and QRZSLXF high-dose, medium-dose group and low-dose groups (n=14). Experimental colitis was induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) in each group, except the normal control group. After modeling, bloody stool, mental state and diarrhea were observed and recorded. Two rats were randomly selected from the model groups adfnd sacrificed on day 3 to observe pathological changes in the colon tissue by microscopy. The rats in the QRZSLXF-treated groups received intramuscular injections of different concentrations of QRZSLXF for 15 days. The rats in the mesalazine group were treated with mesalazine solution (0.5 g/kg/day) by gastric lavage for 15 days. The rats in the normal control group and the model group were treated with 3 mL water by gastric lavage for 15 days. On the 16th day, after fasting for 24 h, the remaining rats were sacrificed and their colon tissues were used to detect the m

  13. Visceral and Somatic Hypersensitivity in TNBS induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, QiQi; Price, Donald D.; Caudle, Robert M.; Verne, G. Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation of visceral structures in rats has been shown to produce visceral/somatic hyperalgesia. Our objectives were to determine if trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis in rats leads to visceral/somatic hypersensitivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200g–250g) were treated with 20 mg of TNBS in 50% ethanol (n=40) or an equivalent volume of ethanol (n=40) or saline (n=25) via the colon. Colonic distension, Von-Frey, Hargreaves, and tail reflex test were used to evaluate for visceral, mechanical, and thermal sensitivity. The rats demonstrated visceral hypersensitivity at 2–28 days following TNBS (p<0.0001). The ethanol treated rats also demonstrated visceral hypersensitivity that resolved after day 14. TNBS treated rats demonstrated somatic hypersensitivity at days 14–28 (p<0.0001) in response to somatic stimuli of the hind-paw. TNBS colitis is associated with visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in areas of somatotopic overlap. This model of colitis should allow further investigation into the mechanisms of visceral and somatic hypersensitivity. PMID:17703363

  14. Resveratrol Pretreatment Ameliorates TNBS Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Gulserap; Yildiz, Yuksel; Ulutas, Pinar A; Yaylali, Asl; Ural, Muruvvet

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in humans constituting a major health concern today whose prevalence has been increasing over the world. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and disturbed capacity of antioxidant defense in IBD subjects have been reported. Antioxidants may play a significant role in IBD treatment. This study aimed at evaluating ameliorative effects of intraperitoneal resveratrol pretreatment on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Thirty five Wistar-Albino female rats were divided equally into five groups. Inflammation was induced by the intrarectal administration of TNBS under anesthesia. Intraperitoneal administration of resveratrol (RSV) at a concentration of 10mg/kg/day for 5 days before the induction of colitis significantly reduced microscopy score and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and increased glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px) activity compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. Also an insignificant increase in catalase (CAT) activity was observed in the RSV treated group compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. In this paper, the most recent patent on the identification and treatment of IBD was indicated. In conclusion, antioxidant RSV proved to have a beneficial effect on TNBS colitis in rats. In light of these advantageous results, the RSV can be considered as adjuvant agent in IBD treatments.

  15. Efficacy of oral administration of lactic acid bacteria isolated from cocoa in a fermented milk preparation: reduction of colitis in an experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, T F; Melo, T A; Santos, D S; Rezende, R P; Dias, J C T; Romano, C C

    2016-07-29

    We investigated the probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) obtained from cocoa fermentation using an experimental rat model of colitis. Cocoa beans were collected from fermentation boxes every 12 h for 5 days to isolate the microorganisms. Strains were isolated by serial dilution and plating on MRS agar. Gram-positive and catalase-negative rods were subjected to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction, and sequencing. Ten strains were randomly pooled and used to prepare a fermented milk drink that was used to treat the experimental colitis. A parallel group was treated with a single strain drink. Serum concentrations of cytokines and IgA, total and differential counts of blood leukocytes, and histological appearance were compared with the untreated control colitis group. Eighty strains of LAB were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum (68) and Lactobacillus plantarum (12). The multi-strain LAB pool significantly reduced the total number of leukocytes. There was a significant reduction in the percentage of neutrophils and monocytes compared with the control colitis group. IFN-γ concentration was downregulated in animals treated with the LAB pool. IL-10 and IgA increased significantly in the group treated with the strains. Histological analysis showed that the LAB pool reduced the inflammatory infiltrate and restored tissue architecture. The group treated with the single strain LAB drink (L. fermentum) showed no signs of inflammation remission. The results confirm the probiotic action of cocoa-derived LAB in the treatment of experimental colitis. Studies using isogenic models and humans will clarify the mechanisms of immune response modulation in inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Modulation in Natriuretic Peptides System in Experimental Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Ho; Ha, Gi Won; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2016-04-01

    Renin-angiotensin system is involved in the pathophysiology of colonic inflammation. However, there are a few reports about modulation of natriuretic peptide system. This study investigates whether a local atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system exists in rat colon and whether ANP plays a role in the regulation of colonic motility in experimental colitis rat model. Experimental colitis was induced by an intake of 5 % dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) dissolved in tap water for 7 days. After rats were killed, plasma hormone concentrations and mRNAs for natriuretic peptide system were measured. Functional analysis of colonic motility in response to ANP was performed using taenia coli. DSS-treated colon showed an increased necrosis with massive infiltration of inflammatory cells. The colonic natriuretic peptide receptor-A mRNA level and particulate guanylyl cyclase activity in response to ANP from colonic tissue membranes were higher, and the mRNA levels of ANP and natriuretic peptide receptor-B were lower in DSS-treated rats than in control rats. ANP decreased the frequency of basal motility in a dose-dependent manner but did not change the amplitude. The inhibitory responses of frequency of basal motility to ANP and 8-bromo-cGMP were enhanced in DSS-treated rat colon. In conclusion, augmentation of inhibitory effect on basal motility by ANP in experimental colitis may be due an increased expression of colonic natriuretic peptide receptor-A mRNA. These data suggest that local natriuretic peptide system is partly involved in the pathophysiology of experimental colitis.

  17. Swimming attenuates inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in a rat model of dextran sulfate sodium-induced chronic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-shan; Liu, Qin-qin; Wang, Li-feng; Yang, An-gang; Gao, Chun-fang; Li, Jun-tang

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that regular physical exercise suppresses chronic inflammation. However, the potential inhibitory effects of swimming on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced chronic colitis, and its underlying mechanisms, remain unclear. In this study, rats were orally administered DSS to induce chronic colitis, and subsequently treated with or without swimming exercise. A 7-week swimming program (1 or 1.5 hours per day, 5 days per week) ameliorated DSS-caused colon shortening, colon barrier disruption, spleen enlargement, serum LDH release, and reduction of body weight gain. Swimming for 1.5 hours per day afforded greater protection than 1 hour per day. Swimming ameliorated DSS-induced decrease in crypt depth, and increases in myeloperoxidase activity, infiltration of Ly6G+ neutrophils and TNF-a- and IFN-?-expressing CD3+ T cells, as well as fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin. Swimming inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production and decreased the protein expression of phosphorylated nuclear factor-?B p65 and cyclooxygenase 2, whereas it elevated interleukin-10 levels. Swimming impeded the generation of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide; however, it boosted glutathione levels, total antioxidant capacity, and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. Additionally, swimming decreased caspase-3 activity and expression of apoptosis-inducing factor, cytochrome c, Bax, and cleaved-caspase-3, but increased Bcl-2 levels. Overall, these results suggest that swimming exerts beneficial effects on DSS-induced chronic colitis by modulating inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. PMID:28030847

  18. Effects of curcumin on apoptosis and oxidoinflammatory regulation in a rat model of acetic acid-induced colitis: the roles of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Topcu-Tarladacalisir, Yeter; Akpolat, Meryem; Uz, Yesim Hulya; Kizilay, Gulnur; Sapmaz-Metin, Melike; Cerkezkayabekir, Aysegul; Omurlu, Imran Kurt

    2013-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of curcumin on epithelial cell apoptosis, the immunoreactivity of the phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in inflamed colon mucosa, and oxidative stress in a rat model of ulcerative colitis induced by acetic acid. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, acetic acid, and acetic acid+curcumin. Curcumin (100 mg/kg per day, intragastrically) was administered 10 days before the induction of colitis and was continued for two additional days. Acetic acid-induced colitis caused a significant increase in the macroscopic and microscopic tissue ranking scores as well as an elevation in colonic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and the number of apoptotic epithelial cells in colon tissue compared to controls. In the rat colon, immunoreactivity of phospho-p38 MAPK was increased, whereas the phospho-JNK activity was decreased following the induction of colitis. Curcumin treatment was associated with amelioration of macroscopic and microscopic colitis sores, decreased MPO activity, and decreased MDA levels in acetic acid-induced colitis. Furthermore, oral curcumin supplementation clearly prevented programmed cell death and restored immunreactivity of MAPKs in the colons of colitic rats. The results of this study suggest that oral curcumin treatment decreases colon injury and is associated with decreased inflammatory reactions, lipid peroxidation, apoptotic cell death, and modulating p38- and JNK-MAPK pathways.

  19. Interleukin 10 gene transfer prevents experimental colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, G; Xing, Z; Hogaboam, C; Gauldie, J; Collins, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The development of colitis in interleukin 10 (IL-10) deficient mice, together with the known anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of this cytokine have prompted consideration of IL-10 as a treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, studies using hrIL-10 in IBD models have yielded inconsistent results.
AIMS—To examine the therapeutic potential of overexpressing the IL-10 gene before and after the induction of experimental colitis in rats.
METHODS—Gene transfer was achieved by intraperitoneal injection of non-replicating human type 5 adenovirus bearing the IL-10 gene, either 24 hours before or one hour after intrarectal administration of dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in rats. Colonic damage and inflammation was assessed macroscopically and by measuring myeloperoxidase activity and leukotriene B4 concentrations.
RESULTS—Gene transfer increased IL-10 protein in serum for up to six days. IL-10 gene transfer prior to colitis improved colitis macroscopically and histologically, and significantly reduced colonic myeloperoxidase activity and leukotriene B4 concentrations. In contrast, IL-10 gene transfer after the onset of colitis had no beneficial effect.
CONCLUSIONS—Gene therapy using an adenovirus-IL-10 construct was successful in preventing but not in reversing experimental colitis in the rat.


Keywords: gene therapy; colitis; interleukin 10; adenovirus vector; leukotrienes; inflammatory bowel disease; maintenance therapy PMID:10673295

  20. The effect of methylsulfonylmethane on the experimental colitis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Amirshahrokhi, K.; Bohlooli, S.; Chinifroush, M.M.

    2011-06-15

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), naturally occurring in green plants, fruits and vegetables, has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. MSM is an organosulfur compound and a normal oxidative metabolite of dimethyl sulfoxide. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of MSM in a rat model of experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 1 ml of 5% of acetic acid. Rats were treated with MSM (400 mg/kg/day, orally) for 4 days. Animals were euthanized and distal colon evaluated histologically and biochemically. Tissue samples were used to measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH) and proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-{alpha} and IL-1{beta}) levels. Results showed that MSM decreased macroscopic and microscopic colonic damage scores caused by administration of acetic acid. MSM treatment also significantly reduced colonic levels of MDA, MPO and IL-1{beta}, while increased the levels of GSH and CAT compared with acetic acid-induced colitis group. It seems that MSM as a natural product may have a protective effect in an experimental ulcerative colitis. - Research Highlights: > Methylsulfonylmethane occurs naturally in some green plants, fruits and vegetables. > Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. > We evaluated the effects of MSM in a rat model of experimental ulcerative colitis. > MSM has protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis in rat.

  1. The dual anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of natural honey promote cell proliferation and neural regeneration in a rat model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Nooh, Hanaa Z; Nour-Eldien, Nermeen M

    2016-07-01

    A decreased antioxidant capacity and excessive inflammation are well-known features in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC). Recent evidence has suggested a role of honey in reducing colitis-induced inflammatory and oxidative stress markers. In this study, we examined whether the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties of honey have a beneficial effect on the enteric innervation and cellular proliferation of UC in rat. The colitis was induced in rats by dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). The effect of natural honey on induced colitis was assessed by the following parameters in colonic samples: tissue injury, inflammatory infiltration, interleukin-1β and -6, superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione. In addition, the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α, inducible NO synthase, caspase-3, CD34, Ki67, S100, c-kit, and neuron-specific enolase were examined by immunohistochemistry. Compared to the DSS-induced colitis group, the honey-treated group had significantly improved macroscopic and microscopic scores and exhibited the down-regulation of oxidative, inflammatory, and apoptotic markers. In addition, up-regulation of intrinsic muscular innervation and epithelial cellular proliferation markers was detected. These results provide new insight into the beneficial role of natural honey in the treatment of DSS-induced colitis via the inhibition of colonic motor dysfunction and the inflammatory-oxidative-apoptotic cascade. In addition, the role of honey in epithelial regeneration was clarified.

  2. Intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of apigenin K in two rat colitis models induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and dextran sulphate sodium.

    PubMed

    Mascaraque, Cristina; González, Raquel; Suárez, María Dolores; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2015-02-28

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that are widespread in nature, and consumed as part of the human diet in significant amounts. The aim of the present study was to test the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of apigenin K, a soluble form of apigenin, in two models of rat colitis, namely the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model and the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) model. Apigenin K (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg; by the oral route; n 4-6 per group) was administered as a pre-treatment to rats with TNBS and DSS colitis, and colonic status was checked by macroscopic and biochemical examination. Apigenin K pre-treatment resulted in the amelioration of morphological signs and biochemical markers in the TNBS model. The results demonstrated a reduction in the inflamed area, as well as lower values of score and colonic weight:length ratio compared with the TNBS group. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was reduced by 30 % (P< 0·05). Moreover, apigenin K pre-treatment ameliorated morphological signs and biochemical markers in the DSS model. Thus, macroscopic damage was significantly reduced and the colonic weight:length ratio was lowered by approximately 10 %, while colonic MPO and alkaline phosphatase activities were decreased by 35 and 21 %, respectively (P< 0·05). Apigenin K pre-treatment also tended to normalise the expression of a number of colonic inflammatory markers (e.g. TNF-α, transforming growth factor-β, IL-6, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 or chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2). In conclusion, apigenin K is found to have anti-inflammatory effects in two preclinical models of inflammatory bowel disease.

  3. Murine models of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Christopher; Levine, Joel; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2003-06-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology limited to the large intestine. The disease is prevalent in industrial societies and is associated with specific ethnic populations. A number of murine models, each focused on distinct aspects of the disease process, were developed over the past 20 years to further our understanding of the pathogenesis of UC. These models have been and remain our best resource for the study of the disorder as a result of their homology to human UC and the ease in which they can be manipulated and examined. This review examines and distills what has been leamed from these models and how this information is related back to human UC.

  4. Dietary intervention with narrow-leaved cattail rhizome flour (Typha angustifolia L.) prevents intestinal inflammation in the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid model of rat colitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation of the intestinal epithelium that is driven by the intestinal immune system, oxidative stress and the loss of tolerance to the luminal microbiota. The use of dietary products containing ingredients such as fibres and carbohydrates and/or antioxidant compounds have been used as a therapeutic strategy for intestinal diseases because these products are considered effective in the modulation of the immune system and colonic microbiota. We investigated the beneficial effects of cattail rhizome flour (Typha angustifolia L.) in the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. In addition, we investigated the effects of cattail rhizome flour on the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of prednisolone, which is a reference drug that is used for treatment of human IBD. Methods The present study included the preparation of flour from rhizomes of cattail (Typha angustifolia L.); an evaluation of the qualitative phytochemical profile of cattail rhizomes; an evaluation of the efficacy of cattail rhizome flour in TNBS-induced rat colitis; an evaluation of the synergistic effects of cattail rhizome flour on the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of prednisolone; and macroscopic, clinical, biochemical, histopathological and microbiological studies to assess the healing effects of cattail rhizome flour and its synergistic effects in TNBS-induced rat colitis. The data were analysed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and χ2 tests. Results We tested several concentrations of cattail rhizome flour and found that dietary supplementation with 10% cattail rhizome flour showed the best effects at reducing the extension of the lesion, the colon weight ratio, adherences to adjacent organs and diarrhoea. These effects were related to inhibition of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activities and an attenuation of glutathione (GSH) depletion. The 10% cattail rhizome flour was as effective as

  5. Dietary intervention with narrow-leaved cattail rhizome flour (Typha angustifolia L.) prevents intestinal inflammation in the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid model of rat colitis.

    PubMed

    Fruet, Andréa Costa; Seito, Leonardo Noboru; Rall, Vera Lúcia Mores; Di Stasi, Luiz Claudio

    2012-05-04

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammation of the intestinal epithelium that is driven by the intestinal immune system, oxidative stress and the loss of tolerance to the luminal microbiota. The use of dietary products containing ingredients such as fibres and carbohydrates and/or antioxidant compounds have been used as a therapeutic strategy for intestinal diseases because these products are considered effective in the modulation of the immune system and colonic microbiota. We investigated the beneficial effects of cattail rhizome flour (Typha angustifolia L.) in the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. In addition, we investigated the effects of cattail rhizome flour on the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of prednisolone, which is a reference drug that is used for treatment of human IBD. The present study included the preparation of flour from rhizomes of cattail (Typha angustifolia L.); an evaluation of the qualitative phytochemical profile of cattail rhizomes; an evaluation of the efficacy of cattail rhizome flour in TNBS-induced rat colitis; an evaluation of the synergistic effects of cattail rhizome flour on the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of prednisolone; and macroscopic, clinical, biochemical, histopathological and microbiological studies to assess the healing effects of cattail rhizome flour and its synergistic effects in TNBS-induced rat colitis. The data were analysed by ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis and χ(2) tests. We tested several concentrations of cattail rhizome flour and found that dietary supplementation with 10% cattail rhizome flour showed the best effects at reducing the extension of the lesion, the colon weight ratio, adherences to adjacent organs and diarrhoea. These effects were related to inhibition of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) activities and an attenuation of glutathione (GSH) depletion. The 10% cattail rhizome flour was as effective as prednisolone, and no synergistic

  6. The effect of menthol on acute experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi-Pirbaluti, Masoumeh; Motaghi, Ehsan; Bozorgi, Homan

    2017-03-18

    Menthol is an aromatic compound with high antiinflammatory activity. The purpose of the current research is to investigate the effectiveness of menthol on acetic acid induced acute colitis in rats. Animals were injected with menthol (20 and 50 and 80mg/kg, i.p.) 24h prior to induction of colitis for 3 consecutive days. Menthol at medium and higher doses similar to dexamethasone as a reference drug significantly reduced body weight loss, macroscopic damage score, ulcer area, colon weight, colon length and improved hematocrit in rats with colitis. The histopathological examination also confirmed anti-colitic effects of menthol. Menthol also reduced significantly the colonic levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in inflamed colons. Thus, the findings of the current study provide evidence that menthol may be beneficial in patients suffering from acute ulcerative colitis.

  7. Actions of Probiotics on Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shiina, Takahiko; Shima, Takeshi; Naitou, Kiyotada; Nakamori, Hiroyuki; Sano, Yuuki; Horii, Kazuhiro; Shimakawa, Masaki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the actions of probiotics, Streptococcus faecalis 129 BIO 3B (SF3B), in a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid- (TNBS-) induced colitis model in rats. After TNBS was administered into the colons of rats for induction of colitis, the rats were divided into two groups: one group was given a control diet and the other group was given a diet containing SF3B for 14 days. There were no apparent differences in body weight, diarrhea period, macroscopic colitis score, and colonic weight/length ratio between the control group and SF3B group, suggesting that induction of colitis was not prevented by SF3B. Next, we investigated whether SF3B-containing diet intake affects the restoration of enteric neurotransmissions being damaged during induction of colitis by TNBS using isolated colonic preparations. Recovery of the nitrergic component was greater in the SF3B group than in the control group. A compensatory appearance of nontachykininergic and noncholinergic excitatory components was less in the SF3B group than in the control group. In conclusion, the present study suggests that SF3B-containing diet intake can partially prevent disruptions of enteric neurotransmissions induced after onset of TNBS-induced colitis, suggesting that SF3B has therapeutic potential. PMID:26550572

  8. Zinc sulphate solution enema decreases inflammation in experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, B W; Wang, H H; Liu, J X; Liu, X G

    1999-11-01

    It has been reported that zinc sulphate contributes an anti-inflammatory action in many animal models; however, the impact of zinc in colitis remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of zinc sulphate in experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNB) in rats. Beginning at the first day of TNB colitis, the rats were treated with a zinc sulphate enema once daily for 6 days. The rats were examined 8 days later. The TNB induced severe colitis as evidenced by increased mucosal lesion area, mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) levels. Six days after the application of the zinc sulphate enema, the mucosal lesion area, MPO activity, PGE2 and LTB4 levels all decreased significantly. Mucosal superoxide dismutase activity remained unchanged after zinc treatments. Our data suggest that zinc sulphate enemas have an anti-inflammatory action on experimental colitis.

  9. In utero and postnatal exposure to a phytoestrogen-enriched diet increases parameters of acute inflammation in a rat model of TNBS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Jan; Molzberger, Almut F; Hertrampf, Torsten; Laudenbach-Leschowski, Ute; Degen, Gisela H; Diel, Patrick

    2008-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is very common in Europe and USA. Its incidence in East Asia has been traditionally low, albeit the risk of IBD increases in Asian immigrants adopting western lifestyles, suggesting a strong role of environmental/dietary factors in IBD. A lifelong exposure to phytoestrogen-rich diets has been associated with a decreased risk of developing breast cancer and might also be protective against IBD. We studied the influence of in utero and postnatal exposure to a phytoestrogen (PE)-rich diet on acute inflammation in an animal model of TNBS-induced colitis. Wistar rats were exposed in utero and postnatally to high (genistein: 240 microg/g feed; daidzein: 232 microg/g feed) or very low levels (genistein and daidzein <10 microg/g feed) of phytoestrogen isoflavones fed to pregnant dams with the diet and throughout nursing. After weaning, the offspring had free access to these diets. At the age of 11 weeks, colitis was induced with an enema of TNBS. After 3 days, animals were sacrificed and tissues were collected for histological evaluation and analysis of molecular markers of inflammation. Animals kept on a PE-rich diet (PRD) had higher colon weights than animals on low PE-levels (PDD), suggesting enhanced acute inflammation by phytoestrogens. This result was supported by histological findings and by analysis of myeloperoxidase activity. Interestingly, relative mRNA and protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were modulated in rats on PRD, providing evidence that COX-2, the inducible isoform of the enzyme, is involved in the management of colonic inflammation. Our results suggest that early-in-life exposure to PE might not protect against the development of IBD but enhances the extent of acute inflammation.

  10. [Regulatory effect of Tripterygium wilfordii polycoride (TWP) towards TLR4/MyD88 independent pathway in TNBS/ethanol ulcerative colitis (UC) rat model].

    PubMed

    Qin, Dan-Ping; Zhou, Yi-Jun; Sun, Pei-Na; Cao, Jun-Min; Zhang, Chun-Li; Dai, Qun

    2016-03-01

    In order to study the regulatory effect of Tripterygium wilfordii polycoride (TWP) towards TLR4/MyD88 independent pathway in TNBS/ethanol ulcerative colitis (UC) rat model, TNBS/ethanol enema was adopted to build TNBS/ethanol UC rat model. After the successful modeling procedure, 90 male Wistar rats are were divided into 6 groups, including namely normal group, model group, TWP low, middle, high dose groups (3, 6, 12 mg•kg⁻¹)and azathioprine (AZA) group (6 g•kg⁻¹), with 15 rats in each group. All rats in each group were administrated with corresponding medicines for 14 days. After 14 days of administration, corresponding colon tissues were taken for general and microscopic evaluation. Western blotting analysis and RT-PCR were adopted to test the mRNA and protein expressions of TLR4/MyD88 independent pathway-related molecules, namely TLR4, TRAM, TRIF, NF-κB and IFN-γ. The results showed that DAI, general and microscopic evaluations all indicated that TNBS/ethanol UC rat model was successful. TWP can improve UC-related clinical manifestation and heal colonic mucosa, which was equal to AZA. RT-PCR and WB results showed that the expression of TLR4/MyD88 independent pathway-related molecules in model group were significantly superior to that in normal group at either mRNA or protein level (P<0.01). Compared with model group, TWP can inhibit the expression of each node in TLR4/MyD88 independent pathway in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of TWP with high dose towards the above molecules was inferior to that in model group at either mRNA or protein level (P<0.05). The inhibitory effect of TWP with high dose towards upstream molecules of TLR4/MyD88 independent pathway (TLR4, TRAM, TRIF, NF-κB) was slightly superior to AZA group at either mRNA or protein level. However, such inhibitory effect towards terminal inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ) was inferior to AZA group at either mRNA or protein level. All the above differences had no statistical

  11. Impact of basal diet on dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Boussenna, Ahlem; Goncalves-Mendes, Nicolas; Joubert-Zakeyh, Juliette; Pereira, Bruno; Fraisse, Didier; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Texier, Odile; Felgines, Catherine

    2015-12-01

    Dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis is a widely used model for inflammatory bowel disease. However, various factors including nutrition may affect the development of this colitis. This study aimed to compare and characterize the impact of purified and non-purified basal diets on the development of DSS-induced colitis in the rat. Wistar rats were fed a non-purified or a semi-synthetic purified diet for 21 days. Colitis was then induced in half of the rats by administration of DSS in drinking water (4% w/v) during the last 7 days of experimentation. At the end of the experimental period, colon sections were taken for histopathological examination, determination of various markers of inflammation (myeloperoxidase: MPO, cytokines) and oxidative stress (superoxide dismutase: SOD, catalase: CAT, glutathione peroxidase: GPx and glutathione reductase: GRed activities), and evaluation of the expression of various genes implicated in this disorder. DSS ingestion induced a more marked colitis in animals receiving the purified diet, as reflected by higher histological score and increased MPO activity. A significant decrease in SOD and CAT activities was also observed in rats fed the purified diet. Also, in these animals, administration of DSS induced a significant increase in interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β and IL-6. In addition, various genes implicated in inflammation were over-expressed after ingestion of DSS by rats fed the purified diet. These results show that a purified diet promotes the onset of a more severe induced colitis than a non-purified one, highlighting the influence of basal diet in colitis development.

  12. Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... those caused by a virus, parasite, and food poisoning due to bacteria Ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease Lack of blood flow (ischemic colitis) Past radiation to the large bowel Necrotizing enterocolitis in newborns ...

  13. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis.

  14. Keratinocyte growth factor gene therapy ameliorates ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jie; Jin, Ji-De; Lv, Tong-De; Wu, Zu-Ze; Ha, Xiao-Qin

    2011-06-07

    To investigate the effect of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) gene therapy in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rat model. The colitis of Sprague-Dawley rats was induced by intrarectal infusion of 1 mL 5% (v/v) acetic acid. Twenty-four hours after exposed to acetic acid, rats were divided into three experimental groups: control group, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Ty21a strain (SP) group and SP strain carrying human KGF gene (SPK) group, and they were separately administered orally with 10% NaHCO(3), SP or SPK. Animals were sacrificed and colonic tissues were harvested respectively on day 3, 5, 7 and 10 after administration. Weights of rats, colonic weight/length ratio and stool score were evaluated. Histological changes of colonic tissues were examined by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining method. The expression of KGF, KGF receptor (KGFR) and TNF-α were measured either by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the cellular localization of KGFR and Ki67. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in the homogenate were measured. Body weight and colonic weight/length ratio were declined in SPK group compared with SP and control groups (body weight: 272.78 ± 17.92 g vs 243.72 ± 14.02 g and 240.68 ± 12.63 g, P < 0.01; colonic weight/length ratio: 115.76 ± 7.47 vs 150.32 ± 5.99 and 153.67 ± 5.50 mg/cm, P < 0.01). Moreover, pathological changes of damaged colon were improved in SPK group as well. After administration of SPK strain, KGF expression increased markedly from the 3rd d, and remained at a high level till the 10th d. Furthermore, KGFR expression and Ki67 expression elevated, whereas TNF-α expression was inhibited in SPK group. In the group administered with SPK, SOD activity increased significantly (d 5: 26.18 ± 5.84 vs 18.12 ± 3.30 and 18.79 ± 4.74 U/mg, P < 0.01; d 7: 35.48 ± 3.35 vs 22.57 ± 3.44 and 21.69 ± 3.94 U/mg, P < 0.01; d 10

  15. Keratinocyte growth factor gene therapy ameliorates ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Jie; Jin, Ji-De; Lv, Tong-De; Wu, Zu-Ze; Ha, Xiao-Qin

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) gene therapy in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rat model. METHODS: The colitis of Sprague-Dawley rats was induced by intrarectal infusion of 1 mL 5% (v/v) acetic acid. Twenty-four hours after exposed to acetic acid, rats were divided into three experimental groups: control group, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Ty21a strain (SP) group and SP strain carrying human KGF gene (SPK) group, and they were separately administered orally with 10% NaHCO3, SP or SPK. Animals were sacrificed and colonic tissues were harvested respectively on day 3, 5, 7 and 10 after administration. Weights of rats, colonic weight/length ratio and stool score were evaluated. Histological changes of colonic tissues were examined by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining method. The expression of KGF, KGF receptor (KGFR) and TNF-α were measured either by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the cellular localization of KGFR and Ki67. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in the homogenate were measured. RESULTS: Body weight and colonic weight/length ratio were declined in SPK group compared with SP and control groups (body weight: 272.78 ± 17.92 g vs 243.72 ± 14.02 g and 240.68 ± 12.63 g, P < 0.01; colonic weight/length ratio: 115.76 ± 7.47 vs 150.32 ± 5.99 and 153.67 ± 5.50 mg/cm, P < 0.01). Moreover, pathological changes of damaged colon were improved in SPK group as well. After administration of SPK strain, KGF expression increased markedly from the 3rd d, and remained at a high level till the 10th d. Furthermore, KGFR expression and Ki67 expression elevated, whereas TNF-α expression was inhibited in SPK group. In the group administered with SPK, SOD activity increased significantly (d 5: 26.18 ± 5.84 vs 18.12 ± 3.30 and 18.79 ± 4.74 U/mg, P < 0.01; d 7: 35.48 ± 3.35 vs 22.57 ± 3.44 and 21.69 ± 3.94 U

  16. Mentha longifolia protects against acetic-acid induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Murad, Hussam A S; Abdallah, Hossam M; Ali, Soad S

    2016-08-22

    Mentha longifolia L (Wild Mint or Habak) (ML) is used in traditional medicine in treatment of many gastrointestinal disorders. This study aimed to evaluate potential protecting effect of ML and its major constituent, eucalyptol, against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats, a model of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Rats were divided into ten groups (n=8) given orally for three days (mg/kg/day) the following: normal control, acetic acid-induced colitis (un-treated, positive control), vehicle (DMSO), sulfasalazine (500), ML extract (100, 500, 1000), and eucalyptol (100, 200, 400). After 24h-fasting, two ML of acetic acid (3%) was administered intrarectally. On the fifth day, serum and colonic biochemical markers, and histopathological changes were evaluated. Colitis significantly increased colonic myeloperoxidase activity and malonaldehyde level, and serum tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and malonaldehyde levels while significantly decreased colonic and serum glutathione levels. All treatments (except ML 100, ML 1000, and eucalyptol 100) significantly reversed these changes where eucalyptol (400) showed the highest activity in a dose-dependent manner. The colitis-induced histopathological changes were mild in sulfasalazine and eucalyptol 400 groups, moderate in ML 500 and eucalyptol 200 groups, and severe in ML 100, ML 1000, and eucalyptol 100 groups nearly similar to colitis-untreated rats. ML (in moderate doses) and eucalyptol (dose-dependently) exerted protective effects against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats possibly through antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties suggesting a potential benefit in treatments of IBD. To our knowledge this is the first report addressing this point. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary intervention with green dwarf banana flour (Musa sp AAA) prevents intestinal inflammation in a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid model of rat colitis.

    PubMed

    Scarminio, Viviane; Fruet, Andrea C; Witaicenis, Aline; Rall, Vera L M; Di Stasi, Luiz C

    2012-03-01

    Dietary products are among the therapeutic approaches used to modify intestinal microflora and to promote protective effects during the intestinal inflammatory process. Because the banana plant is rich in resistant starch, which is used by colonic microbiota for the anaerobic production of the short-chain fatty acids that serve as a major fuel source for colonocytes: first, green dwarf banana flour produces protective effects on the intestinal inflammation acting as a prebiotic and, second, combination of this dietary supplementation with prednisolone presents synergistic effects. For this, we used the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. Our results revealed that the protective effect produced by a combination of 10% green dwarf banana flour with prednisolone was more pronounced than those promoted by a single administration of prednisolone or a diet containing 10% or 20% banana flour. This beneficial effect was associated with an improvement in the colonic oxidative status because the banana flour diet prevented the glutathione depletion and inhibited myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation. In addition, the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity was associated with an inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity, a reduction in macroscopic and microscopic scores, and an extension of the lesions. In conclusion, the dietary use of the green dwarf banana flour constitutes an important dietary supplement and complementary medicine product to prevention and treatment of human inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Protective effects of citicoline on TNBS-induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ek, Rauf Onur; Serter, Mukadder; Ergin, Kemal; Cecen, Serpil; Unsal, Cengiz; Yildiz, Yuksel; Bilgin, Mehmet D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of citicoline on the development of colitis and antioxidant parameters in rats subjected to tribenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Twenty four Wistar Albino female rats were divided into four subgroups (n=6) (control, colitis control, colitis + 50 mg/kg citicoline, colitis + 250 mg/kg citicoline). Colitis was induced using an enema of TNBS and ethanol; following which citicoline was administrated for 3 days and effects of citicoline was subsequently evaluated. Based on microscopic damage scores, there was no difference between rats of the TNBS-colitis and 50 mg/kg citicoline treated groups, whereas treatment with 250 mg/kg citicoline, caused significant reduction in colon injury compared to that observed in rats of TNBS-colitis group. In terms of the biochemical analyses, myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), and IL-6 levels in rats from 250 mg/kg citicoline group were significantly different from that TNBS-colitis group. The levels of MPO, MDA, GSH and IL-6 in control rats were also significantly different those of rats in the TNBS-colitis group. Citicoline may have a positive protective effect on the inflammatory bowel disease treatment process and could, therefore, be used as an adjunct therapy in colitis. These effects of citicoline may exist through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanism.

  19. Healing Effect of Pistacia Atlantica Fruit Oil Extract in Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Masoumi, Samira; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Safarpour, Ali Reza; Erjaee, Hoda; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Rahimikazerooni, Salar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the anti-oxidant properties of Pistacia atlantica and lack of data regarding its efficacy in the treatment of ulcerative colitis, this study aims at investigating the effect of the Pistacia atlantica fruit extract in treating experimentally induced colitis in a rat model. Methods: Seventy male Sprague-Dawley rats (weighing 220±20 g) were used. All rats fasted 24 hours before the experimental procedure. The rats were randomly divided into 7 groups, each containing 10 induced colitis with 2ml acetic acid (3%). Group 1 (Asacol), group 2 (base gel) and group 7 (without treatment) were assigned as control groups. Group 3 (300 mg/ml) and group 4 (600 mg/ml) received Pistacia atlantica fruit orally. Group 5 (10% gel) and group 6 (20% gel) received Pistacia atlantica in the form of gel as enema. Macroscopic, histopathological examination and MDA measurement were carried out. Results: All groups revealed significant macroscopic healing in comparison with group 7 (P<0.001). Regarding microscopic findings in the treatment groups compared with group 7, the latter group differed significantly with groups 1, 2, 4 and 6 (P<0.001). There was a significant statistical difference in MDA scores of the seven treatment groups (F(5,54)=76.61, P<0.001). Post-hoc comparisons indicated that the mean±SD score of Asacol treated group (1.57±0.045) was not significantly different from groups 4 (1.62±0.024) and 6 (1.58±0.028). Conclusion: Our study showed that a high dose of Pistacia atlantica fruit oil extract, administered orally and rectally can improve colitis physiologically and pathologically in a rat model, and may be efficient for ulcerative colitis. PMID:25429174

  20. Relevance of TNBS-Colitis in Rats: A Methodological Study with Endoscopic, Histologic and Transcriptomic Characterization and Correlation to IBD

    PubMed Central

    Brenna, Øystein; Furnes, Marianne W.; Drozdov, Ignat; van Beelen Granlund, Atle; Flatberg, Arnar; Sandvik, Arne K.; Zwiggelaar, Rosalie T. M.; Mårvik, Ronald; Nordrum, Ivar S.; Kidd, Mark; Gustafsson, Björn I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rectal instillation of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) in ethanol is an established model for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to 1) set up a TNBS-colitis protocol resulting in an endoscopic and histologic picture resembling IBD, 2) study the correlation between endoscopic, histologic and gene expression alterations at different time points after colitis induction, and 3) compare rat and human IBD mucosal transcriptomic data to evaluate whether TNBS-colitis is an appropriate model of IBD. Methodology/Principal Findings Five female Sprague Daley rats received TNBS diluted in 50% ethanol (18 mg/0.6 ml) rectally. The rats underwent colonoscopy with biopsy at different time points. RNA was extracted from rat biopsies and microarray was performed. PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH) were done for validation of microarray results. Rat microarray profiles were compared to human IBD expression profiles (25 ulcerative colitis Endoscopic score demonstrated mild to moderate colitis after three and seven days, but declined after twelve days. Histologic changes corresponded with the endoscopic appearance. Over-represented Gene Ontology Biological Processes included: Cell Adhesion, Immune Response, Lipid Metabolic Process, and Tissue Regeneration. IL-1α, IL-1β, TLR2, TLR4, PRNP were all significantly up-regulated, while PPARγ was significantly down-regulated. Among genes with highest fold change (FC) were SPINK4, LBP, ADA, RETNLB and IL-1α. The highest concordance in differential expression between TNBS and IBD transcriptomes was three days after colitis induction. ISH and PCR results corresponded with the microarray data. The most concordantly expressed biologically relevant pathways included TNF signaling, Cell junction organization, and Interleukin-1 processing. Conclusions/Significance Endoscopy with biopsies in TNBS-colitis is useful to follow temporal changes of inflammation visually and histologically, and to acquire tissue for gene

  1. Validation and optimization of experimental colitis induction in rats using 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid

    PubMed Central

    Motavallian-Naeini, A.; Andalib, S.; Rabbani, M.; Mahzouni, P.; Afsharipour, M.; Minaiyan, M.

    2012-01-01

    Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis is one of the most common methods for studying inflammatory bowel disease in animal models. Several factors may, however, affect its reproducibility, rate of animal mortality, and macroscopic and histopathological outcomes. Our aim was to validate the main contributing factors to this method and compare the effects of different reference drugs upon remission of resultant colon injuries. TNBS was dissolved in 0.25 ml of ethanol (50% v/v) and instilled (25, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) intracolonically to the male Wistar rats. After determination of optimum dose of TNBS in male rats and assessment of this dose in female rats, they were treated with reference drugs including dexamethasone [1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.) and 2 mg/kg, orally (p.o.)], Asacol (mesalazine, 100 mg/kg, p.o.; 150 mg/kg, enema) and hydrocortisone acetate (20 mg/kg, i.p.; 20 mg/kg, enema) which started 2 h after colitis induction and continued daily for 6 consecutive days. Thereafter, macroscopic and microscopic parameters and clinical features were assessed and compared in different groups. We found that the optimum dose of TNBS for the reproducibility of colonic damage with the least mortality rate was 50 mg/kg. Amongst studied reference drugs, hydrocortisone acetate (i.p.), dexamethasone (i.p. and p.o.) and Asacol (p.o.) significantly diminished the severity of macroscopic and microscopic injuries and could be considered effective for experimental colitis studies in rats . Our findings suggest that optimization of TNBS dose is essential for induction of colitis under the laboratory conditions; and gender exerts no impact upon macroscopic and histological characteristics of TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Furthermore, the enema forms of hydrocortisone and Asacol are not appropriate reference drugs. PMID:23181094

  2. Increased expression of transforming growth factor α precursors in acute experimental colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, P; Zeeh, J; Lakshmanan, J; Wu, V; Procaccino, F; Reinshagen, M; McRoberts, J; Eysselein, V

    1997-01-01

    Background and aim—Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor α (TGF-α), members of the EGF family of growth factors, protect rat gastric and colonic mucosa against injury. Having shown previously that exogenously applied EGF protects rat colonic mucosa against injury, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the endogenously expressed ligand mediating the protective effect of EGF/TGF-α in vivo. 
Methods—In an experimental model of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)/ ethanol induced colitis in rats EGF and TGF-α expression was evaluated using a ribonuclease protection assay, northern blot analysis, western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. 
Results—TGF-α mRNA increased 3-4 times at 4-8 hours after induction of colitis and returned to control levels within 24 hours. TGF-α immunoreactive protein with a molecular size of about 28kDa representing TGF-α precursors increased markedly after induction of colitis with a peak at 8-12 hours. No fully processed 5.6 kDa TGF-α protein was detected in normal or inflamed colon tissue. Only a weak signal for EGF mRNA expression was detected in the rat colon and no EGF protein was observed by immunohistochemistry or western blot analysis. 
Conclusions—TGF-α precursors are the main ligands for the EGF receptor in acute colitis. It is hypothesised that TGF-α precursors convey the biological activity of endogenous TGF-α peptides during mucosal defence and repair. 

 Keywords: transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-α); epidermal growth factor (EGF); precursor molecules; colitis; rat PMID:9301498

  3. Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, QiQi; Price, Donald D; Caudle, Robert M; Verne, G Nicholas

    2008-02-01

    Inflammation of visceral structures in rats has been shown to produce visceral/somatic hyperalgesia. Our objectives were to determine if trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis in rats leads to visceral/somatic hypersensitivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were treated with 20 mg of TNBS in 50% ethanol (n = 40) or an equivalent volume of ethanol (n = 40) or saline (n = 25) via the colon. Colonic distension, Von Frey, Hargreaves, and tail reflex tests were used to evaluate for visceral, mechanical, and thermal sensitivity. The rats demonstrated visceral hypersensitivity at 2-28 days following TNBS administration (P < 0.0001). The ethanol-treated rats also demonstrated visceral hypersensitivity that resolved after day 14. TNBS-treated rats demonstrated somatic hypersensitivity at days 14-28 (P < 0.0001) in response to somatic stimuli of the hind paw. TNBS colitis is associated with visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in areas of somatotopic overlap. This model of colitis should allow further investigation into the mechanisms of visceral and somatic hypersensitivity.

  4. Investigation of pulmonary involvement in inflammatory bowel disease in an experimental model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Songur, Yıldıran; Songur, Necla; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Senol, Altug; Ciris, I Metin; Sutcu, Recep

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may also involve various extra-intestinal organs. Clinical studies have found asymptomatic/symptomatic pulmonary involvement in 1% to 6% of patients with IBD. The present study histopathologically investigated pulmonary involvement in an experimental model of colitis in order to demonstrate pulmonary tissue involvement in IBD and to expose potential etiological factors. It also explored the relation between inflammation and tissue concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The study comprised 24 male Wistar albino rats. The rats were divided into four groups of six rats each. Acute colitis was induced in two separate groups using either the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) method, while the other two groups were used as controls for each model of colitis. Wallace scoring was used for macroscopic assessment of colitis, and the lungs were histopathologically examined. Concentrations of VEGF and TNF-α in pulmonary tissue were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The number of animals that had alveolar hemorrhage was significantly higher in the TNBS-induced colitis and DSS-induced colitis groups compared to their own control groups (p = 0.015 and p = 0.015, respectively). VEGF and TNF-α concentrations in pulmonary tissues were significantly increased in both the TNBS colitis and DSS colitis groups compared to their own control groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.004, respectively; and p = 0.002 and p = 0.002, respectively). The present study demonstrated that significant and serious histopathological changes directly associated with colitis occur in the lungs in IBD.

  5. Growth failure occurs through a decrease in insulin-like growth factor 1 which is independent of undernutrition in a rat model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ballinger, A; Azooz, O; El-Haj, T; Poole, S; Farthing, M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Linear growth retardation is a frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease in children. The precise mechanisms causing growth failure are not known.
AIMS—To determine the relative contribution of reduced calorie intake and inflammation to linear growth delay and to determine the effect of inflammation on the hypothalamic-pituitary-growth axis.
METHODS—Linear growth was assessed in prepubertal rats with trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis, in healthy free feeding controls, and in a pair-fed group (i.e. healthy animals whose daily food intake was matched to the colitic group thereby distinguishing between the effects of undernutrition and inflammation).
RESULTS—Changes in length over five days in the TNBS colitis and pair-fed groups were 30% and 56%, respectively, of healthy free feeding controls. Linear growth was significantly reduced in the colitic group compared with the pair-fed group. Nutritional supplementation in the colitic group increased weight gain to control values but did not completely reverse the growth deficit. Plasma interleukin 6 (IL-6) concentrations were sixfold higher in the colitic group compared with controls. Plasma concentrations of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) but not growth hormone (GH) were significantly lower in the colitic compared with the pair-fed group. Administration of IGF-1 to the colitic group increased plasma IGF-1 concentrations and linear growth by approximately 44-60%.
CONCLUSIONS—It seems likely that approximately 30-40% of linear growth impairment in experimental colitis occurs as a direct result of the inflammatory process which is independent of undernutrition. Inflammation acts principally at the hepatocyte/IGF-1 level to impair linear growth. Optimal growth in intestinal inflammation may only be achieved by a combination of nutritional intervention and anticytokine treatment.


Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease; TNBS colitis; growth retardation

  6. Boswellia serrata has beneficial anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in a model of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Renata Minuzzo; Fillmann, Henrique Sarubbi; Martins, Maria Isabel Morgan; Meurer, Luise; Marroni, Norma Possa

    2014-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory disease that involves only the colon and rectum, being characterized by leukocyte infiltrate and superficial ulcers in the intestinal mucosa. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of extract from the Boswellia serrata plant in an experimental rat model of acute ulcerative colitis induced by the administration of acetic acid (AA). An extract of B. serrata (34.2 mg/kg/day) was administered by oral gavage for 2 days before and after the induction of colitis with 4 mL of 4% AA. The anal sphincter pressure in the colitis group showed a significant decrease compared to that of the control groups (p < 0.001). The analysis of the values of lipid peroxidation (LPO) obtained by substances that react with thiobarbituric acid (TBARS) showed a significantly increased LPO in the colitis group compared to the control groups (p < 0.001). The nitric oxide levels and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) showed a significant increase in the colitis group compared to control groups (p < 0.01). Both pretreatment and treatment with B. serrata exhibited significantly reduced lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide and iNOS and showed improvements in tissue injury and anal sphincter pressure in animals with ulcerative colitis. The B. serrata extract has protective anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects that inhibit inflammatory mediators in acute experimental colitis.

  7. N-Succinyl-chitosan systems for 5-aminosalicylic acid colon delivery: in vivo study with TNBS-induced colitis model in rats.

    PubMed

    Mura, C; Nácher, A; Merino, V; Merino-Sanjuan, M; Carda, C; Ruiz, A; Manconi, M; Loy, G; Fadda, A M; Diez-Sales, O

    2011-09-15

    5-Aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) loaded N-Succinyl-chitosan (SucCH) microparticle and freeze-dried system were prepared as potential delivery systems to the colon. Physicochemical characterization and in vitro release and swelling studies were previously assessed and showed that the two formulations appeared to be good candidates to deliver the drug to the colon. In this work the effectiveness of these two systems in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease was evaluated. In vitro mucoadhesive studies showed excellent mucoadhesive properties of both the systems to the inflamed colonic mucosa. Experimental colitis was induced by rectal instillation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) into male Wistar rats. Colon/body weight ratio, clinical activity score system, myeloperoxidase activity and histological evaluation were determined as inflammatory indices. The two formulations were compared with drug suspension and SucCH suspension. The results showed that the loading of 5-ASA into SucCH polymer markedly improved efficacy in the healing of induced colitis in rats.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Colonography for Fibrosis Assessment in Rats with Chronic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, Chloé; Loeuillard, Emilien; Marion-Letellier, Rachel; Nicol, Lionel; Mulder, Paul; Guerin, Charlène; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Aziz, Moutaz; Déchelotte, Pierre; Vera, Pierre; Savoye, Guillaume; Savoye-Collet, Céline

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) has been developed to assess inflammatory bowel diseases. We aimed to assess the feasibility of MRC in rats with TNBS-induced chronic colitis and to confront imaging results with fibrosis and stenosing features of the model. Materials and Methods Chronic colitis was induced in 12 rats by weekly intra-rectal injection of increasing doses of TNBS for 6 weeks, while 8 control rats received the vehicle. At week 7, MRC was performed. Fibrosis scores were assessed and fibrosis mediators measured. Results Chronic colitis was associated with significant body weight loss (p<0.0001) and higher colon weight/length compared to controls (p = 0.0004). Fibrosis mediators and histological scores were significantly higher in rats with TNBS than in controls: α-SMA expression (0.9 versus 0.61, p = 0.0311) and fibrosis score (p = 0.0308). Colon wall thickness was higher in rats with TNBS than in controls: maximal thickness (2.38 versus 0.74 mm, p<0.0001) and minimal thickness (1.33 versus 0.48 mm, p<0.0001). Wall signal intensity on T2w images was higher in rats with TNBS than in controls (9040 versus 6192, p = 0.0101) and correlated with fibrosis score (r = 0.5214; p = 0.04). Luminal narrowing was higher in rats with TNBS (50.08 versus 10.33%, p<0.0001) and correlated with α-SMA expression (r = 0.5618; p = 0.01). Stenosis was observed in 7/9 rats with TNBS and in no controls (p = 0.0053). Conclusions MRC is feasible and easily distinguishes rats with colitis from controls. MRC signs correlated with fibrosis parameters. MRC evaluation may be part of a new anti-fibrosis drug assessment in experimental models of chronic colitis. PMID:25000184

  9. Herb-Partitioned Moxibustion Regulates the TLR2/NF-κB Signaling Pathway in a Rat Model of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanan; Dong, Hongsheng; Wu, Luyi; Feng, Xiaoming; Zhou, Zhigang; Zhao, Chen; Liu, Huirong; Wu, Huangan

    2015-01-01

    The TLR2/NF-κB signaling pathway plays an important role in the pathomechanism of ulcerative colitis (UC); acupuncture and moxibustion can improve the damage in colonic tissues of UC, but the regulatory mechanism remains unknown. This study observed the effect of moxibustion on the TLR2/NF-κB signaling pathway at the Tianshu (ST25) and Qihai (CV6) acupuncture points in the UC rat. The result shows that TLR2, IRAK1, and IKK-b mRNA and protein levels in the colonic mucosa were significantly higher in the UC rats than in the control rats. Herb-partitioned moxibustion reduced the expression of TLR2, IRAK1, and IKK-b mRNA and proteins in the UC rats. Similarly, the expression of NF-κB was significantly increased and IFN-β and IL-10 were significantly decreased in the colonic mucosa of UC rats, but herb-partitioned moxibustion reduced the expression of IFN-β and upregulating the expression of IFN-β and IL-10 significantly. It indicates that herb-partitioned moxibustion can inhibit the expression of multiple signaling molecules of the TLR2 pathway effectively, and it may modulate the excessive local immune response by inhibiting TLR2 signaling, thereby promoting the repair of damaged colonic mucosa. PMID:26339273

  10. Attenuation of colitis injury in rats using Garcinia cambogia extract.

    PubMed

    dos Reis, Samara Bonesso; de Oliveira, Caroline Candida; Acedo, Simone Coghetto; Miranda, Daniel Duarte da Conceição; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Pedrazzoli, José; Gambero, Alessandra

    2009-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic enteropathies that probably result from a dysregulated mucosal immune response. These pathologies are characterized by oxidative and nitrosative stress, leukocyte infiltration and up-regulation of pro-inflammatory substances. Current IBD treatment presents limitations in both efficacy and safety that stimulated the search for new active compounds. Garcinia cambogia extract has attracted interest due to its pharmacological properties, including gastroprotective effects. In this study, the antiinflammatory activity of a garcinia extract was assessed in TNBS-induced colitis rats. The results obtained revealed that garcinia administration to colitic rats significantly improved the macroscopic damage and caused substantial reductions in increases in MPO activity, COX-2 and iNOS expression. In addition, garcinia extract treatment was able to reduce PGE(2) and IL-1beta colonic levels. These antiinflammatory actions could be related to a reduction in DNA damage in isolated colonocytes, observed with the comet assay. Finally, garcinia extract caused neither mortality nor toxicity signals after oral administration. As such, the antiinflammatory effects provided by the Garcinia cambogia extract result in an improvement of several parameters analysed in experimental colitis and could provide a source for the search for new antiinflammatory compounds useful in IBD treatment.

  11. The diverse actions of nicotine and different extracted fractions from tobacco smoke against hapten-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ko, Joshua K S; Cho, Chi-Hin

    2005-09-01

    The etiology of ulcerative colitis (UC) remains unknown, although the risk of developing UC is apparently higher in non-smokers and ex-smokers. We have demonstrated in a colitis animal model that exposure to tobacco smoke could attenuate UC pathogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate and compare between the modes of action of nicotine and different fractions of tobacco smoke extract in the development of experimental colitis. The hapten 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) was used to induce colitis in Sprague-Dawley rats. Results indicated that both tobacco smoke exposure and subcutaneous nicotine differentially reduced colonic lesion size, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, luminol-amplified free radical generation, and leukotriene B4 formation in the inflamed colon of colitis animals. These phenomena were accompanied by the downregulation of colonic interleukin (IL)-1beta and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 protein expression. By treating the colitis animals with various tobacco extracts, we further discovered that ethanol extract from filtered tobacco smoke could attenuate DNBS-evoked colonic damage and the elevated MPO activity, while at the same time it downregulated colonic IL-1beta and MCP-1 protein expression. In contrast, the highest dose of the chloroform extract from the cigarette filter caused aggravating effects and overexpression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. These data suggest that effective attenuation of DNBS-induced colitis by tobacco smoke could be due to its nicotine content and possibly other flavonoid components found in the ethanol smoke extract.

  12. Adoptive transfer of nontransgenic mesenteric lymph node cells induces colitis in athymic HLA-B27 transgenic nude rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoentjen, F; Tonkonogy, S L; Liu, B; Sartor, R B; Taurog, J D; Dieleman, L A

    2006-01-01

    HLA-B27 transgenic (TG) rats develop spontaneous colitis when colonized with intestinal bacteria, whereas athymic nude (rnu/rnu) HLA-B27 TG rats remain disease free. The present study was designed to determine whether or not HLA-B27 expression on T cells is required for development of colitis after transfer of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells into rnu/rnu HLA-B27 recipients. Athymic nontransgenic (non-TG) and HLA-B27 TG recipients received MLN cells from either TG or non-TG rnu/+ heterozygous donor rats that contain T cells. HLA-B27 TG rnu/rnu recipients receiving either non-TG or TG MLN cells developed severe colitis and had higher caecal MPO and IL-1β levels, and their MLN cells produced more IFN-γ and less IL-10 after in vitro stimulation with caecal bacterial lysate compared to rnu/rnu non-TG recipients that remained disease free after receiving either TG or non-TG cells. Interestingly, proliferating donor TG T cells were detectable one week after adoptive transfer into rnu/rnu TG recipients but not after transfer into non-TG recipients. T cells from either non-TG or TG donors induce colitis in rnu/rnu TG but not in non-TG rats, suggesting that activation of effector T cells by other cell types that express HLA-B27 is pivotal for the pathogenesis of colitis in this model. PMID:16487247

  13. Dietary α-linolenic acid-rich formula reduces adhesion molecules in rats with experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ayman; Aziz, Moutaz; Hassan, Aktham; Mbodji, Khaly; Collasse, Elodie; Coëffier, Moïse; Bounoure, Frédéric; Savoye, Guillaume; Déchelotte, Pierre; Marion-Letellier, Rachel

    2012-07-01

    The ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid therapy in inflammatory bowel disease is focused on the effects on fish oil-derived polyunsaturated fatty acids. We speculated that a vegetal oil rich in α-linolenic acid (ALA) might also inhibit colitis. Therefore, we evaluated whether dietary ALA would decrease the expression of adhesion molecules by inducing the protective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in a rat colitis model. Colitis was induced at day 0 by an intrarectal injection of 2-4-6-trinitrobenzen sulfonic acid (TNBS), whereas control rats received the vehicle. Rats were fed an ALA-rich formula 450 mg · kg⁻¹ · d⁻¹, whereas the other colitic group (TNBS) and the control group were fed an isocaloric corn oil formula for 14 d (from day -7 to day 7). The colonic expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), vascular endothelial growth factor A receptor-2 (VEGFR2), and HO-1 were studied by immunohistochemistry. The ALA-rich diet significantly decreased the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and VEGFR-2 compared the TNBS group, but it did not affect the expression of HO-1. A vegetal ALA-rich formula decreases the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and VEGFR-2 and independently of HO-1 in rats with TNBS-induced colitis. Further studies are required to evaluate its therapeutic potential in inflammatory bowel disease as an alternative to fish oil. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Mucin production and composition is altered in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Faure, M; Moënnoz, D; Montigon, F; Mettraux, C; Mercier, S; Schiffrin, E J; Obled, C; Breuillé, D; Boza, J

    2003-07-01

    We evaluated the small and large intestinal mucin production in a rat model of human ulcerative colitis by measuring the in vivo fractional synthesis rate (FSR) and the expression of mucins. A chronic colitis was induced by oral administration of 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for 9 days followed by 2% DSS for 18 days. DSS-treated rats showed increased colonic MUC2,3 mRNA levels compared pair-fed controls. The mucin FSR was unaffected while mucin-containing goblet cells were depleted in the vicinity of lesions. In the small intestine, no inflammatory lesions were observed but ileal MUC2 mRNA levels and mucin FSR were decreased by 46% and 21%, respectively. Finally, DSS-treated rats showed a marked decrease in mucin's threonine + serine content all along the gut, which may lead to a reduction of potential O-glycosylation sites. Our data indicate that the chronic colitis may impair the mucus layer protective function all along the gut.

  15. Iloprost reduces colonic injury in ischemic colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Karatepe, Oguzhan; Cakir, Affan; Unal, Orçun; Battal, Muharrem; Adas, Gokhan; Kamali, Gülcin; Kemik, Ahu; Aydin, Timucin; Kamali, Sedat; Karahan, Servet R; Aksoy, Murat

    2011-06-01

    Evaluate the effects of iloprost administration in the early period of ischemic colitis and the mechanism that how these effects develop. Thirty two Wistar albino female rats with an average weight of 220g were divided into four groups of eight rats. In group 1 the rats were given iloprost and sacrificed after 24 hours and in group 2 they were sacrificed after 24 hours without any iloprost. The rats in group 3 were administrated iloprost and sacrificed after 72 hours and in group 4 they were sacrificed at 72th hour without iloprost. The differences between the groups as tissue damage, vascularization or apoptosis were assessed statistically. Oxidative damage and apoptosis were less pronounced and vascularization was better developed in rats that were given iloprost and sacrificed at 24th hour later in contrast to the rats that were not treated with iloprost. But there was no statistical difference among the groups at 72th hour. Iloprost inhibited leucocyte infiltration, decreased proinflammatory cytokines and enhanced angiogenesis so that the oxidative stress and inflammatory response decreased resulting in lesser tissue damage.

  16. Nerol alleviates pathologic markers in the oxazolone-induced colitis model.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Adriana Estrella; González-Trujano, María Eva; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra A; Alvarado-Vásquez, Noé; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-05

    Nerol is a natural monoterpene with antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. Its possible beneficial effects in ulcerative colitis and its corresponding mechanism of action have not been determined to date. The aim of this study was to investigate whether nerol prevents the appearance of pathological markers and hyperalgesia in oxazolone-induced colitis, and protects against gastric damage produced by ethanol. The experimental design included groups of oxazolone-treated mice receiving nerol at 10-300 mg/kg, p.o., or a reference drug (sulfasalazine, 100 mg/kg, p.o.) compared to sham and untreated groups. Gastric damage was evaluated in the absolute ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats. Variables measured in animals with oxazolone-induced colitis included weight loss, stool consistency and macroscopic colon damage; mechanical nociception was determined by the use of von Frey filaments, whereas levels of inflammatory cytokines were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nerol (30-300 mg/kg, p.o.) prevented or significantly decreased the pathological alterations observed in the oxazolone- induced colitis model. It also showed antinociceptive effects and reduced the increased levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-13 and TNF-α). Gastric damage was also prevented starting at 10 mg/kg, p.o. In conclusion, our results provide evidence for a beneficial effect of nerol after colitis induction involving tissue protection, antinociception and modulation of the immunological system, suggesting the therapeutic potential of this monoterpene as a novel alternative in controlling ulcerative colitis.

  17. H2S confers colonoprotection against TNBS-induced colitis by HO-1 upregulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kupai, Krisztina; Almási, Nikoletta; Kósa, Magdolna; Nemcsók, János; Murlasits, Zsolt; Török, Szilvia; Al-Awar, Amin; Baráth, Zoltán; Pósa, Anikó; Varga, Csaba

    2017-08-02

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous mediator that contributes to many important physiological processes including vasodilation and vascular smooth muscle relaxation; in turn, preventing tissue damage and reducing inflammation. Heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes, of which HO-1 is inducible by harmful stimuli, were found to regulate intestinal inflammation in experimental animal models of colitis. We aimed to investigate the protective effects of H2S against 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats, and whether HO enzyme system is involved in the H2S-induced colonic cytoprotection. Male Wistar rats were treated with TNBS to induce colitis, and H2S donor (Lawesson's reagent) was prepared two times/day at different concentrations, and delivered per os (from day 1 to day 3). Our results suggest that daily treatment (2 times/day) with H2S donor, could significantly decrease the extent of colonic inflammation compared to vehicle treatment, and the most effective daily dose of H2S donor against inflammation was 18.75 µM/kg/day. Per os administration of H2S donor increased the colonic HO enzyme activity; on the contrary, the protective effect of H2S was abolished by the co-treatment with HO inhibitor. Our findings suggest that H2S confers colonoprotection, probably by modulation of anti-inflammatory parameters and HO enzyme activity.

  18. BTZO-15, an ARE-activator, ameliorates DSS- and TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yukitake, Hiroshi; Kimura, Haruhide; Suzuki, Hirobumi; Tajima, Yasukazu; Sato, Yoshimi; Imaeda, Toshihiro; Kajino, Masahiro; Takizawa, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic inflammatory disorders that are primarily represented by ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The etiology of IBD is not well understood; however, oxidative stress is considered a potential etiological and/or triggering factor for IBD. We have recently reported the identification of BTZO-1, an activator of antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated gene expression, which protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced insults. Here we describe the potential of BTZO-15, an active BTZO-1 derivative for ARE-activation with a favorable ADME-Tox profile, for the treatment of IBD. BTZO-15 induced expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an ARE-regulated cytoprotective protein, and inhibited NO-induced cell death in IEC-18 cells. Large intestine shortening, rectum weight gain, diarrhea, intestinal bleeding, and an increase in rectal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were observed in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis rat model. Oral administration of BTZO-15 induced HO-1 expression in the rectum and attenuated DSS-induced changes. Furthermore BTZO-15 reduced the ulcerated area and rectal MPO activity in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis rats without affecting rectal TNF-α levels. These results suggest that BTZO-15 is a promising compound for a novel IBD therapeutic drug with ARE activation properties.

  19. Effect of ulcerative colitis in the bursting strength of colonic anastomoses in rats.

    PubMed

    Remes-Troche, Jose Maria; Takahashi, Takeshi; Velasco, Liliana; Garcia-Osogobio, Sandra; Uscanga, Luis; Gamboa-Domínguez, Armando; Santillan-Doherty, Patricio

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease may have a deleterious effect on bowel healing, but its role is difficult to demonstrate in clinical practice because of the association of multiple factors. An experiment was conducted in rats. They were divided into two groups: group I, a model of acetic acid induced colitis, and group II, the control group. Both groups underwent a rectal resection and primary anastomosis. On postoperative day 7, the bursting strength of the anastomosis was evaluated. There were 44 rats in group I and 38 in group II. In 91% of group I rats there were histopathological changes compatible with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Mean bursting pressure was significantly reduced in rats with acetic-acid induced IBD (142.18 +/- 18.22 mm Hg in group I, and 208.85 +/- 14.8 mm Hg in group II; p < .05). These results suggest the deleterious effect of IBD on bowel healing.

  20. Iloprost reduces colitis induced oxidative stress: An experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Aytaç, Erman; Teksöz, Serkan; Saygılı, Seha; Tortum, Osman Baran; Yavuz, Nihat; Sözer, Volkan; Göksel, Süha; Uzun, Hafize; Seymen, Hakkı Oktay; Göksoy, Ertuğrul

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have a known potent role in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. Iloprost, a pharmaceutical, is a chemically stable derivative of a naturally- occurring human prostacyclin. Several studies have demonstrated protective effects of iloprost via its antioxidant and its anti-inflammatory activity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of iloprost on oxidant/antioxidant status, as well as the large bowel histopathology in experimental colitis. Forty adult male Wistar-albino rats were randomly divided in to four equal weight-matched groups: sham group (n=10), iloprost administered sham group (n=10), colitis group (n=10), iloprost administered colitis group (n=10). Acetic acid (1 ml of 4% solution) was used to induce colonic inflammation in the rats. Colonic tissue and plasma malondialdehyde levels were significantly lower in the iloprost administered colitis group than the colitis group (p<0.01). Tissue glutathione levels of the iloprost administered colitis group were significantly higher than the colitis group (p<0.001). We have demonstrated in this study iloprost to be an antioxidant, as well as iloprost demonstrating protective activity against colitis induced oxidative stress.

  1. The effects of LED rectal irradiation on the experimental ulcerative colitis in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chang-Chun; Wang, Xian-Ju; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of light emitting diode(LED λ 632.8nm; power 4.0mw)applied directly to the colon on the experimental ulcerative colitis. 34 rats were divided into 3 groups, which was LED treatment group (n=12), model group (n=12), and normal control group (n=10). Given glacial acetic acid (5%) intra-anally so as to be replicated the rat model of ulcerative colitis. LED irradiation was used to curative group, with 30min each time, once per day. The period of treatment was one week. Then the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and content of malondi-aldehyde (MDA) in the blood plasma were detected and the histopathological study in Colonic tissue was performed. The degree of the Colonic tissue injury in curative group was not as significant as that in the model group. Comparing with model group, the Content of MDA in LED curative group was reductive and the activity of SOD was increased significantly. We concluded that the LED irradiation can protect colonic mucosa from acetic acid induced damage in rats and the effects may be related to the photobiomodulation of LED.

  2. Protective effect of ginger volatile oil against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats: a light microscopic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Mahzooni, Parvin; Sadr, Samira; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2014-03-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronically recurrent inflammatory bowel disease of unknown origin. In the present study, the effect of ginger (rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe) volatile oil on a rat model of colitis was evaluated. Volatile oil of ginger with doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, prednisolone (4 mg/kg), or vehicle were administered orally to groups of male Wistar rats (n = 6) for 5 d. Animals were randomly divided into 6 groups, each group consisting of 6 rats. Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 2 mL of 4% (v/v) acetic acid solution. All rats were sacrificed 24 h later and the tissue injuries were assessed macroscopically and histopathologically. Ginger volatile oil with all doses reduced colon weight/length ratio (P < 0.01) and the effects were similar to the reference drugs. Higher oral doses of volatile oil (200 and 400 mg/kg) reduced ulcer severity (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01), ulcer area (P < 0.01) and ulcer index (P < 0.01). On the other hand, evaluation of microscopic scores showed that the dose of 400 mg/kg of volatile oil was effective to reduce inflammation severity (P < 0.01) and inflammation extent (P < 0.05) compared to the control group. It is concluded that ginger volatile oil could effectively reduce symptoms of experimental colitis in a dose-dependent manner.

  3. Geniposide ameliorates TNBS-induced experimental colitis in rats via reducing inflammatory cytokine release and restoring impaired intestinal barrier function.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Li, Yan-Li; Xu, Ming; Yu, Chang-Chun; Lian, Meng-Qiao; Tang, Ze-Yao; Li, Chuan-Xun; Lin, Yuan

    2017-03-06

    Geniposide is an iridoid glycosides purified from the fruit of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, which is known to have antiinflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-tumor activities. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of geniposide on experimental rat colitis and to reveal the related mechanisms. Experimental rat colitis was induced by rectal administration of a TNBS solution. The rats were treated with geniposide (25, 50 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ig) or with sulfasalazine (SASP, 100 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ig) as positive control for 14 consecutive days. A Caco-2 cell monolayer exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) was used as an epithelial barrier dysfunction model. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured to evaluate intestinal barrier function. In rats with TNBS-induced colitis, administration of geniposide or SASP significantly increased the TNBS-decreased body weight and ameliorated TNBS-induced experimental colitis and related symptoms. Geniposide or SASP suppressed inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) release and neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity) in the colon. In Caco-2 cells, geniposide (25-100 μmol/L) ameliorated LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction via dose-dependently increasing transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). The results from both in vivo and in vitro studies revealed that geniposide down-regulated NF-κB, COX-2, iNOS and MLCK protein expression, up-regulated the expression of tight junction proteins (occludin and ZO-1), and facilitated AMPK phosphorylation. Both AMPK siRNA transfection and AMPK overexpression abrogated the geniposide-reduced MLCK protein expression, suggesting that geniposide ameliorated barrier dysfunction via AMPK-mediated inhibition of the MLCK pathway. In conclusion, geniposide ameliorated TNBS-induced experimental rat colitis by both reducing inflammation and modulating the disrupted epithelial barrier function via activating the AMPK signaling pathway..

  4. Intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of the Serpylli herba extract in experimental models of rodent colitis.

    PubMed

    Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Zorrilla, Pedro; Burkard, Natalie; Pischel, Ivo; Sievers, Hartwig; Benedek, Birgit; Feistel, Björn; Walbroel, Bernd; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, there is an increasing interest for alternative options in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) that combine efficacy and an adequate safety profile. The intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of Serpylli herba, the officinal drug in the European Pharmacopeia composed by the aerial parts of wild thyme (Thymus serpyllum), were evaluated in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat colitis and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced mouse colitis, which are well characterized experimental models with some resemblance to human IBD. S. herba extract exerted an intestinal anti-inflammatory effect in both experimental models of colitis, as evidenced both histologically, since it facilitated the tissue recovery of the damaged colon, and biochemically as showed by the improvement of the different inflammatory markers evaluated, including myeloperoxidase activity, glutathione content, and leukotriene B4 levels as well as the expression of the inducible proteins iNOS and COX-2. This beneficial effect was associated with the reduction in the expression of different cytokines, like TNFα, IL-1β, IFNγ, IL-6 and IL-17, the chemokine MCP-1, and the adhesion molecule ICAM-1, thus ameliorating the altered immune response associated with the colonic inflammation. S. herba extract displays an anti-inflammatory effect on different models of rodent colitis that could be attributed to its immunomodulatory properties. Copyright © 2013 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa. PMID:26798415

  6. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  7. The effect of sodium valproate on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Ali; Motaghi, Ehsan; Hosseini, Mohammad Javad; Ghasemi-Pirbaluti, Masoumeh

    2017-02-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic recurrent disease with incomplete treatment options. The current article evaluated the effect of sodium valproate on acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats. Rats were randomly distributed into six groups including Sham group, colitis control group, sodium valproate treatment groups (50, 100 and 300 mg/kg, i.p.) and dexamethasone-treatment group. Dexamethasone was used as a reference drug. Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 2 mL of 3% acetic acid solution. The efficacy of sodium valproate was evaluated by macroscopical and histopathological scoring systems, hematocrit measurement as well as biochemical analysis including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines assessment. Sodium valproate, particularly with doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg significantly improved weight loss, and macroscopic damage, reduced ulcer area, colon weight, microscopic colitis index and elevated hematocrit level. Biochemical experiments showed elevated levels of colonic MPO activity, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in colitis control group. Treatment with sodium valproate at the doses of 100 and 300 mg/Kg) decreased the MPO activity and colonic concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. The results provide evidence that sodium valproate has a protective effect in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis which might be due to its anti-inflammatory activities, and it may be useful in patients with ulcerative colitis.

  8. Disequilibrium in the CD8(+)CD28(+)/CD8(+)CD28(-) T Lymphocyte Balance Is Related to Prognosis in Rats with Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-Induced Colitis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shixue; Gu, Hongxiang; Lin, Qianyi; Xing, Tiaosi; Chen, Minhua; Zhong, Tao; Wu, Gang; Feng, Yanling; Liu, Hongbo; Gao, Yong; Jian, Hongjian; Zhang, Minhai; Mo, Hongmei; Zhu, Huanjie; Chen, Dongsheng; Xu, Jun; Zou, Ying; Chi, Honggang; Zhu, Yuzhen

    2017-03-01

    The CD8(+)CD28(+)/CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocyte balance is vital for human ulcerative colitis (UC) but has not been defined in experimental colitis. This investigation will try to identify the changes that occur in the CD8(+)CD28(+)/CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocyte balance during the progression of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. The frequencies of blood CD8(+)CD28(+) and CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocytes were detected in the rats belonging to the normal, model, and treated groups on five days using flow cytometry. The treated rats were administered with mesalazine and were euthanized after a 14-day treatment, as were the normal and model rats. The sensitivity and specificity of the CD8(+)CD28(+)/CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocyte balance in diagnosing early colitis were analyzed by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. The frequencies of CD8(+)CD28(+) and CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocytes in the colon tissue were tested via immunofluorescence. ELISA was used to measure the levels of the cytokines. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were used to detect the colonic expression of JAK3, STAT6, NFATc2, and GATA3. We found that the ratio of CD8(+)CD28(+)/CD8(+)CD28(-) T lymphocytes decreased, as did the level of interleukin-7, but not IL-12p40, IL-13, or IL-15, in the blood; however, the ratio increased along with JAK3, STAT6, NFATc2, and GATA3 in the colon of the rats with colitis. The changes were effectively reversed through the administration of mesalazine for 13 days. Surprisingly, the balance in the blood could sensitively distinguish rats with early colitis from normal rats. These data show that increase in CD8(+)CD28(+) T cells in blood and decrease in CD8(+)CD28(-) T cells in colon are associated with experimental colitis.

  9. Cape Gooseberry [Physalis peruviana L.] Calyces Ameliorate TNBS Acid-induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Castro, Jenny; Ocampo, Yanet; Franco, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Physalis peruviana [cape gooseberry] is highly appreciated for its commercial value. The Colombian ecotype is in great demand in the international market, particularly for the unique morphological characteristics of the calyx, which has extended use as a traditional herbal remedy in Colombia because of its anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, the anti-inflammatory activity of the total ethereal extract of Physalis peruviana calyces was evaluated in preventive and therapeutic protocols in a TNBS acid-induced colitis rat model. Colitis was induced by intrarectal administration of TNBS. An evaluation of macroscopic and histopathological parameters in colonic tissue was performed, along with the determination of myeloperoxidase enzyme activity, cytokine levels and gene expression. Additionally, effects on nitric oxide release by lipopolysaccharide [LPS]-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages and the scavenging activity of DPPH and ABTS free radicals were determined. The treatment with the Physalis peruviana extract produced a significant improvement in the colonic tissue at both macroscopic and histological levels. IL-1β and TNF-α production was reduced by the extract in both experimental approaches. The groups treated with Physalis peruviana showed a tendency to MUC2 up-regulation and down-regulation of COX-2, iNOS, NLRP3, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 expression. Nitric oxide release in RAW264.7 macrophages was significantly inhibited. The Physalis peruviana extract showed intestinal anti-inflammatory activity in the TNBS-induced colitis model, placing this species' calyx, a natural derivative, as a promising source of metabolites that could be used in treatment for inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Baicalin attenuates TNBS-induced colitis in rats by modulating the Th17/Treg paradigm.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying; Dai, Shi-Xue; Chi, Hong-Gang; Li, Tao; He, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Jian; Ye, Cai-Guo; Huang, Guo-Liang; Zhao, Bing; Li, Wen-Yang; Wan, Zheng; Feng, Jin-Shan; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2015-10-01

    Baicalin, a flavonoid, has a wide range of pharmacological properties, including immunomodulation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of baicalin on the balance of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells in a colitis model. The rat colitis model was induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Baicalin (10 ml/kg, each) or mesalazine (positive control) was then administered orally for 7 days. Inflammatory and immunological responses were evaluated by pathology, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, and flow cytometry. Our study showed that baicalin not only significantly attenuated TNBS-induced colitis by reducing the disease activity index as well as macroscopic and microscopic scores, but it also improved the weight loss and shortening of the colon. Baicalin treatment also induced a significant decrease in the levels of inflammatory mediators, including the myeloperoxidase activity, the levels of tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β, and Th1-related cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of baicalin seem to be associated with regulation of the Th17 and Treg paradigm. We found that administration of baicalin significantly downregulated the number of Th17 cells and the levels of Th17-related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-6) and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt. In contrast, there was an increase in Treg cells numbers, Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor-β and IL-10, and forkhead box P3. Our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of baicalin may be linked to modulation of the balance between Th17 and Treg cells in TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis.

  11. Effects of Moxibustion Stimulation on the Intensity of Infrared Radiation of Tianshu (ST25) Acupoints in Rats with Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Shuang; Yao, Wei; Wan, Hua; Wu, Huangan; Wu, Luyi; Liu, Huirong; Hua, Xuegui; Shi, Peifeng

    2012-01-01

    ST25 is a key acupoint used in the treatment of ulcerative colitis by moxibustion stimulation, but the biophysical mechanism underlying its effects is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to explore the biophysical properties of ST25 acupoint stimulated by moxibustion in a rat model of ulcerative colitis. The infrared radiation intensity of fourteen wavelengths of ST25 showed significant differences between the normal and model control groups. The intensity of infrared radiation of forty wavelengths showed significant differences compared with the corresponding control points in normal rats. The intensity of infrared radiation of twenty-eight wavelengths showed significant differences compared with the corresponding control points in model rats. The intensity of infrared radiation of nine wavelengths in the herb-partition moxibustion group, eighteen wavelengths in the ginger-partition moxibustion group, seventeen wavelengths in the garlic-partition moxibustion group, and fourteen wavelengths in the warming moxibustion group of the left ST25 showed significant differences compared with that of the model control group. For the right-hand-side ST25, these values were 33, 33, 2, and 8 wavelengths, respectively. This indicated that one possible biophysical mechanism of moxibustion on ST25 in ulcerative colitis model rats might involve changes in the intensity of infrared radiation of ST25 at different wavelengths. PMID:23258997

  12. Plant-Derived Polysaccharide Supplements Inhibit Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Koetzner, Lee; Grover, Gary; Boulet, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Several plant-derived polysaccharides have been shown to have anti-inflammatory activity in animal models. Ambrotose complex and Advanced Ambrotose are dietary supplements that include aloe vera gel, arabinogalactan, fucoidan, and rice starch, all of which have shown such activity. This study was designed to evaluate these formulations against dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in rats and to confirm their short-term safety after 14 days of daily dosing. Rats were dosed daily orally with vehicle, Ambrotose or Advanced Ambrotose. On day six groups of rats received tap water or 5% Dextran Sulfate sodium. Ambrotose and Advanced Ambrotose significantly lowered the disease scores and partially prevented the shortening of colon length. An increase in monocyte count was induced by dextran sulfate sodium and inhibited by Ambrotose and Advanced Ambrotose. There were no observable adverse effects after 14-day daily doses. The mechanism of action of the formulations against DSS-induced colitis may be related to its effect on monocyte count. PMID:19513840

  13. Plant-derived polysaccharide supplements inhibit dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Koetzner, Lee; Grover, Gary; Boulet, Jamie; Jacoby, Henry I

    2010-05-01

    Several plant-derived polysaccharides have been shown to have anti-inflammatory activity in animal models. Ambrotose complex and Advanced Ambrotose are dietary supplements that include aloe vera gel, arabinogalactan, fucoidan, and rice starch, all of which have shown such activity. This study was designed to evaluate these formulations against dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in rats and to confirm their short-term safety after 14 days of daily dosing. Rats were dosed daily orally with vehicle, Ambrotose or Advanced Ambrotose. On day six groups of rats received tap water or 5% Dextran Sulfate sodium. Ambrotose and Advanced Ambrotose significantly lowered the disease scores and partially prevented the shortening of colon length. An increase in monocyte count was induced by dextran sulfate sodium and inhibited by Ambrotose and Advanced Ambrotose. There were no observable adverse effects after 14-day daily doses. The mechanism of action of the formulations against DSS-induced colitis may be related to its effect on monocyte count.

  14. The effects of konjac oligosaccharide on TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixue; Li, Yongchao; Zhang, Bo

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effects and the protective mechanism of konjac oligosaccharide (KOS) on the ulcerative colitis (UC) model induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats. KOS (1.0 and 4.0g/kg/day) was administered for 14days after the induction of colitis with TNBS. The status of the rats was assessed by morphological and biochemical methods. The effect of KOS on the colonic microflora was also assessed by studying the bacteria profile and short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production in feces by standard culture techniques and gas chromatography, respectively. KOS administration improved rat weight, colonic length, damage score, structure of gut microbiota, production of SCFA, and reduced colon tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Therefore, our results indicate that KOS is an anti-inflammatory and could be useful as a prebiotic to design functional foods for UC.

  15. Garlic oil inhibits dextran sodium sulfate-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Balaha, Mohamed; Kandeel, Samah; Elwan, Walaa

    2016-02-01

    Garlic oil (GO) is used for centuries in folk medicine as a therapy for many diseases including inflammatory disorders. Recently, it has exhibited potent anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Consequently, we evaluated the possible protective effect of GO in a rat model of colitis, induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Colitis induced by allowing rats a free access to drinking water containing 5% DSS for 7 days, from day 1 to day 7. GO was administered orally in doses of 25, 50 and 100mg/kg/day. Mesalazine used as a standard medication in a dose of 15 mg/kg/day. All animals fasted for 2h, 1h before and 1h after giving the treatment, which introduced daily for 7 days, from day 1 to day 7, at 10:00 to 11:00 A.M. Animal body, and colonic weights, colonic myeloperoxidase (MPO), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, colonic reduced-glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-10 levels, macroscopic and microscopic changes of colonic tissues were evaluated. GO treatment significantly suppressed the elevated colonic weight, MPO activity, MDA, TNF-α and IL-1β levels. However, it potentiated the decrease body weight, colonic SOD activity, GSH and IL-10 levels. Moreover, it ameliorated the marked macroscopic and microscopic changes of colonic mucosa in a dose dependent manner. Garlic oil inhibits DSS-induced colitis in rats may be through its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. Therefore, GO could be a promising protective agent recommended for UC patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Dong, Jiao; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Zhai, Jing; Ge, Bin

    2016-09-01

    The mimic of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSODm) has been synthesized and reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether MnSODm has anti-inflammatory effects on colitis and any underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study was to investigate therapeutic effects and mechanism of MnSODm on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis model in rats. Rats were intragastrically administered MnSODm (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) per day for 7 days after colitis was induced by TNBS. After treated with MnSODm, the colonic macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and colonic weight/length ratios were significantly decreased compared with colitis model group. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, malonyldialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 levels in colon tissues were also significantly decreased in MnSODm treatment groups. However, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity significantly increased and phosphorylated inhibitory kappa B-alpha (IκBα), inhibitor kappa B kinase (IKKα/β), and nuclear factor-kappa Bp65 (NF-κBp65) as well as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation actor 88 (MyD88) in the colonic mucosa were significantly inhibited by MnSODm treatment. Thus, MnSODm was protective against colitis via antioxidant activity and by inhibiting inflammatory mediators by down-regulating TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathways. These data suggest a potential therapeutic effect of MnSODm in colitis.

  17. Effects of Malva sylvestris and Its Isolated Polysaccharide on Experimental Ulcerative Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hamedi, Azadeh; Rezaei, Hossein; Azarpira, Negar; Jafarpour, Mehrnaz; Ahmadi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Malva sylvestris is an edible plant that is consumed as a herbal supplement for its antiulcer and colon cleansing properties in traditional Persian medicine. This study was designed to evaluate its effects on ulcerative colitis, which is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammation. Colitis was induced by rectal instillation of acetic acid solution. Rats in different groups received aqueous, n-hexane, or ethanolic fractions of the plant before induction of colitis. Isolated polysaccharide of plant was also tested in 2 groups before and after induction of colitis. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of colitis showed that the aqueous fraction was very effective in preventing the inflammation and efficacy was lower for ethanolic and n-hexane fractions. Polysaccharide was effective in reducing signs of inflammation, especially as pretreatment. These beneficial effects provide evidences that this plant can be suggested for patients with this disease to improve their health condition or to reduce adverse effects of their medication.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effect of Chang-An-Shuan on TNBS-induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mi, Hong; Liu, Feng-Bin; Li, Hai-Wen; Hou, Jiang-Tao; Li, Pei-Wu

    2017-06-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), denominated by Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is often associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea and bloody stool. The standard protocols for treating colitis conditions are not satisfactory; thus, complementary and alternative medicines have been increasingly accepted by IBD sufferers worldwide. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the anti-inflammatory effect of Chang-An-Shuan (CAS), a 6-herb Chinese medicinal formula, on 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats and the underlying mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with rectal gavage of 2.5% TNBS in 50% ethanol for the induction of experimental colitis which is considered as a model for Crohn's disease. Upon the TNBS induction, rats were given CAS at 0.5 g/kg/day or 5 g/kg/day for 10 days. The application of salicylazosulfapyridine (0.5 g/kg/day) was served as a positive reference drug for the colitis condition. The efficacy and mechanistic action of CAS were evaluated by means of histopathological and biochemical approaches such as histological staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Oral administration of CAS at 5 g/kg/day, but not 0.5 g/kg/day, significantly ameliorated the severity of TNBS-induced colitis as evidenced by the reduced loss of body weight, alleviated diarrhea and decreased bloody stool. While lowering the disease activity index, the administration of CAS lessened mucosal lesions thus mucosal integrity of the colitis rats was notably improved. Further, the CAS treatment also significantly suppressed the mRNA and protein levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α while enhancing the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the TNBS-treated rats. Importantly, the ameliorative effect of CAS was related to an inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway by downregulating

  19. Impact of colonic mucosal lipoxin A4 synthesis capacity on healing in rats with dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Ağış, Erol R; Savaş, Berna; Melli, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. This study evaluates the role of colonic mucosal lipoxin A4 (LXA4) synthesis in an experimental rat model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: healthy controls, DSS-induced colitis with no or vehicle therapy, misoprostol or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy groups. Disease severity and colonic mucosal LXA4 synthesis was assessed specifically during the acute phase (day 5), chronic phase (day 15) and healing phases (day 19). Both misoprostol and 5-ASA reduced histopathologic score during the acute phase and reduced disease activity score at the healing phase. In addition, misoprostol reduced histopathologic score and colon weight/length ratio during the healing phase. Only misoprostol therapy increased colonic mucosal LXA4 synthesis. Furthermore, LXA4 levels correlated negatively with disease progression (R=-0.953). Collectively, our findings suggest that misoprostol-induced LXA4 synthesis may be favorable for the healing of ulcerative colitis.

  20. Anti-inflammatory effect of Helichrysum oligocephalum DC extract on acetic acid — Induced acute colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Ghassemi-Dehkordi, Nasrollah; Mahzouni, Parvin; Ahmadi, Najme-Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Helichrysum oligocephalum DC. from Asteraceae family is an endemic plant growing wild in Iran. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of H. oligocephalum hydroalcoholic extract (HOHE) on ulcerative colitis (UC) induced by acetic acid (AA) in rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were grouped (n = 6) and fasted for 24 h before colitis induction. Treatments were started 2 h before the induction of colitis and continued for two consecutive days with different doses of HOHE (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) orally (p.o.) and intraperitoneally (i.p.). The colon tissue was removed and tissue damages were scored after macroscopic and histopathologic assessments. Results: Among the examined doses of HOHE, 100 mg/kg was the most effective dose that reduced the extent of UC lesions and resulted in significant alleviation. Weight/length ratio as an index of tissue inflammation and extravasation was also diminished in the treatment group administered HOHE at a dose of 100 mg/kg, and the results showed correlation with macroscopic and histopathologic evaluations. These data suggest that HOHE (100 mg/kg) administered either p.o. or i.p. was effective in diminishing inflammation and ulcer indices in this murine model of acute colitis in a non–dose-related manner. Conclusions: H. oligocephalum could be considered as a suitable anticolitis alternative; however, further studies are needed to support this hypothesis for clinical setting. PMID:24761395

  1. Effects of dextran sulfate sodium induced experimental colitis on cytochrome P450 activities in rat liver, kidney and intestine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Huang, Yanjuan; Gao, Xuejiao; Li, Sai; Yan, Zhixiang; Wei, Bin; Yan, Ru

    2017-06-01

    Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced experimental colitis presents a histologic resemblance to human ulcerative colitis (UC). Altered cytochrome P450s (CYPs) have been reported in this model and patients with UC. In this study, six CYPs activities were quantitatively determined in microsomes of liver (RLMs), kidney (RRMs) and intestine (RIMs) from rats with colitis at acute (5% DSS for 7 days, UCA) and remission (7-day DSS treatment followed by 7-day cessation, UCR) phases and compared with normal rats. Generally, CYPs activities varied with isoform, organ, and disease status. Hepatic CYP1A2, 2B1, 2C6/11, 2E1 and 3A1/2 activities were reduced by acute colitis and completely or partially restored after DSS was halted. Although DSS treatment decreased the Vmax of renal CYP2C6/11 and increased that of CYP2D2, their CLint, in vitro were comparable among normal, acute and remission stages. DSS treatment changed the kinetics of CYP3A1/2-mediated nifedipine metabolism in RRMs from biphasic to classical kinetics. Notably, CYP2D2 activity was elevated in liver and kidney in acute UC, while enhanced in liver and decreased in kidney in remission. In intestine, CYP3A1/2 activity was increased in UCA and further enhanced after DSS withdrawal. These findings highlight the necessity of quantifying enzyme activity for precision drug therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Interaction of Lactobacillus fermentum BGHI14 with Rat Colonic Mucosa: Implications for Colitis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Lukic, Jovanka; Strahinic, Ivana; Milenkovic, Marina; Golic, Natasa; Kojic, Milan; Topisirovic, Ljubisa

    2013-01-01

    The present study was carried out to test the colonic mucosal response of rats to oral supplementation with Lactobacillus fermentum BGHI14 and to correlate the tissue reaction to trinitrobenzenesulfonate (TNBS)-induced colitis with mucosal barrier alterations caused by bacterial ingestion. An immune cell-mediated reaction of healthy colonic tissue was noticed after bacterial feeding. After prolonged bacterial treatment, the observed reaction had retreated to normality, but the mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) remained elevated. These data point to the chronic low-grade inflammation that could be caused by long-term probiotic consumption. Although no detrimental effects of bacterial pretreatment were noticed in colitic rats, at least in the acute state of disease, the results obtained in our study point to the necessity of reassessment of existing data on the safety of probiotic preparations. Additionally, probiotic effects in experimental colitis models might depend on time coordination of disease induction with treatment duration. PMID:23851097

  3. The influence of LED rectal irradiation on IL-1α and IL-4 of experimental ulcerative colitis in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chang-Chun; Wang, Xian-Ju; Liu, Han-Ping; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an inflammatory destructive disease of the large intestine occurred usually in the rectum and lower part of the colon as well as the entire colon. In this paper, the influence of IL-1α and IL-4 on the experimental ulcerative colitis by light emitting diode ( LED ) (λ: 632.8nm; power: 4.0mw) applied to colon directly were studied. Making 30 rats into 3 groups: LED curative group, model group, normal control group. There were 10 rats of each group. We used glacial acetic acid (5%) and trinitro-benzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS) (1%) intra-anally to replicate the rat model of ulcerative colitis. After a week treatment with administrating LED rectal irradiation to curative group, 30mm each time, once per day, the histopathological studies in colonic tissue were performed, and the expression and distribution of IL-lα and IL-4 in colonic tissues were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. The extent of the Colonic tissue injury in LED curative group was not as significant as that in the model group. Compared with model group, the content of MDA in LED curative group was reductived and the activity of SOD was increased significantly, and the expression and distribution of IL-lα in LED curative group was depressed significantly, however the expression and distribution of IL-4 in LED curative group was increased obviously. This results show that the LED rectal irradiation can protect colonic mucosa from the experimental ulcerative colitis in rats, and suggest that the effects may be related to the photobiomodulation and immunomodulation of LED.

  4. Effect of COX-2 inhibitor after TNBS-induced colitis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Paiotti, Ana Paula Ribeiro; Miszputen, Sender Jankiel; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; de Oliveira Costa, Henrique; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Franco, Marcello

    2009-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder characterized by alternating periods of remission and active intestinal inflammation. Some studies suggest that antiinflammatory drugs are a promising alternative for treatment of the disease. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of lumiracoxib, a selective-cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced experimental colitis. Wistar rats (n = 25) were randomized into four groups, as follows: Group (1) Sham group: sham induced-colitis rats; Group (2) TNBS group: nontreated induced-colitis rats; Group (3) Lumiracoxib control group; and Group (4) Lumiracoxib-treated induced-colitis rats. Our results showed that rats from groups 2 and 4 presented similar histopathological damage and macroscopic injury in the distal colon as depicted by significant statistically differences (P < 0.01; P < 0.05) compared to the other two groups. Weak expression of COX-2 mRNA was detected in normal colon cells, while higher levels of COX-2 mRNA were detected in group 2 and group 4. Therapy with lumiracoxib reduced COX-2 expression by 20-30%, but it was still higher and statistically significant compared to data obtained from the lumiracoxib control group. Treatment with the selective COX-2 inhibitor lumiracoxib did not reduce inflammation-associated colonic injury in TNBS-induced experimental colitis. Thus, the use of COX-2 inhibitors for treating IBD should be considered with caution and warrants further experimental investigation to elucidate their applicability.

  5. Aquaporin 3 and 8 are down-regulated in TNBS-induced rat colitis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangxi; Li, Jing; Wang, Jiyao; Shen, Xizhong; Sun, Jianyong

    2014-01-03

    Aquaporins (AQPs) plays an important role in transcellular water movement, but the AQPs expression profile has not been demonstrated in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis which closely mimics human Crohn's disease (CD) histopathologically. To solve the problem, 30 female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into a model group (n=18), an ethanol control group (n=6) and a normal control group (n=6). On day 1, the rats in the model group received TNBS+50% ethanol via the rectum, while the ethanol control rats received an equal volume of 50% ethanol and the normal control rats did not receive any treatment. All rats were sacrificed on day 7, and ileum, proximal colon and distal colon specimens were obtained to examine the alteration in AQP3 and AQP8 using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. As a result, exposure to TNBS+ethanol resulted in a marked decrease in both the mRNA and protein expression of AQP3 and AQP8, with the exception of AQP8 protein which was negative in the distal colon in all three groups. These reductions in AQP3 and AQP8 were accompanied by an increase in intestinal inflammation and injury. The results obtained here implied that both AQP3 and AQP8 may be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. The effect of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) seed oil on experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Genc, Zeynep; Yarat, Aysen; Tunali-Akbay, Tugba; Sener, Goksel; Cetinel, Sule; Pisiriciler, Rabia; Caliskan-Ak, Esin; Altıntas, Ayhan; Demirci, Betul

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of Urtica dioica, known as stinging nettle, seed oil (UDO) treatment on colonic tissue and blood parameters of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Experimental colitis was induced with 1 mL of TNBS in 40% ethanol by intracolonic administration with a 8-cm-long cannula with rats under ether anesthesia, assigned to a colitis group and a colitis+UDO group. Rats in the control group were given saline at the same volume by intracolonic administration. UDO (2.5 mL/kg) was given to the colitis+UDO group by oral administration throughout a 3-day interval, 5 minutes later than colitis induction. Saline (2.5 mL/kg) was given to the control and colitis groups at the same volume by oral administration. At the end of the experiment macroscopic lesions were scored, and the degree of oxidant damage was evaluated by colonic total protein, sialic acid, malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione levels, collagen content, tissue factor activity, and superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase activities. Colonic tissues were also examined by histological and cytological analysis. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6), lactate dehydrogenase activity, and triglyceride and cholesterol levels were analyzed in blood samples. We found that UDO decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, lactate dehydrogenase, triglyceride, and cholesterol, which were increased in colitis. UDO administration ameliorated the TNBS-induced disturbances in colonic tissue except for MDA. In conclusion, UDO, through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant actions, merits consideration as a potential agent in ameliorating colonic inflammation.

  7. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  8. The Influence of Ghrelin on the Development of Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Fyderek, Krzysztof; Gałązka, Krystyna; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Pihut, Małgorzata; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin has protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the development of colitis evoked by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Methods. Studies have been performed on rats. Colitis was induced by adding 5% DSS to the drinking water for 5 days. During this period animals were treated intraperitoneally twice a day with saline or ghrelin given at the dose of 8 nmol/kg/dose. On the sixth day, animals were anesthetized and the severity of colitis was assessed. Results. Treatment with ghrelin during administration of DSS reduced the development of colitis. Morphological features of colonic mucosa exhibited a reduction in the area and deep of mucosal damage. Ghrelin reversed the colitis-induced decrease in blood flow, DNA synthesis, and superoxide dismutase activity in colonic mucosa. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal concentration of interleukin-1β and malondialdehyde. Treatment with ghrelin reversed the DSS-induced reduction in body weight gain. Conclusions. Administration of ghrelin exhibits the preventive effect against the development of DSS-induced colitis. This effect seems to be related to ghrelin's anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties.

  9. The Influence of Ghrelin on the Development of Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Fyderek, Krzysztof; Gałązka, Krystyna; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Pihut, Małgorzata; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin has protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the development of colitis evoked by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Methods. Studies have been performed on rats. Colitis was induced by adding 5% DSS to the drinking water for 5 days. During this period animals were treated intraperitoneally twice a day with saline or ghrelin given at the dose of 8 nmol/kg/dose. On the sixth day, animals were anesthetized and the severity of colitis was assessed. Results. Treatment with ghrelin during administration of DSS reduced the development of colitis. Morphological features of colonic mucosa exhibited a reduction in the area and deep of mucosal damage. Ghrelin reversed the colitis-induced decrease in blood flow, DNA synthesis, and superoxide dismutase activity in colonic mucosa. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal concentration of interleukin-1β and malondialdehyde. Treatment with ghrelin reversed the DSS-induced reduction in body weight gain. Conclusions. Administration of ghrelin exhibits the preventive effect against the development of DSS-induced colitis. This effect seems to be related to ghrelin's anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. PMID:26713317

  10. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis.

  11. Acute experimental colitis decreases colonic circular smooth muscle contractility in rats.

    PubMed

    Myers, B S; Martin, J S; Dempsey, D T; Parkman, H P; Thomas, R M; Ryan, J P

    1997-10-01

    Distal colitis decreases the contractility of the underlying circular smooth muscle. We examined how time after injury and lesion severity contribute to the decreased contractility and how colitis alters the calcium-handling properties of the affected muscle. Distal colitis was induced in rats by intrarectal administration of 4% acetic acid. Contractile responses to acetylcholine, increased extracellular potassium, and the G protein activator NaF were determined for circular muscle strips from sham control and colitic rats at days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 postenemas. Acetylcholine stimulation of tissues from day 3 colitic rats was performed in a zero calcium buffer, in the presence of nifedipine, and after depletion of intracellular stores of calcium. The colitis was graded macroscopically as mild, moderate, or severe. Regardless of agonist, maximal decrease in force developed 2 to 3 days posttreatment, followed by a gradual return to control by day 14. The inhibitory effect of colitis on contractility increased with increasing severity of inflammation. Limiting extracellular calcium influx had a greater inhibitory effect on tissues from colitic rats; intracellular calcium depletion had a greater inhibitory effect on tissues from control animals. The data suggest that both lesion severity and time after injury affect the contractile response of circular smooth muscle from the inflamed distal colon. Impaired utilization of intracellular calcium may contribute to the decreased contractility.

  12. Histomorphometric evaluation of experimentally induced colitis with trinitrobenzene-sulphonic acid in rats

    PubMed Central

    RABAU, MICHA; EYAL, AMI; DAYAN, DAN

    1996-01-01

    Colitis was induced with trinitrobenzene-sulphonic acid (TNB) in rats and a histomorphometric study was performed as a possible scoring system for disease activity. The affected colon was examined 10, 20, 40 and 60 days after TNB administration. Quantitative microscopic analysis was performed on the following histologic parameters: necrosis, mucosal epithelium, muscularis fibres, inflammation, granulation tissue and fibrosis. Clinically, the rats were sick, especially on days 10 and 20 after TNB injection. Concomitantly, a peak necrosis score involving the full thickness of the colonic wall was recorded on day 10. The inflammatory reaction was most intense 20 days after TNB injection. After 60 days, marked epithelial regeneration was seen and most of the inflammatory reaction had subsided. A good correlation was found between clinical features and quantitative histomorphometric characteristics of colitis. The criteria described allow a precise description and quantification of the inflammatory and healing process of TNB-induced colitis in rats. PMID:8943736

  13. A study of the effects of Cydonia oblonga Miller (Quince) on TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Minaiyan, M; Ghannadi, A; Etemad, M; Mahzouni, P

    2012-04-01

    Cydonia oblonga Miller (Quince) from Rosaceae family is a fruit tree cultivated in many countries mainly in Iran. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of quince juice (QJ) and quince hydroalcoholic extract (QHE) on ulcerative colitis (UC) induced by TNBS (trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid) in rats. Rats were grouped (n=6) and fasted for 36 h before colitis induction. TNBS was instilled into the colon with a hydroalcoholic carrier and then treatments were made for 5 days starting 6 h after colitis induction with different doses of QJ (200, 400, 800 mg/kg), QHE (200, 500 & 800 mg/kg) orally, QJ (400 mg/kg) and QHE (200 and 500 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. The colon tissue was removed and tissue damages were scored after macroscopic and histopathologic assessments. Albeit the examined doses of QJ and QHE were apparently effective to reduce the extent of UC lesions, only the greatest doses (500 and 800 mg/kg) resulted in significant alleviation. Weight/Length ratio as an illustrative of tissue inflammation and extravasation was also diminished with quince treatments while the results correlated with macroscopic and histopathologic evaluations. These data suggest that QJ and QHE were effective to diminish inflammation and ulcer indices in this murine model of acute colitis. Although QHE with different doses was effective in induced colitis, the dose and/or route of administration dependency was not confirmed. So quince fractions could be considered as a suitable anticolitic alternative, however further studies are needed to support this hypothesis for clinical setting.

  14. Evaluation of the usefulness of colonoscopy with mucosal biopsies in the follow-up of TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Wendelbo, Ingvild Haukaas; Gundersen, Doris; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve

    2013-08-01

    Animal models are required for research regarding the pathogenesis and efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis closely mimics Crohn's disease. The present study was undertaken in order to determine the reliability of following the inflammatory course of TNBS-induced colitis using colonoscopy together with biopsy samples obtained during the examination. In this study we used 20 adult male Wistar rats, with a mean weight of 201.9 g. The rats were divided into two groups, control and TNBS, with ten rats in each group. Following the induction of TNBS colitis, the rats underwent colonoscopy with mucosal biopsies. At the end of the experiment, the rats were sacrificed and whole-wall colonic samples were obtained. The degree of inflammation was assessed endoscopically, macroscopically and microscopically. There was no significant change in the body weight of the control group but significant weight loss was observed in the TNBS group. Examination of the control group did not reveal any inflammation. Severe colitis was observed in the TNBS-induced colitis rats, as assessed endoscopically, macroscopically and microscopically. The endoscopic inflammation score obtained through colonoscopy examinations correlated with that obtained macroscopically, and those obtained microscopically from the whole-wall colon and biopsy samples collected during the colonoscopy. Moreover, the inflammation scores obtained from the whole-wall colon and biopsy samples collected during colonoscopy correlated markedly. In conclusion, colonoscopy is a reliable method for following up the course of inflammation in experimentally induced colitis. Although biopsy samples collected during colonoscopies may be used to assess the degree of inflammation, whole-wall samples are superior in this regard.

  15. Altered vasoactive intestinal peptides expression in irritable bowel syndrome patients and rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y; Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Anderson, Ethan M; Caudle, Robert M; Henderson, Wendy A

    2015-01-07

    To investigate the vasoactive intestinal peptides (VIP) expression in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis. The VIP gene expression and protein plasma levels were measured in adult participants (45.8% male) who met Rome III criteria for IBS for longer than 6 mo and in a rat model of colitis as induced by TNBS. Plasma and colons were collected from naïve and inflamed rats. Markers assessing inflammation (i.e., weight changes and myeloperoxidase levels) were assessed on days 2, 7, 14 and 28 and compared to controls. Visceral hypersensitivity of the rats was assessed with colo-rectal distension and mechanical threshold testing on hind paws. IBS patients (n = 12) were age, gender, race, and BMI-matched with healthy controls (n = 12). Peripheral whole blood and plasma from fasting participants was collected and VIP plasma levels were assayed using a VIP peptide-enzyme immunoassay. Human gene expression of VIP was analyzed using a custom PCR array. TNBS induced colitis in the rats was confirmed with weight loss (13.7 ± 3.2 g) and increased myeloperoxidase activity. Visceral hypersensitivity to colo-rectal distension was increased in TNBS treated rats up to 21 d and resolved by day 28. Somatic hypersensitivity was also increased up to 14 d post TNBS induction of colitis. The expression of an inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase was significantly elevated in the intracellular granules of neutrophils in rat models following TNBS treatment compared to naïve rats. This confirmed the induction of inflammation in rats following TNBS treatment. VIP plasma concentration was significantly increased in rats following TNBS treatment as compared to naïve animals (P < 0.05). Likewise, the VIP gene expression from peripheral whole blood was significantly upregulated by 2.91-fold in IBS patients when compared to controls (P < 0.00001; 95%CI). VIP plasma protein was not significantly different when compared with controls (P = 0

  16. 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Inhibits Acute Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) inhibits toxin A-induced generation of colonic leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and toxin A colitis in rats. Isolated colonic segments in anesthetized rats were treated intraluminally with toxin A for 3 hours with or without 30 minutes of pretreatment with either 5-ASA or sulfapyridine and then colonic tissue levels of LTB4 were measured and inflammation was assessed. Separately, sulfasalazine was administered to rats in their drinking water for 5 days, isolated colonic segments were then prepared, toxin A was administered, and inflammation was assessed as before. Pretreatment with 5-ASA inhibited toxin A-induced increased tissue LTB4 concentration in the colon. Sulfasalazine and 5-ASA but not sulfapyridine significantly inhibited toxin A colitis. However, pretreatment with 5-ASA did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by capsaicin. Toxin A stimulated the release of substance P (SP), and this effect was also inhibited by sulfasalazine and 5-ASA but not by sulfapyridine. Thus, toxin A stimulates colonic LTB4 resulting in activation of TRPV1, release of SP, and colitis. Inhibition of 5-LO by 5-ASA disrupts this pathway and supports the concept that LTB4 activation of TRPV1 plays a role in toxin A colitis.

  17. 5-Aminosalicylic Acid Inhibits Acute Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vigna, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) inhibits toxin A-induced generation of colonic leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and toxin A colitis in rats. Isolated colonic segments in anesthetized rats were treated intraluminally with toxin A for 3 hours with or without 30 minutes of pretreatment with either 5-ASA or sulfapyridine and then colonic tissue levels of LTB4 were measured and inflammation was assessed. Separately, sulfasalazine was administered to rats in their drinking water for 5 days, isolated colonic segments were then prepared, toxin A was administered, and inflammation was assessed as before. Pretreatment with 5-ASA inhibited toxin A-induced increased tissue LTB4 concentration in the colon. Sulfasalazine and 5-ASA but not sulfapyridine significantly inhibited toxin A colitis. However, pretreatment with 5-ASA did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by capsaicin. Toxin A stimulated the release of substance P (SP), and this effect was also inhibited by sulfasalazine and 5-ASA but not by sulfapyridine. Thus, toxin A stimulates colonic LTB4 resulting in activation of TRPV1, release of SP, and colitis. Inhibition of 5-LO by 5-ASA disrupts this pathway and supports the concept that LTB4 activation of TRPV1 plays a role in toxin A colitis. PMID:25045574

  18. Protective effect of alpha-lipoic acid, aerobic or resistance exercise from colitis in second hand smoke exposed young rats.

    PubMed

    Özbeyli, Dilek; Berberoglu, Ayşe Cansu; Özen, Anıl; Erkan, Oktay; Başar, Yunus; Şen, Tunahan; Akakın, Dilek; Yüksel, Meral; Kasımay Çakır, Özgür

    2017-01-01

    The role of second hand smoke (SHS) exposure on ulcerative colitis is not known. Our aim was to examine the effects of α-lipoic acid (ALA), chronic aerobic (AE) or resistance exercise (RE) on SHS exposed rats with colitis. Sprague-Dawley male rats (150-200 g, n=54) were selected for colitis induction. Among the colitis groups, one group was exposed to SHS (6 d/wk, 4 cigarettes/d) and the other was not. The SHS group was divided into subgroups as follows: sedentary; AE (swimming; 3 d/wk); and RE (climbing with weight; 3 d/wk). After 5 weeks, colitis was induced by intrarectal acetic acid. All groups had subgroups that were given subcutaneously ALA (50 mg/kg per day) or vehicle for 3 days. Following decapitation, colon tissues were sampled to examine malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, luminol and lucigenin chemiluminenscence, macroscopic scoring and histologic examination. ANOVA and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis. The increased macroscopic and microscopic scores, MPO, MDA, luminol and lucigenin measurements in colitis and SHS-colitis groups were decreased via ALA (P<.05-.001). AE declined macroscopic and microscopic scores, MDA, lucigenin compared to colitis and SHS-colitis groups (P<.01-.001). RE reduced microscopic score, MPO, MDA, luminol, lucigenin (P<.05-.001) that were increased with colitis. Decreased GSH levels (P<.01) in the SHS-colitis group approached to control levels when given ALA. According to our results SHS and colitis induction increased inflammatory damage. SHS did not worsen it more than colitis. Our results suggest that ALA, AE or RE might be protective for SHS exposed ulcerative colitis conditions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Alleviation of Antioxidant Defense System by Ozonized Olive Oil in DNBS-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bayoumi, Fatehia A.; Ahmed, Naglaa G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential protective effect of ozonized olive oil (OZO) in 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulphuric acid (DNBS) induced colitis in rats and to elucidate the role of some antioxidant defense system (superoxide dismutase “SOD,” glutathione peroxidase “GSH-Px,” and catalase “CAT”) in these effects. The physicochemical parameters including viscosity, peroxide, and acid values of olive oil and OZO were evaluated. The animals were divided into several groups and the colitis was induced in the rats by intracolonic instillation of DNBS at dose of 15 mg/rat. Olive oil (OO) at dose of 6 mg/kg and OZO at doses of 3 and 6 mg/kg was administered orally for 7 days, starting the day before induction of colitis. Our results showed that macroscopic and microscopic damage scores were significantly reduced in a dose response manner in rats pretreated with OZO only. In contrast, CAT, GSH-Px, and SOD activities were significantly increased in the distal colon of inflamed animals pretreated with OZO with respect to control group dose dependently. Results demonstrate that OZO pretreatment exerts protective effects in DNBS induced colitis in rats and provide evidence that the protective effects of OZO are mediated by stimulation of some antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25276059

  20. Intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of the seeds of Raphanus sativus L. in experimental ulcerative colitis models.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ki-Choon; Cho, Seong-Wan; Kook, Sung-Ho; Chun, Sa-Ra; Bhattarai, Govinda; Poudel, Sher Bahadur; Kim, Min-Kook; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2016-02-17

    Water extract of Raphanus sativus L. (RSL) seeds was traditionally used to treat digestive inflammatory complaints in Korean culture. RSL seeds exerted antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-septic functions, suggesting their pharmacological potential for the treatment of inflammatory pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as inflammatory bowel disease. We evaluated the intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of RSL seed water extract (RWE) in experimental rat models of trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS)- or dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. RWE was characterized by determining the content of sinapic acid as a reference material and then assayed in the DSS and TNBS models of rat colitis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 10 groups (n=7/group): non-colitic control, DSS or TNBS control, DSS colitis groups treated with RWE (100mg/kg) or mesalazine (25mg/kg), and TNBS colitis groups treated with various doses (10, 40, 70, and 100mg/kg) of RWE or mesalazine (25mg/kg). RWE or mesalazine treatment started the same day of colitis induction and rats were sacrificed 24h after the last treatment followed by histological and biochemical analyses. Oral administration with RWE suppressed intestinal inflammatory damages in both DSS- and TNBS-induced colitic rats. The treatment with 100mg/kg RWE recovered intestinal damages caused by TNBS or DSS to levels similar to that of mesalazine, decreasing the activity of myeloperoxidase activity and the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β. RWE treatment inhibited malondialdehyde production and glutathione reduction in colon of colitis rats. The administration of RWE at dose of 100mg/kg also suppressed the TNBS- or DSS-stimulated expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, inducible nitric oxide, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Furthermore, RWE inhibited p38 kinase and DNA-nuclear factor-κB binding activities, both of which were stimulated in the

  1. Ginsenoside Rd attenuates the inflammatory response via modulating p38 and JNK signaling pathways in rats with TNBS-induced relapsing colitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Lai; Guo, Tian-Kang; Wang, Yan-Hong; Huang, Yan-Hui; Liu, Xia; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Wan; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Li-Ping; Yan, Shuai; Wu, Di; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects and the protective mechanism of ginsenoside Rd (GRd) which has been identified as one of the effective compounds from ginseng on relapsing colitis model induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats. After inducing relapsing colitis in experimental rats on two occasions by intracolonic injection of TNBS, GRd (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg) was administered to experimental colitis rats for 7 days. The inflammatory degree was assessed by macroscopic score, histology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were determined by ELISA. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was analyzed by western blotting method. The results showed that GRd markedly attenuates the inflammatory response to TNBS-induced relapsing colitis, as evidenced by improved signs, increased body weight, decreased colonic weight/length ratio, reduced colonic macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, inhibited the activity of MPO, lowered proinflammatory cytokine levels and suppressed phosphorylation of p38 and JNK. The possible mechanism of protection on experimental colitis after GRd administration was that it could reduce the accumulation of leukocytes and down-regulate multiple proinflammatory cytokines through modulation of JNK and p38 activation.

  2. Experimental colitis in rats induces de novo synthesis of cytokines at distant intestinal sites: role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Fadi H; Hamdi, Tamim; Barada, Kassem A; Saadé, Nayef E

    2016-06-01

    Increased levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were observed in various segments of histologically-intact small intestine in animal models of acute and chronic colitis. Whether these cytokines are produced locally or spread from the inflamed colon is not known. In addition, the role of gut innervation in this upregulation is not fully understood. To examine whether cytokines are produced de novo in the small intestine in two rat models of colitis; and to investigate the role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents in the synthesis of these inflammatory cytokines. Colitis was induced by rectal instillation of iodoacetamide (IA) or trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Using reverse transcriptase (RT) and real-time PCR, TNF-α, and IL-10 mRNA expression was measured in mucosal scrapings of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon at different time intervals after induction of colitis. Capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents (CSPA) were ablated using subcutaneous injections of capsaicin at time 0, 8 and 32 h, and the experiment was repeated at specific time intervals to detect any effect on cytokines expression. TNF-α mRNA expression increased by 3-40 times in the different intestinal segments (p<0.05 to p<0.001), 48h after IA-induced colitis. CSPA ablation completely inhibited this upregulation in the small intestine, but not in the colon. Similar results were obtained in TNBS-induced colitis at 24 h. Intestinal IL-10 mRNA expression significantly decreased at 12 h and then increased by 6-43 times (p<0.05 to p<0.001) 48h after IA administration. This increase was abolished in rats subjected to CSPA ablation except in the colon, where IL-10 further increased by twice (p<0.05). In the TNBS group, there was 4-12- and 4-7-fold increases in small intestinal IL-10 mRNA expression at 1 and 21 days after colitis induction, respectively (both p<0.01). This increase was not observed in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Capsaicin-treated and

  3. Enteroendocrine cells, stem cells and differentiation progenitors in rats with TNBS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Mazzawi, Tarek; Umezawa, Kazuo; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as animal models of human IBD have abnormal enteroendocrine cells. The present study aimed to identify the possible mechanisms underlying these abnormalities. For this purpose, 40 male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups as follows: the control group, the group with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis with no treatment (TNBS group), the group with TNBS-induced colitis treated with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G; an activator protein-1 inhibitor) (DTCM-G group), and the group with TNBS-induced colitis treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ; a nuclear factor-κB inhibitor) treatment (DHMEQ group). Three days following the administration of TNBS, the rats were treated as follows: those in the control and TNBS groups received 0.5 ml of the vehicle [0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)], those in the DTCM-G group received DTCM-G at 20 mg/kg body weight in 0.5% CMC, and those in the DHMEQ group received DHMEQ at 15 mg/kg body weight in 0.5% CMC. All injections were administered intraperitoneally twice daily for 5 days. The rats were then sacrificed, and tissue samples were taken from the colon. The tissue sections were stained with hemotoxylin-eosin and immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, Musashi1 (Msi1), Math1, Neurogenin3 (Neurog3) and NeuroD1. The staining was quantified using image analysis software. The densities of CgA-, PYY-, PP-, Msi1-, Neurog3- and NeuroD1-positive cells were significantly lower in the TNBS group than those in the control group, while those of serotonin-, oxyntomodulin- and somatostatin-positive cells were significantly higher in the TNBS group than those in the control group. Treatment with either DTCM-G or DHMEQ restored the densities of enteroendocrine cells, stem cells and their progenitors to normal levels. It was thus concluded that the

  4. Enteroendocrine cells, stem cells and differentiation progenitors in rats with TNBS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Mazzawi, Tarek; Umezawa, Kazuo; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2016-12-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as animal models of human IBD have abnormal enteroendocrine cells. The present study aimed to identify the possible mechanisms underlying these abnormalities. For this purpose, 40 male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups as follows: the control group, the group with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis with no treatment (TNBS group), the group with TNBS-induced colitis treated with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G; an activator protein-1 inhibitor) (DTCM-G group), and the group with TNBS-induced colitis treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ; a nuclear factor-κB inhibitor) treatment (DHMEQ group). Three days following the administration of TNBS, the rats were treated as follows: those in the control and TNBS groups received 0.5 ml of the vehicle [0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)], those in the DTCM-G group received DTCM-G at 20 mg/kg body weight in 0.5% CMC, and those in the DHMEQ group received DHMEQ at 15 mg/kg body weight in 0.5% CMC. All injections were administered intraperitoneally twice daily for 5 days. The rats were then sacrificed, and tissue samples were taken from the colon. The tissue sections were stained with hemotoxylin-eosin and immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, Musashi1 (Msi1), Math1, Neurogenin3 (Neurog3) and NeuroD1. The staining was quantified using image analysis software. The densities of CgA-, PYY-, PP-, Msi1-, Neurog3- and NeuroD1-positive cells were significantly lower in the TNBS group than those in the control group, while those of serotonin-, oxyntomodulin- and somatostatin-positive cells were significantly higher in the TNBS group than those in the control group. Treatment with either DTCM-G or DHMEQ restored the densities of enteroendocrine cells, stem cells and their progenitors to normal levels. It was thus

  5. Unfractionated Heparin and New Heparin Analogues from Ascidians (Chordate-Tunicate) Ameliorate Colitis in Rats*

    PubMed Central

    Belmiro, Celso L. R.; Castelo-Branco, Morgana T. L.; Melim, Leandra M. C.; Schanaider, Alberto; Elia, Celeste; Madi, Kalil; Pavão, Mauro S. G.; de Souza, Heitor S. P.

    2009-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of mammalian heparin analogues, named dermatan sulfate and heparin, isolated from the ascidian Styela plicata was accessed in a TNBS-induced colitis model in rats. Subcutaneous administration of the invertebrate compounds during a 7-day period drastically reduced inflammation as observed by the normalization of the macroscopic and histological characteristics of the colon. At the molecular level, a decrease in the production of TNF-α, TGF-β, and VEGF was observed, as well as a reduction of NF-κB and MAPK kinase activation. At the cellular level, the heparin analogues attenuated lymphocyte and macrophage recruitment and epithelial cell apoptosis. A drastic reduction in collagen-mediated fibrosis was also observed. No hemorrhagic events were observed after glycan treatment. These results strongly indicate the potential therapeutic use of these compounds for the treatment of colonic inflammation with a lower risk of hemorrhage when compared with mammalian heparin. PMID:19258310

  6. Protective effect of isoquercitrin against acute dextran sulfate sodium-induced rat colitis depends on the severity of tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Cibiček, Norbert; Roubalová, Lenka; Vrba, Jiří; Zatloukalová, Martina; Ehrmann, Jiří; Zapletalová, Jana; Večeřa, Rostislav; Křen, Vladimír; Ulrichová, Jitka

    2016-12-01

    Isoquercitrin (quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside) is a flavonoid that exhibited antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in a number of in vitro and in vivo studies. Experimental evidence from rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease is, however, lacking. This study was designed to examine whether isoquercitrin effectively and dose-dependently attenuates acute dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced rat colitis. Wistar rats were divided into negative control group (exposed to vehicle only), positive control group (DSS-induced colitis plus vehicle), low isoquercitrin group (DSS pretreated with isoquercitrin 1mg/kg/day) and high isoquercitrin group (DSS with isoquercitrin 10mg/kg/day). Isoquercitrin was administered daily for 14days, and during the last 7days rats drank DSS solution. The effect of isoquercitrin on DSS-induced colitis was assessed clinically (e.g. disease activity index), biochemically (tissue myeloperoxidase activity, local cyclooxygenase-2 expression), using histology (standard hematoxylin-eosin-based histomorphometry, immunohistochemical detection of inducible nitric oxide synthase) and hematology (blood count). Isoquercitrin dose-dependently ameliorated whole colon shortening and mitigated DSS-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the descending segment of the organ. However, when different parts of colon were assessed histomorphometrically, the results did not globally support the protective role of this flavonoid. Tissue healing trends observable in the descending colon were not apparent in the rectum, where histological damage was most severe. We surmise that isoquercitrin may be effective in the prevention of acute colitis. Besides being dose-dependent, the potency of orally administered isoquercitrin may depend on the severity of tissue damage and/or on the site of its action. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o

  7. Active hexose correlated compound acts as a prebiotic and is antiinflammatory in rats with hapten-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Daddaoua, Abdelali; Martínez-Plata, Enrique; López-Posadas, Rocío; Vieites, José María; González, Mercedes; Requena, Pilar; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Suárez, María Dolores; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2007-05-01

    Active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) is a product prepared from the mycelium of edible Basidiomycete fungi that contains oligosaccharides. Here we have studied the antiinflammatory effect of AHCC in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of colitis in rats. Rats received AHCC (100 or 500 mg/kg) daily starting 2 d before (pretreatment) colitis induction and were killed 6 d after the TNBS challenge. The status of the rats was assessed by morphological and biochemical methods. The effect of AHCC on the colonic microflora was also assessed by studying the bacteria profile in feces by standard culture techniques. AHCC administration attenuated colonic inflammation, improving rat weight, food intake, damage score, extension of necrosis, colonic weight, colonic weight-to-length ratio, myeloperoxidase and alkaline phosphatase activities, glutathione concentration, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (IL-1beta, IL-1 receptor antagonist, TNF, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and of mucins 2-4 and trefoil factor 3. The magnitude of the antiinflammatory effect of AHCC was similar to that of sulfasalazine (200 mg/kg). The study of colonic microflora indicated that rats treated with AHCC had higher aerobic and lactic acid bacteria counts as well as higher bifidobacteria counts, whereas clostridia were reduced when compared with the TNBS group. Therefore, our results indicate that AHCC is antiinflammatory and could be useful as a prebiotic to design functional foods for inflammatory bowel disease patients.

  8. Quality of Methods Reporting in Animal Models of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bramhall, Michael; Flórez-Vargas, Oscar; Stevens, Robert; Brass, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current understanding of the onset of inflammatory bowel diseases relies heavily on data derived from animal models of colitis. However, the omission of information concerning the method used makes the interpretation of studies difficult or impossible. We assessed the current quality of methods reporting in 4 animal models of colitis that are used to inform clinical research into inflammatory bowel disease: dextran sulfate sodium, interleukin-10−/−, CD45RBhigh T cell transfer, and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Methods: We performed a systematic review based on PRISMA guidelines, using a PubMed search (2000–2014) to obtain publications that used a microarray to describe gene expression in colitic tissue. Methods reporting quality was scored against a checklist of essential and desirable criteria. Results: Fifty-eight articles were identified and included in this review (29 dextran sulfate sodium, 15 interleukin-10−/−, 5 T cell transfer, and 16 TNBS; some articles use more than 1 colitis model). A mean of 81.7% (SD = ±7.038) of criteria were reported across all models. Only 1 of the 58 articles reported all essential criteria on our checklist. Animal age, gender, housing conditions, and mortality/morbidity were all poorly reported. Conclusions: Failure to include all essential criteria is a cause for concern; this failure can have large impact on the quality and replicability of published colitis experiments. We recommend adoption of our checklist as a requirement for publication to improve the quality, comparability, and standardization of colitis studies and will make interpretation and translation of data to human disease more reliable. PMID:25989337

  9. MAG-EPA reduces severity of DSS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Morin, Caroline; Blier, Pierre U; Fortin, Samuel

    2016-05-15

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic disease characterized by diffuse inflammation of the intestinal mucosa of the large bowel. Omega-3 (ω3) fatty acid supplementation has been associated with a decreased production of inflammatory cytokines involved in UC pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the preventive and therapeutic potential of eicosapentaenoic acid monoglyceride (MAG-EPA) in an in vivo rats model of UC induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). DSS rats were untreated or treated per os with MAG-EPA. Morphological, histological, and biochemical analyses were performed following MAG-EPA administrations. Morphological and histological analyses revealed that MAG-EPA pretreatment (12 days pre-DSS) and treatment (6 days post-DSS) exhibited strong activity in reducing severity of disease in DSS rats. Following MAG-EPA administrations, tissue levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were markedly lower compared with rats treated only with DSS. MAG-EPA per os administration decrease neutrophil infiltration in colon tissues, as depicted by myelohyperoxidase activity. Results also revealed a reduced activation of NF-κB pathways correlated with a decreased expression of COX-2 in colon homogenates derived from MAG-EPA-pretreated and treated rats. Tension measurements performed on colon tissues revealed that contractile responses to methacholine and relaxing effect induced by sodium nitroprusside were largely increased following MAG-EPA treatment. The combined treatment of MAG-EPA and vitamin E displayed an antagonistic effect on anti-inflammatory properties of MAG-EPA in DSS rats.

  10. Changes in enteroendocrine and immune cells following colitis induction by TNBS in rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 3.6 million individuals suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the western world, with an annual global incidence rate of 3–20 cases/100,000 individuals. The etiology of IBD is unknown, and the currently available treatment options are not satifactory for long-term treatment. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease present with abnormalities in multiple intestinal endocrine cell types, and a number of studies have suggested that interactions between gut hormones and immune cells may serve a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of IBD. The aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in colonic endocrine cells in a rat model of IBD. A total of 30 male Wistar rats were divided into control and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis groups. Colonoscopies were performed in the control and TNBS groups at day 3 following the induction of colitis, and colonic tissues were collected from all animals. Colonic endocrine and immune cells in the obtained tissue samples were immunostained and their densities were quantified. The densities of chromogranin A, peptide YY, and pancreatic polypeptide-producing cells were significantly lower in the TNBS group compared with the control group, whereas the densities of serotonin, oxyntomodulin, and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly higher in the TNBS group. The densities of mucosal leukocytes, B/T-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells were significantly higher in the TNBS group compared with the controls, and these differences were strongly correlated with alterations in all endocrine cell types. In conclusion, the results suggest the presence of interactions between intestinal hormones and immune cells. PMID:27840918

  11. Changes in enteroendocrine and immune cells following colitis induction by TNBS in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 3.6 million individuals suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the western world, with an annual global incidence rate of 3‑20 cases/100,000 individuals. The etiology of IBD is unknown, and the currently available treatment options are not satifactory for long‑term treatment. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease present with abnormalities in multiple intestinal endocrine cell types, and a number of studies have suggested that interactions between gut hormones and immune cells may serve a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of IBD. The aim of the present study was to investigate alterations in colonic endocrine cells in a rat model of IBD. A total of 30 male Wistar rats were divided into control and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)‑induced colitis groups. Colonoscopies were performed in the control and TNBS groups at day 3 following the induction of colitis, and colonic tissues were collected from all animals. Colonic endocrine and immune cells in the obtained tissue samples were immunostained and their densities were quantified. The densities of chromogranin A, peptide YY, and pancreatic polypeptide‑producing cells were significantly lower in the TNBS group compared with the control group, whereas the densities of serotonin, oxyntomodulin, and somatostatin‑producing cells were significantly higher in the TNBS group. The densities of mucosal leukocytes, B/T‑lymphocytes, T‑lymphocytes, B‑lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells were significantly higher in the TNBS group compared with the controls, and these differences were strongly correlated with alterations in all endocrine cell types. In conclusion, the results suggest the presence of interactions between intestinal hormones and immune cells.

  12. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD.

  13. Vitamin E has a dual effect of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities in acetic acid–induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tahan, Gulgun; Aytac, Erman; Aytekin, Huseyin; Gunduz, Feyza; Dogusoy, Gulen; Aydin, Seval; Tahan, Veysel; Uzun, Hafize

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased free radical production, decreased antioxidant capacity and excessive inflammation are well-known features in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Vitamin E is a powerful antioxidant and a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals, and it has been shown to have anti-inflammatory activities in tissues. We investigated the effects of vitamin E on inflammatory activities using an acetic acid (AA)–induced ulcerative colitis model in rats. Methods Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Acetic acid was given to 2 groups of animals to induce colitis while the other 2 groups received saline intrarectally. One AA-induced colitis group and 1 control group received vitamin E (30 U/kg/d) intraperitoneally and the pair groups received saline. After 4 days, we evaluated colonic changes biochemically by measuring proinflammatory cytokine levels in tissue homogenates and by histopathologic examination. Results Acetic acid caused colonic mucosal injury, whereas vitamin E administration suppressed these changes in the AA-induced colitis group (p < 0.001). Administration of AA resulted in increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde, and decreased levels of glutathione and superoxide dismutase; vitamin E reversed these effects (all p < 0.001). Conclusion Our study proposes that vitamin E is an effective anti-inflammatory and antioxidant and may be a promising therapeutic option for ulcerative colitis. PMID:21933527

  14. Effects of Carum carvi L. (Caraway) extract and essential oil on TNBS-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarz, A.; Minaiyan, M.; Ghannadi, A.; Mahzouni, P.

    2013-01-01

    Carum carvi L. (Apiaceae family) or caraway is a common household plant grown around the world including Iran. Caraway fruits are used as flavoring agent in foods and beverages, and have various traditional uses in ethnomedicine. Anti-inflammatory, spasmolytic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, carminative and immunomodulatory properties of caraway suggest that it might exert beneficial effects on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the effects of caraway hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) and its essential oil (CEO) in an immunological model of colitis in rats induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Different doses of CHE (100, 200, 400 mg/kg) and CEO (100, 200, 400 μl/kg) were administered orally (p.o.) and also doses of CHE (100, 400 mg/kg) and CEO (100, 400 μl/kg) were given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to the separate groups of male Wistar rats (n=6). Administration of the doses started 6 h after induction of colitis and continued daily for 5 consecutive days. Wet colon weight/length ratio was measured and tissue damage scores as well as indices of colitis were evaluated both macroscopically and histopathologically. CHE and CEO at all doses tested were effective in reducing colon tissue lesions and colitis indices and the efficacy was nearly the same when different doses of plant fractions were administered p.o. or i.p. Administration of prednisolone (p.o., 4 mg/kg), Asacol® (mesalazine microgranules, p.o., 100 mg/kg) and hydrocortisone acetate (i.p., 20 mg/kg) as references were effective in reducing colon tissue injures as well. These data suggest that caraway fractions are both effective and possess anti-colitic activity irrespective of the dose and route of administration. PMID:24459470

  15. Effects of extract and essential oil of Rosmarinus officinalis L. on TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Minaiyan, M; Ghannadi, A R; Afsharipour, M; Mahzouni, P

    2011-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Family Lamiaceae) popularly named rosemary, is a common household plant grown around the world, including Iran. Rosemary aerial parts are used as flavoring agent in foods, beverages, and cosmetic preparations and have various traditional uses in ethnomedicine including: analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic, spasmolytic, carminative and choleretic applications. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of rosemary leaves hydroalcoholic extract (RHE) and essential oil (REO) in a well-defined model of experimental colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats. Different doses of RHE (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) and REO (100, 200 and 400 μl/kg) were administered orally and intraperitoneally (100, 400 mg/kg and 100, 400 μl/kg) to male Wistar rats (n=6), 6 h after colitis induction and continued for 5 days by intracolonic instillation of 0.25 ml TNBS (80 mg/kg)/ethanol 50% v/v. Wet colon weight/length ratio was measured and tissue damage scores as well as indices of colitis were evaluated both macroscopically and histopathologically. RHE and REO at all test doses used were effective to reduce colon tissue lesions and colitis indices while greater doses were significantly effective to diminish histopathologic parameters irrespective to the route of administration. Administration of oral prednisolone, Asacol(®) (mesalazine microgranules) and parenteral hydrocortisone acetate were effective to reduce colon tissue injures as well. These data suggest that RHE and REO are both effective to possess anti-colitic activity, and reinforce the use of this plant as a remedy for inflammatory bowel diseases in traditional medicine.

  16. Effects of extract and essential oil of Rosmarinus officinalis L. on TNBS-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, M.; Ghannadi, A. R.; Afsharipour, M.; Mahzouni, P.

    2011-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Family Lamiaceae) popularly named rosemary, is a common household plant grown around the world, including Iran. Rosemary aerial parts are used as flavoring agent in foods, beverages, and cosmetic preparations and have various traditional uses in ethnomedicine including: analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatic, spasmolytic, carminative and choleretic applications. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of rosemary leaves hydroalcoholic extract (RHE) and essential oil (REO) in a well-defined model of experimental colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats. Different doses of RHE (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) and REO (100, 200 and 400 μl/kg) were administered orally and intraperitoneally (100, 400 mg/kg and 100, 400 μl/kg) to male Wistar rats (n=6), 6 h after colitis induction and continued for 5 days by intracolonic instillation of 0.25 ml TNBS (80 mg/kg)/ethanol 50% v/v. Wet colon weight/length ratio was measured and tissue damage scores as well as indices of colitis were evaluated both macroscopically and histopathologically. RHE and REO at all test doses used were effective to reduce colon tissue lesions and colitis indices while greater doses were significantly effective to diminish histopathologic parameters irrespective to the route of administration. Administration of oral prednisolone, Asacol® (mesalazine microgranules) and parenteral hydrocortisone acetate were effective to reduce colon tissue injures as well. These data suggest that RHE and REO are both effective to possess anti-colitic activity, and reinforce the use of this plant as a remedy for inflammatory bowel diseases in traditional medicine. PMID:22049274

  17. Effects of Carum carvi L. (Caraway) extract and essential oil on TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, A; Minaiyan, M; Ghannadi, A; Mahzouni, P

    2013-01-01

    Carum carvi L. (Apiaceae family) or caraway is a common household plant grown around the world including Iran. Caraway fruits are used as flavoring agent in foods and beverages, and have various traditional uses in ethnomedicine. Anti-inflammatory, spasmolytic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, carminative and immunomodulatory properties of caraway suggest that it might exert beneficial effects on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the effects of caraway hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) and its essential oil (CEO) in an immunological model of colitis in rats induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Different doses of CHE (100, 200, 400 mg/kg) and CEO (100, 200, 400 μl/kg) were administered orally (p.o.) and also doses of CHE (100, 400 mg/kg) and CEO (100, 400 μl/kg) were given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to the separate groups of male Wistar rats (n=6). Administration of the doses started 6 h after induction of colitis and continued daily for 5 consecutive days. Wet colon weight/length ratio was measured and tissue damage scores as well as indices of colitis were evaluated both macroscopically and histopathologically. CHE and CEO at all doses tested were effective in reducing colon tissue lesions and colitis indices and the efficacy was nearly the same when different doses of plant fractions were administered p.o. or i.p. Administration of prednisolone (p.o., 4 mg/kg), Asacol® (mesalazine microgranules, p.o., 100 mg/kg) and hydrocortisone acetate (i.p., 20 mg/kg) as references were effective in reducing colon tissue injures as well. These data suggest that caraway fractions are both effective and possess anti-colitic activity irrespective of the dose and route of administration.

  18. Assessment of colon and bladder crosstalk in an experimental colitis model using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Towner, R A; Smith, N; Saunders, D; Van Gordon, S B; Tyler, K R; Wisniewski, A B; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B; Hurst, R E

    2015-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) consists of two chronic remitting-relapsing inflammatory disorders in the colon referred to as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease (CD). Inflammatory bowel disease affects about 1.4 million Americans. 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis is a widely used model of experimental intestinal inflammation with characteristic transmural and segmental lesions that are similar to CD. Here, we report on the use of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to monitor in vivo bladder permeability changes resulting from bladder crosstalk following colon TNBS exposure, and TNBS-induced colitis. Changes in MRI signal intensities and histology were evaluated for both colon and bladder regions. Uptake of contrast agent in the colon demonstrated a significant increase in signal intensity (SI) for TNBS-exposed rats (p < 0.01) compared to controls. In addition, a significant increase in bladder SI for colon TNBS-exposed rats (p < 0.001) was observed compared to saline controls. Histological damage within the colon was observed, however, bladder histology indicated a normal urothelium in rats with TNBS-induced colitis, despite increased permeability seen by CE-MRI. Contrast-enhanced MRI was able to quantitatively measure inflammation associated with TNBS-induced colitis, and assess bladder crosstalk measured as an increase in urothelial permeability. Although CE-MRI is routinely used to assess inflammation with IBD, currently there is no diagnostic test to assess bladder crosstalk with this disease, and our developed method may be useful in providing crosstalk information between organ and tissue systems in IBD patients, in addition to colitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Comparison of anti-inflammatory activities of an anthocyanin-rich fraction from Portuguese blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and 5-aminosalicylic acid in a TNBS-induced colitis rat model.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sónia R; Pereira, Rita; Figueiredo, Isabel; Freitas, Victor; Dinis, Teresa C P; Almeida, Leonor M

    2017-01-01

    Despite the actual therapeutic approaches for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), efficient and secure alternative options remain a research focus. In this context, anthocyanins seem promising natural anti-inflammatory agents, but their action mechanisms and efficacy as compared with established drugs still require more clarification. The main aim of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory action of a chemically characterized anthocyanin-rich fraction (ARF), obtained from Portuguese blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.), with that of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), a first-line drug in IBD, in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis rat model. Such fraction showed a high content and great molecular diversity of anthocyanins, with malvidin-3-galactoside and petunidin-3-arabinoside in the highest concentrations. After daily administration by intragastric infusion for 8 days, ARF, at a molar anthocyanin concentration about 30 times lower than 5-ASA, showed a higher effectiveness in counteracting the intestinal inflammation, as assessed by i) body weight variation and colon damage score, ii) reduction in leukocyte infiltration, iii) increase in antioxidant defenses and iv) by downregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in colon tissue homogenates. The strong inhibition of COX-2 expression seems to be a crucial anti-inflammatory mechanism common to both ARF and 5-ASA, but the additional higher abilities of anthocyanins to downregulate iNOS and to decrease leukocytes infiltration and to increase antioxidant defenses in colon may account for the much higher anti-inflammatory action of anthocyanins. These data may contribute to the development of a promising natural approach in IBD management.

  20. Comparison of anti-inflammatory activities of an anthocyanin-rich fraction from Portuguese blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and 5-aminosalicylic acid in a TNBS-induced colitis rat model

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sónia R.; Pereira, Rita; Figueiredo, Isabel; Freitas, Victor; Dinis, Teresa C. P.; Almeida, Leonor M.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the actual therapeutic approaches for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), efficient and secure alternative options remain a research focus. In this context, anthocyanins seem promising natural anti-inflammatory agents, but their action mechanisms and efficacy as compared with established drugs still require more clarification. The main aim of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory action of a chemically characterized anthocyanin-rich fraction (ARF), obtained from Portuguese blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.), with that of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), a first-line drug in IBD, in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis rat model. Such fraction showed a high content and great molecular diversity of anthocyanins, with malvidin-3-galactoside and petunidin-3-arabinoside in the highest concentrations. After daily administration by intragastric infusion for 8 days, ARF, at a molar anthocyanin concentration about 30 times lower than 5-ASA, showed a higher effectiveness in counteracting the intestinal inflammation, as assessed by i) body weight variation and colon damage score, ii) reduction in leukocyte infiltration, iii) increase in antioxidant defenses and iv) by downregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in colon tissue homogenates. The strong inhibition of COX-2 expression seems to be a crucial anti-inflammatory mechanism common to both ARF and 5-ASA, but the additional higher abilities of anthocyanins to downregulate iNOS and to decrease leukocytes infiltration and to increase antioxidant defenses in colon may account for the much higher anti-inflammatory action of anthocyanins. These data may contribute to the development of a promising natural approach in IBD management. PMID:28329021

  1. Curcumin improves TNBS-induced colitis in rats by inhibiting IL-27 expression via the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhaojing; Zhan, Lingling; Liao, Hui; Chen, Lan; Lv, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin is a widely used spice with anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. It has been reported to have beneficial effects in experimental colitis. This study explored whether curcumin improves colonic inflammation in a rat colitis model through inhibition of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway and IL-27 expression. After induction of colitis with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, rats were intragastrically administered with curcumin or sulfasalazine daily for one week. Rat intestinal mucosa was collected for evaluation of the disease activity index, colonic mucosa damage index, and histological score. Myeloperoxidase activity was detected by immunohistochemistry, and mRNA and protein expression levels of TLR4, NF-κB, and IL-27 in colonic mucosa were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared with the untreated colitis group, the curcumin-treated group showed significant decreases in the disease activity index, colonic mucosa damage index, histological score, myeloperoxidase activity, and expressions of NF-κB mRNA, IL-27 mRNA, TLR4 protein, NF-κB p65 protein, and IL-27 p28 protein (p < 0.05). TLR4 mRNA expression did not differ between groups. Disease activity index decreased more rapidly in the curcumin-treated group than in the sulfasalazine-treated group (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in TLR4, NF-κB, and IL-27 mRNA and proteins between curcumin-treated and sulfasalazine-treated groups. Curcumin shows significant therapeutic effects on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis that are comparable to sulfasalazine. The anti-inflammatory actions of curcumin on colitis may involve inhibition of the TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway and of IL-27 expression.

  2. Nicotine Inhibits Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis but Not Ileitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Vigna, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis but not Crohn's disease of the small intestine, but little is known about the effects of nicotine on Clostridium difficile toxin A-induced enteritis. Isolated ileal or colonic segments in anesthetized rats were pretreated with nicotine bitartrate or other pharmacological agents before intraluminal injection of toxin A. After 3 hours, the treated segments were removed and inflammation was assessed. Nicotine biphasically inhibited toxin A colitis but not ileitis. Pretreatment with the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, blocked the effects of nicotine. Pretreating the colonic segments with hexamethonium before toxin A administration resulted in more inflammation than seen with toxin A alone, suggesting that a tonic nicotinic anti-inflammatory condition exists in the colon. Nicotine also inhibited toxin A-induced increased colonic concentrations of the TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1) agonist, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and release of the proinflammatory neuropeptide, substance P. Pretreatment with nicotine did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by intraluminal capsaicin. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors tonically protect the colon against inflammation and nicotine inhibits toxin A colitis but not toxin A ileitis in rats in part by inhibition of toxin A-induced activation of TRPV1 by endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as LTB4.

  3. Nicotine Inhibits Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Induced Colitis but Not Ileitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vigna, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis but not Crohn's disease of the small intestine, but little is known about the effects of nicotine on Clostridium difficile toxin A-induced enteritis. Isolated ileal or colonic segments in anesthetized rats were pretreated with nicotine bitartrate or other pharmacological agents before intraluminal injection of toxin A. After 3 hours, the treated segments were removed and inflammation was assessed. Nicotine biphasically inhibited toxin A colitis but not ileitis. Pretreatment with the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, blocked the effects of nicotine. Pretreating the colonic segments with hexamethonium before toxin A administration resulted in more inflammation than seen with toxin A alone, suggesting that a tonic nicotinic anti-inflammatory condition exists in the colon. Nicotine also inhibited toxin A-induced increased colonic concentrations of the TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1) agonist, leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and release of the proinflammatory neuropeptide, substance P. Pretreatment with nicotine did not protect against direct TRPV1-mediated colitis caused by intraluminal capsaicin. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors tonically protect the colon against inflammation and nicotine inhibits toxin A colitis but not toxin A ileitis in rats in part by inhibition of toxin A-induced activation of TRPV1 by endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as LTB4. PMID:26881175

  4. Oral microbiome composition changes in mouse models of colitis.

    PubMed

    Rautava, Jaana; Pinnell, Lee J; Vong, Linda; Akseer, Nadia; Assa, Amit; Sherman, Philip M

    2015-03-01

    Oral mucosal pathologies are frequent in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Since host-microbiome interactions are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD, in this study the potential for changes affecting the oral microbiome was evaluated using two complementary mouse models of colitis: either chemically (dextran sulfate sodium) or with Citrobacter rodentium infection. After sacrifice, the tongue, buccal mucosa, saliva, colon, and stool samples were collected for analyses. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was performed to assess bacterial 16S rRNA gene profiles. Relative changes were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis for the phyla Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Spirochetes, and Actinobacteria, classes Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, and the genera Bacillus and Lactobacillus. These groups represent over 99% of the oral microbiota of healthy C57BL/6 mice. Both models of colitis changed the oral microbiome, with the buccal microbiome being the most resistant to alterations in composition (maximum 1.8% change, vs tongue maximum 2.5% change, and saliva which demonstrated up to 7.2% total changes in microbiota composition). Changes in the oral microbiota were greater after dextran sulfate sodium challenge, compared with C. rodentium-induced colitis. Using cluster analysis, tongue and buccal mucosal microbiota composition changed ∼ 5%, saliva ∼ 35%, while stool changed ∼ 10%. These findings indicate that dysbiosis observed in murine models of colitis is associated with changes in the composition of bacteria present in the oral cavity and in saliva. Such changes in the oral microbiota could be relevant to the etiology and management of oral mucosal pathologies observed in IBD patients. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Monochloramine induces acute and protracted colitis in the rat: response to pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Isabel; González, Raquel; Nieto, Ana; Zarzuelo, Antonio; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2005-05-06

    Monochloramine is a powerful oxidative molecule that is produced in inflammatory sites. We investigated the effect of intrarectally administered monochloramine (3.2 mg) in the rat. A single enema induced after 24 h an intense inflammatory reaction characterized by mucosal necrosis, submucosal edema, hemorrhage and colonic thickening, as well as induction of nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor and an increase in the interferon gamma/interleukin 4 ratio. The inflammatory response peaked 3-5 days after monochloramine administration and then followed a extended recovery phase. At 1 week there was substantial but incomplete mucosal repair, submucosal edema, neutrophil/macrophage infiltration and increased myeloperoxydase and alkaline phosphatase activities. Oxidative stress, as determined by malonyldialdehyde levels, was prominent only in the acute phase (3-5 days). Monochloramine colitis was amenable to pharmacological treatment with sulphasalazine or prednisolone, suggesting that it may be used as an experimental model of inflammatory bowel disease. In conclusion, monochloramine induces acute and protracted colonic inflammation in the rat. Locally produced monochloramine might contribute to the perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Prebiotic and synbiotic fructooligosaccharide administration fails to reduce the severity of experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Geier, Mark S; Butler, Ross N; Giffard, Philip M; Howarth, Gordon S

    2007-07-01

    Opposing effects of the prebiotic, fructooligosaccharide, have been reported in experimental colitis. We compared the effects of the prebiotic, fructooligosaccharide, alone and in synbiotic combination with Lactobacillus fermentum BR11, on the development of dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in rats. Rats consumed an 18 percent casein-based diet or diet supplemented with 6 percent fructooligosaccharide or maltodextrin for 14 days. The synbiotic group was gavaged 1 ml of L. fermentum BR11 (1x10(9) cfu/ml) twice daily. From Days 7 to 14, colitis was induced via 3 percent dextran sulfate sodium in drinking water. Disease activity was assessed daily, and at killing, gastrointestinal organs were measured, weighed, and examined by quantitative histology, proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry, and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Administration of dextran sulfate sodium resulted in an increased colitic disease activity, and an increased colon and cecum weight compared with normal controls. Colon and cecum weights were further increased in dextran sulfate sodium+fructooligosaccharide (colon: 19 percent; cecum: 48 percent) and dextran sulfate sodium+fructooligosaccharide/L. fermentum BR11-treated rats (16 and 62 percent) compared with dextran sulfate sodium+vehicle-treatment. Dextran sulfate sodium+fructooligosaccharide-treated rats displayed an 81 percent increase in colonic myeloperoxidase activity compared with dextran sulfate sodium-treated controls. Histologic damage severity scores increased in dextran sulfate sodium+vehicle, dextran sulfate sodium+fructooligosaccharide, and dextran sulfate sodium+fructooligosaccharide/L. fermentum BR11-treated rats compared with normal controls (P<0.05). Crypt depth increased in all treatments compared with normal controls (P<0.01). No protection from dextran sulfate sodium-colitis was accorded by fructooligosaccharide alone or in synbiotic combination with L. fermentum BR11, whereas fructooligosaccharide

  7. Paradoxical regulation of ChAT and nNOS expression in animal models of Crohn's colitis and ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Winston, John H; Li, Qingjie; Sarna, Sushil K

    2013-08-15

    Morphological and functional changes in the enteric nervous system (ENS) have been reported in inflammatory bowel disease. We examined the effects of inflammation on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nNOS in the muscularis externae of two models of colonic inflammation, trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, which models Crohn's disease-like inflammation, and DSS-induced colitis, which models ulcerative Colitis-like inflammation. In TNBS colitis, we observed significant decline in ChAT, nNOS, and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 protein and mRNA levels. In DSS colitis, ChAT and PGP9.5 were significantly upregulated while nNOS levels did not change. The nNOS dimer-to-monomer ratio decreased significantly in DSS- but not in TNBS-induced colitis. No differences were observed in the percentage of either ChAT (31 vs. 33%)- or nNOS (37 vs. 41%)-immunopositive neurons per ganglia or the mean number of neurons per ganglia (55 ± 5 vs. 59 ± 5, P > 0.05). Incubation of the distal colon muscularis externae in vitro with different types of inflammatory mediators showed that cytokines decreased ChAT and nNOS expression, whereas H₂O₂, a component of oxidative stress, increased their expression. NF-κB inhibitor MG-132 did not prevent the IL-1β-induced decline in either ChAT or nNOS expression. These findings showed that TNBS- and DSS-induced inflammation differentially regulates the expression of two critical proteins expressed in the colonic myenteric neurons. These differences are likely due to the exposure of the myenteric plexus neurons to different combinations of Th1-type inflammatory mediators and H₂O₂ in each model.

  8. Beneficial effect of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tuber on experimental ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Dey, Yadu Nandan; Sharma, Garima; Wanjari, Manish M; Kumar, Dharmendra; Lomash, Vinay; Jadhav, Ankush D

    2017-12-01

    The tuber of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Dennst.) Nicolson (Araceae), commonly called Suran or Jimmikand, has high medicinal value and is used ethnomedicinally for the treatment of different gastrointestinal and inflammatory disorders. The present study evaluated the effects of extracts of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tubers on acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats. Wistar rats were orally administered methanol extract (APME) or aqueous extract (APAE) (250 and 500 mg/kg) or standard drug, prednisolone (PRDS) (4 mg/kg) for 7 days. On 6th day of treatment, UC was induced by transrectal instillation of 4% acetic acid (AA) and after 48 h colitis was assessed by measuring colitis parameters, biochemical estimations and histology of colon. APME or APAE pretreatment significantly (p < .05-.001) prevented AA-induced reduction in body weight and increase in colitis parameters viz. stool consistency, colon weight/length ratio and ulcer score, area and index. Extracts treatment attenuated (p < .001) increase in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase in serum and myeloperoxidase activity and cytokines in colon tissue due to AA administration. Extracts treatment prevented AA-induced elevation in lipid peroxidation and decline in activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced-glutathione content (p < .05-.001) along with histopathological alterations. PRDS also showed similar ameliorative effect on colitis. APME and APAE showed a preventive effect on UC, and ameliorated inflammation and oxidative damage in colon. The effects may be attributed to presence of phytochemicals, betulinic acid, β-sitosterol, and glucomannan. In conclusion, the tuber of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius exhibited an anticolitic effect through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant action.

  9. BMP signaling in rats with TNBS-induced colitis following BMP7 therapy.

    PubMed

    Maric, Ivana; Kucic, Natalia; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Smoljan, Ivana; Grahovac, Blazenka; Zoricic Cvek, Sanja; Celic, Tanja; Bobinac, Dragica; Vukicevic, Slobodan

    2012-05-15

    Beyond stimulating bone formation, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are important in development, inflammation, and malignancy of the gut. We have previously shown that BMP7 has a regenerative, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferative effect on experimental inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in rats. To further investigate the BMP signaling pathway we monitored the effect of BMP7 therapy on the BMP signaling components in the rat colon during different stages of experimentally induced colitis by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The results showed a significantly decreased BMP7 expression in the acute phase, followed by a significantly increased BMP2 and decreased BMP6 expression during the chronic phase of colitis. BMP7 therapy influenced the expression of several BMPs with the most prominent effect on downregulation of BMP2 and upregulation of BMP4 in the chronic phase of colitis. Importantly, connective tissue growth factor and noggin expression were elevated in the acute stage and significantly decreased upon BMP7 therapy. BMP receptor I expression was unchanged, whereas BMP receptor II was decreased at day 2 and increased at days 14 and 30 of TNBS inflammation. However, an opposite pattern of expression following BMP7 therapy has been observed. BMP7 increased the expression of BR-Smad including Smad3 and Smad4. Inhibitory Smads were increased in colitis and significantly decreased following BMP7 therapy at later stages of the disease. We suggest that BMP signaling was altered during TNBS-induced colitis and was recovered with BMP7 administration, suggesting that IBD is a reversible process.

  10. Dextran-5-(4-ethoxycarbonylphenylazo)salicylic acid ester, a polymeric colon-specific prodrug releasing 5-aminosalicylic acid and benzocaine, ameliorates TNBS-induced rat colitis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joon; Kim, Wooseong; Lee, Sunyoung; Jeong, Seongkeun; Yoo, Jin-Wook; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Yunjin

    2016-01-01

    Local anesthetics have beneficial effects on colitis. Dextran-5-(4-ethoxycarbonylphenylazo)salicylic acid ester (Dex-5-ESA), designed as a polymeric colon-specific prodrug liberating 5-ASA and benzocaine in the large intestine, was prepared and its therapeutic activity against colitis was evaluated using a TNBS-induced rat colitis model. Dex-5-ESA liberated 5-ASA and benzocaine in the cecal contents while (bio)chemically stable in the small intestinal contents and mucosa. Oral administration of Dex-5-ESA (equivalent to 10 mg 5-ASA/kg, twice a day) alleviated colonic injury and reduced MPO activity in the inflamed colon. In parallel, pro-inflammatory mediators, COX-2, iNOS and CINC-3, elevated by TNBS-induced colitis, were substantially diminished in the inflamed colon. Dex-5-ESA was much more effective for the treatment of colitis than 5-(4-ethoxycarbonylphenylazo)salicylic acid (5-ESA) that may not deliver benzocaine to the large intestine. Our data suggest that Dex-5-ESA is a polymeric colon-specific prodrug, liberating 5-ASA and benzocaine in the target site (large intestine), probably exerting anti-colitic effects by combined action of 5-ASA and benzocaine.

  11. Nadroparin sodium activates Nrf2/HO-1 pathway in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yalniz, Mehmet; Demirel, Ulvi; Orhan, Cemal; Bahcecioglu, Ibrahim Halil; Ozercan, Ibrahim Hanefi; Aygun, Cem; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Kazim

    2012-06-01

    Effects of nadroparin sodium, a low molecular weight heparin, in colitis was investigated by analyzing proteins implicated in nuclear factor E2-related factor-2/heme oxygenase-1 (Nrf2/HO-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. Twenty-eight rats were used. Colitis was induced by acetic acid (AA). Nadroparin sodium was given to prevention and treatment groups in addition to AA. Colitis was assessed histologically and levels of proteins were analyzed with Western blot. Nadroparin not only prevented and ameliorated the AA-induced colitis histopathologically but also decreased expression of colon NF-κB, activator protein-1, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and IL-6, which were significantly increased in group AA compared to control. The accumulation of Nrf2 in nuclear fraction and HO-1 found low in group AA was increased with nadroparin (p < 0.05). The mean malondialdehyde level increased with AA and was decreased significantly with nadroparin prevention and treatment (p < 0.001). Nadroparin sodium has both protective and therapeutic effects against colonic inflammation via exerting anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects by modulating Nrf2/HO-1 and NF-κB pathways.

  12. Dietary protocatechuic acid ameliorates dextran sulphate sodium-induced ulcerative colitis and hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Farombi, Ebenezer O; Adedara, Isaac A; Awoyemi, Omolola V; Njoku, Chinonye R; Micah, Gabriel O; Esogwa, Cynthia U; Owumi, Solomon E; Olopade, James O

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigated the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of dietary protocatechuic acid (PCA), a simple hydrophilic phenolic compound commonly found in many edible vegetables, on dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis and its associated hepatotoxicity in rats. PCA was administered orally at 10 mg kg(-1) to dextran sulphate sodium exposed rats for five days. The result revealed that administration of PCA significantly (p < 0.05) prevented the incidence of diarrhea and bleeding, the decrease in the body weight gain, shortening of colon length and the increase in colon mass index in DSS-treated rats. Furthermore, PCA prevented the increase in the plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, markers of liver toxicity and markedly suppressed the DSS-mediated elevation in colonic nitric oxide concentration and myeloperoxidase activity in the treated rats. Administration of PCA significantly protected against colonic and hepatic oxidative damage by increasing the antioxidant status and concomitantly decreased hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation levels in the DSS-treated rats. Moreover, histological examinations confirmed PCA chemoprotection against colon and liver damage. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that PCA significantly inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression in the colon of DSS-treated rats. In conclusion, the effective chemoprotective role of PCA in colitis and the associated hepatotoxicity is related to its intrinsic anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties.

  13. Hydroalcoholic extract of Brazilian red propolis exerts protective effects on acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Barbosa Bezerra, Gislaine; de Menezes de Souza, Luana; Dos Santos, Adailma Santana; de Almeida, Grace Kelly Melo; Souza, Marília Trindade Santana; Santos, Sandra Lauton; Aparecido Camargo, Enilton; Dos Santos Lima, Bruno; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Cardoso, Juliana Cordeiro; Gomes, Silvana Vieira Floresta; Gomes, Margarete Zanardo; de Albuquerque, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti

    2017-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common intestinal inflammatory disease with an etiology that is not well understood. Although the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of Brazilian red propolis (HERP) have been reported in various experimental models, its protective effect in models of UC have not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemopreventive effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Brazilian red propolis (HERP) in acetic acid-induced colitis (AAIC) using a rodent model. The HERP was chemically characterised by HPLC/DAD analyses. Male rats were randomly assigned into four groups: sham, vehicle (with AAIC, treated with vehicle), P10 (with AAIC, treated with 10mg/kg HERP), and P100 (with AAIC, treated with 100mg/kg HERP). Treatments were performed for 7days, and colitis was induced on day seven. Animals were euthanized 24h after colitis induction and body weight, colon length, gross and histological scores, malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentrations in colon tissue, and the immunohistochemical expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were assessed. The major compounds found in HERP were liquiritigenin (68.8mg/g), formononetin (54.29mg/g), biochanin A (30.97mg/g), and daidzein (19.90mg/g). Rats treated with 10mg/kg HERP demonstrated significant decreases in MPO concentrations, gross and histological scores of tissue damage, and iNOS expression (p<0.05). Similarly, rats treated with 100mg/kg HERP demonstrated significant decreases in MPO levels (p<0.05) and histological scores of tissue damage (p<0.05). The results of this study indicate that oral administration of HERP attenuates AAIC in rats, which may be due to anti-inflammatory effects related to iNOS inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effect of ondansetron through 5-HT3 receptors on TNBS-induced colitis in rat

    PubMed Central

    Motavallian-Naeini, Azadeh; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Rabbani, Mohammad; Mahzuni, Parvin

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract whose etiology has not yet been fully elucidated. Available medicines for treatment of IBD are not universally effective and result in marked deleterious effects. This challenge has thus heightened the need for research in order to adopt new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of IBD. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have shown analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo. Our aim was to investigate the effect of ondansetron, 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, in an immune-based animal model of IBD, trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat colitis and probable involvement of 5-HT3 receptors. Two hours after induction of colitis (instillation of 50 mg/kg of TNBS dissolved in 0.25 ml of ethanol 50 % v/v) to male Wistar rats, ondansetron (2 mg/kg), dexamethasone (1 mg/kg), meta-chlorophenylbiguanide (mCPBG, 5 mg/kg), a 5-HT3 receptor agonist, or ondansetron + mCPBG were administrated intraperitoneally (ip) and continued daily for six days. The animals were sacrificed and distal colons were assessed macroscopically, histologically and biochemically [myeloperoxidase (MPO), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 beta]. Ondansetron and dexamethasone resulted in a decrease in macroscopic and microscopic colonic damage significantly. In addition a dramatic reduction in MPO activity and colonic levels of inflammatory cytokines were seen. The protective effects of ondansetron were antagonized by concurrent administration of mCPBG. Our data suggests that the beneficial effects of ondansetron in TNBS-induced colitis could be mediated by 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:27350767

  15. Adenosine A2A receptors and uric acid mediate protective effects of inosine against TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Rahimian, Reza; Fakhfouri, Gohar; Daneshmand, Ali; Mohammadi, Hamed; Bahremand, Arash; Rasouli, Mohammad Reza; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2010-12-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease comprises chronic recurrent inflammation of gastrointestinal tract. This study was conducted to investigate inosine, a potent immunomodulator, in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced chronic model of experimental colitis, and contribution of adenosine A(2A) receptors and the metabolite uric acid as possible underlying mechanisms. Experimental colitis was rendered in rats by a single colonic administration of 10 mg of TNBS. Inosine, potassium oxonate (a hepatic uricase inhibitor), SCH-442416 (a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist), inosine+potassium oxonate, or inosine+SCH-442416 were given twice daily for 7 successive days. At the end of experiment, macroscopic and histopathologic scores, colonic malondialdehyde (MDA), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) levels, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assessed. Plasma uric acid level was measured throughout the experiment. Both macroscopic and histological features of colonic injury were markedly ameliorated by either inosine, oxonate or inosine+oxonate. Likewise, the elevated amounts of MPO and MDA abated as well as those of TNF-α and IL-1β (P<0.05). SCH-442416 partially reversed the effect of inosine on theses markers, while inosine+oxonate showed a higher degree of protection than each treatment alone (P<.0.05). No significant difference was observed between TNBS and SCH-442416 groups. Uric acid levels were significantly higher in inosine or oxonate groups compared to control. Inosine+oxonate resulted in an even more elvelated uric acid level than each treatment alone (P<0.05). Inosine elicits notable anti-inflammatory effects on TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Uric acid and adenosine A(2A) receptors contribute to these salutary properties.

  16. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant activities of olmesartan medoxomil ameliorate experimental colitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nagib, Marwa M.; Tadros, Mariane G.; ELSayed, Moushira I.; Khalifa, Amani E.

    2013-08-15

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) driven through altered immune responses with production of proinflammatory cytokines. Many therapies are used, but side effects and loss of response limit long-term effectiveness. New therapeutic strategies are thus needed for patients who don't respond to current treatments. Recently, there is suggested involvement of the proinflammatory hormone angiotensin II in inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of olmesartan medoxomil (OLM-M), an angiotensin II receptor blocker in ameliorating ulcerative colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by administration of 5% dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) in drinking water for 5 days. OLM-M (1, 3 and 10 mg/kg) was administered orally during 21 days prior to the induction of colitis, and for 5 days after. Sulfasalazine (500 mg/kg) was used as reference drug. All animals were tested for changes in colon length, disease activity index (DAI) and microscopic damage. Colon tissue concentration/activity of tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α), myeloperoxidase (MPO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), reduced glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed. Results showed that the OLM-M dose-dependently ameliorated the colonic histopathological and biochemical injuries, an effect that is comparable or even better than that of the standard sulfasalazine. These results suggest that olmesartan medoxomil may be effective in the treatment of UC through its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. - Highlights: • Olmesartan medoximil reduced dextran sodium sulphate- induced colitis. • Mechanism involved anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects dose- dependently. • It suppressed malondialdehyde and restored reduced glutathione levels. • It reduced inflammatory markers levels and histological changes.

  17. Proanthocyanidins from grape seeds modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B signal transduction pathways in rats with TNBS-induced recurrent ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Ge, Bin; Yang, Xiao-Lai; Zhai, Jing; Yang, Li-Ning; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Xia; Shi, Jin-Cheng; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effects of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds (GSPE) on recurrent ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats. GSPE in doses of 100, 200, and 400mg/kg were intragastrically administered per day for 7 days after recurrent colitis was twice-induced by TNBS. The levels of GSH, as well as the activity of GSH-Px and SOD in colon tissues were measured by biochemical methods. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and the nuclear translocation levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the colon tissues were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. Western blotting analysis was used to determine the protein expression levels of inhibitory kappa B-alpha (IκBα), inhibitor kappa B kinase (IKKα/β), phosphorylated IκBα and phosphorylated IKKα/β. GSPE treatment was associated with a remarkable increased the activity of GSH-Px and SOD with GSH levels in TNBS-induced recurrent colitis rats as compared to the model group. GSPE also significantly reduced the expression levels of TNF-α, p-IKKα/β, p-IκBα and the translocation of NF-κB in the colon mucosa. GSPE exerted a protective effect on recurrent colitis in rats by modifying the inflammatory response and promoting damaged tissue repair to improve colonic oxidative stress. Moreover, GSPE inhibited the TNBS-induced inflammatory of recurrent colitis though blocking NF-κB signaling pathways.

  18. Enterohepatic circulation of bacterial chemotactic peptide in rats with experimental colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, C.H.; Butt, T.J.; Ferry, D.M.; Hunter, J.; Chadwick, V.S.; Broom, M.F.

    1988-04-01

    The association of hepatobiliary disorders with colonic inflammation is well recognized. Although the pathophysiology is obscure, increased permeation of toxic bacterial products across the inflamed gut to the portal circulation might be one mechanism. Potentially toxic metabolites include N-formylated chemotactic peptides that are produced by several species of intestinal bacteria and can be detected in colonic fluid in vivo. To investigate the metabolic fate of one of these low molecular weight proinflammatory peptides, N-formyl L-methionine L-leucine /sup 125/I-L-tyrosine was introduced into colon loops of healthy rats (n = 10) and rats with experimental colitis (n = 15) induced by rectal instillation of 15% (vol/vol) acetic acid. Gut, liver, and blood radioactivity were monitored by external gamma-counting and radioactivity in bile was measured by biliary catheter drainage into a well counter. Bile was processed by high-performance liquid chromatography to determine the amount of intact, bioactive peptide excreted over 3 h. After colonic instillation of 1 nmol of peptide, the mean (+/- SEM) biliary excretion of intact peptide was 6.4 +/- 2.0 pmol in normal rats and 49.0 +/- 20 pmol in rats with colitis (p less than 0.01). An enterohepatic circulation of synthetic N-formyl L-methionine L-leucine L-tyrosine has been demonstrated in the rat. Experimental colitis was associated with an eightfold increase in biliary excretion of this proinflammatory bacterial peptide. Proinflammatory bacterial peptides synthesized by colonic bacteria could be important in the pathophysiology of colon inflammation and its frequently associated hepatobiliary complications.

  19. The effect of chemically induced colitis, psychological stress and their combination on visceral pain in female Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Deiteren, Annemie; Vermeulen, Wim; Moreels, Tom G; Pelckmans, Paul A; De Man, Joris G; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2014-09-01

    Visceral sensitivity is of pathophysiological importance in abdominal pain disorders and can be modulated by inflammation and stress. However, it is unclear whether inflammation and stress alter visceral perception independently of each other or in conjunction through neuroendocrine interactions. Therefore, we compared the short- and long-term effects of experimental colitis and water avoidance stress (WAS), alone or in combination, on visceral sensitivity in female Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and colonoscopically confirmed. During WAS, rats were placed on a platform surrounded by water for 1 h. Visceral sensitivity was assessed by quantifying the visceromotor responses (VMRs) to colorectal distension. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis was determined by measuring serum corticosterone in a separate protocol. TNBS instillation resulted in overt colitis, associated with significant visceral hypersensitivity during the acute inflammatory phase (3 days post-TNBS; n = 8/group); after colitis had subsided (28 days post-TNBS), hypersensitivity was resolved (n = 4-8/group). Single WAS was associated with increased VMRs of a magnitude comparable to acute TNBS-induced hypersensitivity (n = 8/group). However, after repetitive WAS no significant hypersensitivity was present (n = 8/group). No additive effect of colitis and stress was seen on visceral pain perception (n = 6-8/group). Corticosterone levels were only increased in acute TNBS-colitis, acute WAS and their combination. To conclude, both colitis and stress successfully induced short-term visceral hypersensitivity and activated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, but long-term effects were absent. In addition, our current findings do not support an additive effect of colitis and stress on visceral sensitivity in female Wistar rats.

  20. Curcumin inhibits trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis in rats by activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Deng, Changsheng; Zheng, Jiaju; Xia, Jian; Sheng, Dan

    2006-08-01

    Curcumin is a widely used spice with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. It has been reported that curcumin held therapeutic effects on experimental colitis by inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB). The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) is a nuclear receptor with anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory effects and its activation may inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB. Several studies have shown that PPARgamma ligands had an important therapeutic effect in colitis. However there is no report about the alteration of PPARgamma in trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis treated with curcumin. In this study, we administered curcumin (30 mg/kg/day) by intraperitoneal injection immediately after colitis was induced and the injection lasted for two weeks. have evaluated the effects of curcumin on the colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS). Curcumin (30 mg/kg d) was administered by intraperitoneal just after colitis was induced and lasted for two weeks. Therapeutic effects of dexamethasone (Dex, 2 mg/kg d) alone and the combined effects of curcumin+Dex were also examined. We found that curcumin improved long-term survival rate of disease-bearing rats, promoted rat body weight recovery, and decreased macroscopic scores of the colitis. The expression levels of PPARgamma, 15-deoxy-D12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) were all increased, but the expression level of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was decreased in rats after administration of curcumin. Treatment with Dex improved PPARgamma expression and inhibited the expression of COX-2, 15d-PGJ(2) and PGE(2). Combined effects of curcumin+Dex were similar to that of Dex. In summary, curcumin showed therapeutic effects on TNBS-induced colitis and the mechanisms by which curcumin exerts its effects may involve activation of PPARgamma and its ligands.

  1. Cytokine networks in animal models of colitis-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Efstathios; Margonis, Georgios Antonios; Angelou, Anastasios; Zografos, George C; Pikoulis, Emmanouil

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) poses an increased, yet not definitely estimated, risk of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC), which is considered a more aggressive and distinct in both genetic and molecular levels clinical entity compared to sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). The present review discusses the cytokine networks involved in CAC-based translational findings from suitable animal models of the disease. Moreover, we summarize the most prominent data concerning the role of Th1, Th2, Th17 and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of CAC. Last, we briefly address the controversies between basic science findings in IBD and CAC and suggest further directions regarding research on cytokines. This review should serve as a primer for clinicians and surgeons to understand the rapidly evolving field of cytokines in the context of CAC. The MEDLINE database was thoroughly searched using the keywords: cytokines, colitis-associated cancer, animal models, carcinogenesis. Additional articles were gathered and evaluated. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Resveratrol abrogates adhesion molecules and protects against TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Dalaal M; Ismael, Naglaa R

    2011-11-01

    Resveratrol, a polyphenol compound with anti-inflammatory properties, has been previously evaluated for its beneficial effects in several ulcerative colitis models. However, the current study elucidates the effect of resveratrol on adhesion molecules, as well as its antioxidant efficacy in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced ulcerative-colitis model. Colitis was induced by rectal instillation of TNBS, followed by daily per os administration of either sulphasalazine (300 mg/kg) or resveratrol (2 and 10 mg/kg) for 7 days. Administration of resveratrol decreased the ulcerative area and colon mass index; these effects were further supported by the reduction in colon inflammation grades, as well as histolopathological changes, and reflected by the stalling of body mass loss. The anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol were indicated by lowered myeloperoxidase activity, and by suppressing ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels in the colon and serum. In addition, it restored a reduced colonic nitric oxide level and reinstated its redox balance, as evidenced by the suppression of lipid peroxides and prevention of glutathione depletion. The anti-ulcerative effect of the higher dose of resveratrol was comparable with those of sulphasalazine. The study confirms the anti-ulcerative effect of resveratrol in TNBS-induced experimental colitis via reduction of neutrophil infiltration, inhibition of adhesive molecules, and restoration of the nitric oxide level, as well as the redox status.

  3. Comparative Protective Effect of Hawthorn Berry Hydroalcoholic Extract, Atorvastatin, and Mesalamine on Experimentally Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shafie-Irannejad, Vahid; Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Tabatabaie, Seyed Hamed; Moshtaghion, Seyed-Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The protective effect of hydroalcoholic extract of hawthorn berries (HBE) on acetic acid (AA)–induced colitis in rats was investigated. Forty-two Wistar rats were divided into seven groups, including control and test groups (n=6). The control animals received saline, and the test animals were treated with saline (sham group), mesalamine (50 mg/kg; M group), atorvastatin (20 mg/kg; A group), HBE (100 mg/kg; H group), mesalamine and HBE (HM group), or atorvastatin plus HBE (HA group), 3 days before and a week after colitis induction. Colitis was induced by administration of 1 mL AA (4%) via a polyethylene catheter intrarectally. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses showed that HBE contained 0.13% and 0.5% oleanolic acid and ursolic acid, respectively. Elevated myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation were attenuated in the HA group. The H and HM groups showed marked reductions in colitis-induced decreases in total thiol molecules and body weight. The histopathological studies revealed that HBE decreased colitis-induced edema and infiltration of neutrophils. Our data suggest the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of HBE and atorvastatin protect against AA-induced colitis. The anti-inflammatory effect of HBE may be attributable to its ability to decrease myeloperoxidase activity as a biomarker of neutrophil infiltration. PMID:23875899

  4. The Effect of the iNOS Inhibitor S-Methylisothiourea and Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment on Radiation Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Demirci, H; Polat, Z; Uygun, A; Kadayifci, A; Sager, O; Oztutk, K; Sahiner, F; Caliskan, B; Karslioglu, Y; Ozler, M; Ozel, M; Ergun, H; Ozturk, O; Beyzadeoglu, M; Bagci, S

    2016-03-01

    External radiotherapy is one of the main treatment modalities for a variety of malignancies. However, the lower gastrointestinal tract is sensitive to the ionizing radiation. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HOT) has been suggested as a viable treatment for refractory radiation colitis, but the effect of S-Methylisothiourea (SMT) in the radiation colitis have not reported. To investigate the effect of SMT, HOT and the combination of both in an acute radiation-induced enterocolitis model. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into five equal groups. A single dose of gamma irradiation (25 Gy) was administered through the colorectal region to anesthetized rats. In the control group, we applied 2 ml of saline solution intraperitoneally for five days. In the HOT group, 100-per-cent oxygen at 2.5 atm pressure was applied for five days. In the SMT group, 10 mg/kg/day of SMT was applied intraperitoneally for five days. In the HOT+SMT group, HOT and SMT were both applied in the same dosages as in the preceding two groups. At the end of five days, the rats were sacrificed and colon samples were collected for histological grading. Blood samples were collected to test for : tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-1β, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA. The TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10 and TGF-β levels were reduced by SMT, HOT and HOT+SMT applications (p < 0.05). However ICAM-1 mRNA levels were not significantly lower (p:0.19). The microscopic scores differed significantly between the SMT, HOT and HOT+SMT groups and the control group. There was significant improvement histologically, especially in the HOT+SMT group. When we compared the weight of the rats before and after the study, weight loss was significantly lower in the SMT, HOT and HOT+SMT groups compared with the control group (p < 0.05). HOT and SMT together were significantly more effective in preventing weight loss and in

  5. Effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Hibiscus rosa sinensis Linn. leaves in experimental colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kandhare, Amit D; Raygude, Kiran S; Ghosh, Pinaki; Ghule, Arvindkumar E; Gosavi, Tejas P; Badole, Sachin L; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2012-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the ameliorative effect of hydroalcoholic extract of leaves of Hibiscus rosa sinensis (HRS) in acetic acid induced experimental colitis in male wistar rats. Methods The animals were administered with 2 mL acetic acid (4%) via intra rectal. The animals were divided into various treatment groups (n=6). Prednisolone was used as standard drug and HRS was administered at a dose of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. The control group of animals received 1 mL of vehicle (distilled water). Ulcer area, ulcer index, spleen weight, colon weight to length ratio, macroscopic score, haematological parameters, colonic superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO) and histological changes were recorded after the treatment regimen of 11 days. Results Intrarectal instillation of acetic acid caused enhanced ulcer area, ulcer index, spleen weight, colon weight to length ratio, colonic MPO, MDA, NO and TNF-α It caused significant decreased level of SOD and GSH. Pretreatment with HRS for 7 days exhibited significant effect in lowering of oxidative stress, colonic NO, TNF-α and elevation of SOD and GSH at a dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg in acetic acid induced colitis. Conclusions The present investigation demonstrates HRS is of potent therapeutic value in the amelioration of experimental colitis in laboratory animals by inhibiting the proinflammatory mediator like NO and TNF-α. PMID:23569927

  6. Effects of dexpanthenol on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cagin, Yasir Furkan; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Vardi, Nigar; Polat, Alaadin; Atayan, Yahya; Erdogan, Mehmet Ali; Tanbek, Kevser

    2016-01-01

    While the pathogenesis of acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis is unclear, reactive oxygen species are considered to have a significant effect. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the therapeutic potential of dexpanthenol (Dxp) on the amelioration of colitis in rats. Group I (n=8; control group) was intrarectally administered 1 ml saline solution (0.9%); group II [n=8; AA] was administered 4% AA into the colon via the rectum as a single dose for three consecutive days; group III (n=8; AA + Dxp) was administered AA at the same dosage as group II from day 4, and a single dose of Dxp was administered intraperitoneally; and group IV (n=8; Dxp) was administered Dxp similarly to Group III. Oxidative stress and colonic damage were assessed via biochemical and histologic examination methods. AA treatment led to an increase in oxidative parameters and a decrease in antioxidant systems. Histopathological examination showed that AA treatment caused tissue injury and increased caspase-3 activity in the distal colon and triggered apoptosis. Dxp treatment caused biochemical and histopathological improvements, indicating that Dxp may have an anti-oxidant effect in colitis; therefore, Dxp may be a potential therapeutic agent for the amelioration of IBD. PMID:27882101

  7. Effects of dexpanthenol on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cagin, Yasir Furkan; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Vardi, Nigar; Polat, Alaadin; Atayan, Yahya; Erdogan, Mehmet Ali; Tanbek, Kevser

    2016-11-01

    While the pathogenesis of acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis is unclear, reactive oxygen species are considered to have a significant effect. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the therapeutic potential of dexpanthenol (Dxp) on the amelioration of colitis in rats. Group I (n=8; control group) was intrarectally administered 1 ml saline solution (0.9%); group II [n=8; AA] was administered 4% AA into the colon via the rectum as a single dose for three consecutive days; group III (n=8; AA + Dxp) was administered AA at the same dosage as group II from day 4, and a single dose of Dxp was administered intraperitoneally; and group IV (n=8; Dxp) was administered Dxp similarly to Group III. Oxidative stress and colonic damage were assessed via biochemical and histologic examination methods. AA treatment led to an increase in oxidative parameters and a decrease in antioxidant systems. Histopathological examination showed that AA treatment caused tissue injury and increased caspase-3 activity in the distal colon and triggered apoptosis. Dxp treatment caused biochemical and histopathological improvements, indicating that Dxp may have an anti-oxidant effect in colitis; therefore, Dxp may be a potential therapeutic agent for the amelioration of IBD.

  8. The effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol alone and in combination on damage, inflammation and in vitro motility disturbances in rat colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jamontt, JM; Molleman, A; Pertwee, RG; Parsons, ME

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cannabis is taken as self-medication by patients with inflammatory bowel disease for symptomatic relief. Cannabinoid receptor agonists decrease inflammation in animal models of colitis, but their effects on the disturbed motility is not known. (-)-Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown to interact with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in behavioural studies, but it remains to be established if these cannabinoids interact in vivo in inflammatory disorders. Therefore the effects of CBD and THC alone and in combination were investigated in a model of colitis. Experimental approach: The 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) model of acute colitis in rats was used to assess damage, inflammation (myeloperoxidase activity) and in vitro colonic motility. Sulphasalazine was used as an active control drug. Key results: Sulphasalazine, THC and CBD proved beneficial in this model of colitis with the dose–response relationship for the phytocannabinoids showing a bell-shaped pattern on the majority of parameters (optimal THC and CBD dose, 10 mg·kg−1). THC was the most effective drug. The effects of these phytocannabinoids were additive, and CBD increased some effects of an ineffective THC dose to the level of an effective one. THC alone and in combination with CBD protected cholinergic nerves whereas sulphasalazine did not. Conclusions and implications: In this model of colitis, THC and CBD not only reduced inflammation but also lowered the occurrence of functional disturbances. Moreover the combination of CBD and THC could be beneficial therapeutically, via additive or potentiating effects. This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids. To view the editorial for this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00831.x PMID:20590574

  9. Preventive effect of the microalga Chlamydomonas debaryana on the acute phase of experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Avila-Román, Javier; Talero, Elena; Alcaide, Antonio; Reyes, Carolina de Los; Zubía, Eva; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Motilva, Virginia

    2014-10-14

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterised by chronic uncontrolled inflammation of intestinal mucosa. Diet and nutritional factors have emerged as possible interventions for IBD. Microalgae are rich sources of n-3 PUFA and derived oxylipins. Oxylipins are lipid mediators involved in the resolution of many inflammatory disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of the oxylipin-containing biomass of the microalga Chlamydomonas debaryana and its major oxylipin constituent, (9Z,11E,13S,15Z)-13-hydroxyoctadeca-9,11,15-trienoic acid ((13S)-HOTE), on acute 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Lyophilised microalgal biomass and (13S)-HOTE were administered by oral route 48, 24 and 1 h before the induction of colitis and 24 h later, and the rats were killed after 48 h. The treatment with the lyophilised microalga and (13S)-HOTE improved body-weight loss and colon shortening, as well as attenuated the extent of colonic damage and increased mucus production. Cellular neutrophil infiltration, with the subsequent increase in myeloperoxidase levels induced by TNBS, were also reduced after the administration of the lyophilised microalga or (13S)-HOTE. The anti-inflammatory effects of these treatments were confirmed by the inhibition of colonic TNF-α production. Moreover, lyophilised microalga or (13S)-HOTE down-regulated cyclo-oxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression. The present study was the first to show the prophylactic effects of a lyophilised biomass sample of the microalga C. debaryana and the oxylipin (13S)-HOTE on TNBS-induced acute colitis in rats. Our findings suggest that the microalga C. debaryana or derived oxylipins could be used as nutraceuticals in the treatment of the active phase of IBD.

  10. Moxibustion regulates inflammatory mediators and colonic mucosal barrier in ulcerative colitis rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tie-Ming; Xu, Na; Ma, Xian-De; Bai, Zeng-Hua; Tao, Xing; Yan, Hong-Chi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To observe the efficacy and mechanism of grain-sized moxibustion at different acupoints in a rat model of ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control, UC model, grain-sized moxibustion at a single acupoint (CV 12), grain-sized moxibustion at two acupoints (CV 12 and CV 4), grain-sized moxibustion at three acupoints (CV 12, CV 4, and ST 36), and medication groups (n = 8/group). The UC model was established by enema of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Direct moxibustion was used once a day for 7 d. Disease activity index (DAI) was evaluated before and after the treatment. Morphologic changes of intestinal tissue were observed under an optical microscope. The expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) in colonic tissue was detected using Western blot, and the levels of occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) mRNAs were detected using reverse transcription PCR. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the intestinal mucosae were incomplete in the model group, glandular structures were irregular, and submucosae were edematous, hyperemic, and infiltrated with inflammatory cells. The DAI scores and expression of TNF-α and p38MAPK were increased significantly in the model group compared to controls (Ps < 0.01), while the mRNA levels of occludin and ZO-1 were reduced significantly (Ps < 0.01). Compared with the model group, colonic mucosa and the arrangement of glands were complete and regular in the treatment groups. DAI scores and the expression of TNF-α and p38MAPK were reduced significantly in moxibustion groups compared to controls (Ps < 0.01), while the mRNA levels of occludin and ZO-1 were increased significantly (Ps < 0.01). The improvements in the above indices in the three acupoints group and the medication group were superior to those in the single and two acupoints groups (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Reduction of TNF-α and p38MAPK and increased expression of

  11. Bacteria penetrate the normally impenetrable inner colon mucus layer in both murine colitis models and patients with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Malin E V; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica; Jabbar, Karolina S; Xia, Lijun; Xu, Hua; Ghishan, Fayez K; Carvalho, Frederic A; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Sjövall, Henrik; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2014-02-01

    The inner mucus layer in mouse colon normally separates bacteria from the epithelium. Do humans have a similar inner mucus layer and are defects in this mucus layer a common denominator for spontaneous colitis in mice models and ulcerative colitis (UC)? The colon mucus layer from mice deficient in Muc2 mucin, Core 1 O-glycans, Tlr5, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Slc9a3 (Nhe3) together with that from dextran sodium sulfate-treated mice was immunostained for Muc2, and bacterial localisation in the mucus was analysed. All murine colitis models revealed bacteria in contact with the epithelium. Additional analysis of the less inflamed IL-10(-/-) mice revealed a thicker mucus layer than wild-type, but the properties were different, as the inner mucus layer could be penetrated both by bacteria in vivo and by fluorescent beads the size of bacteria ex vivo. Clear separation between bacteria or fluorescent beads and the epithelium mediated by the inner mucus layer was also evident in normal human sigmoid colon biopsy samples. In contrast, mucus on colon biopsy specimens from patients with UC with acute inflammation was highly penetrable. Most patients with UC in remission had an impenetrable mucus layer similar to that of controls. Normal human sigmoid colon has an inner mucus layer that is impenetrable to bacteria. The colon mucus in animal models that spontaneously develop colitis and in patients with active UC allows bacteria to penetrate and reach the epithelium. Thus colon mucus properties can be modulated, and this suggests a novel model of UC pathophysiology.

  12. Bacteria penetrate the normally impenetrable inner colon mucus layer in both murine colitis models and patients with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Malin E V; Gustafsson, Jenny K; Holmén-Larsson, Jessica; Jabbar, Karolina S; Xia, Lijun; Xu, Hua; Ghishan, Fayez K; Carvalho, Frederic A; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Sjövall, Henrik; Hansson, Gunnar C

    2014-01-01

    Objective The inner mucus layer in mouse colon normally separates bacteria from the epithelium. Do humans have a similar inner mucus layer and are defects in this mucus layer a common denominator for spontaneous colitis in mice models and ulcerative colitis (UC)? Methods and results The colon mucus layer from mice deficient in Muc2 mucin, Core 1 O-glycans, Tlr5, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Slc9a3 (Nhe3) together with that from dextran sodium sulfate-treated mice was immunostained for Muc2, and bacterial localisation in the mucus was analysed. All murine colitis models revealed bacteria in contact with the epithelium. Additional analysis of the less inflamed IL-10−/− mice revealed a thicker mucus layer than wild-type, but the properties were different, as the inner mucus layer could be penetrated both by bacteria in vivo and by fluorescent beads the size of bacteria ex vivo. Clear separation between bacteria or fluorescent beads and the epithelium mediated by the inner mucus layer was also evident in normal human sigmoid colon biopsy samples. In contrast, mucus on colon biopsy specimens from patients with UC with acute inflammation was highly penetrable. Most patients with UC in remission had an impenetrable mucus layer similar to that of controls. Conclusions Normal human sigmoid colon has an inner mucus layer that is impenetrable to bacteria. The colon mucus in animal models that spontaneously develop colitis and in patients with active UC allows bacteria to penetrate and reach the epithelium. Thus colon mucus properties can be modulated, and this suggests a novel model of UC pathophysiology. PMID:23426893

  13. Protective effect of melatonin on myenteric neuron damage in experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Shang, Boxin; Shi, Haitao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Xiaoyan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Yan; Dong, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation of the colon in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) causes pain and altered motility, at least in part through the damage of the myenteric neurons (MNs). Thus, it is important to evaluate new drugs for UC treatment that could also protect myenteric neurons efficiently. As a well-known neural protective and anti-inflammatory agent, melatonin could protect neurons from damage through the activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and antioxidant responsive element (Nrf2-ARE) signaling pathway. Therefore, we investigated the potential protective effect of melatonin against MN damage during colitis induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) in rats. Colitis was induced by intracolonic (i.c.) instillation of DNBS and treated with melatonin at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg for 4 days. The damage of MN in the left colon was immunohistochemically evaluated in different groups. Ulcerations and inflammation in the colon were semiquantitatively observed. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were detected to evaluate the inflammatory and oxidative stress status. The protein and mRNA expressions of Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the colon were detected by Western blot and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), respectively. Melatonin partially prevented the loss of MN and alleviated the inflammation and oxidative stress induced by DNBS. In addition, melatonin markedly increased the Nrf2 and HO-1 level in the colitis. These results indicate that melatonin protects MN from damage by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress, effects that are partly mediated by the Nrf2-ARE pathway.

  14. Effect of traditional Chinese medicinal enemas on ulcerative colitis of rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song-Ming; Tong, Hong-Bin; Bai, Lian-Song; Yang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of traditional Chinese medicinal enema (TCME) on inflammatory and immune response of colonic mucosa of rats with ulcerative colitis (UC), and to observe the pathogenic mechanism. METHODS: Thirty UC rats, induced by intestinal enema together with 2.4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) and acetic acid, were randomly divided into 3 groups, i.e., G I, G II and G III. Groups G I and G II were administered with TCME and salazosulfapyridine enema (SASPE), respectively. Group G III was clystered with only normal saline (NSE), served as control. Group G IV was taken from normal rats as reference, once daily, from the 7th day after the establishment of UC for total 28 d. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the colonic mucosa was assayed by 3H-TdR incorporation assay. Colonic mucosal lymphocyte subpopulation adhesive molecules, CD4+CD11a+, CD4+CD18+, CD8+CD11a+, CD8+CD18+ (LSAM), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, the expression of TNF-α mRNA and IFN-γ mRNA in colonic mucosa were detected by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: Before therapies, in model groups, G I, G II and G III, levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, CD8+CD11a+ and CD8+CD18+ were significantly different (38.29 ± 2.61 U/mL, 16.54 ± 1.23 ng/L, 8.61 ± 0.89 ng/L, 13.51% ± 2.31% and 12.22% ± 1.13%, respectively) compared to those in G IV group (31.56 ± 2.47 U/mL, 12.81 ± 1.38 ng/L, 5.28 ± 0.56 ng/L, 16.68% ± 1.41% and 16.79% ± 1.11%, respectively). After therapeutic enemas, in G I group, the contents of IL-6 (32.48 ± 2.53 U/m), TNF-α (13.42 ± 1.57 ng/L) and IFN-γ (5.87 ± 0.84 ng/L) were reduced; then, the contents of CD8+CD11a+ (16.01% ± 1.05 %) and CD8+CD18+ (16.28% ± 0.19%) were raised. There was no significant difference between groups G I and G IV, but the difference between groups G I and G II was quite obvious (P < 0.05). The expressions of TNF-α mRNA and IFN-γ mRNA in group G

  15. Anti-inflammatory intestinal activity of Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae) in TNBS colitis model.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Ana Beatriz Albino; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Martín, Antonio Ramón; Luiz-Ferreira, Anderson; Trigo, José Roberto; Vilegas, Wagner; dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; Souza-Brito, Alba Regina Monteiro; de la Lastra, Catalina Alarcón

    2013-03-07

    In Brazilian traditional medicine, Arctium lappa (Asteraceae), has been reported to relieve gastrointestinal symptoms. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the lactone sesquiterpene onopordopicrin enriched fraction (ONP fraction) from Arctium lappa in an experimental colitis model induced by 2,4,6 trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and performed experiments to elucidate the underlying action mechanisms involved in that effect. ONP fraction (25 and 50 mg/kg/day) was orally administered 48, 24 and 1 h prior to the induction of colitis and 24 h after. The inflammatory response was assessed by gross appearance, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels and a histological study of the lesions. We determined cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 protein expressions by western blotting and immunohistochemistry assays. TNBS group was characterized by increased colonic wall thickness, edema, diffuse inflammatory cell infiltration, increased MPO activity and TNF-α levels. On the contrary, ONP fraction (25 and 50 mg/kg) treatment significantly reduced the macroscopic inflammation scores (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively) and morphological alterations associated with an increase in the mucus secretion. Similarly, the degree of neutrophil infiltration and the cytokine levels were significantly ameliorated. Moreover, COX-2 expression was up regulated in TNBS-treated rats. In contrast, ONP fraction (50 mg/kg) administration reduced COX-2 overexpression. We have shown that the ONP fraction obtained from Arctium lappa exert marked protective effects in acute experimental colitis, confirming and justifying, at least in part, the popular use of this plant to treat gastrointestinal diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SPECT-computed tomography in rats with TNBS-induced colitis: A first step toward functional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Marion-Letellier, Rachel; Bohn, Pierre; Modzelewski, Romain; Vera, Pierre; Aziz, Moutaz; Guérin, Charlène; Savoye, Guillaume; Savoye-Collet, Céline

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the feasibility of SPECT-computed tomography (CT) in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced acute colitis and confront it with model inflammatory characteristics. METHODS Colitis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intrarectal injection of TNBS (n = 10) while controls received vehicle (n = 10). SPECT-CT with intravenous injection of 10 MBq of 67Ga-Citrate was performed at day 2. SPECT-CT criteria were colon wall thickness and maximal wall signal intensity. Laboratory parameters were assessed: colon weight:length ratio, colon cyclooxygenase-2 expression by western blot and histological inflammatory score. RESULTS Colon weight/length ratio, colon COX-2 expression and histological inflammatory score were significantly higher in the TNBS group than in the control group (P = 0.0296, P < 0.0001, P = 0.0007 respectively). Pixel max tend to be higher in the TNBS group than in the control group but did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.0662). Maximal thickness is significantly increased in the TNBS group compared to the control group (P = 0.0016) while colon diameter is not (P = 0.1904). Maximal thickness and colon diameter were correlated to colon COX-2 expression (P = 0.0093, P = 0.009 respectively) while pixel max was not (P = 0.22). Maximal thickness was significantly increased when inflammation was histologically observed (P = 0.0043) while pixel max and colon diameter did not (P = 0.2452, P = 0.3541, respectively). CONCLUSION SPECT-CT is feasible and easily distinguished control from colitic rats. PMID:28127195

  17. Inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides have divergent effects on colitis and commensal microbiota in HLA-B27 transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Koleva, Petya T; Valcheva, Rosica S; Sun, Xu; Gänzle, Michael G; Dieleman, Levinus A

    2012-11-14

    Modulation of intestinal microbiota by non-digestible carbohydrates may reduce inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of inulin and fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) on intestinal microbiota and colitis in HLA-B27 transgenic rats, a well-validated rodent model for IBD. In this study, 4-week-old rats were fed 8 g/kg body weight inulin or FOS for 12 weeks, or not. Faeces were collected at 4 and 16 weeks of age; and caecal samples were collected at necropsy. The effects of inulin and FOS on chronic intestinal inflammation were assessed using a gross gut score, histology score and levels of mucosal IL-1β. Intestinal microbiota were characterised by quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Colitis was significantly reduced in all FOS-fed rats compared to the control diet, whereas inulin decreased chronic intestinal inflammation in only half the number of animals. Quantitative analysis of caecal microbiota demonstrated that inulin increased the numbers of total bacteria and the Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas group, FOS increased bifidobacteria, and both fructans decreased Clostridium cluster XI. In the faecal samples, both inulin and FOS decreased total bacteria, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas group, and Clostridium clusters XI and XIVa. FOS increased Bifidobacterium spp., and mediated a decrease of gene copies of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium difficile toxin B in faeces. SCFA concentrations in the faecal and caecal samples were unaffected by the diets. In conclusion, FOS increased the abundance of Bifidobacterium spp., whereas both fructans reduced Clostridium cluster XI and C. difficile toxin gene expression, correlating with a reduction of chronic intestinal inflammation.

  18. The effect of Saccharomyces boulardii on human colon cells and inflammation in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Youn Wha; Chi, Sung-Gil; Joo, Yeong-Shil; Kim, Hyo Jong

    2009-02-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) has beneficial effects in the treatment of intestinal inflammation; however, little is known about the mechanisms by which these effects occur. We investigated the effects of S. boulardii on the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), using human HT-29 colonocytes and a rat model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. The effect of S. boulardii on gene expression was assessed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Northern blot and Western blot assays. Pharmacological inhibitors for various signaling pathways were used to determine the signaling pathways implicated in the S. boulardii regulation of PPAR-gamma and IL-8. We found that S. boulardii up-regulated and down-regulated PPAR-gamma and IL-8 expression at the transcription level, both in vitro and in vivo (P < 0.05, respectively). Saccharomyces boulardii blocked tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) regulation of PPAR-gamma and IL-8 through disruption of TNF-alpha-mediated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation. Furthermore, S. boulardii suppressed colitis and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes in vivo (P < 0.05, respectively). Our study demonstrated that S. boulardii reduces colonic inflammation and regulates inflammatory gene expression.

  19. Effect of royal jelly on experimental colitis induced by acetic acid and alteration of mast cell distribution in the colon of rats

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, T.; Bayiroglu, F.; Yoruk, M.; Kaya, M.S.; Uslu, S.; Comba, B.; Mis, L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of royal jelly (RJ) on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Twenty adult female Wistar albino rats were divided into four treatment groups of 5 animals each, including a control group (Group I); Group II was treated orally with RJ (150 mg kg−1 body weight); Group III had acetic acid-induced colitis; and Group IV had acetic acid-induced colitis treated orally with RJ (150 mg kg−1 body weight) for 4 weeks. Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 4% acetic acid; the control group received physiological saline (10 mL kg−1). Colon samples were obtained under deep anaesthesia from animals in all groups. Tissues were fixed in 10% formalin neutral buffer solution for 24 h and embedded in paraffin. Six-micrometre-thick sections were stained with Mallory’s triple stain and toluidine blue in 1% aqueous solution at pH 1.0 for 5 min (for Mast Cells). RJ was shown to protect the colonic mucosa against the injurious effect of acetic acid. Colitis (colonic damage) was confirmed histomorphometrically as significant increases in the number of mast cells (MC) and colonic erosions in rats with acetic acid-induced colitis. The RJ treatment significantly decreased the number of MC and reduced the area of colonic erosion in the colon of RJ-treated rats compared with rats with untreated colitis. The results suggest that oral treatment with RJ could be used to treat colitis. PMID:21263740

  20. Dietary medium-chain triglycerides prevent chemically induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki; Ishii, Kenichi; Hosomura, Naohiro; Ogiku, Masahito

    2010-03-01

    The effects of dietary medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) on experimental colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) were investigated in rats. Male Wistar rats were given an intracolonic injection of TNBS and were then fed liquid diets containing MCTs or corn oil (AIN93) as controls. Serum and tissue samples were collected 1 week after TNBS enema. The severity of colitis was evaluated pathologically, and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured. Furthermore, messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels for inflammatory cytokines and a chemokine were assessed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. In another set of experiments, the protein expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 in the colon was measured 1 week after feeding of liquid diets. To investigate the effects of MCTs on macrophages, RAW246.7 macrophages were incubated with media containing albumin conjugated with MCT or linoleic acid, which is the major component of corn oil. Then, the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was measured. Dietary MCTs blunted significantly the protein levels of TLR-4 in the colon. Furthermore, the expression of TLR-4 was significantly blunted in RAW264.7 cells incubated with MCTs compared with cells incubated with linoleic acid. Induction of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), TNF-alpha, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in the colon was attenuated by dietary MCT. Furthermore, MPO activities in the colonic tissue were significantly blunted in animals fed the MCT diets compared with those fed the control diets. As a result, dietary MCTs improved chemically induced colitis significantly. MCTs most likely are useful for the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease as an anti-inflammatory immunomodulating nutrient.

  1. Role of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in visceral hypersensitivity to colorectal distension during experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Wim; De Man, Joris G; De Schepper, Heiko U; Bult, Hidde; Moreels, Tom G; Pelckmans, Paul A; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2013-01-05

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptor antagonists and their synergism on the visceromotor responses during experimental colitis in rats. Colitis was induced in rats by a TNBS/ethanol enema at day 0 and was assessed at day 3 using endoscopy, histology and a myeloperoxidase assay. The visceromotor response to colorectal distension (10-80 mmHg) was evaluated in conscious rats before (control condition) and 3 days after 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) administration (colitis condition). At day 3, visceromotor responses were assessed before and after treatment with a TRPV1 (BCTC) or TRPA1 (TCS-5861528) receptor antagonist either alone or in combination and either after intraperitoneal or intrathecal administration. Endoscopy, microscopy and myeloperoxidase activity indicated severe colonic tissue damage 3 days after TNBS administration. Colorectal distension-evoked visceromotor responses demonstrated a 2.9-fold increase during acute colitis (day 3) compared to control conditions. Intraperitoneal and intrathecal administration of BCTC or TCS-5861528 partially reversed the colitis-induced increase in visceromotor responses compared to control conditions (P<0.05). Intraperitoneal blockade of TRPA1 plus TRPV1 further decreased the enhanced visceromotor responses at high distension pressures (40-80 mmHg) compared to blockade of either TRPV1 or TRPA1 alone. This synergistic effect was not seen after combined intrathecal blockade of TRPA1 plus TRPV1. The present study demonstrates that in the rat, TRPV1 and TRPA1 play a pivotal role in visceral hypersensitivity at the peripheral and spinal cord level during acute TNBS colitis. Target interaction, however, is presumably mediated via a peripheral site of action.

  2. Effect of Coriandrum sativum hydroalcoholic extract and its essential oil on acetic acid- induced acute colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Bahareh; Sajjadi, Seyed Ebrahim; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the protective effects of Coriandrum sativum on acetic acid-inducedcolitis in rats. C. sativum (Coriander) has long been used in Iranian traditional medicine and its use as an anti-inflammatory agent is still common in some herbal formulations. Colitis was induced by intra-rectal administration of 2ml acetic acid 4% in fasted male Wistar rats. Treatment was carried out using three increasing doses of extract (250, 500, 1000 mg/kg) and essential oil (0.25, 0.5, 1 ml/kg) of coriander started 2 h before colitis induction and continued for a five-day period. Colon biopsies were taken for weighting, macroscopic scoring of injured tissue, histopathological examination and measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Colon weight was decreased in the groups treated with extract (500 and 1000 mg/kg) and essential oil (0.5 ml/kg) compared to the control group. Regarding MPO levels, ulcer severity and area as well as the total colitis index, same results indicating meaningful alleviation of colitis was achieved after treatment with oral extract and essential oil. Since the present experiment was made by oral fractions of coriander thus the resulting effects could be due to both the absorption of the active ingredients and/or the effect of non-absorbable materials on colitis after reaching the colon. In this regard, we propose more toxicological and clinical experiments to warranty its beneficial application in human inflammatory bowel diseases.

  3. Multivariate Modeling Identifies Neutrophil- and Th17-Related Factors as Differential Serum Biomarkers of Chronic Murine Colitis

    PubMed Central

    McBee, Megan E.; Zeng, Yu; Parry, Nicola; Nagler, Cathryn R.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of chronic intestinal inflammation, which characterizes inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), along with prediction of disease state is hindered by the availability of predictive serum biomarker. Serum biomarkers predictive of disease state will improve trials for therapeutic intervention, and disease monitoring, particularly in genetically susceptible individuals. Chronic inflammation during IBD is considered distinct from infectious intestinal inflammation thereby requiring biomarkers to provide differential diagnosis. To address whether differential serum biomarkers could be identified in murine models of colitis, immunological profiles from both chronic spontaneous and acute infectious colitis were compared and predictive serum biomarkers identified via multivariate modeling. Methodology/Principal Findings Discriminatory multivariate modeling of 23 cytokines plus chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine (protein adducts from reactive nitrogen species and hypochlorite) in serum and tissue from two murine models of colitis was performed to identify disease-associated biomarkers. Acute C. rodentium-induced colitis in C57BL/6J mice and chronic spontaneous Helicobacter-dependent colitis in TLR4−/− x IL-10−/− mice were utilized for evaluation. Colon profiles of both colitis models were nearly identical with chemokines, neutrophil- and Th17-related factors highly associated with intestinal disease. In acute colitis, discriminatory disease-associated serum factors were not those identified in the colon. In contrast, the discriminatory predictive serum factors for chronic colitis were neutrophil- and Th17-related factors (KC, IL-12/23p40, IL-17, G-CSF, and chlorotyrosine) that were also elevated in colon tissue. Chronic colitis serum biomarkers were specific to chronic colitis as they were not discriminatory for acute colitis. Conclusions/Significance Immunological profiling revealed strikingly similar colon profiles, yet distinctly different serum

  4. Dual effect of chronic nicotine administration: augmentation of jejunitis and amelioration of colitis induced by iodoacetamide in rats.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, R; Karmeli, F; Cohen, P; Heyman, S N; Rachmilewitz, D

    2001-02-01

    Smoking has a dichotomous effect on inflammatory bowel disease, ameliorating disease activity in ulcerative colitis but having a deleterious effect on Crohn's disease. This effect is thought to be due to nicotine. We investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on the small and large bowel in iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis and colitis. Jejunitis was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intrajejunal administration of 0.1 ml 2% iodoacetamide and colitis by intrarectal administration of 0.1 ml 3% iodoacetamide. Nicotine was dissolved in drinking water (12.5 or 250 micrograms/ml), rats drinking ad libitum. Nicotine administration started 10 days prior to damage induction and throughout the experiment and had no effect on weight gain or daily food intake of rats. Rats were killed 5 days after iodoacetamide-induced colitis and 7 days after induction of jejunitis. The jejunum and colon were resected, rinsed, weighed, damage assessed macroscopically and microscopically and tissue processed for myeloperoxidase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activities and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) generation. Effects of nicotine on gut microcirculation were also assessed. Nicotine by itself caused no damage to the colon. Nicotine had a dichotomous effect on jejunitis and colitis. At a dose of 12.5 micrograms/ml nicotine improved the macroscopic damage of colitis from 252 +/- 66 to 70 +/- 31 mm2, and segmental weight also declined significantly in the colon (from 1.7 +/- 0.2 to 1.2 +/- 0.1 g/10 cm). In contrast, the same dose of nicotine had a deleterious effect on iodoacetamide-induced jejunitis, increasing the macroscopic damage from 368 +/- 38 to 460 +/- 97 mm2 in rats treated with injury escalating to 970 +/- 147 in rats treated with 250 micrograms/ml nicotine. Nicotine treatment also significantly increased jejunal segmental weight. By itself nicotine did not change NOS activity or PGE2 generation compared to control rats, but it enhanced microcirculation in the colon

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of Mangifera indica L. extract in a model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Lucía; Pérez-Nievas, Beatriz G; Gárate, Icíar; García-Bueno, Borja; Madrigal, José LM; Menchén, Luis; Garrido, Gabino; Leza, Juan C

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of aqueous extract from Mangifera indica L. (MIE) on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in rats. METHODS: MIE (150 mg/kg) was administered in two different protocols: (1) rectally, over 7 d at the same time as DSS administration; and (2) once daily over 14 d (by oral gavage, 7 d before starting DSS, and rectally for 7 d during DSS administration). General observations of clinical signs were performed. Anti-inflammatory activity of MIE was assessed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Colonic lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, expression of inflammatory related mediators [inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, respectively] and cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and TNF receptors 1 and 2] in colonic tissue were also assessed. Interleukin (IL)-6 and TNF-α serum levels were also measured. RESULTS: The results demonstrated that MIE has anti-inflammatory properties by improvement of clinical signs, reduction of ulceration and reduced MPO activity when administered before DSS. In addition, administration of MIE for 14 d resulted in an increase in GSH and reduction of TBARS levels and iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α and TNF R-2 expression in colonic tissue, and a decrease in IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels. CONCLUSION: MIE has anti-inflammatory activity in a DSS-induced rat colitis model and preventive administration (prior to DSS) seems to be a more effective protocol. PMID:20954278

  6. Protective effects of Pogostemon cablin Bentham water extract on inflammatory cytokine expression in TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Young; Neupane, Ganesh Prasad; Lee, Sung Ok; Lee, Jong Suk; Kim, Mi-Young; Kim, Sun Yeou; Park, Byung Chul; Park, Young-Joon; Kim, Jung-Ae

    2014-02-01

    In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), colon epithelial cells express a variety of inflammatory mediators, including chemokines, which perpetuate inflammatory response. In the current study, we report that water extract of Pogostemon cablin Bentham aerial parts (PCW), which has traditionally been used for treatment of the common cold and infectious disease, suppressed colon inflammation. Treatment with PCW resulted in effective inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to HT-29 human colonic epithelial cells. In a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat model of IBD, PCW suppressed clinical signs of colitis, including weight loss, colon tissue myeloperoxidase activity, a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration, and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PCW suppressed TNBS-induced mRNA expression of IL-8, MCP-1, and IL-6 in rat colon. The nuclear level of NF-κB in TNBS-treated rat colon and NF-κB luciferase reporter gene activity in TNF-α-treated HT-29 cells were significantly inhibited by PCW. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that PCW suppressed colon inflammation via suppression of NF-κB-dependent expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  7. DNBS/TNBS colitis models: providing insights into inflammatory bowel disease and effects of dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Morampudi, Vijay; Bhinder, Ganive; Wu, Xiujuan; Dai, Chuanbin; Sham, Ho Pan; Vallance, Bruce A; Jacobson, Kevan

    2014-02-27

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD), including Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, have long been associated with a genetic basis, and more recently host immune responses to microbial and environmental agents. Dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis allows one to study the pathogenesis of IBD associated environmental triggers such as stress and diet, the effects of potential therapies, and the mechanisms underlying intestinal inflammation and mucosal injury. In this paper, we investigated the effects of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids on the colonic mucosal inflammatory response to DNBS-induced colitis in rats. All rats were fed identical diets with the exception of different types of fatty acids [safflower oil (SO), canola oil (CO), or fish oil (FO)] for three weeks prior to exposure to intrarectal DNBS. Control rats given intrarectal ethanol continued gaining weight over the 5 day study, whereas, DNBS-treated rats fed lipid diets all lost weight with FO and CO fed rats demonstrating significant weight loss by 48 hr and rats fed SO by 72 hr. Weight gain resumed after 72 hr post DNBS, and by 5 days post DNBS, the FO group had a higher body weight than SO or CO groups. Colonic sections collected 5 days post DNBS-treatment showed focal ulceration, crypt destruction, goblet cell depletion, and mucosal infiltration of both acute and chronic inflammatory cells that differed in severity among diet groups. The SO fed group showed the most severe damage followed by the CO, and FO fed groups that showed the mildest degree of tissue injury. Similarly, colonic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, a marker of neutrophil activity was significantly higher in SO followed by CO fed rats, with FO fed rats having significantly lower MPO activity. These results demonstrate the use of DNBS-induced colitis, as outlined in this protocol, to determine the impact of diet in the pathogenesis of IBD.

  8. Establishing the colitis-associated cancer progression mouse models.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiming; Lu, Zhanjun; Wang, Ruhua; Chen, Niwei; Zheng, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been reported as an important inducer of colorectal cancer (CRC). The most malignant IBD-associated CRC type has been highlighted as colitis-associated cancer (CAC). However, lack of CAC cases and difficulties of the long follow-up research have challenged researchers in molecular mechanism probing. Here, we established pre-CAC mouse models (dextran sulfate sodium [DSS] group and azoxymethane [AOM] group) and CAC mouse model (DSS/AOM group) to mimic human CAC development through singly or combinational treatment with DSS and AOM followed by disease activity index analysis. We found that these CAC mice showed much more severe disease phenotype, including serious diarrhea, body weight loss, rectal prolapse and bleeding, bloody stool, tumor burden, and bad survival. By detecting expression patterns of several therapeutic targets-Apc, p53, Kras, and TNF-α-in these mouse models through western blot, histology analysis, qRT-PCR, and ELISA methods, we found that the oncogene Kras expression remained unchanged, while the tumor suppressors-Apc and p53 expression were both significantly downregulated with malignancy progression from pre-CAC to CAC, and TNF-α level was elevated the most in CAC mice blood which is of potential clinical use. These data indicated the successful establishment of CAC development mouse models, which mimics human CAC well both in disease phenotype and molecular level, and highlighted the promoting role of inflammation in CAC progression. This useful tool will facilitate the further study in CAC molecular mechanism.

  9. Efficacy of use of colonoscopy in dextran sulfate sodium induced ulcerative colitis in rats: the evaluation of the effects of antioxidant by colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, B O; Ko, K H; Oh, T Y; Cho, H; Kim, W B; Lee, K J; Cho, S W; Hahm, K B

    2001-06-01

    The goals in developing animal models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are to determine the underlying mechanisms and the action of currently available drugs and to evaluate the value of new therapeutic approaches. Because of the difficulty in determining the severity of colitis in living animals, it has been necessary to kill the experimental animals at varying stages in the studies. If colonoscopic evaluation or endoscopic biopsy is feasible in these experimental animals, continuous observations could be possible, thus avoiding the need to kill them. The aims of the current study were to assess the efficacy of endoscopic examination as a monitoring tool for the severity of colitis in rats and to the efficacy of DA-9601, an extract from Artemisia asiatica which has both antioxidative and cytoprotective actions, on dextran sulfate sodium induced ulcerative colitis in rats endoscopically. Sprague-Dawley rats received 4% DSS in drinking water for 5 consecutive days. Either DA-9601 or sulfasalazine was administered twice a day for 8 days, starting 3 days before DSS administration. After the colonoscopic evaluations on days 2, 4, and 5 after DSS administration the rats were also killed for gross and histopathological evaluations. Simultaneous measurements of malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities were performed. There was a statistically significant correlation between the scores evaluated by the gross examination and colonoscopic scores, between the colonoscopic scores and the levels of MDA or mucosal MPO activities, and between colonoscopic scores and histopathological activity index. DA-9601 showed excellent improvement in gross lesion scores, decreased MDA amounts and MPO activities compared to sulfasalazine. In conclusion, the introduction of appropriate colonoscopic examination in animal models of IBD could avoid the sacrifice of experimental animals for interim evaluation and provide the valuable information on the course and efficacy of

  10. Anti-inflammatory effect of Prunus armeniaca L. (Apricot) extracts ameliorates TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, M.; Ghannadi, A.; Asadi, M.; Etemad, M.; Mahzouni, P.

    2014-01-01

    Prunus armeniaca L. (Apricot) is a tree cultivated in different parts of the world. Apricot kernel as a good dietary supplement has shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and other pharmacologic properties which suggest that it may be functional as an anticolitis agent. In this study we evaluated the effects of apricot kernel extract and oil on ulcerative colitis in rats. Rats were fasted for 36 h before the experiment. Colitis was induced by intra-rectal instillation of 50 mg/kg trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid in male Wistar rats. Treatments were started 6 h after colitis induction and continued every 24 h for 5 days. Apricot kernel extract (100, 200, 400 mg/kg p.o. and 100, 400 mg/kg i.p.) and apricot kernel extract/oil (100, 200, 400 mg/kg p.o.) were used as experimental treatments and prednisolone (4 mg/kg p.o. or i.p.) was used as reference drug. On the day 6, colon tissue was removed and macroscopic and pathologic parameters were evaluated. Ulcer index and total colitis index as representative of macroscopic and histologic parameters respectively showed ameliorating effects in experimental groups especially those treated by intraperitoneal administration route. Results also demonstrated that oil fraction was not able to potentiate the effects of extract. These data suggest that apricot kernel extracts (with or without oil) can be introduced for further mechanistic and clinical studies as a complementary medicine for inflammatory bowel disorders. PMID:25657793

  11. Anti-inflammatory effect of Prunus armeniaca L. (Apricot) extracts ameliorates TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Minaiyan, M; Ghannadi, A; Asadi, M; Etemad, M; Mahzouni, P

    2014-01-01

    Prunus armeniaca L. (Apricot) is a tree cultivated in different parts of the world. Apricot kernel as a good dietary supplement has shown antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and other pharmacologic properties which suggest that it may be functional as an anticolitis agent. In this study we evaluated the effects of apricot kernel extract and oil on ulcerative colitis in rats. Rats were fasted for 36 h before the experiment. Colitis was induced by intra-rectal instillation of 50 mg/kg trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid in male Wistar rats. Treatments were started 6 h after colitis induction and continued every 24 h for 5 days. Apricot kernel extract (100, 200, 400 mg/kg p.o. and 100, 400 mg/kg i.p.) and apricot kernel extract/oil (100, 200, 400 mg/kg p.o.) were used as experimental treatments and prednisolone (4 mg/kg p.o. or i.p.) was used as reference drug. On the day 6, colon tissue was removed and macroscopic and pathologic parameters were evaluated. Ulcer index and total colitis index as representative of macroscopic and histologic parameters respectively showed ameliorating effects in experimental groups especially those treated by intraperitoneal administration route. Results also demonstrated that oil fraction was not able to potentiate the effects of extract. These data suggest that apricot kernel extracts (with or without oil) can be introduced for further mechanistic and clinical studies as a complementary medicine for inflammatory bowel disorders.

  12. Statins in the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer in established animal models of sporadic and colitis-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Pikoulis, Emmanouil; Margonis, Georgios A; Angelou, Anastasios; Zografos, George C; Antoniou, Efstathios

    2016-03-01

    Despite the availability of effective surveillance for colorectal cancer with colonoscopy, chemoprevention might be an acceptable alternative. Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. In clinical trials, statins have been found to be beneficial in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. However, the overall benefits observed with statins appear to be greater than what might be expected from changes in lipid levels alone, suggesting effects beyond cholesterol lowering. This systematic review aimed to gather information on the possible chemopreventive role of statins in preventing carcinogenesis and tumor promotion by a diverse array of mechanisms in both sporadic and colitis-associated cancer in animal models. The MEDLINE database was thoroughly searched using the following keywords: 'statin, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, colon cancer, mice, rats, chemoprevention, colitis-associated cancer'. Additional articles were gathered and evaluated. There are a lot of clinical studies and meta-analyses, as well as a plethora of basic research studies implementing cancer cell lines and animal models, on the chemopreventive role of statins in colorectal cancer (CRC). However, data derived from clinical studies are inconclusive, yet they show a tendency toward a beneficial role of statins against CRC pathogenesis. Thus, more research on the molecular pathways of CRC tumorigenesis as related to statins is warranted to uncover new mechanisms and compare the effect of statins on both sporadic and colitis-associated cancer in animal models. Basic science results could fuel exclusive colitis-associated cancer clinical trials to study the chemopreventive effects of statins and to differentiate between their effects on the two types of CRCs in humans.

  13. The influence of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic-acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Maduzia, D; Matuszyk, A; Ceranowicz, D; Warzecha, Z; Ceranowicz, P; Fyderek, K; Galazka, K; Dembinski, A

    2015-12-01

    Ghrelin has been primarily shown to exhibit protective and therapeutic effect in the gut. Pretreatment with ghrelin inhibits the development of acute pancreatitis and accelerates pancreatic recovery in the course of this disease. In the stomach, ghrelin reduces gastric mucosal damage induced by ethanol, stress or alendronate, as well as accelerates the healing of acetic acid-induced gastric and duodenal ulcer. The aim of present studies was to investigate the effect of pretreatment with ghrelin on the development of acetic acid-induced colitis. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Animals were treated intraperitoneally with saline (control) or ghrelin (4, 8 or 16 nmol/kg/dose). Saline or ghrelin was given twice: 8 and 1 h before induction of colitis. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 1 ml of 4% solution of acetic acid and the severity of colitis was assessed 1 or 24 hours after induction of inflammation. Rectal administration of acetic acid induced colitis in all animals. Damage of colonic wall was seen at the macroscopic and microscopic level. This effect was accompanied by a reduction in colonic blood flow and mucosal DNA synthesis. Moreover, induction of colitis significantly increased mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β), activity of myeloperoxidase and concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). Mucosal activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was reduced. Pretreatment with ghrelin reduced the area and grade of mucosal damage. This effect was accompanied by an improvement of blood flow, DNA synthesis and SOD activity in colonic mucosa. Moreover, ghrelin administration reduced mucosal concentration of IL-1β and MDA, as well as decreased mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Administration of ghrelin protects the large bowel against the development of the acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect seems to be related to the ghrelin-evoked anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects.

  14. Protective Effect of the Methanolic Extract of Malva parviflora L. leaves on Acetic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dugani, Aisha; Dakhil, Bushra; Treesh, Soad

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a general term describing chronic, idiopathic relapsing, inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. Previous studies have indicated that Malva parviflora leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiulcerogenic activity. activity. This work aimed to investigatee the anti-inflammatory effect of the methanolic (MEMP) and aqueous (AEMP) extracts of M. parviflora leaves on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: 42 male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups (n = 6). Group I: Normal saline control group with no colitis; Group II: Acetic acid colitis group; Group III: 100 mg/kg/5 d MEMP; Group IV: 200 mg/kg/5 d.MEMP; Group V: 100 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VI: 200 mg/kg/5 d AEMP; Group VII: Prednisolone group (2 mg/kg/5 d). Treatments were followed by induction of colitis using intrarectal instillation of 2 mL of 4% acetic acid. Colon damage was evaluated macroscopically (spleen weight/body weight, colon weight/length ratio) and the histological changes were also recorded. Results: The results of this study showed that acetic acid caused severe inflammation of the colon and a significant increase in spleen weight/body weight, and an increase in colon weight/length ratio compared with normal control group. Pretreatment with MEMP and AEMP for 5 days followed by induction of colitis resulted in a significant attenuation of spleen weight and colon weight/length ratio compared with acetic acid control group. Methanolic extract provided better anticolitic effect than aqueous extract; the effect was prominent at the dose of 200 mg/kg. Histopathological findings confirmed the protective effect of the MEMP. Conclusion: In conclusion, MEMP could ameliorate mucosal damage in experimentally induced colitis when given orally. PMID:27184642

  15. The Syk Inhibitor Fostamatinib Decreases the Severity of Colonic Mucosal Damage in a Rodent Model of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Can, Guray; Ayvaz, Suleyman; Can, Hatice; Demirtas, Selim; Aksit, Hasan; Yilmaz, Bulent; Korkmaz, Ugur; Kurt, Mevlut; Karaca, Turan

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal system. In some cases, current medications used for inflammatory bowel disease may not be enough for remission, creating a need for more potent and reliable medications. There is no study showing the efficacy of fostamatinib, with proven effects on some inflammatory diseases, on ulcerative colitis. In our study we planned to research the efficacy of fostamatinib, a spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, on acetic acid-induced colitis. The study included 28 male Sprague-Dawley rats, randomly divided into control group, fostamatinib group, colitis group and fostamatinib + colitis group, each containing seven rats. Colitis induction was performed with 4% acetic acid. Colonic inflammation was assessed with disease activity index, macroscopic and histological damage scores, colonic myeloperoxidase, malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase activity, and tumour necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], CD3, Syk, and phospho-Syk expression. There was a significant difference between the colitis and control groups in terms of all parameters. The disease activity index, macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, immunohistochemical TNFα, CD3, Syk, and phospho-Syk expression, and tissue myeloperoxidase activity were found to be significantly lower in the colitis + fostamatinib group compared with the colitis group. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activity. Fostamatinib reduced the inflammatory damage in the experimental colitis. This effect may be due to suppression of TNFα, T-lymphocytes, and neutrophils in colonic mucosa via suppression of Syk. Fostamatinib may be an appropriate treatment alternative for ulcerative colitis. Further clinical studies are required to support this. Copyright © 2015 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please

  16. Study on the physicochemical properties and anti-inflammatory effects of paeonol in rats with TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Zong, Shi-Yu; Pu, Yi-Qiong; Xu, Ben-Liang; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Paeonol, an active component from Paeonia suffruticosa Andr., has a variety of biological activities, such as vascular endothelial cell protection, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the basic physicochemical properties of paeonol, including solubility, oil-water partition coefficient, and permeability. Then evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of paeonol were evaluated on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats. The rats were divided randomly into 6 groups, namely, normal, model, paeonol-treated (100, 200, and 400mg/kg), and positive. Each group had 10 rats. Inhibition effects were evaluated by the disease activity index (DAI), colon weight/length ratio, as well as macroscopical and histological evaluations. Serum interleukin (IL)-17, IL-6 and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The solubility and oil-water partition coefficient of paeonol in different phosphate buffer solutions were 284.06-598.23 and 461.97-981.17μg/mL, respectively. The effective passive permeability value Pe was 23.49×10(-6)cm/s. In terms of anti-inflammatory results, compared with the model group, treatment with 200 and 400mg/kg doses of paeonol had significantly decreased DAI, colon weight/length ratio, and macroscopic and histopathological scores. Furthermore, the serum levels of IL-17 and IL-6 were significantly reduced, whereas the TGF-β1 level was increased in the two paeonol-treated groups (medium- and high-dose group). Therefore, paeonol had poor water solubility, but oral absorption was good. In addition, paeonol had therapeutic effects on ulcerative colitis, and the therapeutic efficacy was dose dependent. The results presented in this study provide evidence for the development of a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of UC. However, whether this agent could have therapeutic benefit or adverse effects in human IBD remains to be

  17. Dietary Propolis Ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis and Modulates the Gut Microbiota in Rats Fed a Western Diet

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaolu; You, Mengmeng; Tian, Wenli; Le Leu, Richard K.; Topping, David L.; Conlon, Michael A.; Wu, Liming; Hu, Fuliang

    2017-01-01

    Propolis is an important hive product and considered beneficial to health. However, evidence of its potential for improving gut health is still lacking. Here we use rats to examine whether dietary supplementation with propolis could be used as a therapy for ulcerative colitis. Rats were fed with a Western style diet alone (controls) or supplemented with different amounts of Chinese propolis (0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.3%) to examine effects on acute colitis induced by 3% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) in drinking water. Propolis at 0.3%, but not lower levels, significantly improved colitis symptoms compared with the control group, with a less pronounced disease activity index (DAI) (p < 0.001), a significant increase in colon length/weight ratio (p < 0.05) and an improved distal colon tissue structure as assessed by histology. Although short chain fatty acid levels in digesta were not altered by propolis supplementation, 16S rRNA phylogenetic sequencing revealed a significant increase in gut microbial diversity after 21 days of 0.3% propolis supplementation compared with controls including a significant increase in bacteria belonging to the Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria phyla. This is the first study to demonstrate that propolis can attenuate DSS-induced colitis and provides new insight into diet-microbiota interactions during inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:28805735

  18. Atorvastatin attenuates TNBS-induced rat colitis: the involvement of the TLR4/NF-kB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Muhammadnejad, Ahad; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemai; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Shirkoohi, Reza; Chamanara, Mohsen; Mousavi, Seyyedeh-Elaheh; Rezayat, Seyed-Mahdi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore whether atorvastatin improves intestinal inflammation through the inhibition of the TLR4/NFkB signaling pathway in TNBS-induced rat colitis. Acute colitis was induced by intra-rectal administration of 100 mg/kg TNBS dissolved in 0.25 ml of 50 % ethanol. Twenty four hours after colitis induction, saline, atorvastatin (20 and 40 mg/kg) and sulfasalazine (100 mg/kg) were given to the animals by oral route. This was repeated daily for 1 week. Body weight changes, macroscopic and microscopic lesions were assessed. MPO and TNF-α activities were detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and the expression level of TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB p65 proteins were measured by western blotting analysis. Atorvastatin and sulfasalazine reduced the body weight loss, macroscopic and microscopic lesions. Additionally, both drugs decreased the expression of MPO and TNF-α positive cells in the colon tissue. Furthermore, they inhibited the TNBS-induced expression of TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB p65 proteins. It is suggested that the anti-inflammatory effect of atorvastatin on TNBS-induced rat colitis may involve the inhibition of the TLR4/NFkB signaling pathway.

  19. Dietary Propolis Ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis and Modulates the Gut Microbiota in Rats Fed a Western Diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Xiaolu; You, Mengmeng; Tian, Wenli; Le Leu, Richard K; Topping, David L; Conlon, Michael A; Wu, Liming; Hu, Fuliang

    2017-08-14

    Propolis is an important hive product and considered beneficial to health. However, evidence of its potential for improving gut health is still lacking. Here we use rats to examine whether dietary supplementation with propolis could be used as a therapy for ulcerative colitis. Rats were fed with a Western style diet alone (controls) or supplemented with different amounts of Chinese propolis (0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.3%) to examine effects on acute colitis induced by 3% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) in drinking water. Propolis at 0.3%, but not lower levels, significantly improved colitis symptoms compared with the control group, with a less pronounced disease activity index (DAI) (p < 0.001), a significant increase in colon length/weight ratio (p < 0.05) and an improved distal colon tissue structure as assessed by histology. Although short chain fatty acid levels in digesta were not altered by propolis supplementation, 16S rRNA phylogenetic sequencing revealed a significant increase in gut microbial diversity after 21 days of 0.3% propolis supplementation compared with controls including a significant increase in bacteria belonging to the Proteobacteria and Acidobacteria phyla. This is the first study to demonstrate that propolis can attenuate DSS-induced colitis and provides new insight into diet-microbiota interactions during inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. Effect of ethanolic extract of leaves of Paederia foetida Linn. on acetic acid induced colitis in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swarnamoni; Kanodia, Lalit; Mukherjee, Apurba; Hakim, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of ethanolic extract of leaves of Paederia foetida on acetic acid induced colitis in albino rats. Materials and Methods: Ethanolic extract of Paederia foetida (EEPF) was prepared by percolation method. Acute toxicity test was done by using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development guidelines. Albino rats were divided into four groups of five animals each. Groups A and B received 3% gum acacia. Groups C and D received EEPF 500 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 5-aminosalisylic acid 100 mg/kg BW respectively. Colitis was induced by transrectal administration of 4% acetic acid on 5th day. All animals were sacrificed after 48 h of colitis induction and distal 10 cm of the colon was dissected. Colon was weighed for disease activity index (DAI) and scored macroscopically and microscopically. Biochemical assessment of tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was done in colonic tissue homogenate and malondialdehyde (MDA) was estimated in serum. Results: P. foetida showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in DAI, macroscopic and microscopic lesion score as well as significant (P < 0.05) improvement in MPO, MDA, CAT, and SOD level as compared to Group B. Conclusions: The ethanolic extract of leaves of P. foetida showed significant amelioration of experimentally induced colitis, which may be attributed to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant property. PMID:24130378

  1. Effect of ethanolic extract of leaves of Paederia foetida Linn. on acetic acid induced colitis in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Swarnamoni; Kanodia, Lalit; Mukherjee, Apurba; Hakim, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of ethanolic extract of leaves of Paederia foetida on acetic acid induced colitis in albino rats. Ethanolic extract of Paederia foetida (EEPF) was prepared by percolation method. Acute toxicity test was done by using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development guidelines. Albino rats were divided into four groups of five animals each. Groups A and B received 3% gum acacia. Groups C and D received EEPF 500 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 5-aminosalisylic acid 100 mg/kg BW respectively. Colitis was induced by transrectal administration of 4% acetic acid on 5(th) day. All animals were sacrificed after 48 h of colitis induction and distal 10 cm of the colon was dissected. Colon was weighed for disease activity index (DAI) and scored macroscopically and microscopically. Biochemical assessment of tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was done in colonic tissue homogenate and malondialdehyde (MDA) was estimated in serum. P. foetida showed significant (P < 0.05) reduction in DAI, macroscopic and microscopic lesion score as well as significant (P < 0.05) improvement in MPO, MDA, CAT, and SOD level as compared to Group B. The ethanolic extract of leaves of P. foetida showed significant amelioration of experimentally induced colitis, which may be attributed to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant property.

  2. Effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma ligands on dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Celinski, K; Dworzanski, T; Korolczuk, A; Piasecki, R; Slomka, M; Madro, A; Fornal, R

    2011-06-01

    Recent studies indicate the involvement of peroxisone proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) in the inflammatory reaction. The exact mechanism of PPAR-γ action has not been elucidated. It is supposed that PPAR-γ regulates transcription of genes responsible for encoding cytokines involved in the inflammatory response. The latest studies, carried out to explain the pathogenesis of non-specific colitis, confirm beneficial effects of PPAR-γ agonists on attenuation of colon inflammation. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of nuclear PPAR-γ activity on the course of experimental acute colitis induced by intragastric administration of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) using the PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone and the antagonist BADGE in rats. Colitis in Wistar rats was induced by 1.5% DSS administered in drinking water for 8 days. Animals with induced colitis received rosiglitazone, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) or both substances. After decapitation, colons were macroscopically and histopathologically evaluated. Levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were determined in serum and colon homogenates using ELISA. In rats with experimentally induced colitis receiving rosiglitazone, the inflammatory reaction was found to be markedly limited; ulceration, oedema and infiltration activity were reduced. The activated PPAR-γ inhibit the expression of proinflammatory factors, such as IL-6, TNF-α, and neutrophil chemotaxis, which was evidenced by MPO reduction in serum and colon homogenates mediated by rosiglitazone. The positive effects of rosiglitazone on expression of IL-10 were also demonstrated. During the short period of observation, BADGE did not increase histopathological inflammatory markers.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds on acetic acid-induced acute colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Asghari, Gholamreza; Taheri, Diana; Saeidi, Mozhgan; Nasr-Esfahani, Salar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Anti-inflammatory, immuno-modulatory, and antioxidant properties of Moringa oleifera Lam. suggest that it might have beneficial effects on colitis. The present study was performed to investigate the anticolitis effect of Moringa oleifera seeds hydro-alcoholic extract (MSHE) and its chloroform fraction (MCF) on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods: Both MSHE and MCF with three increasing doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) were administered orally to separate groups of male Wistar rats, 2 h before ulcer induction (using acetic acid 4%) and continued for 5 days. Prednisolone (4 mg/kg) and normal saline (1 ml/kg) were used in reference and control groups, respectively. All rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last dose (at day 6) and tissue injuries were assessed macroscopically and pathologically. Results: Extracts with three doses mentioned before were effective to reduce weight of distal colon (8 cm) as a marker for inflammation and tissue edema. Three doses of MSHE and two greater doses of MCF (100 and 200 mg/kg) were effective to reduce ulcer severity, area, and index as well as mucosal inflammation severity and extent, crypt damage, invasion involvement, total colitis index, and MPO activity compared with controls. MCF (50 mg/kg) was not significantly effective in reducing evaluated parameters of colitis compared with controls. Conclusion: It is concluded that MSHE and MCF were both effective to treat experimental colitis and this might be attributed to their similar major components, biophenols and flavonoids. Since the efficacy was evident even in low doses of MSHE, presence of active constituents with high potency in seeds is persuasive. PMID:25050310

  4. Anti-inflammatory effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds on acetic acid-induced acute colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Asghari, Gholamreza; Taheri, Diana; Saeidi, Mozhgan; Nasr-Esfahani, Salar

    2014-03-01

    Anti-inflammatory, immuno-modulatory, and antioxidant properties of Moringa oleifera Lam. suggest that it might have beneficial effects on colitis. The present study was performed to investigate the anticolitis effect of Moringa oleifera seeds hydro-alcoholic extract (MSHE) and its chloroform fraction (MCF) on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Both MSHE and MCF with three increasing doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) were administered orally to separate groups of male Wistar rats, 2 h before ulcer induction (using acetic acid 4%) and continued for 5 days. Prednisolone (4 mg/kg) and normal saline (1 ml/kg) were used in reference and control groups, respectively. All rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last dose (at day 6) and tissue injuries were assessed macroscopically and pathologically. Extracts with three doses mentioned before were effective to reduce weight of distal colon (8 cm) as a marker for inflammation and tissue edema. Three doses of MSHE and two greater doses of MCF (100 and 200 mg/kg) were effective to reduce ulcer severity, area, and index as well as mucosal inflammation severity and extent, crypt damage, invasion involvement, total colitis index, and MPO activity compared with controls. MCF (50 mg/kg) was not significantly effective in reducing evaluated parameters of colitis compared with controls. It is concluded that MSHE and MCF were both effective to treat experimental colitis and this might be attributed to their similar major components, biophenols and flavonoids. Since the efficacy was evident even in low doses of MSHE, presence of active constituents with high potency in seeds is persuasive.

  5. Hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus stimulation reduces intestinal injury in rats with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Quan-Jun; Deng, Ding-Jing; Che, Jin; Zhao, Hai-Rong; Yu, Jun-Jie; Lu, Yong-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect and mechanism of stimulation of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus with glutamate acid in rats with ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: The rats were anesthetized with 10% chloral hydrate via abdominal injection and treated with an equal volume of TNBS + 50% ethanol enema, injected into the upper section of the anus with the tail facing up. Colonic damage scores were calculated after injecting a certain dose of glutamic acid into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and the effect of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and vagus nerve in alleviating UC injury through chemical stimulation of the PVN was observed in rats. Expression changes of C-myc, Apaf-1, caspase-3, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-17 during the protection against UC injury through chemical stimulation of the PVN in rats were detected by Western blot. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in colon tissues of rats were measured by colorimetric methods. RESULTS: Chemical stimulation of the PVN significantly reduced UC in rats in a dose-dependent manner. The protective effects of the chemical stimulation of the PVN on rats with UC were eliminated after chemical damage to the PVN. After glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid was injected into the PVN, the protective effects of the chemical stimulation of the PVN were eliminated in rats with UC. After AVP-Vl receptor antagonist ([Deamino-penl, val4, D-Arg8]-vasopressin) was injected into NTS or bilateral chemical damage to NTS, the protective effect of the chemical stimulation of PVN on UC was also eliminated. After chemical stimulation of the PVN, SOD activity increased, MDA content decreased, C-myc protein expression significantly increased, caspase-3 and Apaf-1 protein expression significantly decreased, and IL-6 and IL-17 expression decreased in colon tissues in rats with UC. CONCLUSION: Chemical stimulation of the hypothalamic PVN provides a protective effect against UC injury in

  6. Clostridium butyricum, a probiotic derivative, suppresses dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshio; Andoh, Akira; Takizawa, Jyou; Takizawa, Wataru; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that probiotics or short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) exert a therapeutic effect on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. In a previous study, we demonstrated that Clostridium butyricum produces high levels of SCFAs in culture. In addition, a yogurt-based additive effectively masked, completely eliminating the unpleasant odor derived from the SCFAs. We recently reported that the oral administration of both high and low dose diets (50% w/w for 17 days and 5% w/w for 16 months, respectively) of the Clostridium butyricum derivative did not cause pathological abnormalities in rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of this product against dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis in rats. Five-week-old male Wistar Hannover GALAS rats were given a mixture of a standard diet containing 3% (w/w) of DSS for 8 days. In the derivative-fed group, Clostridium butyricum derivative (20% w/w) with 0.1% (w/w) additive was also added to their diet. The control-fed group was given tap water (20% w/w) with 0.1% (w/w) additive. After 8 days, a laparotomy was performed, and macroscopic and microscopic inflammation scoring was determined. The Clostridium butyricum derivative effectively prevented bloody diarrhea. In addition, mucosal damage to the derivative-fed group was significantly reduced macroscopically compared to that of the control-fed group. The potential clinical efficacy of the Clostridium butyricum derivative in IBD patients is also discussed.

  7. Intraperitoneal administration of butyrate prevents the severity of acetic acid colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Malago, Joshua J.; Sangu, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Intrarectal infusion of butyrate improves colorectal disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). However, it is not established whether systemically administered butyrate benefits such patients. The current study aimed at exploring and comparing the potential of intraperitoneally, intrarectally, and orally administered butyrate against acetic acid (AA)-induced UC in rats. Intrarectal administration of 2 ml of 50% AA was done after or without prior treatment of rats for 7 consecutive days with 100 mg/kg sodium butyrate (SB) intraperitoneally, intrarectally, or orally. Rats were sacrificed after 48 h of AA-treatment. Subsequently, colon sections were processed routinely for histopathological examination. We clinically observed diarrhea, loose stools, and hemoccult-positive stools, and histologically, epithelial loss and ulceration, crypt damage, goblet cell depletion, hemorrhage, and mucosal infiltration of inflammatory cells. The changes were significantly reduced by intraperitoneal, intrarectal, or oral butyrate, with intraperitoneal butyrate exhibiting the highest potency. It is concluded that intraperitoneal administration of butyrate abrogates the lesions of AA-induced UC and its potency surpasses that of intrarectal or oral butyrate. PMID:25743124

  8. The protective and healing effects of a natural antioxidant formulation based on ubiquinol and Aloe vera against dextran sulfate-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Korkina, Ludmila; Suprun, Maxim; Petrova, Anna; Mikhal'chik, Elena; Luci, Antonio; De Luca, Chiara

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen/nitrogen reactive species (ROS/RNS) are currently implicated in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis, drawing attention on the potential prophylactic and healing properties of antioxidants, scavengers, chelators. We evaluated the possible protective/curative effects of a natural antioxidant preparation based on Aloe vera and ubiquinol, against intestinal inflammation, lesions, and pathological alterations of the intestinal electrophysiological activity and motility, in a rat model of DSS-induced colitis. 5% dextrane sulfate (DDS) (3 days), followed by 1% DSS (4 days) was administered in drinking water. The antioxidant formulation (25 mg/kg) was delivered with a pre-treatment protocol, or simultaneously or post-colitis induction. Spontaneous and acetylcholine-stimulated electrical activity were impaired in the small intestine and in distal colon, upon exposure to DSS only. Severe inflammation occurred, with increased myeloperoxidase activity, and significant alterations of the oxidant/antioxidant status in colonic tissue and peritoneal cells. Lipoperoxidation, superoxide production, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase activities, and reduced glutathione content increased, whilst superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were sharply suppressed in colon tissue. ROS/RNS formation in peritoneal cells was strongly inhibited. Inflammation, electrical/mechanical impairment in the gut, and a great majority of oxidative stress parameters were improved substantially by pre-treatment with the antioxidant preparation, but not by simultaneous administration or post-treatment.

  9. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Amitriptyline on Ulcerative Colitis in Normal and Reserpine-Induced Depressed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fattahian, Ehsan; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Rabbani, Mohammad; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Depressive disorders are more common among persons with chronic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and anti-inflammatory effect of some antidepressants such as amitriptyline has been reported. Acetic acid colitis was induced in both reserpinised (depressed) and non-reserpinised (normal) rats. Reserpinised groups received reserpine (6 mg/kg, i.p.) one hour prior to colitis induction. Then Amitriptyline (5, 10, 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered to separate groups of male Wistar rats. All treatments were carried out two hours after colitis induction and continued daily for four days. Dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) and normal saline (1 mL/kg) were used in reference and control groups, respectively. At day five, animals were euthanized and colonic tissue injuries were assessed macroscopically and pathologically. Myeloperoxidase activity as a marker of neutrophil infiltration was also measured in colonic tissues. Results showed that reserpine (6 mg/kg, i.p.) intensified colitic condition. Compared to control, amitriptyline (10, 20 mg/kg) and dexamethasone significantly decreased weight of colon and ulcer index in normal and reserpine-induced depressed rats. Myeloperoxidase activity and pathological assessments also proved anti-inflammatory effect of amitriptyline. Our results suggest that amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, could reduce inflammatory and ulcerative injuries of colon both in normal and depressed rats. So among the wide spread anti-depressant drugs, amitriptyline is a good choice to treat depression comorbidities in patients with IBD. PMID:28228811

  10. Role of moxibustion in inflammatory responses during treatment of rat ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yang; Ma, Tie-Ming; Lu, Mao-Lin; Ren, Lu; Ma, Xian-De; Bai, Zeng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of moxibustion in ulcerative colitis (UC) rats from morphological, immunological and molecular biological perspectives. METHODS: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to a blank control group (normal rats, n = 6) and a model replication (MR) group (UC rats, n = 26). A UC model was established by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid/dextran sulfate sodium enema. Rats in the MR group were further randomly assigned to a 9-min moxibustion (9M) group (9 moxa-cone, n = 6), 6-min moxibustion (6M) group (6 moxa-cone, n = 6), 3-min moxibustion (3M) group (3 moxa-cone, n = 6), and a waiting list control (WLC) group (no moxibustion treatment, n = 6). Rats in the moxibustion treatment group were treated in 14 sessions over 28 d. Disease activity, local tissue morphology, serum level of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-10, and expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)9 as well as nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 in colonic tissue were determined by disease activity index (DAI), hematoxylin and eosin staining, electron microscopy, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting, respectively. RESULTS: DAI was lowest in the 9M group and highest in the WLC group. The differences in DAI between the moxibustion treatment (3M, 6M, 9M) and no treatment groups were significant for all one-to-one comparisons (0.60 ± 0.54 vs 1.20 ± 0.44, 0.60 ± 0.54 vs 1.80 ± 0.45, 0.60 ± 0.54 vs 3.0 ± 0.45, respectively, P < 0.05). Light and electron microscopy showed that the neatness of the glandular arrangement in colonic mucosal epithelia gradually increased in the WLC, 3M, 6M to 9M groups. IL-8 level successively decreased while IL-10 level increased from the WLC to 3M, 6M and 9M groups. The differences among these groups were significant for all comparisons (105.46 ± 8.75 vs 76.61 ± 3.58, 105.46 ± 8.75 vs 69.78 ± 1.87, 105.46 ± 8.75 vs 67.41 ± 1.84, respectively, P < 0.01 for IL-8; and 30.83 ± 1.29 vs 75.64 ± 1.90, 30.83 ± 1.29 vs 80.90 ± 3

  11. Catechin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside isolated from the seed of Phaseolus calcaratus Roxburgh ameliorates experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kook, Sung-Ho; Choi, Ki Choon; Cho, Seong-Wan; Cho, Hyoung-Kwon; Lee, Kyung Dong; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2015-12-01

    The seeds of Phaseolus calcaratus Roxburgh (PHCR) are common legumes that comprise part of the daily diet in Chinese and Korean culture. Recent findings highlight anti-inflammatory and anti-septic potentials of catechin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (CGP) isolated from PHCR seeds. We investigated the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity and associated mechanisms of CGP using a rat model of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Oral treatment with CGP (10mg/kg body weight) suppressed body weight loss and intestinal inflammatory damages in TNBS-induced colitic rats. This treatment reduced myeloperoxidase activity and malondialdehyde level, but increased glutathione level in the TNBS colitic rats. CGP treatment also inhibited the TNBS-mediated increases in nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 proteins or mRNA levels. This inhibition was accompanied by the increased mRNA levels of mucins MUC2 and MUC3. The CGP treatment prevented phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, IκB-α, and DNA-nuclear factor-κB binding, all of which were increased in the inflamed colons of TNBS-treated rats. Furthermore, oral administration with a crude PHCR butanol extract (100mg/kg body weight) which contains 1.5% of CGP showed intestinal anti-inflammatory potentials similar to that of CGP. Collectively, our current findings suggest that CGP or CGP-containing PHCR seeds may have favorable effects on intestinal inflammatory diseases.

  12. Intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of RGD-functionalized silk fibroin nanoparticles in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; De Matteis, Laura; Lozano-Perez, A Abel; Garrido-Mesa, Jose; Vezza, Teresa; de la Fuente, J M; Cenis, Jose Luis; Gálvez, Julio; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena

    Current treatment of inflammatory bowel disease is based on the use of immunosuppressants or anti-inflammatory drugs, which are characterized by important side effects that can limit their use. Previous research has been performed by administering these drugs as nanoparticles that target the ulcerated intestinal regions and increase their bioavailability. It has been reported that silk fibroin can act as a drug carrier and shows anti-inflammatory properties. This study was designed to enhance the interaction of the silk fibroin nanoparticles (SFNs) with the injured intestinal tissue by functionalizing them with the peptide motif RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) and to evaluate the intestinal anti-inflammatory properties of these RGD-functionalized silk fibroin nanoparticles (RGD-SFNs) in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. SFNs were prepared by nanoprecipitation in methanol, and the linear RGD peptide was linked to SFNs using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinker. The SFNs (1 mg/rat) and RGD-SFNs (1 mg/rat) were administered intrarectally to TNBS-induced colitic rats for 7 days. The SFN treatments ameliorated the colonic damage, reduced neutrophil infiltration, and improved the compromised oxidative status of the colon. However, only the rats treated with RGD-SFNs showed a significant reduction in the expression of different pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, and IL-12) and inducible nitric oxide synthase in comparison with the TNBS control group. Moreover, the expression of both cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was significantly diminished by the RGD-SFN treatment. However, both treatments improved the intestinal wall integrity by increasing the gene expression of some of its markers (trefoil factor-3 and mucins). SFNs displayed intestinal anti-inflammatory properties in the TNBS model of colitis in rats, which were improved by functionalization with the RGD peptide.

  13. Intestinal anti-inflammatory effects of RGD-functionalized silk fibroin nanoparticles in trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid-induced experimental colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; De Matteis, Laura; Lozano-Perez, A. Abel; Garrido-Mesa, Jose; Vezza, Teresa; de la Fuente, J M.; Cenis, Jose Luis; Gálvez, Julio; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background Current treatment of inflammatory bowel disease is based on the use of immunosuppressants or anti-inflammatory drugs, which are characterized by important side effects that can limit their use. Previous research has been performed by administering these drugs as nanoparticles that target the ulcerated intestinal regions and increase their bioavailability. It has been reported that silk fibroin can act as a drug carrier and shows anti-inflammatory properties. Purpose This study was designed to enhance the interaction of the silk fibroin nanoparticles (SFNs) with the injured intestinal tissue by functionalizing them with the peptide motif RGD (arginine–glycine–aspartic acid) and to evaluate the intestinal anti-inflammatory properties of these RGD-functionalized silk fibroin nanoparticles (RGD-SFNs) in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis. Materials and methods SFNs were prepared by nanoprecipitation in methanol, and the linear RGD peptide was linked to SFNs using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinker. The SFNs (1 mg/rat) and RGD-SFNs (1 mg/rat) were administered intrarectally to TNBS-induced colitic rats for 7 days. Results The SFN treatments ameliorated the colonic damage, reduced neutrophil infiltration, and improved the compromised oxidative status of the colon. However, only the rats treated with RGD-SFNs showed a significant reduction in the expression of different pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, and IL-12) and inducible nitric oxide synthase in comparison with the TNBS control group. Moreover, the expression of both cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was significantly diminished by the RGD-SFN treatment. However, both treatments improved the intestinal wall integrity by increasing the gene expression of some of its markers (trefoil factor-3 and mucins). Conclusion SFNs displayed intestinal anti-inflammatory properties in the TNBS model of colitis in rats

  14. Effect of Coriandrum sativum hydroalcoholic extract and its essential oil on acetic acid- induced acute colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Bahareh; Sajjadi, Seyed Ebrahim; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the protective effects of Coriandrum sativum on acetic acid-inducedcolitis in rats. C. sativum (Coriander) has long been used in Iranian traditional medicine and its use as an anti-inflammatory agent is still common in some herbal formulations. Materials and Methods: Colitis was induced by intra-rectal administration of 2ml acetic acid 4% in fasted male Wistar rats. Treatment was carried out using three increasing doses of extract (250, 500, 1000 mg/kg) and essential oil (0.25, 0.5, 1 ml/kg) of coriander started 2 h before colitis induction and continued for a five-day period. Colon biopsies were taken for weighting, macroscopic scoring of injured tissue, histopathological examination and measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Results: Colon weight was decreased in the groups treated with extract (500 and 1000 mg/kg) and essential oil (0.5 ml/kg) compared to the control group. Regarding MPO levels, ulcer severity and area as well as the total colitis index, same results indicating meaningful alleviation of colitis was achieved after treatment with oral extract and essential oil. Conclusion: Since the present experiment was made by oral fractions of coriander thus the resulting effects could be due to both the absorption of the active ingredients and/or the effect of non-absorbable materials on colitis after reaching the colon. In this regard, we propose more toxicological and clinical experiments to warranty its beneficial application in human inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27222834

  15. Pretreatment of Gymnema sylvestre revealed the protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Overproduction of free radicals and decreased antioxidant capacity are well-known risk factors for inflammatory bowel diseases. Gymnema sylvestre (GS) leaves extract is distinguished for its anti-diabetic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Present study is designed to evaluate the preventative activities of GS against acetic acid (AA)-induced ulcerative colitis in Wistar rats. Methods Experimentally ulcerative colitis (UC) was induced by AA in animals pretreated with three different doses of GS leaves extract (50, 100, 200 mg/kg/day) and a single dose of mesalazine (MES, 300 mg/kg/day) for seven days. Twenty four hours later, animals were sacrificed and the colonic tissues were collected. Colonic mucus content was determined using Alcian blue dye binding technique. Levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total glutathione sulfhydryl group (T-GSH) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NPSH) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were estimated in colon tissues. Colonic nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and total protein (TP) concentrations were also determined. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) were estimated in colonic tissues. The histopathological changes of the colonic tissues were also observed. Results In AA administered group TBARS levels were increased, while colonic mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH, SOD and CAT were reduced in colon. Pretreatment with GS inhibited TBARS elevation as well as mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH reduction. Enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT were brought back to their normal levels in GS pretreated group. A significant reduction in DNA, RNA and TP levels was seen following AA administration and this inhibition was significantly eliminated by GS treatment. GS pretreatment also inhibited

  16. Pretreatment of Gymnema sylvestre revealed the protection against acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, Abdulaziz M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S; Abuohashish, Hatem M; Ola, Mohammed S; Parmar, Mihir Y; Ahmed, Mohammed M

    2014-02-10

    Overproduction of free radicals and decreased antioxidant capacity are well-known risk factors for inflammatory bowel diseases. Gymnema sylvestre (GS) leaves extract is distinguished for its anti-diabetic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Present study is designed to evaluate the preventative activities of GS against acetic acid (AA)-induced ulcerative colitis in Wistar rats. Experimentally ulcerative colitis (UC) was induced by AA in animals pretreated with three different doses of GS leaves extract (50, 100, 200 mg/kg/day) and a single dose of mesalazine (MES, 300 mg/kg/day) for seven days. Twenty four hours later, animals were sacrificed and the colonic tissues were collected. Colonic mucus content was determined using Alcian blue dye binding technique. Levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), total glutathione sulfhydryl group (T-GSH) and non-protein sulfhydryl group (NPSH) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were estimated in colon tissues. Colonic nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and total protein (TP) concentrations were also determined. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO) were estimated in colonic tissues. The histopathological changes of the colonic tissues were also observed. In AA administered group TBARS levels were increased, while colonic mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH, SOD and CAT were reduced in colon. Pretreatment with GS inhibited TBARS elevation as well as mucus content, T-GSH and NP-SH reduction. Enzymatic activities of SOD and CAT were brought back to their normal levels in GS pretreated group. A significant reduction in DNA, RNA and TP levels was seen following AA administration and this inhibition was significantly eliminated by GS treatment. GS pretreatment also inhibited AA-induced elevation of pro

  17. An Inducible, Large-Intestine-Specific Transgenic Mouse Model for Colitis and Colitis-Induced Colon Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fa; Johnson, Robert L; Snyder, Paul W; DeSmet, Marsha L; Fleet, James C

    2016-04-01

    Animal models are an important tool to understand intestinal biology. Our laboratory previously generated C57BL/6-Tg(Car1-cre)5Flt transgenic mice (CAC) with large-intestine-specific Cre recombinase (Cre) expression as a model to study colon health. To expand the utility of the CAC mouse model by determining the impact of chemically induced colitis on CAC transgene expression. CAC mice were crossed to Rosa reporter mice (Rosa26R (flox/flox) ) with a lox-STOP-lox signal controlling β-galactosidase (βgal) expression and then further crossed with Apc(CKO/CKO) mice in some experiments to delete Apc alleles (Apc (Δ580) ). Initially, 8-week-old CAC(Tg/WT);Rosa26R (flox/WT) ;Apc (Δ580/WT) mice were treated with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water (5 days, 0, 0.65, 1.35, or 2.0 %). Colon tissue damage and βgal labeling were analyzed 10 day after stopping DSS. Next, 8-week-old CAC(Tg/WT);Rosa26R(flox/flox) mice were treated with 0 or 1.35 % DSS, and colonic βgal labeling was assessed at 30 day post-DSS treatment. Finally, 10-week-old CAC(Tg/WT);Apc (Δ580/WT) mice were treated with DSS (0 or 2 %) for 5 days and colonic tumors were analyzed at 20 weeks. CAC(Tg/WT);Rosa26R (flox/WT) ;Apc (Δ580/WT) mice had a DSS dose-dependent increase in colon epithelial damage that correlated with increased epithelial βgal labeling at 10 days (r (2) = 0.9, β = 0.75). The βgal labeling in CAC(Tg/WT);Rosa26R(flox/flox) mice colon remained high at 30 days, especially in the crypts of the healed ulcer. DSS also increased colon tumor incidence and multiplicity in CAC(Tg/WT);Apc (Δ580/WT) mice. DSS-mediated epithelial damage induces a persistent, Cre-mediated recombination of floxed alleles in CAC mice. This enables the examination of gene function in colon epithelium during experimental colitis and colitis-induced colon cancer.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effect of diosmectite in hapten-induced colitis in the rat

    PubMed Central

    González, Raquel; Sánchez de Medina, Fermin; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Nieto, Ana; Gálvez, Julio; Risco, Severiano; Zarzuelo, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Diosmectite is a natural silicate effectively used in the treatment of infectious diarrhoea. Its antidiarrhoeal properties involve adsorption of toxins and bacteria and modifications of the rheological characteristics of gastrointestinal mucus. Hence, the aim of this study was to test the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of diosmectite. Diosmectite (500 mg kg−1 day−1, p.o.) was administered as a post-treatment to rats with chronic trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid colitis. Colonic status was checked 1 and 2 weeks after colitis induction by macroscopic, histological and biochemical examination. Diosmectite post-treatment resulted in amelioration of the morphological signs (intestinal weight, macroscopic damage, necrosed area, histology) and biochemical markers (myeloperoxidase activity, glutathione levels, MUC2 expression, inducible nitric oxide synthase and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukotriene B4 synthesis), as well as in the reduction of the severity of diarrhoea. The effect of the clay was comparable to that of sulphasalazine (50 mg kg−1 day−1). Diosmectite exhibited a dose-dependent capacity to adsorb proteins in vitro as well as a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the basolateral secretion of IL-8 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated HT29 cells. Diosmectite had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on IL-1β production by LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. The effect of diosmectite on MUC2 was post-transcriptional, since mRNA levels were unaffected. However, diosmectite is able to upregulate MUC2 mRNA levels in HT29-MTX cells. Diosmectite has anti-inflammatory activity administered as a post-treatment. Possible mechanisms include adsorption of luminal antigens, increase of colonic mucin levels and possibly a direct modulatory action of cytokine production by mucosal cells. PMID:14993105

  19. Healing Acceleration of Acetic Acid-induced Colitis by Marigold (Calendula officinalis) in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tanideh, Nader; Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Hosseinzadeh, Masood; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Najibi, Asma; Raam, Mozhdeh; Daneshi, Sajad; Asadi-Yousefabad, Seyedeh-Leili

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with unknown etiology. Several therapeutic strategies such as consumption of medicinal plants have been used for its treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing effects of Calendula officinalis hydroalcoholic extract in experimentally induced UC in rat. Materials and Methods: Ninety-six rats, weighing 200 ± 20 g, were randomly divided into eight equal groups. UC induced by 3% acetic acid and oral doses of C. officinalis extract, 1500 and 3000 mg/kg, and enema (gel 10% and 20%) were given. Two groups as positive controls were given asacol (enema) and oral mesalamine. Negative control groups were given normal saline and base gel. On days 3 and 7, intestinal histopathology and weight changes, plus oxidative stress indices including malondialdehyde (MDA) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed. Results: A significant increase in the body weight of rats was seen in the group given C. officinalis extract 3000 mg/kg orally, oral mesalamine, and 20% intracolonic gel form of marigold extract compared with negative control and base gel groups during the experimental period. Acute inflammation and granular atrophy after UC induction were resolved completely completely by both 20% intracolonic gel and 3000 mg/kg orally. An increase in MPO activity and a decrease in MDA level in response to oral and intracolonic gel form of C. officinalis were observed 3 and and 7 days after treatment (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our results indicate that oral and enema forms of hydroalcoholic extract of C. officinalis can be offered as are potential therapeutic agents for UC induced in rats. PMID:26831607

  20. Healing acceleration of acetic acid-induced colitis by marigold (Calendula officinalis) in male rats.

    PubMed

    Tanideh, Nader; Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Sepehrimanesh, Masood; Hosseinzadeh, Masood; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Najibi, Asma; Raam, Mozhdeh; Daneshi, Sajad; Asadi-Yousefabad, Seyedeh-Leili

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with unknown etiology. Several therapeutic strategies such as consumption of medicinal plants have been used for its treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing effects of Calendula officinalis hydroalcoholic extract in experimentally induced UC in rat. Ninety-six rats, weighing 200 ± 20 g, were randomly divided into eight equal groups. UC induced by 3% acetic acid and oral doses of C. officinalis extract, 1500 and 3000 mg/kg, and enema (gel 10% and 20%) were given. Two groups as positive controls were given asacol (enema) and oral mesalamine. Negative control groups were given normal saline and base gel. On days 3 and 7, intestinal histopathology and weight changes, plus oxidative stress indices including malondialdehyde (MDA) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assayed. A significant increase in the body weight of rats was seen in the group given C. officinalis extract 3000 mg/kg orally, oral mesalamine, and 20% intracolonic gel form of marigold extract compared with negative control and base gel groups during the experimental period. Acute inflammation and granular atrophy after UC induction were resolved completely completely by both 20% intracolonic gel and 3000 mg/kg orally. An increase in MPO activity and a decrease in MDA level in response to oral and intracolonic gel form of C. officinalis were observed 3 and and 7 days after treatment (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that oral and enema forms of hydroalcoholic extract of C. officinalis can be offered as are potential therapeutic agents for UC induced in rats.

  1. Abnormalities in endocrine and immune cells are correlated in dextran-sulfate-sodium-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between the gut hormones and the immune system has been suggested to serve an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease. The aims of the present study were to elucidate the possible abnormalities in the colonic endocrine cells in rats with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis, and to determine whether they are correlated with alterations in the immune cells. A total of 24 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Control and DSS-induced colitis. Colonic tissues were harvested via postmortem laparotomy from all of the animals at the end of the experimental period, and fixed and sectioned for histology. The colonic endocrine and immune cells in those tissue samples were immunostained and their densities quantified by computerized image analysis. The densities of chromogranin A, serotonin, peptide YY and oxyntomodulin cells were significantly higher, and those of pancreatic peptide and somatostatin cells were lower in rats with DSS-induced colitis than in the controls. The densities of mucosal leukocytes, T and B lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes, and mast cells were significantly higher than in the controls, and these changes were closely associated with the aforementioned changes in all endocrine cell types. These observations indicate an interaction between intestinal hormones and the immune system as represented by immune cells. PMID:27959399

  2. Is Coenzyme Q10 Effective in Protection against Ulcerative Colitis? An Experimental Study in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ewees, Mohamed Gamal; Messiha, Basim Anwar Shehata; Abo-Saif, Ali Ahmed; Abd El-Latif, Hekma Abd El-Tawab

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10) is a vitamin-like supplement which appears to be safe, with minimal side effects and low drug interaction potential. Co-Q10 is used in the treatment of a variety of disorders related primarily to suboptimal cellular energy metabolism and oxidative injury. Studies supporting the efficacy of Co-Q10 appear most promising for a variety of diseases, including ulcerative colitis (UC). The present investigation aims to elucidate the possible protective effects of Co-Q10 against UC, as induced by the administration of iodoacetamide to adult male albino rats. In our study, Co-Q10 showed potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities through a significant increase in catalase activity and glutathione content. In addition, it significantly decreased myeloperoxidase activity, malondialdehyde content and nitrate/nitrite production. These results suggest that Co-Q10 protects against UC in rats via anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory potentials, and therefore seems promising for use in further clinical trials.

  3. Therapeutic effect of ginsenoside Rd in rats with TNBS-induced recurrent ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Lai; Guo, Tian-Kang; Wang, Yan-Hong; Gao, Ming-Tang; Qin, Hong; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2012-07-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by oxidative and nitrosative stress and neutrophil infiltration. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic effect of ginsenoside Rd (GRd) in rats with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced recurrent UC. After UC was twice-induced by intracolonic injection of TNBS, rats were intragastrically administered different doses of GRd per day for 7 days. The colonic lesions and inflammation were evaluated both histologically and biochemically. Compared with the TNBS group, GRd treatment facilitated recovery of pathologic changes in the colon after induction of recurrent UC, as evidenced by a significant reduction of colonic weight/length ratio and macroscopic and microscopic damage scores (p < 0.01). The myeloperoxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities with malonyldialdehyde and nitric oxide levels in colonic tissues were significantly decreased in the GRd group compared with those in the TNBS group (p < 0.01). GRd treatment was associated with remarkably increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. Results showed a valuable effect of GRd against TNBS-induced recurrent UC by inhibiting neutrophil infiltration and promoting the antioxidant capacity of the damaged colonic tissue.

  4. Comparative efficacies of 2 cysteine prodrugs and a glutathione delivery agent in a colitis model

    PubMed Central

    OZ, HELIEH S.; CHEN, THERESA S.; NAGASAWA, HERBERT

    2007-01-01

    Oxidant-mediated injury plays an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recently, antioxidants were shown to modulate colitis in mice. In this study, the protective effects of L-cysteine and glutathione (GSH) prodrugs are further evaluated against progression of colitis in a murine model. ICR mice were fed compounds incorporated into chow as follows: Group (A) received chow supplemented with vehicle. Group (B) was provided 2-(RS)-n-propylthiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic-acid (PTCA), a cysteine prodrug. Group (C) received D-ribose-L-cysteine (RibCys), another cysteine prodrug that releases L-cysteine. Group (D) was fed L-cysteine-glutathione mixed sulfide (CySSG), a ubiquitous GSH derivative present in mammalian cells. After 3 days, the animals were further provided with normal drinking water or water supplemented with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Mice administered DSS developed severe colitis and suffered weight loss. Colonic lesions significantly improved in animals treated with PTCA and RibCys and, to a lesser extent, with CySSG therapy. Hepatic GSH levels were depleted in colitis animals (control vs DSS, P < 0.001), and normalized with prodrug therapies (control vs treatments, P > 0.05). Protein expressions of serum amyloid A and inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), osteopontin (OPN)] were significantly increased in colitis animals and improved with therapies. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses showed significant upregulation of the macrophage-specific markers, COX-2 and CD68, which suggests macrophage activation and infiltration in the colonic lamina propria in colitis animals. These abnormalities were attenuated in prodrug-treated mice. In conclusion, these data strongly support the novel action of the PTCA against colitis, which further supports a possible therapeutic application for IBD patients. PMID:17656332

  5. Effect of acute and chronic DSS induced colitis on plasma eicosanoid and oxylipin levels in the rat.

    PubMed

    Willenberg, Ina; Ostermann, Annika I; Giovannini, Samoa; Kershaw, Olivia; von Keutz, Anne; Steinberg, Pablo; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2015-07-01

    Eicosanoids and oxylipins are potent lipid mediators involved in the regulation of inflammation. In order to evaluate their role and suitability as biomarkers in colitis, we analyzed their systemic levels in the acute and chronic phase of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis. Male Fischer 344 rats were treated in three cycles with 4% DSS in the drinking water (4 days followed by 10 days recovery) and blood was drawn 3 days prior to the first DSS treatment and on days 4, 11, 32 and 39. Histopathological evaluation of the colon tissue after 42 days showed that the animals developed a mild to severe chronic colitis. Consistently, prostaglandin levels were massively (twofold) elevated in the colonic tissue. LC-MS based targeted metabolomics was used to determine plasma oxylipin levels at the different time points. In the acute phase of inflammation directly after DSS treatment, epoxy-fatty acid (FA), dihydroxy-FA and hydroxy-FA plasma concentrations were uniformly elevated. With each treatment cycle the increase in these oxylipin levels was more pronounced. Our data suggest that in the acute phase of colitis release of polyunsaturated FAs from membranes in the inflamed tissue is reflected by a uniform increase of oylipins formed in different branches of the arachidonic acid cascade. However, during the recovery phases the systemic oxylipin pattern is not or only moderately altered and does not allow to evaluate the onset of chronic inflammation in the colon.

  6. Anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin and hydroalcoholic extract of Dracocephalum kotschyi on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sadraei, Hassan; Asghari, Gholamreza; Khanabadi, Mohammad; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2017-08-01

    Colitis is an inflammatory disease of the intestine with unknown etiology involving multiple immune, genetic, and environmental factors. We were interested to examine the effect of total extract from Dracocephalum kotschyi (D. kotschyi) Boiss. on the experimental colitis. D. kotschyi hydroalcoholic extract (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) or apigenin (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) were administered orally 2 h prior to induction of colitis which was induced by intrarectal administration of acetic acid (4%) in rats. Prednisolone (4 m/kg) was used as the standard drug for comparison. Biochemical evaluation of inflamed colon was performed by measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. After 5 days treatment, mucosal ulceration was evaluated. Intrarectal instillation of acetic acid caused significant inflammatory reactions as indicated by macroscopic and microscopic changes. The activity of MPO increased in vehicle treated groups while recovered to normal level by pretreatment of animals with D. kotschyi extract, apigenin, or prednisolone. D. kotschyi and apigenin-treated groups showed significantly lower score values of macroscopic and microscopic characters when compared with the vehicle-treated negative control group. The beneficial effect of apigenin was comparable with that of prednisolone. This research has shown the anti-inflammatory potential of D. kotschyi extract and apigenin in experimentally induced colitis.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effect of Pycnocycla spinosa extract and its component isoacetovanillone on acetic acid induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Asghari, Gholamreza; Sadraei, Hassan; Feili, Edris

    2015-01-01

    Colitis is an inflammatory disease of the intestine with unknown etiology involving multiple immune, genetic and environmental factors. We were interested to examine the effect of total extract from Pycnocycla spinosa Boiss. on the treatment of experimental colitis. Mediators involved in colonic inflammation are prostaglandins, interleukins, leukotriene as well as an increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Therefore, MPO activity was also determined in this research. P. spinosa hydroalcoholic extract (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) or isoacetovanillone (2, 5 and 10 mg/kg) were administered orally, started 2 h before induction of colitis by intrarectal administration of acetic acid (3%) in rats. Prednisolone (4 m/kg) was used as the standard drug for comparison. Biochemical evaluation of inflamed colon was done using assay of MPO activity. After 5 days treatments, mucosal ulceration was evaluated. Intrarectal instillation of acetic acid caused significant inflammatory reactions as indicated by macroscopic and microscopic changes. The activity of MPO increased in vehicle treated groups while recovered to normal level by pretreatment of animals with P. spinosa extract, isoacetovanillone and prednisolone. P. spinosa and isoacetovanillone-treated groups showed significantly lower score values of macroscopic and microscopic characters when compared with the vehicle treated negative control group. The beneficial effect of P. spinosa was comparable with that of prednisolone. This research has shown the anti-inflammatory potential of P. spinosa extract and isoacetovanillone in experimentally induced colitis.

  8. Effects of dosmalfate, a new cytoprotective agent, on acute and chronic trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Isabel; La Casa, Carmen; Orjales, Aurelio; Alarcón de la Lastra, Catalina

    2003-01-24

    Activated neutrophils and proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are clearly involved in the pathogenesis of bowel disease. Increased expression of epidermal growth factor-receptor (EGF receptor) has been reported for the colon mucosa surrounding areas of ulceration, suggesting a pivotal role in mucosal defence and repair. In this study, we examined the effects of dosmalfate, a new flavonoid derivative compound (diosmin heptakis) with antioxidant and cytoprotective properties, on acute and chronic experimental trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. The inflammation response was assessed by neutrophil infiltration as evaluated by histology and myeloperoxidase activity. Mucosal TNF-alpha production and histological analysis of the lesions was also carried out. In addition, we studied the expression of the EGF receptor inmunohistochemically during the healing of TNBS-induced chronic colitis. A 2-day treatment with 400 or 800 mg/kg of dosmalfate ameliorated the colon damage score and the incidence of adhesions. It also significantly (P<0.05) decreased myeloperoxidase activity and colonic mucosal production of TNF-alpha. Chronic treatment (14 days) with 800 mg/kg/day of dosmalfate also had significant protective effects on TNBS-induced colitis which were reflected by significant attenuation (P<0.05) of the damage score while the inflammatory indicators were not improved. The chronic beneficial effect of dosmalfate was apparently related to the enhancement of EGF receptor expression. These findings confirm the protective effects of dosmalfate in acute and chronic experimental colitis.

  9. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system prevents acute and immunologically relevant colitis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Okawada, Manabu; Wilson, Michael W; Larsen, Scott D; Lipka, Elke; Hillfinger, John; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2016-12-01

    Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been shown to alleviate inflammatory processes in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to determine if blockade of the RAS would be effective in an immunologically relevant colitis model, and to compare outcome with an acute colitis model. A losartan analog, CCG-203025 (C23H26ClN3O5S) containing a highly polar sulfonic acid moiety that we expected would allow localized mucosal antagonism with minimal systemic absorption was selected as an angiotensin II type 1a receptor antagonist (AT1aR-A). Two colitis models were studied: (1) Acute colitis was induced in 8- to 10-week-old C57BL/6J mice by 2.5 % dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, in drinking water) for 7 days. (2) IL10-/-colitis Piroxicam (200 ppm) was administered orally in feed to 5-week-old IL-10-/-mice (C57BL/6J background) for 14 days followed by enalaprilat (ACE-I), CCG-203025 or PBS administered transanally for 14 days. In the DSS model, weight loss and histologic score for CCG-203025 were better than with placebo. In the IL10-/-model, ACE-I suppressed histologic damage better than CCG-203025. Both ACE-I and CCG-203025 reduced pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This study demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of both ACE-I and AT1aR-A for preventing the development of both acute and immunologically relevant colitis.

  10. Ameliorating effects of short-chain inulin-like fructans on the healing stage of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shingo; Ito, Hiroyuki; Bito, Hiroyuki; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Morita, Tatsuya

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the ameliorating effects of short-chain inulin-like fructans (SIF) with different degrees of polymerization (DP) on the healing stage of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. The rats were assigned to 3 groups 10 d after the colitis induction, and fed for 24 d on a control diet or diet including 60 g of DP4 or DP8/kg. The fecal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and IgA concentration were monitored every 7 d. The colonic MPO activities and cecal concentrations of organic acids, lactobacilli, bifidobacteria, mucin and IgA were measured at the end of the study. DP4, but not DP8, significantly reduced the colonic inflammation accompanied by higher cecal concentrations of short-chain fatty acids, propionate in particular, and lactic acid-producing bacteria. DP4 therefore accelerated the healing process of TNBS-induced colitis, even when the treatment was initiated after inducing colitis.

  11. An α-linolenic acid-rich formula reduces oxidative stress and inflammation by regulating NF-κB in rats with TNBS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Aktham; Ibrahim, Ayman; Mbodji, Khaly; Coëffier, Moïse; Ziegler, Frédéric; Bounoure, Frédéric; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Skiba, Mohamed; Savoye, Guillaume; Déchelotte, Pierre; Marion-Letellier, Rachel

    2010-10-01

    We have previously shown that α-linolenic acid (ALA), a (n-3) PUFA exerts in vitro antiinflammatory effects in the intestine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate its effect on inflammatory and oxidative stress in a colitis model. Colitis was induced in 2 groups at d 0 by intrarectal injection of 2-4-6-trinitrobenzen sulfonic acid (TNBS), whereas the control group received the vehicle. Rats we fed 450 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) of ALA (TNBS+ALA) while the other colitic group (TNBS) and the control group were fed an isocaloric corn oil formula for 14 d (from d -7 to d 7). RBC fatty acid composition was assessed. Oxidative stress was studied by measuring urinary 8-isoprostanes (8-IP) and colon glutathione (GSH) concentration and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Colitis was assessed histologically, by production of proinflammatory mediators, including cytokines, leukotrienes B(4) (LTB(4)), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. The ALA-rich diet significantly increased the RBC levels of ALA, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosapentaenoic acid (n-3) compared with the TNBS group (P < 0.01 for all). The beneficial effect of ALA supplementation on oxidative stress was reflected by lower urinary 8-IP levels (P < 0.05), a normalized colon GSH concentration (P < 0.01), and reduced colon iNOS expression (P < 0.05) compared with the TNBS group. ALA also protected against colon inflammation as assessed by lower tumor necrosis factor-α secretion and mRNA level (P < 0.05), reduced NF-κB activation (P = 0.01), and lower colon lipid mediator concentrations such as LTB(4) and COX-2 (P < 0.05) compared with the TNBS group. These findings show that an ALA-rich formula is beneficial to TNBS-induced colitic rats via inhibition of oxidative and inflammatory stress.

  12. Selective Allosteric Inhibition of MMP9 Is Efficacious in Preclinical Models of Ulcerative Colitis and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McCauley, Scott; Kovalenko, Maria; Spangler, Rhyannon; Liu, Chian; Lee, Michael; O’Sullivan, Christopher; Barry-Hamilton, Vivian; Ghermazien, Haben; Mikels-Vigdal, Amanda; Garcia, Carlos A.; Jorgensen, Brett; Velayo, Arleene C.; Wang, Ruth; Adamkewicz, Joanne I.; Smith, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) is elevated in a variety of inflammatory and oncology indications, including ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer. MMP9 is a downstream effector and an upstream mediator of pathways involved in growth and inflammation, and has long been viewed as a promising therapeutic target. However, previous efforts to target matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including MMP9, have utilized broad-spectrum or semi-selective inhibitors. While some of these drugs showed signs of efficacy in patients, all MMP-targeted inhibitors have been hampered by dose-limiting toxicity or insufficient clinical benefit, likely due to their lack of specificity. Here, we show that selective inhibition of MMP9 did not induce musculoskeletal syndrome (a characteristic toxicity of pan-MMP inhibitors) in a rat model, but did reduce disease severity in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced mouse model of ulcerative colitis. We also found that MMP9 inhibition decreased tumor growth and metastases incidence in a surgical orthotopic xenograft model of colorectal carcinoma, and that inhibition of either tumor- or stroma-derived MMP9 was sufficient to reduce primary tumor growth. Collectively, these data suggest that selective MMP9 inhibition is a promising therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and oncology indications in which MMP9 is upregulated and is associated with disease pathology, such as ulcerative colitis and colorectal cancer. In addition, we report the development of a potent and highly selective allosteric MMP9 inhibitor, the humanized monoclonal antibody GS-5745, which can be used to evaluate the therapeutic potential of MMP9 inhibition in patients. PMID:25961845

  13. Anti-inflammatory effect of recreational exercise in TNBS-induced colitis in rats: role of NOS/HO/MPO system.

    PubMed

    Szalai, Zita; Szász, András; Nagy, István; Puskás, László G; Kupai, Krisztina; Király, Adél; Berkó, Anikó Magyariné; Pósa, Anikó; Strifler, Gerda; Baráth, Zoltán; Nagy, Lajos I; Szabó, Renáta; Pávó, Imre; Murlasits, Zsolt; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Varga, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    There are opposite views in the available literature: Whether physical exercise has a protective effect or not on the onset of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, we investigated the effects of recreational physical exercise before the induction of colitis. After 6 weeks of voluntary physical activity (running wheel), male Wistar rats were treated with TNBS (10 mg). 72 hrs after trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) challenge we measured colonic gene (TNF-α, IL-1β, CXCL1 and IL-10) and protein (TNF-α) expressions of various inflammatory mediators and enzyme activities of heme oxygenase (HO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzymes. Wheel running significantly increased the activities of HO, constitutive NOS (cNOS) isoform. Furthermore, 6 weeks of running significantly decreased TNBS-induced inflammatory markers, including extent of lesions, severity of mucosal damage, and gene expression of IL-1β, CXCL1, and MPO activity, while IL-10 gene expression and cNOS activity were increased. iNOS activity decreased and the activity of HO enzyme increased, but not significantly, compared to the sedentary TNBS-treated group. In conclusion, recreational physical exercise can play an anti-inflammatory role by downregulating the gene expression of proinflammatory mediators, inducing anti-inflammatory mediators, and modulating the activities of HO and NOS enzymes in a rat model of colitis.

  14. Enteral diets enriched with medium-chain triglycerides and N-3 fatty acids prevent chemically induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kono, Hiroshi; Fujii, Hideki; Ogiku, Masahito; Tsuchiya, Masato; Ishii, Kenichi; Hara, Michio

    2010-11-01

    The specific purpose of this study was to evaluate the significant effects of medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) and N-3 fatty acids on chemically induced experimental colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed liquid diets enriched with N-6 fatty acid (control diets), N-3 fatty acid (MCT- diets), and N-3 fatty acid and MCT (MCT+ diets) for 2 weeks and then were given an intracolonic injection of TNBS. Serum and tissue samples were collected 5 days after ethanol or TNBS enema. The severity of colitis was evaluated pathologically, and tissue myeloperoxidase activity was measured in colonic tissues. Furthermore, protein levels for inflammatory cytokines and a chemokine were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in colonic tissues. Induction of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β in the colon by TNBS enema was markedly attenuated by the MCT+ diet among the 3 diets studied. Furthermore, the induction of chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 also was blunted significantly in animals fed the MCT+ diets. As a result, MPO activities in the colonic tissue also were blunted significantly in animals fed the MCT+ diets compared with those fed the control diets or the MCT- diets. Furthermore, the MCT+ diet improved chemically induced colitis significantly among the 3 diets studied. Diets enriched with both MCTs and N-3 fatty acids may be effective for the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease as antiinflammatory immunomodulating nutrients.

  15. Moxibustion inhibits interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor alpha and modulates intestinal flora in rat with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Mei; Lu, Yuan; Wu, Lu-Yi; Yu, Shu-Guang; Zhao, Bai-Xiao; Hu, Hong-Yi; Wu, Huan-Gan; Bao, Chun-Hui; Liu, Hui-Rong; Wang, Jin-Hai; Yao, Yi; Hua, Xue-Gui; Guo, Hui-Ying; Shen, Li-Rong

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of moxibustion on intestinal flora and release of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from the colon in rat with ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: A rat model of UC was established by local stimulation of the intestine with supernatant from colonic contents harvested from human UC patients. A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following groups: normal (sham), model (UC), herb-partition moxibustion (HPM-treated), and positive control sulfasalazine (SA-treated). Rats treated with HPM received HPM at acupuncture points ST25 and RN6, once a day for 15 min, for a total of 8 d. Rats in the SA group were perfused with SA twice a day for 8 d. The colonic histopathology was observed by hematoxylin-eosin. The levels of intestinal flora, including Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Bacteroides fragilis (B. fragilis), were tested by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to detect bacterial 16S rRNA/DNA in order to determine DNA copy numbers of each specific species. Immunohistochemical assays were used to observe the expression of TNF-α and IL-12 in the rat colons. RESULTS: HPM treatment inhibited immunopathology in colonic tissues of UC rats; the general morphological score and the immunopathological score were significantly decreased in the HPM and SA groups compared with the model group [3.5 (2.0-4.0), 3.0 (1.5-3.5) vs 6.0 (5.5-7.0), P < 0.05 for the general morphological score, and 3.00 (2.00-3.50), 3.00 (2.50-3.50) vs 5.00 (4.50-5.50), P < 0.01 for the immunopathological score]. As measured by DNA copy number, we found that Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, which are associated with a healthy colon, were significantly higher in the HPM and SA groups than in the model group (1.395 ± 1.339, 1.461 ± 1.152 vs 0.045 ± 0.036, P < 0.01 for Bifidobacterium, and 0.395 ± 0.325, 0.851 ± 0.651 vs 0.0015 ± 0.0014, P < 0.01 for Lactobacillus). On the

  16. Anti-inflammatory intestinal activity of Combretum duarteanum Cambess. in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid colitis model

    PubMed Central

    de Morais Lima, Gedson Rodrigues; Machado, Flavia Danniele Frota; Périco, Larissa Lucena; de Faria, Felipe Meira; Luiz-Ferreira, Anderson; Souza Brito, Alba Regina Monteiro; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Barbosa Filho, José Maria; Batista, Leônia Maria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the anti-inflammatory intestinal effect of the ethanolic extract (EtOHE) and hexane phase (HexP) obtained from the leaves of Combretum duarteanum (Cd). METHODS Inflammatory bowel disease was induced using trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid in acute and relapsed ulcerative colitis in rat models. Damage scores, and biochemical, histological and immunohistochemical parameters were evaluated. RESULTS Both Cd-EtOHE and Cd-HexP caused significant reductions in macroscopic lesion scores and ulcerative lesion areas. The vegetable samples inhibited myeloperoxidase increase, as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β. Anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 also increased in animals treated with the tested plant samples. The anti-inflammatory intestinal effect is related to decreased expression of cyclooxygenase-2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and an increase in superoxide dismutase. CONCLUSION The data indicate anti-inflammatory intestinal activity. The effects may also involve participation of the antioxidant system and principal cytokines relating to inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:28293082

  17. Initial gut microbiota structure affects sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wu, Yanqiu; Hu, Yingxin; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Chenhong

    2017-08-15

    The dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model is a widely applied mouse model, but controversial results have been obtained from experiments using the same mouse strain under the same conditions. Because the gut microbiota play an important role in DSS-induced colitis, it is essential to evaluate the influence of the initial gut microbiota in this model. Here, we identified significant variations in the initial gut microbiota of different batches of mice and found that the initial intestinal microbiota had a profound influence on DSS-induced colitis. We performed three independent trials using the same C57BL/6J mouse model with DSS treatment and used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to analyze the gut microbiota. We found that the structure and composition of the gut microbiota in mice with severe colitis, as compared with mice with milder colon damage, had unique features, such as an increase in Akkermansia bacteria and a decrease in Barnesiella spp. Moreover, these varied gut bacteria in the different trials also showed different responses to DSS treatment. Our work suggests that, in studies using mouse models, the gut microbiota must be considered when examining mechanisms of diseases, to ensure that comparable results are obtained.

  18. Novel insights on the effect of nicotine in a murine colitis model.

    PubMed

    AlSharari, Shakir D; Akbarali, Hamid I; Abdullah, Rehab A; Shahab, Omer; Auttachoat, Wimolnut; Ferreira, Gabriela A; White, Kimber L; Lichtman, Aron H; Cabral, Guy A; Damaj, M Imad

    2013-01-01

    Studies showed that nicotine has a positive influence on symptoms of ulcerative colitis. In the present study, we explored the effect of nicotine treatment using different routes of administration in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis mouse model. We also investigated the effects of cotinine, a major metabolite of nicotine, in the model. C57BL6 adult male mice were given DSS solution freely in the drinking water for seven consecutive days, and tap water was given thereafter. Disease severity, length of the colon, colon tissue histology, and inflammatory markers, including colonic myeloperoxidase activity and colonic tumor necrosis factor-α levels, were evaluated. The effect of nicotine and cotinine treatments via various different routes of administration were examined the DSS model. In addition, we measured the plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine in our treatment protocols. Administration of low, but not high, doses of oral nicotine in DSS-treated mice resulted in a significant decrease in disease severity, histologic damage scores, as well as colonic level of tumor necrosis factor-α. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of nicotine was not seen after chronic s.c. or minipump infusion of the drug. Differences in plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine do not seem to account for this lack of effect. Finally, oral cotinine alone failed to show a significant effect in the DSS model of colitis. These results highlight that dose and route of administration play a critical role in the protective effect of nicotine in the DSS mouse colitis model.

  19. Prenylated flavonoid morusin protects against TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Vochyánová, Zora; Pokorná, Marie; Rotrekl, Dominik; Smékal, Václav; Fictum, Petr; Suchý, Pavel; Gajdziok, Jan; Šmejkal, Karel; Hošek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Morusin is a prenylated flavonoid isolated from the root bark of Morus alba. Many studies have shown the ability of flavonoids to act as anti-inflammatory agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of morusin on experimentally colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzensulfonic acid in Wistar rats and to compare it with sulfasalazine, a drug conventionally used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Morusin was administered by gavage at doses of 12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg/day for five days. The colonic tissue was evaluated macroscopically, histologically, and by performing immunodetection and zymographic analysis to determine the levels of antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT)], interleukin (IL)-1β, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and the activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9. The tissue damage scores were significantly reduced with increasing dose of morusin, however efficacy was not demonstrated at the highest dose. At the dose of 12.5 mg/kg, morusin exerted therapeutic effectivity similar to that of sulfasalazine (50 mg/kg). This was associated with significant reduction of TGF-β1 levels and MMP2 and MMP9 activities, and slight reduction of IL-1β. Our results suggest that morusin possesses therapeutic potential for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  20. Impact of probiotics on toll-like receptor 4 expression in an experimental model of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Fu, Yu; Liu, Jun; Ren, Hong-yu

    2013-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key components of the innate immune system which trigger antimicrobial host defense responses. This study aimed to investigate the impact of probiotics (Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium) on the expression of TLR4 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the colon mucosa of rat experimental ulcerative colitis model induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)/ethanol and immune complexes. The gross and histological changes of the colonic mucosa were observed and assessed by the means-standard deviation and independent samples t-test. The protein expression levels of TLR4 and TNF-α were detected by using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. It was revealed that there was visible infiltration of inflammatory cells, formation of crypt abscess, and the reduction of goblet cells in the colon tissue of experimental models. As compared with the control group, the levels of TLR4 and TNF-α protein were significantly increased in the model group (P<0.01 for both). No significant difference was found in the expression of TLR4 and TNF-α between the two-week probiotics treatment group and the model group (P>0.05), whereas significant reductions were shown in rats which were treated with probiotics for four weeks as compared with the model group (P<0.01). There was no significant difference between two probiotics-treated groups. Our results implied that probiotics were likely to play a key role in protecting ulcerative colitis by reducing the inflammatory factor TNF-α expression through inhibiting the TLR4 expression in the colon tissue of experimental models.

  1. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ulcerative colitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Ulcerative colitis (UL-sur-uh-tiv koe-LIE-tis) is an inflammatory ... and ulcers (sores) in your digestive tract. Ulcerative colitis affects the innermost lining of your large intestine ( ...

  2. Antiinflammatory Effect of Phytosterols in Experimental Murine Colitis Model: Prevention, Induction, Remission Study

    PubMed Central

    Aldini, Rita; Micucci, Matteo; Cevenini, Monica; Fato, Romana; Bergamini, Christian; Nanni, Cristina; Cont, Massimiliano; Camborata, Cecilia; Spinozzi, Silvia; Montagnani, Marco; Roda, Giulia; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Rosini, Francesca; Roda, Aldo; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Phytosterols, besides hypocholesterolemic effect, present anti-inflammatory properties. Little information is available about their efficacy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of a mixture of phytosterols on prevention/induction/remission in a murine experimental model of colitis. Phytosterols were administered x os before, during and after colitis induction with Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) in mice. Disease Activity Index (DAI), colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress in the intestinal tissue (ileum and colon) and gallbladder ileum and colon spontaneous and carbachol (CCh) induced motility, plasma lipids and plasma, liver and biliary bile acids (BA) were evaluated. A similar longitudinal study was performed in a DSS colitis control group. Mice treated with DSS developed severe colitis as shown by DAI, colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress. Both spontaneous and induced ileal and colonic motility were severely disturbed. The same was observed with gallbladder. DSS colitis resulted in an increase in plasma cholesterol, and a modification of the BA pattern. Phytosterols feeding did not prevent colitis onset but significantly reduced the severity of the disease and improved clinical and histological remission. It had strong antioxidant effects, almost restored colon, ileal and gallbladder motility. Plasmatic levels of cholesterol were also reduced. DSS induced a modification in the BA pattern consistent with an increase in the intestinal BA deconjugating bacteria, prevented by phytosterols. Phytosterols seem a potential nutraceutical tool for gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases, combining metabolic systematic and local anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:25268769

  3. Antiinflammatory effect of phytosterols in experimental murine colitis model: prevention, induction, remission study.

    PubMed

    Aldini, Rita; Micucci, Matteo; Cevenini, Monica; Fato, Romana; Bergamini, Christian; Nanni, Cristina; Cont, Massimiliano; Camborata, Cecilia; Spinozzi, Silvia; Montagnani, Marco; Roda, Giulia; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Rosini, Francesca; Roda, Aldo; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Phytosterols, besides hypocholesterolemic effect, present anti-inflammatory properties. Little information is available about their efficacy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of a mixture of phytosterols on prevention/induction/remission in a murine experimental model of colitis. Phytosterols were administered x os before, during and after colitis induction with Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) in mice. Disease Activity Index (DAI), colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress in the intestinal tissue (ileum and colon) and gallbladder ileum and colon spontaneous and carbachol (CCh) induced motility, plasma lipids and plasma, liver and biliary bile acids (BA) were evaluated. A similar longitudinal study was performed in a DSS colitis control group. Mice treated with DSS developed severe colitis as shown by DAI, colon length, histopathology score, 18F-FDG microPET, oxidative stress. Both spontaneous and induced ileal and colonic motility were severely disturbed. The same was observed with gallbladder. DSS colitis resulted in an increase in plasma cholesterol, and a modification of the BA pattern. Phytosterols feeding did not prevent colitis onset but significantly reduced the severity of the disease and improved clinical and histological remission. It had strong antioxidant effects, almost restored colon, ileal and gallbladder motility. Plasmatic levels of cholesterol were also reduced. DSS induced a modification in the BA pattern consistent with an increase in the intestinal BA deconjugating bacteria, prevented by phytosterols. Phytosterols seem a potential nutraceutical tool for gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases, combining metabolic systematic and local anti-inflammatory effects.

  4. The effect of sildenafil on an animal model for ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Irkorucu, Oktay; Taşcilar, Oge; Cakmak, Guldeniz Karadeniz; Karakaya, Kemal; Emre, Ali Ugur; Ucan, Bülent Hamdi; Bahadir, Burak; Acikgoz, Serefden; Ankarali, Handan; Ugurbas, Ebru; Comert, Mustafa

    2008-06-01

    Sildenafil both enhances vasodilatation by relaxing the smooth muscle in the vessels and inhibits platelet aggregation. We have therefore examined the potential benefits of sildenafil on an animal model for ischemic colitis (IC). Twenty-eight female Wistar albino rats weighing 250-300 g were randomized into three experimental groups as follows: in Group 1, animals were sham operated (n = 8) and received tap water; in Groups 2 and 3, the rats underwent a standardized surgical procedure to induce IC (n = 10 in each group). Group 2 animals served as the controls, receiving only tap water, while Group 3 animals received 10 mg/kg sildenafil per day as a single dose for a 3-day period. All animals were sacrificed 72 h after devascularization. To determine the severity of the ischemia, we scored the macroscopically visible damage, measured the ischemic area and scored the histopathology. Tissue malondialdehyde levels were also evaluated. The mean area of ischemic changes were 116.80 +/- 189.93 and 0.55 +/- 1.01 mm2 in Group 2 and 3 animals, respectively (p = 0.0001), while the macroscopically mean visible damage score decreased to 0.66 +/- 0.70 (p = 0.0001) for Group 3 animals. The Chiu scores were 0.00, 3.80 +/- 0.91 and 2.66 +/- 1.00 in Group 1, 2 and 3 animals, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between Group 2 and 3 animals (p = 0.017). Our findings support the view that sildenafil leads to a improvement in IC due to its well-known effects on the vascular smooth muscle and on the microcirculatory hemodynamics.

  5. Th17 Responses Are Not Induced in Dextran Sodium Sulfate Model of Acute Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoon Suk; Lee, Min Ho; Ju, Ahn Seung

    2011-01-01

    Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) is a widely used chemical model for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is thought that imbalances in the T helper (Th) cell subsets contribute to IBD. Recent studies suggest that the acute DSS-colitis model is polarized toward a Th1/Th17 profile based on RT-PCR analysis of colonic tissues. In the current study we determined whether colonic Th cells from DSS-colitis mice were skewed toward the Th17 profile. Mice were treated with 5% DSS for 7 days and colonic T cells isolated and examined for production of IFN-γ (Th1 cell), IL-4 (Th2 cell) and IL-17 (Th17 cell) by intracellular flow cytometry. We found that the percentage of colonic Th17 cells were similar to non-treated controls but the percentage of Th1 cells were elevated in DSS-colitis mice. These results suggest that in the acute DSS-colitis model the colonic Th cells exhibit a Th1 profile and not a Th17 profile. PMID:22346784

  6. Sleep deprivation worsens inflammation and delays recovery in a mouse model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yueming; Preuss, Fabian; Turek, Fred W; Jakate, Shriram; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2009-06-01

    We recently showed that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) report significantly more sleep disturbances. To determine whether disrupted sleep can affect the severity of inflammation and the course of IBD, we used an animal model of colonic inflammation to determine the effects of acute and chronic intermittent sleep deprivation on the severity of colonic inflammation and tissue damage in colitis and recovery from this damage. Acute sleep deprivation (ASD) consisted of 24h of forced locomotor activity in a mechanical wheel rotating at a constant speed. Chronic intermittent sleep deprivation (CISD) consisted of an acute sleep deprivation episode, followed by additional sleep deprivation periods in the wheel for 6h every other day throughout the 10day study period. To induce colitis, mice were given 2% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in their daily drinking water for 7days. The development and severity of colitis were monitored by measuring weight loss and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity daily and colon histology scores 10days after initiation of colitis. ASD or CISD did not cause colonic inflammation in vehicle-treated mice. Changes in daily body weight, tissue MPO levels and colon histopathology score were similar between mice that were sleep deprived and controls. Daily DSS ingestion caused colitis in mice. ASD worsened colonic inflammation: tissue MPO levels in ASD/DSS-treated mice were significantly higher than in DSS-treated mice that were not sleep deprived. However, the worsening of colonic inflammation by ASD was not enough to exacerbate clinical manifestations of colitis such as weight loss. In contrast, the deleterious effects of CISD were severe enough to cause worsening of histological and clinical manifestations of colitis. The deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on severity of colitis appeared to be due to both increased colonic inflammation and a decrease in the ability of mice to recover from DSS-induced colonic injury. Both acute

  7. Sijunzi Decoction attenuates 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats and ameliorates TNBS-induced claudin-2 damage via NF-κB pathway in Caco2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Lin, HanJie; Zhang, JinWei; Wei, JianAn; Sun, Jing; Han, Ling

    2017-01-10

    SijunziDecoction (SJZD) is a traditional Chinese medicine prescription used to treat the diseases of gastrointestinal tract since ancient times. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of SJZD on TNBS-induced colitis in rats and TNBS-damaged Caco2 cells. The rat colitis model was induced by 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). SJZD (2.8 5.6, 11.2 g/kg) or salazosulfapyridine (SASP) (0.4 g/kg) was administrated orally in rats for 7 days. DAI, pathological scores and the expression of claudin-2 were evaluated. Then we explored the effect and mechanism of SijunziDecoction Serum (SJZDS) onTNBS-damaged Caco2 cells to figure out intestinal barrier protective effect and mechanism of SJZD. SJZD significantly ameliorated the severity of TNBS-induced colitis and downregulated the level of claudin-2 in colonic tissues. SJZDS promoted proliferation and inhibited apoptosis ofTNBS-damaged Caco2 cells. In Caco2 cell monolayers, we provided mechanistic evidence that SJZDS-induced increased TEER and decreased permeability after TNBS damage, which were mediated through claudin-2 and NF-κB pathway, including the upregulation of claudin-2, decreased activity of NF-κB p65, reduced level of NF-κB p65 and MLCK. Our results indicated that SJZD possesses protective effect of intestinal barrier towards TNBS-induced colitis in rats and TNBS-damaged Caco2 cells in vitro. SJZDis a potential protective agent of intestinal barrier that deserves further investigation.

  8. Qingchang Wenzhong Decoction Ameliorates Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rats by Downregulating the IP10/CXCR3 Axis-Mediated Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Tang-you; Shi, Rui; Zhao, Wei-han; Guo, Yi; Gao, Kang-li; Chen, Chen; Xie, Tian-hong; Li, Jun-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Qingchang Wenzhong Decoction (QCWZD) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine prescription. Our previous studies have shown that QCWZD has significant efficacy in patients with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis (UC) and in colonic mucosa repair in UC rat models. However, the exact underlying mechanism remains unknown. Thus, this study was conducted to determine QCWZD's efficacy and mechanism in dextran sulphate sodium- (DSS-) induced UC rat models, which were established by 7-day administration of 4.5% DSS solution. QCWZD was administered daily for 7 days, after which the rats were euthanized. Disease activity index (DAI), histological score (HS), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) level were determined to evaluate UC severity. Serum interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP10) levels were determined using ELISA kits. Western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction were, respectively, used to determine colonic protein and gene expression of IP10, chemokine (cys-x-cys motif) receptor (CXCR)3, and nuclear factor- (NF-) κB p65. Intragastric QCWZD administration ameliorated DSS-induced UC, as evidenced by decreased DAI, HS, and MPO levels. Furthermore, QCWZD decreased the protein and gene expression of IP10, CXCR3, and NF-κB p65. Overall, these results suggest that QCWZD ameliorates DSS-induced UC in rats by downregulating the IP10/CXCR3 axis-mediated inflammatory response and may be a novel UC therapy. PMID:27413386

  9. Protective effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mannasaheb, Basheerahmed A.A.; Kulkarni, Preeti V.; Sangreskopp, Mashood Ahmed; Savant, Chetan; Mohan, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Natural plants always provide core compounds for new drug development. In the present life and food style, inflammatory bowel disease has become common and needs a lead compound for its drug development. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Agave americana Linn. leaf extract in acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats based on its traditional anti-inflammatory use. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were pretreated with A. americana leaf extract in the dose of 200 and 400 mg/kg p.o. daily for 7 days. On 8th day, 2 ml of 4% v/v acetic acid in saline was instilled into rats’ rectum. Prednisolone was used as standard drug and it was administered on the day of acetic acid instillation and continued for 3 days. Extract treatment was continued till 11th day. Body weight, ulcer score, colonic muscle contraction, antioxidant activity and histopathology were studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Parametric one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey's posttest. Results: A. americana have retained total body weight significantly (P < 0.01) and decreased colon weight/length ratio. Extract have shown a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in ulcer scores, myeloperoxidase, lipid peroxidase activity. Further, extract have shown significant improvement in colonic muscle contraction, histopathology of colon etc., which is comparable with standard drug. Conclusion: A. americana possess protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:26730148

  10. Syndecan-1 deficiency promotes tumor growth in a murine model of colitis-induced colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Binder Gallimidi, Adi; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Hermano, Esther; Weizman, Barak; Meirovitz, Amichay; Vlodavsky, Israel; Götte, Martin; Elkin, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Syndecan-1 (Sdc1) is an important member of the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan family, highly expressed by epithelial cells in adult organisms. Sdc1 is involved in the regulation of cell migration, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, growth-factor, chemokine and integrin activity, and implicated in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. Gastrointestinal tract represents an important anatomic site where loss of Sdc1 expression was reported both in inflammation and malignancy. However, the biological significance of Sdc1 in chronic colitis-associated tumorigenesis has not been elucidated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to test the effects of Sdc1 loss on colorectal tumor development in inflammation-driven colon tumorigenesis. Utilizing a mouse model of colitis-related colon carcinoma induced by the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM), followed by the inflammatory agent dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), we found that Sdc1 deficiency results in increased susceptibility to colitis-associated tumorigenesis. Importantly, colitis-associated tumors developed in Sdc1-defficient mice were characterized by increased local production of IL-6, activation of STAT3, as well as induction of several STAT3 target genes that act as important effectors of colonic tumorigenesis. Altogether, our results highlight a previously unknown effect of Sdc1 loss in progression of inflammation-associated cancer and suggest that decreased levels of Sdc1 may serve as an indicator of colon carcinoma progression in the setting of chronic inflammation. PMID:28350804

  11. Oral administration of d-limonene controls inflammation in rat colitis and displays anti-inflammatory properties as diet supplementation in humans.

    PubMed

    d'Alessio, Patrizia A; Ostan, Rita; Bisson, Jean-François; Schulzke, Joerg D; Ursini, Matilde V; Béné, Marie C

    2013-07-10

    To further explore the anti-inflammatory properties of d-Limonene. A rat model was used to compare evolution of TNBS (2,5,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid)-induced colitis after oral feeding with d-Limonene compared to ibuprofen. Peripheral levels of TNF-α (Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha) were assessed in all animals. Cell cultures of fibroblasts and enterocytes were used to test the effect of d-Limonene respectively on TNFα-induced NF-κB (nuclear factor-kappa B) translocation and epithelial resistance. Finally, plasmatic inflammatory markers were examined in an observational study of diet supplementation with d-Limonene-containing orange peel extract (OPE) in humans. Administered per os at a dose of 10mg/kg p.o., d-Limonene induced a significant reduction of intestinal inflammatory scores, comparable to that induced by ibuprofen. Moreover, d-Limonene-fed rats had significantly lowered serum concentrations of TNF-α compared to untreated TNBS-colitis rats. The anti-inflammatory effect of d-Limonene also involved inhibition of TNFα-induced NF-κB translocation in fibroblast cultures. The application of d-Limonene on colonic HT-29/B6 cell monolayers increased epithelial resistance. Finally, inflammatory markers, especially peripheral IL-6, markedly decreased upon OPE supplementation of elderly healthy subjects submitted or not to 56 days of dietary supplementation with OPE. In conclusion, d-Limonene indeed demonstrates significant anti-inflammatory effects both in vivo and in vitro. Protective effects on the epithelial barrier and decreased cytokines are involved, suggesting a beneficial role of d-Limonene as diet supplement in reducing inflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Rhizophora mangle on Experimental Colitis Induced by TNBS in Rats.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Felipe Meira; Luiz-Ferreira, Anderson; Socca, Eduardo Augusto Rabelo; de Almeida, Ana Cristina Alves; Dunder, Ricardo José; Manzo, Luis Paulo; da Silva, Marcelo Aparecido; Vilegas, Wagner; Rozza, Ariane Leite; Pellizzon, Cláudia Helena; Dos Santos, Lourdes Campaner; Souza Brito, Alba Regina Monteiro

    2012-01-01

    Male Unib-WH rats were pretreated for two weeks with butanolic (BuOH) and ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fractions. Colitis was induced by rectal administration of TNBS, the treatment continued, and animals were sacrificed on day 7 after the TNBS administration. Phytochemical studies were performed in order to provide the characterization of the tannins present in the bark of R. mangle. Results showed that EtOAc fraction increased the levels of IL-10 (∗∗P < 0.01) and diminished the levels of TNF-α (∗∗∗P < 0.001) and IL-6 (∗∗P < 0.01). BuOH fraction reduced the MPO activity (∗∗P < 0.01) and levels of TBARS (∗∗∗P < 0.001); it also increased COX-1 expression, diminished the levels of TNF-α (∗∗∗P < 0.001), and increased the levels of IL-12 (∗∗∗P < 0.001). Besides, both treatments augmented the levels of GSH (∗P < 0.05), the activity of GSH-Px (∗∗P < 0.01 for BuOH fraction and ∗∗∗P < 0.001 for EtOAc fraction), and CAT (∗∗P < 0.01). In conclusion, both treatments ameliorated the injury induced by TNBS through different mechanisms, probably by their chemical composition which directed its activity into an antioxidant or anti-inflammatory response, leading to an immune modulation.

  13. St. John's wort may ameliorate 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid colitis off rats through the induction of pregnane X receptors and/or P-glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Sehirli, A O; Cetinel, S; Ozkan, N; Selman, S; Tetik, S; Yuksel, M; Dulger, F G A

    2015-04-01

    It is reported that deficiencies of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the latter of which is encoded by the MDR1 gene, are important factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is also known that the activation of PXR is protective of IBD due to the mutual repression between PXR and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) expression and because NF-κB was reported to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. The goal of this study was to investigate whether St. John's wort (SJW) and spironolactone (SPL), both known to have strong inducing effects on cytochrome P 450 (CYP) enzymes as well as PXR and P-gp, have ameliorating effects on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis of rats through induction of PXR and/or P-gp. Wistar albino rats (250 - 300 g) were divided into control and TNBS-colitis groups. Each group was then divided into a) control (saline), b) SJW (300 mg/kg p.o. bid), and c) SPL (80 mg/kg p.o.) groups. Drugs were given for 7 days. Both treatments ameliorated the clinical hallmarks of colitis, as determined by body weight loss and assessment of diarrhea, colon length, and bowel histology. Plasma levels of NF-κB, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the oxidative stress markers that increased during colitis, decreased significantly after both treatments. The PXR and P-gp expression in the intestinal tissues was diminished in the colitis group but increased after drug treatments. Both drugs appeared to have significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and ameliorated the TNBS colitis of the rats, most likely through their PXR- and P-gp-inducing properties.

  14. 1,3-Diphenylpropenone ameliorates TNBS-induced rat colitis through suppression of NF-κB activation and IL-8 induction.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Young; Ku, Sae Kwang; Lee, Eung Seok; Kim, Jung-Ae

    2012-03-05

    In the present study, we examined whether newly synthesized phenylpropenone derivatives, by inhibiting NF-κB activity, would inhibit IL-8 expression, inflammation and abnormal angiogenesis, resulting in amelioration of disease conditions. The phenylpropenone derivatives inhibited NF-κB transcriptional activity, which correlated with their suppressive activity against TNF-α-induced adhesion of U937 human monocytic cells to HT-29 human colonic epithelial cells, an in vitro model of IBD. Among the derivatives, 1,3-diphenylpropenone (DPhP) was most efficacious, and it significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of IL-8 which is a proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokine. The anti-inflammatory activity of DPhP was also confirmed in the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat colitis model. DPhP was protective against the TNBS-induced inflammatory responses, which included weight loss, increased myeloperoxidase activity and mucosal damage. In the colon tissue, DPhP inhibited TNBS-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation, IL-8 and TNF-α expressions, and abnormal angiogenesis. In addition, DPhP also suppressed IL-8-induced angiogenesis, which was revealed by an in vivo assay using chick chorioallantoic membrane. Furthermore, the level of IL-6, a pleiotropic cytokine which is implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD and colitis-associated cancer, was suppressed by DPhP in rat colon tissue and serum. In conclusion, the results suggest that DPhP is a potential dual-acting IBD drug candidate targeting both inflammation and abnormal angiogenesis, possibly through the NF-κB and IL-8 signaling pathway.

  15. Novel Insights on the Effect of Nicotine in a Murine Colitis Model

    PubMed Central

    AlSharari, Shakir D.; Akbarali, Hamid I.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Shahab, Omer; Auttachoat, Wimolnut; Ferreira, Gabriela A.; White, Kimber L.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Cabral, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    Studies showed that nicotine has a positive influence on symptoms of ulcerative colitis. In the present study, we explored the effect of nicotine treatment using different routes of administration in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis mouse model. We also investigated the effects of cotinine, a major metabolite of nicotine, in the model. C57BL6 adult male mice were given DSS solution freely in the drinking water for seven consecutive days, and tap water was given thereafter. Disease severity, length of the colon, colon tissue histology, and inflammatory markers, including colonic myeloperoxidase activity and colonic tumor necrosis factor-α levels, were evaluated. The effect of nicotine and cotinine treatments via various different routes of administration were examined the DSS model. In addition, we measured the plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine in our treatment protocols. Administration of low, but not high, doses of oral nicotine in DSS-treated mice resulted in a significant decrease in disease severity, histologic damage scores, as well as colonic level of tumor necrosis factor-α. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of nicotine was not seen after chronic s.c. or minipump infusion of the drug. Differences in plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine do not seem to account for this lack of effect. Finally, oral cotinine alone failed to show a significant effect in the DSS model of colitis. These results highlight that dose and route of administration play a critical role in the protective effect of nicotine in the DSS mouse colitis model. PMID:23115221

  16. Lessons from probiotic-host interaction studies in murine models of experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Claes, Ingmar J J; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Vanderleyden, Jos; Lebeer, Sarah

    2011-10-01

    In inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), it is known that besides genetic and environmental factors (e.g. diet, drugs, stress), the microbiota play an important role in the pathogenesis. Patients with IBD have an altered microbiota (dysbiosis) and therefore, probiotics, defined as 'live micro-organisms that when administered in adequate amounts can confer a health benefit on the host', have been suggested as nutritional supplements to restore these imbalances. The best response on probiotics among the different types of IBD appears to be in the case of ulcerative colitis. Although probiotics show promise in IBD in both clinical and animal studies, further mechanistic studies are necessary to optimize the use of probiotics as supporting therapy in IBD. Murine models of experimental colitis have been used for decades to study this pathology, and these models have been proven useful to search for new therapeutic approaches. The purpose of this review is to summarize probiotic-host interaction studies in murine models of experimental colitis and to evaluate how these models can further help in understanding these complex interactions. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms behind the beneficial effects will assist in better and possibly more efficient probiotic formulations.

  17. Effect of COX-2 inhibitor lumiracoxib and the TNF-α antagonist etanercept on TNBS-induced colitis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Paiotti, Ana Paula Ribeiro; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Silva, Roseane Mendes; Marchi, Patrícia; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Neto, Ricardo Artigiani; Miszputen, Sender Jankiel; Franco, Marcello

    2012-06-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with gut barrier dysfunction. Besides the baseline barrier defect, a subgroup of patients also expresses an intestinal barrier hyperresponsiveness to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. On the other hand, the anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) treatment has brought benefits to these patients. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of lumiracoxib, a selective-cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, and Etanercept (ETC), a TNF-α antagonist on the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced experimental colitis. A total of 47 Wistar rats were randomized into seven groups, as follows: (1) Sham: sham induced-colitis; (2) TNBS: nontreated induced-colitis; (3) Lumiracoxib control; (4) Lumiracoxib-treated induced-colitis; (5) ETC control; (6) ETC-treated induced-colitis; (7) Lumiracoxib-ETC-treated induced-colitis. Rats from groups 6 and 7 presented significant improvement of macroscopic and histopathological damages in the distal colon. The gene expression of COX-2 mRNA, as well of TNF-α mRNA, decreased significantly in groups 6 and 7 compared to the TNBS nontreated and lumiracoxib-treated groups. The treatment only with lumiracoxib did not reduce the inflammation on TNBS-induced experimental colitis. ETC attenuated the damage seen in the colon and reduced the inflammation caused by TNBS. Our results suggest that down-regulation of TNF-α and COX-2 resulted in a decrease in inflammation caused by TNBS and thus provided some protection from the colonic damage caused by TNBS.

  18. Short-chain inulin-like fructans reduce endotoxin and bacterial translocations and attenuate development of TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Tanabe, Hiroki; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Tadashi, Wada; Yasuhiko, Tomono; Sugiyama, Kimio; Kiriyama, Shuhachi; Morita, Tatsuya

    2009-10-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of short-chain inulin-like fructans (SCF) on trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis were investigated in rats, focusing specifically on endotoxin and bacterial translocations. SCF with degrees of polymerization (DP) of 4 and 8 were used. Rats were fed either control diet or diets including 60 g DP4 or DP8 per kilogram for 7 days, and then received intracolonic TNBS and were fed the respective diets for a further 10 days. DP4 and DP8 significantly reduced colonic injuries as assessed by damage score, but the reduction of colonic myeloperoxidase activity was manifest solely with DP8. At 3 days after colitis induction, bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node was significantly lower in the DP4 and DP8 groups, but significant reduction in the portal endotoxin concentration was achieved solely in the DP8 group. Immediately prior to colitis induction, cecal immunoglobulin A and mucin concentrations were higher in the DP4 and DP8 groups, but these changes were abolished at 10 days post colitis induction. The data suggest that SCF exert prophylactic effects against TNBS colitis, presumably as a result of inhibitory effects on endotoxin and bacterial translocations.

  19. Synergic Interaction of Rifaximin and Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917) in the Treatment of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Gałązka, Krystyna; Konturek, Peter Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background. Inflammatory bowel disease results from the dysregulation of immune response to environmental and microbial agents in genetically susceptible individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of rifaximin and/or Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, EcN) administration on the healing of acetic acid-induced colitis. Methods. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Rifaximin (50 mg/kg/dose) and/or Mutaflor (109 CFU/dose) were given intragastrically once a day. The severity of colitis was assessed at the 8th day after induction of inflammation. Results. Treatment with rifaximin significantly accelerated the healing of colonic damage. This effect was associated with significant reversion of the acetic acid-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Moreover, administration of rifaximin significantly reduced concentration of proinflammatory TNF-α and activity of myeloperoxidase in colonic mucosa. Mutaflor given alone was without significant effect on activity of colitis. In contrast, Mutaflor given in combination with rifaximin significantly enhanced therapeutic effect of rifaximin. Moreover, Mutaflor led to settle of the colon by EcN and this effect was augmented by pretreatment with rifaximin. Conclusion. Rifaximin and Mutaflor exhibit synergic anti-inflammatory and therapeutic effect in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:27433160

  20. Synergic Interaction of Rifaximin and Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917) in the Treatment of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dembiński, Artur; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Dembiński, Marcin; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Gosiewski, Tomasz; Bulanda, Małgorzata; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Gałązka, Krystyna; Konturek, Peter Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Background. Inflammatory bowel disease results from the dysregulation of immune response to environmental and microbial agents in genetically susceptible individuals. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of rifaximin and/or Mutaflor (Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, EcN) administration on the healing of acetic acid-induced colitis. Methods. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats by rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Rifaximin (50 mg/kg/dose) and/or Mutaflor (10(9) CFU/dose) were given intragastrically once a day. The severity of colitis was assessed at the 8th day after induction of inflammation. Results. Treatment with rifaximin significantly accelerated the healing of colonic damage. This effect was associated with significant reversion of the acetic acid-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Moreover, administration of rifaximin significantly reduced concentration of proinflammatory TNF-α and activity of myeloperoxidase in colonic mucosa. Mutaflor given alone was without significant effect on activity of colitis. In contrast, Mutaflor given in combination with rifaximin significantly enhanced therapeutic effect of rifaximin. Moreover, Mutaflor led to settle of the colon by EcN and this effect was augmented by pretreatment with rifaximin. Conclusion. Rifaximin and Mutaflor exhibit synergic anti-inflammatory and therapeutic effect in acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

  1. Therapeutic effects of human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conditioned medium enema in rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Shuichi; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Onishi, Reizo; Tsuchiya, Ikuki; Hosono, Hidetaka; Katsurada, Takehiko; Yamahara, Kenichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is expected to provide a new strategy for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Large amounts of MSCs can be obtained from human amnion. Therefore, we investigated the effect of transplantation of human amnion-derived MSCs (hAMSCs) or enema of conditioned medium (CM) from hAMSCs into rats with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. In the first experiment, 10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously injected with hAMSCs (1 × 106 cells) 3 h after rectal administration of TNBS (45 mg/kg). In the second experiment, rats with TNBS-induced colitis received CM by enema into the colon for 3 days. Colitis was investigated by endoscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry, and by measuring mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators. Administration of hAMSCs or CM enema significantly improved the endoscopic score. In addition, these two interventions resulted in significantly decreased infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages and decreased expression levels of TNF-α, CXCL1, and CCL2. In conclusion, transplantation of hAMSCs and CM enema provided significant improvement in rats with TNBS-induced colitis. CM from hAMSCs and hAMSCs may be new strategies for the treatment of IBD. PMID:28386323

  2. Investigation of mitigating effect of colon-specific prodrugs of boswellic acid on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in Wistar rats: Design, kinetics and biological evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sarkate, Ajinkya; Dhaneshwar, Suneela S

    2017-01-01

    AIM To develop a colon-targeting bioreversible delivery system for β-boswellic acid (BBA) and explore utility of its prodrugs in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. METHODS Synthesis of 4 co-drugs of BBA with essential amino acids was achieved by CDI coupling, followed by their spectral characterization. In vitro kinetics were studied by HPLC in aqueous buffers, homogenates of gastrointestinal tract and fecal matter. In vivo kinetic studies were performed in Wistar rat plasma, urine and feces. The prodrugs were screened in TNBS-induced colitis modeled Wistar rats. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05, P < 0.01, P < 0.001 when compared with disease controls using one-way and two-way ANOVAs. RESULTS Prodrugs were stable in 0.05 mol/L HCl buffer (pH 1.2) and stomach homogenates. Negligible hydrolysis was observed in phosphate buffer and intestinal homogenates. Substantial release (55%-72% and 68%-86%) of BBA was achieved in rat fecal matter and homogenates of colon. In vivo studies of BBA with L-tryptophan (BT) authenticated colon-specific release of BBA. But, surprisingly substantial concentration of BBA was seen to reach the systemic circulation due to probable absorption through colonic mucosa. Site-specifically enhanced bioavailability of BBA could be achieved in colon, which resulted in demonstration of significant mitigating effect on TNBS-induced colitis in rats without inducing any adverse effects on stomach, liver and pancreas. Prodrug of BT was found to be 1.7% (P < 0.001) superior than sulfasalazine in reducing the inflammation to colon among all prodrugs tested. CONCLUSION The outcome of this study strongly suggests that these prodrugs might have dual applicability to inflammatory bowel disease and chronotherapy of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:28275295

  3. Investigation of mitigating effect of colon-specific prodrugs of boswellic acid on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in Wistar rats: Design, kinetics and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sarkate, Ajinkya; Dhaneshwar, Suneela S

    2017-02-21

    To develop a colon-targeting bioreversible delivery system for β-boswellic acid (BBA) and explore utility of its prodrugs in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Synthesis of 4 co-drugs of BBA with essential amino acids was achieved by CDI coupling, followed by their spectral characterization. In vitro kinetics were studied by HPLC in aqueous buffers, homogenates of gastrointestinal tract and fecal matter. In vivo kinetic studies were performed in Wistar rat plasma, urine and feces. The prodrugs were screened in TNBS-induced colitis modeled Wistar rats. Statistical significance was assumed at P < 0.05, P < 0.01, P < 0.001 when compared with disease controls using one-way and two-way ANOVAs. Prodrugs were stable in 0.05 mol/L HCl buffer (pH 1.2) and stomach homogenates. Negligible hydrolysis was observed in phosphate buffer and intestinal homogenates. Substantial release (55%-72% and 68%-86%) of BBA was achieved in rat fecal matter and homogenates of colon. In vivo studies of BBA with L-tryptophan (BT) authenticated colon-specific release of BBA. But, surprisingly substantial concentration of BBA was seen to reach the systemic circulation due to probable absorption through colonic mucosa. Site-specifically enhanced bioavailability of BBA could be achieved in colon, which resulted in demonstration of significant mitigating effect on TNBS-induced colitis in rats without inducing any adverse effects on stomach, liver and pancreas. Prodrug of BT was found to be 1.7% (P < 0.001) superior than sulfasalazine in reducing the inflammation to colon among all prodrugs tested. The outcome of this study strongly suggests that these prodrugs might have dual applicability to inflammatory bowel disease and chronotherapy of rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Neutrophil apoptosis is delayed in an equine model of colitis: Implications for the development of systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S L; Singh, B

    2017-05-01

    Horses that develop colitis invariably exhibit signs of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). A significant contributor to the development of SIRS in human subjects is delayed neutrophil apoptosis, but this has not been specifically studied in horses. To determine the occurrence of ex vivo neutrophil apoptosis and its contribution to the development of SIRS in an equine colitis model. Experiment using a colitis model. Neutrophils were isolated before and after the induction of colitis using an oligofructose overdose model, placed into culture for 12 h or 24 h with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at various concentrations, and assessed for the occurrence of apoptosis using Annexin V and propidium iodide staining with flow cytometric quantification. Levels of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activity were measured after 12 h of incubation in neutrophil lysates. Ex vivo neutrophil apoptosis was significantly delayed in neutrophils isolated after the induction of colitis (12-h incubation: P = 0.004; 24-h incubation: P = 0.003) with concomitant reductions in caspase-3, -8 and -9 activity (caspase-3: P = 0.004; caspase-8: P = 0.02; caspase-9: P = 0.02). Neutrophils isolated after the induction of colitis were refractory to LPS-delayed apoptosis. Neutrophil apoptosis was delayed with increasing cell concentration in vitro. The main limitation of the study is the that the exact mechanism for delayed neutrophil apoptosis following the induction of colitis was not fully elucidated. The data show that neutrophil apoptosis is delayed in horses following the induction of colitis as a result of interference with the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, which may contribute to the development of equine SIRS. Concurrent development of neutrophilia may contribute to a prolonged neutrophil lifespan through a concentration-dependent delay in apoptosis. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  5. Protective effect of Averrhoa bilimbi L. fruit extract on ulcerative colitis in wistar rats via regulation of inflammatory mediators and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Suluvoy, Jagadish Kumar; Sakthivel, K M; Guruvayoorappan, C; Berlin Grace, V M

    2017-07-01

    Ulcerative Colitis (UC) is a lingering type of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) which affects the colon mucosa. Ulcerative colitis is majorly associated with oxidative stress and inflammation in colon tissue leading to damage. Averrhoa bilimbi L. fruit is rich in antioxidant phytochemicals including Vitamin C. In the current research, we have evaluated the defence mechanism of Averrhoa bilimbi L. on Ulcerative Colitis (UC). Male wistar rats were treated with Averrhoa bilimbi L. fruit extract (50mg/kg/bwt and 100mg/kg/bwt) and a standard drug Sulfasalazine (100mg/kg/bwt) for 6 consecutive days via intra peritoneally. After one day fasting, rats were given single dose of 3% 2ml of acetic acid through anal (intra-anal) region to induce Ulcerative Colitis. The protective and therapeutic effect of fruit extract on UC was assessed by comparing the relevant changes observed in the normal and treated group. In treated group the level of mucosal injury was decreased (ulcer score - 2) when compared to the control group (ulcer score - 9). The abnormal increase observed in the inflammation mediator cytokines in control rats, i.e IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α levels were decreased significantly (**p<0.01) in the Averrhoa bilimbi L. fruit extract treated groups. The increase in weights of the colon tissue and spleen of the control rats were found to be reduced in treated groups. The levels of inflammatory markers iNOS and COX-2 were also decreased in treated group significantly (**p<0.01) when compared with the control. Furthermore, the treatment with Averrhoa bilimbi L. fruit extract has shown a significant antioxidant activity in the UC condition by reducing the levels of NO and enhancing the levels of SOD and GSH in the colon tissue. These results demonstrate the effective anti-ulcerative colitis activity of the Averrhoa bilimbi L. fruit extract in experimental wistar rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Plecanatide and dolcanatide, novel guanylate cyclase-C agonists, ameliorate gastrointestinal inflammation in experimental models of murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shailubhai, Kunwar; Palejwala, Vaseem; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Saykhedkar, Sayali; Nefsky, Bradley; Foss, John A; Comiskey, Stephen; Jacob, Gary S; Plevy, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of orally administered plecanatide or dolcanatide, analogs of uroguanylin, on amelioration of colitis in murine models. METHODS: The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) stimulatory potency of plecanatide and dolcanatide was measured using a human colon carcinoma T84 cell-based assay. For animal studies all test agents were formulated in phosphate buffered saline. Sulfasalazine or 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) served as positive controls. Effect of oral treatment with test agents on amelioration of acute colitis induced either by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water or by rectal instillation of trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid, was examined in BALB/c and/or BDF1 mice. Additionally, the effect of orally administered plecanatide on the spontaneous colitis in T-cell receptor alpha knockout (TCRα-/-) mice was also examined. Amelioration of colitis was assessed by monitoring severity of colitis, disease activity index and by histopathology. Frozen colon tissues were used to measure myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Plecanatide and dolcanatide are structurally related analogs of uroguanylin, which is an endogenous ligand of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C). As expected from the agonists of GC-C, both plecanatide and dolcanatide exhibited potent cGMP-stimulatory activity in T84 cells. Once-daily treatment by oral gavage with either of these analogs (0.05-0.5 mg/kg) ameliorated colitis in both DSS and TNBS-induced models of acute colitis, as assessed by body weight, reduction in colitis severity (P < 0.05) and disease activity index (P < 0.05). Amelioration of colitis by either of the drug candidates was comparable to that achieved by orally administered sulfasalazine or 5-ASA. Plecanatide also effectively ameliorated colitis in TCRα-/- mice, a model of spontaneous colitis. As dolcanatide exhibited higher resistance to proteolysis in simulated gastric and intestinal juices, it was selected for further studies. CONCLUSION: This is

  7. Effects of Boswellia serrata in mouse models of chemically induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Kiela, Pawel R; Midura, Anna J; Kuscuoglu, Nesrin; Jolad, Shivanand D; Sólyom, Anikó M; Besselsen, David G; Timmermann, Barbara N; Ghishan, Fayez K

    2005-04-01

    Extracts from Boswellia serrata have been reported to have anti-inflammatory activity, primarily via boswellic acid-mediated inhibition of leukotriene synthesis. In three small clinical trials, boswellia was shown to improve symptoms of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, and because of its alleged safety, boswellia was considered superior over mesalazine in terms of a benefit-risk evaluation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of boswellia extracts in controlled settings of dextran sulfate- or trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in mice. Our results suggest that boswellia is ineffective in ameliorating colitis in these models. Moreover, individual boswellic acids were demonstrated to increase the basal and IL-1beta-stimulated NF-kappaB activity in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro as well as reverse proliferative effects of IL-1beta. We also observed hepatotoxic effect of boswellia with pronounced hepatomegaly and steatosis. Hepatotoxity and increased lipid accumulation in response to boswellia were further confirmed in vitro in HepG2 cells with fluorescent Nile red binding/resazurin reduction assay and by confocal microscopy. Microarray analyses of hepatic gene expression demonstrated dysregulation of a number of genes, including a large group of lipid metabolism-related genes, and detoxifying enzymes, a response consistent with that to hepatotoxic xenobiotics. In summary, boswellia does not ameliorate symptoms of colitis in chemically induced murine models and, in higher doses, may become hepatotoxic. Potential implications of prolonged and uncontrolled intake of boswellia as an herbal supplement in inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory conditions should be considered in future clinical trials with this botanical.

  8. Suppression of TNBS-induced colitis in rats by 4-methylesculetin, a natural coumarin: comparison with prednisolone and sulphasalazine.

    PubMed

    Witaicenis, Aline; Luchini, Ana C; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia A; Felisbino, Sérgio L; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Utrilla, Pilar; Gálvez, Julio; Di Stasi, Luiz C

    2012-01-05

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of the 4-methylesculetin with those produced by prednisolone and sulphasalazine and to elucidate the mechanisms involved in its action. Colitis was induced in rat by instillation of trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). The colon damage was evaluated using macroscopic, microscopic and biochemical analysis. In addition, in vitro studies were performed to evaluate cytokine production in cell cultures using the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7, mouse splenocytes and the human colonic epithelial cell line Caco-2. 4-Methylesculetin produced a reduction of the macroscopic damage score and the recovery of the intestinal cytoarchitecture. These effects were associated with a prevention of the GSH depletion and an inhibition in AP activity. After colitis relapse, 4-methylesculetin improved the colonic inflammatory status as evidenced by histological findings, with a reduction in apoptosis, as well as biochemically by inhibition of colonic myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase and metalloproteinase 9 activities. Paired with this inhibitive activity, there was a decrease in malondialdehyde content and in IL-1β levels. In vitro assays revealed that 4-methylesculetin promoted an inhibition in IL-1β, IL-8, IL-2 and IFN-γ production in cell cultures. In conclusion, 4-methylesculetin showed similar efficacy to that obtained with either prednisolone or sulphasalazine, both in the acute phase of colitis as well as following a curative protocol. The intestinal anti-inflammatory activity by 4-methylesculetin is likely related to its ability in reduce colonic oxidative stress and inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokine production.

  9. Blocking TNF-α by combination of TNF-α- and TNFR-binding cyclic peptide ameliorates the severity of TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bingjiao; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jing; Liang, Huifang; Li, Xiaoyan; Niu, Nin; Li, Baihua; Jiang, Xiaodan; Li, Zhuoya

    2011-04-10

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. TNF antagonists are effectively used to treat these patients, although the efficiency of different antagonists varies. In the present study we combined TNF-α binding cyclic peptide (TBCP) and TNFR1 binding cyclic peptide (TRBCP) to treat TNBS-induced colitis in rats for one week. The symptoms of colitis including bloody diarrhea, rectal prolapse, and a profound and sustained weight loss were significantly ameliorated and the colon inflammatory damage, both macroscopic and histological scores, MPO activity, and NO production were markedly decreased in rats by neutralization of TNF-α and blocking TNFR1, as compared with those in rats treated with irrelevant peptide or normal saline (P<0.05). The transcripts of IL-1β and IL-8, and the protein expression of TNF-α in rats treated with both TBCP and TRBCP were also down-regulated (P<0.05), while these proinflammatory cytokines remained unchanged in rats treated with irrelevant peptide or normal saline. These findings suggest that the combination of TNF-α- and TNFR1-binding peptide effectively improves the symptoms of TNBS-induced colitis and alleviates colonic pathological damages in rats. This combination may be a potent candidate for clinical treatment of the inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Comparative Study of Berberis vulgaris Fruit Extract and Berberine Chloride Effects on Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaiyan, Mohsen; Ghannadi, Alireza; Mahzouni, Parvin; Jaffari-Shirazi, Elham

    2011-01-01

    Antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects of anthocyanins are abundant in berberry fruits suggesting that they may have beneficial effects on inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The present study was carried out to investigate the anti-colitic effect of Berberis vulgaris fruit extract (BFE) compared to berberine chloride (BEC) and corticosteroids using an animal model of acetic acid induced experimental colitis. BFE with three different doses (375, 750, and 1500 mg/Kg) was administered orally or rectally prior to ulcer induction. BEC (10 mg/Kg), prednisolone (5 mg/Kg), hydrocortisone acetate enema (20 mg/Kg) and normal saline (5 mL/Kg) were considered as respective controls. The tissue was assessed macroscopically for damage scores, area, index and weight/length ratio. They were also examined histopathologically for inflammation extent and severity, crypt damage, invasion involvement and total colitis index. Results indicated that greater doses of oral BFE (750, 1500 mg/Kg) as well as BEC (10 mg/Kg) were effective to protect against colonic damage. By rectal pretreatment, the extract was only effective to diminish the ulcer index and the efficacy was not significant for mucosal inflammation parameters. In conclusion BFE, which is nearly devoid of berberine, was effective to protect against colitis and this might be attributed to its anthocyanin constituents. PMID:24363687

  11. Streptococcus thermophilus NCIMB 41856 ameliorates signs of colitis in an animal model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J R; Vince, V; Williams, N A; Cogan, T A

    2017-08-24

    Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is mainly based on suppression of symptoms, often with numerous side effects. Trials of probiotics in IBD have frequently produced disappointing results. The majority of probiotics are unusual, since they do not require iron for growth, unlike many bacteria resident in the intestine. The IBD intestine is iron-rich due to bleeding and use of oral iron supplements; conventional probiotics would be rapidly outcompeted. We have evaluated an iron-responsive Streptococcus thermophilus strain for its potential to reduce signs of colitis. Efficacy of S. thermophilus was evaluated in the dextran sodium sulphate mouse model of colitis. Treated animals were given 1×10(8) cfu S. thermophilus per day and clinical observations were taken daily. At termination, gross and histopathological signs of disease, cellular infiltration, location of bacteria, and cytokine expression in the intestine were determined. S. thermophilus delayed onset of colitis and reduced clinical signs of disease, including bodyweight loss and gastrointestinal bleeding. It reduced bacterial translocation into the colonic tissue. Increased numbers of CD8(+) intraepithelial lymphocytes were seen in control animals treated with S. thermophilus. S. thermophilus had no effect on gross pathology, histopathology or cytokine production in either colitic or control animals. We propose that S. thermophilus promotes maintenance of mucosal barrier function which reduces bacterial translocation, thereby reducing immune stimulation and associated inflammation. This allows mucosal healing, reducing gastrointestinal bleeding and weight loss. This could be studied as a locally-acting adjunct or alternative to current IBD treatments.

  12. Effect of Arctium lappa L. in the dextran sulfate sodium colitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzou-Chi; Tsai, Shinn-Shyong; Liu, Li-Fang; Liu, Yu Lin; Liu, Hung-Jen; Chuang, Kuo Pin

    2010-09-07

    To analyze the possible protective role of Arctium lappa L. (AL) in a murine model of ulcerative colitis (UC). BALB/c mice were administered 100 mg/kg AL powder orally each day. After 7 d, colitis was induced by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) (5% W/V) in drinking water for a further 8 consecutive days. Diarrhea and bloody stools as well as colonic histology were observed. The level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in colonic sections were detected by immunohistochemistry. There were significant differences in mean body weight values and disease activity indices between controls and AL-treated animals. Moreover, the histological findings showed that AL treatment can prevent mucosal edema, submucosal erosions, ulceration, inflammatory cell infiltration and colon damage. In addition, immunohistochemistry analysis showed that the levels of the inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-alpha were also decreased in AL-treated groups. We suggest that AL can prevent intestinal damage and decrease inflammatory cytokines in mice with DSS-induced colitis. Thus, AL could prove to be a useful food for UC.

  13. Effect of Arctium lappa L. in the dextran sulfate sodium colitis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tzou-Chi; Tsai, Shinn-Shyong; Liu, Li-Fang; Liu, Yu Lin; Liu, Hung-Jen; Chuang, Kuo Pin

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the possible protective role of Arctium lappa L. (AL) in a murine model of ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: BALB/c mice were administered 100 mg/kg AL powder orally each day. After 7 d, colitis was induced by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) (5% W/V) in drinking water for a further 8 consecutive days. Diarrhea and bloody stools as well as colonic histology were observed. The level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in colonic sections were detected by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: There were significant differences in mean body weight values and disease activity indices between controls and AL-treated animals. Moreover, the histological findings showed that AL treatment can prevent mucosal edema, submucosal erosions, ulceration, inflammatory cell infiltration and colon damage. In addition, immunohistochemistry analysis showed that the levels of the inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α were also decreased in AL-treated groups. CONCLUSION: We suggest that AL can prevent intestinal damage and decrease inflammatory cytokines in mice with DSS-induced colitis. Thus, AL could prove to be a useful food for UC. PMID:20806438

  14. Therapeutic and immunoregulatory effect of GATA-binding protein-3/T-box expressed in T-cells ratio of astragalus polysaccharides on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Jian; Zhu, Feng; Qian, Jia-Ming; Dai, Jia-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the immunological characteristics of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis model and examine the therapeutic effects and mechanisms of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) treatment. Thirty-two male specific pathogen free Spragne-Dawley rats were randomly equally assigned to four groups: control, TNBS, APS and prednisone groups. Experimental colitis was induced by enema administration of TNBS. Then rats were treated with APS (0.5 g•kg(-1)•day(-1), once daily) or prednisone (1.0 mg•kg(-1)•day(-1), once daily) by gavage for 14 days. Macroscopic lesion and histological damage were determined, and activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured in the colonic tissues. Expressions of T-box expressed in T-cells (T-bet) and GATA-binding protein-3 (GATA-3) were determined by immunohistochemistry analysis and western blot. Both macroscopic lesion and histological colonic damage induced by TNBS were reduced by APS and prednisone treatment. These were accompanied by significant attenuation of MPO activity (P=0.03). TNBS intervention enhanced the expression of both GATA-3 and T-bet, but the expression of T-bet was significantly enhanced than that of GATA-3, resulting in significant reduction of GATA-3/T-bet ratio (P=0.025). APS administration enhanced the expression of T-bet (P=0.04) and GATA-3 (P=0.019) in comparison to TNBS group, and resulting in an up-regulated GATA-3/T-bet ratio. Prednisone treatment inhibited both expressions; however it also resulted in up-regulation of the GATA-3/T-bet ratio. These results demonstrated that APS exerted a beneficial immune regulatory effect on experimental colitis. It promoted the expression of T helper cell 1 (Th1) and T helper cell 2 (Th2) specific transcription factors but ultimately favor a shift toward Th2 phenotype, suggesting that APS possessed therapeutic potential in experimental colitis.

  15. Camel's milk ameliorates TNBS-induced colitis in rats via downregulation of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Arab, Hany H; Salama, Samir A; Eid, Ahmed H; Omar, Hany A; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A

    2014-07-01

    Current treatment strategies for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with several adverse effects, and thus, the search for effective agents with minimal side effects merits attention. Camel's milk (CM) is endowed with antioxidant/anti-inflammatory features and has been reported to protect against diabetes and hepatic injury, however, its effects on IBD have not been previously explored. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the potential alleviating effects of CM against TNBS-induced colitis in rats. CM (10 ml/kg b.i.d. by oral gavage) effectively suppressed the severity of colon injury as evidenced by amelioration of macroscopic damage, colon weight/length ratio, histopathological alterations, leukocyte influx and myeloperoxidase activity. Administration of CM mitigated the colonic levels of TNF-α and IL-10 cytokines. The attenuation of CM to colon injury was also associated with suppression of oxidative stress via reduction of lipid peroxides and nitric oxide along with boosting the antioxidant defenses through restoration of colon glutathione and total anti-oxidant capacity. In addition, caspases-3 activity, an apoptotic marker, was inhibited. Together, our study highlights evidences for the promising alleviating effects of CM in colitis. Thus, CM may be an interesting complementary approach for the management of IBD.

  16. Animal models of ulcerative colitis and their application in drug research

    PubMed Central

    Low, Daren; Nguyen, Deanna D; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2013-01-01

    The specific pathogenesis underlying inflammatory bowel disease is complex, and it is even more difficult to decipher the pathophysiology to explain for the similarities and differences between two of its major subtypes, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC). Animal models are indispensable to pry into mechanistic details that will facilitate better preclinical drug/therapy design to target specific components involved in the disease pathogenesis. This review focuses on common animal models that are particularly useful for the study of UC and its therapeutic strategy. Recent reports of the latest compounds, therapeutic strategies, and approaches tested on UC animal models are also discussed. PMID:24250223

  17. A Multihit Model: Colitis Lessons from the Interleukin-10–deficient Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Keubler, Lydia M.; Buettner, Manuela; Häger, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Complex mechanisms are pulling the strings to initiate the development of inflammatory bowel disease. Current evidence indicates that an interaction of genetic susceptibilities (polymorphisms), environmental factors, and the host microbiota leads to a dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. In the past decades, the interleukin-10–deficient mouse has served as an excellent model to mirror the multifactorial nature of this disease. Here, we want to review in detail the interplay of the genetic factors, immune aspects, and especially summarize and discuss the role of the microbiota contributing to colitis development in the interleukin-10–deficient mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease as a multihit model. PMID:26164667

  18. The anti-ulcerative colitis effects of Annona squamosa Linn. leaf aqueous extract in experimental animal model

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Rasha YM; Hassan, Amal I; AL-Adham, Eithar K

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of Annona squamosa (A. squamosa) leaf aqueous extract against acetic acid induced colitis in rats with a trial to explore its use for the treatment of colon inflammation. Sprague Dawley rats weighing 180-200 g were used in this study. Treatment with A. squamosa extract at dose 300 mg/kg for 4 weeks counteracted acetic acid induced ulcerative colitis by a significant decrease (P<0.05) of colonic tissue of malondialdehyde (MDA) and significant increases of catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) compared to ulcerative colitis control group. Furthermore, induction of oxidative stress was observed in the colonic tissue through the levels of 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) which significant increase in colonic tissue DNA by acetic acid. Moreover AA induced significant increase in serum interleukin-10 (IL10), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), transforming growth factor (TGF 1β), and C reactive protein (CRP) as compared to the control group. On the contrary, our results showed AA induced significant decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thyroid hormones triiodothyronin and thyroxin (T3 & T4) in installed group with AA as compared to control which significantly improved after treatment with A. squamosa leaf extract. Histopathological observation in our study confirmed the biochemical study. Thus, therapeutic method offer a sign to analyze further the effectiveness of A. squamosa as a unique agent for alleviating colitis. PMID:26885156

  19. Microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Jorge; Delgado, Bertha; Fich, Alex; Odes, Shmuel

    2004-08-01

    Microscopic colitis is an idiopathic chronic inflammatory bowel disease presenting with watery diarrhea. While colonoscopy and radiology findings are normal, the colon shows striking pathologic findings, including lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The clinical course is usually benign with sustained remission. Recent medical evidence shows that bismuth and budesonide are effective treatments.

  20. L-arginine and aminoguanidine reduce colonic damage of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats: potential modulation of nuclear factor-κB/p65.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, Hanan S M; Thabit, Romany H

    2014-10-01

    The transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key inducer of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential protective effect of l-arginine (Arg; nitric oxide precursor) and aminoguanidine (inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor) against acetic acid (AA)-induced colitis in rats, and the potential role of NF-κB. Colitis was induced by intrarectal inoculation of rats with 4% acetic acid for three consecutive days. The effect of Arg and aminoguanidine on nitric oxide levels was assessed by Greiss assay and protein expression of NF-κB/p65, and inducible nitric oxide synthase was also investigated by immunohistochemistry. Slides were examined using ImageJ, and results reported as the percent area positive for each marker. Intrarectal AA caused a significant increase in bodyweight loss and colon weights. Arg at 100 mg/day for 7 days before induction of colitis diminished the changes in both bodyweight loss and colon weights. Furthermore, Arg attenuated the colonic tissues macroscopic and microscopic damage induced by acetic acid. In addition, i.p. AG 100 mg/kg given during and after induction of colitis recovered the colonic ulcerative lesion induced by AA. Arg can protect against colonic inflammation; an effect that probably be attributed to its nitric oxide-donating property, resulting in modulatory effects on the expression of NF-κB/p65 in the colon tissues. The results suggested that Arg might reduce the inflammation associated with colitis as confirmed by histopathological investigations. Arg might inhibit AA-induced colitis through the NF-κB/nitric oxide pathway.

  1. The Attenuation of Scutellariae radix Extract on Oxidative Stress for Colon Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 Cell and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yu; Yang, Jun; Lin, Lianjie; Lin, Yan; Zheng, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress (OS) has been regarded as one of the major pathogeneses of ulcerative colitis (UC) through damaging colon. It has been shown that Scutellariae radix (SR) extract has a beneficial effect for the prevention and treatment of UC. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether SR had a potential capacity on oxidant damage for colon injury both in vivo and in vitro. Materials and Methods: The 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) was used to induce UC rats model while 1 μg/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was for RAW264.7 cell damage. Disease activity index (DAI) was determined to response the severity of colitis. The myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in rat colon was also estimated. The 2,2’-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid assay was performed to evaluate the total antioxidant capacity of SR. Furthermore, the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation malondialdehyde (MDA) in cell supernatant and rat serum were detected by appropriate kits. In addition, an immunohistochemical assay was applied to examine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) protein expression in colon tissue. Results: The treatment with SR could significantly increase the activity of GSH-PX, CAT, and SOD associated with OS in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cell damage and TNBS-induced UC rats. However, the level of MDA was markedly reduced both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, SR significantly decreased DAI and reversed the increased MPO activity. Thus, SR could decrease the severity of acute TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Immunohistochemical assay showed that SR significantly downregulated TGF-β1 protein expression in colon tissue. Conclusion: Our data provided evidence to support this fact that SR attenuated OS in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cell and also in TNBS-induced UC rats. Thus, SR may be an interesting candidate drug for the management of UC. SUMMARY Scutellariae radix (SR

  2. Modeling Colitis-Associated Cancer with Azoxymethane (AOM) and Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS)

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Ameet I.; Shaker, Anisa; Rao, M. Suprada; Ciorba, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) are at increased risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC) over healthy individuals. This risk is proportional to the duration and extent of disease, with a cumulative incidence as high as 30% in individuals with longstanding UC with widespread colonic involvement.1 Colonic dysplasia in IBD and colitis associated cancer (CAC) are believed to develop as a result of repeated cycles of epithelial cell injury and repair while these cells are bathed in a chronic inflammatory cytokine milieu.2 While spontaneous and colitis-associated cancers share the quality of being adenocarcinomas, the sequence of underlying molecular events is believed to be different.3 This distinction argues the need for specific animal models of CAC. Several mouse models currently exist for the study of CAC. Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS), an agent with direct toxic effects on the colonic epithelium, can be administered in drinking water to mice in multiple cycles to create a chronic inflammatory state. With sufficient duration, some of these mice will develop tumors.4 Tumor development is hastened in this model if administered in a pro-carcinogenic setting. These include mice with genetic mutations in tumorigenesis pathways (APC, p53, Msh2), as well as mice pre-treated with genotoxic agents (azoxymethane [AOM], 1,2-dimethylhydrazine [DMH]).5 The combination of DSS with AOM as a model for colitis associated cancer has gained popularity for its reproducibility, potency, low price, and ease of use. Though they have a shared mechanism, AOM has been found to be more potent and stable in solution than DMH. While tumor development in other models generally requires several months, mice injected with AOM and subsequently treated with DSS develop adequate tumors in as little as 7-10 weeks.6, 7 Finally, AOM and DSS can be administered to mice of any genetic background (knock out, transgenic, etc

  3. [Microscopic colitis].

    PubMed

    Bohr, Johan

    2002-02-11

    Microscopic colitis is an umbrella term for a newly described group of colitides, belonging to the inflammatory bowel diseases, which are only diagnosable by microscopic evaluation of a macroscopically normal colon mucosa. Collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis are the most common of these colitides. Microscopic colitis is characterised clinically by chronic non-bloody watery diarrhoea. Crampy abdominal pain, nocturnal diarrhoea, urgency, and initial weight loss are usual. Concomitant diseases of autoimmune origin and arthralgia are commonly seen. Treatment of microscopic colitis follows the guidelines for treatment of other inflammatory bowel diseases, but a substantial part of the patients with microscopic colitis enter spontaneous remission after some years. A minor part, however, have very troublesome symptoms and are almost refractory to treatment. Microscopic colitis has apparently no malignant potential.

  4. Anti-inflammatory effect of volatile oil and hydroalcoholic extract of Rosa damascena Mill. on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Ghazal; Ghannadi, Alireza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Rosa damascena is a small plant belonging to Rosaceae family which has been used for the treatment of some inflammatory diseases and digestive disorders in the Iranian folk medicine. This study was performed to investigate the effect of R. damascena hydroalcoholic extract (RDHE) and R. damascena volatile oil (RDVO) on ulcerative colitis induced by acetic acid in rats. Different doses of RDHE (250, 500, 1000 mg/kg) and RDVO (100, 200, 400 µl/kg) were given orally (p.o.) and doses of RDHE (125, 250, 500 mg/kg) were administrated intraperitoneally (i.p.) to the male Wistar rats (n=6) 2 h before induction of colitis which continued daily for 4 successive days. Prednisolone (4 mg/kg p.o.) and dexamethasone (1 mg/kg i.p.) were used in the reference groups. Weight/length ratios of wet colon were measured and the tissues were assessed macroscopically, histopathologically, and biochemically via measuring the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Oral RDHE at all doses examined, and the lowest dose of RDVO given p.o. or RDHE administered i.p. reduced all indices of colitis measured in different assays as well as the MPO activity. These results provide encouraging support for the use of hydroalcoholic extract of R. damascena in relieving alimentary inflammatory conditions and reinforce the use of this plant to develop new agents for treating ulcerative colitis.

  5. Anti-inflammatory effect of volatile oil and hydroalcoholic extract of Rosa damascena Mill. on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Latifi, Ghazal; Ghannadi, Alireza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Rosa damascena is a small plant belonging to Rosaceae family which has been used for the treatment of some inflammatory diseases and digestive disorders in the Iranian folk medicine. This study was performed to investigate the effect of R. damascena hydroalcoholic extract (RDHE) and R. damascena volatile oil (RDVO) on ulcerative colitis induced by acetic acid in rats. Different doses of RDHE (250, 500, 1000 mg/kg) and RDVO (100, 200, 400 µl/kg) were given orally (p.o.) and doses of RDHE (125, 250, 500 mg/kg) were administrated intraperitoneally (i.p.) to the male Wistar rats (n=6) 2 h before induction of colitis which continued daily for 4 successive days. Prednisolone (4 mg/kg p.o.) and dexamethasone (1 mg/kg i.p.) were used in the reference groups. Weight/length ratios of wet colon were measured and the tissues were assessed macroscopically, histopathologically, and biochemically via measuring the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Oral RDHE at all doses examined, and the lowest dose of RDVO given p.o. or RDHE administered i.p. reduced all indices of colitis measured in different assays as well as the MPO activity. These results provide encouraging support for the use of hydroalcoholic extract of R. damascena in relieving alimentary inflammatory conditions and reinforce the use of this plant to develop new agents for treating ulcerative colitis. PMID:26779271

  6. Evaluation of the protective effect of Pterocarpus marsupium on acetic acid-induced ulcerative colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Merin Maria; Han, Nguyen Vinh; Murugesan, A; Raj, E Arun; Prasanth, K G

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of Pterocarpus marsupium (PM) on acetic acid (AA)-induced ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats. The rats were divided into five groups, each having six rats. PM extract 100 mg and 200 mg/kg was given orally to groups four and five, respectively, and standard drug sulfasalazine (100 mg/kg, p.o) to group three. Group two served as UC control animals, and group one control animals received vehicle for 7 days. UC was induced by administering AA (3 % v/v of 2 ml) to all the animals except group one. After 72 h, the animals were killed and the colon was dissected out for microscopic, clinical evaluation, histopathological study and biochemical estimation. PM (100 and 200 mg/kg)-treated group had significantly reduced colon inflammation and mucosal damage. The treatment also normalized the altered antioxidant enzyme levels (LPO, SOD and GSH). Histopathological studies support the effect. The protective effect of PM may be due to antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties.

  7. Effects of Herb-Partitioned Moxibustion on the miRNA Expression Profiles in Colon from Rats with DSS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Ma, Zhe; Cui, Yun-hua; Dong, Hong-sheng; Dou, Chuan-zi

    2017-01-01

    Objective. This study explored the mechanism of herb-partitioned moxibustion (HM) on dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced ulcerative colitis (UC) from the miRNA perspective. Methods. Rats were randomly divided into 3 groups [normal control (NC) group, UC model (UC) group, and herb-partitioned moxibustion (UCHM) group]. The UC and UCHM groups were administered 4% DSS for 7 days. The UCHM group received HM at the Tianshu (bilateral, ST25). The effect of HM on UC was observed and the miRNA expression profile in the colon tissues was analyzed. Results. Compared with the UC group, the body weights were significantly higher in the UCHM group on day 14 (P < 0.001); the macroscopic colon injury scores and microscopic histopathology scores in the UCHM group decreased (P < 0.05); and there were 15 differentially expressed miRNAs in the UCHM group. The changes in miR-184 and miR-490-5p expression levels on the UC were reversed by HM intervention. Validation using qRT-PCR showed that two miRNAs expression trend was consistent with the sequencing results. Conclusion. HM at ST25 might regulate miR-184 and miR-490-5p expression, act on the transcription of their target genes to regulate inflammatory signaling pathways, and attenuate inflammation and tissue injury in the colons of rats with DSS-induced UC. PMID:28246536

  8. Time to Integrate to Nest Test Evaluation in a Mouse DSS-Colitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Häger, Christine; Keubler, Lydia M.; Biernot, Svenja; Dietrich, Jana; Buchheister, Stephanie; Buettner, Manuela; Bleich, André

    2015-01-01

    Severity assessment in laboratory animals is an important issue regarding the implementation of the 3R concept into biomedical research and pivotal in current EU regulations. In mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease severity assessment is usually undertaken by clinical scoring, especially by monitoring reduction of body weight. This requires daily observance and handling of each mouse, which is time consuming, stressful for the animal and necessitates an experienced observer. The time to integrate to nest test (TINT) is an easily applicable test detecting disturbed welfare by measuring the time interval mice need to integrate nesting material to an existing nest. Here, TINT was utilized to assess severity in a mouse DSS-colitis model. TINT results depended on the group size of mice maintained per cage with most consistent time intervals measured when co-housing 4 to 5 mice. Colitis was induced with 1% or 1.5% DSS in group-housed WT and Cd14-deficient mice. Higher clinical scores and loss of body weight were detected in 1.5% compared to 1% DSS treated mice. TINT time intervals showed no dose dependent differences. However, increased clinical scores, body weight reductions, and increased TINT time intervals were detected in Cd14-/- compared to WT mice revealing mouse strain related differences. Therefore, TINT is an easily applicable method for severity assessment in a mouse colitis model detecting CD14 related differences, but not dose dependent differences. As TINT revealed most consistent results in group-housed mice, we recommend utilization as an additional method substituting clinical monitoring of the individual mouse. PMID:26637175

  9. Identification of gene expression changes from colitis to CRC in the mouse CAC model.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Gao, Yuyan; Yang, Ming; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Guangyu; Yang, Yan Mei; Yang, Yue; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Yanqiao

    2014-01-01

    A connection between colorectal carcinogenesis and inflammation is well known, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. Chemically induced colitis-associated cancer (CAC) is an outstanding mouse model for studying the link between inflammation and cancer. Additionally, the CAC model is used for examining novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive markers for use in clinical practice. Here, a CAC model was established in less than 100 days using azoxymethane (AOM) with dextran sulfate sodium salt (DSS) in BALB/c mice. We examined the mRNA expression profiles of three groups: control untreated mice (K), DSS-induced chronic colitis mice (D), and AOM/DSS-induced CAC (AD) mice. We identified 6301 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) among the three groups, including 93 persistently upregulated genes and 139 persistently downregulated genes. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses revealed that the most persistent DEGs were significantly enriched in metabolic or inflammatory components in the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, several associated DEGs were identified as potential DEGs by protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis. We selected 14 key genes from the DEGs and potential DEGs for further quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) verification. Six persistently upregulated, 3 persistently downregulated DEGs, and the other 3 genes showed results consistent with the microarray data. We demonstrated the regulation of 12 key genes specifically involved in Wnt signaling, cytokine and cytokine receptor interactions, homeostasis, and tumor-associated metabolism during colitis-associated CRC. Our results suggest that a close relationship between metabolic and inflammatory mediators of the tumor microenvironment is present in CAC.

  10. Time to Integrate to Nest Test Evaluation in a Mouse DSS-Colitis Model.

    PubMed

    Häger, Christine; Keubler, Lydia M; Biernot, Svenja; Dietrich, Jana; Buchheister, Stephanie; Buettner, Manuela; Bleich, André

    2015-01-01

    Severity assessment in laboratory animals is an important issue regarding the implementation of the 3R concept into biomedical research and pivotal in current EU regulations. In mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease severity assessment is usually undertaken by clinical scoring, especially by monitoring reduction of body weight. This requires daily observance and handling of each mouse, which is time consuming, stressful for the animal and necessitates an experienced observer. The time to integrate to nest test (TINT) is an easily applicable test detecting disturbed welfare by measuring the time interval mice need to integrate nesting material to an existing nest. Here, TINT was utilized to assess severity in a mouse DSS-colitis model. TINT results depended on the group size of mice maintained per cage with most consistent time intervals measured when co-housing 4 to 5 mice. Colitis was induced with 1% or 1.5% DSS in group-housed WT and Cd14-deficient mice. Higher clinical scores and loss of body weight were detected in 1.5% compared to 1% DSS treated mice. TINT time intervals showed no dose dependent differences. However, increased clinical scores, body weight reductions, and increased TINT time intervals were detected in Cd14-/- compared to WT mice revealing mouse strain related differences. Therefore, TINT is an easily applicable method for severity assessment in a mouse colitis model detecting CD14 related differences, but not dose dependent differences. As TINT revealed most consistent results in group-housed mice, we recommend utilization as an additional method substituting clinical monitoring of the individual mouse.

  11. Goat whey ameliorates intestinal inflammation on acetic acid-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Daline Fernandes de Souza; Guerra, Gerlane Coelho Bernardo; Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes de Araújo; Antunes de Araújo, Aurigena; Antonino de Assis, Paloma Oliveira; Nunes de Medeiros, Ariosvaldo; Formiga de Sousa, Yasmim Regis; Pintado, Maria Manuela Estevez; Gálvez, Julio; Queiroga, Rita de Cássia Ramos do Egypto

    2016-12-01

    Complementary or alternative medicine is of great interest for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, with the aim of ameliorating the side effects of the drugs commonly used or improving their efficacy. In this study, we evaluated the ability of goat whey to prevent intestinal inflammation in the experimental model of acetic acid-induced rats and compared it to sulfasalazine. Pretreatment with goat whey (1, 2, and 4g/kg) and sulfasalazine (250mg/kg) on colitic rats improved colonic inflammatory markers, including myeloperoxidase activity, leukotriene B4 levels, as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, the administration of goat whey significantly reduced the colonic oxidative stress by reducing malondialdehyde levels and increased total glutathione content, a potent antioxidant peptide. The histological evaluation of the colonic specimens from colitic rats confirmed these beneficial effects, as goat whey preserved the colonic tissue, especially in those rats treated with the highest dose of goat whey or with sulfasalazine. The immunohistochemistry analysis of the colonic tissue evaluation also revealed a reduction in the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, together with an increased expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1. These results suggest that goat whey exerted a preventive effect against the intestinal damage induced by acetic acid, showing a similar efficacy to that shown by sulfasalazine, therefore making it a potential treatment for human inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic effect and mechanism of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds in rats with TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Li; Cai, Yong-Qing; Qin, Hong; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds (GSPE) in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC). Rats were intragastrically administered different doses of GSPE (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) per day for 7 days after UC was twice-induced by intracolonic injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)dissolved in 50% ethanol. Sulfasalazine (SASP) at 200 mg/kg was used as a positive control drug. Macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and changes in weight/length ratio (mg/mm) of colon segments were analyzed. The levels of malonyldialdehyde (MDA), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the colon tissues and MPO activity in the serum were all measured by biochemical methods or double antibody sandwich ELISA methods. Compared with the TNBS control group, GSPE treatment facilitated recovery of pathologic changes in the colon after insult with TNBS, as demonstrated by increased body weight (p < 0.01) and decreased colonic weight/length ratio (p < 0.01); GSPE also notably reduced the colonic macroscopic and microscopic damage scores (p < 0.01). The MPO activity in colon tissues and serum of rats treated with GSPE was significantly lower than that in the TNBS control group. The MDA and IL-1beta levels of colon tissues were also decreased in GSPE groups. The intestinal antiinflammatory effect of GSPE was accompanied by a significant improvement of IL-2 and IL-4 levels in the colon tissues of rats in the high-dose GSPE group (p < 0.05). Compared with the SASP group, GSPE groups had no significant difference in the therapeutic effect (p > 0.05). GSPE exerts a beneficial antiinflammatory effect in the acute phase of TNBS-induced colitis in rats by downregulating some of the mediators involved in the intestinal inflammatory response, inhibiting inflammatory cell infiltration and antioxidation damage, promoting damaged tissue repair to improve colonic oxidative stress

  13. Protective Effect of Dietary Lily Bulb on Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis in Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Yukako; Chiji, Hideyuki; Kato, Norihisa

    2016-01-01

    Lily bulb is traditionally consumed in East Asia and contains high amounts of glucomannan. This study investigated the effect of dietary lily bulb on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 30% beef tallow with or without 7% steamed lily bulb powder for 17 d. Experimental colitis was induced by replacing drinking water with DSS during the last 7 d. The disease activity index (DAI) was significantly lower in the lily bulb+DSS group than in the DSS group on day 17. The fecal abundance of Bifidobacterium was significantly reduced in the DSS group compared with that in the control group, but it was recovered by lily bulb intake. Cecal butyrate, fecal mucins, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were significantly higher in the DSS group than in the control group. Dietary lily bulb potentiated the increase in cecal butyrate, fecal mucins, and the ALP activity caused by DSS treatment. These results indicate that lily bulb attenuates DSS-induced colitis by modulating colonic microflora, organic acids, mucins, and ALP activity in HF diet-fed rats.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of Dioscorea alata L. anthocyanins in a TNBS-induced colitis model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Hu, Shihui; Zhang, Haiwen; Guan, Qingfeng; Yang, Yuhui; Wang, Xuemei

    2017-02-22

    The purple yam, Dioscorea alata L., is an important source of starch, vitamins and polyphenols. Five different pigments from the purple tubers of this plant were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the anthocyanin fraction (DACN) was collected. The anti-inflammatory effects of DACNs were investigated at different concentrations and compared with the standard colitis treatment, 5-aminosalicylic acid, in a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis mouse model. Macro- and microscopic parameters including body weight change, disease activity index (DAI) and intestinal histology were used for the determination of the anti-inflammatory effects of DACNs. The gene expression levels of tight junction-related proteins in the intestine, myeloperoxidase activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase activity in colonic tissues and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in serum were also measured to elucidate the mechanism of DACN action. Eighty micrograms of DACNs per kilogram of body weight produced potent anti-inflammatory effects in the mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as shown by the DAI (2.78 ± 0.38 vs. 0.44 ± 0.51). Therefore, DACNs may be applied as a potential food supplement in IBD therapy.

  15. Experimental colitis models: Insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease and translational issues.

    PubMed

    Valatas, Vassilis; Bamias, Giorgos; Kolios, George

    2015-07-15

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, ulcerative colitis and Crohn׳s disease are characterized by chronic relapsing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology that seems to be the consequence of a genetically driven dysregulated immune response against various local and environmental triggers through a defective epithelial barrier. During the last decades, a large number of animal experimental models of intestinal inflammation have been generated and provided valuable insights into the mechanisms that either maintain mucosal homeostasis or drive intestinal inflammation. Their study enabled the identification of various treatment targets and the development a large pipeline of new drugs, mostly biologics. Safety and therapeutic efficacy of these agents have been evaluated in a large number of clinical trials but only a minority has reached the clinic so far. Translational successes but mostly translational failures have prompted to re-evaluate results of efficacy and safety generated by pre-clinical testing and to re-examine the way to interpret experimental in vivo data. This review examines the contribution of the most popular experimental colitis models to our understanding of the pathogenesis of human inflammatory bowel diseases and their translational input in drug development and discusses ways to improve translational outcome.

  16. Octacosanol Attenuates Inflammation in Both RAW264.7 Macrophages and a Mouse Model of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tianyi; Lin, Qinlu; Li, Xinhua; Nie, Ying; Wang, Long; Shi, Limin; Xu, Wei; Hu, Tao; Guo, Ting; Luo, Feijun

    2017-05-10

    Octacosanol has multiple biological functions. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effect and molecular mechanism of octacosanol were evaluated by using dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis model in mice and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells. The colitis mouse model was induced by 3.0% DSS in 8-week ICR mice and octacosanol orally administered with 100 mg/kg/day. The results showed that octacosanol significantly improved the health status of mice and reduced DSS-induced pathological damage in the colonic tissues. Octacosanol obviously inhibited the mRNA and protein expression levels of pro-inflammatory factors of colonic tissues. In vitro, octacosanol administration significantly reduced the expression of mRNA or protein of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38, and it also partly prevented LPS-induced translocations of NF-κB and AP-1. Octacosanol has anti-inflammatory effect, and its molecular mechanism may be involved in downregulating the expression of inflammatory factors and blocking of MAPK/NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathway.

  17. The effect of pentoxifylline and its metabolite-1 on inflammation and fibrosis in the TNBS model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Theresa C; Peterson, Marc R; Raoul, Jennifer M

    2011-07-15

    TNBS-induced colitis has characteristics resembling human Crohn's disease including transmural inflammation, ulceration, and fibrosis. Current treatments target acute symptoms but do not necessarily prevent fibrotic complications of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pentoxifylline and its primary metabolite (M-1) on fibrosis in the TNBS-induced colitis model. Myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-18 are indicators of inflammation and were elevated in the TNBS model. The morphology damage score assesses colon damage and was also elevated in the TNBS model. Collagen as the indicator of fibrosis was quantified and visualized by the Sirius Red/Fast Green staining technique and collagen type I was assessed by Western analysis. Collagen was elevated in the TNBS-induced model. Pentoxifylline and M-1 treatment significantly attenuated colon damage and inflammation in TNBS-colitis (P<0.05). M-1 treatment significantly reduced the TNBS-induced increase in colon weight, colon thickness and total collagen content (P<0.05). Results suggest that pentoxifylline and M-1 inhibit intestinal fibrosis in this experimental model and may prove beneficial in the treatment of intestinal fibrosis associated with human Crohn's disease with the added benefit of inhibiting inflammation and ulceration. This is the first study to examine the effects of racemic M-1 in vivo and one of the few studies to examine the effect of drugs on both inflammation and fibrosis in an experimental model of colitis.

  18. pH-sensitive nanoparticles of curcumin-celecoxib combination: evaluating drug synergy in ulcerative colitis model.

    PubMed

    Gugulothu, Dalapathi; Kulkarni, Aditya; Patravale, Vandana; Dandekar, Prajakta

    2014-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases, which largely comprise ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease, are increasingly posing as a global threat because of the incompetence of the current therapy in the entire patient population. This necessitates the identification of alternative therapeutic molecules or their combinations, which may serve as effective first-line or maintenance therapeutics. In this quest, celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibiting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent and curcumin, a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, have both been found to be useful in alleviating UC. Furthermore, studies involving their combination have proved synergistic action of these two agents. In the current investigation, we have formulated pH-sensitive nanoparticles of curcumin-celecoxib combination as a potential therapy for UC. Synergistic action of the drug combination, delivery advantages of nanosized carriers, and pH-sensitive nature of the polymer were collectively hypothesized to reduce the overall toxicity and total dose of celecoxib and provide enhanced efficacy for mitigating UC. The hypothesis was confirmed in a UC model in rats, where pH-sensitive nanoparticles of the drug combination were found to be more efficacious than nanoparticles of either drugs or drug/s suspension. Further, the blank nanoparticles did not exhibit any therapeutic effect, thereby confirming efficacy of the drug combination for treating UC. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Therapies and Gut Function in a Colitis Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nahidi, Lily; Leach, Steven T.; Mitchell, Hazel M.; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Lemberg, Daniel A.; Munday, John S.; Huinao, Karina; Day, Andrew S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a well-established approach to the management of Crohn's disease. Aim. To determine effects of EEN upon inflammation and gut barrier function in a colitis mouse model. Methods. Interleukin-10-deficient mice (IL-10−/−) were inoculated with Helicobacter trogontum and then treated with EEN, metronidazole, hydrocortisone, or EEN and metronidazole combination. Blood and tissue were collected at 2 and 4 weeks with histology, mucosal integrity, tight junction integrity, inflammation, and H. trogontum load evaluated. Results. H. trogontum induced colitis in IL-10−/− mice with histological changes in the cecum and colon. Elevated mucosal IL-8 mRNA in infected mice was associated with intestinal barrier dysfunction indicated by decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and mRNA of tight junction proteins and increased short-circuit current, myosin light chain kinase mRNA, paracellular permeability, and tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase plasma levels (P < 0.01 for all comparisons). EEN and metronidazole, but not hydrocortisone, treatments restored barrier function, maintained gut barrier integrity, and reversed inflammatory changes along with reduction of H. trogontum load (versus infected controls P < 0.05). Conclusion. H. trogontum infection in IL-10−/− mice induced typhlocolitis with intestinal barrier dysfunction. EEN and metronidazole, but not hydrocortisone, modulate barrier dysfunction and reversal of inflammatory changes. PMID:24027765

  20. Local Treatment with Lactate Prevents Intestinal Inflammation in the TNBS-Induced Colitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Iraporda, Carolina; Romanin, David E.; Bengoa, Ana A.; Errea, Agustina J.; Cayet, Delphine; Foligné, Benoit; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Garrote, Graciela L.; Abraham, Analía G.; Rumbo, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Lactate has long been considered as a metabolic by-product of cells. Recently, this view has been changed by the observation that lactate can act as a signaling molecule and regulates critical functions of the immune system. We previously identified lactate as the component responsible for the modulation of innate immune epithelial response of fermented milk supernatants in vitro. We have also shown that lactate downregulates proinflammatory responses of macrophages and dendritic cells. So far, in vivo effects of lactate on intestinal inflammation have not been reported. We evaluated the effect of intrarectal administration of lactate in a murine model of colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The increase in lactate concentration in colon promoted protective effects against TNBS-induced colitis preventing histopathological damage, as well as bacterial translocation and rise of IL-6 levels in serum. Using intestinal epithelial reporter cells, we found that flagellin treatment induced reporter gene expression, which was abrogated by lactate treatment as well as by glycolysis inhibitors. Furthermore, lactate treatment modulated glucose uptake, indicating that high levels of extracellular lactate can impair metabolic reprograming induced by proinflammatory activation. These results suggest that lactate could be a potential beneficial microbiota metabolite and may constitute an overlooked effector with modulatory properties. PMID:28082985

  1. Local Treatment with Lactate Prevents Intestinal Inflammation in the TNBS-Induced Colitis Model.

    PubMed

    Iraporda, Carolina; Romanin, David E; Bengoa, Ana A; Errea, Agustina J; Cayet, Delphine; Foligné, Benoit; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Garrote, Graciela L; Abraham, Analía G; Rumbo, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Lactate has long been considered as a metabolic by-product of cells. Recently, this view has been changed by the observation that lactate can act as a signaling molecule and regulates critical functions of the immune system. We previously identified lactate as the component responsible for the modulation of innate immune epithelial response of fermented milk supernatants in vitro. We have also shown that lactate downregulates proinflammatory responses of macrophages and dendritic cells. So far, in vivo effects of lactate on intestinal inflammation have not been reported. We evaluated the effect of intrarectal administration of lactate in a murine model of colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The increase in lactate concentration in colon promoted protective effects against TNBS-induced colitis preventing histopathological damage, as well as bacterial translocation and rise of IL-6 levels in serum. Using intestinal epithelial reporter cells, we found that flagellin treatment induced reporter gene expression, which was abrogated by lactate treatment as well as by glycolysis inhibitors. Furthermore, lactate treatment modulated glucose uptake, indicating that high levels of extracellular lactate can impair metabolic reprograming induced by proinflammatory activation. These results suggest that lactate could be a potential beneficial microbiota metabolite and may constitute an overlooked effector with modulatory properties.

  2. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS‑G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)‑methyl]‑glutarimide (DTCM‑G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS‑Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer‑aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti‑inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the

  3. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    EL-SALHY, MAGDY; UMEZAWA, KAZUO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS-G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecyl thiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS-Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti-inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the clinical manifestation of

  4. Anti-inflammatory Mechanisms of Enteric Heligmosomoides polygyrus Infection on TNBS-Induced Colitis in a Murine Model

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To model the protective mechanism of helminth infection on colitis-induced changes in immune and epithelial cell function, BALB/c mice received intra-rectal saline or TNBS (2 mg/mouse; 40% ETOH) and were studied 4 days (d) later. Separate groups of mice received oral Heligmosomoides polygyrus follow...

  5. Rosiglitazone, a PPARgamma ligand, modulates signal transduction pathways during the development of acute TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Martín, Antonio Ramon; Villegas, Isabel; de la Lastra, Catalina Alarcón

    2007-05-21

    Recent studies have shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a highly nuclear receptor expressed in the colon, may participate in the control of inflammation, especially in regulating the production of immunomodulatory and inflammatory mediators, cellular proliferation and apoptosis. In order to delve into the anti-inflammatory mechanisms and signalling pathways of PPARgamma agonists, we have studied the effects of rosiglitazone, a PPARgamma agonist on the extent and severity of acute ulcerative colitis caused by intracolonic administration of 2,4,6-trinitribenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in rats. The inflammatory response was assessed by gross appearance, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) levels and a histological study of the lesions. We determined prostaglandin E2 production as well as the cyclooxygenases (COX)-1 and -2 expressions by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The nuclear factor kappa (NF-kappaB) p65 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) expression levels were also measured by Western blotting. Finally, since PPARgamma agonists modulate apoptosis, we tried to clarify its effects under early acute inflammatory conditions. Inflammation following TNBS induction was characterized by increased colonic wall thickness, edema, diffuse inflammatory cells infiltration, necrosis reaching an ulcer index (UI) of 9.66+/-0.66 cm(2) and increased MPO activity and TNF-alpha colonic levels. Rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the morphological alteration associated with TNBS administration and the UI with the highest dose. In addition, the degree of neutrophil infiltration and the cytokine levels were significantly ameliorated. Rosiglitazone significantly reduced the rise in the prostaglandin (PG) E(2) generation compared with TNBS group. The COX-1 levels remained stable throughout the treatment in all groups. The COX-2 expression was elevated in TNBS group; however

  6. Iron supplementation promotes gut microbiota metabolic activity but not colitis markers in human gut microbiota-associated rats.

    PubMed

    Dostal, Alexandra; Lacroix, Christophe; Pham, Van T; Zimmermann, Michael B; Del'homme, Christophe; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Chassard, Christophe

    2014-06-28

    The global prevalence of Fe deficiency is high and a common corrective strategy is oral Fe supplementation, which may affect the commensal gut microbiota and gastrointestinal health. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of different dietary Fe concentrations on the gut microbiota and gut health of rats inoculated with human faecal microbiota. Rats (8 weeks old, n 40) were divided into five (n 8 each) groups and fed diets differing only in Fe concentration during an Fe-depletion period (12 weeks) and an Fe-repletion period (4 weeks) as follows: (1) Fe-sufficient diet throughout the study period; (2) Fe-sufficient diet followed by 70 mg Fe/kg diet; (3) Fe-depleted diet throughout the study period; (4) Fe-depleted diet followed by 35 mg Fe/kg diet; (5) Fe-depleted diet followed by 70 mg Fe/kg diet. Faecal and caecal samples were analysed for gut microbiota composition (quantitative PCR and pyrosequencing) and bacterial metabolites (HPLC), and intestinal tissue samples were investigated histologically. Fe depletion did not significantly alter dominant populations of the gut microbiota and did not induce Fe-deficiency anaemia in the studied rats. Provision of the 35 mg Fe/kg diet after feeding an Fe-deficient diet significantly increased the abundance of dominant bacterial groups such as Bacteroides spp. and Clostridium cluster IV members compared with that of an Fe-deficient diet. Fe supplementation increased gut microbial butyrate concentration 6-fold compared with Fe depletion and did not affect histological colitis scores. The present results suggest that Fe supplementation enhances the concentration of beneficial gut microbiota metabolites and thus may contribute to gut health.

  7. Hyaluronan Synthase 3 Null Mice Exhibit Decreased Intestinal Inflammation and Tissue Damage in the DSS-Induced Colitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Sean P.; Obery, Dana R.; de la Motte, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) overproduction is a hallmark of multiple inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Hyaluronan can act as a leukocyte recruitment molecule and in the most common mouse model of intestinal inflammation, the chemically induced dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) experimental colitis model, we previously determined that changes in colon distribution of HA occur before inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that, during a pathologic challenge, HA promotes inflammation. In this study, we tested the progression of inflammation in mice null for the hyaluronan synthase genes (HAS1, HAS3, or both HAS1 and HAS3) in the DSS-colitis model. Our data demonstrate that both the HAS1/HAS3 double and the HAS3 null mice are protected from colitis, compared to wild-type and HAS1 null mice, as determined by measurement of weight loss, disease activity, serum IL-6 levels, histologic scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Most notable is the dramatic increase in submucosal microvasculature, hyaluronan deposition, and leukocyte infiltration in the inflamed colon tissue of wild-type and HAS1 null mice. Our data suggest, HAS3 plays a crucial role in driving gut inflammation. Developing a temporary targeted therapeutic intervention of HAS3 expression or function in the microcirculation may emerge as a desirable strategy toward tempering colitis in patients undergoing flares of IBD. PMID:26448758

  8. Dietary Supplementation with a Low Dose of Polyphenol-Rich Grape Pomace Extract Prevents Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Boussenna, Ahlem; Joubert-Zakeyh, Juliette; Fraisse, Didier; Pereira, Bruno; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Texier, Odile; Felgines, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Evidence from several epidemiological and experimental studies points to a beneficial role of dietary polyphenols in inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we investigate the protective effect of dietary supplementation with various amounts of a polyphenol-rich grape pomace extract (GPE) on the development of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in rats. Rats were fed 21 days on a semisynthetic diet enriched with GPE (0.1%, 0.5%, and 1%), and acute colitis was induced by DSS (40 g/L in the drinking water) administration during the last 7 days. The low GPE content in the diet (0.1%) attenuated clinical signs and colon shortening and limited DSS-induced histological lesions. GPE 0.1% also attenuated the DSS-induced increase in myeloperoxidase activity and improved superoxide dismutase activity. Higher amounts of GPE in the diet induced only weak and nonsignificant protective effects. These results suggest that consumption of a low amount of polyphenol-rich GPE helps protect against colitis development.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors in dextran-sulfate-sodium-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the anti-inflammatory effects of the two novel anti-inflammatory substances, 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)‑methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G) and dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ), on DSS-induced colitis in rats. For this purpose, rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 groups with 10 animals in each group as follows: i) the control group, which received 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC; vehicle), ii) rats that received DTCM-G (20 mg/kg body weight in 0.5% CMC; the DTCM-G group), and iii) rats that received DHMEQ (15 mg/kg body weight in 0.5% CMC; the DHMEQ group). The animals were sacrificed after the 5-day treatment period, and tissue samples were taken from their colons and sectioned for histological evaluation. The tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and immunostained for leukocytes, lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The disease activity index (DAI), histological grading of colitis, and densities of several types of submucosal immune cells were compared between the controls, and the DTCM-G and DHMEQ groups. The DAI values were significantly lower in both the DTCM-G and DHMEQ groups than in the control group. The total scores for the histological grading of colitis were also significantly lower in the DTCM-G and DHMEQ groups than in the control group. The submucosal densities of leucocytes, lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells were significantly lower in the DTCM-G and DHMEQ groups than in the control group. Our findings indicate that the anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects of DTCM-G and DHMEQ, and the absence of any associated toxicity render them excellent therapeutic candidates for clinical use in the treatment of colitis.

  10. [Exploration of the theory of "Fei and Dachang being interior-exteriorly related" from observing changes of inflammatory cytokines and oxygen free radicals in the lung tissue of ulcerative colitis rats].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xin; Wang, Xin-Yue; Sheng, Yi-Hua; Zhu, Li; Zhang, Liang-Deng; Zang, Qin

    2014-04-01

    To explore the theory of "Fei and Dachang being interior-exteriorly related" and the pathogenesis of lung injury by observing changes of inflammatory cytokines and oxygen free radicals in ulcerative colitis (UC) rats. Totally 50 healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups, the normal control group and the model group, 25 rats in each group. The UC model was established by allergizing colon mucosa combined with TNBS-alcohol (50%) enema. Another 25 rats were recruited as the normal control group. At week 2 and 4 after modeling, the pathomorphological changes of the lung were observed. Furthermore, the contents of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-1beta were determined by ELISA. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated with colorimetry. Compared with the normal control group, the pathomorphology of the lung tissue in the model group appeared abnormal at week 2 and 4. Compared with the normal control group, levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and MDA in the lung tissue significantly increased in the model group (P < 0. 01) and the activities of SOD significantly decreased (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, SOD, and MDA might be common material bases for the large intestine involved in lung disease of UC patients, thus providing a modern scientific basis for the theory of Fei and Dachang being interior-exteriorly related.

  11. Ferulic acid ameliorates TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis through modulation of cytokines, oxidative stress, iNOs, COX-2, and apoptosis in laboratory rats

    PubMed Central

    Sadar, Smeeta S.; Vyawahare, Niraj S.; Bodhankar, Subhash L.

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic immune-inflammatory disorder characterized by oxido-nitrosative stress, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis. Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound is considered to possess potent antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim is to evaluate possible mechanism of action of FA against trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) induced ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats. UC was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats (150-200 g) by intrarectal administration of TNBS (100 mg/kg). FA was administered (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o.) for 14 days after colitis was induced. Various biochemical, molecular and histological changes were assessed in the colon. Intrarectal administration of TNBS caused significant induction of ulcer in the colon with an elevation of oxido-nitrosative stress, myeloperoxidase and hydroxyproline activity in the colon. Administration of FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly decrease oxido-nitrosative stress, myeloperoxidase, and hydroxyproline activities. Up-regulated mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2, and iNOs, as well as down-regulated IL-10 mRNA expressions after TNBS administration, were significantly inhibited by FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) treatment. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that intrarectal administration of TNBS-induced significantly enhanced the colonic apoptosis whereas administration of FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly restored the elevated apoptosis. FA administration also significantly restored the histopathological aberration induced by TNBS. The findings of the present study demonstrated that FA ameliorates TNBS-induced colitis via inhibition of oxido-nitrosative stress, apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokines production, and down- regulation of COX-2 synthesis. Graphical Abstract: TNBS caused activation of T cells which interact with CD40 on antigen presenting cells i.e. dendritic cells (DC) that induce the key Interleukin 12 (IL-12)-mediated Th1 T cell immune

  12. Ferulic acid ameliorates TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis through modulation of cytokines, oxidative stress, iNOs, COX-2, and apoptosis in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Sadar, Smeeta S; Vyawahare, Niraj S; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic immune-inflammatory disorder characterized by oxido-nitrosative stress, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis. Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound is considered to possess potent antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim is to evaluate possible mechanism of action of FA against trinitrobenzensulfonic acid (TNBS) induced ulcerative colitis (UC) in rats. UC was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats (150-200 g) by intrarectal administration of TNBS (100 mg/kg). FA was administered (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o.) for 14 days after colitis was induced. Various biochemical, molecular and histological changes were assessed in the colon. Intrarectal administration of TNBS caused significant induction of ulcer in the colon with an elevation of oxido-nitrosative stress, myeloperoxidase and hydroxyproline activity in the colon. Administration of FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly decrease oxido-nitrosative stress, myeloperoxidase, and hydroxyproline activities. Up-regulated mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2, and iNOs, as well as down-regulated IL-10 mRNA expressions after TNBS administration, were significantly inhibited by FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) treatment. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that intrarectal administration of TNBS-induced significantly enhanced the colonic apoptosis whereas administration of FA (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly restored the elevated apoptosis. FA administration also significantly restored the histopathological aberration induced by TNBS. The findings of the present study demonstrated that FA ameliorates TNBS-induced colitis via inhibition of oxido-nitrosative stress, apoptosis, proinflammatory cytokines production, and down- regulation of COX-2 synthesis.Graphical Abstract: TNBS caused activation of T cells which interact with CD40 on antigen presenting cells i.e. dendritic cells (DC) that induce the key Interleukin 12 (IL-12)-mediated Th1 T cell immune

  13. [Saccharomyces boulardii reduced intestinal inflammation in mice model of 2,4,6-trinitrobencene sulfonic acid induced colitis: based on microarray].

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Kil; Kim, Hyo Jong; Chi, Sung Gil

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii has been reported to be beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of S. boulardii in a mice model of 2,4,6-trinitrobencene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis and analyze the expression of genes in S. boulardii treated mice by microarray. BALB/c mice received TNBS or TNBS and S. boulardii treatment for 4 days. Microarray was performed on total mRNA form colon, and histologic evaluation was also performed. In mice treated with S. boulardii, the histological appearance and mortality rate were significantly restored compared with rats receiving only TNBS. Among 330 genes which were altered by both S. boulardii and TNBS (>2 folds), 193 genes were down-regulated by S. boulardii in microarray. Most of genes which were down-regulated by S. bouardii were functionally classified as inflammatory and immune response related genes. S. boulardii may reduce colonic inflammation along with regulation of inflammatory and immune responsive genes in TNBS-induced colitis.

  14. Huang Qi Jian Zhong Pellet Attenuates TNBS-Induced Colitis in Rats via Mechanisms Involving Improvement of Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Duan-Yong; Pan, Chun-Shui; Liu, Yu-Ying; Wei, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Chang-Man; Sun, Kai; He, Ke; Li, Chong; Yan, Li; Fan, Jing-Yu; Wang, Chuan-She; Hibi, Toshifumi; Liu, Hong-Ning; Han, Jing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Huang Qi Jian Zhong Pellet (HQJZ) is a famous Chinese medicine formula for treatment of various gastrointestinal tract diseases. This study investigated the role of HQJZ in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (TNBS-) induced colitis and its underlying mechanism. Colonic mucosal injury was induced by TNBS in the Sprague-Dawley rats. In the HQJZ treatment group, HQJZ was administered (2 g/kg) for 14 days starting from day 1 after TNBS infusion. Colonic mucosal injury occurred obviously 1 day after TNBS challenge and did not recover distinctively until day 15, including an increase in macro- and microscopic scores, a colonic weight index, a decrease in colonic length, a number of functional capillaries, and blood flow. Inverted intravital microscopy and ELISA showed colonic microcirculatory disturbances and inflammatory responses after TNBS stimulation, respectively. TNBS decreased occludin, RhoA, and ROCK-I, while increasing Rac-1, PAK-1, and phosphorylated myosin light chain. In addition, ATP content and ATP5D expression in colonic mucosa decreased after TNBS challenge. Impressively, treatment with HQJZ significantly attenuated all of the alterations evoked by TNBS, promoting the recovery of colonic injury. The present study demonstrated HQJZ as a multitargeting management for colonic mucosal injury, which set in motion mechanisms involving improvement of energy metabolism.

  15. Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis: A robust model to study mucosal immune responses in the gut.

    PubMed

    Koroleva, Ekaterina P; Halperin, Sydney; Gubernatorova, Ekaterina O; Macho-Fernandez, Elise; Spencer, Cody M; Tumanov, Alexei V

    2015-06-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a natural mouse pathogen which reproducibly infects mice and causes intestinal disease. The C. rodentium model of infection is very useful for investigating host-pathogen immune interactions in the gut, and can also be used to understand the pathogenesis of several important human intestinal disorders, including Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, dysbiosis and colon tumorigenesis. Both innate and adaptive immune responses play a critical role in protection against C. rodentium. Here, we summarize the role of immune components in protection against C. rodentium and describe techniques for the analysis of innate and adaptive mucosal immune responses, including setting up the infection, analysis of colonic hyperplasia and bacterial dissemination, evaluation of antibody responses, and purification and analysis of intestinal epithelial and lymphoid cells.

  16. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for S100A9 in the stool of rats with dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Shunsuke; Murata, Makoto; Arai, Satoshi; Murayama, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Atushi; Ashida, Noriyuki; Okada, Kohki; Ikemoto, Masaki

    2016-12-01

    Calprotectin, a heterodimer of S100A8 and S100A9, has been reported to be a useful biomarker in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, the relationship between the fecal level of S100A9 and the extent of inflammation in IBD remains unclear. Our aim was to develop a new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for rat S100A9, and to investigate whether changes in fecal S100A9 levels reflect the inflammatory conditions in the intestinal tracts of rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Anti-rat S100A9 monoclonal antibodies were raised in mice and used for the development of a novel ELISA for rat S100A9. The performance of our ELISA was assessed by dilution and recovery tests, and the detection range was 3.75-240ng/mL. The dilution test showed good linearity. The recovery of fecal S100A9 was 95.1% (mean), with a range of 86.1%-108.8%. Colitis was induced in rats by oral administration of 3% DSS/drinking water (DW) for 11days (D group), while DW alone was provided to rats of the control group (C group) during the same period. The extent of inflammation was evaluated with the disease activity index (DAI), and the concentration of fecal S100A9 was determined by ELISA. Both the DAI scores and the fecal S100A9 levels were significantly higher in the D group than in the C group. Microscopic observation revealed that S100A9 was dominantly produced in many immune cells of myeloid origin in rat rectal tissues. These results indicate that the novel ELISA may be applied to clinically evaluate IBD in rats with high sensitivity. In conclusion, our ELISA is useful in toxicological and pharmacological evaluations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Naringin ameliorates acetic acid induced colitis through modulation of endogenous oxido-nitrosative balance and DNA damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Venkatashivam Shiva; Rajmane, Anuchandra Ramchandra; Adil, Mohammad; Kandhare, Amit Dattatraya; Ghosh, Pinaki; Bodhankar, Subhash Laxman

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of naringin on experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease in rats. Naringin (20, 40 and 80 mg/kg) was given orally for 7 days to Wistar rats before induction of colitis by intrarectal instillation of 2 mL of 4% (v/v) acetic acid solution. The degree of colonic mucosal damage was analyzed by examining mucosal damage, ulcer area, ulcer index and stool consistency. Intrarectal administration of 4% acetic acid resulted in significant modulation of serum alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) content along with colonic nitric oxide (NO), xanthine oxidase (XO) level and protein carbonyl content in the colonic tissue as well as in blood. Naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg) exerted a dose dependent (P < 0.05) ameliorative effect, as it significantly increased hematological parameter as well as colonic SOD and GSH. There was a significant (P < 0.05) and dose dependant inhibition of macroscopical score, ulcer area along with colonic MDA, MPO activity by the 7 days of pretreatment of naringin (40 and 80 mg/kg). Biochemical studies revealed a significant (P < 0.05) dose dependant inhibition in serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels by pretreatment of naringin. Increased levels of colonic NO, XO, protein carbonyl content and DNA damage were also significantly decreased by naringin pretreatment. The findings of the present investigation propose that naringin has an anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic potential effect at colorectal sites as it modulates the production and expression of oxidative mediators such as MDA, MPO, NO and XO, thus reducing DNA damage. PMID:24683411

  18. Effects of increase in fish oil intake on intestinal eicosanoids and inflammation in a mouse model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases affecting about 1% of western populations. New eating behaviors might contribute to the global emergence of IBD. Although the immunoregulatory effects of omega-3 fatty acids have been well characterized in vitro, their role in IBD is controversial. Methods The aim of this study was to assess the impact of increased fish oil intake on colonic gene expression, eicosanoid metabolism and development of colitis in a mouse model of IBD. Rag-2 deficient mice were fed fish oil (FO) enriched in omega-3 fatty acids i.e. EPA and DHA or control diet for 4 weeks before colitis induction by adoptive transfer of naïve T cells and maintained in the same diet for 4 additional weeks. Onset of colitis was monitored by colonoscopy and further confirmed by immunological examinations. Whole genome expression profiling was made and eicosanoids were measured by HPLC-MS/MS in colonic samples. Results A significant reduction of colonic proinflammatory eicosanoids in FO fed mice compared to control was observed. However, neither alteration of colonic gene expression signature nor reduction in IBD scores was observed under FO diet. Conclusion Thus, increased intake of dietary FO did not prevent experimental colitis. PMID:23725086

  19. Effects of Prunus mume Sieb. et Zucc. extract and its biopolymer encapsulation on a mouse model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yun; Lee, Seung-Jae; Hur, Sun Jin

    2017-01-01

    Prunus mume suppresses various diseases caused by inflammation response and exhibits antioxidant and free radical-scavenging activities. Therefore this study determined the effect of an aqueous P. mume (PM) extract in a mouse colitis model and investigated the value of biopolymer encapsulation, facilitating targeted delivery to the colon. Colitis was induced by administration of 30 g kg(-1) dextran sulfate sodium to male BALB/c mice for 7 days prior to treatment with vehicle, 50 mg kg(-1) PM extract or biopolymer-encapsulated PM extract, or 50 mg kg(-1) sulfasalazine. Histological examination of the colon in BALB/c mice showed epithelial destruction and mucosal infiltration of inflammatory cells. These changes were attenuated in PM-treated mice, which had lower levels of inflammatory cytokines, cyclooxygenase 2 and immunoglobulins (IgA, IgM and IgE) compared with the vehicle-treated colitis group. The PM extract showed concentration-dependent radical scavenging and superoxide dismutase-like antioxidant activities. These results indicated that the effects of the PM extract on colitis were not influenced by biopolymer encapsulation and that this PM extract could be a potential therapeutic agent for inflammatory bowel disease. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Rutin has intestinal antiinflammatory effects in the CD4+ CD62L+ T cell transfer model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Mascaraque, Cristina; Aranda, Carlos; Ocón, Borja; Monte, María Jesús; Suárez, María Dolores; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Marín, José Juan García; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2014-12-01

    Rutin, one of the most abundant flavonoids in nature, has been shown to exert intestinal antiinflammatory effects in experimental models of colitis. Our aim was to study the antiinflamatory effect of rutin in the CD4+ CD62L+ T cell transfer model of colitis, one of the closest to the human disease. Colitis was induced by transfer of CD4+ CD62L+ T cells to Rag1(-/-) mice. Rutin was administered by gavage as a postreatment. Treatment with rutin improved colitis at the dose of 57mg/kg/day, while no effect was noted with 28.5mg/kg/day. Therapeutic benefit was evidenced by a reduced disease activity index, weight loss and damage score, plus a 36% lower colonic myeloperoxidase and a 54% lower alkaline phosphatase activity. In addition, a decreased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (IFNγ and TNFα) by mesenteric lymph node cells was observed ex vivo. The colonic expression of proinflammatory genes, including IFNγ, TNFα, CXCL1, S100A8 and IL-1β, was significantly reduced by more than 80% with rutin as assessed by RT-qPCR. Flavonoid treated mice exhibited decreased activation of splenic CD4+ cells (STAT4 phosphorylation and IFNγ expression) and reduced plasma cytokine levels. This effect was also apparent in mucosal lymphocytes based on reduced STAT4 phosphorylation. The protective effect was comparable to that of 3mg/kg/day budesonide. Rutin had no effect on splenocytes or murine T cells in vitro, while its aglycone, quercetin, exhibited a concentration dependent inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines, including IFNγ. Rutin but not quercetin showed vectorial basolateral to apical transport in IEC18 cells, associated with reduced biotransformation. We conclude that rutin exerts intestinal antiinflammatory activity in chronic, T lymphocyte dependent colitis via quercetin release and actions involving mucosal and lymph node T cells. Our results suggest that rutin may be useful in the management of inflammatory bowel disease in appropriate dosage conditions.

  1. High vitamin D3 diet administered during active colitis negatively affects bone metabolism in an adoptive T cell transfer model.

    PubMed

    Larmonier, C B; McFadden, R-M T; Hill, F M; Schreiner, R; Ramalingam, R; Besselsen, D G; Ghishan, F K; Kiela, P R

    2013-07-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) represents an extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D₃ has been considered a viable adjunctive therapy in IBD. However, vitamin D₃ plays a pleiotropic role in bone modeling and regulates the bone formation-resorption balance, depending on the physiological environment, and supplementation during active IBD may have unintended consequences. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D₃ supplementation during the active phase of disease on colonic inflammation, BMD, and bone metabolism in an adoptive IL-10-/- CD4⁺ T cell transfer model of chronic colitis. High-dose vitamin D₃ supplementation for 12 days during established disease had negligible effects on mucosal inflammation. Plasma vitamin D₃ metabolites correlated with diet, but not disease, status. Colitis significantly reduced BMD. High-dose vitamin D₃ supplementation did not affect cortical bone but led to a further deterioration of trabecular bone morphology. In mice fed a high vitamin D₃ diet, colitis more severely impacted bone formation markers (osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and increased bone resorption markers, ratio of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand to osteoprotegrin transcript, plasma osteoprotegrin level, and the osteoclast activation marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACp5). Bone vitamin D receptor expression was increased in mice with chronic colitis, especially in the high vitamin D₃ group. Our data suggest that vitamin D₃, at a dose that does not improve inflammation, has no beneficial effects on bone metabolism and density during active colitis or may adversely affect BMD and bone turnover. These observations should be taken into consideration in the planning of further clinical studies with high-dose vitamin D₃ supplementation in patients with active IBD.

  2. High vitamin D3 diet administered during active colitis negatively affects bone metabolism in an adoptive T cell transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Larmonier, C. B.; McFadden, R.-M. T.; Hill, F. M.; Schreiner, R.; Ramalingam, R.; Besselsen, D. G.; Ghishan, F. K.

    2013-01-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) represents an extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D3 has been considered a viable adjunctive therapy in IBD. However, vitamin D3 plays a pleiotropic role in bone modeling and regulates the bone formation-resorption balance, depending on the physiological environment, and supplementation during active IBD may have unintended consequences. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D3 supplementation during the active phase of disease on colonic inflammation, BMD, and bone metabolism in an adoptive IL-10−/− CD4+ T cell transfer model of chronic colitis. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation for 12 days during established disease had negligible effects on mucosal inflammation. Plasma vitamin D3 metabolites correlated with diet, but not disease, status. Colitis significantly reduced BMD. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation did not affect cortical bone but led to a further deterioration of trabecular bone morphology. In mice fed a high vitamin D3 diet, colitis more severely impacted bone formation markers (osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and increased bone resorption markers, ratio of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand to osteoprotegrin transcript, plasma osteoprotegrin level, and the osteoclast activation marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACp5). Bone vitamin D receptor expression was increased in mice with chronic colitis, especially in the high vitamin D3 group. Our data suggest that vitamin D3, at a dose that does not improve inflammation, has no beneficial effects on bone metabolism and density during active colitis or may adversely affect BMD and bone turnover. These observations should be taken into consideration in the planning of further clinical studies with high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with active IBD. PMID:23639807

  3. Expression Levels of Proinflammatory Cytokines and NLRP3 Inflammasome in an Experimental Model of Oxazolone-induced Colitis.

    PubMed

    Zherebiatiev, Aleksandr; Kamyshnyi, Aleksandr

    2016-02-01

    IL-1β and IL-17A are two cytokines with strong proinflammatory activities and are now known to be involved in a number of chronic inflammatory disorders. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein regulating the expression of these proinflammatory cytokines. The NLRP3 inflammasome promotes the maturation of the IL-1β and its activation has been shown as a critical mechanism in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, underlying mechanisms to modulate their production in IBD are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression levels of mRNA for the NLRP3 inflammasome, HMGB1 and proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, IL-17A in the inflamed colon of rats with experimental oxazolone-induced colitis. Experiments were carried out on male wistar rats. IL-1β, IL-17A, HMGB1 and NLRP3 inflammasome mRNA expression were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicated that the expression levels of IL-1β, IL-17A, NLRP3 and HMGB1 were elevated in the inflamed colon of rats with oxazolone-induced colitis.

  4. Rat Endovascular Perforation Model

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental animal models of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have provided a wealth of information on the mechanisms of brain injury. The Rat endovascular perforation model (EVP) replicates the early pathophysiology of SAH and hence is frequently used to study early brain injury following SAH. This paper presents a brief review of historical development of the EVP model, details the technique used to create SAH and considerations necessary to overcome technical challenges. PMID:25213427

  5. Ulcerative colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... proctocolectomy - discharge Types of ileostomy Ulcerative colitis - discharge Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist at Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Internal review and ...

  6. Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... become very limited, talk to a registered dietitian. Stress Although stress doesn't cause inflammatory bowel disease, ... al. Ulcerative colitis practice guidelines in adults: American College of Gastroenterology, Practice Parameters Committee. American Journal of ...

  7. Effects of AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors on colonic endocrine cells in rats with TNBS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between intestinal neuroendocrine peptides/amines and the immune system appear to have an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The present study investigated the effects of activator protein (AP)-1 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors on inflammation-induced alterations in enteroendocrine cells. A total of 48 male Wistar rats were divided into the following four groups (n=12 rats/group): Control, trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis only (TNBS group), TNBS-induced colitis with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G) treatment (DTCM-G group), and TNBS-induced colitis with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ) treatment (DHMEQ group). A total of 3 days following administration of TNBS, the rats were treated as follows: The control and TNBS groups received 0.5 ml vehicle (0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose; CMC), respectively; the DTCM-G group received DTCM-G (20 mg/kg body weight) in 0.5% CMC; and the DHMEQ group received DHMEQ (15 mg/kg body weight) in 0.5% CMC. All injections were performed intraperitoneally twice daily for 5 days. The rats were sacrificed, and tissue samples obtained from the colon were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Inflammation was evaluated using a scoring system. In addition, the sections were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and somatostatin, and immunostaining was quantified using image-analysis software. The density of cells expressing CgA, PYY and PP was significantly lower in the TNBS group compared with in the control group, whereas the density of cells expressing serotonin, oxyntomodulin and somatostatin was significantly higher in the TNBS group compared with in the control group. None of the endocrine cell types differed significantly between the control group and either the DTCM-G or DHMEQ groups. All of the colonic endocrine cell types were affected in

  8. Microscopic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Cammarota, Giovanni; Valerio, Luca; Annicchiarico, Brigida Eleonora; Milani, Alessandro; Siciliano, Massimo; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic colitis may be defined as a clinical syndrome, of unknown etiology, consisting of chronic watery diarrhea, with no alterations in the large bowel at the endoscopic and radiologic evaluation. Therefore, a definitive diagnosis is only possible by histological analysis. The epidemiological impact of this disease has become increasingly clear in the last years, with most data coming from Western countries. Microscopic colitis includes two histological subtypes [collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)] with no differences in clinical presentation and management. Collagenous colitis is characterized by a thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer that is absent in LC. The main feature of LC is an increase of the density of intra-epithelial lymphocytes in the surface epithelium. A number of pathogenetic theories have been proposed over the years, involving the role of luminal agents, autoimmunity, eosinophils, genetics (human leukocyte antigen), biliary acids, infections, alterations of pericryptal fibroblasts, and drug intake; drugs like ticlopidine, carbamazepine or ranitidine are especially associated with the development of LC, while CC is more frequently linked to cimetidine, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and lansoprazole. Microscopic colitis typically presents as chronic or intermittent watery diarrhea, that may be accompanied by symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss and incontinence. Recent evidence has added new pharmacological options for the treatment of microscopic colitis: the role of steroidal therapy, especially oral budesonide, has gained relevance, as well as immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine. The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents, infliximab and adalimumab, constitutes a new, interesting tool for the treatment of microscopic colitis, but larger, adequately designed studies are needed to confirm existing data. PMID:23180940

  9. Microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Cammarota, Giovanni; Valerio, Luca; Annicchiarico, Brigida Eleonora; Milani, Alessandro; Siciliano, Massimo; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-11-21

    Microscopic colitis may be defined as a clinical syndrome, of unknown etiology, consisting of chronic watery diarrhea, with no alterations in the large bowel at the endoscopic and radiologic evaluation. Therefore, a definitive diagnosis is only possible by histological analysis. The epidemiological impact of this disease has become increasingly clear in the last years, with most data coming from Western countries. Microscopic colitis includes two histological subtypes [collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC)] with no differences in clinical presentation and management. Collagenous colitis is characterized by a thickening of the subepithelial collagen layer that is absent in LC. The main feature of LC is an increase of the density of intra-epithelial lymphocytes in the surface epithelium. A number of pathogenetic theories have been proposed over the years, involving the role of luminal agents, autoimmunity, eosinophils, genetics (human leukocyte antigen), biliary acids, infections, alterations of pericryptal fibroblasts, and drug intake; drugs like ticlopidine, carbamazepine or ranitidine are especially associated with the development of LC, while CC is more frequently linked to cimetidine, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs and lansoprazole. Microscopic colitis typically presents as chronic or intermittent watery diarrhea, that may be accompanied by symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss and incontinence. Recent evidence has added new pharmacological options for the treatment of microscopic colitis: the role of steroidal therapy, especially oral budesonide, has gained relevance, as well as immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine. The use of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α agents, infliximab and adalimumab, constitutes a new, interesting tool for the treatment of microscopic colitis, but larger, adequately designed studies are needed to confirm existing data.

  10. Pseudomembranous Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Priya D.; Urrunaga, Nathalie H.; Tang, Derek M.; von Rosenvinge, Erik C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomembranous colitis is an inflammatory condition of the colon characterized by elevated yellow-white plaques that coalesce to form pseudomembranes on the mucosa. Patients with the condition commonly present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, and leukocytosis. Because pseudomembranous colitis is often associated with C. difficile infection, stool testing and empiric antibiotic treatment should be initiated when suspected. When results of C. difficile testing are negative and symptoms persist despite escalating empiric treatment, early gastroenterology consultation and lower endoscopy would be the next step in the appropriate clinical setting. If pseudomembranous colitis is confirmed endoscopically, colonic biopsies should be obtained, as histology can offer helpful clues to the underlying diagnosis. The less common non-C. difficile causes of pseudomembranous colitis should be entertained, as a number of etiologies can result in this condition. Examples include Behcet’s disease, collagenous colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, ischemic colitis, other infections organisms (e.g. bacteria, parasites, viruses), and a handful of drugs and toxins. Pinpointing the correct underlying etiology would better direct patient care and disease management. Surgical specialists would be most helpful in colonic perforation, gangrenous colon, or severe disease. PMID:25769243

  11. Adjunct therapy of n-3 fatty acids to 5-ASA ameliorates inflammatory score and decreases NF-κB in rats with TNBS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Mbodji, Khaly; Charpentier, Cloé; Guérin, Charlène; Querec, Coraline; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Aziz, Moutaz; Savoye, Guillaume; Déchelotte, Pierre; Marion-Letellier, Rachel

    2013-04-01

    5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is widely used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent studies have evaluated the potential of nutritional intervention as adjunct therapy to 5-ASA in IBD. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have shown potent anti-inflammatory properties in gut inflammation. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the dual therapy (n-3 PUFA plus 5-ASA) in rats with 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzen sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced by intrarectal injection of TNBS while control rats received the vehicle. Rats received by gavage a fish oil-rich formula (n-3 groups) or an isocaloric and isolipidic oil formula supplemented with 5-ASA for 14 days. A dose response of 5-ASA (5-75 mg. suppression mg kg(-1) d(-1)) was tested. Colitis was evaluated and several inflammatory markers were quantified in the colon. COX-2 expression (P<.05) and pro-inflammatory eicosanoids production of prostaglandin E2 (P<.001) and leukotriene B4 (P<.001) were significantly inhibited by n-3 PUFA or 5-ASA therapy. 5-ASA also reduces mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α (P<.05). n-3 PUFA or 5-ASA significantly inhibits nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation (P<.01 and P<.05, respectively). The dual therapy n-3 PUFA plus 5-ASA also inhibited inflammatory response by lowering NF-κB activation (P<.01) or inducing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression (P<.05). These results indicate that 5-ASA plus n-3 PUFAs are more effective than a higher dose of 5-ASA alone to reduce NF-κB activation and to induce PPARγ. By contrast, the dual therapy did not improve the effects of individual treatments on eicosanoids or cytokine production. Use of n-3 PUFA in addition to 5-ASA may reduce dose of standard therapy.

  12. Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 ameliorates experimental colitis by modulating intestinal permeability, the inflammatory response and clinical signs in a faecal transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Souza, Éricka L; Elian, Samir D; Paula, Laís M; Garcia, Cristiana C; Vieira, Angélica T; Teixeira, Mauro M; Arantes, Rosa M; Nicoli, Jacques R; Martins, Flaviano S

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are a group of inflammatory conditions of the gut that include ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Probiotics are live micro-organisms that may be used as adjuvant therapy for patients with IBD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prophylactic ingestion of Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) in a murine model of colitis. For induction of colitis, mice were given a 3.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) solution for 7 days in drinking water. EcN administration to mice subjected to DSS-induced colitis resulted in significant reduction in clinical and histopathological signs of disease and preservation of intestinal permeability. We observed reduced inflammation, as assessed by reduced levels of neutrophils, eosinophils, chemokines and cytokines. We observed an increase in the number of regulatory T-cells in Peyer's patches. Germ-free mice received faecal content from control or EcN-treated mice and were then subjected to DSS-induced colitis. We observed protection from colitis in animals that were colonized with faecal content from EcN-treated mice. These results suggest that preventative oral administration of EcN or faecal microbiota transplantation with EcN-containing microbiota ameliorates DSS-induced colitis by modifying inflammatory responsiveness to DSS.

  13. Validation of bovine glycomacropeptide as an intestinal anti-inflammatory nutraceutical in the lymphocyte-transfer model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Ortega-González, Mercedes; Capitán-Cañadas, Fermín; Requena, Pilar; Ocón, Borja; Romero-Calvo, Isabel; Aranda, Carlos; Suárez, María Dolores; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Sánchez de Medina, Fermín; Martínez-Augustin, Olga

    2014-04-14

    Milk κ-casein-derived bovine glycomacropeptide (GMP) exerts immunomodulatory effects. It exhibits intestinal anti-inflammatory activity in chemically induced models of colitis. However, to validate its clinical usefulness as a nutraceutical, it is important to assess its effects in a model with a closer pathophysiological connection with human inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, in the present study, we used the lymphocyte-transfer model of colitis in mice and compared the effects of GMP in this model with those obtained in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) model. GMP (15 mg/d) resulted in higher body-weight gain and a reduction of the colonic damage score and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in Rag1(-/-) mice with colitis induced by the transfer of naïve T cells. The colonic and ileal weight:length ratio was decreased by approximately 25%, albeit non-significantly. GMP treatment reduced the percentage of CD4⁺ interferon (IFN)-γ⁺ cells in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). The basal production of IL-6 by MLN obtained from the GMP-treated mice ex vivo was augmented. However, concanavalin A-evoked production was similar. The colonic expression of regenerating islet-derived protein 3γ, S100A8, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 and IL-1β was unaffected by GMP, while that of TNF-α and especially IFN-γ was paradoxically increased. In the DSS model, GMP also reduced the activity of colonic MPO, but it failed to alter weight gain or intestinal weight:length ratio. GMP augmented the production of IL-10 by MLN cells and was neutral towards other cytokines, except exhibiting a trend towards increasing the production of IL-6. The lower effect was attributed to the lack of the effect of GMP on epithelial cells. In conclusion, GMP exerts intestinal anti-inflammatory effects in lymphocyte-driven colitis.

  14. Effect of a probiotic beverage consumption (Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707) in rats with chemically induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Celiberto, Larissa Sbaglia; Bedani, Raquel; Dejani, Naiara Naiana; Ivo de Medeiros, Alexandra; Sampaio Zuanon, José Antonio; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos; Tallarico Adorno, Maria Angela; Amâncio Varesche, Maria Bernadete; Carrilho Galvão, Fábio; Valentini, Sandro Roberto; Font de Valdez, Graciela; Rossi, Elizeu Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Some probiotic strains have the potential to assist in relieving the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. The impact of daily ingestion of a soy-based product fermented by Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Lactobacillus helveticus 416 with the addition of Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707 on chemically induced colitis has been investigated thereof within a period of 30 days. Methods Colitis was induced by dextran sulfate sodium. The animals were randomly assigned into five groups: Group C: negative control; Group CL: positive control; Group CLF: DSS with the fermented product; Group CLP: DSS with the non-fermented product (placebo); Group CLS: DSS with sulfasalazine. The following parameters were monitored: disease activity index, fecal microbial analyses, gastrointestinal survival of probiotic microorganisms and short-chain fatty acids concentration in the feces. At the end of the protocol the animals’ colons were removed so as to conduct a macroscopical and histopathological analysis, cytokines and nitrite quantification. Results Animals belonging to the CLF group showed fewer symptoms of colitis during the induction period and a lower degree of inflammation and ulceration in their colon compared to the CL, CLS and CLP groups (p<0.05). The colon of the animals in groups CL and CLS presented severe crypt damage, which was absent in CLF and CLP groups. A significant increase in the population of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. at the end of the protocol was verified only in the CLF animals (p<0.05). This group also showed an increase in short-chain fatty acids (propionate and acetate). Furthermore, the intestinal survival of E. faecium CRL 183 and B. longum ATCC 15707 in the CLF group has been confirmed by biochemical and molecular analyzes. Conclusions The obtained results suggest that a regular intake of the probiotic product, and placebo to a lesser extent, can reduce the severity of DSS-induced colitis on rats. PMID:28437455

  15. Effect of a probiotic beverage consumption (Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707) in rats with chemically induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Celiberto, Larissa Sbaglia; Bedani, Raquel; Dejani, Naiara Naiana; Ivo de Medeiros, Alexandra; Sampaio Zuanon, José Antonio; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos; Tallarico Adorno, Maria Angela; Amâncio Varesche, Maria Bernadete; Carrilho Galvão, Fábio; Valentini, Sandro Roberto; Font de Valdez, Graciela; Rossi, Elizeu Antonio; Cavallini, Daniela Cardoso Umbelino

    2017-01-01

    Some probiotic strains have the potential to assist in relieving the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease. The impact of daily ingestion of a soy-based product fermented by Enterococcus faecium CRL 183 and Lactobacillus helveticus 416 with the addition of Bifidobacterium longum ATCC 15707 on chemically induced colitis has been investigated thereof within a period of 30 days. Colitis was induced by dextran sulfate sodium. The animals were randomly assigned into five groups: Group C: negative control; Group CL: positive control; Group CLF: DSS with the fermented product; Group CLP: DSS with the non-fermented product (placebo); Group CLS: DSS with sulfasalazine. The following parameters were monitored: disease activity index, fecal microbial analyses, gastrointestinal survival of probiotic microorganisms and short-chain fatty acids concentration in the feces. At the end of the protocol the animals' colons were removed so as to conduct a macroscopical and histopathological analysis, cytokines and nitrite quantification. Animals belonging to the CLF group showed fewer symptoms of colitis during the induction period and a lower degree of inflammation and ulceration in their colon compared to the CL, CLS and CLP groups (p<0.05). The colon of the animals in groups CL and CLS presented severe crypt damage, which was absent in CLF and CLP groups. A significant increase in the population of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. at the end of the protocol was verified only in the CLF animals (p<0.05). This group also showed an increase in short-chain fatty acids (propionate and acetate). Furthermore, the intestinal survival of E. faecium CRL 183 and B. longum ATCC 15707 in the CLF group has been confirmed by biochemical and molecular analyzes. The obtained results suggest that a regular intake of the probiotic product, and placebo to a lesser extent, can reduce the severity of DSS-induced colitis on rats.

  16. Antioxidant properties of mesenchymal stem cells against oxidative stress in a murine model of colitis.

    PubMed

    da Costa Gonçalves, Fabiany; Grings, Mateus; Nunes, Natália Schneider; Pinto, Fernanda Otesbelgue; Garcez, Tuane Nerissa Alves; Visioli, Fernanda; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Paz, Ana Helena

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effects of oxidative stress injury in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Mice exposed to oral administration of 2% DSS over 7 days presented a high disease activity index and an intense colonic inflammation. Systemic infusion of MSC protected from severe colitis, reducing weight loss and diarrhea while lowering the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Moreover, toxic colitis injury increased oxidative stress. Administration of DSS decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in the colon. No alteration was found in catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Otherwise, MSC transplantation was able to prevent the decrease of GSH levels and SOD activity suggestive of an antioxidant property of MSC. The oxidative stress is a pathomechanism underlying the pathophysiology of colitis and MSC play an important role in preventing the impairment of antioxidants defenses in inflamed colon.

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  18. Amelioration of severe TNBS induced colitis by novel AP-1 and NF- κ B inhibitors in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo; Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan G; Gundersen, Doris; Hausken, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    AP-1 and NF-κ B inhibitors, namely, DTCM-G and DHMEQ, were investigated in male Wistar rats with severe colitis, induced by TNBS. The animals were randomized into 3 groups. The control group received 0.5 mL of 0.5% of the vehicle i.p., the DTCM-G group received 22.5 mg/kg body weight DTCM-G in 0.5% i.p., and the DHMEQ group received 15 mg/kg body weight DHMEQ i.p., all twice daily for 5 days. The body weight losses and mortality rates were significantly higher in the control group than those in DTCM-G-treated and DHMEQ-treated groups. The endoscopic inflammation scores in the control, DTCM-G-treated, and DHMEQ-treated groups were 6.3 ± 0.7, 1.0 ± 0.3, and 0.7 ± 0.3, respectively (P = 0.004 and 0.02, resp.). The inflammation scores as assessed by the macroscopic appearance were 4.3 ± 0.8, 0.7 ± 0.3, and 1.2 ± 0.4 in the control, DTCM-G-treated, and DHMEQ-treated groups, respectively (P = 0.01 and 0.009, resp.). The histopathological inflammation scores were 6.4 ± 0.7, 2.0 ± 1.0, and 2.2 ± 0.6 in the control, DTCM-G-treated, and DHMEQ-treated groups, respectively (P = 0.03 and 0.01, resp.). It was concluded that DTCM-G and DHMEQ exhibit strong anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities with no apparent toxicity, which make them excellent drug candidates for clinical use in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  19. Effects of Dietary Plant Sterols and Stanol Esters with Low- and High-Fat Diets in Chronic and Acute Models for Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    te Velde, Anje A; Brüll, Florence; Heinsbroek, Sigrid E M; Meijer, Sybren L; Lütjohann, Dieter; Vreugdenhil, Anita; Plat, Jogchum

    2015-10-15

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of dietary plant sterols and stanols as their fatty acid esters on the development of experimental colitis. The effects were studied both in high- and low-fat diet conditions in two models, one acute and another chronic model of experimental colitis that resembles gene expression in human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the first experiments in the high fat diet (HFD), we did not observe a beneficial effect of the addition of plant sterols and stanols on the development of acute dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) colitis. In the chronic CD4CD45RB T cell transfer colitis model, we mainly observed an effect of the presence of high fat on the development of colitis. In this HFD condition, the presence of plant sterol or stanol did not result in any additional effect. In the second experiments with low fat, we could clearly observe a beneficial effect of the addition of plant sterols on colitis parameters in the T cell transfer model, but not in the DSS model. This positive effect was related to the gender of the mice and on Treg presence in the colon. This suggests that especially dietary plant sterol esters may improve intestinal inflammation in a T cell dependent manner.

  20. Image Analysis-Based Approaches for Scoring Mouse Models of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, R; Eastham-Anderson, J; DeVoss, J; Lesch, J; Yan, D; Xu, M; Solon, M; Hotzel, K; Diehl, L; Webster, J D

    2016-01-01

    Mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease are critical for basic and translational research that is advancing the understanding and treatment of this disease. Assessment of these mouse models frequently relies on histologic endpoints. In recent years, whole slide imaging and digital pathology-based image analysis platforms have become increasingly available for implementation into the pathology workflow. These automated image analysis approaches allow for nonbiased quantitative assessment of histologic endpoints. In this study, the authors sought to develop an image analysis workflow using a commercially available image analysis platform that requires minimal training in image analysis or programming, and this workflow was used to score 2 mouse models of colitis that are primarily characterized by immune cell infiltrates in the lamina propria. Although the software was unable to accurately and consistently segment hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections, automated quantification of CD3 immunolabeling resulted in strong correlations with the pathologist's score in all studies and allowed for the identification of 8 of the 9 differences among treatment groups that were identified by the pathologist. These results demonstrate not only the ability to incorporate solutions based on image analysis into the pathologist's workflow but also the importance of immunohistochemical or histochemical surrogates for the incorporation of image analysis in histologic assessments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Preparation, characterization and anti-colitis activity of curcumin-asafoetida complex encapsulated in turmeric nanofiber.

    PubMed

    Gopi, Sreeraj; Amalraj, Augustine; Jude, Shintu; Varma, Karthik; Sreeraj, T R; Haponiuk, Józef T; Thomas, Sabu

    2017-12-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a main form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Asafoetida (ASF) and turmeric have traditionally been used for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, including UC, because ASF is rich in sulfur compounds and turmeric contains curcumin (CUR). Turmeric nanofiber (TNF), the modified cell wall component of turmeric is considered to play important role in the human diet, health and can be used as a carrier agent to encapsulate bioactive components. A novel gut health product (GHP) was formulated by encapsulation of ASF and CUR complex onto TNF. The GHP was characterized by UPLC, GC-MS, FTIR, XRD, SEM with EDS and DSC studies. GHP was evaluated for anti-colitis activity in a rat model of 5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced UC. Treatment with GHP significantly attenuated the disease activity index, colitis score, histopathological changes and myeloperoxidase activity. GHP has significant protective effects against DSS induced colitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MicroRNA 429 Regulates Mucin Gene Expression and Secretion in Murine Model of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ji-Su; Alam, Khondoker Jahengir; Kim, Hun-Soo; Lee, Young-Mi; Yun, Ki-Jung; Chae, Soo-Cheon

    2016-07-01

    miRNAs are non-coding RNAs that play important roles in the pathogenesis of human diseases by regulating target gene expression in specific cells or tissues. We aimed to detect miRNAs related to ulcerative colitis [UC], identify their target molecules, and analyse the correlation between the miRNAs and their target genes in colorectal cells and dextran sulphate sodium [DSS]-induced mouse colitis. UC-associated miRNAs were identified by miRNA microarray analysis using DSS-induced colitis and normal colon tissues. The results were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction [RT-PCR]. We identified target genes of MIR429, a colitis-associated miRNA, from our screen by comparing the mRNA microarray analysis in MIR429-overexpressed cells with predicted candidate target genes. We constructed luciferase reporter plasmids to confirm the effect of MIR429 on target gene expression. The protein expression of the target genes was measured by western blot,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] analysis, or immunohistochemistry. We identified 37 DSS-induced colitis associated miRNAs. We investigated MIR429 that is down-regulated in DSS-induced colitis, and identified 41 target genes of MIR429. We show that the myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate [MARCKS] is a direct target of MIR429. MARCKS mRNA and protein expression levels are down-regulated by MIR429, and MIR429 regulates the expression of MARCKS and MARCKS-mediated mucin secretion in colorectal cells and DSS-induced colitis. In addition, anti-MIR429 up-regulates MARCKS expression in colorectal cell lines. Our findings suggest that MIR429 modulates mucin secretion in human colorectal cells and mouse colitis tissues by up-regulating of MARCKS expression, thereby making MIR429 a candidate for anti-colitis therapy in human UC. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email

  3. Protective effect of aqueous extract of Bombax malabaricum DC on experimental models of inflammatory bowel disease in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, A G; Niphadkar, P V; Phadke, A S

    2011-05-01

    There is little evidence regarding role of B. malabaricum in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); though it is clinically employed as a constituent of a polyherbal preparation for IBD. To establish its role as a monotherapy for IBD, preliminary phytochemical screening of aqueous extract of B. malabaricum (AEBM) was undertaken. Subsequently, its protective effect in indomethacin and iodoacetamide induced colitis in rats (45, 90, 180, 270 mg/kg) and acetic acid induced colitis in mice (65, 130, 250, 500 mg/kg) was assessed. AEBM (270 mg/kg) in indomethacin and iodoacetamide induced colitis significantly reduced the ulcer score and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. AEBM/500 mg/kg dose/significantly reduced the ulcer score and MPO activity in acetic acid induced colitis. The extract (270 mg/kg in rats and 500 mg/kg in mice) was found to be comparable with prednisolone (10 mg/kg) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) (100 mg/kg) used as standard treatments. AEBM provided reduction in edema of the intestinal tissues, ulcer protection and lowering of MPO activity in a dose dependent manner. AEBM (500 mg/kg) significantly reduced colonic and serum TNF-alpha level when compared with the positive control in acetic acid induced colitis model. The results suggest a protective role of AEBM in IBD.

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of an oxylipin-containing lyophilised biomass from a microalga in a murine recurrent colitis model.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Román, Javier; Talero, Elena; Rodríguez-Luna, Azahara; García-Mauriño, Sofía; Motilva, Virginia

    2016-12-01

    Diet and nutritional factors have emerged as possible interventions for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which are characterised by chronic uncontrolled inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. Microalgal species are a promising source of n-3 PUFA and derived oxylipins, which are lipid mediators with a key role in the resolution of inflammation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of an oxylipin-containing lyophilised biomass from Chlamydomonas debaryana on a recurrent 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis mice model. Moderate chronic inflammation of the colon was induced in BALB/c mice by weekly intracolonic instillations of low dose of TNBS. Administration of the lyophilised microalgal biomass started 2 weeks before colitis induction and was continued throughout colitis development. Mice were killed 48 h after the last TNBS challenge. Oral administration of the microalgal biomass reduced TNBS-induced intestinal inflammation, evidenced by an inhibition of body weight loss, an improvement in colon morphology and a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17. This product also down-regulated colonic expressions of inducible nitric oxide, cyclo-oxygenase 2 and NF-κB, as well as increased PPAR-γ. In addition, lyophilised microalgal biomass up-regulated the expressions of the antioxidant transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 and the target gene heme oxygenase 1. This study describes for the first time the prophylactic effects of an oxylipin-containing lyophilised microalgae biomass from C. debaryana in the acute phase of a recurrent TNBS-induced colitis model in mice. These findings suggest the potential use of this microalga, or derived oxylipins, as a nutraceutical in the treatment of IBD.

  5. Proanthocyanidins from Grape Seeds Modulate the NF-κB Signal Transduction Pathways in Rats with TNBS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Yang, Xiaolai; Cai, Yongqing; Qin, Hong; Wang, Li; Wang, Yanhong; Huang, Yanhui; Wang, Xiaoxia; Yan, Shuai; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Xin; Li, Wan; Li, Sijia; Chen, Jiajia; Wu, Yongjie

    2011-08-08

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effects of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds (GSPE), we explore whether GSPE regulates the inflammatory response of TNBS-induced colitis in rats at the levels of NF-κB signal transduction pathway. Rats were intragastrically administered of different doses of GSPE (100, 200 and 400 mg·kg-1) per day for seven days after ulcerative colitis (UC) was induced by intracolonic injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) dissolved in 50% ethanol. Sulfasalazine (SASP) at 400 mg/kg was used as a positive control drug. The expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), phospho-I kappaB-alpha (pIκBα), inhibitor kappa B kinase (IκK) in the colon tissues were all measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Treatment with GSPE reduced the expression of NF-κB, pIκBα and IκK in the colon. The results of this study show that GSPE exerts beneficial effects in inflammatory bowel disease by inhibition of NF-κB signal transduction pathways.

  6. Comparison of anti-inflammatory mechanisms of mango (Mangifera Indica L.) and pomegranate (Punica Granatum L.) in a preclinical model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyemee; Banerjee, Nivedita; Ivanov, Ivan; Pfent, Catherine M.; Prudhomme, Kalan R.; Bisson, William H.; Dashwood, Rodrick H.; Talcott, Stephen T.; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U.

    2016-01-01

    Scope Tannin-rich fruits have been evaluated as alternative prevention strategies for colorectal cancer based on their anti-inflammatory properties. This study compared tannin-rich preparations from mango (rich in gallotannins) and pomegranate (rich in ellagitannins) in the dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model. Methods and results In rats, mango and pomegranate beverages decreased intestinal inflammation and the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mucosa and serum. The mango beverage suppressed the ratio of phosphorylated/total protein expression of the IGF-1R-AKT/mTOR axis and down-regulated mRNA expression of Igf1, Insr, and pik3cv. Pomegranate decreased p70S6K and RPS6, as well as Rps6ka2, Map2k2, and Mapk1 mRNA. In silico modeling indicated a high binding-docked of gallic acid to the catalytic domain of IGF-1R, which may suppress the activity of the enzyme. Ellagic acid docked effectively into the catalytic domains of both IGF-1R and EGFR. In vitro assays with lipopolysaccharide-treated CCD-18Co cells using polyphenolic extracts from each beverage, as well as pure compounds, corroborated the predictions made in silico. Conclusion Mango polyphenols inhibited the IGF-1R- AKT/mTOR axis, and pomegranate polyphenols downregulate the mTOR downstream pathway through reductions in ERK1/2. These results suggest that extracts rich in gallo- and ellagitannins act on different molecular targets in the protection against ulcerative colitis. PMID:27028006

  7. Comparison of anti-inflammatory mechanisms of mango (Mangifera Indica L.) and pomegranate (Punica Granatum L.) in a preclinical model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyemee; Banerjee, Nivedita; Ivanov, Ivan; Pfent, Catherine M; Prudhomme, Kalan R; Bisson, William H; Dashwood, Roderick H; Talcott, Stephen T; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2016-09-01

    Tannin-rich fruits have been evaluated as alternative prevention strategies for colorectal cancer based on their anti-inflammatory properties. This study compared tannin-rich preparations from mango (rich in gallotannins) and pomegranate (rich in ellagitannins) in the dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model. In rats, mango and pomegranate beverages decreased intestinal inflammation and the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mucosa and serum. The mango beverage suppressed the ratio of phosphorylated/total protein expression of the IGF-1R-AKT/mTOR axis and downregulated mRNA expression of Igf1, Insr, and pik3cv. Pomegranate decreased p70S6K and RPS6, as well as Rps6ka2, Map2k2, and Mapk1 mRNA. In silico modeling indicated a high binding of docked of gallic acid to the catalytic domain of IGF-1R, which may suppress the activity of the enzyme. Ellagic acid docked effectively into the catalytic domains of both IGF-1R and EGFR. In vitro assays with lipopolysaccharide-treated CCD-18Co cells using polyphenolic extracts from each beverage, as well as pure compounds, corroborated the predictions made in silico. Mango polyphenols inhibited the IGF-1R- AKT/mTOR axis, and pomegranate polyphenols downregulate the mTOR downstream pathway through reductions in ERK1/2. These results suggest that extracts rich in gallo- and ellagitannins act on different molecular targets in the protection against ulcerative colitis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Profiles of microRNA networks in intestinal epithelial cells in a mouse model of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juneyoung; Park, Eun Jeong; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Ahmad, Shandar; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Ishii, Ken J.; Shimaoka, Motomu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) accompany a critical loss of the frontline barrier function that is achieved primarily by intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). Although the gene-regulation pathways underlying these host-defense roles of IECs presumably are deranged during IBD pathogenesis, the quantitative and qualitative alterations of posttranscriptional regulators such as microRNAs (miRNAs) within the cells largely remain to be defined. We aimed to uncover the regulatory miRNA–target gene relationships that arise differentially in inflamed small- compared with large-IECs. Whereas IBD significantly increased the expression of only a few miRNA candidates in small-IECs, numerous miRNAs were upregulated in inflamed large-IECs. These marked alterations might explain why the large, as compared with small, intestine is more sensitive to colitis and shows more severe pathology in this experimental model of IBD. Our in-depth assessment of the miRNA–mRNA expression profiles and the resulting networks prompts us to suggest that miRNAs such as miR-1224, miR-3473a, and miR-5128 represent biomarkers that appear in large-IECs upon IBD development and co-operatively repress the expression of key anti-inflammatory factors. The current study provides insight into gene-regulatory networks in IECs through which dynamic rearrangement of the involved miRNAs modulates the gene expression–regulation machinery between maintaining and disrupting gastrointestinal homeostasis. PMID:26647826

  9. Food-grade titanium dioxide exposure exacerbates tumor formation in colitis associated cancer model.

    PubMed

    Urrutia-Ortega, Ismael M; Garduño-Balderas, Luis G; Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Flores-Flores, José O; González-Robles, Arturo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; León-Cabrera, Sonia; Terrazas, Luis I; van Loveren, Henk; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the fourth worldwide cause of death and even if some dietary habits are consider risk factors, the contribution of food additives including foodgrade titanium dioxide (TiO2), designated as E171, has been poorly investigated. We hypothesized that oral E171 intake could have impact on the enhancement of colorectal tumor formation and we aimed to investigate if E171 administration could enhance tumor formation in a colitis associated cancer (CAC) model. BALB/c male mice were grouped as follows: a) control, b) E171, c) CAC and d) CAC + E171 group (n = 6). E171 used in this study formed agglomerates of 300 nm in water. E171 intragastric administration (5 mg/kg body weight/5 days/10 weeks) was unable to induce tumor formation but dysplastic alterations were observed in the distal colon but enhanced the tumor formation in distal colon (CAC + E171 group) measured by tumor progression markers. Some E171 particles were internalized in colonic cells of the E171 and CAC + E171 groups and both groups showed a decrease in goblet cells in the distal colon. However the CAC + E171 group showed a higher decrease of these cells that act as protection barrier in colon. These results suggest that E171 could worsen pre-existent intestinal diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-inflammatory effects of enemas containing an oily extract of curcumin in an experimental model of diversion colitis.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Caled Jaoudat; Pereira, José Aires; Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Ortega, Manoela Marques; Bragion, Celene Benediti; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin has powerful anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and it has been used for treatment of distal ulcerative colitis. The therapeutic effects of curcumin have not yet been evaluated in diversion colitis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin on colonic mucosa devoid of a faecal stream. Thirty-six rats were subjected to a proximal colostomy and distal colonic fistulation. They were divided into two groups, which were sacrificed two or four weeks after the intervention. Each group was divided into three subgroups treated with the daily application of enemas containing saline or an oily extract of curcumin at 50 mg/kg/day or 200 mg/kg/day. Colitis was diagnosed by histological analysis. Inflammatory grades were assessed using a previously validated scoring system. The infiltration of neutrophils was evaluated based on the tissue expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO), as determined by immunohistochemistry, and a computer-assisted image analysis program. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare inflammation grades and myeloperoxidase levels among groups, and ANOVA was used to verify the variance over time, with the level of significance set at 5% (p<0.05) for both tests. Enemas containing curcumin improved the inflammation of the mucosa without a faecal stream and reduced the tissue contents of MPO. MPO tissue levels did not vary with time or between the concentrations of curcumin used. Enemas with curcumin improved the inflammation of the colonic mucosa, reduced the inflammatory grade and decreased the tissue content of MPO in colon segments without a faecal stream.

  11. A new model for the discrimination between ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhe; Ma, Wei-Ping; Shao, Xiao-Na; Yu, Chao-Hui; Du, Juan; Xiang, Zun; Guo, Gan-Hua; Zhang, Hong; Li, You-Ming; Yue, Min

    2015-01-01

    Distinguishing ulcerative colitis (UC) from Crohn’s disease (CD) is sometimes difficult in a clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to identify a series of independent serum markers capable of distinguishing between UC and CD. 140 UC and 174 CD patients hospitalized at The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University were recruited into this study. A panel of serum markers was quantified for each patient and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) was used to determine a discrimination model. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was used to evaluate the performance of the model, and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was used to evaluate the accuracy of the model. Serum albumin (Alb), total cholesterol (TC), total calcium (TCa), platelet (Plt), glycyl proline dipeptidyl aminopeptidase (GPDA) and their ratios (Alb: Plt, Alb: GPDA, TCa: TC, and Plt: GPDA) were selected into the diagnosis model using BIC. The resulting CD/UC Index (CUI) is CUI = 1.901 + 0.425 Alb - 3.324 TC - 7.444 TCa + 0.018 Plt + 0.087 GPDA - 0.0007 Alb: Plt - 0.004 Alb: GPDA + 1.839 TC: TCa + 0.003 Plt: GPDA, with CUI > 0 incrementally favored a diagnosis of UC, while CUI < 0 corresponded to a higher likelihood of a diagnosis of CD. An average value of the AUC for the CUI model is 0.73 (95% confidence interval: 0.67-0.80). The CUI, derived from commonly available serum biomarkers, could try to differentiate UC from CD in patients with unclear clinical features as a new approach to diagnosis. PMID:25785066

  12. A short treatment with an antibody to sclerostin can inhibit bone loss in an ongoing model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Eddleston, Alison; Marenzana, Massimo; Moore, Adrian R; Stephens, Paul; Muzylak, Mariusz; Marshall, Diane; Robinson, Martyn K

    2009-10-01

    Chronic inflammation leads to bone loss, and increased fracture rates have been reported in a number of human chronic inflammatory conditions. The study reported here investigates the skeletal effects of dosing a neutralizing antibody to the bone regulatory protein sclerostin in a mouse model of chronic colitis. When dosed prophylactically, an antibody to sclerostin (Scl-AbI) did not reduce the weight loss or histological changes associated with colitis but did prevent inflammation-induced bone loss. At the end of the experiment, Scl-AbI-treated animals had a significantly higher femoral BMD (+27%, p < 0.05) than control antibody (Cntrl-Ab)-treated animals. In a second experiment, treatment with Scl-AbI was delayed until colitis had developed, by which time the mechanical properties of femurs in colitic animals were significantly worse than those of healthy age-matched control mice (maximum load, -26%, p < 0.05; energy, -37%, p < 0.05; ultimate strength, -33%, p < 0.05; elastic modulus, -17%, p < 0.05). A short treatment with Scl-AbI halted bone loss and reversed the decline of both intrinsic and extrinsic mechanical properties of the femur such that, after 19 days of treatment, the bone mechanical properties in the Scl-AbI-treated animals were not significantly different from those of noncolitic age-matched controls. Serum markers of bone formation and resorption suggested that the antibody to sclerostin stimulated osteoblast activity and inhibited osteoclast-mediated bone resorption.

  13. Toll-like receptor 2 signaling protects mice from tumor development in a mouse model of colitis-induced cancer.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Emily L; Crother, Timothy R; Rabizadeh, Shervin; Hu, Bing; Wang, Hanlin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Wong, Michelle H; Michelsen, Kathrin S; Arditi, Moshe

    2010-09-27

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disorder of chronic inflammation with increased susceptibility to colorectal cancer. The etiology of IBD is unclear but thought to result from a dysregulated adaptive and innate immune response to microbial products in a genetically susceptible host. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling induced by intestinal commensal bacteria plays a crucial role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, innate immunity and the enhancement of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) integrity. However, the role of TLR2 in the development of colorectal cancer has not been studied. We utilized the AOM-DSS model for colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) in wild type (WT) and TLR2(-/-) mice. Colons harvested from WT and TLR2(-/-) mice were used for histopathology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and cytokine analysis. Mice deficient in TLR2 developed significantly more and larger colorectal tumors than their WT controls. We provide evidence that colonic epithelium of TLR2(-/-) mice have altered immune responses and dysregulated proliferation under steady-state conditions and during colitis, which lead to inflammatory growth signals and predisposition to accelerated neoplastic growth. At the earliest time-points assessed, TLR2(-/-) colons exhibited a significant increase in aberrant crypt foci (ACF), resulting in tumors that developed earlier and grew larger. In addition, the intestinal microenvironment revealed significantly higher levels of IL-6 and IL-17A concomitant with increased phospho-STAT3 within ACF. These observations indicate that in colitis, TLR2 plays a protective role against the development of CAC.

  14. Dysregulated luminal bacterial antigen-specific T-cell responses and antigen-presenting cell function in HLA-B27 transgenic rats with chronic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Bi-Feng; Tonkonogy, Susan L; Hoentjen, Frank; Dieleman, Levinus A; Sartor, R Balfour

    2005-01-01

    HLA-B27/β2 microglobulin transgenic (TG) rats spontaneously develop T-cell-mediated colitis when colonized with normal commensal bacteria, but remain disease-free under germ-free conditions. We investigated regulation of in vitro T-cell responses to enteric bacterial components. Bacterial lysates prepared from the caecal contents of specific pathogen-free (SPF) rats stimulated interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production by TG but not non-TG mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells. In contrast, essentially equivalent amounts of interleukin-10 (IL-10) were produced by TG and non-TG cells. However, when cells from MLNs of non-TG rats were cocultured with TG MLN cells, no suppression of IFN-γ production was noted. Both non-TG and TG antigen-presenting cells (APC) pulsed with caecal bacterial lysate were able to induce IFN-γ production by TG CD4+ cells, although non-TG APC were more efficient than TG APC. Interestingly, the addition of exogenous IL-10 inhibited non-TG APC but not TG APC stimulation of IFN-γ production by cocultured TG CD4+ lymphocytes. Conversely, in the presence of exogenous IFN-γ, production of IL-10 was significantly lower in the supernatants of TG compared to non-TG APC cultures. We conclude that commensal luminal bacterial components induce exaggerated in vitro IFN-γ responses in HLA-B27 TG T cells, which may in turn inhibit the production of regulatory molecules, such as IL-10. Alterations in the production of IFN-γ, and in responses to this cytokine, as well as possible resistance of TG cells to suppressive regulation could together contribute to the development of chronic colitis in TG rats. PMID:16108823

  15. Elevated H2 O2 levels in trinitrobenzene sulfate-induced colitis rats contributes to visceral hyperalgesia through interaction with the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 cation channel.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Yoko; Wang, Shenglan; Tanaka, Koh-Ichi; Hao, Yongbiao; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Nobuyoshi; Noguchi, Koichi; Dai, Yi

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with chronic abdominal pain. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a well-known pain sensor expressed in primary sensory neurons. Recent studies indicate that reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) may activate TRPA1. Colonic inflammation was induced by intra-colonic administration of trinitrobenzene sulfate (TNBS) in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distention (CRD) was recorded to evaluate the visceral hyperalgesia. Rats were sacrificed 1 day after treatment with saline or TNBS; colonic tissues from the inflamed region were removed and then processed to assess the H2 O2 content. H2 O2 scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine or a TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031, was intravenously administrated to the TNBS-treated rats or saline-treated rats. In a parallel experiment, intra-colonic H2 O2 -induced visceral hyperalgesia in naïve rats and the effect of intravenous HC-030031 were measured based on the VMR to CRD. Trinitrobenzene sulfate treatment resulted in significant increase in VMR to CRD at day 1. The H2 O2 content in the inflamed region of the colon in TNBS-treated rats was significantly higher than that of saline-treated rats. N-acetyl-l-cysteine or HC-030031 significantly suppressed the enhanced VMR in TNBS-treated rats while saline-treated rats remained unaffected. Moreover, blockade of TRPA1 activation by HC-030031 significantly reversed the exogenous H2 O2 -induced visceral hyperalgesia. These results suggest that H2 O2 content of the colonic tissue is increased in the early stage of TNBS-induced colitis. The increased H2 O2 content may contribute to the visceral hyperalgesia by activating TRPA1. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Montessori, Gino; Liepa, Egils V.

    1970-01-01

    Twenty cases of ischemic colitis are reviewed; 19 were obtained from autopsy files and the diagnosis in one was made from a surgical specimen. The majority of the patients were elderly with generalized arteriosclerosis. In approximately two-thirds of the patients the ischemic colitis was precipitated by preceding trauma, operation or congestive heart failure. Clinically, ischemic colitis is characterized by abdominal pain, distension and bleeding per rectum. Perforation of large bowel may occur. The lesions tend to be localized around the splenic flexure and junction of the descending and sigmoid colon, and in cases following aortic graft surgery the rectum is involved. Microscopically, there is necrosis, hemorrhage and ulceration. In less severe cases the mucosa only is affected. Cases with perforation show necrosis of all layers. It is considered that ischemic colitis is comparatively frequent and should be distinguished from other inflammatory conditions of the colon. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9 PMID:5308923

  17. Collagenous colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, J G; Levison, D A; Morson, B C; Dawson, A M

    1986-01-01

    Clinical and pathological aspects of six patients with collagenous colitis are presented. These patients have been observed for between four and 15 years and the evolution of the condition is documented in three (cases 1, 3 and 5). Management and possible pathogenetic mechanisms of this enigmatic condition are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3699567

  18. Netrin-1 regulates colon-kidney cross talk through suppression of IL-6 function in a mouse model of DSS-colitis.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Santhakumar, Manicassamy; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2013-05-01

    Organ cross talk is increasingly appreciated in human disease, and inflammatory mediators are shown to mediate distant organ injury in many disease models. Colitis and intestinal injury are known to be mediated by infiltrating immune cells and their secreted cytokines. However, its effect on other organs, such as the kidney, has never been studied. In the current study, we examined the effect of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-colitis on kidney injury and inflammation. In addition, we hypothesized that netrin-1 could modulate colon-kidney cross talk through regulation of inflammation and apoptosis. Consistent with our hypothesis, DSS-colitis induced acute kidney injury in mice. Epithelial-specific overexpression of netrin-1 suppressed both colitis and colitis-induced acute kidney injury, which was associated with reduced weight loss, neutrophil infiltration into colon mucosa, intestinal permeability, epithelial cell apoptosis, and cytokine and chemokine production in netrin-1 transgenic mice colon and kidney. To determine whether netrin-1-protective effects were mediated through suppression of IL-6, IL-6 knockout mice were treated with DSS and acute kidney injury was determined. IL-6 knockout was resistant to colitis and acute kidney injury. Moreover, administration of IL-6 to netrin-1 transgenic mice did not affect the netrin-1-protective effects on the colon and kidney, suggesting that netrin-1 may reduce both IL-6 production and its activity. The present study identifies previously unrecognized cross talk between the colon and kidney, and netrin-1 may limit distant organ injury by suppressing inflammatory mediators and apoptosis.

  19. DNFB-DNS hapten-induced colitis in mice should not be considered a model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bailón, Elvira; Cueto-Sola, Margarita; Utrilla, Pilar; Nieto, Ana; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Celada, Antonio; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Xaus, Jordi; Gálvez, Julio; Comalada, Mònica

    2011-10-01

    The dinitrofluorobenzene/dinitrosulfonic acid (DNFB/DNS) model was originally described as an experimental model of intestinal inflammation resembling human ulcerative colitis (UC). Due to the absence of acceptable UC experimental models for pharmacological preclinical assays, here we examine the immune response induced in this model. Balb/c mice were sensitized by skin application of DNFB on day 1, followed by an intrarectal challenge with DNS on day 5. We further expanded this model by administering a second DNS challenge on day 15. The features of colonic inflammation and immune response were evaluated. The changes observed in colonic tissue corresponded, in comparison to the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis model, to a mild mucosal effect in the colon, which spontaneously resolved in less than 5 days. Furthermore, the second hapten challenge did not exacerbate the inflammatory response. In contrast to other studies, we did not observe any clear involvement of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or other Th1 cytokines during the initial inflammatory response; however, we found that a more Th2-humoral response appeared to mediate the first contact with the hapten. An increased humoral response was detected during the second challenge, although an increased Th1/Th17-cytokine expression profile was also simultaneously observed. On the basis of these results, although the DNFB/DNS model can display some features found in human UC, it should be considered as a model for the study of the intestinal hypersensitivity seen, for example, during food allergy or irritable bowel syndrome but not intestinal inflammation per se. Copyright © 2010 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  20. Medical therapy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, S B

    2000-07-01

    Last year was not a banner year for developments in medical therapy for ulcerative colitis. In contrast to the expansion of therapies for Crohn disease, treatment for ulcerative colitis was evolutionary, at best, leading many patients to seek alternative medical approaches. Nevertheless, there have been advances in the application of aminosalicylates and immune modifiers for ulcerative colitis. Additional, nonconventional approaches include nicotine, probiotics, dietary therapies, and heparins. Several novel approaches have arisen from animal models, including additional means of inhibiting nuclear factor-kappaB and targeting of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

  1. Preventive and curative effect of Pistacia lentiscus oil in experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Naouar, Mustafa S; Mekki, Lilia Zouiten; Charfi, Lamia; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2016-10-01

    to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of the Pistacia lentiscus oil in experimental colitis model. Colitis was induced in male rats by instillation of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) in all groups. The experimental groups consisted of: 5 rats received Lentisc oil 2months before colitis induction (preventive group), 5 rats received the oil on the day of colitis induction (curative group) and 5 control rats. Lentisc oil was extracted from the ripe fruit of the plant by the cold press method and was analyzed by spectro-chromatography. Lentisc oil has been inserted with a standard diet at the dose of 30mg oil/100g of food/rat. The lentisc oil sample is composed mainly by Oleic acid (47.96%), Palmitic acid (27.94%) and Linoleic acid (20.22%).There was a significant difference between control rats and treated rats with lentisc oil concerned body mass (p=0.009), bleeding index (p=0.005 and p=0.018) and diarrhea (p=0.012). Histological examination revealed a clear difference between the control and preventive groups with disappearance of erosion, decreased of cryptitis, irregular crypts and crypt loss in the preventive group. Curative group showed a significant decrease of ulceration, hyperplasia, cryptitis, irregular crypts and crypt loss compared to the control group. There was an attenuation of inflammation in the preventive group compared to the curative group without statistically significant. Lentisc oil administration could provide a protective effect on intestinal inflammation in colitis rats induced by TNBS mainly when it is administered at a young age in preventive mode. This beneficial effect would involve a modification of arachidonic acid metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Retrotransposition of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 is associated with colitis but not tumors in a murine colitic cancer model.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Takeshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Hagiwara, Teruki; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Dohi, Taeko; Kawamura, Yuki I

    2015-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (L1) is a transposable element that can move within the genome, potentially leading to genome diversity and modified gene function. Although L1 activity in somatic cells is normally suppressed through DNA methylation, some L1s are activated in tumors including colorectal carcinoma. However, how L1-retrotransposition (L1-RTP) is involved in gastrointestinal disorders remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that L1-RTP in somatic cells might contribute to colitis-associated cancer (CAC). To address this, we employed an experimental model of CAC using transgenic L1-reporter mice carrying a human L1-EGFP reporter gene. Mice were subjected to repeated cycles of colitis induced by administration of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in drinking water with injection of carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). L1-RTP levels were measured by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeting the newly inserted reporter EGFP in various tissues and cell types, including samples obtained by laser microdissection and cell sorting with flow cytometry. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter were analyzed by bisulfite pyrosequencing. AOM+DSS-treated mice exhibited significantly higher levels of L1-RTP in whole colon tissue during the acute phase of colitis when compared with control naïve mice. L1-RTP levels in whole colon tissue were positively correlated with the histological severity of colitis and degree of neutrophil infiltration into the lamina propria (LP), but not with tumor development in the colon. L1-RTP was enriched in LP mesenchymal cells rather than epithelial cells (ECs), myeloid, or lymphoid cells. DNA methylation levels of the human L1 promoter region showed a negative correlation with L1-RTP levels. L1-RTP was absent from most tumors found in 22-week-old mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that L1-RTP was induced in the mouse CAC mucosa in accordance with the acute inflammatory response; however, retrotransposition appears not to have

  3. Simultaneous Determination of Three Furanocoumarins by UPLC/MS/MS: Application to Pharmacokinetic Study of Angelica dahurica Radix after Oral Administration to Normal and Experimental Colitis-Induced Rats.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Youn-Hwan; Yang, Hye Jin; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2017-03-07

    In traditional oriental medicine, Angelica dahurica Radix (ADR) is used in the treatment of gastrointestinal, respiratory, neuromuscular, and dermal disorders. We evaluated the pharmacokinetic profiles of oxypeucedanin, imperatorin, and isoimperatorin, major active ingredients of ADR, in normal and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis rats. A rapid, sensitive, and validated UPLC/MS/MS method was established for evaluating the pharmacokinetics of three furanocoumarins. After oral administration of ADR (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg), blood samples were collected periodically from the tail vein. In colitis rats, the time to reach the peak concentration (Tmax) of imperatorin and isoimperatorin was significantly delayed (p < 0.05). Lower peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) and longer mean residence times for all furanocoumarins were also observed (p < 0.05) compared with normal rats. There was no significant difference in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve or elimination half-lives. Thus, the delayed Tmax and decreased Cmax, with no influence on the elimination half-life, could be colitis-related changes in the drug-absorption phase. Therefore, the prescription and use of ADR in colitis patients should receive more attention.

  4. CMV - gastroenteritis/colitis

    MedlinePlus

    Colitis - cytomegalovirus; Gastroenteritis - cytomegalovirus; Gastrointestinal CMV disease ... or after bone marrow or organ transplant Ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease Rarely, serious CMV infection involving ...

  5. Flavonoids Extracted from Licorice Prevents Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis in AOM/DSS Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xiaowei; Liu, Dongyu; Gao, Li; Li, Liyong; Cao, Li

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is generally considered as a major risk factor in the progression of colitis-associated carcinogenesis (CAC). Thus, it is well accepted that ameliorating inflammation creates a potential to achieve an inhibitory effect on CAC. Licorice flavonoids (LFs) possess strong anti-inflammatory activity, making it possible to investigate its pharmacologic role in suppressing CAC. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the anti-tumor potential of LFs, and further explore the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, an azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse model was established and administered with or without LFs for 10 weeks, and then the severity of CAC was examined macroscopically and histologically. Subsequently, the effects of LFs on expression of proteins associated with apoptosis and proliferation, levels of inflammatory cytokine, expression of phosphorylated-Janus kinases 2 (p-Jak2) and phosphorylated-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-Stat3), and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) and P53 were assessed. We found that LFs could significantly reduce tumorigenesis induced by AOM/DSS. Further study revealed that LFs treatment substantially reduced activation of NFκB and P53, and subsequently suppressed production of inflammatory cytokines and phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat3 in AOM/DSS-induced mice. Taken together, LFs treatment alleviated AOM/DSS induced CAC via P53 and NFκB/IL-6/Jak2/Stat3 pathways, highlighting the potential of LFs in preventing CAC. PMID:27563884

  6. Colonic and Hepatic Modulation by Lipoic Acid and/or N-Acetylcysteine Supplementation in Mild Ulcerative Colitis Induced by Dextran Sodium Sulfate in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Fabiana Andréa; de Andrade, Kívia Queiroz; de Araújo, Orlando Roberto Pimentel; Santos, Juliana Célia de Farias

    2016-01-01

    Lipoic acid (LA) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) are antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents that have not yet been tested on mild ulcerative colitis (UC). This study aims to evaluate the action of LA and/or NAC, on oxidative stress and inflammation markers in colonic and hepatic rat tissues with mild UC, induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) (2% w/v). LA and/or NAC (100 mg·kg·day−1, each) were given, once a day, in the diet, in a pretreatment phase (7 days) and during UC induction (5 days). Colitis induction was confirmed by histological and biochemical analyses (high performance liquid chromatography, spectrophotometry, and Multiplex®). A redox imbalance occurred before an immunological disruption in the colon. NAC led to a decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and myeloperoxidase activity. In the liver, DSS did not cause damage but treatments with both antioxidants were potentially harmful, with LA increasing MDA and LA + NAC increasing H2O2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma, and transaminases. In summary, NAC exhibited the highest colonic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, while LA + NAC caused hepatic damage. PMID:27957238

  7. Genetic analysis of the Trichuris muris-induced model of colitis reveals QTL overlap and a novel gene cluster for establishing colonic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic susceptibility to colonic inflammation is poorly defined at the gene level. Although Genome Wide Association studies (GWAS) have identified loci in the human genome which confer susceptibility to Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohn’s and Ulcerative Colitis), it is not clear if precise loci exist which confer susceptibility to inflammation at specific locations within the gut e.g. small versus large intestine. Susceptibility loci for colitis in particular have been defined in the mouse, although specific candidate genes have not been identified to date. We have previously shown that infection with Trichuris muris (T. muris) induces chronic colitis in susceptible mouse strains with clinical, histological, and immunological homology to human colonic Crohn’s disease. We performed an integrative analysis of colitis susceptibility, using an F2 inter-cross of resistant (BALB/c) and susceptible (AKR) mice following T. muris infection. Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL), polymorphic and expression data were analysed alongside in silico workflow analyses to discover novel candidate genes central to the development and biology of chronic colitis. Results 7 autosomal QTL regions were associated with the establishment of chronic colitis following infection. 144 QTL genes had parental strain SNPs and significant gene expression changes in chronic colitis (expression fold-change ≥ +/-1.4). The T. muris QTL on chromosome 3 (Tm3) mapped to published QTL in 3 unrelated experimental models of colitis and contained 33 significantly transcribed polymorphic genes. Phenotypic pathway analysis, text mining and time-course qPCR replication highlighted several potential cis-QTL candidate genes in colitis susceptibility, including FcgR1, Ptpn22, RORc, and Vav3. Conclusion Genetic susceptibility to induced colonic mucosal inflammation in the mouse is conserved at Tm3 and overlays Cdcs1.1. Genes central to the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis reside within this locus

  8. Ischemic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, James F.; Hernandez III, Luis O.

    2015-01-01

    Most clinicians associate ischemic colitis with elderly patients who have underlying cardiovascular comorbidities. While the majority of cases probably occur in this population, the disease can present in younger patients as a result of different risk factors, making the diagnosis challenging. While a majority of patients respond to medical management, surgery is required in approximately 20% of the cases and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. PMID:26034405

  9. Rat Genome and Model Resources.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Mary; Smith, Jennifer R; Bryda, Elizabeth; Kuramoto, Takashi; Saba, Laura; Dwinell, Melinda

    2017-07-01

    Rats remain a major model for studying disease mechanisms and discovery, validation, and testing of new compounds to improve human health. The rat's value continues to grow as indicated by the more than 1.4 million publications (second to human) at PubMed documenting important discoveries using this model. Advanced sequencing technologies, genome modification techniques, and the development of embryonic stem cell protocols ensure the rat remains an important mammalian model for disease studies. The 2004 release of the reference genome has been followed by the production of complete genomes for more than two dozen individual strains utilizing NextGen sequencing technologies; their analyses have identified over 80 million variants. This explosion in genomic data has been accompanied by the ability to selectively edit the rat genome, leading to hundreds of new strains through multiple technologies. A number of resources have been developed to provide investigators with access to precision rat models, comprehensive datasets, and sophisticated software tools necessary for their research. Those profiled here include the Rat Genome Database, PhenoGen, Gene Editing Rat Resource Center, Rat Resource and Research Center, and the National BioResource Project for the Rat in Japan. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Elevated fecal peptidase D at onset of colitis in Galphai2-/- mice, a mouse model of IBD

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Robert; Sapnara, Maria; Halfvarson, Jonas; Hörnquist, Elisabeth Hultgren

    2017-01-01

    Background The identification of novel fecal biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is hampered by the complexity of the human fecal proteome. On the other hand, in experimental mouse models there is probably less variation. We investigated the fecal protein content in mice to identify possible biomarkers and pathogenic mechanisms. Methods Fecal samples were collected at onset of inflammation in Galphai2-/- mice, a well-described spontaneous model of chronic colitis, and from healthy littermates. The fecal proteome was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and quantitative mass spectrometry and results were then validated in a new cohort of mice. Results As a potential top marker of disease, peptidase D was found at a higher ratio in Galphai2-/- mouse feces relative to controls (fold change 27; p = 0.019). Other proteins found to be enriched in Gαi2-/- mice were mainly pancreatic proteases, and proteins from plasma and blood cells. A tendency of increased calprotectin, subunit S100-A8, was also observed (fold change 21; p = 0.058). Proteases are potential activators of inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract through their interaction with the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). Accordingly, the level of PAR2 was found to be elevated in both the colon and the pancreas of Galphai2-/- mice at different stages of disease. Conclusions These findings identify peptidase D, an ubiquitously expressed intracellular peptidase, as a potential novel marker of colitis. The elevated levels of fecal proteases may be involved in the pathogenesis of colitis and contribute to the clinical phenotype, possibly by activation of intestinal PAR2. PMID:28323866

  11. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and cyclooxigenase-2 by Isatin: a molecular mechanism of protection against TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Socca, Eduardo Augusto Rabelo; Luiz-Ferreira, Anderson; de Faria, Felipe Meira; de Almeida, Ana Cristina; Dunder, Ricardo José; Manzo, Luis Paulo; Brito, Alba Regina Monteiro Souza

    2014-02-25

    Isatin, an indole alkaloid has been shown to have anti-microbial, anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory effects. Due to its findings, we evaluated whether this alkaloid would have any effect on TNBS-induced colitis. Animals (male Unib:WH rats, aged 8 weeks old) were induced colitis through a rectal administration of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid using a catheter inserted 8 cm into the rectum of the animals. The rats were divided into two major groups: non-colitic and colitic. The colitic group was sub-divided into 6 groups (10 animals per group): colitic non-treated, Isatin 3; 6; 12.5; 18.75 and 25 mg/kg. Our main results showed that the oral treatment with Isatin 6 and 25 mg/kg were capable of avoiding the increase in TNF-α, COX-2 and PGE₂ levels when compared to the colitic non-treated group. Interestingly, the same doses (6 and 25 mg/kg) were also capable of preventing the decrease in IL-10 levels comparing with the colitic non-treated group. The levels of MPO, (an indirect indicator of neutrophil presence), were also maintained lower than those of the colitic non-treated group. Isatin also prevented the decrease of SOD activity and increase of GSH-Px and GSH-Rd activity as well as the depletion of GSH levels. In conclusion, both pre-treatments (6 and 25 mg/kg) were capable of protecting the gut mucosa against the injury caused by TNBS, through the combination of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, which, together, showed a protective activity of the indole alkaloid Isatin.

  12. Oral pirfenidone protects against fibrosis by inhibiting fibroblast proliferation and TGF-β signaling in a murine colitis model.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jianan; Hu, Qiongyuan; Deng, Youming; Chen, Guopu; Guo, Kun; Li, Ranran; Li, Yuan; Wu, Lei; Wang, Gefei; Gu, Guosheng; Li, Jieshou

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly Crohn's disease, frequently causes intestinal fibrosis that ultimately leads to formation of strictures requiring bowel resection. Currently there is no effective antifibrotic therapy available for this disease. Pirfenidone is a small compound that has a broad spectrum of antifibrogenic effect and has been used for the treatment of fibrotic diseases in various organs. The present study aimed to investigate the antifibrogenic effect of pirfenidone in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced murine colitis model. C57BL/6 mice were used and animals were randomly divided into groups receiving pirfenidone or vehicle by oral or transanal routes. Inflammation- and fibrosis-related indexes including body weight, colon length, disease activity, histological change, mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic cytokines were assessed. Furthermore, we performed in vitro analysis using CCD18-Co fibroblasts to evaluate cell proliferation, transdifferentiation, and viability after the cells were cultured with pirfenidone. It was found that oral administration of pirfenidone reduced deposition of collagen in colitis-associated fibrosis, and significantly suppressed the mRNA expression of col1a2, col3a1, and TGF-β. Moreover, pirfenidone inhibited the activation of TGF-β-related smad and MAPK pathways both in vitro and in vivo. Clinical and histological evaluation demonstrated that pirfenidone had no anti-inflammatory effect. The antifibrogenic effect was reduced when pirfenidone was administered in a delayed manner and was unobserved if given locally. Pirfenidone suppressed fibroblast proliferation and transdifferentiation without observed toxicity. Altogether, our results suggested that oral pirfenidone protects against fibrosis of DSS-induced colitis through inhibiting the proliferation of colonic fibroblasts and TGF-β signaling pathways.

  13. Microbial, metabolomic, and immunologic dynamics in a relapsing genetic mouse model of colitis induced by T-synthase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jonathan P; Lin, Lin; Goudarzi, Maryam; Ruegger, Paul; McGovern, Dermot P B; Fornace, Albert J; Borneman, James; Xia, Lijun; Braun, Jonathan

    2017-01-02

    Intestinal dysbiosis is thought to confer susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is unknown whether dynamic changes in the microbiome contribute to fluctuations in disease activity. We explored this question using mice with intestine-specific deletion of C1galt1 (also known as T-synthase) (Tsyn mice). These mice develop spontaneous microbiota-dependent colitis with a remitting/relapsing course due to loss of mucin core-1 derived O-glycans. 16S rRNA sequencing and untargeted metabolomics demonstrated age-specific perturbations in the intestinal microbiome and metabolome of Tsyn mice compare with littermate controls at weeks 3 (disease onset), 5 (during remission), and 9 (after relapse). Colitis remission corresponded to increased levels of FoxP3+RORγt+CD4+ T cells in the colonic lamina propria that were positively correlated with operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in the S24-7 family and negatively correlated with OTUs in the Clostridiales order. Relapse was characterized by marked expansion of FoxP3-RORγt+CD4+ T cells expressing IFNγ and IL17A, which were associated with Clostridiales OTUs distinct from those negatively correlated with FoxP3+RORγt+CD4+ T cells. Our findings suggest that colitis remission and relapse in the Tsyn model may reflect alterations in the microbiome due to reduced core-1 O-glycosylation that shift the balance of regulatory and pro-inflammatory T cell subsets. We investigated whether genetic variation in C1galt1 correlated with the microbiome in a cohort of 78 Crohn's disease patients and 101 healthy controls. Polymorphisms near C1galt1 (rs10486157) and its molecular chaperone, Cosmc (rs4825729), were associated with altered composition of the colonic mucosal microbiota, supporting the relevance of core-1 O-glycosylation to host regulation of the microbiome.

  14. Epithelial vanin-1 controls inflammation-driven carcinogenesis in the colitis-associated colon cancer model.

    PubMed

    Pouyet, Laurent; Roisin-Bouffay, Céline; Clément, Aurélie; Millet, Virginie; Garcia, Stéphane; Chasson, Lionel; Issaly, Nathalie; Rostan, Agathe; Hofman, Paul; Naquet, Philippe; Galland, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Vanin-1 is an epithelial pantetheinase that provides cysteamine to tissue and regulates response to stress. Vanin-1 is expressed by enterocytes, and its absence limits intestinal epithelial cell production of proinflammatory signals. A link between chronic active inflammation and cancer is illustrated in patients with ulcerative colitis, who have an augmented risk of developing colorectal cancer. Indeed, sustained inflammation provides advantageous growth conditions to tumors. We examined whether epithelial cells affect tumorigenesis through vanin-1-dependent modulation of colonic inflammation. To vanin-1(-/-) mice, we applied the colitis-associated cancer (CAC) protocol, which combines injection of azoxymethane (AOM) with repeated administrations of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). We numbered tumors and quantified macrophage infiltration and molecular markers of cell death and proliferation. We also tested DSS-induced colitis. We scored survival, tissue damages, proinflammatory cytokine production, and tissue regeneration. Finally, we explored activation pathways by biochemical analysis on purified colonic epithelial cells (CECs) and in situ immunofluorescence. Vanin-1(-/-) mice displayed a drastically reduced incidence of colorectal cancer in the CAC protocol and manifested mild clinical signs of DSS-induced colitis. The early impact of vanin-1 deficiency on tumor induction was directly correlated to the amount of inflammation and subsequent epithelial proliferation rather than cell death rate; all this was linked to the modulation of NF-kappaB pathway activation in CECs. These results emphasize the importance of the intestinal epithelium in the control of mucosal inflammation acting as a cofactor in carcinogenesis. This might lead to novel anti-inflammatory strategies useful in cancer therapy.

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of carboxyamidotriazole on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis model is associated with the inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaowan; Chen, Wei; Wang, Yufeng; Chen, Chen; Guo, Lei; Ju, Rui; Li, Juan; Zhang, Dechang; Zhu, Lei; Ye, Caiying

    2017-04-01

    Excess proinflammatory cytokines owing to the activation of NF-κB and NLRP3 inflammasome play the key role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Previously, we reported the anti-inflammatory activity of carboxyamidotriazole (CAI) resulting from decreasing cytokines. Therefore, we investigated the therapeutic effects of CAI in 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced rat colitis and the involvement of CAI action with NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB pathway. CAI was orally administered to TNBS-induced colitis rat. The severity of colitis was assessed, and NLRP3 inflammasome, NF-κB pathway and cytokines were determined. Our results showed that CAI significantly reduced weight loss and disease activity index (DAI) scores in colitis rats and alleviated the colonic macroscopic signs and pathological damage. In addition, the intestinal inflammatory markers and permeability index were markedly ameliorated by CAI treatment. The decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18 were also detected in the colon tissues of CAI-treated colitis rats. Moreover, the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in inflamed colon was significantly suppressed by showing an obvious reduction in the NLRP3 and activated caspase-1 levels. Furthermore, CAI reduced NF-κB p65 expression and IκBα phosphorylation and degradation in colitis rats. Therefore, CAI attenuates TNBS-induced colitis, which may be attributed to its inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome and NF-κB activation, and down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines. These results provide further understanding of the intestinal anti-inflammatory effect of CAI and highlight it as a potential drug for the treatment of IBD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental colitis is ameliorated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Karmeli, F; Okon, E; Bursztyn, M

    1995-01-01

    Enhanced nitric oxide (NO) generation by stimulated NO synthase (NOS) activity may, through its oxidative metabolism contribute to tissue injury in experimental colitis. In this study the possible amelioration of experimental colitis by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS activity, was evaluated. Colitis was induced in rats by intracolonic administration of 30 mg trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNB) dissolved in 0.25 ml 50% ethanol or by flushing the colon of capsaicin pretreated rats with 2 ml of 5% acetic acid. In several experiments, L-NAME 0.1 mg/ml was added to the drinking water at the time of colitis induction with TNB or seven days before acetic acid treatment. Rats were killed at various time intervals after induction of colitis. A 10 cm distal colonic segment was isolated, weighed, lesion area measured, and explants organ cultured for 24 hours for determination of NO generation by the Greiss reaction. The rest of the mucosa was scraped for determination of myeloperoxidase and NOS activities and leukotriene generation. In TNB treated rats mean arterial pressure was also determined up to 72 hours after damage induction, with or without cotreatment with nitroprusside. L-NAME significantly decreased the extent of tissue injury in TNB treated rats. Seven days after TNB treatment lesion area was reduced by 55%, colonic weight by 37%, and myeloperoxidase and NOS activity by 59% and 42%, respectively. Acetic acid induced colitis in capsaicin pretreated rats was also significantly decreased by L-NAME. Twenty four hours after acetic acid treatment lesion area was reduced by 61%, colonic weight by 21% and NOS activity by 39%. Mean (SEM) arterial blood pressure in TNB+L-NAME treated rats was 37.6 (8.1) mm Hg higher than in TNB treated rats, an effect that was only partially abolished by nitroprusside. These results show that inhibition of NO synthesis by an L-arginine analogue significantly ameliorates the extent of tissue injury in two

  17. Id1 Deficiency Protects against Tumor Formation in Apc(Min/+) Mice but Not in a Mouse Model of Colitis-Associated Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Chin, Yvette; Benezra, Robert; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Different mechanisms contribute to the development of sporadic, hereditary and colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation (Id) proteins act as dominant-negative antagonists of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Id1 is a promising target for cancer therapy, but little is known about its role in the development of colon cancer. We used immunohistochemistry to demonstrate that Id1 is overexpressed in human colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, whether sporadic or syndromic. Furthermore, elevated Id1 levels were found in dysplasia and colon cancer arising in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Because levels of PGE2 are also elevated in both colitis and colorectal neoplasia, we determined whether PGE2 could induce Id1. PGE2 via EP4 stimulated protein kinase A activity resulting in enhanced pCREB-mediated Id1 transcription in human colonocytes. To determine the role of Id1 in carcinogenesis, two mouse models were used. Consistent with the findings in humans, Id1 was overexpressed in tumors arising in both Apc(Min) (/+) mice, a model of familial adenomatous polyposis, and in experimental colitis-associated colorectal neoplasia. Id1 deficiency led to significant decrease in the number of intestinal tumors in Apc(Min) (/+) mice and prolonged survival. In contrast, Id1 deficiency did not affect the number or size of tumors in the model of colitis-associated colorectal neoplasia, likely due to exacerbation of colitis associated with Id1 loss. Collectively, these results suggest that Id1 plays a role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. Our findings also highlight the need for different strategies to reduce the risk of colitis-associated colorectal cancer compared with sporadic or hereditary colorectal cancer.

  18. An experimental model of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium from acute progresses to chronicity in C57BL/6: correlation between conditions of mice and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Taghipour, Niloofar; Molaei, Mahsa; Mosaffa, Nariman; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Anissian, Ali; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To induce acute colitis progresses to chronicity in C57BL/6 mice by dextran sulfate sodium. Background: Murine models are essential tools to understand IBD pathogenesis. Among different types of chemically induced colitis models, the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model is the most common model of IBD, due to its simplicity. Patients and methods: Male C57BL/6 mice 6–8 weeks old, were collected and matched by age with controls. C57BL/6 mice treated with 2 cycles of 3.5% DSS for 4 days and 4 days of pure water between each cycle. After that, mice were sacrificed and the entire colon was removed. Small sections of the colon were fixed in formaldehyde, embedded in paraffin and sectioned with a microtome. Sections were stained with hematoxylin eosin to analyses the degree of inflammation. Results: After the first cycle oral administration of DSS, mice with severe and visible rectal bleeding and diarrhea entered into the acute phase. After day 4-5, bleeding and diarrhea were improved and mice entered into the chronic phase with peak levels of weight loss. Macroscopically, the inflammation was predominantly located in the distal colon. Microscopically, examination of the distal colon sections showed a decrease number of goblet cells, loss of crypts, signs of surface epithelial regeneration and moderate to severe infiltration of inflammatory cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: In order to achieve an experimental colitis model, our protocol is recommended for future therapies in IBD experimental modeling. PMID:26744614

  19. Combined Therapy with Rheum tanguticum Polysaccharide and Low-dose 5-ASA Ameliorates TNBS-Induced Colitis in Rats by Suppression of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linna; Liu, Zhenxiong; Zhang, Tian; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Wenjuan; Zhang, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The most common conventional therapy for inflammatory bowel disease in clinical practice involves the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as 5-amino salicylic acid. However, a high dose of 5-amino salicylic acid may bring about severe side effects. Chinese people have used Rheum tanguticum as a folk remedy for gastrointestinal disease for two thousand years. Our group has isolated R. tanguticum polysaccharide 1 from R. tanguticum and verified that it can attenuate 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in murines/rats. The present study aims to evaluate whether the addition of R. tanguticum polysaccharide 1 can improve efficacy and limit subsequent side effects of conventional treatment (5-amino salicylic acid) in rats with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis. Sixty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomized into five groups and treated with (1) saline (saline, 0.2 mL/day × 5, p. o.), (2) 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid alone (saline, 0.2 mL/day × 5, p. o.), (3) 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid + 5-amino salicylic acid (5-amino salicylic acid, 75 mg/kg/day × 5, p.o), (4) 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid + R. tanguticum polysaccharide 1 (R. tanguticum polysaccharide 1, 200 mg/kg/day × 5, p. o.), and (5) 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid + 5-amino salicylic acid + R. tanguticum polysaccharide 1 (5-amino salicylic acid, 25 mg/kg/day × 5, p.o; R. tanguticum polysaccharide 1, 200 mg/kg/day × 5, p. o.). All the rats were sacrificed on the 6th day after treatment using an overdose of anesthesia. A histological assessment was performed using semiquantitative scores; nuclear factor-kappa B and tumor necrosis factor-α were measured with Western blot, cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2 protein expressions were investigated by RT-polymerase chain reaction, and prostoglandin E2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase productions were investigated by ELISA. The extent and

  20. A new therapeutic association to manage relapsing experimental colitis: Doxycycline plus Saccharomyces boulardii.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Mesa, José; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Ocete, Maria Angeles; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Galvez, Julio

    2015-07-01

    Immunomodulatory antibiotics have been proposed for the treatment of multifactorial conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. Probiotics are able to attenuate intestinal inflammation, being considered as safe when chronically administered. The aim of the study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of doxycycline, a tetracycline with immunomodulatory properties, alone and in association with the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii CNCMI-745. Doxycycline was assayed both in vitro (Caco-2 epithelial cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages) and in vivo, in the trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) model of rat colitis and the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) model of mouse colitis. In addition, the anti-inflammatory effect of the association of doxycycline and the probiotic was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in a DSS model of reactivated colitis in mice. Doxycycline displayed immunomodulatory activity in vitro, reducing IL-8 production by intestinal epithelial cells and nitric oxide by macrophages. Doxycycline administration to TNBS-colitic rats (5, 10 and 25 mg/kg) ameliorated the intestinal inflammatory process, being its efficacy comparable to that previously showed by minocycline. Doxycycline treatment was also effective in reducing acute intestinal inflammation in the DSS model of mouse colitis. The association of doxycycline and S. boulardii helped managing colitis in a reactivated model of colitis, by reducing intestinal inflammation and accelerating the recovery and attenuating the relapse. This was evidenced by a reduced disease activity index, colonic tissue damage and expression of inflammatory mediators. This study confirms the intestinal anti-inflammatory activity of doxycycline and supports the potential use of its therapeutic association with S. boulardii for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, in which doxycycline is used to induce remission and long term probiotic administration helps to prevent the relapses.

  1. Change of intestinal microbiota with elemental diet and its impact on therapeutic effects in a murine model of chronic colitis.

    PubMed

    Kajiura, Takayuki; Takeda, Tomoko; Sakata, Shinji; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Hashimoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Hideki; Suzuki, Manabu; Benno, Yoshimi

    2009-09-01

    Elemental diet (ED) has been used as an enteral nutritional therapy for Crohn's disease. However, the precise mechanisms of ED remain unclear. In interleukin-10 (IL-10)-deficient cell-transferred mice, we investigated the change of intestinal microbiota with ED using molecular terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and culture method, and evaluated its influence on therapeutic effects of ED. ED significantly suppressed intestinal inflammation. The total amount of bacteria in colitis mice fed the regular diet was higher than in normal mice but decreased in colitis mice fed ED. T-RFLP profiles of the ED group markedly differed from those of the regular diet groups. The diversity of bacterial species in the ED group decreased to 60% of that found in the regular diet groups. Among the cultivated bacteria, the change in lactic acid bacteria composition was remarkable. Lactobacillus reuteri and L. johnsonii decreased and Enterococcus faecalis and E. durans increased in the ED group. The culture supernatant of L. reuteri isolates induced significant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 activity in RAW 264 cells, while the culture supernatant of E. faecalis and E. durans barely induced their activity. These data suggested that reduction in amount and diversity of intestinal microbiota and decrease of proinflammatory cytokines via a change in composition of lactic acid bacteria by ED seem to contribute to reduction of bowel inflammation in this model.

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Properties of the Enaminone E121 in the Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS) Colitis Model

    PubMed Central

    Khajah, Maitham A.; Ananthalakshmi, Kethireddy V.; Edafiogho, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Background Enaminones are synthetic compounds with an established role in the prevention of various forms of seizures. Recent evidence suggests potent anti-tussive, bronchodilation and anti-inflammatory properties. Pre-treatment with particularly E121 compound resulted in a decrease in leukocyte recruitment in the ovalbumin induced-model of asthma, immune cell proliferation and cytokine release in vitro. We hypothesize that E121 might serve as a therapeutic potential in intestinal inflammation through modulating immune cell functions. Methods Colitis was induced by daily dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) administration for 5 days, and its severity was determined by gross and histological assessments. The plasma level of various cytokines was measured using flow cytometry-based assay. The colonic expression/ phosphorylation level of various molecules was determined by immunofluorescence and western blotting. The effects of E121 treatment on in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis (under-agarose assay), superoxide release (luminol oxidation assay) and apoptosis (annexin V/7AAD) were also determined. Results DSS-induced colitis in mice was significantly reduced by daily E121 treatment (30–100 mg/kg) at gross and histological levels. This effect was due to modulated plasma levels of interleukin (IL-2) and colonic expression levels of various signaling molecules and proteins involved in apoptosis. In vitro neutrophil survival, chemotaxis, and superoxide release were also reduced by E121 treatment. Conclusion Our results indicate important anti-inflammatory actions of E121 in the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:27997590

  3. Comparison of prophylactic and therapeutic use of short‐chain fatty acid enemas in diversion colitis: a study in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ariano José Freitas; Júnior, Francisco Edilson Leite Pinto; Formiga, Maria Célia Carvalho; da Costa Melo, Syomara Pereira; Brandão‐Neto, José; de Oliveira Ramos, Ana Maria

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of short‐chain fatty‐acids on atrophy and inflammation of excluded colonic segments before and after the development of diversion colitis. INTRODUCTION: Diversion colitis is a chronic inflammatory process affecting the dysfunctional colon, possibly evolving with mucous and blood discharge. The most favored hypotheses to explain its development is short‐chain fatty‐acid deficiency in the colon lumen. METHODS: Wistar rats were submitted to colostomy with distal colon exclusion. Two control groups (A1 and B1) received rectally administered physiological saline, whereas two experimental groups (A2 and B2) received rectally administered short‐chain fatty‐acids. The A groups were prophylactically treated (5th to 40th days postoperatively), whereas the B groups were therapeutically treated (after post‐operative day 40). The mucosal thickness of the excluded colon was measured histologically. The inflammatory reaction of the mucosal lamina propria and the lymphoid tissue response were quantified through established scores. RESULTS: There was a significant thickness recovery of the colonic mucosa in group B2 animals (p  =  0.0001), which also exhibited a significant reduction in the number of eosinophilic polymorphonuclear cells in the lamina propria (p  =  0.0126) and in the intestinal lumen (p  =  0.0256). Group A2 showed no mucosal thickness recovery and significant increases in the numbers of lymphocytes (p  =  0.0006) and eosinophilic polymorphonuclear cells in the lamina propria of the mucosa (p  =  0.0022). CONCLUSION: Therapeutic use of short‐chain fatty‐acids significantly reduced eosinophilic polymorphonuclear cell numbers in the intestinal wall and in the colonic lumen; it also reversed the atrophy of the colonic mucosa. Prophylactic use did not impede the development of mucosal atrophy. PMID:21340226

  4. Fucoidan Extracts Ameliorate Acute Colitis.

    PubMed

    Lean, Qi Ying; Eri, Rajaraman D; Fitton, J Helen; Patel, Rahul P; Gueven, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, are an important cause of morbidity and impact significantly on quality of life. Overall, current treatments do not sustain a long-term clinical remission and are associated with adverse effects, which highlight the need for new treatment options. Fucoidans are complex sulphated, fucose-rich polysaccharides, found in edible brown algae and are described as having multiple bioactivities including potent anti-inflammatory effects. Therefore, the therapeutic potential of two different fucoidan preparations, fucoidan-polyphenol complex (Maritech Synergy) and depyrogenated fucoidan (DPF) was evaluated in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) mouse model of acute colitis. Mice were treated once daily over 7 days with fucoidans via oral (Synergy or DPF) or intraperitoneal administration (DPF). Signs and severity of colitis were monitored daily before colons and spleens were collected for macroscopic evaluation, cytokine measurements and histology. Orally administered Synergy and DPF, but not intraperitoneal DPF treatment, significantly ameliorated symptoms of colitis based on retention of body weight, as well as reduced diarrhoea and faecal blood loss, compared to the untreated colitis group. Colon and spleen weight in mice treated with oral fucoidan was also significantly lower, indicating reduced inflammation and oedema. Histological examination of untreated colitis mice confirmed a massive loss of crypt architecture and goblet cells, infiltration of immune cells and oedema, while all aspects of this pathology were alleviated by oral fucoidan. Importantly, in this model, the macroscopic changes induced by oral fucoidan correlated significantly with substantially decreased production of at least 15 pro-inflammatory cytokines by the colon tissue. Overall, oral fucoidan preparations significantly reduce the inflammatory pathology associated with DSS-induced colitis and could therefore represent

  5. N-nitroso compounds in the gastrointestinal tract of rats and in the feces of mice with induced colitis or fed hot dogs or beef.

    PubMed

    Mirvish, Sidney S; Haorah, James; Zhou, Lin; Hartman, Melissa; Morris, Chantey R; Clapper, Marge L

    2003-03-01

    Because colonic N-nitroso compounds (NOC) may be a cause of colon cancer, we determined total NOC levels by Walters' method in the gastrointestinal tract and feces of rodents: (i) feces of C57BL mice fed chow and semi-purified diets contained 3.2 +/- 0.4 and 0.46 +/- 0.06 NOC/g, respectively (P < 0.01, mean +/- SD). (ii) NOC levels for gastrointestinal contents of three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats fed chow diet were 0.9 +/- 0.05 (diet), 0.2 +/- 0 (stomach), 0.3-0.4 (small intestine), 0.7-1.6 (cecum and colon) and 2.6 +/- 0.6 (feces) nmol/g. NOC precursor (NOCP) levels (measured as NOC after mild nitrosation) for two rat groups fed chow diet showed a 16-fold increase from stomach to proximal small intestine (mean, 6.2 micromol/g), and a 1.7-fold increase from distal colon to feces (mean, 11.6 micromol/g). (iii) Eight Min and five C57BL/6J mice received 4% dextran sulfate sodium in drinking water on days 1-4 to induce acute colitis. This increased fecal NOC levels 1.9-fold on day 5 in both strains (P < or = 0.04), probably due to NO synthase-derived nitrosating agents in the colon. (iv) Following studies on humans fed beef [Hughes et al. (2001) Carcinogenesis, 22, 199], Swiss mice received semi-purified diets mixed with 18% of beef plus pork hot dogs or sautéed beef for 7 days. On day 7, individual 24-h fecal NOC outputs were determined. In three hot dog and two beef groups with 5 mice/group, mean fecal NOC output/day was 3.7-5.0 (hot dog) and 2.0-2.9 (beef) times that for control groups fed semi-purified diet alone (P < 0.002 for each of combined groups). These groups showed little change in fecal NOCP output. (v) Initial purification of rat fecal NOCP by adsorption-desorption and HPLC is described. Results should help evaluate the view that colonic NOC causes colon cancer associated with colitis and ingestion of red and nitrite-preserved meat.

  6. Prevention of colonic fibrosis by Boswellia and Scutellaria extracts in rats with colitis induced by 2,4,5-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid.

    PubMed

    Latella, G; Sferra, R; Vetuschi, A; Zanninelli, G; D'Angelo, A; Catitti, V; Caprilli, R; Gaudio, E

    2008-06-01

    Currently, no effective preventive measures or medical therapies are available for intestinal fibrosis and, thus, surgery remains the only available strategy in the management of fibrostenotic enteropathies, especially Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a combined therapy of anti-inflammatory Boswellia and antifibrotic Scutellaria extracts on the development of colonic fibrosis in rats. Chronic colonic inflammation-associated fibrosis was induced in rats by intracolonic administration of 2,4,5-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS). Sixty-four healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to five groups: 8 controls, 14 TNBS, 14 TNBS orally treated with Boswellia extracts (50 mg kg(-1) day(-1)), 14 TNBS orally treated with Scutellaria extracts (150 mg kg(-1) day(-1)), and 14 TNBS orally treated with both Boswellia (50 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) and Scutellaria extracts (150 mg kg(-1) day(-1)). The colon was removed after 21 days of treatment and assessed by macroscopic, histological, morphometric and immunohistochemical analyses. For immunohistochemical analysis, alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), collagen types I-III, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), Smad3, Smad7 and CD3 antibodies were used. Combined oral administration of Boswellia and Scutellaria significantly improved the course and macroscopic findings of TNBS-induced chronic colitis assessed by disease activity index, colon weight, length, adhesions, strictures, dilatation, thickness, oedema, ulcerations and extension of damage. The histological severity of the colonic fibrosis was also notably improved by the treatment and associated with a significant reduction in the colonic expression of alpha-SMA, collagen I-III, CTGF, TGF-beta1, Smad3, and Smad7. These data demonstrate that the prophylactic administration of anti-inflammatory Boswellia and antifibrotic Scutellaria extracts is effective in preventing colonic fibrosis in

  7. Longitudinal analysis of inflammation and microbiota dynamics in a model of mild chronic dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Luigia; Cavazza, Elena; Spisni, Enzo; Strillacci, Antonio; Centanni, Manuela; Candela, Marco; Praticò, Chiara; Campieri, Massimo; Ricci, Chiara; Valerii, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize longitudinally the inflammation and the gut microbiota dynamics in a mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. METHODS: In animal models, the most common method used to trigger colitis is based on the oral administration of the sulfated polysaccharides DSS. The murine DSS colitis model has been widely adopted to induce severe acute, chronic or semi-chronic colitis, and has been validated as an important model for the translation of mice data to human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, it is now clear that models characterized by mild intestinal damage are more accurate for studying the effects of therapeutic agents. For this reason, we have developed a murine model of mild colitis to study longitudinally the inflammation and microbiota dynamics during the intestinal repair processes, and to obtain data suitable to support the recovery of gut microbiota-host homeostasis. RESULTS: All plasma cytokines evaluated, except IL-17, began to increase (P < 0.05), after 7 d of DSS administration. IL-17 only began to increase 4 d after DSS withdrawal. IL-1β and IL-17 continue to increase during the recovery phase, even when clinical signs of colitis had disappeared. IL-6, IL-10 and IFN-γ reached their maxima 4 d after DSS withdrawal and decreased during the late recovery phase. TNFα reached a peak (a three- fold increase, P < 0.05), after which it slightly decreased, only to increase again close to the end of the recovery phase. DSS administration induced profound and rapid changes in the mice gut microbiota. After 3 d of DSS administration, we observed a major reduction in Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and a corresponding increase in Bacillaceae, with respect to control mice. In particular, Bacteroidetes/Prevotella decreased from a relative abundance of 59.42%-33.05%, while Bacillaceae showed a concomitant increase from 2.77% to 10.52%. Gut microbiota rapidly shifted toward a healthy profile during the recovery phase and returned

  8. Longitudinal analysis of inflammation and microbiota dynamics in a model of mild chronic dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    De Fazio, Luigia; Cavazza, Elena; Spisni, Enzo; Strillacci, Antonio; Centanni, Manuela; Candela, Marco; Praticò, Chiara; Campieri, Massimo; Ricci, Chiara; Valerii, Maria Chiara

    2014-02-28

    To characterize longitudinally the inflammation and the gut microbiota dynamics in a mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. In animal models, the most common method used to trigger colitis is based on the oral administration of the sulfated polysaccharides DSS. The murine DSS colitis model has been widely adopted to induce severe acute, chronic or semi-chronic colitis, and has been validated as an important model for the translation of mice data to human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, it is now clear that models characterized by mild intestinal damage are more accurate for studying the effects of therapeutic agents. For this reason, we have developed a murine model of mild colitis to study longitudinally the inflammation and microbiota dynamics during the intestinal repair processes, and to obtain data suitable to support the recovery of gut microbiota-host homeostasis. All plasma cytokines evaluated, except IL-17, began to increase (P < 0.05), after 7 d of DSS administration. IL-17 only began to increase 4 d after DSS withdrawal. IL-1β and IL-17 continue to increase during the recovery phase, even when clinical signs of colitis had disappeared. IL-6, IL-10 and IFN-γ reached their maxima 4 d after DSS withdrawal and decreased during the late recovery phase. TNFα reached a peak (a three- fold increase, P < 0.05), after which it slightly decreased, only to increase again close to the end of the recovery phase. DSS administration induced profound and rapid changes in the mice gut microbiota. After 3 d of DSS administration, we observed a major reduction in Bacteroidetes/Prevotella and a corresponding increase in Bacillaceae, with respect to control mice. In particular, Bacteroidetes/Prevotella decreased from a relative abundance of 59.42%-33.05%, while Bacillaceae showed a concomitant increase from 2.77% to 10.52%. Gut microbiota rapidly shifted toward a healthy profile during the recovery phase and returned normal 4 d after DSS

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of Lacto-Wolfberry in a mouse model of experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, David; Brahmbhatt, Viral; Foata, Francis; Saudan, Yen; Serrant, Patrick; Blum, Stephanie; Benyacoub, Jalil; Vidal, Karine

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of Lacto-Wolfberry (LWB), both in vitro and using a mouse model of experimental colitis. METHODS: The effects of LWB on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion were assessed in a murine macrophage cell line. in vitro assessment also included characterizing the effects of LWB on the activation of NF-E2 related 2 pathway and inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, utilizing reporter cell lines. Following the in vitro assessment, the anti-inflammatory efficacy of an oral intervention with LWB was tested in vivo using a preclinical model of intestinal inflammation. Multiple outcomes including body weight, intestinal histology, colonic cytokine levels and anti-oxidative measures were investigated. RESULTS: LWB reduced the LPS-mediated induction of ROS production [+LPS vs 1% LWB + LPS, 1590 ± 188.5 relative luminescence units (RLU) vs 389 ± 5.9 RLU, P < 0.001]. LWB was more effective than wolfberry alone in reducing LPS-induced IL-6 secretion in vitro (wolfberry vs 0.5% LWB, 15% ± 7.8% vs 64% ± 5%, P < 0.001). In addition, LWB increased reporter gene expression via the anti-oxidant response element activation (wolfberry vs LWB, 73% ± 6.9% vs 148% ± 28.3%, P < 0.001) and inhibited the TNF-α-induced activation of the NF-κB pathway (milk vs LWB, 10% ± 6.7% vs 35% ± 3.3%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, oral supplementation with LWB resulted in a reduction of macroscopic (-LWB vs +LWB, 5.39 ± 0.61 vs 3.66 ± 0.59, P = 0.0445) and histological scores (-LWB vs +LWB, 5.44 ± 0.32 vs 3.66 ± 0.59, P = 0.0087) in colitic mice. These effects were associated with a significant decrease in levels of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β (-LWB vs +LWB, 570 ± 245 μg/L vs 89 ± 38 μg/L, P = 0.0106), keratinocyte-derived chemokine/growth regulated protein-α (-LWB vs +LWB, 184 ± 49 μg/L vs 75 ± 20 μg/L, P = 0

  10. Implication of TNF-alpha convertase (TACE/ADAM17) in inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and inflammation in an experimental model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Colón, A L; Menchén, L A; Hurtado, O; De Cristóbal, J; Lizasoain, I; Leza, J C; Lorenzo, P; Moro, M A

    2001-12-21

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which is shed in its soluble form by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) called TNF-alpha convertase (TACE; ADAM17). TNF-alpha plays a role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is involved in the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) which has also been implicated in IBD. The study was designed to investigate whether colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) in rats produces an increase in TACE activity and/or expression and whether its pharmacological inhibition reduces TNF-alpha levels, iNOS expression and colonic damage in this model. TNBS (30 mg in 0.4 ml of 50% ethanol) was instilled into the colon of female Wistar rats. Saline or TACE inhibitor BB1101 (10 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally 5 days after TNBS instillation. On day 10, colons were removed and assessed for pathological score, myeloperoxidase (MPO), NO synthase (NOS), TACE enzymatic activity and protein levels, colonic TNF-alpha and NOx- levels. Instillation of TNBS caused an increase in TACE activity and expression and the release of TNF-alpha. TNBS also resulted in iNOS expression and colonic damage. BB1101 blocked TNBS-induced increase in TACE activity, TNF-alpha release and iNOS expression. Concomitantly, BB1101 ameliorated TNBS-induced colonic damage and inflammation. TNBS causes TNF-alpha release by an increase in TACE activity and expression and this results in the expression of iNOS and subsequent inflammation, suggesting that TACE inhibition may prove useful as a therapeutic means in IBD.

  11. Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Elena; Siegmund, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that is chronically present in patients throughout their lives. Hence, the chronic nature of the disease invariably requires continuous medical treatment. Advances in medical therapy over the last decades and current developments offer increasing options and are closely associated with a better life quality in patients. Recent developments in understanding the pathogenesis of UC are discussed. The current standard therapeutic regimens are outlined and recent developments and upcoming strategies introduced. (1) Environmental factors that are yet to be defined contribute to the pathogenesis of UC. (2) An accelerated step-up therapy represents the current standard in UC. (3) Anti-integrins represent the most recently introduced pharmacological class in the therapy of UC. (4) Novel strategies including Janus kinase inhibitors are in the near future. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Eosinophilic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Okpara, Nnenna; Aswad, Bassam; Baffy, Gyorgy

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic colitis (EC) is a rare form of primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease with a bimodal peak of prevalence in neonates and young adults. EC remains a little understood condition in contrast to the increasingly recognized eosinophilic esophagitis. Clinical presentation of EC is highly variable according to mucosal, transmural, or serosal predominance of inflammation. EC has a broad differential diagnosis because colon tissue eosinophilia often occurs in parasitic infection, drug-induced allergic reactions, inflammatory bowel disease, and various connective tissue disorders, which require thorough searching for secondary causes that may be specifically treated with antibiotics or dietary and drug elimination. Like eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease involving other segments of the gastrointestinal tract, EC responds very well to steroids that may be spared by using antihistamines, leukotriene inhibitors and biologics. PMID:19554649

  13. Expression profiles of proliferative and antiapoptotic genes in sporadic and colitis-related mouse colon cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Švec, Jiří; Ergang, Peter; Mandys, Václav; Kment, Milan; Pácha, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Elevated levels of survivin, telomerase catalytic subunit (TERT), integrin-linked kinase (ILK), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the regulatory factors c-MYB and Tcf-4 are often found in human cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC) and have been implicated in the development and progression of tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of these genes in mouse models of sporadic and colitis-associated CRC. To address these issues, we used qRT-PCR approach to determine changes in gene expression patterns of neoplastic cells (high-grade dysplasia/intramucosal carcinoma) and surrounding normal epithelial cells in A/J and ICR mouse strains using laser microdissection. Both strains were injected with azoxymethane and ICR mice were also given drinking water that contained 2% dextran sodium sulphate. In both sporadic (A/J mice) and colitis-associated (ICR mice) models of CRC, the levels of TERT mRNA, COX-2 mRNA and Tcf-4 mRNA were higher in neoplastic cells than in surrounding normal epithelial cells. In contrast, survivin mRNA was upregulated only in neoplastic cells from A/J mice and ILK mRNA was upregulated only in neoplastic cells from ICR mice. However, the expression of iNOS mRNA was similar in normal and neoplastic cells in both models and c-MYB mRNA was actually downregulated in neoplastic cells compared with normal cells in both models. These findings suggest that the genetic background and/or the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis associated with genotoxic insults and colonic inflammation influence the gene expression of mTERT, COX-2, Tcf-4, c-MYB, ILK and survivin in colon epithelial neoplasia. PMID:20096072

  14. Oral administration of red ginseng powder fermented with probiotic alleviates the severity of dextran-sulfate sodium-induced colitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sun-Hee; Park, Jisang; Kim, Sae-Hae; Choi, Kyung-Min; Ko, Eun-Sil; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Lee, Young-Ran; Jang, Hyonseok; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2017-03-01

    Red ginseng is a well-known alternative medicine with anti-inflammatory activity. It exerts pharmacological effects through the transformation of saponin into metabolites by intestinal microbiota. Given that intestinal microflora vary among individuals, the pharmacological effects of red ginseng likely vary among individuals. In order to produce homogeneously effective red ginseng, we prepared probiotic-fermented red ginseng and evaluated its activity using a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model in mice. Initial analysis of intestinal damage indicated that the administration of probiotic-fermented red ginseng significantly decreased the severity of colitis, compared with the control and the activity was higher than that induced by oral administration of ginseng powder or probiotics only. Subsequent analysis of the levels of serum IL-6 and TNF-α, inflammatory biomarkers that are increased at the initiation stage of colitis, were significantly decreased in probiotic-fermented red ginseng-treated groups in comparison to the control group. The levels of inflammatory cytokines and mRNAs for inflammatory factors in colorectal tissues were also significantly decreased in probiotic-fermented red ginseng-treated groups. Collectively, oral administration of probiotic-fermented red ginseng reduced the severity of colitis in a mouse model, suggesting that it can be used as a uniformly effective red ginseng product. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Impairment of skin barrier function via cholinergic signal transduction in a dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Dry skin has been clinically associated with visceral diseases, including liver disease, as well as for our previously reported small intestinal injury mouse model, which have abnormalities in skin barrier function. To clarify this disease-induced skin disruption, we used a dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Following treatment with DSS, damage to the colon and skin was monitored using histological and protein analysis methods as well as the detection of inflammatory mediators in the plasma. Notably, transepidermal water loss was higher, and skin hydration was lower in DSS-treated mice compared to controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 and NO2-/NO3- levels were also upregulated in the plasma, and a decrease in body weight and colon length was observed in DSS-treated mice. However, when administered TNF-α antibody or an iNOS inhibitor, no change in skin condition was observed, indicating that another signalling mechanism is utilized. Interestingly, the number of tryptase-expressing mast cells, known for their role in immune function via cholinergic signal transduction, was elevated. To evaluate the function of cholinergic signalling in this context, atropine (a muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist) or hexamethonium (a nicotinic cholinergic ganglion-blocking agent) was administered to DSS-treated mice. Our data indicate that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are the primary receptors functioning in colon-to-skin signal transduction, as DSS-induced skin disruption was suppressed by atropine. Thus, skin disruption is likely associated with DSS-induced colitis, and the activation of mast cells via mAChRs is critical to this association.

  16. Extracts of the Rat Tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, Suppress Macrophage Activation In Vitro and Alleviate Chemically Induced Colitis in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, M. J. G.; Wang, A.; Catarino, M. E. D.; Ball, L.; Phan, V. C.; MacDonald, J. A.; McKay, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of parasite-host interactions can reveal the intricacies of immunity and identify ways to modulate immunopathological reactions. We assessed the ability of a phosphate-buffered saline-soluble extract of adult Hymenolepis diminuta to suppress macrophage (human THP-1 cell line, murine peritoneal macrophages) activity in vitro and the impact of treating mice with this extract on colitis induced by dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS). A high-molecular-mass fraction of adult H. diminuta (HdHMW) or excretory/secretory products reduced macrophage activation: lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and poly(I:C)-induced TNF-α and IL-6 were suppressed by HdHMW. The active component in the HdHMW extract was minimally sensitive to boiling and trypsin digestion, whereas the use of sodium metaperiodate, as a general deglycosylation strategy, indicated that the immunosuppressive effect of HdHMW was at least partially dependent on a glycan: treating the HdHMW with neuraminidase and α-mannosidase failed to inhibit its blockade of LPS-induced TNF-α production by THP-1 macrophages. Mice treated with DNBS developed colitis, as typified by wasting, shortening of the colon, macroscopic and microscopic tissue damage, and an inflammatory infiltrate. Mice cotreated with HdHMW (three intraperitoneal injections) displayed significantly less inflammatory disease, and this was accompanied by reduced TNF-α production and increased IL-10 and IL-4 production by mitogen-stimulated spleen cells. However, cotreatment of mice with neutralizing anti-IL-10 antibodies had only a minor impact on the anticolitic effect of the HdHMW. We speculate that purification of the immunosuppressive factor(s) from H. diminuta has the potential to lead to the development of novel immunomodulatory drugs to treat inflammatory disease. PMID:20028812

  17. IMMUNOLOGICAL STUDIES IN ULCERATIVE COLITIS

    PubMed Central

    Lagercrantz, R.; Hammarström, S.; Perlmann, P.; Gustafsson, B. E.

    1968-01-01

    The incidence and height of antibody titers to colon, assayed by indirect hemagglutination with a heat stable colon extract from germ free rats, is significantly higher in sera from patients with ulcerative colitis than in those from healthy controls or from patients with amebic liver abscess or dysentery. While sera from ulcerative colitis patients and controls are indistinguishable in regard to incidence and height of antibody titers to Forsman antigen, Staphylococcus aureus S 209, Clostridium difficile, and several common strains of E. coli, they have elevated titers and increased incidence of antibodies to a heat stable antigen of E. coli O14. Patients with amebic dysentery have normal titers of such antibodies. Absorption of patients' sera with E. coli O14 antigen inhibits the colon directed hemagglutination reaction in approximately 30% of the cases tested. Likewise, the anti-E. coli O14 reaction can sometimes be inhibited with the colon extract. Other E. coli strains and other bacteria are inactive or have only weak inhibitory activity. Hemagglutination inhibition experiments show that germ free rat colon and E. coli O14 contain common structures, depicted by antibodies in the patients' sera. This pattern of reactivity closely resembles that seen in rats made autoimmune to colon by injection of newborn rabbit colon. E. coli O14 is known to carry a heterogenetic antigen present in lower concentration (or activity) in most Enterobacteriaceae. Hemagglutination inhibition experiments with rabbit antisera to E. coli O14 suggest that the antigen common for E. coli O14 and colon is related to this heterogenetic antigen. The findings imply that this antigen, which is constantly present in low concentrations in the human colon, may give rise to anticolon antibody formation in ulcerative colitis through breakage of tolerance. Since this antigen is present in healthy individuals as well, additional factors are required to explain the induction of anti

  18. Therapeutic Potential of Secreted Molecules Derived from Human Amniotic Fluid Mesenchymal Stem/Stroma Cells in a Mice Model of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Legaki, E; Roubelakis, M G; Theodoropoulos, G E; Lazaris, A; Kollia, A; Karamanolis, G; Marinos, E; Gazouli, M

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are the result of pathological immune responses due to environmental factors or microbial antigens into a genetically predisposed individual. Mainly due to their trophic properties, a mounting interest is focused on the use of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) to treat IBD disease in animal models. The aim of the study is to test whether the secreted molecules, derived from a specific population of second trimester amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, the spindle-shaped MSCs (SS-AF-MSCs), could be utilized as a novel therapeutic, cell free approach for IBD therapy. Induction of colitis was achieved by oral administration of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) (3 % w/v in tap water), for 5 days, to 8-week-old NOD/SCID mice. The progression of colitis was assessed on a daily basis through recording the body weight, stool consistency and bleeding. Conditioned media (CM) derived from SS-AF-MSCs were collected, concentrated and then delivered intraperitoneally into DSS treated mice. To evaluate and determine the inflammatory cytokine levels, histopathological approach was applied. Administration of CM derived from SS-AF-MSCs cells reduced the severity of colitis in mice. More importantly, TGFb1 protein levels were increased in the mice received CM, while TNFa and MMP2 protein levels were decreased, respectively. Accordingly, IL-10 was significantly increased in mice received CM, whereas TNFa and IL-1b were decreased at mRNA level. Our results demonstrated that CM derived from SS-AF-MSCs cells is able to ameliorate DSS-induced colitis in immunodeficient colitis mouse model, and thus, it has a potential for use in IBD therapy.

  19. Genetic Deletion of Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1/TIMP-1 Alters Inflammation and Attenuates Fibrosis in Dextran Sodium Sulphate-induced Murine Models of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Breynaert, Christine; de Bruyn, Magali; Arijs, Ingrid; Cremer, Jonathan; Martens, Erik; Van Lommel, Leentje; Geboes, Karel; De Hertogh, Gert; Schuit, Frans; Ferrante, Marc; Vermeire, Séverine; Ceuppens, Jan; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Van Assche, Gert

    2016-11-01

    Increased levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 [TIMP-1] have been detected in both inflammatory and fibrotic lesions in Crohn's disease. In a murine model of chronic inflammation, fibrosis was associated with an increase in TIMP-1 and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-mediated degradation. We investigated the effect of TIMP-1 deficiency in acute and chronic murine models of colitis. Colitis was induced via oral administration of dextran sodium sulphate [DSS] to B6.129S4-Timp1(tm1Pds)/J knock-out [KO] and C57BL/6J wild-type [WT] mice. Levels of inflammation and fibrosis were assessed and gelatin zymographies and gene expression microarrays were performed. Compared with WT mice, TIMP-1 KO mice had higher inflammatory parameters after acute DSS administration and developed less fibrosis after chronic DSS administration. MMP-2 levels were increased in WT versus TIMP-1 KO mice with acute colitis, whereas a trend for higher proMMP-9 levels was observed in WT versus TIMP-1 KO mice with chronic colitis. In control conditions, several immune-related genes [e.g Ido1, Cldn8] were differentially expressed between young TIMP-1 KO and WT mice, but to a lesser extent between older TIMP-1 KO and WT mice. In response to DSS, the gene expression pattern was significantly different between young TIMP-1 KO and WT mice, whereas it was similar in older TIMP-1 KO and WT mice. TIMP-1 deficiency leads to differential expression of immune-related genes and to attenuated development of fibrosis. Unravelling the role of TIMP-1 in intestinal remodelling is necessary to develop more effective and more targeted therapeutic strategies for intestinal fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Tropisetron suppresses colitis-associated cancer in a mouse model in the remission stage.

    PubMed

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Momeny, Majid; Abdollahi, Alireza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Ghaffari, Seyed Hamid; Rahimian, Reza; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei

    2016-07-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a high risk for development of colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Serotonin is a neurotransmitter produced by enterochromaffin cells of the intestine. Serotonin and its receptors, mainly 5-HT3 receptor, are overexpressed in IBD and promote development of CAC through production of inflammatory cytokines. In the present study, we demonstrated the in vivo activity of tropisetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, against experimental CAC. CAC was induced by azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DDS) in BALB/c mice. The histopathology of colon tissue was performed. Beta-catenin and Cox-2 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry as well as quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Alterations in the expression of 5-HT3 receptor and inflammatory-associated genes such as Il-1β, Tnf-α, Tlr4 and Myd88 were determined by qRT-PCR. Our results showed that tumor development in tropisetron-treated CAC group was significantly lower than the controls. The qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression of 5-HT3 receptor was significantly increased following CAC induction. In addition, tropisetron reduced expression of β-catenin and Cox-2 in the CAC experimental group. The levels of Il-1β, Tnf-α, Tlr4 and Myd88 were significantly decreased upon tropisetron treatment in the AOM/DSS group. Taken together, our data show that tropisetron inhibits development of CAC probably by attenuation of inflammatory reactions in the colitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.