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Sample records for rat colon loops

  1. In Situ Perfusion Model in Rat Colon for Drug Absorption Studies: Comparison with Small Intestine and Caco-2 Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Lozoya-Agullo, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde; Bermejo, Marival

    2015-09-01

    Our aim is to develop and to validate the in situ closed loop perfusion method in rat colon and to compare with small intestine and Caco-2 cell models. Correlations with human oral fraction absorbed (Fa) and human colon fraction absorbed (Fa_colon) were developed to check the applicability of the rat colon model for controlled release (CR) drug screening. Sixteen model drugs were selected and their permeabilities assessed in rat small intestine and colon, and in Caco-2 monolayers. Correlations between colon/intestine/Caco-2 permeabilities versus human Fa and human Fa_colon have been explored to check model predictability and to apply a BCS approach in order to propose a cut off value for CR screening. Rat intestine perfusion with Doluisio's method and single-pass technique provided a similar range of permeabilities demonstrating the possibility of combining data from different laboratories. Rat colon permeability was well correlated with Caco-2 cell-4 days model reflecting a higher paracellular permeability. Rat colon permeabilities were also higher than human colon ones. In spite of the magnitude differences, a good sigmoidal relationship has been shown between rat colon permeabilities and human colon fractions absorbed, indicating that rat colon perfusion can be used for compound classification and screening of CR candidates.

  2. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body’s H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. PMID:26853722

  3. Colonic Fermentation Promotes Decompression sickness in Rats.

    PubMed

    de Maistre, Sébastien; Vallée, Nicolas; Gempp, Emmanuel; Lambrechts, Kate; Louge, Pierre; Duchamp, Claude; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS). During dives with hydrogen as a diluent for oxygen, decreasing the body's H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. So we set out to investigate if colonic fermentation leading to endogenous hydrogen production promotes DCS in fasting rats. Four hours before an experimental dive, 93 fasting rats were force-fed, half of them with mannitol and the other half with water. Exhaled hydrogen was measured before and after force-feeding. Following the hyperbaric exposure, we looked for signs of DCS. A higher incidence of DCS was found in rats force-fed with mannitol than in those force-fed with water (80%, [95%CI 56, 94] versus 40%, [95%CI 19, 64], p < 0.01). In rats force-fed with mannitol, metronidazole pretreatment reduced the incidence of DCS (33%, [95%CI 15, 57], p = 0.005) at the same time as it inhibited colonic fermentation (14 ± 35 ppm versus 118 ± 90 ppm, p = 0.0001). Pre-diveingestion of mannitol increased the incidence of DCS in fasting rats when colonic fermentation peaked during the decompression phase. More generally, colonic fermentation in rats on a normal diet could promote DCS through endogenous hydrogen production.

  4. Nuclear microscopy of rat colon epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, M.; Rajendran, Reshmi; Ng, Mary; Udalagama, Chammika; Rodrigues, Anna E.; Watt, Frank; Jenner, Andrew Michael

    2011-10-01

    Using Nuclear microscopy, we have investigated iron distributions in the colons of Sprague Dawley rats, in order to elucidate heme uptake. Four groups of five Sprague Dawley rats (mean weight 180 g) were fed different purified diets containing either heme diet (2.5% w/w hemoglobin), high fat diet (HFD) (18% w/w fat, 1% w/w cholesterol), 'western' diet (combination of hemoglobin 2.5% and 18% fat, 1% cholesterol) or control diet (7% w/w fat). After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed by exsanguination after anaesthesia. Thin sections of frozen colon tissue were taken, freeze dried and scanned using nuclear microscopy utilising the techniques PIXE, RBS and STIM. The new data acquisition system (IonDaq) developed in CIBA was used to obtain high resolution images and line scans were used to map the iron distributions across the colon boundaries. The nuclear microscope results indicate that when HFD is given in addition to heme, the iron content of the epithelial cells that line the colon decreases, and the zinc in the smooth muscle wall increases. This implies that the level of heme and fat in diet has an important role in colon health, possibly by influencing epithelial cells directly or changing luminal composition such as bacterial flora or levels of metabolites and cytotoxins.

  5. Salmonella induces prominent gene expression in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Roosing, Susanne; Vink, Carolien; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Salmonella enteritidis is suggested to translocate in the small intestine. In vivo it induces gene expression changes in the ileal mucosa and Peyer's patches. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary prebiotics fermented in colon suggests involvement of the colon as well. However, effects of Salmonella on colonic gene expression in vivo are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize time dependent Salmonella-induced changes of colonic mucosal gene expression in rats using whole genome microarrays. For this, rats were orally infected with Salmonella enteritidis to mimic a foodborne infection and colonic gene expression was determined at days 1, 3 and 6 post-infection (n = 8 rats per time-point). As fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) affect colonic physiology, we analyzed colonic mucosal gene expression of FOS-fed versus cellulose-fed rats infected with Salmonella in a separate experiment. Colonic mucosal samples were isolated at day 2 post-infection. Results Salmonella affected transport (e.g. Chloride channel calcium activated 6, H+/K+ transporting Atp-ase), antimicrobial defense (e.g. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein, Defensin 5 and phospholipase A2), inflammation (e.g. calprotectin), oxidative stress related genes (e.g. Dual oxidase 2 and Glutathione peroxidase 2) and Proteolysis (e.g. Ubiquitin D and Proteosome subunit beta type 9). Furthermore, Salmonella translocation increased serum IFNγ and many interferon-related genes in colonic mucosa. The gene most strongly induced by Salmonella infection was Pancreatitis Associated Protein (Pap), showing >100-fold induction at day 6 after oral infection. Results were confirmed by Q-PCR in individual rats. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary FOS was accompanied by enhancement of the Salmonella-induced mucosal processes, not by induction of other processes. Conclusion We conclude that the colon is a target tissue for Salmonella, considering the abundant changes in mucosal gene expression

  6. Triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in an experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qingsong; Wang, Baochai; Zheng, Yu; Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jianan

    2015-08-01

    Triptolide is known to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities; however, its impact on intestinal fibrosis has not been previously examined. Based on our previous studies of the suppressive activity of triptolide on human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the therapeutic efficacy of triptolide in Crohn's disease, it was hypothesized that triptolide may have beneficial effects on intestinal fibrosis. In the present study, colonic fibrosis was induced in rats by 6 weekly repeated administration with a low-dose of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and was then treated with triptolide or PBS daily (control) simultaneously. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in the colon was examined with image analysis of Masson Trichrome staining. Total collagen levels in colonic homogenates were measured by a Sircol assay. Collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein were measured ex vivo in the isolated colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The results indicated that triptolide decreased ECM deposition and collagen production in the colon, and inhibited collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein expression in the isolated subepithelial myofibroblasts of the rats with colonic fibrosis. In conclusion, triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in the experimental rat model, suggesting triptolide may be a promising compound for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:25845760

  7. Triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in an experimental rat model

    PubMed Central

    TAO, QINGSONG; WANG, BAOCHAI; ZHENG, YU; LI, GUANWEI; REN, JIANAN

    2015-01-01

    Triptolide is known to exert anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities; however, its impact on intestinal fibrosis has not been previously examined. Based on our previous studies of the suppressive activity of triptolide on human colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts and the therapeutic efficacy of triptolide in Crohn’s disease, it was hypothesized that triptolide may have beneficial effects on intestinal fibrosis. In the present study, colonic fibrosis was induced in rats by 6 weekly repeated administration with a low-dose of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and was then treated with triptolide or PBS daily (control) simultaneously. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition in the colon was examined with image analysis of Masson Trichrome staining. Total collagen levels in colonic homogenates were measured by a Sircol assay. Collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein were measured ex vivo in the isolated colonic subepithelial myofibroblasts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis, respectively. The results indicated that triptolide decreased ECM deposition and collagen production in the colon, and inhibited collagen Iα1 transcripts and collagen I protein expression in the isolated subepithelial myofibroblasts of the rats with colonic fibrosis. In conclusion, triptolide ameliorates colonic fibrosis in the experimental rat model, suggesting triptolide may be a promising compound for inflammatory bowel disease treatment. PMID:25845760

  8. Piroxicam decreases postirradiation colonic neoplasia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Northway, M.G.; Scobey, M.W.; Cassidy, K.T.; Geisinger, K.R. )

    1990-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent piroxicam on chronic radiation proctitis in the rat. Forty female Wistar rats received a 2250-cGy dose of irradiation to the distal 2 cm of the colon. Twenty received piroxicam 8.0 mg/kg orally 30 minutes before exposure and 24 hours after exposure; 20 rats served as irradiated controls. All animals were evaluated by colonoscopy 1 and 3 weeks postexposure and every third week until death or killing at 1 year. At killing, colons were removed for light microscopic examination. One year postirradiation results showed no differences in mortality, vascular changes, acute inflammation, colitis cystica profunda, or rectal stricture between the control and piroxicam-treated groups. However, at 1 year postirradiation the control group demonstrated neoplasia in 15 of 19 animals compared with eight of 20 animals in the piroxicam-treated group. The first endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasm occurred at 15 weeks postirradiation in one control irradiated rat whereas the first evidence of endoscopic neoplasm in the piroxicam-treated group did not occur until 36 weeks postirradiation. Histologic examination documented a tendency toward a greater presence of adenocarcinomas in the control group compared with the piroxicam-treated group. The authors conclude that piroxicam treatment significantly decreased the incidence of colonic neoplasia in general as well as delayed the endoscopic appearance of colonic neoplasia in rats after pelvic irradiation. 41 references.

  9. Hypothalamic circuit regulating colonic transit following chronic stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Sazu; Cerjak, Diana; Babygirija, Reji; Bulbul, Mehmet; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2012-03-01

    Although acute stress accelerates colonic transit, the effect of chronic stress on colonic transit remains unclear. In this study, rats received repeated restraint stress (chronic homotypic stress) or various types of stress (chronic heterotypic stress) for 5 and 7 days, respectively. Vehicle saline, oxytocin (OXT), OXT receptor antagonist or corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonists were administered by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection prior to restraint stress for 90 min. Immediately after the stress exposure, the entire colon was removed and the geometric center (GC) of Na51CrO4 (a nonabsorbable radioactive marker; 0.5 μCi) distribution was calculated to measure the transit. Gene expression of OXT and CRF in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was evaluated by in situ hybridization. Accelerated colonic transit with the acute stressor was no longer observed following chronic homotypic stress. This restored colonic transit was reversed by ICV injection of an OXT antagonist. In contrast, chronic heterotypic stress significantly accelerated colonic transit, which was attenuated by ICV injection of OXT and by a CRF receptor 1 antagonist. OXT mRNA expression in the PVN was significantly increased following chronic homotypic stress, but not chronic heterotypic stress. However, CRF mRNA expression in the PVN was significantly increased following acute and chronic heterotypic stress, but not chronic homotypic stress. These results indicate that central OXT and CRF play a pivotal role in mediating the colonic dysmotility following chronic stress in rats.

  10. Mucin secretion is modulated by luminal factors in the isolated vascularly perfused rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Barcelo, A; Claustre, J; Moro, F; Chayvialle, J; Cuber, J; Plaisancie, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Mucins play an important protective role in the colonic mucosa. Luminal factors modulating colonic mucus release have been not fully identified.
AIM—To determine the effect of some dietary compounds on mucus discharge in rat colon.
METHODS—An isolated vascularly perfused rat colon model was used. Mucus secretion was induced by a variety of luminal factors administered as a bolus of 1 ml for 30 minutes in the colonic loop. Mucin release was evaluated using a sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay supported by histological analysis.
RESULTS—The three dietary fibres tested in this study (pectin, gum arabic, and cellulose) did not provoke mucus secretion. Luminal administration of sodium alginate (an algal polysaccharide used as a food additive) or ulvan (a sulphated algal polymer) induced a dose dependent increase in mucin discharge over the concentration range 1-25 mg/l (p<0.05 for 25 mg/l alginate and p<0.05 for 10 and 25 mg/l ulvan). Glucuronic acid and galacturonic acid, which are major constituents of a variety of fibres, produced significant mucin secretion (p<0.05). Hydrogen sulphide and mercaptoacetate, two sulphides produced in the colonic lumen by microbial fermentation of sulphated polysaccharides, did not modify mucin secretion. Among the short chain fatty acids, acetate (5-100 mM) induced a dose dependent release of mucus (p<0.05 for 100 mM acetate). Interestingly, butyrate at a concentration of 5 mM produced colonic mucin secretion (p<0.05), but increasing its concentration to 100 mM provoked a gradual decrease in mucus discharge. Propionate (5-100 mM) did not induce mucin release. Several dietary phenolic compounds (quercetin, epicatechin, resveratrol) did not provoke mucus discharge.
CONCLUSIONS—Two algal polysaccharides (alginate and ulvan), two uronic acids (glucuronic acid and galacturonic acid), and the short chain fatty acids acetate and butyrate induce mucin secretion in rat colon. Taken together, these

  11. Decreased colonic mucus in rats with loperamide-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Shimotoyodome, A; Meguro, S; Hase, T; Tokimitsu, I; Sakata, T

    2000-06-01

    Constipation is a risk factor of colorectal cancer. Mucin is a major component of lumenal mucus, which protects the colorectal mucosa against mechanical and chemical damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate mucus production and to quantitate lumen mucus in a rat model of spastic constipation. We induced constipation with loperamide (1.5 mg/kg), and histochemically evaluated mucus production and the thickness of the mucus layer at the fecal surface. We quantitated the mucus attached to the mucosal surface using colonic perfusion with N-acetylcysteine. While more feces remained in the colon, there was less fecal excretion and lower fecal water content in loperamide-administered rats than in control rats. Crypt epithelial cells contained less mucus in constipated rats than in control rats. The mucus layer at the fecal surface was thinner and less mucus was recovered from the mucosal surface in constipated rats than in control rats. Mucus production of crypt epithelial cells and mucus at the fecal and mucosal surface were reduced by loperamide-induced constipation.

  12. Intraglomerular microcirculation: measurements of single glomerular loop flow in rats.

    PubMed

    Steinhausen, M; Zimmerhackl, B; Thederan, H; Dussel, R; Parekh, N; Esslinger, H U; von Hagens, G; Komitowski, D; Dallenbach, F D

    1981-08-01

    With the use of a new fluorescent microscopic technique, we were able to measure the mean intracapillary velocities and pressures of single capillary loops of renal glomeruli of living rats. The technique involved photographing and recording the flow of fluorescent latex particles through the glomerular loops with a television monitor. In 25 rats the single glomerular loop flow velocity was 781 +/- (SD) 271 micrometers . sec-1. The mean diameter of the capillary loops measured 8.4 +/- 1.4 micrometers; their lengths were 72.3 +/- 37.5 micrometers. From the decrease in velocity of flow along the capillary loop, we were able to evaluate the filtration equivalent for the capillary surface. It was possible to measure intracapillary pressures of single glomerular loops continuously under microscopic control. High intracapillary pressures correlated with high intracapillary velocities. From the data we obtained, we were unable to calculate a filtration equilibrium at the ends of the observed capillary loops. For further correlations, we injected the glomeruli we had studied in the living state and examined them with the scanning electron microscope.

  13. Early colonizing Escherichia coli elicits remodeling of rat colonic epithelium shifting toward a new homeostatic state

    PubMed Central

    Tomas, Julie; Reygner, Julie; Mayeur, Camille; Ducroc, Robert; Bouet, Stephan; Bridonneau, Chantal; Cavin, Jean-Baptiste; Thomas, Muriel; Langella, Philippe; Cherbuy, Claire

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of early colonizing bacteria on the colonic epithelium. We isolated dominant bacteria, Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Lactobacillus intestinalis, Clostridium innocuum and a novel Fusobacterium spp., from the intestinal contents of conventional suckling rats and transferred them in different combinations into germfree (GF) adult rats. Animals were investigated after various times up to 21 days. Proliferative cell markers (Ki67, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, phospho-histone H3, cyclin A) were higher in rats monocolonized with E. coli than in GF at all time points, but not in rats monocolonized with E. faecalis. The mucin content of goblet cells declined shortly after E. coli administration whereas the mucus layer doubled in thickness. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that E. coli resides in this mucus layer. The epithelial mucin content progressively returned to baseline, following an increase in KLF4 and in the cell cycle arrest-related proteins p21CIP1 and p27KIP1. Markers of colonic differentiated cells involved in electrolyte (carbonic anhydrase II and slc26A3) and water (aquaglyceroporin3 (aqp3)) transport, and secretory responses to carbachol were modulated after E. coli inoculation suggesting that ion transport dynamics were also affected. The colonic responses to simplified microbiotas differed substantially according to whether or not E. coli was combined with the other four bacteria. Thus, proliferation markers increased substantially when E. coli was in the mix, but very much less when it was absent. This work demonstrates that a pioneer strain of E. coli elicits sequential epithelial remodeling affecting the structure, mucus layer and ionic movements and suggests this can result in a microbiota-compliant state. PMID:25012905

  14. Adherence of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to rat and human colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Ravdin, J I; John, J E; Johnston, L I; Innes, D J; Guerrant, R L

    1985-01-01

    We studied the adherence of [3H]thymidine-labeled axenic Entamoeba histolytica (strain HM1-IMSS) to in vitro preparations of rat and human colonic mucosa. Studies were performed with fixed or unfixed rat colonic mucosa, unfixed rat mucosa exposed to trypsin, unfixed rat submucosa, and fixed human colonic mucosa. Twenty percent of the amebae adhered to fixed rat colonic mucosa; adherence was specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), galactose, and asialofetuin. The adherence of amebae to fixed human colonic mucosa was also GalNAc inhibitable. Greater adherence was found with unfixed rat colonic mucosa (40.9%) and was not GalNAc inhibitable unless the tissue was first exposed to trypsin. However, GalNAc did inhibit the adherence of amebae to unfixed rat submucosa. Glutaraldehyde fixation of amebae inactivates known amebic adhesion proteins; there was a markedly decreased adherence of fixed amebae to trypsin-exposed mucosa or fixed rat colonic mucosa. However, fixed or viable amebae had equal levels of adherence to unfixed rat colonic mucosa, suggesting the presence of a host adhesion protein that binds to receptors on amebae. Human (10%) and rabbit (5%) immune sera reduced the adherence of viable amebae to fixed rat colonic mucosa. We concluded that the GalNAc-inhibitable adhesion protein on the surface of E. histolytica trophozoites mediated adherence to fixed rat mucosa, fixed human colonic mucosa, trypsin-exposed unfixed rat mucosa, and unfixed rat submucosa. The surface of unfixed rat colonic mucosa contained a glutaraldehyde- and trypsin-sensitive host adhesion protein, perhaps in the overlying mucus blanket, which bound viable or fixed E. histolytica trophozoites. Images PMID:2580787

  15. Carbohydrate digestibility predicts colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Helene; Poulsen, Morten; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Meyer, Otto; Lindecrona, Rikke Hvid

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of carbohydrate structure and digestibility on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis. Five groups of male Fischer 344 rats each comprising 30 animals were injected with AOM and fed a high-fat diet with 15% of various carbohydrates. The carbohydrate sources used were sucrose, cornstarch (a linear starch, reference group), potato starch (a branched starch), a short-chained oligofructose (Raftilose), and a long-chained inulin-type fructan (Raftiline). An interim sacrifice was performed after 9 wk to investigate markers of carbohydrate digestibility, including caecal fermentation (caecum weight and pH) and glucose and lipid metabolism [glucose, fructoseamine, HbA1c, triglycerides, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1]. In addition potential early predictors of carcinogenicity [cell proliferation and aberrant crypt foci (ACF)] at 9 wk and their correlation to colon cancer risk after 32 wk were investigated. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in animals fed oligofructose, and the number of tumors per animal was significantly reduced in animals fed inulin and oligofructose at 32 wk after AOM induction compared to the reference group fed sucrose. Increased caecum weight and decreased caecal pH were seen in groups fed oligofructose, inulin, and potato starch. Plasma triglyceride was decreased in rats fed oligofructose and inulin. Cell proliferation was increased in the proximal colon of rats fed sucrose, oligofructose, and inulin, and the number of cells per crypt decreased in rats fed oligofructose and inulin. The total number of ACF's was unaffected by treatment, and the size and multiplicity of ACF was unrelated to tumor development. It was concluded that less digestible carbohydrates with an early effect on caecum fermentation and plasma triglyceride decreased subsequent tumor incidence and multiplicity. This was unrelated to ACF, cell proliferation, and other markers of glucose and lipid metabolism.

  16. Circadian regulation of electrolyte absorption in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Soták, M; Polidarová, L; Musílková, J; Hock, M; Sumová, A; Pácha, J

    2011-12-01

    The intestinal transport of nutrients exhibits distinct diurnal rhythmicity, and the enterocytes harbor a circadian clock. However, temporal regulation of the genes involved in colonic ion transport, i.e., ion transporters and channels operating in absorption and secretion, remains poorly understood. To address this issue, we assessed the 24-h profiles of expression of genes encoding the sodium pump (subunits Atp1a1 and Atp1b1), channels (α-, β-, and γ-subunits of Enac and Cftr), transporters (Dra, Ae1, Nkcc1, Kcc1, and Nhe3), and the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) regulatory factor (Nherf1) in rat colonic mucosa. Furthermore, we investigated temporal changes in the spatial localization of the clock genes Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 and the genes encoding ion transporters and channels along the crypt axis. In rats fed ad libitum, the expression of Atp1a1, γEnac, Dra, Ae1, Nhe3, and Nherf1 showed circadian variation with maximal expression at circadian time 12, i.e., at the beginning of the subjective night. The peak γEnac expression coincided with the rise in plasma aldosterone. Restricted feeding phase advanced the expression of Dra, Ae1, Nherf, and γEnac and decreased expression of Atp1a1. The genes Atp1b1, Cftr, αEnac, βEnac, Nkcc1, and Kcc1 did not show any diurnal variations in mRNA levels. A low-salt diet upregulated the expression of βEnac and γEnac during the subjective night but did not affect expression of αEnac. Similarly, colonic electrogenic Na(+) transport was much higher during the subjective night than the subjective day. These findings indicate that the transporters and channels operating in NaCl absorption undergo diurnal regulation and suggest a role of an intestinal clock in the coordination of colonic NaCl absorption.

  17. Boron absorption imaging in rat lung colon adenocarcinoma metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altieri, S.; Bortolussi, S.; Bruschi, P.; Fossati, F.; Vittor, K.; Nano, R.; Facoetti, A.; Chiari, P.; Bakeine, J.; Clerici, A.; Ferrari, C.; Salvucci, O.

    2006-05-01

    Given the encouraging results from our previous work on the clinical application of BNCT on non-resectable, chemotherapy resistant liver metastases, we explore the possibility to extend our technique to lung metastases. A fundamental requirement for BNCT is achieving higher 10B concentrations in the metastases compared to those in healthy tissue. For this reason we developed a rat model with lung metastases in order to study the temporal distribution of 10B concentration in tissues and tumoral cells. Rats with induced lung metastases from colon adenocarcinoma were sacrificed two hours after intraperitoneal Boronphenylalanine infusion. The lungs were harvested, frozen in liquid nitrogen and subsequently histological sections underwent neutron autoradiography in the nuclear reactor Triga Mark II, University of Pavia. Our findings demonstrate higher Boron uptake in tumoral nodules compared to healthy lung parenchyma 2 hours after Boronphenylalanine infusion.

  18. Lactose malabsorption and colonic fermentations alter host metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Virginie; Even, Patrick C; Larue-Achagiotis, Christiane; Blouin, Jean-Marc; Blachier, François; Benamouzig, Robert; Tomé, Daniel; Davila, Anne-Marie

    2013-08-01

    Lactose malabsorption is associated with rapid production of high levels of osmotic compounds, such as organic acids and SCFA in the colon, suspected to contribute to the onset of lactose intolerance. Adult rats are lactase deficient and the present study was conducted to evaluate in vivo the metabolic consequences of acute lactose ingestion, including host-microbiota interactions. Rats received diets of 25% sucrose (S25 control group) or 25% lactose (L25 experimental group). SCFA and lactic acid were quantified in intestinal contents and portal blood. Expression of SCFA transporter genes was quantified in the colonic mucosa. Carbohydrate oxidation (Cox) and lipid oxidation (Lox) were computed by indirect calorimetry. Measurements were performed over a maximum of 13 h. Time, diet and time × diet variables had significant effects on SCFA concentration in the caecum (P<0·001, P=0·004 and P=0·007, respectively) and the portal blood (P<0·001, P=0·04 and P<0·001, respectively). Concomitantly, expression of sodium monocarboxylate significantly increased in the colonic mucosa of the L25 group (P=0·003 at t = 6 h and P<0·05 at t = 8 h). During 5 h after the meal, the L25 group's changes in metabolic parameters (Cox, Lox) were significantly lower than those of the S25 group (P=0·02). However, after 5 h, L25 Cox became greater than S25 (P=0·004). Thus, enhanced production and absorption of SCFA support the metabolic changes observed in calorimetry. These results underline the consequences of acute lactose malabsorption and measured compensations occurring in the host's metabolism, presumably through the microbiota fermentations and microbiota-host interactions.

  19. Western diet enhances benzo(a)pyrene-induced colon tumorigenesis in a polyposis in rat coli (PIRC) rat model of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Kelly L.; Pulliam, Stephanie R.; Okoro, Emmanuel; Guo, Zhongmao; Washington, Mary K.; Adunyah, Samuel E.; Amos-Landgraf, James M.; Ramesh, Aramandla

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of Western diet (WD), contaminated with environmental toxicants, has been implicated as one of the risk factors for sporadic colon cancer. Our earlier studies using a mouse model revealed that compared to unsaturated dietary fat, the saturated dietary fat exacerbated the development of colon tumors caused by B(a)P. The objective of this study was to study how WD potentiates B(a)P-induced colon carcinogenesis in the adult male rats that carry a mutation in the Apc locus - the polyposis in the rat colon (PIRC) rats. Groups of PIRC rats were fed with AIN-76A standard diet (RD) or Western diet (WD) and received 25, 50, or 100 μg B(a)P/kg body weight (wt) via oral gavage for 60 days. Subsequent to exposure, rats were euthanized; colons were retrieved and preserved in 10% formalin for counting the polyp numbers, measuring the polyp size, and histological analyses. Blood samples were collected and concentrations of cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin and leptin were measured. Rats that received WD + B(a)P showed increased levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and leptin in comparison to RD + B(a)P groups or controls. The colon tumor numbers showed a B(a)P dose-response relationship. Adenomas with high grade dysplasia were prominent in B(a)P + WD rats compared to B(a)P + RD rats and controls (p < 0.05). The larger rat model system used in this study allows for studying more advanced tumor phenotypes over a longer duration and delineating the role of diet - toxicant interactions in sporadic colon tumor development. PMID:26959117

  20. Cilengitide inhibits metastatic bone colonization in a nude rat model.

    PubMed

    Bretschi, Maren; Merz, Maximilian; Komljenovic, Dorde; Berger, Martin R; Semmler, Wolfhard; Bäuerle, Tobias

    2011-10-01

    Integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5 are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer bone metastases. This study investigates the effects of the αvβ3/αvβ5 integrin-specific inhibitor cilengitide during early metastatic bone colonization. The impact of cilengitide on the migration, invasion and proliferation of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells as well as on bone resorption by osteoclasts was investigated in vitro. For in vivo experiments, nude rats were treated with cilengitide for 30 days starting one day after site-specific tumor cell inoculation in the hind leg, and the course of metastatic changes in bone was followed using flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (VCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Vascular changes in bone metastases were investigated using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-) MRI-derived parameters amplitude A and exchange rate coefficient kep. In vitro, cilengitide treatment resulted in a decrease in proliferation, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells, as well as of osteoclast activity. In vivo, the development of bone metastasis in the hind leg of rats was not prevented by adjuvant cilengitide treatment, but cilengitide reduced the volumes of osteolytic lesions and respective soft tissue tumors of developing bone metastases as assessed with VCT and MRI, respectively. DCE-MRI revealed significant changes in the A and kep parameters including decreased relative blood volume and increased vessel permeability after cilengitide treatment indicating vessel remodeling. In conclusion, during early pathogenic processes of bone colonization, cilengitide treatment exerted effects on tumor cells, osteoclasts and vasculature reducing the skeletal lesion size of experimental skeletal metastases. PMID:21725616

  1. Endoscopic ligation (“Loop-And-Let-Go”) is effective treatment for large colonic lipomas: a prospective validation study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colonic lipomas (CL) are rare benign adipose tumours usually found incidentally during colonoscopy. Endoscopic resection of symptomatic large CL remains controversial, since significant rates of perforation have been reported. In recent years, a novel technique for removal of large CL has been described, consisting of looping and ligating the lipoma with a nylon snare. The aim of our study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the “loop and let go” technique for large colon lipomas in a large case series. Methods Consecutive patients referred to our institution for colonoscopy were eligible for the study. The diagnosis of CL was confirmed endoscopically by “pillow” and “naked fat” signs. Following diagnosis, lipomas were looped and ligated by endoloop. Follow-up colonoscopies were scheduled at 1- and 3-months interval. Results A total of 11 patients with large CL were enrolled in study. The indications for the colonoscopy included altered bowel habits (7 patients, 64%), screening for colorectal neoplasm (3 pts, 27%) and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (1 pts, 9%). The median lesion size was 3 cm (range 2,5-6 cm). Lesions were located at the hepatic flexure in 4 patients (36%), cecum and ascending colon (4 pts, 36%), rectosigmoid (2 pts, 18%) and transverse colon (1 pts, 9%). There were no immediate and late complications. On follow-up (median follow-up time 11,9 months, range 8–24), there was one small residual lipoma (<1 cm). Conclusion The results of this study confirm that “loop-and-let-go” technique is safe and efficacious treatment of large colonic lipomas. PMID:25005025

  2. Green vegetables, red meat and colon cancer: chlorophyll prevents the cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects of haem in rat colon.

    PubMed

    de Vogel, Johan; Jonker-Termont, Denise S M L; van Lieshout, Esther M M; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof

    2005-02-01

    Diets high in red meat and low in green vegetables are associated with increased colon cancer risk. This association might be partly due to the haem content of red meat. In rats, dietary haem is metabolized in the gut to a cytotoxic factor that increases colonic cytotoxicity and epithelial proliferation. Green vegetables contain chlorophyll, a magnesium porphyrin structurally analogous to haem. We studied whether green vegetables inhibit the unfavourable colonic effects of haem. First, rats were fed a purified control diet or purified diets supplemented with 0.5 mmol haem/kg, spinach (chlorophyll concentration 1.2 mmol/kg) or haem plus spinach (n = 8/group) for 14 days. In a second experiment we also studied a group that received haem plus purified chlorophyll (1.2 mmol/kg). Cytotoxicity of faecal water was determined with a bioassay and colonic epithelial cell proliferation was quantified in vivo by [methyl-(3)H]thymidine incorporation into newly synthesized DNA. Exfoliation of colonocytes was measured as the amount of rat DNA in faeces. In both studies haem increased cytotoxicity of the colonic contents approximately 8-fold and proliferation of the colonocytes almost 2-fold. Spinach or an equimolar amount of chlorophyll supplement in the haem diet inhibited these haem effects completely. Haem clearly inhibited exfoliation of colonocytes, an effect counteracted by spinach and chlorophyll. Finally, size exclusion chromatography showed that chlorophyll prevented formation of the cytotoxic haem metabolite. We conclude that green vegetables may decrease colon cancer risk because chlorophyll prevents the detrimental, cytotoxic and hyperproliferative colonic effects of dietary haem.

  3. A neurotensin antagonist, SR 48692, inhibits colonic responses to immobilization stress in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Castagliuolo, I; Leeman, S E; Bartolak-Suki, E; Nikulasson, S; Qiu, B; Carraway, R E; Pothoulakis, C

    1996-01-01

    We previously reported that short-term immobilization stress of rats causes increased colonic mucin release, goblet cell depletion, prostaglandin E2 secretion, and colonic mast cell activation, as well as increased colonic motility. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether neurotensin (NT), a peptide expressed in both brain and digestive tract, participates in these responses. Rats were pretreated with SR 48692 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), an NT antagonist, 15 min before immobilization (30 min). The administration of the antagonist significantly inhibited stress-mediated secretion of colonic mucin, prostaglandin E2, and a product of rat mast cells, rat mast cell protease II (P < 0.05), but did not alter the increase in fecal pellet output caused by immobilization stress. Immobilization stress also resulted in a quantifiable decrease in the abundance of NT receptor mRNA in rat colon compared with that in colonic tissues from nonimmobilized rats as measured by densitometric analysis of in situ hybridization studies (P < 0.03). We conclude that the peptide NT is involved in colonic goblet cell release and mucosal mast cell activation after immobilization stress. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8901630

  4. Brush border peptidases and arylamidases in the experimental blind loop syndrome of the rat.

    PubMed

    Mazzacca, G; Musella, S; Andria, G; D'Agostino, L; Cimino, L; Budillon, G

    1977-10-01

    Peptidase and arylamidase activities were assessed in purified brush borders from jejunum of rats with surgically created blind loops. The blind loop segment and the jejunum proximal and distal to the blind loop were studied. Comparable jejunal segments from control rats were also studied. The blind loop syndrome was documented by presence of macrocytic anemia. Enzyme activities were determined on purified brush borders. In rats with the blind loop syndromes enzymatic activities hydrolizing sucrose, L-Leucyl-beta-naphthylamide, L-lysyl-beta-naphthylamide, alpha-L-glutamyl-beta-naphthylamide, L-phenylalanyl-alanine and L-leucyl-glycine were significantly reduced as compared to controls (P less than 0.001). After a short course of antibiotic therapy enzymatic activities returned to normal. Our findings suggest a reversible intestinal mucosa damage in the rat with blind loop syndrome.

  5. Dry beans inhibit azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J S; Ganthavorn, C; Wilson-Sanders, S

    1997-12-01

    Epidemiological studies show a low incidence of colon cancer in many Latin American countries where the consumption of dry beans (e.g., pinto) is high. The purpose of this study was to use rats as an animal model to obtain experimental data on the inhibition of colon carcinogenesis by dry beans. Fifty-three 5-wk-old weanling male F344 rats were randomly assigned by weight to the following groups: control (11 rats), casein diet (21 rats), and bean diet (21 rats). Animals fed the casein and bean diets were treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) once weekly for 2 wk. Rats in the control group also consumed the casein diet but were not exposed to AOM. All diets were isocaloric. The protein concentration of the diets was adjusted to 18 g/100 g with casein, and the fat concentration was adjusted to 5 g/100 g with corn oil. Rats fed the bean diet had significantly fewer colon adenocarcinomas (P < 0.05) than rats fed the casein diet (5 vs. 22 tumors), and significantly fewer rats fed the bean diet (P < 0.05) had colonic tumors than did casein-fed rats (24 vs. 50%). Tumor multiplicity was also significantly lower for the bean-fed rats, and significantly fewer (P < 0.05) tumors per tumor-bearing rat were observed in bean-fed rats than in casein-fed rats (1.0 +/- 0.0 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.6). This study demonstrates that dry beans contain anticarcinogenic compounds capable of inhibiting AOM-induced colon cancer in rats. However, the specific anticarcinogenic components within dry beans have not been identified, and it is unclear whether dietary fiber, phytochemicals or other components within dry beans are primarily responsible for the anticarcinogenic properties of beans. PMID:9405582

  6. Inhibitory effects of zingerone, a pungent component of Zingiber officinale Roscoe, on colonic motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Iwami, Momoe; Shiina, Takahiko; Hirayama, Haruko; Shima, Takeshi; Takewaki, Tadashi; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2011-01-01

    Ginger (rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is an herbal medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders including constipation and diarrhea. Zingerone is a likely active constituent responsible for the antidiarrheal activity of ginger. The current study was designed to characterize pharmacological actions of zingerone on colonic motility. To evaluate pharmacological effects of zingerone on colonic motility, we used isolated colonic segments from rats, in which mechanical responses were recorded in the longitudinal direction. In addition, we evaluated the effects on colonic motility in vivo by measuring intraluminal pressure changes and expelled fluid volume from the colon in anesthetized rats. Zingerone was applied to the lumen of the colon to allow the drug to access from the mucosal side. Zingerone inhibited spontaneous contractile movements in the isolated colonic segments in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of zingerone on colonic movements were not affected by pretreatment with capsazepine, a typical antagonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1. In addition, tetrodotoxin, a blocker of voltage-dependent sodium channels on neurons, did not affect the suppression of colonic movements by zingerone, suggesting that zingerone acts on the smooth muscles directly. Zingerone also attenuated colonic motility in vivo without affecting blood pressure and heart rate. The effects were reversible and reproducible. Our findings suggest that zingerone can inhibit colonic motility via direct action on smooth muscles. Zingerone might exert beneficial therapeutic effects on hypermotility-induced diarrhea by abrogating excessive gastrointestinal motility. PMID:20799069

  7. Mechanical properties of the rat colon: the effect of age, sex and different conditions of storage.

    PubMed

    Watters, D A; Smith, A N; Eastwood, M A; Anderson, K C; Elton, R A

    1985-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the rat colon were studied in old and young Sprague-Dawley rats which were also grouped by sex. Different storage media were used. Rings of colonic tissue were submitted to pulls on an Instron 1026 tensiometer. Gender did not affect the properties of the young rat colon. The rat colon has a tensile strength of around 50 g/mm2 (which places it between the dog and the cat). It increased in strength from proximal to distal, though the rectum was weaker than the colon. The pre-strain of the rat colon was 10% and it was capable of stretching to 200% of its original dimensions. The strength and ability to stretch fell with age, although it initially increased, in the first year of life. Physiological saline at 4 degrees C preserved the burst strength, percentage elongation, hysteresis and Young's modulus between 25 and 100 g stress for up to 1 week. Young's modulus between 125 and 200 g fell progressively with each day of storage. Stress relaxation rose in the first 24 h and thereafter remained constant. Salt appeared to be a good long-term storage medium. Irradiation of the colons before storage did not affect the mechanical properties.

  8. Effect of the dietary fibre content of lifelong diet on colonic cellular proliferation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C A; Wilson, R G; Hanlon, L; Eastwood, M A

    1992-08-01

    The effect of the fibre content of lifelong (18 months) diets on proximal and distal colonic cellular proliferation and short chain fatty acid (SCFA) content was investigated in 40 rats. Rats were fed a low fibre diet (17 g/kg non-starch polysaccharides NSP) or the stock diet (133 g/kg NSP). The higher fibre fed rats had increased caecal and colonic total contents (p < 0.001) and SCFAs than the low fibre fed rats (caecal SCFAs: higher fibre rats 96.4 (6.8) mumol/g wet weight v low fibre 22.7 (3.0): p < 0.001, colonic SCFAs: higher fibre 52.3 (3.1) mumol/g wet weight v low fibre 6.9 (2.2) mumol/g wet weight: p < 0.001). Cellular proliferation was increased in the proximal colon (bromodeoxyuridine labelling index, higher fibre 9.3 v low fibre 8.4 p < 0.05; flow cytometry, % cells in S phase higher fibre diet 7.9 v low fibre 6.9; p < 0.01) and there was a shift of proliferating cells to a higher region in each crypt. There was no significant difference in the percentage of cells in S phase in the distal colon of rats in both diet groups. The proliferative zone, however, was expanded in the distal colon of the higher fibre diet fed rats. This study indicates that long term higher fibre intake in rats is associated with a modest increase in cellular proliferation in the proximal colon but not the distal colon.

  9. Partial lipectomy reduces dimethylhydrazine-induced carcinogenic initiation in the colon of rats.

    PubMed

    Kannen, Vinicius; Moreira, Mauro César Silveira; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria; Modiano, Patricia; Elias Junior, Jorge; Fernandes, Cleverson R; Garcia, Sérgio B

    2014-02-28

    This study investigated whether visceral adipose tissue directly modulates the development of preneoplastic lesions in the colon of carcinogen-treated rats. Wistar rats (n=64) were randomly assigned to 8 experimental groups in two experiments. In one experiment, 32 rats were exposed or not to either carcinogen treatment (dimethylhydrazine, DMH; 125 mg/kg) or high-fat diet (standard chow enriched with 14% lard) or both for 56 days. In a second experiment, 32 rats were exposed to a carcinogen or they underwent partial lipectomy or both for 30 days (partial lipectomy groups underwent ablation of mesenteric and parametrial fat pads, whereas sham groups did not; all rats were fed with standard chow). Colon was collected for histopathological analysis. After 56 experimental days a high-fat diet increased carcinogenic mutations in the colonic epithelia. Partial lipectomy reduced weight gain in carcinogen-exposed rats and decreased the de novo formation of mesenteric and parametrial fat pads. Partial lipectomy significantly inhibited the mutational process after 30 days: there were fewer colonic preneoplastic lesions and less proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation. These data suggest that visceral adipose tissue promotes colon carcinogenesis and enhances the establishment and expansion of genetically mutated cells in colonic epithelia.

  10. Differential colon DNA damage induced by azo food additives between rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Chihiro; Kano, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Yu F; Sato, Itaru; Tsudua, Shuji

    2010-08-01

    Azo dyes, amaranth, allura red and new coccine, which are currently used as food color additives in Japan, have been reported to cause colon specific DNA damage in mice. To examine species difference in the DNA damage between rats and mice, each of dyes was administered to male mice (1 and 10 mg/kg) and male rats (10, 100 and 1,000 mg/kg) by gavage. Brain, lung, liver, kidney, glandular stomach, colon, urinary bladder and bone marrow were sampled 3 hr (for mice) and 3, 6, 12 and 24 hr (for rats) after the treatment. The alkaline comet assay showed DNA damage in the mouse colon 3 hr after the administration of all of the dyes at 10 mg/kg. In rats, however, none of the dyes damaged DNA. Azo dyes should undergo metabolic reduction in the colon to be adducted to DNA. To determine transit time of the dyes to the colon after their administration, gastric emptying and intestinal transport in mice and rats were examined using brilliant blue FCF (BB) as an indicator. The half times of gastric emptying were 70 and 80 min for mice and rats, respectively; and about 60% of the BB was removed from the stomach 1 hr after the gastric intubation in both mice and rats. BB reached the mouse and rat colon 1 and 3 hr after the administration, respectively. Considering the wide dose range and sampling times well covering the transit time to the colon, rats may be insensitive to these azo dye-induced DNA damage.

  11. Effects of longterm epidermal growth factor treatment on the normal rat colon.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmeyer-Nielsen, P; Vinter-Jensen, L; Smerup, M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Epidermal growth factor (EGF) exerts trophic effects on the mucosa of damaged and defunctioned colon, but the effects on the normal large bowel wall are not known. AIMS--To investigate the effect of systemic EGF treatment on growth and morphology of normal rat colon. METHODS--Rats were treated with subcutaneous biosynthetic EGF injections of 150 micrograms/kg/day for 28 days. The weight of the histological colonic wall layers and the luminal surface area were measured using quantitative morphometric analysis (stereology). The colon was subdivided into proximal and distal parts. RESULTS--EGF treatment increased the total colon wet weight by 23% compared with controls (p < 0.005). The weight increase occurred in the mucosal (33%) and the submucosal layers of the bowel wall (36%) and there was a 69% increase of the total luminal surface area (p = 0.001). In the proximal part of colon of EGF rats there was a 68% increase in mucosal weight (p < 0.005) accompanied by a 79% increase in the mucosal surface area compared with controls (p < 0.005), whereas submucosal and muscularis propria weights were identical. In distal colon, the mucosal weight increased 28% in the EGF group (p < 0.005), the mucosal surface area increased by 72% after treatment (p < 0.01). Furthermore there was a 34% increase in the weight of submucosa (p < 0.001) in the distal colon among EGF rats. CONCLUSIONS--Treatment of rats with EGF has a stimulating role on the mucosa and luminal surface area of the entire functioning colon and a trophic effect on the submucosa of the distal colon. Images Figure 1 PMID:8707092

  12. Dietary guar gum alters colonic microbial fermentation in azoxymethane-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Weaver, G A; Tangel, C; Krause, J A; Alpern, H D; Jenkins, P L; Parfitt, M M; Stragand, J J

    1996-08-01

    To assess the effects of guar gum on colonic microbial fermentation and cancer development, azoxymethane-treated rats were fed a partially hydrolyzed guar or control diet. Anaerobic fecal incubations were conducted at 8-wk intervals, either without added substrate or with cornstarch or hydrolyzed guar as substrates. Short-chain fatty acids in colonic contents and colonic carcinoma areas were measured at 27 wk. Fecal in vitro fermentation rates were higher for guar-fed rats than for control rats [three-way ANOVA (diet, time, in vitro substrates), P = 0.002]. Fecal in vitro butyrate production was greater for guar-fed rats than for control rats after 3-11 weeks of diet treatment (three-way ANOVA, P = 0.027). Butyrate concentrations of colonic contents at 27 wk were higher in guar-fed than in control rats and higher in the cecum than in the post-cecal colon (two-way ANOVA, P = 0.0001). A regression equation predicting colonic carcinoma area (r2 = 0.279) using propionate and butyrate concentrations of the contents of the post-cecal colon showed propionate as a positive predictor (P < 0.001) and butyrate as a negative predictor (P = 0.033). Our results show that patterns of short-chain fatty acid production may affect the results of fiber-carcinogenesis experiments. Dietary addition of hydrolyzed guar is associated with fecal fermentation low in propionate and high in butyrate; short-chain fatty acid concentrations are greater proximally than distally. These results suggest that butyrate protects against colonic neoplasia, whereas propionate enhances it, and demonstrate that colonic microbiota adapt to produce more butyrate if given time and the proper substrate.

  13. Acute colonic ischaemia in rats results in long-term structural changes without alterations of colonic sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ravnefjord, Anna; Pettersson, Madeleine; Rehnström, Erika; Martinez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Colonic ischaemia and mast cells have been involved in the pathophysiology of the functional gastrointestinal disorder irritable bowel syndrome, although the cause–effect relationships remain unknown. We assessed long-term histopathological and functional changes associated to an acute ischaemic episode (1 h) of the colon, followed by 8-week recovery, in rats. Functional colonic alterations [sensitivity during colorectal distension (CRD), compliance and propulsive motility] were assessed regularly during the recovery. Colonic histopathology (presence of inflammation, morphometric alterations and variations in neuronal density in the enteric nervous system) 8-week postischaemia was assessed. Following ischaemia, none of the functional parameters tested (motility, sensitivity and compliance) were affected. At necropsy, the colon presented an overall normal appearance with an increase in weight of the ischaemic area (mg/cm: 99 ± 6; P < 0.05 vs. control: 81 ± 4 or sham ischaemia: 81 ± 3). Histopathological evaluations revealed the presence of a local infiltrate of mast cells in the area of ischaemia (nb of mast cells: 142 ± 50; P < 0.05 vs. control, 31 ± 14 or sham ischaemia: 40 ± 16), without other significant alterations. Animals subjected to colonic ischaemia and treated 8 weeks later with the mast cell degranulator, compound 48/80, showed no changes in CRD-related pain responses. These studies show that acute colonic ischaemia is associated with the presence of a long-term local infiltration of mast cells, located within the serosa and muscle layers, despite the absence of functional changes, including colonic sensitivity. Considering the important pathophysiological functions of mast cells, the observed mast cell infiltration may be involved in ischaemia-induced functional changes yet to be characterized. PMID:19134057

  14. Colon Necrosis Due to Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate with and without Sorbitol: An Experimental Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Isabelle; Oh, Man S.; Gupta, Raavi; McFarlane, Michael; Babinska, Anna; Salifu, Moro O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Based on a single rat study by Lillemoe et al, the consensus has been formed to implicate sorbitol rather than sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS) as the culprit for colon necrosis in humans treated with SPS and sorbitol. We tested the hypothesis that colon necrosis by sorbitol in the experiment was due to the high osmolality and volume of sorbitol rather than its chemical nature. Methods 26 rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy. They were divided into 6 groups and given enema solutions under anesthesia (normal saline, 33% sorbitol, 33% mannitol, SPS in 33% sorbitol, SPS in normal saline, and SPS in distilled water). They were sacrificed after 48 hours of enema administration or earlier if they were very sick. The gross appearance of the colon was visually inspected, and then sliced colon tissues were examined under light microscopy. Results 1 rat from the sorbitol and 1 from the mannitol group had foci of ischemic colonic changes. The rats receiving SPS enema, in sorbitol, normal saline, distilled water, had crystal deposition with colonic necrosis and mucosal erosion. All the rats not given SPS survived until sacrificed at 48 h whereas 11 of 13 rats that received SPS in sorbitol, normal saline or distilled water died or were clearly dying and sacrificed sooner. There was no difference between sorbitol and mannitol when given without SPS. Conclusions In a surgical uremic rat model, SPS enema given alone or with sorbitol or mannitol seemed to cause colon necrosis and high mortality rate, whereas 33% sorbitol without SPS did not. PMID:26413782

  15. Effects of the carcinogen dimethylhydrazine (DMH) on the function of rat colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Bleich, M; Ecke, D; Schwartz, B; Fraser, G; Greger, R

    1997-01-01

    Rats injected with dimethylhydrazine for 5 weeks (DMH, 40 mg/kg body weight) invariably develop colonic cancer after a latency of some 10-14 weeks. Preliminary studies have suggested that Na+ absorption by surface colonic crypt cells is attenuated in the preneoplastic period (8-12 weeks after the first injection of DMH). The present study of glucocorticoid-treated (dexamethasone 6 mg/kg body weight, s.c. 3 days or triamcinolone 30 mg/kg body weight, s.c. 3 days) rats was undertaken to examine the ion transport properties of rat distal colon during this period in more detail. Ussing chamber studies of the distal colon and whole-cell patch-clamp measurements in surface cells, mid-crypt cells and crypt-base cells obtained from isolated crypts were performed. In Ussing chamber studies the equivalent short-circuit current inhibitable by amiloride (10 micromol/l) DMH-treated rats was about 40% of control. In addition, the hyperpolarizing effect of amiloride (10 micromol/l) on membrane voltage (Vm) was strongly attenuated in surface and mid-crypt cells of DMH-treated rats. Carbachol (CCH, 100 micromol/l), which predictably hyperpolarized surface, mid-crypt cells and crypt-base cells of control rats, had no significant effect on Vm in DMH-treated rats, but increased membrane conductance (Gm) significantly. This indicates that CCH probably activates both Cl- and K+ channels in all three colonic crypt compartments in the DMH-treated rats. Forskolin (5 micromol/l), which has the most pronounced effect in crypt-base cells in control rats, depolarized Vm and enhanced Gm in all three compartments in DMH-treated rats. These data indicate that DMH profoundly alters Na+ and Cl- transport in colonic crypts prior to the appearance of colonic adenocarcinoma and that these effects can be summarized as follows: (1) the Na+ conductance of surface cells is attenuated; (2) cells along the length of the crypt-lumen axis tend to lose their normal response to CCH and instead show simultaneous

  16. Relationship between oxidative damage and colon carcinogenesis in irradiated rats: influence of dietary countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Nancy; Sanders, Lisa; Wu, Guoyao; Davidson, Laurie; Ford, John; Braby, Leslie; Carroll, Raymond; Chapkin, Robert; Lupton, Joanne

    Galactic cosmic radiation not only kills colon epithelial cells, it also generates a cellular environment that can lead to oxidative DNA damage. We previously demonstrated that a diet containing fish oil and pectin protects against initiation of colon cancer by enhancing apoptotic removal of cells with oxidative DNA adducts (8-OHdG), and that apoptosis was highly correlated with colon cancer suppression. We hypothesized this diet combination will mitigate the oxidative damage occurring from radiation and thus reduce colon cancer. The experiment tested the effect of radiation (± 1 Gy, 1 GeV/n Fe ions) on redox balance, apoptosis, and 8-OHdG levels at initiation and colon tumor incidence. Diets contained fish oil or corn oil, and cellulose or pectin (2x2 factorial design). Rats received the diets 3 wk before irradiation (half of the rats), followed by azoxymethane (AOM) injections 10 and 17 d later (all rats). Just prior to AOM injection, irradiated fish oil/pectin rats had a more reduced redox state in colonocytes (lower GSSG, P < 0.05; higher GSH/GSSG ratio), which was not observed in irradiated corn oil/cellulose rats. A shift to a more oxidative state (lower GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio, P < 0.05) occurred between 6 and 12 h after AOM in the fish oil/pectin irradiated rats. Changes in redox balance likely contributed to lower 8-OHdG levels in colonocytes from rats consuming the fish oil diets. Dietary pectin enhanced (P < 0.04) apoptosis induction 12 h after AOM injection in irradiated rats. Similar to the 8-OHdG results, colon tumor incidence was 42% higher (P < 0.05) in rats fed corn oil vs fish oil diets. In summary, fish oil/pectin diets created a more reduced colon environment in irradiated rats that was evident 10 d after irradiation. The ensuing oxidative shift in those rats after AOM injection may have enhanced apoptosis; effectively eliminating more DNA damaged cells. Thus, inclusion of fish oil and pectin in diets for long-duration space flights should help

  17. Rat and human colonic mucins bind to and inhibit adherence lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Chadee, K; Petri, W A; Innes, D J; Ravdin, J I

    1987-01-01

    Establishment of adherence by Entamoeba histolytica is mediated by a 170-kD Gal/GalNAc inhibitable lectin and is required for cytolysis and phagocytosis of mammalian target cells. We studied the biochemical mechanisms of the in vitro interaction between rat and human colonic mucins and axenic E. histolytica trophozoites. Crude mucus prevented amebic adherence to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by up to 70%. Purification of the colonic mucins by Sepharose 4B chromatography, nuclease digestion, and cesium chloride gradient centrifugation resulted in a 1,000-fold enrichment of the inhibitory mucins. Purified rat mucin inhibited amebic adherence to and cytolysis of homologous rat colonic epithelial cells. Oxidation and enzymatic cleavage of rat mucin Gal and GalNAc residues completely abrogated mucin inhibition of amebic adherence. The binding of rat 125I-mucin to amebae was galactose specific, saturable, reversible, and pH dependent. A monoclonal antibody specific for the 170-kD amebic Gal/GalNAc lectin completely inhibited the binding of rat 125I-mucin. Rat mucin bound to Affigel affinity purified the amebic lectin from conditioned medium. Colonic mucin glycoproteins act as an important host defense by binding to the parasite's adherence lectin, thus preventing amebic attachment to and cytolysis of host epithelial cells. Images PMID:2890655

  18. Role of intestinal microflora in chronic inflammation and ulceration of the rat colon.

    PubMed Central

    Videla, S; Vilaseca, J; Guarner, F; Salas, A; Treserra, F; Crespo, E; Antolín, M; Malagelada, J R

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria and their products stimulate inflammatory responses. The effects of different antimicrobial regimens (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, tobramycin, imipenem, vancomycin, metronidazole) were investigated on the course of experimental colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNB) in the rat. On day 7 and 21 after the induction of colitis, matched groups of control and antibiotic treated rats were subjected to colonic dialysis to measure eicosanoid release, and killed for morphological assessment of the colonic lesions (macro and microscopic scores). Stool samples were cultured. Selective antibiotic treatment against Gram positive, Gram negative or anaerobic bacteria had no effect on colonic lesion scores. By contrast, certain broad spectrum antibiotics (amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or the association of imipenem plus vancomycin) significantly reduced macro and microscopic scores. Rats receiving these antibiotics did not develop chronic colitis as shown by the virtual absence of colonic strictures, adhesions, fibrosis, and granulomas. On day 21 after TNB, the intracolonic release of prostaglandin E2, thromboxane B2, and leukotriene B4 was significantly higher in control than in antibiotic treated rats. Control stool cultures showed abundant colony forming units of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and imipenem plus vancomycin induced appreciable reductions in luminal bacteria. In conclusion, certain broad spectrum antibiotics prevent chronic colitis. The normal colonic flora seems to play an important pathogenetic part in the progression of inflammatory colonic lesions to chronicity. PMID:7926912

  19. Stimulation of colonic mucosal growth associated with oxidized redox status in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Junqiang; Washizawa, Naohiro; Gu, Li H; Levin, Marc S; Wang, Lihua; Rubin, Deborah C; Mwangi, Simon; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Gao, Yuhao; Jones, Dean P; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2007-03-01

    Limited data in animal models suggest that colonic mucosa undergoes adaptive growth following massive small bowel resection (SBR). In vitro data suggest that intestinal cell growth is regulated by reactive oxygen species and redox couples [e.g., glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) and cysteine (Cys)/cystine (CySS) redox]. We investigated the effects of SBR and alterations in redox on colonic growth indexes in rats after either small bowel transection (TX) or 80% midjejunoileal resection (RX). Rats were pair fed +/- blockade of endogenous GSH synthesis with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Indexes of colonic growth, proliferation, and apoptosis and GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS redox potentials (E(h)) were determined. RX significantly increased colonic crypt depth, number of cells per crypt, and epithelial cell proliferation [crypt cell bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation]. Administration of BSO markedly decreased colonic mucosal GSH, GSSG, and Cys concentrations in both TX and RX groups, with a resultant oxidation of GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS E(h). BSO did not alter colonic crypt cell apoptosis but significantly increased all colonic mucosal growth indexes (crypt depth, cells/crypt, and BrdU incorporation) in both TX and RX groups in a time- and dose-dependent manner. BSO significantly decreased plasma GSH and GSSG, oxidized GSH/GSSG E(h), and increased plasma Cys and CySS concentrations. Collectively, these data provide in vivo evidence indicating that oxidized colonic mucosal redox status stimulates colonic mucosal growth in rats. The data also suggest that GSH is required to maintain normal colonic and plasma Cys/CySS homeostasis in these animal models.

  20. [Significance of deficient bacterial colonization in the pathogenesis of mucosal lesions in experimental blind loop syndrome].

    PubMed

    Menge, H; Germer, C T; Stössel, R; Simes, G; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-07-20

    A complete evaluation of the bacterial flora in jejunal self-filling blind loops was performed. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the genera E. coli, Streptococcus and Bacteroides. In further experiments, jejunal self-filling blind loops were created in germ-free animals. In spite of the germ-free state the mucosa displayed marked hyperplasia. The same was true when the blind loops had been contaminated with aerobic bacteria. These results demonstrate that other factors in addition to bacterial overgrowth contribute to the mucosal damage observed in self-filling blind loops.

  1. Effect of supplemental vitamin A on colon anastomotic healing in rats given preoperative irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Winsey, K.; Simon, R.J.; Levenson, S.M.; Seifter, E.; Demetriou, A.A.

    1987-02-01

    We studied the effect of dietary supplementation with vitamin A on the healing of colon anastomoses in irradiated bowel. Rats were divided into two groups. Those in the first group were fed a standard chow diet and those in the second group were fed the same diet supplemented with 150 IU vitamin A/g of chow. The rats were maintained on their respective diets throughout the experiment. After 7 days, half the rats in each group underwent abdominal irradiation (200 rads). Seven days later, all of the rats underwent distal colon division and anastomosis under pentobarbital anesthesia. All rats were killed 7 days postoperatively, the colons excised, and bursting strength and hydroxyproline determinations performed on both the anastomotic segment and a normal proximal segment of adjacent colon. There was a significant decrease in the bursting strength at the colon anastomosis (p less than 0.02) and in the collagen content (p less than 0.02) after preoperative irradiation. This effect was mitigated by dietary vitamin A supplementation.

  2. Colonic transit in rats: effect of ovariectomy, sex steroid hormones, and pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J.P.; Bhojwani, A.

    1986-07-01

    In vitro studies suggest that the female sex steroid hormones (estrogen (E) and progesterone (P)) can affect the myoelectric and mechanical activity of colonic smooth muscle. The present study was designed to examine the influence of the hormones on colonic transit in vivo. Transit was assessed by quantifying the distribution within the colon of a radiolabeled marker (0.5 Ci Na2V CrO4), using the geometric center method of analysis. Studies were performed with adult male rats and the following groups of female rats: nonpregnant, ovariectomized, ovariectomy plus hormone pretreatment, and pregnant (day 18). Hormone-pretreated animals were studied 24 h following the fourth injection. The data can be summarized as follows. 1) Colonic transit was affected by the timing of the estrus cycle. 2) Ovariectomy eliminated the biphasic transit pattern observed in estruscycling females and resulted in a geometric center value comparable with that of the metestrus-diestrus animals. 3) E + P pretreatment of ovariectomized rats resulted in a significant decrease in the geometric center compared with the untreated ovariectomized rats. 4) The geometric center value in pregnant anials and hormone-pretreated animals. 5) Adult male rats had a geometric center value of 4.12 +/- 0.29. The results suggest that a relation exists between colonic transit and the circulating levels of the steroid hormones.

  3. Effect of chronic hypokalemia on H(+)-K(+)-ATPase expression in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Codina, J; Pressley, T A; DuBose, T D

    1997-01-01

    Although the kidney plays the major role in the regulation of systemic K+ homeostasis, the colon also participates substantively in K+ balance. The colon is capable of both K+ absorption and secretion, the magnitude of which can be modulated in response to dietary K+ intake. The H(+)-K(+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (H(+)-K(+)-ATPase) has been proposed as a possible mediator of K+ absorption in distal colon, but inhibitor profiles obtained in recent studies suggest that two, and perhaps more, distinct H(+)-K(+)-ATPase activities may be present in mammalian distal colon. We have developed highly specific probes for the catalytic alpha-subunits of colonic and gastric H(+)-K(+)-ATPase, alpha 1-Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, and beta-actin, which were used in Northern analysis of total RNA from whole distal colon and stomach obtained from one of three experimental groups of rats: 1) controls, 2) chronic dietary K+ depletion, and 3) chronic metabolic acidosis. The probe for the colonic but not the gastric H(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha-isoform hybridized to distal colon total RNA in all groups. A significant increase in colonic H(+)-K(+)-ATPase mRNA abundance was observed in response to chronic dietary K+ depletion but not to chronic metabolic acidosis. The alpha 1-isoform of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, which is also expressed in distal colon, did not respond consistently to either chronic dietary K+ depletion or chronic metabolic acidosis. The gastric probe did not hybridize to total RNA from distal colon but, as expected, hybridized to total stomach RNA. However, the abundance of gastric H(+)-K(+)-ATPase or Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in stomach was not altered consistently by either chronic dietary K+ depletion or metabolic acidosis. Under the conditions of this study, it appears that the mRNA encoding the colonic alpha-isoform is upregulated by chronic dietary K+ restriction, a condition shown previously to increase K+ absorption in the distal colon.

  4. Chemoprevention of azoxymethane-induced rat colon carcinogenesis by a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Kawabata, K; Kakumoto, M; Makita, H; Matsunaga, K; Mori, H; Satoh, K; Hara, A; Murakami, A; Koshimizu, K; Ohigashi, H

    1997-09-01

    In our studies to find natural compounds with chemopreventive efficacy in foods, using azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci and colonic mucosal cell proliferation as biomarkers, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), present in the edible plant Languas galanga from Thailand was found to be effective. This study was conducted to test the ability of ACA to inhibit AOM-induced colon tumorigenesis when it was fed to rats during the initiation or post-initiation phase. Male F344 rats were given three weekly s.c. injections of AOM (15 mg/kg body weight) to induce colonic neoplasms. They were fed diet containing 100 or 500 ppm ACA for 4 weeks, starting one week before the first dosing of AOM (the initiation feeding). The other groups were fed the ACA diet for 34 weeks, starting one week after the last AOM injection (the post-initiation feeding). At the termination of the study (week 38), AOM had induced 71% incidence of colonic adenocarcinoma (12/17 rats). The initiation feeding with ACA caused significant reduction in the incidence of colon carcinoma (54% inhibition by 100 ppm ACA feeding and 77% inhibition by 500 ppm ACA feeding, P = 0.03 and P = 0.001, respectively). The post-initiation feeding with ACA also suppressed the incidence of colonic carcinoma (45% inhibition by 100 ppm ACA feeding and 93% inhibition by 500 ppm ACA feeding, P = 0.06 and P = 0.00003, respectively). Such inhibition was dose-dependent and was associated with suppression of proliferation biomarkers, such as ornithine decarboxylase activity in the colonic mucosa, and blood and colonic mucosal polyamine contents. ACA also elevated the activities of phase II enzymes, glutathione S-transferase (GST) and quinone reductase (QR), in the liver and colon. These results indicate that ACA could inhibit the development of AOM-induced colon tumorigenesis through its suppression of cell proliferation in the colonic mucosa and its induction of GST and QR. The results

  5. PCR Conditions for 16S Primers for Analysis of Microbes in the Colon of Rats.

    PubMed

    Guillen, I A; Camacho, H; Tuero, A D; Bacardí, D; Palenzuela, D O; Aguilera, A; Silva, J A; Estrada, R; Gell, O; Suárez, J; Ancizar, J; Brown, E; Colarte, A B; Castro, J; Novoa, L I

    2016-09-01

    The study of the composition of the intestinal flora is important to the health of the host, playing a key role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and the evolution of the immune system. For these studies, various universal primers of the 16S rDNA gene are used in microbial taxonomy. Here, we report an evaluation of 5 universal primers to explore the presence of microbial DNA in colon biopsies preserved in RNAlater solution. The DNA extracted was used for the amplification of PCR products containing the variable (V) regions of the microbial 16S rDNA gene. The PCR products were studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and DNA sequence, whose percent of homology with microbial sequences reported in GenBank was verified using bioinformatics tools. The presence of microbes in the colon of rats was quantified by the quantitative PCR (qPCR) technique. We obtained microbial DNA from rat, useful for PCR analysis with the universal primers for the bacteria 16S rDNA. The sequences of PCR products obtained from a colon biopsy of the animal showed homology with the classes bacilli (Lactobacillus spp) and proteobacteria, normally represented in the colon of rats. The proposed methodology allowed the attainment of DNA of bacteria with the quality and integrity for use in qPCR, sequencing, and PCR-RFLP analysis. The selected universal primers provided knowledge of the abundance of microorganisms and the formation of a preliminary test of bacterial diversity in rat colon biopsies. PMID:27382362

  6. PCR Conditions for 16S Primers for Analysis of Microbes in the Colon of Rats.

    PubMed

    Guillen, I A; Camacho, H; Tuero, A D; Bacardí, D; Palenzuela, D O; Aguilera, A; Silva, J A; Estrada, R; Gell, O; Suárez, J; Ancizar, J; Brown, E; Colarte, A B; Castro, J; Novoa, L I

    2016-09-01

    The study of the composition of the intestinal flora is important to the health of the host, playing a key role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and the evolution of the immune system. For these studies, various universal primers of the 16S rDNA gene are used in microbial taxonomy. Here, we report an evaluation of 5 universal primers to explore the presence of microbial DNA in colon biopsies preserved in RNAlater solution. The DNA extracted was used for the amplification of PCR products containing the variable (V) regions of the microbial 16S rDNA gene. The PCR products were studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and DNA sequence, whose percent of homology with microbial sequences reported in GenBank was verified using bioinformatics tools. The presence of microbes in the colon of rats was quantified by the quantitative PCR (qPCR) technique. We obtained microbial DNA from rat, useful for PCR analysis with the universal primers for the bacteria 16S rDNA. The sequences of PCR products obtained from a colon biopsy of the animal showed homology with the classes bacilli (Lactobacillus spp) and proteobacteria, normally represented in the colon of rats. The proposed methodology allowed the attainment of DNA of bacteria with the quality and integrity for use in qPCR, sequencing, and PCR-RFLP analysis. The selected universal primers provided knowledge of the abundance of microorganisms and the formation of a preliminary test of bacterial diversity in rat colon biopsies.

  7. PCR Conditions for 16S Primers for Analysis of Microbes in the Colon of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, H.; Tuero, A. D.; Bacardí, D.; Palenzuela, D. O.; Aguilera, A.; Silva, J. A.; Estrada, R.; Gell, O.; Suárez, J.; Ancizar, J.; Brown, E.; Colarte, A. B.; Castro, J.; Novoa, L. I.

    2016-01-01

    The study of the composition of the intestinal flora is important to the health of the host, playing a key role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and the evolution of the immune system. For these studies, various universal primers of the 16S rDNA gene are used in microbial taxonomy. Here, we report an evaluation of 5 universal primers to explore the presence of microbial DNA in colon biopsies preserved in RNAlater solution. The DNA extracted was used for the amplification of PCR products containing the variable (V) regions of the microbial 16S rDNA gene. The PCR products were studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and DNA sequence, whose percent of homology with microbial sequences reported in GenBank was verified using bioinformatics tools. The presence of microbes in the colon of rats was quantified by the quantitative PCR (qPCR) technique. We obtained microbial DNA from rat, useful for PCR analysis with the universal primers for the bacteria 16S rDNA. The sequences of PCR products obtained from a colon biopsy of the animal showed homology with the classes bacilli (Lactobacillus spp) and proteobacteria, normally represented in the colon of rats. The proposed methodology allowed the attainment of DNA of bacteria with the quality and integrity for use in qPCR, sequencing, and PCR-RFLP analysis. The selected universal primers provided knowledge of the abundance of microorganisms and the formation of a preliminary test of bacterial diversity in rat colon biopsies. PMID:27382362

  8. BPC-15 reduces trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colonic damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Veljaca, M; Lesch, C A; Pllana, R; Sanchez, B; Chan, K; Guglietta, A

    1995-01-01

    The effect of BPC-15 (Booly Protection Compound-15) was evaluated in a rat model of colonic injury. A single intracolonic administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) dissolved in ethanol induces severe colonic damage, which is characterized by areas of necrosis surrounded by areas of acute inflammation. The damage is associated with high myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, mainly as a reflection of neutrophilic infiltration into the damaged tissue. In this study, 1 hr before a single intracolonic administration of 50 mg/kg of TNBS in 50% ethanol, the animals were treated with one of the following doses of BPC-15: 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 or 10 nmol/kg administered i.p. or with a dose of 10 nmol/kg administered intracolonically. The animals were sacrificed 3 days later and the extent of colonic necrosis and hyperemia was measured with an image analyzer. The i.p. administration of BPC-15 significantly reduced the extent of TNBS-induced colonic damage in a dose-dependent manner. This was associated with a statistically significant and dose-dependent reduction in colonic tissue MPO activity. At the dose tested (10 nmol/kg), intracolonic administration of BPC-15 did not significantly reduce either the extent of the colonic damage or the increase in MPO activity induced by TNBS. In conclusion, this study showed that i.p. administration of BPC-15 reduced TNBS-induced colonic damage in rats. PMID:7815358

  9. [Qualitative and quantitative detection of bacterial flora in experimental blind loop syndrome of the rat].

    PubMed

    Menge, H; Simes, G; Germer, C T; Wagner, J; Hahn, H; Riecken, E O

    1985-08-01

    In the blind loop syndrome bacterial overgrowth--accompanied by an increase in bile acid deconjugation--is thought to be responsible for the observed morphological alterations of the small intestinal mucosa with its concomitant malabsorption syndrome. Since in this chain of events the bacterial overgrowth is of primary importance, we have performed a complete qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the intraluminal flora in rats with surgically created self-filling blind loops. The results show a significant increase in bacteria of the aerobic growing genera E. coli and Streptococcus (Enterococcus), and of the anaerobic growing genus Bacteroides, in one single rat also of the genera Lactobacillus/Bifidobacterium. In order to elucidate which strains of bacteria are predominantly responsible for the morphological and functional alterations observed in the stagnant loop syndrome, germ-free rats with self-filling blind loops should be contaminated selectively with bacteria of these genera.

  10. Simple method for the preparation of single cell suspensions from normal and tumorous rat colonic mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Perret, V; Lev, R; Pigman, W

    1977-01-01

    Viable single cell suspensions from rat colonic epithelium were obtained by using phosphate buffered saline containing 0-2 M mannitol. The method, which requires no prior enzyme treatment, provides undamaged cells in high yield within one hour. The procedure was also applied to neoplastic rat colonic tissue, which was induced by repeated intrarectal infusion of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Comparison between normal and neoplastic cells has shown that the latter have a higher nucleus: cytoplasm ratio and a higher metabolic activity. Images Figure PMID:873323

  11. A protective role of dietary vitamin D3 in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mokady, E; Schwartz, B; Shany, S; Lamprecht, S A

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to gain insight into a putative anticancer effect of dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in a rat model of colon carcinogenesis. Male rats were assigned to three different dietary groups. The dietary regimens were based on a standard murine-defined diet (AIN-76A) or a stress diet containing 20% fat, reduced Ca2+ concentration, a high phosphorus-to-Ca2+ ratio, and either low or high vitamin D3 content. Colorectal cancer was induced by administration of the procarcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Blood Ca2+, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] levels were measured in DMH-treated rats and in respective weight- and age-matched dietary control groups. Colonic epithelial proliferation was assessed by determining thymidine kinase (TK) activity, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation into crypt cell DNA, and the mean labeling index along the colonic crypt continuum. Maintenance of rats on the stress diet either unmodified or supplemented with vitamin D3 in the absence of carcinogen treatment provoked a time-dependent rise in colonic TK activity and hyperproliferation of colonic epithelium. DMH treatment of rats maintained on the standard diet caused a marked increase in the proliferative indexes of colonic epithelium and in expansion of the crypt proliferative compartment. TK activity and the crypt mitotic zone were significantly augmented in the animal group fed the stress diet. Supplementary vitamin D3 abrogated the stress diet-enhanced colonic responses to the carcinogenic insult. Colon tumor multiplicity was fourfold higher in animals fed the stress diet than in animals maintained on a standard diet. The marked rise in colonic tumor multiplicity and adenocarcinoma incidence in rats fed the stress diet was obliterated by supplemental dietary vitamin D3. Cumulatively, the present results indicate that dietary vitamin D3 impedes the neoplastic process in murine large intestine and strengthen the

  12. Pineal gland function is required for colon antipreneoplastic effects of physical exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Frajacomo, F T T; de Paula Garcia, W; Fernandes, C R; Garcia, S B; Kannen, V

    2015-10-01

    Light-at-night exposure enhances the risk of cancer. Colon cancer is among the most dangerous tumors affecting humankind. Physical exercise has shown positive effects against colon cancer. Here, we investigated whether pineal gland modulates antipreneoplastic effects of physical exercise in the colon. Surgical and non-surgical pineal impairments were performed to clarify the relationship between the pineal gland activity and manifestation of colonic preneoplastic lesions. Next, a progressive swimming training was applied in rats exposed or not to either non-surgical pineal impairment or carcinogen treatment for 10 weeks. Both surgical and non-surgical pineal impairments increased the development of colon preneoplasia. It was further found that impairing the pineal gland function, higher rates of DNA damage were induced in colonic epithelial and enteric glial cells. Physical exercise acted positively against preneoplasia, whereas impairing the pineal function with constant light exposure disrupts its positive effects on the development of preneoplastic lesions in the colon. This was yet related to increased DNA damage in glial cells and enteric neuronal activation aside from serum melatonin levels. Our findings suggest that protective effects of physical exercise against colon cancer are dependent on the pineal gland activity.

  13. Characterization of AQPs in Mouse, Rat, and Human Colon and Their Selective Regulation by Bile Acids

    PubMed Central

    Yde, Jonathan; Keely, Stephen; Wu, Qi; Borg, Johan F.; Lajczak, Natalia; O’Dwyer, Aoife; Dalsgaard, Peter; Fenton, Robert A.; Moeller, Hanne B.

    2016-01-01

    In normal individuals, the epithelium of the colon absorbs 1.5–2 l of water a day to generate dehydrated feces. However, in the condition of bile acid malabsorption (BAM), an excess of bile acids in the colon results in diarrhea. Several studies have attempted to address the mechanisms contributing to BAM induced by various bile acids. However, none have addressed a potential dysregulation of aquaporin (AQP) water channels, which are responsible for the majority of transcellular water transport in epithelial cells, as a contributing factor to the onset of diarrhea and the pathogenesis of BAM. In this study, we aimed to systematically analyze the expression of AQPs in colonic epithelia from rat, mouse, and human and determine whether their expression is altered in a rat model of BAM. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics, RT-PCR, and western blotting identified various AQPs in isolated colonic epithelial cells from rats (AQP1, 3, 4, 7, 8) and mice (AQP1, 4, 8). Several AQPs were also detected in human colon (AQP1, 3, 4, 7–9). Immunohistochemistry localized AQP1 to the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells in the bottom of the crypts, whereas AQP3 (rat, human) and AQP4 (mice, human) were localized predominantly in the basolateral plasma membrane. AQP8 was localized intracellularly and at the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells. Rats fed sodium cholate for 72 h had significantly increased fecal water content, suggesting development of BAM-associated diarrhea. Colonic epithelial cells isolated from this model had significantly altered levels of AQP3, 7, and 8, suggesting that these AQPs may be involved in the pathogenesis of bile acid-induced diarrhea. PMID:27777930

  14. Effects of VIP and NO on the motor activity of vascularly perfused rat proximal colon.

    PubMed

    Kumano, K; Fujimura, M; Oshima, S; Yamamoto, H; Hayashi, N; Nakamura, T; Fujimiya, M

    2001-01-01

    The effects of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and nitric oxide (NO) on the motor activity of the rat proximal colon were examined in an ex vivo model of vascularly perfused rat proximal colon. VIP reduced motor activity and this inhibitory effect was not altered by either atropine, hexamethonium, tetrodotoxin (TTX) nor TTX plus acetylcholine (ACh), but was completely antagonized by NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) and by VIP receptor antagonist, VIP(10-28). These results suggest that VIP may exert a direct inhibitory effect on the motor activity of the rat proximal colon via a VIP receptor located on the smooth muscle and this effect is mediated by NO but not by cholinergic pathways. Atropine and hexamethonium reduced but ACh stimulated motor activity and the effect of ACh was not changed by TTX, suggesting that the cholinergic pathway may exert a direct stimulatory effect on motor activity. Single injection of TTX, VIP(10-28) or L-NA induced a marked increase in motor activity, suggesting that the motor activity of rat proximal colon is tonically suppressed by VIP and NO generating pathways, and elimination of inhibitory neurotransmission by TTX may induce an abnormal increase of the motor activity. The interaction between VIP and NO in regulation of motor activity was further examined by a measurement of NO release from vascularly perfused rat proximal colon. Results showed that NO release was significantly increased during infusion of VIP and this response was reversed by L-NA. These results suggest that VIP generating neurons may inhibit colonic motility by stimulating endogenous NO production in either smooth muscle cells or nerve terminals.

  15. Diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin for colonic drug targeting: In vivo performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Amélia C F; Serra, Arménio C; Veiga, Francisco J; Gonsalves, António M d'A Rocha; Basit, Abdul W; Murdan, Sudaxshina

    2016-03-16

    The aim of this in vivo study was to assess the ability of the prodrug conjugate diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin to release diclofenac in the colon following oral administration, using sulfapyridine (a metabolite of sulfasalazine) as a marker of colonic absorption. Two groups of rats were used; the test rats received a suspension containing the two prodrugs, diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin and sulfasalazine, while the control rats received a suspension containing the corresponding free drugs, sodium diclofenac and sulfapyridine. The rats were fasted overnight with free access to water before and throughout the first 12h of the study. Blood was collected from the tail vein at pre-determined time points and the plasma analyzed for the concentrations of diclofenac and sulfapyridine. Following the oral administration of the two prodrugs, a more extended absorption profile was observed and Cmax was achieved 10h post-dose, in contrast to rapid absorption of the free drugs (tmax of diclofenac being 1.3h, and that of sulfapyridine being 2.1h). In addition to a later tmax, conjugation of diclofenac to β-cyclodextrin also resulted in a reduced Cmax and a reduced AUC. The same tmax for diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin as for sulfasalazine confirms the colonic metabolism of diclofenac-β-cyclodextrin. This study shows the potential of this new cyclodextrin-based prodrug to target and release diclofenac specifically in the colon following oral administration. PMID:26784980

  16. Dysregulations of intestinal and colonic UDP-glucuronosyltransferases in rats with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hao; Sun, Shiqing; Cheng, Xuefang; Yan, Tingting; Zheng, Xiao; Li, Feiyan; Qi, Qu; Wang, Guangji; Hao, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease of complex metabolic disorder associated with various types of complications. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), the major phase II conjugation enzymes, mediate the metabolism of both drugs and endogenous metabolites that may raise great concerns in the condition of diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether diabetes could affect UGTs in the intestinal and colonic tract. A high-fat diet combined with low-dose streptozotocin was used to induce a type 2 diabetic model in rats. The mRNA levels and enzymatic activities of UGT1A1, -1A6, and -1A7 in the diabetic intestine and colon were higher than those in nondiabetic rats. In contrast, both the activity and mRNA level of UGT2B1 in diabetic rats were lower than those in nondiabetic rats. Notably, the diabetic intestine and colon exhibited an inflammatory state with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines. Various transcriptional factors involved in UGT regulation were unanimously upregulated in the diabetic intestine and colon. These findings strongly suggest that the regulating pathways of the UGT1 family are adaptively upregulated in the diabetic gastrointestinal tract. Given the essential regulatory role of the gastrointestinal site in drug disposition, such changes in UGTs may have a dynamic and complex impact on therapeutic drugs and endogenous metabolomes. PMID:23545594

  17. THE INDUCTION OF COLON NEOPLASIA IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALOMETHANES (THMS) IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE INDUCTION OF COLON NEOPLASIA IN MALE RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALO METHANES (THMs) IN THE DRINKING WATER
    Christopher Sistrunk and Tony DeAngelo, North Carolina Central University and US Environmental Protection Agency
    The THMs are the most widely distributed and the most co...

  18. Interleukin-6 Modulates Colonic Transepithelial Ion Transport in the Stress-Sensitive Wistar Kyoto Rat

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Dervla; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological challenge stimulates secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6, resulting in variety of biological responses. In the gastrointestinal tract, IL-6 modulates the excitability of submucosal neurons and stimulates secretion into the colonic lumen. When considered in the context of the functional bowel disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where plasma levels of IL-6 are elevated, this may reflect an important molecular mechanism contributing to symptom flares, particularly in the diarrhea-predominant phenotype. In these studies, colonic ion transport, an indicator of absorption and secretion, was assessed in the stress-sensitive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat model of IBS. Mucosa-submucosal colonic preparations from WKY and control Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were mounted in Ussing chambers and the basal short circuit current (ISC) was electrophysiologically recorded and compared between the strains. Exposure to IL-6 (1 nM) stimulated a secretory current of greater amplitude in WKY as compared to SD samples. Furthermore, the observed IL-6-mediated potentiation of secretory currents evoked by veratridine and capsaicin in SD rats was blunted in WKY rats. Exposure to IL-6 also stimulated an increase in transepithelial resistance in both SD and WKY colonic tissue. These studies demonstrate that the neuroexcitatory effects of IL-6 on submucosal plexi have functional consequences with alterations in both colonic secretory activity and permeability. The IL-6-induced increase in colonic secretory activity appears to neurally mediated. Thus, local increases in IL-6 levels and subsequent activation of enteric neurons may underlie alterations in absorpto-secretory function in the WKY model of IBS. PMID:23162465

  19. Neurogenic and myogenic motor activity in the colon of the guinea pig, mouse, rabbit, and rat.

    PubMed

    Costa, M; Dodds, K N; Wiklendt, L; Spencer, N J; Brookes, S J H; Dinning, P G

    2013-11-15

    Gastrointestinal motility involves interactions between myogenic and neurogenic processes intrinsic to the gut wall. We have compared the presence of propagating myogenic contractions of the isolated colon in four experimental animals (guinea pig, mouse, rabbit, and rat), following blockade of enteric neural activity. Isolated colonic preparations were distended with fluid, with the anal end either closed or open. Spatiotemporal maps of changes in diameter were constructed from video recordings. Distension-induced peristaltic contractions were abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.6 μM) in all animal species. Subsequent addition of carbachol (0.1-1 μM) did not evoke myogenic motor patterns in the mouse or guinea pig, although some activity was observed in rabbit and rat colon. These myogenic contractions propagated both orally and anally and differed from neurogenic propagating contractions in their frequency, extent of propagation, and polarity. Niflumic acid (300 μM), used to block myogenic activity, also blocked neural peristalsis and thus cannot be used to discriminate between these mechanisms. In all species, except the mouse colon, small myogenic "ripple" contractions were revealed in TTX, but in both rat and rabbit an additional, higher-frequency ripple-type contraction was superimposed. Following blockade of enteric nerve function, a muscarinic agonist can evoke propulsive myogenic peristaltic contractions in isolated rabbit and rat colon, but not in guinea pig or mouse colon. Marked differences between species exist in the ability of myogenic mechanisms to propel luminal content, but in all species there is normally a complex interplay between neurogenic and myogenic processes.

  20. Identification of bladder and colon afferents in the nodose ganglia of male rats.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Rau, Kristofer K; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Hubscher, Charles H

    2014-11-01

    The sensory neurons innervating the urinary bladder and distal colon project to similar regions of the central nervous system and often are affected simultaneously by various diseases and disorders, including spinal cord injury. Anatomical and physiological commonalities between the two organs involve the participation of shared spinally derived pathways, allowing mechanisms of communication between the bladder and colon. Prior electrophysiological data from our laboratory suggest that the bladder also may receive sensory innervation from a nonspinal source through the vagus nerve, which innervates the distal colon as well. The present study therefore aimed to determine whether anatomical evidence exists for vagal innervation of the male rat urinary bladder and to assess whether those vagal afferents also innervate the colon. Additionally, the relative contribution to bladder and colon sensory innervation of spinal and vagal sources was determined. By using lipophilic tracers, neurons that innervated the bladder and colon in both the nodose ganglia (NG) and L6/S1 and L1/L2 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were quantified. Some single vagal and spinal neurons provided dual innervation to both organs. The proportions of NG afferents labeled from the bladder did not differ from spinal afferents labeled from the bladder when considering the collective population of total neurons from either group. Our results demonstrate evidence for vagal innervation of the bladder and colon and suggest that dichotomizing vagal afferents may provide a neural mechanism for cross-talk between the organs. PMID:24845615

  1. Effect of nitrergic system on colonic motility in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Temiz, Tijen Kaya; Demir, Omer; Simsek, Fatma; Kaplan, Yusuf Cem; Bahceci, Selen; Karadas, Barıs; Celik, Aslı; Koyluoglu, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate whether nitric oxide (NO)-mediated colonic motility was altered in rat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) model, using different isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS) inhibitors. Materials and Methods: The animal model of IBS-like visceral hypersensitivity was induced by intra-colonic infusion of 0.5% acetic acid (AA) in saline once daily from postnatal days 8 to 21. Control animals received saline instead of AA. Experiments were performed at the end of 8 weeks. Distal colon tissues were resected and direct effects of different NOS inhibitors; N-omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride, (L-NAME), ARL-17477 dihydrochloride hydrate (ARL 17477), N-[3-(Aminomethyl) phenyl] methyl]-ethanimidamidedihydrochloride (1400 W), and N5-(1-Iminoethyl)-L-ornithine dihydrochloride (L-NIO) were evaluated concentration-dependently in vitro tissue bath. Besides, morphology of both groups was assessed with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E) staining and the impact of NO antibodies was determined using the immunohistochemical method. Results: The mean pressure values of spontaneous contractions and KCL (80 mmol/L) responses of distal colonic segments were similar in normal and IBS rats. L-NAME and ARL-17477 significantly increased the mean pressure of spontaneous colonic contractions in normal rats versus own base values (P < 0.05), but this increase did not significantly different when compared to IBS rats. In H and E staining, there was no difference with regard to morphology between two groups. Neuronal NOS (nNOS) immunoreactivity was found to be significantly decreased in IBS when compared to control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: L-NAME and ARL-17477 mediated mean pressure values were found to be slightly decreased in IBS rats. These findings may be related to a decrease in nNOS level in IBS. PMID:27756955

  2. Protein-losing enteropathy in the human and experimental rat blind-loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    King, C E; Toskes, P P

    1981-03-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy in 2 human subjects with small intestine bacterial overgrowth is reported. Partial improvement in 1 and complete normalization in the 2nd, during long-term antibiotic therapy, demonstrate for the first time antibiotic reversibility of protein-losing enteropathy in the human blind-loop syndrome. Studies in rats with experimental jejunal blind loops revealed depressed serum protein levels and excessive fecal excretion of intravenously administered 51Cr as compared with nonoperated and surgical controls. Comparison of protein loss of rats with blind loops present for varying lengths of time and paired comparison of rats tested for protein loss at two different times revealed a relatively stable degree of protein loss once it was manifest. Reversal of protein loss with antibiotic therapy was accomplished in only a small percentage of rats, and in those only after prolonged therapy. Surgical extirpation of the blind loop from rats with protein-losing enteropathy consistently corrected the protein loss, although this correction was delayed up to 9 wk from the time of corrective surgery. These studies demonstrate (a) significant protein loss as one etiologic factor for protein metabolic disturbances in the human and experimental rat blind-loop syndrome, (b) the occurrence of intestinal protein loss as a manifestation of functionally significant mucosal injury in the contaminated nonstagnant small bowel as well as the stagnant part of the small intestine affected by bacterial overgrowth, and (c) the difficulty of reversing functionally significant mucosal injury in the blind-loop syndrome once it has been manifest.

  3. The effect of peritoneal lavage on the postoperative course after colonic anastomosis and perforation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Arnesjö, B; Breland, U; Petersson, B G

    1975-01-01

    Peritoneal lavage was given during four days to rats subjected either to transection and re-anastomosis or perforation of the descending part of the colon or caecum. Control rats were treated in the smae way but did not receive peritoneal lavage. The rats which were treated with a colonic anastomosis and peritoneal lavage had significantly less abdominal adhesions, peritonitis and peritoneal fluid observed at autopsy 11 or 60 days after surgery. No rats developed anastomosis insufficiency and all survived. Peritoneal lavage in rats subjected to colonic or caecal perforation increased the survival time and reduced the mortality rate, the frequency of adhesions and the signs of peritonitis. An increased frequency of peritoneal adhesions was observed after extensive mobilization of the colon during operation when no peritoneal lavage had been given. The peritoneal lavage catheter per se did not cause adhesions.

  4. Therapy effect of antiulcer agents on new chronic cysteamine colon lesion in rat.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Aralica, G; Perovic, D; Staresinic, M; Anic, T; Gjurasin, M; Prkacin, I; Separovic, J; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Lovric-Bencic, M; Mikus, D; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Ziger, T; Sebecic, B; Ivasovic, Z; Jagic, V; Komericki, L; Balen, I; Boban-Blagaic, A; Sjekavica, I

    2001-01-01

    After demonstration that cysteamine induced duodenal lesions in gastrectomized rats, while a number of antiulcer drugs mitigated these lesions, it was shown that one single intrarectal (i.r.) cysteamine application produced severe colon lesions in acute studies in rats. Thus, the further focus was on the protracted effect of cysteamine challenge (400 mg/kg b.w. i.r.) and therapy influence in chronic experiments in female rats. Regularly, cysteamine colon lesions were markedly mitigated by ranitidine (10), omeprazole (10), atropine (10), methylprednisolone (1), sulphasalazine (50; mg/kg), pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116; 10 microg or 10 ng/kg). Specifically, after 1 or 3 months following initial challenge (cysteamine 400 mg/kg i.r.) in female rat, the therapy [BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116 (10.0 microg or 10.0 ng/kg; i.g., i.p., i.r.), ranitidine, omeprazole, atropine, methylprednisolone, sulphasalazine (i.p.)] reversed the protracted cysteamine colon injury: the 1 week-regimen (once daily application) started after 1 month post-cysteamine, as well as the 2 weeks-regimen (once daily application), which started after 3 months. The effect on recidive lesion was also tested. These cysteamine lesions may reappear after stopping therapy (after stopping therapy for 3 weeks at the end of 2-weeks regimen started in 3 months-cysteamine female rats) in sulphasalazine group, while this reappearance is markedly antagonized in pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (PL-10, PLD-116)-rats (cysteamine-colon lesion still substantially low). PMID:11595451

  5. A loop resonator for slice-selective in vivo EPR imaging in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; He, Guanglong; Deng, Yuanmu; Salikhov, Ildar; Petryakov, Sergey; Zweier, Jay L.

    2008-01-01

    A loop resonator was developed for 300 MHz continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) spectroscopy and imaging in live rats. A single-turn loop (55 mm in diameter) was used to provide sufficient space for the rat body. Efficiency for generating a radiofrequency magnetic field of 38 μT/W 1/2 was achieved at the center of the loop. For the resonator itself, an unloaded quality factor of 430 was obtained. When a 350 g rat was placed in the resonator at the level of the lower abdomen, the quality factor decreased to 18. The sensitive volume in the loop was visualized with a bottle filled with an aqueous solution of the nitroxide spin probe 3-carbamoyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-pyrrolin-1-yloxy (3-CP). The resonator was shown to enable EPR imaging in live rats. Imaging was performed for 3-CP that had been infused intravenously into the rat and its distribution was visualized within the lower abdomen.

  6. Brewers' rice attenuated aberrant crypt foci developing in colon of azoxymethane-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bee Ling; Norhaizan, Mohd Esa; Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Hazilawati, Hamzah; Roselina, Karim

    2016-01-01

    Brewers' rice is one of abundant agricultural waste products in the rice industry. The present study is designed to investigate the potential of brewers' rice to inhibit the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in colon of azoxymethane (AOM)-treated rats. The effects on the attenuation of hepatic toxicity and kidney function enzymes were also evaluated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups: (G1) normal; (G2) AOM alone; and (G3), (G4), and (G5), which were AOM fed with 10%, 20%, and 40% (w/w) of brewers' rice, respectively. The rats in group 2-5 were injected intraperitoneally with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight) once weekly for two weeks. After 8 weeks of treatment,the total number of ACF/colon and the number of ACF in the distal and middle colon were significantly reduced in all treatment groups compared to G2 (p<0.05). Brewers' rice decreased the number of ACF with dysplastic morphology in a dose-dependent manner. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level in G5 was significantly lower compared to the G2 (p<0.05). In conclusion, this study found the potential value of brewers' rice in reducing the risk of cancer susceptibility in colon. PMID:26826813

  7. Architecture of kangaroo rat inner medulla: segmentation of descending thin limb of Henle's loop.

    PubMed

    Urity, Vinoo B; Issaian, Tadeh; Braun, Eldon J; Dantzler, William H; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2012-03-15

    We hypothesize that the inner medulla of the kangaroo rat Dipodomys merriami, a desert rodent that concentrates its urine to more than 6,000 mosmol/kgH(2)O water, provides unique examples of architectural features necessary for production of highly concentrated urine. To investigate this architecture, inner medullary nephron segments in the initial 3,000 μm below the outer medulla were assessed with digital reconstructions from physical tissue sections. Descending thin limbs of Henle (DTLs), ascending thin limbs of Henle (ATLs), and collecting ducts (CDs) were identified by immunofluorescence using antibodies that label segment-specific proteins associated with transepithelial water flux (aquaporin 1 and 2, AQP1 and AQP2) and chloride flux (the chloride channel ClC-K1); all tubules and vessels were labeled with wheat germ agglutinin. In the outer 3,000 μm of the inner medulla, AQP1-positive DTLs lie at the periphery of groups of CDs. ATLs lie inside and outside the groups of CDs. Immunohistochemistry and reconstructions of loops that form their bends in the outer 3,000 μm of the inner medulla show that, relative to loop length, the AQP1-positive segment of the kangaroo rat is significantly longer than that of the Munich-Wistar rat. The length of ClC-K1 expression in the prebend region at the terminal end of the descending side of the loop in kangaroo rat is about 50% shorter than that of the Munich-Wistar rat. Tubular fluid of the kangaroo rat DTL may approach osmotic equilibrium with interstitial fluid by water reabsorption along a relatively longer tubule length, compared with Munich-Wistar rat. A relatively shorter-length prebend segment may promote a steeper reabsorptive driving force at the loop bend. These structural features predict functionality that is potentially significant in the production of a high urine osmolality in the kangaroo rat.

  8. Fluid reabsorption in Henle's loop and urinary excretion of sodium and water in normal rats and rats with chronic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stumpe, Klaus O.; Lowitz, Hans D.; Ochwadt, Bruno

    1970-01-01

    The function of the short loops of Henle was investigated by micropuncture technique in normal rats, in rats with spontaneous hypertension, and in the untouched kidney of rats with experimental renal hypertension. All animals received a standard infusion of 1.2 ml of isotonic saline per hr. With increasing arterial blood pressure (range from 90 to 220 mm Hg), a continuous decrease in transit time of Lissamine green through Henle's loop from 32 to 10 sec was observed. Fractional water reabsorption along the loop declined progressively from 26 to 10%, and fractional sodium reabsorption decreased from 40 to 36% of the filtered load. The fluid volume in Henle's loop calculated from transit time and mean flow rate also decreased with increasing blood pressure. There was no change in superficial single nephron filtration rate but there was a slight increase in total glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Sodium and water reabsorption in the proximal tubule remained unchanged. Urine flow rate, sodium excretion, osmolar clearance, and negative free water clearance increased with increasing blood pressure. The osmolal urine to plasma (U/P) ratio declined but did not fall below a value of 1.5. It is concluded that the increase in sodium and water excretion with chronic elevation of arterial blood pressure is caused by a decrease of sodium and water reabsorption along the loop of Henle, presumably as a consequence of increased medullary blood pressure. PMID:5422022

  9. A simple, quantitative method using alginate gel to determine rat colonic tumor volume in vivo.

    PubMed

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-04-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the Apc(Pirc/+) rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm³. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained.

  10. A Simple, Quantitative Method Using Alginate Gel to Determine Rat Colonic Tumor Volume In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-01-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the ApcPirc/+ rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm3. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained. PMID:24674588

  11. Effect of luminal or circulating nitrite on colonic ion movement in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Radcliffe, B.C.; Nance, S.H.; Deakin, E.J.; Roediger, W.E.W. )

    1987-08-01

    The disposition of intravenously or luminally administered nitrite across the colonic mucosa and its effect on ion movement into or from the colon was assessed in anesthetized Porton rats using the isolated colon instilled either with sodium chloride or sodium chloride with sodium butyrate. Ionic changes in the colon after intravenous injection of 10 {mu}mol NaNO{sub 2} were compared with those occurring after injection of 10 {mu}mol NaCl. After intravenous administration of nitrite, both nitrite and nitrate appeared in the colonic instillate in a ratio of 1:1. Nitrite increased chloride absorption (110%) and bicarbonate production (20%) when 40 mM butyrate was included in the instillate. Net sodium absorption, measured in the whole colon, was unchanged. Intravenous nitrite had no effect on ionic movement in the absence of butyrate. When NaNO{sub 2} was included luminally with the sodium chloride-butyrate instillate, bicarbonate production rate increased, but sodium and chloride absorption were unaffected. Nitrite concentration in the instillate decreased during the 40-min experimental period at a rate of 0.275 nmol{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}cm{sup {minus}2} and nitrate appeared at a rate of 0.037 nmol{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}{center dot}cm{sup {minus}2}. The authors conclude that nitrite stimulates bicarbonate production in the colon, probably by stimulating the oxidation by butyrate, the main source of CO{sub 2} generation by the colonic mucosa.

  12. The function of 5-HT3 receptors on colonic transit in rats.

    PubMed

    Haga, K; Asano, K; Fukuda, T; Kobayakawa, T

    1995-12-01

    The function of serotonin (5-HT)3 receptors on colonic transit was investigated in unanesthetized rats. The colonic transit was accelerated by 5-HT (10 mg/kg, s.c.), 2-methyl-5-HT (30 mg/kg, s.c.), neostigmine (0.03-0.1 mg/kg, s.c.), corticotropin releasing factor (CRF; 1 microgram intracerebroventricular administration) and restraint stress (for 45 minutes). A potent and selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, azasetron (+/-)-N-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl)-6-chloro- 4-methyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzoxazine-8-carboxamide monohydrochloride ; 0.01-10 mg/kg, p.o. inhibited the 5-HT-, CRF- and stress-accelerated colonic transit in a dose-dependent manner. Ondansetron (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and granisetron (1 mg/kg, p.o) also inhibited the stress-accelerated colonic transit, but azasetron was more effective than these two drugs. Atropine methylbromide (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) and tetrodotoxin (0.01 mg/kg, s.c.) inhibited the accelerated colonic transit under stress conditions, but methysergide (10 mg/kg, s.c.), SDZ205-557 (10 mg/kg, s.c.), domperidone (30 mg/kg, p.o.), trimebutine (300 mg/kg, p.o.), did not. Azasetron (10 micrograms) administered intracerebroventricularly did not inhibit the stress-induced acceleration. These results suggest that endogenous 5-HT which is released through stress accelerates the colonic transit via the 5-HT3 receptors and finally a cholinergic mechanism. It is considered that azasetron inhibits colonic transit particularly under stress conditions through the blockade of the peripheral 5-HT3 receptors. Azasetron may improve bowel function in stress-related colonic dysfunction like irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:8653566

  13. Loop Diuretics Have Anxiolytic Effects in Rat Models of Conditioned Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, Andrew D.; Sutherland, Janice; Hochman, Daryl W.

    2012-01-01

    A number of antiepileptic medications that modulate GABAA mediated synaptic transmission are anxiolytic. The loop diuretics furosemide (Lasix) and bumetanide (Bumex) are thought to have antiepileptic properties. These drugs also modulate GABAA mediated signalling through their antagonism of cation-chloride cotransporters. Given that loop diuretics may act as antiepileptic drugs that modulate GABAergic signalling, we sought to investigate whether they also mediate anxiolytic effects. Here we report the first investigation of the anxiolytic effects of these drugs in rat models of anxiety. Furosemide and bumetanide were tested in adult rats for their anxiolytic effects using four standard anxiety models: 1) contextual fear conditioning; 2) fear-potentiated startle; 3) elevated plus maze, and 4) open-field test. Furosemide and bumetanide significantly reduced conditioned anxiety in the contextual fear-conditioning and fear-potentiated startle models. At the tested doses, neither compound had significant anxiolytic effects on unconditioned anxiety in the elevated plus maze and open-field test models. These observations suggest that loop diuretics elicit significant anxiolytic effects in rat models of conditioned anxiety. Since loop diuretics are antagonists of the NKCC1 and KCC2 cotransporters, these results implicate the cation-chloride cotransport system as possible molecular mechanism involved in anxiety, and as novel pharmacological target for the development of anxiolytics. In view of these findings, and since furosemide and bumetanide are safe and well tolerated drugs, the clinical potential of loop diuretics for treating some types of anxiety disorders deserves further investigation. PMID:22514741

  14. THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI (ACF) IN THE COLONS OF RATS BY TRIHALOMETHANES ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM) and bromoform (TBM) had been demonstrated to be colon carcinogens in male and female F344/N rats following administration by corn oil gavage. Our chronic bioassay of BDCM administered in the drinking water failed to demonstrate an enhanced colon cance...

  15. Dose-response efficacy of caraway (Carum carvi L.) on tissue lipid peroxidation and antioxidant profile in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamaleeswari, Muthaiyan; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2006-08-01

    Colon cancer is a leading cause of cancer death and its prevention is of great interest throughout the world. This study was conducted to examine the efficacy of different doses of dietary caraway (Carum carvi L.) on tissue lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant profile in rat colon carcinogenesis. Wistar male rats were divided into 6 groups and were fed a modified pellet diet for the whole of 30 weeks. To induce colon cancer, rats were given a weekly subcutaneous injection of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) at a dose of 20 mg kg(-1) (based on body weight) for the first 15 weeks. Caraway was supplemented every day orally at doses of 30, 60 and 90 mg kg(-1) for different groups of rats for the total period of 30 weeks. All rats were sacrificed at the end of 30 weeks, the colons were examined visually for masses and were subsequently evaluated histologically. The results showed diminished levels of intestinal, colonic and caecal LPO products, such as conjugated dienes (CD), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and also the antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione reductase (GR) in DMH treated rats, which were significantly reversed (P<0.05) on caraway supplementation. Moreover, enhanced activity of intestinal, colonic and caecal glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and colonic ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol levels were observed in carcinogen-treated rats, which were significantly (P<0.05) reduced on caraway supplementation. Thus, our study showed that caraway supplementation at a dose of 60 mg kg(-1) had a modulatory role on tissue LPO, antioxidant profile and prevented DMH-induced histopathological lesions in colon cancer rats.

  16. Lysophosphatidic acids induce contraction of rat isolated colon by two different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tokumura, A; Yube, N; Fujimoto, H; Tsukatani, H

    1991-11-01

    Lysophosphatidic acids (1-linoleoyl-, 1-linolenoyl, 1-arachidonoyl- and 1-O-hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate) induced rapid contraction of rat isolated colon which was dependent on external Ca2+, 1-linolenoyl-lysophosphatidic acid having the greatest effect. The contraction induced by 1-linolenoyl-lysophosphatidic acid was reduced considerably by nifedipine and verapamil, but not by atropine or indomethacin. Phosphatidic acids with two short-chain acyl groups induced a small, atropine-sensitive contraction at 100 microM, but phosphatidic acids with two long-chain acyl groups were inactive. These results suggest that unlike phosphatidic acids, lysophosphatidic acids act directly on extracellular sites of the plasma membrane of smooth muscle cells in rat colon, mainly through activation of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels.

  17. Diverting colostomy induces mucosal and muscular atrophy in rat distal colon.

    PubMed Central

    Kissmeyer-Nielsen, P; Christensen, H; Laurberg, S

    1994-01-01

    The progress of adaptive changes in the left colon after diverting colostomy was studied in rats using stereological techniques. Standardised segments of left colon proximal and distal to the colostomy was examined after 0, 1, 2, 4, or 12 weeks. In excluded colon the mucosal weight was reduced by 37% (p < 0.01) and the luminal surface area by 47% (p < 0.01) after four weeks and reached a steady state at this point of time, as no further reduction was seen from 4 to 12 weeks. The number of proliferating crypt cells was determined immunohistochemically after in vivo labelling with bromodeoxyuridine and was compared with the total number of colonocytes. Total bowel rest leads to a reduction in the number of proliferating epithelial cells and not to a reduced average life span. The weight of the muscularis propria decreased by 32% after four weeks (p < 0.01) and by 48% after 12 weeks (p < 0.001), whereas the weight of the submucosa was unchanged. No adaptive changes were found in segments proximal to the colostomy. These results show that the wall composition of defunctioned colon in rats is radically changed resulting from a mucosal and muscular atrophy, and from a reduction in luminal surface area. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7959237

  18. Huqi San-Evoked Rat Colonic Anion Secretion through Increasing CFTR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaowei; Shi, Zhengming; Wang, Wen; Yu, Xiaotong; Feng, Ping; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xuejiang; Xu, Jingdong

    2015-01-01

    Huqi San (HQS) is a Chinese herbal preparation of eight medicinal herbs that promote diuresis, detoxification, blood circulation, and cholestasis. Defects in transporter expression and function can cause cholestasis and jaundice. However, the mechanism of the cholestasis underlying HQS effects, especially on the gastrointestinal tract ion secretion, has not been elucidated. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to study the expression and localization of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and α-ENaC in rat alimentary tract, and then the effect of HQS on the ion transport in rat distal colon mucosa was investigated using the short-circuit current (ISC) technique. The results showed that pretreatment with HQS significantly enhanced mRNA transcripts and protein content of CFTR in liver and distal colon but not α-ENaC in alimentary organs. HQS increases ISC and decreases the transepithelial resistance. Pretreatment with epithelial Na+ channel blocker did not affect the ISC responses elicited by HQS, but removal of extracellular Cl− or pretreatment with Cl− channel or Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter blocker inhibited HQS-elicited ISC responses. These findings demonstrated that HQS, RA, and RP can stimulate Cl− secretion in the distal colon by increasing the mRNA transcripts and protein content of CFTR in liver and distal colon. PMID:26290673

  19. Effects of pinaverium bromide and verapamil on the motility of the rat isolated colon.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, A.; Drack, E.; Halter, F.; Scheurer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Pinaverium bromide was 30 times less potent than verapamil in inhibiting intraluminal pressure responses of in vitro rat colonic segments to barium chloride, acetylcholine, FK 33-824 or field stimulation. The inhibitory effects of both verapamil and pinaverium bromide on the pressure responses to field stimulation were antagonized similarly by exogenous calcium administration. These results support the concept that pinaverium bromide acts on calcium channels in the smooth muscle cell membrane. PMID:4052731

  20. Effects of pinaverium bromide and verapamil on the motility of the rat isolated colon.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, A; Drack, E; Halter, F; Scheurer, U

    1985-09-01

    Pinaverium bromide was 30 times less potent than verapamil in inhibiting intraluminal pressure responses of in vitro rat colonic segments to barium chloride, acetylcholine, FK 33-824 or field stimulation. The inhibitory effects of both verapamil and pinaverium bromide on the pressure responses to field stimulation were antagonized similarly by exogenous calcium administration. These results support the concept that pinaverium bromide acts on calcium channels in the smooth muscle cell membrane. PMID:4052731

  1. Nucleoside-nucleotide free diet protects rat colonic mucosa from damage induced by trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Adjei, A A; Morioka, T; Ameho, C K; Yamauchi, K; Kulkarni, A D; Al-Mansouri, H M; Kawajiri, A; Yamamoto, S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Growing evidence suggests that intestinal recovery from injury induced by radiation, endotoxin, and protein deficiency is improved by the ingestion of nucleosides and nucleotides. AIM: This study examined the effect of dietary nucleosides and nucleotides supplementation on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid induced colonic damage in experimental colitis. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into two groups and fed nucleic acid free 20% casein diet (control) or this diet supplemented with 0.5% nucleoside-nucleotide mixture for four weeks. On the second week, colonic inflammation was induced in rats by intracolonic administration of 0.25 ml of 50% ethanol containing 25 mg of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid. Additionally, other sets of rats were treated with 0.25 ml of 50% ethanol, 25 mg of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in 0.25 ml saline, or 0.25 ml of 0.9% saline. RESULTS: After two weeks, colon weight, macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, were significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group compared with the non-supplemented control groups. The same variables seen in the trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-ethanol group fed nucleoside-nucleotide free diet were greater (p < 0.05) than in the rest of the groups fed nucleoside-nucleotide free diet and treated with ethanol, trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid in saline, or saline. Histologically, segmental ulceration and inflammation associated with significantly increased infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes, fibroblasts were observed in the supplemented group compared with the controls. In the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group the epithelial damage, mucosal erosion, oedema, and coagulative necrosis of the muscularis propria was more extensive in comparison to the non-supplemented control groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that dietary nucleosides and nucleotides may aggravate colonic damage and inflammation in chemically

  2. Sensory and inflammatory colonic changes induced by vincristine in distinct rat models of colitis.

    PubMed

    Viana-Cardoso, K V; Silva, M T B; Peixoto-Junior, A A; Marinho, L S; Matias, N S; Soares, P M G; Santos, A A; Brito, G A C; Rola, F H; Gondim, F de A A

    2015-04-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies show that gastrointestinal (GI) inflammation can evoke sensory changes occasionally far from the original inflammatory site. Animal models of colitis with either trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) or mustard oil (MO) produce distinct patterns of somatic and visceral sensory changes. We evaluated the effects of four doses of i.v. vincristine 150 μg kg(-1) (total of 600 μg kg(-1) ) treatment on the somatic (thermal nociceptive threshold) and colonic (morphological) changes induced by TNBS or MO in rats. TNBS and MO groups were further submitted to vincristine or saline pretreatments. TNBS induced somatic hypersensitivity, while MO induced somatic hyposensitivity (P < 0.05) when compared to the saline and ethanol control groups. Vincristine per se induced somatic hypersensitivity (P < 0.05). This effect was enhanced by TNBS and reversed by MO treatments. Although vincristine increased the colitis area (colonic weight length(-1) ratio) and the Morris' score in TNBS-treated rats, it did not alter the colitis area and even lowered the Morris' score in MO-treated rats. Compared to the saline (control) group, vincristine did not alter the colonic microscopic pattern. However, such lesions scores are higher (P < 0.05) in colitis groups induced by TNBS and MO, pretreated or not with vincristine. In conclusion, the somatic changes induced by different models of experimental colitis are diverse and modulated differently by vincristine.

  3. Novel models for bacterial colonization and infection of full-thickness wounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Asada, Mayumi; Nakagami, Gojiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Nagase, Takashi; Akase, Tomoko; Huang, Lijuan; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Sanada, Hiromi

    2012-01-01

    An animal model is needed to study the pathophysiology of wound infections; however, an animal model that is reproducible and clinically relevant has not previously been available. In addition, an animal model of wound colonization generated in a manner similar to the wound infection model would be useful. Here, we describe new animal models of the wound infection continuum for the characterization of essential host-pathogen relationships. We determined the conditions needed to establish rat models of stable wound colonization and infection, without the use of disturbing factors (e.g., foreign bodies or induction of diabetes mellitus). We found that the age of the rats, bacterial inoculum size, and wound location were important elements in generating reproducible, obvious, spreading wound infections. We inoculated approximately 6-month-old rats with 2.06 × 10(9) or 4.12 × 10(9) colony-forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to generate the wound colonization and wound infection models, respectively. Wounds were made 2 cm cranial to the greater trochanter. These clinically relevant and highly reproducible animal models can be used to investigate the mechanisms of wound infection and monitor the effect of therapeutic agents in vivo.

  4. Protective effect ofAgave salmiana fructans in azoxymethane- induced colon cancer in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Dávila-Céspedes, Antonio; Juárez-Flores, Bertha I; Pinos-Rodríguezc, Juan M; Aguirre-Riverab, Juan R; Oros-Ovalled, A Cuahutemoc; Loyola-Martínez, E D; Andrade-Zaldívar, Hera

    2014-10-01

    Colon cancer is a world concerning disease; it shows a high mortality rate and may be related to eating habits. Studies using inulin-like fructans, which are produced as energy supplies by several plants, have demonstrated a chemo-protective effect of these fructans in colon cancer. However, agavins a structurally different type of fructans from the Agave genus with demonstrated prebiotic effects, have been poorly studied for their possible protective effects in cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect ofAgave fructan-rich diets in colon cancer progress using a rat model and "Agave mezcalero potosino" A. salmiana Otto ex Salm Dick, which is widely distributed in Mexico. Results showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) in early lesions of colon cancer (aberrant crypt foci) compared with the control group. These data suggest that fructans from A. salmiana may contribute to a reduction in the risk of colon cancer as well as inulin-like compounds. PMID:25522547

  5. Tomato and garlic can modulate azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, A; Ghosh, S; Das, S

    2003-06-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and garlic (Allium cepa) are important constituents of the human diet. Compounds like diallyl sulfides, diallyl disulfides and quercetin, which are active components of garlic, have known anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic activities. Similarly, active components in tomato, such as kaempferol and chlorogenic acid, have antimutagenic activities and lycopene is the most active oxygen quencher with potential chemopreventive activities. In view of this, an endeavour was made to evaluate the anticarcinogenic effect, if any, of tomato and garlic consumption individually and in combination on azoxymethane-induced colonic precancerous lesion, the aberrant crypt foci in animal model. Sprague-Dawley rats (4-5 weeks old) were injected with azoxymethane (15 mg/kg b.w.) and orally administered with 2% (w/v) of tomato, garlic and a combination of both. After 12 weeks of first azoxymethane injection, colons were assessed for aberrant crypt foci and compared with the carcinogen control group. Lipid peroxidation level and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity were assessed in liver as well as in colon. Furthermore, in situ cell proliferation and apoptosis were estimated using the Brdu incorporation method and TUNEL method respectively. It was observed that aberrant crypt foci were reduced in all treated groups (by 32.11% in garlic, by 76.14% in tomato and by 55.96% in the combination group). Among treated groups, GST activity was found to be induced in both liver and colon, whereas considerable reduction in lipid peroxidation level was observed in liver as well as in colon with respect to the carcinogen control group. Significant reduction in Brdu labelling index and increase in apoptotic index in colon was noted in the treated groups. These results suggest that tomato and garlic suspensions have a protective effect on colon carcinogenesis, which is mediated by modulation of different biological pathways during carcinogenesis. PMID:12771557

  6. Mechanisms involved in carbachol-induced Ca2+ sensitization of contractile elements in rat proximal and distal colon

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Tadayoshi; Kushida, Masahiko; Hirayama, Nobue; Kitayama, Muneyoshi; Fujita, Akikazu; Hata, Fumiaki

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in Ca2+ sensitization of contractile elements induced by the activation of muscarinic receptors in membrane-permeabilized preparations of the rat proximal and distal colon were studied. In α-toxin-permeabilized preparations from the rat proximal and distal colon, Ca2+ induced a rapid phasic and subsequent tonic component. After Ca2+-induced contraction reached a plateau, guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP) and carbachol (CCh) in the presence of GTP further contracted preparations of both the proximal and distal colon (Ca2+ sensitization). Y-27632, a rho-kinase inhibitor, inhibited GTP plus CCh-induced Ca2+ sensitization more significantly in the proximal colon than in the distal colon. Y-27632 at 10 μM had no effect on Ca2+-induced contraction or slightly inhibited phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate-induced Ca2+ sensitization in either proximal or distal colon. Chelerythrine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, inhibited GTP plus CCh-induced Ca2+ sensitization in the distal colon, but not in the proximal colon. The component of Ca2+ sensitization that persisted after the chelerythrine treatment was completely inhibited by Y-27632. In β-escin-permeabilized preparations of the proximal colon, C3 exoenzyme completely inhibited GTP plus CCh-induced Ca2+ sensitization, but PKC(19–31) did not. In the distal colon, C3 exoenzyme abolished GTP-induced Ca2+ sensitization. It inhibited CCh-induced sensitization by 50 % and the remaining component was inhibited by PKC(19–31). These results suggest that both protein kinase C and rho pathways in parallel mediate the Ca2+ sensitization coupled to activation of muscarinic receptors in the rat distal colon, whereas the rho pathway alone mediates this action in the proximal colon. PMID:15159278

  7. Effect of irradiation on healing of newly made colonic anastomoses in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Biert, J.; Wobbes, T.; Hendriks, T.; Hoogenhout, J. )

    1993-12-01

    Short-term effects of radiotherapy on the healing process of newly made colonic anastomoses are investigated by measuring the anastomotic strength in a rat model. Four groups of Wistar rats were used. In all groups, rats underwent a 1 cm sigmoid resection with end-to-end anastomosis. Group I served as a control group. In group II the anastomosis was irradiated after closure of the abdominal wall with a single dose of 20 Gy of 250 kV [times] rays. Group III was irradiated with a single dose of 20 Gy while the abdominal wall was not closed, and the surrounding tissues were carefully covered by a lead plate, simulating intra-operative radiotherapy. Group IV was treated as group III, but a larger dose of 25 Gy was applied. Animals were sacrificed 3 or 7 days after the operation. General condition of the rats was determined by observation, weight loss, serum protein and albumin at sacrifice. Anastomotic healing was evaluated by inspection, bursting pressure, hydroxyproline and protein contents of the anastomotic segment. Direct postoperative externally irradiated rats (group II) showed a marked weight loss, hypoproteinaemia and hypo-albuminaemia because of involvement of small bowel in the irradiated volume. With respect to anastomotic healing there were no significant differences between control and irradiated groups. These data suggest that the application of a single dose of irradiation (20 and 25 Gy) on colonic anastomoses given in a direct postoperative or intraoperative model has no measurable side effect on the early healing of newly made colonic anastomoses. Direct postoperative external irradiation results in unwanted side effects in the adjacent bowel. 33 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Characterization of apical potassium channels induced in rat distal colon during potassium adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, I; Warhurst, G; Jones, M N; Sandle, G I

    1997-01-01

    1. Chronic dietary K+ loading stimulates an active K+ secretory process in rat distal colon, which involves an increase in the macroscopic apical K+ conductance of surface epithelial cells. In the present study, the abundance and characteristics of K+ channels constituting this enhanced apical K+ conductance were evaluated using patch clamp recording techniques. 2. In isolated non-polarized surface cells, K+ channels were seen in 9 of 90 (10%) cell-attached patches in cells from control animals, and in 247 of 437 (57%) cell-attached patches in cells from K(+)-loaded animals, with a significant (P < 0.001) shift in distribution density. Similarly, recordings from cell-attached patches of the apical membrane of surface cells surrounding the openings of distal colonic crypts revealed identical K+ channels in 1 of 11 (9%) patches in control animals, and in 9 of 13 (69%) patches in K(+)-loaded animals. 3. In isolated surface cells and surface cells in situ, K+ channels had mean slope conductances of 209 +/- 6 and 233 +/- 14 pS, respectively, when inside-out patches were bathed symmetrically in K2SO4 solution. The channels were sensitive to 'cytosolic' Ca2+ concentration, were voltage sensitive at 'cytosolic' Ca2+ concentrations encountered in colonic epithelial cells, and were inhibited by 1 mM quinidine, 20 mM TEA or 5 mM Ba2+ ions. 4. The data show that dietary K+ loading increases the abundance of Ca(2+)- and voltage-sensitive large-conductance K+ channels in the apical membrane of surface cells in rat distal colon. These channels constitute the enhanced macroscopic apical K+ conductance previously identified in these cells, and are likely to play a critical role in the active K+ secretory process that typifies this model of colonic K+ adaptation. PMID:9218214

  9. Mediators of nonadrenergic, noncholinergic inhibition in the proximal, middle and distal regions of rat colon.

    PubMed Central

    Suthamnatpong, N.; Hata, F.; Kanada, A.; Takeuchi, T.; Yagasaki, O.

    1993-01-01

    1. The mediators of non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxation of the longitudinal muscle of rat proximal, middle and distal colon were examined in vitro. 2. Electrical transmural stimulation (TMS) of proximal, middle and distal segments of rat colon induced NANC relaxations which were inhibited by tetrodotoxin (1 microM), but not by atropine (1 microM) or guanethidine (4 microM). 3. In the proximal colon, L-nitro-arginine (N5-nitroamidino-L-2,5-diaminopentanoic acid) inhibited the TMS-induced NANC relaxation and L-arginine (1 mM) reversed this inhibition. Nitric oxide (0.3-10 microM) induced relaxation of the proximal segment. 4. NANC relaxation of the proximal segments was still evident after desensitization to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). A VIP antagonist (VIP 10-28, 10 microM) had no effect on the TMS-induced NANC relaxation, which was also resistant to alpha-chymotrypsin (2 units ml-1) and a substance P antagonist ([D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9]substance P, 1 microM). 5. In the middle colon, L-nitro-arginine did not inhibit the TMS-induced NANC relaxation in 6 of 9 preparations tested and partially inhibited the relaxation in the other 3 preparations. L-Arginine did not reverse the partial inhibition. 6. Complete desensitization to VIP was not achieved in the middle colon. The VIP antagonist had no effect on the TMS-induced NANC relaxation. After alpha-chymotrypsin treatment of the segment, desensitization of the segments to substance P, or in the presence of the substance P antagonist, the TMS-induced NANC relaxation was augmented.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7680592

  10. Neurotensin Changes Propulsive Activity into a Segmental Motor Pattern in the Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongfei; Chen, Ji-Hong; Yang, Zixian; Huang, Min; Yu, Yuanjie; Tan, Shiyun; Luo, Hesheng; Huizinga, Jan D

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Neurotensin is a gut-brain peptide with both inhibitory and excitatory actions on the colonic musculature; our objective was to understand the implications of this for motor patterns occurring in the intact colon of the rat. Methods The effects of neurotensin with concentrations ranging from 0.1–100 nM were studied in the intact rat colon in vitro, by investigating spatio-temporal maps created from video recordings of colonic motility before and after neurotensin. Results Low concentration of neurotensin (0.1–1 nM) inhibited propagating long distance contractions and rhythmic propagating motor complexes; in its place a slow propagating rhythmic segmental motor pattern developed. The neurotensin receptor 1 antagonist SR-48692 prevented the development of the segmental motor pattern. Higher concentrations of neurotensin (10 nM and 100 nM) were capable of restoring long distance contraction activity and inhibiting the segmental activity. The slow propagating segmental contraction showed a rhythmic contraction—relaxation cycle at the slow wave frequency originating from the interstitial cells of Cajal associated with the myenteric plexus pacemaker. High concentrations given without prior additions of low concentrations did not evoke the segmental motor pattern. These actions occurred when neurotensin was given in the bath solution or intraluminally. The segmental motor pattern evoked by neurotensin was inhibited by the neural conduction blocker lidocaine. Conclusions Neurotensin (0.1–1 nM) inhibits the dominant propulsive motor patterns of the colon and a distinct motor pattern of rhythmic slow propagating segmental contractions develops. This motor pattern has the hallmarks of haustral boundary contractions. PMID:26882114

  11. Contribution of peripheral opioid receptors to the trimebutine-induced contractions of the proximal colon in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Yamada, K; Ikezawa, K; Tamaki, H

    1989-02-01

    In this study we investigated the involvement of opioid receptors in the contractile response to trimebutine using with the proximal colon of anesthetized rats. Trimebutine (3 mg/kg i.v.) enhanced spontaneous contractions of the proximal colon in anesthetized rats. The contractile response was partially inhibited by intravenous administration of an opioid antagonist, naloxone at 1 approximately 30 micrograms/kg, but was hardly depressed by intracisternal administration of naloxone (30 micrograms/kg). Morphine (30 micrograms/kg i.v.) evoked colonic contractions which were abolished by intravenous naloxone (30 micrograms/kg). These results suggest that the colonic contractions evoked by trimebutine in anesthetized rats are, in part, mediated by peripheral opioid receptors. PMID:2560095

  12. Impaired intestinal sodium and chloride transport in the blind loop syndrome of the rat.

    PubMed

    Schulzke, J D; Fromm, M; Menge, H; Riecken, E O

    1987-03-01

    Self-filling blind loops of rat jejunum were used as a model for the blind loop syndrome in humans. Electrical resistance, short circuit current, and unidirectional sodium and chloride fluxes were measured using the Ussing technique. Whereas net fluxes for sodium and chloride did not differ significantly from zero in the blind loop or in the control, unidirectional fluxes of either direction were decreased and electrical resistance was increased, indicating an increase in the tightness of the intestinal wall. Measurements of alternating current impedance and micropuncture experiments revealed that this was due to an increase in epithelial resistance from 9 +/- 1 omega X cm2 (n = 15, results of both methods) to 27 +/- 4 omega X cm2 (n = 15) and in subepithelial resistance from 40 +/- 2 omega X cm2 (n = 15) to 76 +/- 7 omega X cm2 (n = 15). As the ratio of epithelial to subepithelial resistance was similar in the blind loop and in the control, lower transport rates in the blind loop are indicative of impaired epithelial transport function. Subsequently, two different transport systems were characterized. First, the 3-o-methyl-glucose-induced, phlorizin-reversible increase in short circuit current, representing glucose-coupled sodium absorption, showed a 77% decrease in maximum velocity in the blind loop and no change in Km. Second, the chloride-induced, bumetanide-reversible increase in short circuit current in tissues stimulated simultaneously by prostaglandin E1 and theophylline, representing rheogenic chloride secretion, also showed a decrease in maximum velocity (of 83%) and no change in Km. A morphometric analysis revealed that the crypt surface area increased by 100% in the blind loop, whereas the villous surface area was not significantly different between blind loops and controls. We conclude that the jejunal self-filling blind loop is characterized by impaired active ion transport processes and an increase in epithelial and subepithelial resistance.

  13. In Vivo Evaluation of 5-ASA Colon-Specific Tablets Using Experimental-Induced Colitis Rat Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Sawarkar, Sujata P; Deshpande, S G; Bajaj, A N; Nikam, V S

    2015-12-01

    Colonic drug delivery is intended not only for local treatment in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but also for systemic delivery of therapeutics. Intestinal myeloperoxidase (MPO) determination could be used to estimate the average level of inflammation in colon as well as to determine the efficacy of drugs to be used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases or study the specificity of dosage forms to be used for colonic targeting of anti-inflammatory drugs. Colonic prodrug sulfasalazine (SASP) gets metabolized to give 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the active portion of SASP. However, when given orally, 5-ASA is absorbed in upper part of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and not made available in colon. In the present study, colon-targeted delivery of 5-ASA was achieved by formulating tablets with two natural polymers namely guar gum and pectin using compression coating method. Colonic specificity of 5-ASA tablets (prepared using guar gum and pectin as polymers) was evaluated in vitro using simulated fluids mimicking in vivo environment as well as in vivo method using chemically (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and acetic acid)-induced colitis rat model. Both colon-specific formulations of 5-ASA (guar gum and pectin) were observed to be more effective in reducing inflammation in chemically induced colitis rat models when compared to colon-specific prodrug sulfasalazine as well as conventional 5-ASA administered orally. PMID:26017284

  14. In Vivo Evaluation of 5-ASA Colon-Specific Tablets Using Experimental-Induced Colitis Rat Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Sawarkar, Sujata P; Deshpande, S G; Bajaj, A N; Nikam, V S

    2015-12-01

    Colonic drug delivery is intended not only for local treatment in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but also for systemic delivery of therapeutics. Intestinal myeloperoxidase (MPO) determination could be used to estimate the average level of inflammation in colon as well as to determine the efficacy of drugs to be used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases or study the specificity of dosage forms to be used for colonic targeting of anti-inflammatory drugs. Colonic prodrug sulfasalazine (SASP) gets metabolized to give 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), which is the active portion of SASP. However, when given orally, 5-ASA is absorbed in upper part of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and not made available in colon. In the present study, colon-targeted delivery of 5-ASA was achieved by formulating tablets with two natural polymers namely guar gum and pectin using compression coating method. Colonic specificity of 5-ASA tablets (prepared using guar gum and pectin as polymers) was evaluated in vitro using simulated fluids mimicking in vivo environment as well as in vivo method using chemically (2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and acetic acid)-induced colitis rat model. Both colon-specific formulations of 5-ASA (guar gum and pectin) were observed to be more effective in reducing inflammation in chemically induced colitis rat models when compared to colon-specific prodrug sulfasalazine as well as conventional 5-ASA administered orally.

  15. Colonic Hypersensitivity and Sensitization of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels in Primary Sensory Neurons in Rats with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ji; Song, Zhen-Yuan; Zhang, Hong-Hong; Qin, Xin; Hu, Shufen; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Patients with long-standing diabetes often demonstrate intestinal dysfunction and abdominal pain. However, the pathophysiology of abdominal pain in diabetic patients remains elusive. The purpose of study was to determine roles of voltage-gated sodium channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in colonic hypersensitivity of rats with diabetes. Methods Diabetic models were induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg) in adult female rats, while the control rats received citrate buffer only. Behavioral responses to colorectal distention were used to determine colonic sensitivity in rats. Colon projection DRG neurons labeled with DiI were acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel currents by whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Western blot analysis was employed to measure the expression of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 of colon DRGs. Results STZ injection produced a significantly lower distention threshold than control rats in responding to colorectal distention. STZ injection also depolarized the resting membrane potentials, hyperpolarized action potential threshold, decreased rheobase and increased frequency of action potentials evoked by 2 and 3 times rheobase and ramp current stimulation. Furthermore, STZ injection enhanced neuronal sodium current densities of DRG neurons innervating the colon. STZ injection also led to a significant upregulation of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 expression in colon DRGs compared with age and sex-matched control rats. Conclusions Our results suggest that enhanced neuronal excitability following STZ injection, which may be mediated by upregulation of NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 expression in DRGs, may play an important role in colonic hypersensitivity in rats with diabetes. PMID:26459453

  16. Butyrate delivered by butyrylated starch increases distal colonic epithelial apoptosis in carcinogen-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Julie M; Young, Graeme P; Topping, David L; Bird, Anthony R; Cobiac, Lynne; Scherer, Benjamin L; Winkler, Jessica G; Lockett, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    Animal studies show that increasing large bowel butyrate concentration through ingestion of butyrylated or resistant starches opposes carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis, which is consistent with population data linking greater fiber consumption with lowered colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Butyrate has been shown to regulate the apoptotic response to DNA damage. This study examined the impact of increasing large bowel butyrate concentration by dietary butyrylated starch on the colonic epithelium of rats treated with the genotoxic carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). Four groups of 10 male rats were fed AIN-93G based-diets containing either low amylose maize starch (LAMS), LAMS with 3% tributyrin, 10% high amylose maize starch (HAMS) or 10% butyrylated HAMS (HAMSB). HAMS and HAMSB starches were cooked by heating in water. After 4 weeks, rats were injected once with AOM and killed 6 h later. Rates of apoptosis and proliferation were measured in colonic epithelium. Short-chain fatty acid concentrations in large bowel digesta and hepatic portal venous plasma were higher in HAMSB than all other groups. Apoptotic rates in the distal colon were increased by HAMSB and correlated with luminal butyrate concentrations but cellular proliferation rates were unaffected by diet. The increase in apoptosis was most marked in the base and proliferative zone of the crypt. Regulation of luminal butyrate using HAMSB increases the rates of apoptotic deletion of DNA-damaged colonocytes. We propose this pro-apoptotic function of butyrate plays a major role reducing tumour formation in the AOM-treated rat and that these data support a potential protective role of butyrate in CRC.

  17. Bioavailability of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) polyphenols in rats: impact of colonic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Felgines, Catherine; Fraisse, Didier; Besson, Catherine; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Texier, Odile

    2014-05-28

    Lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) infusion, a widely consumed herbal tea, contains significant amounts of polyphenols such as flavone diglucuronides and phenylpropanoid glycosides (mainly verbascoside). We have recently shown that lemon verbena infusion offers beneficial effects against dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colonic inflammation in rats. The present study aimed to evaluate the bioavailability and intestinal absorption of polyphenols derived from lemon verbena infusion in both healthy and colitic rats. For this purpose, lemon verbena infusion was given to rats ad libitum for 14 d, and then 4 % DSS was added to the infusion for 7 d. Before and after DSS administration, 24 h urinary excretion of polyphenols was determined. Flavones were excreted in the urine as conjugated aglycones, and their excretion was not significantly altered by colonic inflammation. Only trace amounts of verbascoside were excreted in the urine, but various metabolites (hydroxycinnamic acids) were detected. The urinary excretion of hydroxycinnamic acids, particularly that of caffeic acid, increased after DSS administration (P< 0·05). Only flavone aglycones (luteolin and diosmetin) were excreted in the faeces in small proportions (3·2 % of ingested flavones). Intestinal absorption of lemon verbena polyphenols was examined using an in situ intestinal perfusion model. Intestinal absorption of verbascoside and flavone diglucuronides did not significantly differ between the healthy and colitic rats. Collectively, these results show that intestinal absorption and urinary excretion of lemon verbena flavone diglucuronides were not altered by colonic inflammation, but that urinary excretion of hydroxycinnamic acids derived from verbascoside was affected in a colitic situation.

  18. Bioavailability of lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) polyphenols in rats: impact of colonic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Felgines, Catherine; Fraisse, Didier; Besson, Catherine; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Texier, Odile

    2014-05-28

    Lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) infusion, a widely consumed herbal tea, contains significant amounts of polyphenols such as flavone diglucuronides and phenylpropanoid glycosides (mainly verbascoside). We have recently shown that lemon verbena infusion offers beneficial effects against dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colonic inflammation in rats. The present study aimed to evaluate the bioavailability and intestinal absorption of polyphenols derived from lemon verbena infusion in both healthy and colitic rats. For this purpose, lemon verbena infusion was given to rats ad libitum for 14 d, and then 4 % DSS was added to the infusion for 7 d. Before and after DSS administration, 24 h urinary excretion of polyphenols was determined. Flavones were excreted in the urine as conjugated aglycones, and their excretion was not significantly altered by colonic inflammation. Only trace amounts of verbascoside were excreted in the urine, but various metabolites (hydroxycinnamic acids) were detected. The urinary excretion of hydroxycinnamic acids, particularly that of caffeic acid, increased after DSS administration (P< 0·05). Only flavone aglycones (luteolin and diosmetin) were excreted in the faeces in small proportions (3·2 % of ingested flavones). Intestinal absorption of lemon verbena polyphenols was examined using an in situ intestinal perfusion model. Intestinal absorption of verbascoside and flavone diglucuronides did not significantly differ between the healthy and colitic rats. Collectively, these results show that intestinal absorption and urinary excretion of lemon verbena flavone diglucuronides were not altered by colonic inflammation, but that urinary excretion of hydroxycinnamic acids derived from verbascoside was affected in a colitic situation. PMID:24513110

  19. Fibrinogen-thrombin collagen patch reinforcement of high-risk colonic anastomoses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Grau, Juan Manuel; Bernardos García, Carlos; Cepeda Franco, Carmen; Mendez García, Cristina; García Ruiz, Salud; Docobo Durantez, Fernando; Morales-Conde, Salvador; Padillo Ruiz, Javier

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effectiveness of human fibrinogen-thrombin collagen patch (TachoSil®) in the reinforcement of high-risk colon anastomoses. METHODS A quasi-experimental study was conducted in Wistar rats (n = 56) that all underwent high-risk anastomoses (anastomosis with only two sutures) after colectomies. The rats were divided into two randomized groups: Control group (24 rats) and treatment group (24 rats). In the treatment group, high-risk anastomosis was reinforced with TachoSil® (a piece of TachoSil® was applied over this high-risk anastomosis, covering the gap). Leak incidence, overall survival, intra-abdominal adhesions, and histologic healing of anastomoses were analyzed. Survivors were divided into two subgroups and euthanized at 15 and 30 d after intervention in order to analyze the adhesions and histologic changes. RESULTS Overall survival was 71.4% and 57.14% in the TachoSil® group and control group, respectively (P = 0.29); four rats died from other causes and six rats in the treatment group and 10 in the control group experienced colonic leakage (P > 0.05). The intra-abdominal adhesion score was similar in both groups, with no differences between subgroups. We found non-significant differences in the healing process according to the histologic score used in both groups (P = 0.066). CONCLUSION In our study, the use of TachoSil® was associated with a non-statistically significant reduction in the rate of leakage in high-risk anastomoses. TachoSil® has been shown to be a safe product because it does not affect the histologic healing process or increase intra-abdominal adhesions. PMID:27721926

  20. Effect of pinaverium bromide on stress-induced colonic smooth muscle contractility disorder in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yun; Liu, Jian-Xiang; Li, Jun-Xia; Xu, Yun-Feng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of pinaverium bromide, a L-type calcium channel blocker with selectivity for the gastrointestinal tract on contractile activity of colonic circular smooth muscle in normal or cold-restraint stressed rats and its possible mechanism. METHODS: Cold-restraint stress was conducted on rats to increase fecal pellets output. Each isolated colonic circular muscle strip was suspended in a tissue chamber containing warm oxygenated Tyrode-Ringer solution. The contractile response to ACh or KCl was measured isometrically on ink-writing recorder. Incubated muscle in different concentrations of pinaverium and the effects of pinaverium were investigated on ACh or KCl-induced contraction. Colon smooth muscle cells were cultured from rats and [Ca2+]i was measured in cell suspension using the Ca2+ fluorescent dye fura-2/AM. RESULTS: During stress, rats fecal pellet output increased 61% (P < 0.01). Stimulated with ACh or KCl, the muscle contractility was higher in stress than that in control. Pinaverium inhibited the increment of [Ca2+]i and the muscle contraction in response to ACh or KCl in a dose dependent manner. A significant inhibition of pinaverium to ACh or KCl induced [Ca2+]i increment was observed at 10-6 mol/L. The IC50 values for inhibition of ACh induced contraction for the stress and control group were 1.66 × 10-6 mol/L and 0.91 × 10-6 mol/L, respectively. The IC50 values for inhibition of KCl induced contraction for the stress and control group were 8.13 × 10-7 mol/L and 3.80 × 10-7 mol/L, respectively. CONCLUSION: Increase in [Ca2+]i of smooth muscle cells is directly related to the generation of contraction force in colon. L-type Ca2+ channels represent the main route of Ca2+ entry. Pinaverium inhibits the calcium influx through L-type channels; decreases the contractile response to many kinds of agonists and regulates the stress-induced colon hypermotility. PMID:12632518

  1. Effects of nobiletin on PhIP-induced prostate and colon carcinogenesis in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming Xi; Ogawa, Kumiko; Asamoto, Makoto; Chewonarin, Teera; Suzuki, Shugo; Tanaka, Takuji; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the effects of nobiletin (5,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxy flavone) on 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP)-induced prostate and colon carcinogenesis. PhIP was administered to 6-wk-old F344 male rats intragastrically (100 mg/kg) twice a wk for 10 wk. The animals were given 0.05% nobiletin or the basal diet for 50 wk. At the end of the experiment, serum testosterone, estrogen, and leptin did not differ between the 2 groups. The body weights of nobiletin-treated rats were significantly higher than controls (P<0.05), and feeding of nobiletin significantly reduced the relative prostate (P<0.05) and testes (P<0.05) weights as well as the Ki67 labeling index in the normal epithelium in the ventral prostate (P<0.01). The incidence and multiplicity of adenocarcinomas in nobiletin-treated ventral prostate were 50% and 36%, respectively, of controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. However, nobiletin did significantly reduce the total number of colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) compared to the control value (P<0.05). Nobiletin, therefore, may have potential for chemoprevention of early changes associated with carcinogenesis in both the prostate and colon.

  2. The probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 inhibits propagating colonic contractions in the rat isolated large intestine.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, J E; Mohan, V; Peters, J; Anderson, R C; Gopal, P K; Roy, N C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to test an in vitro motility model by investigating whether a probiotic that reduces diarrhea in humans would reduce motility in the rat colon in vitro. The probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) the active ingredient in Mutaflor® was used as an example probiotic because it is effective for treating infectious diarrheal diseases. The effect of EcN on motility was compared in two colonic preparations. In distal colon segments EcN extract decreased the tension of spontaneous contractions by 74% and frequency by 46% compared with pre-treatment controls. In the whole large intestine the number of synchronized spontaneous propagating contractions decreased by 86% when EcN extract was applied externally and 69% when applied via the lumen compared with pre-treatment. From the inhibition produced by EcN extract in the distal colon segment a myogenic action was inferred and in the whole large intestine neural involvement was implicated. Both are consistent with its anti-diarrheal effect in humans. PMID:25415771

  3. Azithromycin and erythromycin ameliorate the extent of colonic damage induced by acetic acid in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mahgoub, Afaf . E-mail: afaf_mahgoub@yahoo.com; El-Medany, Azza; Mustafa, Ali; Arafah, Maha; Moursi, Mahmoud

    2005-05-15

    Ulcerative colitis is a common inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) of unknown etiology. Recent studies have revealed the role of some microorganisms in the initiation and perpetuation of IBD. The role of antibiotics in the possible modulation of colon inflammation is still uncertain. In this study, we evaluated the effects of two macrolides, namely azithromycin and erythromycin, at different doses on the extent and severity of ulcerative colitis caused by intracolonic administration of 3% acetic acid in rats. The lesions and the inflammatory response were assessed by histology and measurement of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha}) in colonic tissues. Inflammation following acetic acid instillation was characterized by oedema, diffuse inflammatory cell infiltration and necrosis. Increase in MPO, NOS and TNF{alpha} was detected in the colonic tissues. Administration of either azithromycin or erythromycin at different dosage (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg orally, daily for 5 consecutive days) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the colonic damage, MPO and NOS activities as well as TNF{alpha} level. This reduction was highly significant with azithromycin when given at a dose of 40 mg/kg. It is concluded that azithromycin and erythromycin may have a beneficial therapeutic role in ulcerative colitis.

  4. Quantitative contribution of factors regulating rat colonic crypt epithelium: role of parenteral and enteral feeding, caloric intake, dietary cellulose level and the colon carcinogen DMH.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I L; Ord, V A; Hunter, K E; Van Nguyen, M; Padilla, G M; Heitman, D W

    1990-05-01

    To elucidate the role and quantitative contribution of several exogenous factors which may regulate colon crypt mitotic activity, proliferative zone height (PZH) and crypt height, groups of rats were subjected to various feeding regimens both with and without treatment with the colon carcinogen, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The rats were divided into two major groups and one group was given eight weekly injections of DMH base at 9.5 mg kg-1 body weight. Throughout this period and for two additional weeks the rats were isocalorically fed either a defined nutritionally complete diet with different levels of dietary cellulose or they were parenterally (i.v.) fed a nutritionally complete liquid formula with different caloric levels. The rats were then injected with colchicine 3 h prior to sacrifice to arrest and to collect dividing cells at metaphase. The results of multiple regression analysis of all data were interpreted to indicate that parenteral feeding caused dramatic suppression of the colon crypt height (CH) and of the number of metaphase figures per crypt (MC). Increased cellulose intake stimulated CH but suppressed MC. The CH was also stimulated by DMH. CH was positively correlated to PZH and MC. The MC was suppressed by cellulose intake and negatively correlated to PZH but was positively correlated to CH. The PZH was positively correlated to CH. These findings were related to the role of luminal food, functional workload, kcal intake and treatment with DMH on the measured colon crypt parameters. A quantitative assessment of factors that regulate the measured colonic crypt parameters was accomplished.

  5. Carcinogen and dietary lipid regulate ras expression and localization in rat colon without affecting farnesylation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Davidson, L A; Lupton, J R; Jiang, Y H; Chapkin, R S

    1999-05-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data suggest that dietary fiber and fat are major determinants of colorectal cancer. However, the mechanisms by which these dietary constituents alter the incidence of colon cancer have not been elucidated. Evidence indicates that dominant gain-of-function mutations short-circuit protooncogenes and contribute to the pathogenesis of cancer. Therefore, we began to dissect the mechanisms whereby dietary fat and fiber, fed during the initiation, promotion and progression stages of colon tumorigenesis, regulate ras p21 localization, expression and mutation frequency. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (140) were provided with corn oil or fish oil and pectin or cellulose plus or minus the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design and killed after 34 weeks. We have previously shown adenocarcinoma incidence in these animals to be 70.3% (52/74) for corn oil + AOM and 56.1% (37/66) for fish oil + AOM (P < 0.05). Total ras expression as well as ras membrane:cytosol ratio was 4- to 6-fold higher in colon tumors than in mucosa from AOM- or saline-injected rats. Expression of ras in the mucosal membrane fraction was 13% higher for animals fed corn oil compared with fish oil feeding (P < 0.05), which is noteworthy since ras must be localized at the plasma membrane to function. The elevated ras membrane:cytosol ratio in tumors was not due to increased farnesyl protein transferase activity or prenylation state, as nearly all detectable ras was in the prenylated form. Phosphorylated p42 and p44 mitogen activated protein kinase (ERK) expression was two-fold higher in tumor extracts compared with uninvolved mucosa from AOM- and saline-injected rats (P < 0.05). The frequency of K-ras mutations was not significantly different between the various groups, but there was a trend toward a greater incidence of mutations in tumors from corn oil fed rats (85%) compared with fish oil fed rats (58%). Our results indicate that the carcinogen

  6. Salicylic acid modulates oxidative stress and glutathione peroxidase activity in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Drew, Janice E; Arthur, John R; Farquharson, Andrew J; Russell, Wendy R; Morrice, Philip C; Duthie, Garry G

    2005-09-15

    Oxidative stress is a characteristic of cancerous colon tissue and inflammatory bowel diseases that increase colon cancer risk. Epidemiological evidence supports a protective effect of plant-derived compounds. Aspirin is also protective against colon cancer. The mechanism of action is unclear although salicylic acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, has been shown to decrease the synthesis of pro-inflammatory and potentially neo-plastic prostaglandins. Salicylic acid is found in significant quantities in a plant-based diet. However, in plants salicylic acid is also reported to modulate the expression of numerous enzymes with antioxidant activity. The aim of this study was to assess whether salicylic acid can modulate pro-cancerous biological pathways in the colon. Oxidative stress, prostaglandins and cytosolic glutathione peroxidase (cyGPX) were analysed in proximal, transverse and distal colon from a rat model of diet-induced oxidative stress. Elevated plasma pyruvate kinase activity (1293+/-206 U/ml) and increased indices of lipid peroxidation in colon (proximal 6.4+/-0.84 nM MDA/mg protein; transverse 6.9+/-0.97 nM MDA/mg protein; distal 5.2+/-0.62 nM MDA/mg protein) from rats fed a Vitamin E deficient diet were significantly decreased on supplementation with salicylic acid (plasma pyruvate 546+/-43 U/ml; salicylic acid proximal 3.6+/-0.39 nM MDA/mg protein; transverse 4.5+/-0.61 nM MDA/mg protein; distal 4.4+/-0.27 nM MDA/mg protein). Reductions in oxidative stress and prostaglandin production on supplementation with salicylic acid were associated with an elevation in glutathione peroxidase activity (Vitamin E deficient proximal 0.056+/-0.013 U/mg protein; transverse 0.073+/-0.008 U/mg protein; distal 0.088+/-0.010 U/mg protein; Vitamin E deficient with salicylic acid proximal 0.17+/-0.01 U/mg protein; transverse 0.23+/-0.016 U/mg protein; distal 0.16+/-0.020 U/mg protein). Gpx1 and Gpx2 gene transcripts were not elevated in association with increased activity

  7. Vanillin differentially affects azoxymethane-injected rat colon carcinogenesis and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ket Li; Chong, Pei Pei; Yazan, Latifah Saiful; Ismail, Maznah

    2012-12-01

    Vanillin is the substance responsible for the flavor and smell of vanilla, a widely used flavoring agent. Previous studies reported that vanillin is a good antimutagen and anticarcinogen. However, there are also some contradicting findings showing that vanillin was a comutagen and cocarcinogen. This study investigated whether vanillin is an anticarcinogen or a cocarcinogen in rats induced with azoxymethane (AOM). Rats induced with AOM will develop aberrant crypt foci (ACF). AOM-challenged rats were treated with vanillin orally and intraperitoneally at low and high concentrations and ACF density, multiplicity, and distribution were observed. The gene expression of 14 colorectal cancer-related genes was also studied. Results showed that vanillin consumed orally had no effect on ACF. However, high concentrations (300 mg/kg body weight) of vanillin administered through intraperitoneal injection could increase ACF density and ACF multiplicity. ACF were mainly found in the distal colon rather than in the mid-section and proximal colon. The expression of colorectal cancer biomarkers, protooncogenes, recombinational repair, mismatch repair, and cell cycle arrest, and tumor suppressor gene expression were also affected by vanillin. Vanillin was not cocarcinogenic when consumed orally. However, it was cocarcinogenic when being administered intraperitoneally at high concentration. Hence, the use of vanillin in food should be safe but might have cocarcinogenic potential when it is used in high concentration for therapeutic purposes.

  8. Influence of prenatal corticosteroids on bacterial colonization in the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, E J; Carter, E A; Walker, W A; Frieberg, E; Benjamin, J; Israel, E J

    1993-10-01

    The interactions between bacteria and the host's intestinal barrier appear to be important regulators of bacterial colonization. In this study we investigated the effect of prenatal corticosteroids, known to accelerate the intestinal maturation of newborn rats, on bacterial colonization in the rat pup. Pregnant rats were treated with either cortisone acetate or normal saline on days 18-21 of gestation and were allowed to deliver spontaneously. The pups, after normal delivery, were sacrificed at different times during the first 10 days of life. The entire small intestine was removed, and each lumen was flushed to exclude nonadherent, transient organisms and homogenized. Tenfold dilutions were plated on horse-blood agar (total bacteria) and MacConkey's medium (gram-negatives). Quantitation and bacterial typification was determined after 24 h of incubation at 37 degrees C. Total bacteria and gram-negatives found in association with the mucosa were significantly lower in pups prenatally treated with steroids. These changes were not related to any changes in motility or intraluminal digestion. This suggests that the developmental condition of the host's intestinal barrier may be an important regulator of the bacterial microenvironment of the newborn small intestinal mucosa. PMID:8271126

  9. Efficacy of potential chemopreventive agents on rat colon aberrant crypt formation and progression.

    PubMed

    Wargovich, M J; Jimenez, A; McKee, K; Steele, V E; Velasco, M; Woods, J; Price, R; Gray, K; Kelloff, G J

    2000-06-01

    We assessed the effects of 78 potential chemopreventive agents in the F344 rat using two assays in which the inhibition of carcinogen-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon was the measure of efficacy. In both assays ACF were induced by the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) in F344 rats by two sequential weekly injections at a dose of 15 mg/kg. Two weeks after the last AOM injection, animals were evaluated for the number of aberrant crypts detected in methylene blue stained whole mounts of rat colon. In the initiation phase protocol agents were given during the period of AOM administration, whereas in the post-initiation assay the chemopreventive agent was introduced during the last 4 weeks of an 8 week assay, a time when ACF had progressed to multiple crypt clusters. The agents were derived from a priority listing based on reports of chemopreventive activity in the literature and/or efficacy data from in vitro models of carcinogenesis. During the initiation phase carboxyl amidoimidazole, p-chlorphenylacetate, chlorpheniramine maleate, D609, diclofenac, etoperidone, eicosatetraynoic acid, farnesol, ferulic acid, lycopene, meclizine, methionine, phenylhexylisothiocyanate, phenylbutyrate, piroxicam, 9-cis-retinoic acid, S-allylcysteine, taurine, tetracycline and verapamil were strong inhibitors of ACF. During the post-initiation phase aspirin, calcium glucarate, ketoprofen, piroxicam, 9-cis-retinoic acid, retinol and rutin inhibited the outgrowth of ACF into multiple crypt clusters. Based on these data, certain phytochemicals, antihistamines, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and retinoids show unique preclinical promise for chemoprevention of colon cancer, with the latter two drug classes particularly effective in the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis. PMID:10837003

  10. Escherichia coli K5 capsule expression enhances colonization of the large intestine in the gnotobiotic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hérias, M V; Midtvedt, T; Hanson, L A; Wold, A E

    1997-01-01

    The role of capsule expression in the capacity of Escherichia coli to colonize in the large intestinal environment was studied in a gnotobiotic rat model. The rats were given perorally a mixture of two mutant strains differing in K5 expression. After 2 weeks, the rats were sacrificed, and subsequently intestinal contents, intestinal mucosae, and mesenteric lymph nodes were homogenized and bacterial numbers were quantified. Two E. coli mutant pairs were used, the first pair (972-998) lacking the O-specific side chain and the second pair (973-997) carrying the O75 lipopolysaccharide. The K5+ mutants established themselves at a higher level than the K5- mutants (10(9) versus 10(6) CFU/g [P < 0.001] for the first pair and 10(9) versus 10(8) CFU/g [P < 0.01] for the second pair, respectively). The results were confirmed by serology showing a K5+ phenotype for practically all isolates. The bacterial population associated with the mucosa was similar to that in the luminal contents with respect to the proportions of the respective mutants, and translocation occurred in numbers proportional to the intestinal population densities of the respective mutants. All mutants were able to express type 1 as well as P fimbriae. After colonization, the expression of P fimbriae remained high whereas only a minority of the isolates expressed type 1 fimbriae. The results suggest that capsule expression and P fimbriae enhance intestinal colonization by E. coli and that these virulence factors, by increasing bacterial densities in the intestine, secondarily increase translocation. PMID:9009309

  11. Successful radioimmunotherapy of established syngeneic rat colon carcinoma with 211At-mAb

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most carcinomas are prone to metastasize despite successful treatment of the primary tumor. One way to address this clinical challenge may be targeted therapy with α-emitting radionuclides such as astatine-211 (211At). Radioimmunotherapy utilizing α-particle emitting radionuclides is considered especially suitable for the treatment of small cell clusters and single cells, although lesions of different sizes may also be present in the patient. The aim of this study was primarily to evaluate the toxicity and secondarily in vivo efficacy of a 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against colon carcinoma with tumor diameters of approximately 10 mm. Methods Eighteen rats with subperitoneal syngeneic colon carcinoma were allocated to three groups of six animals together with three healthy rats in each group. The groups were injected intravenously with either 150 μg of unlabeled mAbs (controls) or 2.5 or 5 MBq 211At-mAbs directed towards the Lewis Y antigen expressed on the cell membrane of several carcinomas. Tumor volume, body weight, and blood cell counts were monitored for 100 days after treatment. Results Local tumors were non-palpable in five out of six rats after treatment with both activities of 211At-mAbs, compared to one out of six in the control group. At the study end, half of the animals in each group given 211At-BR96 and one animal in the control group were free from disease. Radioimmunotherapy resulted in dose-dependent, transient weight loss and myelotoxicity. Survival was significantly better in the groups receiving targeted alpha therapy than in those receiving unlabeled mAbs. Conclusions This study demonstrates the possibility of treating small, solid colon carcinoma tumors with α-emitting radionuclides such as 211At bound to mAbs, with tolerable toxicity. PMID:23557183

  12. The effect of hormones and peptides involved in water balance on rat colonic motility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Voderholzer, W A; Allescher, H D; Müller-Lissner, S A

    1995-03-01

    We have previously shown that restriction of water intake decreased stool frequency and stool weight in volunteers. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these effects of thirst could be mediated by an action of systematically released hormones on colonic smooth muscle. Using isolated colonic smooth muscle strips the effect of arginine-vasopressin (AVP), angiotensin II (ANG II) and aldosterone on rat colonic motility in vitro was investigated. AVP (10(-12)-10(-10) mol/l) and aldosterone (3 x 10(-10)-3 x 10(-8) mol/l) and physiological hormonal concentrations of ANG II (10(-13)-10(-10) mol/l) had no effect on either basal activity, direct stimulation of colonic smooth muscle or neurally stimulated contractions using carbachol 10(-7)-3 x 10(-5) mol/l or neurally stimulated contractions using electrical field stimulation at various stimulation frequencies (1-10 pps, 1 ms, 40 V). ANG II in higher concentrations (10(-7)-10(-6) mol/l) increased basal activity and neurally mediated contractions. Accordingly, ANG II (10(-6) mol/l) caused a prestimulation but did not increase the maximum contractile effect of carbachol. The response to ANG II was not affected by atropine (10(-6) mol/l). TTX (10(-6) mol/l) and N-nitro-L8-arginine (L-NNA) (3 x 10(-4) mol/l) stimulated basal muscular activity but did not affect the maximum contractile effect of ANG II. Systemic serum concentrations of AVP, aldosterone and ANG II are presumably not involved in thirst-induced colonic motility changes. The ANG II effect in higher concentrations is mediated by a direct stimulatory smooth muscle effect and/or by facilitating neuronal liberation of acetylcholine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Only fibres promoting a stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem decrease the rate of aberrant crypt foci in rats

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, P; Pierre, F; Patry, Y; Champ, M; Berreur, M; Pradal, G; Bornet, F; Meflah, K; Menanteau, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Dietary fibres have been proposed as protective agents against colon cancer but results of both epidemiological and experimental studies are inconclusive.
AIMS—Hypothesising that protection against colon cancer may be restricted to butyrate producing fibres, we investigated the factors needed for long term stable butyrate production and its relation to susceptibility to colon cancer.
METHODS—A two part randomised blinded study in rats, mimicking a prospective study in humans, was performed using a low fibre control diet (CD) and three high fibre diets: starch free wheat bran (WB), type III resistant starch (RS), and short chain fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS). Using a randomised block design, 96 inbred rats were fed for two, 16, 30, or 44 days to determine the period of adaptation to the diets, fermentation profiles, and effects on the colon, including mucosal proliferation on day 44. Subsequently, 36 rats fed the same diets for 44 days were injected with azoxymethane and checked for aberrant crypt foci 30 days later.
RESULTS—After fermentation had stabilised (44 days), only RS and FOS produced large amounts of butyrate, with a trophic effect in the large intestine. No difference in mucosal proliferation between the diets was noted at this time. In the subsequent experiment one month later, fewer aberrant crypt foci were present in rats fed high butyrate producing diets (RS, p=0.022; FOS, p=0.043).
CONCLUSION—A stable butyrate producing colonic ecosystem related to selected fibres appears to be less conducive to colon carcinogenesis.


Keywords: fibre; fermentation; butyrate; colon carcinogenesis; aberrant crypt foci; rat PMID:11115823

  14. Lack of chemopreventive effects of ginger on colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rats.

    PubMed

    Dias, M C; Spinardi-Barbisan, A L T; Rodrigues, M A M; de Camargo, J L V; Terán, E; Barbisan, L F

    2006-06-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has been proposed as a promising candidate for cancer prevention. Its modifying potential on the process of colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) was investigated in male Wistar rats using the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) assay. Five groups were studied: Groups 1-3 were given four s.c. injections of DMH (40 mg/kg b.w.) twice a week, during two weeks, whereas Groups 4 and 5 received similar injections of EDTA solution (DMH vehicle). After DMH-initiation, the animals were fed a ginger extract mixed in the basal diet at 0.5% (Group 2) and 1.0% (Groups 3 and 4) for 10 weeks. All rats were killed after 12 weeks and the colons were analyzed for ACF formation and crypt multiplicity. The rates of cell proliferation and apoptosis were also evaluated in epithelial colonic crypt cells. Dietary consumption of ginger at both dose levels did not induce any toxicity in the rats, but ginger meal at 1% decreased significantly serum cholesterol levels (p<0.038). Treatment with ginger did not suppress ACF formation or the number of crypts per ACF in the DMH-treated group. Dietary ginger did not significantly change the proliferative or apoptosis indexes of the colonic crypt cells induced by DMH. Thus, the present results did not confirm a chemopreventive activity of ginger on colon carcinogenesis as analyzed by the ACF bioassay and by the growth kinetics of the colonic mucosa. PMID:16442687

  15. Estrogens regulate the expression of NHERF1 in normal colon during the reproductive cycle of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Cuello-Carrión, F Darío; Troncoso, Mariana; Guiñazu, Elina; Valdez, Susana R; Fanelli, Mariel A; Ciocca, Daniel R; Kreimann, Erica L

    2010-12-01

    In breast cancer cell lines, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulator factor 1 (NHERF1) gene is regulated at the transcriptional level by estrogens, the protein expression levels correlate with the presence of estrogen receptors and the effect is blocked by anti-estrogens. However, there is limited information regarding the regulation of NHERF1 by estrogens in normal colon tissue. The NHERF1 protein has an important role in the maintenance of the intestine ultrastructure. NHERF1-deficient mice showed defects in the intestinal microvilli as well as molecular alterations in brush border membrane proteins. Here, we have studied the expression of NHERF1 in normal rat colon and uterus during the reproductive cycle of Wistar rats. We found that NHERF1 expression in rat colon during the estral cycle is modified by estrogen levels: higher expression of NHERF1 was observed during the proestrous and estrous stages and lower expression in diestrous 1 when estrogen levels decreased. In uterus, NHERF1 was expressed in the apical region of the luminal epithelium and glands in all stages of the estral cycle, and in both colon and uterus, the expression was independent of the proliferation status. Our results show that NHERF1 expression is regulated by estrogens in colon during the rat estral cycle.

  16. Identification of mucin-depleted foci in the unsectioned colon of azoxymethane-treated rats: correlation with carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Caderni, Giovanna; Femia, Angelo Pietro; Giannini, Augusto; Favuzza, Alessandro; Luceri, Cristina; Salvadori, Maddalena; Dolara, Piero

    2003-05-15

    We tested the association between aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and tumor induction by feeding azoxymethane-induced rats (15 mg/kg x 2, s.c.) with synbiotics (Raftilose Synergy 1, a derivative of inulin, 10% of the diet, along with lactobacilli and bifidobacteria). After 16 weeks of feeding, synbiotics significantly increased ACF multiplicity. On the contrary, after 32 weeks, synbiotics significantly decreased intestinal tumors. When the same unsectioned colon used for ACF determination was stained with high-iron diamine Alcian blue, foci of crypts with scarce or absent mucins were identified. We defined these lesions as mucin-depleted foci (MDF), and they were visible in all azoxymethane-treated rats and correlated with tumor induction (MDF/colon: 8.2 +/- 0.9 and 3.8 +/- 0.9 in controls and synbiotic-fed rats, respectively, P < 0.01; crypts/MDF: 12.2 +/- 2 and 6.4 +/- 1 in controls and synbiotic-fed rats, respectively, P < 0.05, means +/- SE, n = 7). There were fewer MDF/colon than ACF, and they were histologically more dysplastic than mucinous lesions identified as ACF in high-iron diamine Alcian blue-stained colon. In conclusion, MDF may be premalignant lesions that predict colon carcinogenesis.

  17. A xanthine oxidase inhibitor 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate inhibits azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci in rats.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Makita, H; Kawamori, T; Kawabata, K; Mori, H; Murakami, A; Satoh, K; Hara, A; Ohigashi, H; Koshimizu, K

    1997-05-01

    The modifying effect of dietary administration of a xanthine oxidase inhibitor 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) present in an edible plant Languas galanga in Thailand on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) was investigated in rats. Male F344 rats were given s.c. injections of AOM (15 mg/kg body wt) once a week for 3 weeks to induce colonic ACF. They were fed the diets containing 100 or 200 ppm ACA for 5 weeks, starting 1 week before the first dosing of AOM. At the termination of the study (week 5), AOM induced 118 +/- 28 ACF/colon. Dietary administration of ACA caused significant reduction in the frequency of ACF (41% inhibition by 100 ppm ACA feeding and 37% inhibition by 200 ppm ACA feeding, P<0.01). Such inhibition might be associated with suppression of the proliferation biomarkers' expression such as ornithine decarboxylase activity in the colonic mucosa, number of silver-stained nucleolar organizer regions' protein in the colonic mucosal cell nuclei and blood polyamine content. These results indicate that ACA could inhibit the development of AOM-induced ACF through its suppression of cell proliferation in the colonic mucosa and ACA might be a possible chemopreventive agent against colon tumourigenesis.

  18. Handling of psilocybin and psilocin by everted sacs of rat jejunum and colon.

    PubMed

    Eivindvik, K; Rasmussen, K E; Sund, R B

    1989-01-01

    Psilocybin and psilocin at luminal concentrations of about 20 nmol/ml were incubated aerobically with everted sacs from rat jejunum and colon. When incubation was terminated, samples of the lumen and blood side solutions and of the intestinal tissue were analyzed for parent drug and metabolites by HPLC using a multidetector system. Both sacs caused hydrolysis of psilocybin to psilocin, but the rate was much faster in the jejunum than in the colon. Tissue uptake of intact psilocybin was negligible or absent, and no transfer to the contraside of the parent drug could be demonstrated. In contrast, psilocin, whether formed by hydrolysis or added as a substrate, was well taken up by both intestinal segments and transferred to the blood side. In the colonic psilocybin experiments, this uptake and transfer was limited by a low hydrolytic rate. The results indicate that psilocybin under in vivo conditions is absorbed predominantly as psilocin. No further metabolism of either drug was observed, as opposed to the complex metabolism pattern that has been reported for serotonin, a close chemical relative to psilocin.

  19. Effect of dietary phytosterols on cell proliferation and protein kinase C activity in rat colonic mucosa.

    PubMed

    Awad, A B; Hernandez, A Y; Fink, C S; Mendel, S L

    1997-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of phytosterols in colonic cell proliferation and examined the possible role of protein kinase C (PKC) in this process. A total of 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 240-270 g were fed, for a period of 22 days, one of three experimental diets: a control diet, a diet supplemented with 0.2% cholic acid, or a diet supplemented with 0.2% cholic acid + 2% dietary phytosterols. Two hours before decapitation, animals were injected with 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU, 50 mg/kg body wt ip). Cell proliferation in the proximal colon was measured using a monoclonal antibody to BrdU. PKC activity in the proximal colonic mucosa was assayed using a myelin basic protein as a substrate. Cell proliferation was significantly increased by 276% with 0.2% cholic acid feeding compared with controls. The presence of 2% phytosterols in the diet abolished the cholic acid-induced hyperplasia. Cholic acid induced a 31% expansion of the proliferative zone. Only the cytosolic PKC was significantly lower in the phytosterol-fed group. Neither the total PKC nor the particulate PKC demonstrated an effect of phytosterols on enzyme activity. In conclusion, we found that dietary supplementation with 2% phytosterol has a significant protective effect on enhanced cell proliferation and that this effect is not mediated through the PKC system.

  20. Ginger's (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) inhibition of rat colonic adenocarcinoma cells proliferation and angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy C; Shah, Chirag; Liu, Jessie; Pham, Jimmy T H; Zhang, Jian Gang; Jadus, Martin R

    2009-05-01

    Ginger's (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) natural bioactives, specifically ginger extract and 6-gingerol, were measured for their in vitro inhibition of two key aspects of colon cancer biology--cancer cell proliferation and angiogenic potential of endothelial cell tubule formation. Ginger extract was obtained via column distillation, while the 6-gingerol was purchased from Calbiochem. Antiproliferation activity was assessed through tritiated thymidine ([(3)H]Tdr) incorporation studies of YYT colon cancer cells; the anti-angiogenic ability of gingerol was assessed by a Matrigel assays using MS1 endothelial cells. These selected ginger bioactives had: 1) a direct effect on YYT rat cancer cell proliferation (6-1.5% ginger extract; 100-4 microM 6-gingerol); 2) an indirect effect on MS1 endothelial cell function either at the level of endothelial cell proliferation or through inhibition of MS1 endothelial cell tube formation (100-0.8 microM). Compound 6-gingerol was most effective at lower doses in inhibiting endothelial cell tube formation. These in vitro studies show that 6-gingerol has two types of antitumor effects: 1) direct colon cancer cell growth suppression, and 2) inhibition of the blood supply of the tumor via angiogenesis. Further research is warranted to test 6-gingerol in animal studies as a potential anticancer plant bioactive in the complementary treatment of cancer. PMID:19117330

  1. Fetal programming of colon cancer in adult rats: correlations with altered neonatal trajectory, circulating IGF-I and IGFPBs, and testosterone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lifelong consumption of soy protein isolate (SPI) reduces the incidence of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon tumors in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. We determined if a maternal SPI diet during pregnancy could protect against colon cancer in progeny. Four groups of male rats were used: a lifetime ...

  2. Brewer's yeast and Saccharomyces boulardii both attenuate Clostridium difficile-induced colonic secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Izadnia, F; Wong, C T; Kocoshis, S A

    1998-09-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb), a nonpathogenic yeast, has been used to prevent recurrences of Clostridium difficile (C.diff) -associated diarrhea. A single report suggested that treatment with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc), commonly called brewer's yeast (BY), facilitates treatment of persistent C.diff infection. We conducted this experiment to determine whether C.diff toxin A-induced colonic secretion in the rat is blunted by pretreatment with either Sb or BY. We employed closed cecal pouches in two groups of five adult male Sprague-Dawley rats fed with standard chow for five days prior to the experiment, another group whose water was supplemented with 20 x 10(9) colony-forming units (CFU) of Sb per day for five days, and another group whose water was supplemented with 20 x 10(9) CFU of Sc per day for five days. Cecal pouches were infused for 3 hr with one of the following: (1) normal saline alone for a control group, or (2) normal saline plus 5 microg of C.diff toxin A (for the other control group and for the two experimental groups). Water movement was measured by a nonabsorbable marker technique. Sodium movement and permeability to mannitol were also measured. Prior to the infusion, cecal contents were quantitatively cultured. In the three animals whose ceca were colonized with less than 10(6) CFU of either yeast per gram wet cecal content, toxin A-induced secretion could not be attenuated. In contrast, animals whose ceca were colonized with more than 10(6) CFU of either yeast per gram of wet cecal content showed significantly less secretion after toxin A application than those which were not fed yeast. S. cerevisiae reduced secretion by half (N = 5, P = 0.039 for water, 0.044 for sodium) and Sb by 75% (N = 4, P = 0.015 for water, 0.034 for sodium). Toxin-induced increases in permeability to [3H]mannitol from systemic circulation to cecum could not be blunted by either yeast. We conclude that rat ceca can be colonized by either organism and that both organisms

  3. Expression of Serotonin Receptors in the Colonic Tissue of Chronic Diarrhea Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Tong; Qiu, Juanjuan; Wan, Jiajia; Wang, Fengyun; Tang, Xudong; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study aimed to investigate the difference among the expression of serotonin receptors (5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors) in colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats. Materials and Methods: A rat model of chronic diarrhea was established by lactose diet. The expression of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blotting techniques. Results: There is no significant difference on the protein expression of 5-HT3 receptor between the normal group and the chronic diarrhea model group. The mRNA expression of 5-HT3 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group was significantly lower than that in the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.01). The protein and mRNA expression of 5-HT4 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group were significantly higher than those in the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.05, P < 0.01). On the contrary, the protein and mRNA expressions of 5-HT7 receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group were significantly decreased compared with the normal group (n = 10; P < 0.01, P < 0.01). Conclusions: The results suggested the receptors of 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 may be involved in inducing diarrhea by lactose diet. PMID:27184643

  4. Effect of gingerol on colonic motility via inhibition of calcium channel currents in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zheng-Xu; Tang, Xu-Dong; Wang, Feng-Yun; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Li, Yu-Chun; Qiu, Juan-Juan; Guo, Hui-Shu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of gingerol on colonic motility and the action of L-type calcium channel currents in this process. METHODS: The distal colon was cut along the mesenteric border and cleaned with Ca2+-free physiological saline solution. Muscle strips were removed and placed in Ca2+-free physiological saline solution, which was oxygenated continuously. Longitudinal smooth muscle samples were prepared by cutting along the muscle strips and were then placed in a chamber. Mechanical contractile activities of isolated colonic segments in rats were recorded by a 4-channel physiograph. Colon smooth muscle cells were dissociated by enzymatic digestion. L-type calcium currents were recorded using the conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. RESULTS: Gingerol inhibited the spontaneous contraction of colonic longitudinal smooth muscle in a dose-dependent manner with inhibition percentages of 13.3% ± 4.1%, 43.4% ± 3.9%, 78.2% ± 3.6% and 80.5% ± 4.5% at 25 μmol/L, 50 μmol/L, 75 μmol/L and 100 μmol/L, respectively (P < 0.01). Nifedipine, an L-type calcium channel blocker, diminished the inhibition of colonic motility by gingerol. Gingerol inhibited L-type calcium channel currents in colonic longitudinal myocytes of rats. At a 75 μmol/L concentration of gingerol, the percentage of gingerol-induced inhibition was diminished by nifedipine from 77.1% ± 4.2% to 42.6% ± 3.6% (P < 0.01). Gingerol suppressed IBa in a dose-dependent manner, and the inhibition rates were 22.7% ± 2.38%, 35.77% ± 3.14%, 49.78% ± 3.48% and 53.78% ± 4.16% of control at 0 mV, respectively, at concentrations of 25 μmol/L, 50 μmol/L, 75 μmol/L and 100 μmol/L (P < 0.01). The steady-state activation curve was shifted to the right by treatment with gingerol. The value of half activation was -14.23 ± 1.12 mV in the control group and -10.56 ± 1.04 mV in the 75 μmol/L group (P < 0.05) with slope factors, Ks, of 7.16 ± 0.84 and 7.02 ± 0.93 (P < 0.05) in the control and 75

  5. Fish oil and flax seed oil supplemented diets increase FFAR4 expression in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Kandi, Praveen; Singh, Monalisa; Britt, April; Hayslett, Renee; Moniri, Nader H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Omega-3 fatty acids, such as α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) that have long been associated with anti-inflammatory activity and general benefit toward human health. Over the last decade, the identification of a family of cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors that bind and are activated by free-fatty acids, including omega-3 fatty acids, suggests that many effects of PUFA are receptor-mediated. One such receptor, free-fatty acid receptor-4 (FFAR4), previously described as GPR120, has been shown to modulate anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing effects in response to PUFA such as ALA and DHA. Additionally, FFAR4 stimulates secretion of the insulin secretagogue glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from the GI tract and acts as a dietary sensor to regulate energy availability. The aim of the current study was to assess the effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on FFAR4 expression in the rat colon. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were fed control soybean oil diets or alternatively, diets supplemented with either fish oil, which is enriched in DHA and EPA, or flaxseed oil, which is enriched in ALA, for seven weeks. GLP-1 and blood glucose levels were monitored weekly and at the end of the study period, expression of FFAR4 and the inflammatory marker TNF–α was assessed. Results Our findings indicate that GLP-1 and blood glucose levels were unaffected by omega-3 supplementation, however, animals that were fed fish or flaxseed oil-supplemented diets had significantly heightened colonic FFAR4 and actin expression, and reduced expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α compared to animals fed control diets. Conclusions These results suggest that similar to ingestion of other fats, dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids can alter FFAR4 expression within the colon. PMID:26275932

  6. Amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel currents in surface cells of rat rectal colon.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, A; Yamaguchi, S; Ishikawa, T

    2004-02-01

    Surface cells of the mammalian distal colon are shown to molecularly express the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel composed of three homologous subunits (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ENaC). However, because basic electrophysiological properties of amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels expressed in these cells are largely unknown at the cellular level, functional evidence for the involvement of the subunits in the native channels is incomplete. Using electrophysiological techniques, we have now characterized functional properties of native ENaC in surface cells of rectal colon (RC) of rats fed a normal Na+ diet. Ussing chamber experiments showed that apical amiloride inhibited a basal short-circuit current in mucosal preparation of RC with an apparent half-inhibition constant (Ki) value of 0.20 microM. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the presence of transcripts of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-rENaC in rectal mucosa. Whole cell patch-clamp experiments in surface cells of intact crypts acutely isolated from rectal mucosa identified an inward cationic current, which was inhibited by amiloride with a Ki value of 0.12 microM at a membrane potential of -64 mV, the inhibition being weakly voltage dependent. Conductance ratios of the currents were Li+ (1.8) > Na+ (1) > K+ ( approximately 0), respectively. Amiloride-sensitive current amplitude was almost the same at 15 or 150 mM extracellular Na+, suggesting a high Na+ affinity for current activation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a heterooligomer composed of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-ENaC may be the molecular basis of the native channels, which are responsible for amiloride-sensitive electrogenic Na+ absorption in rat rectal colon. PMID:14576089

  7. Antinociceptive action against colonic distension by brain orexin in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Miyagishi, Saori; Ohhira, Masumi

    2015-02-19

    Increasing evidence has suggested that brain orexins are implicated in a wide variety of physiological functions. With regard to gastrointestinal functions, orexin-A acts centrally to regulate gastrointestinal functions such as gastric and pancreatic secretion, and gastrointestinal motility. Visceral sensation is also known as one of key gastrointestinal functions which are controlled by the central nervous system. Little is, however, known about a role of central orexin in visceral sensation. This study was therefore performed to clarify whether brain orexin may be involved in the process of visceral sensation. Visceral sensation was evaluated by colonic distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in conscious rats. Intracisternally administered orexin-A dose-dependently increased the threshold volume of colonic distension-induced AWR. In contrast, neither intraperitoneal injection of orexin-A nor intracisternal orexin-B altered the threshold volume. While intracisternal SB334867, an orexin 1 receptor antagonist, by itself failed to change the threshold volume, SB334867 injected centrally completely blocked the morphine-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. These results suggest for the first time that orexin-A specifically acts centrally in the brain to enhance antinociceptive response to colonic distension. We would furthermore suggest that endogenous orexin-A indeed mediates the antinociceptive effect of morphine on visceral sensation through the orexin 1 receptors. All these evidence might indicate that brain orexin plays a role in the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome because visceral hypersensitivity of the gut is considered to play a vital role in the diseases.

  8. Modulation of distal colonic epithelial barrier function by dietary fibre in normal rats

    PubMed Central

    Mariadason, J; Catto-Smith, A; Gibson, P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Dietary fibre influences the turnover and differentiation of the colonic epithelium, but its effects on barrier function are unknown. 
AIMS—To determine whether altering the type and amount of fibre in the diet affects paracellular permeability of intestinal epithelium, and to identify the mechanisms of action. 
METHODS—Rats were fed isoenergetic low fibre diets with or without supplements of wheat bran (10%) or methylcellulose (10%), for four weeks. Paracellular permeability was determined by measurement of conductance and 51Cr-EDTA flux across tissue mounted in Ussing chambers. Faecal short chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations were assessed by gas chromatography, epithelial kinetics stathmokinetically, and mucosal brush border hydrolase activities spectrophotometrically. 
RESULTS—Body weight was similar across the dietary groups. Conductance and 51Cr-EDTA flux were approximately 25% higher in animals fed no fibre, compared with those fed wheat bran or methylcellulose in the distal colon, but not in the caecum or jejunum. Histologically, there was no evidence of epithelial injury or erosion associated with any diet. The fibres exerted different spectra of effects on luminal SCFA concentrations and pH, and on mucosal indexes, but both bulked the faeces, were trophic to the epithelium, and stimulated expression of a marker of epithelial differentiation. 
CONCLUSIONS—Both a fermentable and a non-fermentable fibre reduce paracellular permeability specifically in the distal colon, possibly by promoting epithelial cell differentiation. The mechanisms by which the two fibres exert their effects are likely to be different. 

 Keywords: colon; differentiation; epithelium; fibre; paracellular permeability; proliferation PMID:10026327

  9. Remodeling of the rat distal colon in diabetes: function and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Siegman, Marion J; Eto, Masumi; Butler, Thomas M

    2016-01-15

    This study seeks to define and explain remodeling of the distal colon in the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat model of diabetes through analysis of resting and active length dependence of force production, chemical composition, and ultrastructure. Compared with untreated controls, the passive stiffness on extension of the diabetic muscle is high, and active force produced at short muscle lengths is amplified but is limited by an internal resistance to shortening. The latter are accounted for by a significant increase in collagen type 1, with no changes in types 3 and 4. In the diabetic colon, ultrastructural studies show unique, conspicuous pockets of collagen among muscle cells, in addition to a thickened basement membrane and an extracellular space filled with collagen fibers and various fibrils. Measurements of DNA and total protein content revealed that the diabetic colon underwent hypertrophy, along with a proportional increase in actin and myosin contents, with no change in the actin-to-myosin ratio. Active force production per cross-sectional area was not different in the diabetic and normal muscles, consistent with the proportionality of changes in contractile proteins. The stiffness and the limit to shortening of the diabetic colon were significantly reduced by treatment with the glycation breaker alagebrium chloride (ALT-711), with no change in collagen contents. Functionally, this study shows that, in diabetes, the production of collagen type 1 and glycation increase stiffness, which limits distensibility on filling and limits shortening and expulsion of contents, both of which can be alleviated by treatment with ALT-711. PMID:26561639

  10. Region-specific changes in mitochondrial D-loop in aged rat CNS.

    PubMed

    McInerny, Simone C; Brown, Amanda L; Smith, Doug W

    2009-05-01

    Impaired mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is considered a cause of aging. A reduction in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and/or transcription may contribute to this OXPHOS diminution. Impairments in the displacement (D) loop, or non-coding, region of the mitochondrial genome, or accumulation of mtDNA mutations, may affect mtDNA replication and transcription. We determined the effects of age on the D-loop and on mtDNA deletion mutations in the spinal cord, medulla, midbrain, cerebellum, striatum, and cerebral cortex of Fischer 344 rats. D-loop, 7S DNA levels were reduced by 3-fold in striatum, 2.5-fold in cortex, and 2-fold in the spinal cord of older animals. We did not detect a population of mtDNA affected by the most prevalent known (ND4-containing) deletions, indicating they do not comprise a significant portion of total mtDNA. However, we detected an age-related and region-specific increase in the common deletion, which comprised 0.0003-0.0007% of total mtDNA. Mitochondrial genome copy number varied between regions, in addition to an overall 18% decrease with age across the whole brain. These results suggest the age-related decline in OXPHOS may be related to a reduction in D-loop function. PMID:19428453

  11. Increased colonic sodium absorption in rats with chronic renal failure is partially mediated by AT1 receptor agonism.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Marguerite; Freel, Robert W

    2008-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that colonic Na(+) transport is altered in the 5/6 nephrectomized rat model of chronic renal failure (CRF), we measured Na(+) fluxes across distal colon from control (CON), CRF, and CRF rats treated with the angiotensin II (ANG II) receptor antagonist losartan (+LOS). We also evaluated overall fluid and Na(+) balance and compared colonic protein and mRNA expression profiles for electroneutral [sodium-hydrogen exchanger (NHE)] and electrogenic Na(+) transport [epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)] in these groups. Consistent with a 60% enhancement in colonic Na(+) absorption in CRF, urinary Na(+) excretion increased by about 50% while serum Na(+) homeostasis was maintained. These CRF-induced changes in Na(+) handling were normalized by treatment with LOS. Net Na(+) absorption was also stimulated in in vitro tissues from CON rats following acute serosal addition of ANG II (10(-7) M), and this increase was blocked by AT(1) antagonism but not by an AT(2) antagonist. In CRF, colonic protein and mRNA expression variably increased for apical NHE2, NHE3, and ENaC alpha-, beta-, gamma-subunits, whereas expression of basolateral NHE1 and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (alpha-isoform) remained unaltered. Upregulation of the ENaC subunit mRNA was attenuated somewhat by LOS treatment. Previously, we showed that colonic AT(1) receptor protein is upregulated twofold in CRF, and here we find that AT(1) and AT(2) mRNA and AT(2) protein abundance is unchanged in CRF. We conclude that Na(+) absorption in CRF rat distal colon is increased due to elevated expression of proteins mediating electroneutral and electrogenic uptake and that it is partially mediated by AT(1) receptors. PMID:18535292

  12. Effects of a 15% orange-pulp diet on tumorigenesis and immune response in rats with colon tumors.

    PubMed

    Kossoy, G; Ben-Hur, H; Stark, A; Zusman, I; Madar, Z

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated whether the feeding of rats with a 15% orange-pulp diet affects the lymphatic system and the tumorigenic response in rats exposed to a high dose of carcinogen. Five-week-old Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 2 groups fed a control chow diet or the same diet with 15% orange pulp. All rats were injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) (20 mg/kg) weekly for 6 weeks. At 8 months, tumors, spleens and descending colon were taken from each group for analyses. Feeding rats the 15% orange-pulp diet did not reduce the tumor number but modified the number of adenocarcinomas found in the orange-pulp group compared to controls: 66.7% vs. 93.7%. The number of endophytic tumors was also significantly lower in the experimental group: 6.3% vs. 32.3% in controls. DMH affected the size of the splenic structures. The size of follicles and germinal centers decreased significantly in tumor-bearing rats compared to tumor-free rats. This effect was changed in rats fed the orange-pulp diet. In tumor-bearing rats from this group, only the area of the marginal zone decreased and the red pulp increased compared to tumor-free rats. The size of germinal centers significantly increased compared to tumor-bearing rats in controls. The total number of lymphoid cells decreased in germinal centers of spleens obtained from control tumor-bearing rats compared to tumor-free rats. DMH alone significantly increased the total number of cells in the colon mucosa of the rats fed the control diet. In tumor-bearing rats exposed to the carcinogen and fed the 15% orange-pulp diet, the total number of cells and the number of Ki-67+ cells increased in the depth of tumors whereas the number of CD8+ T cells increased in the colon mucosa, at the border of tumors and its depth. The caspase-3 protein a cysteine protease was elevated in tumors from rats fed the orange-pulp diet. Although the 15% orange-pulp diet did not change the number of tumors in the tumor-bearing rats, feeding rats orange

  13. DNA adduct formation and oxidative stress in colon and liver of Big Blue rats after dietary exposure to diesel particles.

    PubMed

    Dybdahl, Marianne; Risom, Lotte; Møller, Peter; Autrup, Herman; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Bornholdt, Jette; Daneshvar, Bahram; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Weimann, Allan; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Loft, Steffen

    2003-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) via the gastrointestinal route may impose risk of cancer in the colon and liver. We investigated the effects of DEP given in the diet to Big Blue rats by quantifying a panel of markers of DNA damage and repair, mutation, oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, and antioxidative defence mechanisms in colon mucosa cells, liver tissue and the blood compartment. Seven groups of rats were fed a diet with 0, 0.2, 0.8, 2, 8, 20 or 80 mg DEP/kg feed for 21 days. DEP induced a significant increase in DNA strand breaks in colon and liver. There was no effect on oxidative DNA damage (8-oxodG) in colon or liver DNA or in the urine. However, the mRNA expression of OGG1, encoding an enzyme involved in repair of 8-oxodG, was increased by DEP in both liver and colon. DNA adduct levels measured by 32P-post-labelling were elevated in colon and liver, and the expression of ERCC1 gene was affected in liver, but not in colon. In addition to these effects, DEP exposure induced apoptosis in liver. There was no significant change in mutation frequency in colon or liver. The levels of oxidative protein modifications (oxidized arginine and proline residues) were increased in liver accompanied by enhanced vitamin C levels. In plasma, we found no significant effects on oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, antioxidant enzymes or vitamin C levels. Our data indicate that gastrointestinal exposure to DEP induces DNA adducts and oxidative stress resulting in DNA strand breaks, enhanced repair capacity of oxidative base damage, apoptosis and protein oxidation in colon mucosa cells and liver.

  14. DNA adduct formation and oxidative stress in colon and liver of Big Blue rats after dietary exposure to diesel particles.

    PubMed

    Dybdahl, Marianne; Risom, Lotte; Møller, Peter; Autrup, Herman; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Bornholdt, Jette; Daneshvar, Bahram; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Weimann, Allan; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Loft, Steffen

    2003-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) via the gastrointestinal route may impose risk of cancer in the colon and liver. We investigated the effects of DEP given in the diet to Big Blue rats by quantifying a panel of markers of DNA damage and repair, mutation, oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, and antioxidative defence mechanisms in colon mucosa cells, liver tissue and the blood compartment. Seven groups of rats were fed a diet with 0, 0.2, 0.8, 2, 8, 20 or 80 mg DEP/kg feed for 21 days. DEP induced a significant increase in DNA strand breaks in colon and liver. There was no effect on oxidative DNA damage (8-oxodG) in colon or liver DNA or in the urine. However, the mRNA expression of OGG1, encoding an enzyme involved in repair of 8-oxodG, was increased by DEP in both liver and colon. DNA adduct levels measured by 32P-post-labelling were elevated in colon and liver, and the expression of ERCC1 gene was affected in liver, but not in colon. In addition to these effects, DEP exposure induced apoptosis in liver. There was no significant change in mutation frequency in colon or liver. The levels of oxidative protein modifications (oxidized arginine and proline residues) were increased in liver accompanied by enhanced vitamin C levels. In plasma, we found no significant effects on oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, antioxidant enzymes or vitamin C levels. Our data indicate that gastrointestinal exposure to DEP induces DNA adducts and oxidative stress resulting in DNA strand breaks, enhanced repair capacity of oxidative base damage, apoptosis and protein oxidation in colon mucosa cells and liver. PMID:12919963

  15. A mathematical model of rat proximal tubule and loop of Henle

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proximal tubule and loop of Henle function are coupled, with proximal transport determining loop fluid composition, and loop transport modulating glomerular filtration via tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF). To examine this interaction, we begin with published models of the superficial rat proximal convoluted tubule (PCT; including flow-dependent transport in a compliant tubule), and the rat thick ascending Henle limb (AHL). Transport parameters for this PCT are scaled down to represent the proximal straight tubule (PST), which is connected to the thick AHL via a short descending limb. Transport parameters for superficial PCT and PST are scaled up for a juxtamedullary nephron, and connected to AHL via outer and inner medullary descending limbs, and inner medullary thin AHL. Medullary interstitial solute concentrations are specified. End-AHL hydrostatic pressure is determined by distal nephron flow resistance, and the TGF signal is represented as a linear function of end-AHL cytosolic Cl concentration. These two distal conditions required iterative solution of the model. Model calculations capture inner medullary countercurrent flux of urea, and also suggest the presence of an outer medullary countercurrent flux of ammonia, with reabsorption in AHL and secretion in PST. For a realistically strong TGF signal, there is the expected homeostatic impact on distal flows, and in addition, a homeostatic effect on proximal tubule pressure. The model glycosuria threshold is compatible with rat data, and predicted glucose excretion with selective 1Na+:1glucose cotransporter (SGLT2) inhibition comports with observations in the mouse. Model calculations suggest that enhanced proximal tubule Na+ reabsorption during hyperglycemia is sufficient to activate TGF and contribute to diabetic hyperfiltration. PMID:25694479

  16. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel extract efficacy as a dietary antioxidant against azoxymethane-induced colon cancer in rat.

    PubMed

    Waly, Mostafa I; Ali, Amanat; Guizani, Nejib; Al-Rawahi, Amani S; Farooq, Sardar A; Rahman, Mohammad S

    2012-01-01

    Functional foods include antioxidant nutrients which may protect against many human chronic diseases by combating reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of pomegranate peel extract (PPE) on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon tumors in rats as an in vivo experimental model. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats (4 weeks old) were randomly divided into 4 groups containing 10 rats per group, and were treated with either AOM, PPE, or PPE plus AOM or injected with 0.9% physiological saline solution as a control. At 8 weeks of age, the rats in the AOM and PPE plus AOM groups were injected with 15 mg AOM/kg body weight, once a week for two weeks. After the last AOM injection, the rats were continuously fed ad-libitum their specific diets for another 6 weeks. At the end of the experiment (i.e. at the age of 4 months), all rats were killed and the colon tissues were examined microscopically for lesions suspected of being preneoplastic lesions or tumors as well as for biochemical measurement of oxidative stress indices. The results revealed a lower incidence of aberrant crypt foci in the PPE plus AOM administered group as compared to the AOM group. In addition, PPE blocked the AOM-induced impairment of biochemical indicators of oxidative stress in the examined colonic tissue homogenates. The results suggest that PPE can partially inhibit the development of colonic premalignant lesions in an AOM-induced colorectal carcinogenesis model, by abrogating oxidative stress and improving the redox status of colonic cells. PMID:23098515

  17. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations are critical for fibrin glue adherence in rat high-risk colon anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Buen, Eliseo Portilla-de; Orozco-Mosqueda, Abel; Leal-Cortés, Caridad; Vázquez-Camacho, Gonzalo; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Alvarez-Villaseñor, Andrea Socorro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; González-Ojeda, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fibrin glues have not been consistently successful in preventing the dehiscence of high-risk colonic anastomoses. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in glues determine their ability to function as sealants, healers, and/or adhesives. The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin on bursting pressure, leaks, dehiscence, and morphology of high-risk ischemic colonic anastomoses using fibrin glue in rats. METHODS: Colonic anastomoses in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (weight, 250-350 g) treated with fibrin glue containing different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin were evaluated at post-operative day 5. The interventions were low-risk (normal) or high-risk (ischemic) end-to-end colonic anastomoses using polypropylene sutures and topical application of fibrinogen at high (120 mg/mL) or low (40 mg/mL) concentrations and thrombin at high (1000 IU/mL) or low (500 IU/mL) concentrations. RESULTS: Ischemia alone, anastomosis alone, or both together reduced the bursting pressure. Glues containing a low fibrinogen concentration improved this parameter in all cases. High thrombin in combination with low fibrinogen also improved adherence exclusively in low-risk anastomoses. No differences were detected with respect to macroscopic parameters, histopathology, or hydroxyproline content at 5 days post-anastomosis. CONCLUSIONS: Fibrin glue with a low fibrinogen content normalizes the bursting pressure of high-risk ischemic left-colon anastomoses in rats at day 5 after surgery. PMID:24714834

  18. Chemotherapeutic effect of Berberis integerrima hydroalcoholic extract on colon cancer development in the 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine rat model.

    PubMed

    Malayeri, Mohammad R Mohammadi; Dadkhah, Abolfazl; Fatemi, Faezeh; Dini, Salome; Torabi, Fatemeh; Tavajjoh, Mohammad M; Rabiei, Javad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a Berberis integerrima hydroalcoholic extract as a chemotherapeutic agent in colon carcinogenesis in the rat induced by 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: a negative control group without DMH treatment; a control group injected DMH (20 mg/kg b.w); two groups receiving B. integerrima extract (50 and 100 mg/kg b.w), concomitant with injected DMH, as chemotherapeutic groups; a positive control group receiving 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) along with DMH. The effects of the extracts were determined by assessment of hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), and the activities of hepatic glutathione S-transferase and cytochrome P450 (GST and CYP450). Additionally, colon tissues were assessed for colonic β-catenin and histopathological analysis. In DMH-treated rats, the extracts partially normalized the levels of FRAP, CYP450, β-catenin, and GST. Likewise, formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in colon tissue of DMH-treated was reduced by the extracts. Thus, the extracts possess chemotherapeutic activity against colon carcinogenesis.

  19. Effect of YNS-15P, a new alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist, on stress-stimulated colonic propulsion in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, O; Niida, H; Tajima, K; Shirouchi, Y; Kyotani, Y; Ueda, F; Kise, M; Kimura, K

    1998-11-01

    We studied effects of a novel alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist, YNS-15P (N-[(2R,11bS)-9-methoxy-1,3,4,6,7, 11b-hexahydro-2H-benzoquinolizin-2-yl]-N-methylmethanesulfonami de hydrochloride), on colonic propulsion stimulated by wrap-restraint stress (WRS) or bethanechol, on normal colonic propulsion and on diarrhea induced by castor oil in rats. Alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonists, rauwolscine and RX821002, decreased the increase in the number and weight of fecal pellets induced by WRS. YNS-15P also inhibited WRS-stimulated fecal excretion in a dose-dependent manner. A 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonist, granisetron, trimebutine and diazepam, but not a 5-hydroxytryptamine4 receptor antagonist, GR113808, significantly inhibited WRS-stimulated fecal excretion. YNS-15P inhibited WRS-stimulated colonic transit in a dose-dependent manner. However, YNS-15P had no significant effect on normal fecal excretion and colonic transit or on bethanechol-stimulated fecal excretion. YNS-15P also failed to inhibit castor-oil-induced diarrhea. These results indicate that YNS-15P selectively inhibits WRS-stimulated colonic propulsion, and that alpha-2 adrenoceptors may be involved in stress-induced colonic motor dysfunction in fed rats. PMID:9808698

  20. Colon Delivery of Budesonide Using Solid Dispersion in Dextran for the Treatment and Secondary Prevention of Ulcerative Colitis in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Emami, Jaber; Tavakoli, Naser; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Mahzouni, Parvin; Dorkoosh, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Ulcerative colitis is characterized by local inflammation. Targeting drugs directly to the site of injury has the benefit of lower adverse effects and more effective therapy. The aim of this study was colon targeted delivery of budesonide to deliver the major part of the drug to the colon. Methods: Matrix tablets of budesonide from solid dispersion of drug with dextran were prepared using different drug to polymer ratios and three molecular weights of dextran. The physical evaluation and drug release behavior were studied. In vivo efficacy of the selected formulation against acetic acid induced colitis in rats was evaluated and compared to the control (untreated) and references (mesalazine and budesonide suspensions) groups. Results: The results showed that solid dispersion of budesonide with dextran in the ratio of 1:7 using molecular weight (MW) of 10,000 dextran (SDT710) released 25% of the drug in the first 6 hours and 100% in caecal and colonic contents. It could target the drug to colon with improvement in some of the inflammatory signs of induced ulcerative colitis in rat. Treatment with SDT710 could improve not only the percent of involvement also macroscopic damage parameters. The macroscopic parameters included weight/length ratio of the colon, ulcer area, damage score, and ulcer index reduced in comparison to the control group and conventional suspension of budesonide; however, only weight/length ratio was significant. Conclusions: In the experimental model studied, the new colonic delivery system significantly improved the efficacy of budesonide in the weight/length ratio of the colon in induced colitis in rats. PMID:21566772

  1. Interactive suppression of aberrant crypt foci induced by azoxymethane in rat colon by phytic acid and green tea.

    PubMed

    Challa, A; Rao, D R; Reddy, B S

    1997-10-01

    Several epidemiological studies point to a strong correlation between nutrient composition of the diet and cancer of the colon. Phytic acid, present in grains, has been credited with reducing the risk of cancer of the colon. A number of reports are available indicating the benefits of green tea consumption in reducing the risk of stomach, lung and skin cancer, but little data are available on the effect of green tea in reducing the risk of colon cancer. Also, there are no studies on the combined effect of these compounds on colon tumorigenesis. Thus the primary objective of this investigation was to elucidate the combined effects of green tea and phytic acid on colonic preneoplastic lesions and the Phase II enzyme glutathione S-transferase. Fisher 344 male weanling rats were divided into nine groups of 15 rats each and fed the experimental diet for 13 weeks. Rats received two s.c. injections of azoxymethane in saline at 16 mg/kg body wt at 7 and 8 weeks of age. Rats received three levels (0, 1 and 2%) of phytic acid with three levels (0, 1 and 2%) of green tea within each phytic acid level in a 3 x 3 factorial experiment. Results indicate that while green tea had a marginal effect (P < 0.14), phytic acid significantly reduced the incidence of aberrant crypt foci (P < 0.008). The interaction between green tea and phytic acid was significant (P < 0.029 for distal and < 0.0168 for entire colon) and positive, pointing to a synergistic effect of green tea and phytic acid.

  2. SCFA increase intestinal Na absorption by induction of NHE3 in rat colon and human intestinal C2/bbe cells.

    PubMed

    Musch, M W; Bookstein, C; Xie, Y; Sellin, J H; Chang, E B

    2001-04-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), produced by colonic bacterial flora fermentation of dietary carbohydrates, promote colonic Na absorption through mechanisms not well understood. We hypothesized that SCFA promote increased expression of apical membrane Na/H exchange (NHE), serving as luminal physiological cues for regulating colonic Na absorptive capacity. Studies were performed in human colonic C2/bbe (C2) monolayers and in vivo. In C2 cells exposed to butyrate, acetate, proprionate, or the poorly metabolized SCFA isobutyrate, apical membrane NHE3 activity and protein expression increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, whereas no changes were observed for NHE2. In contrast, no significant changes in brush-border hydrolase or villin expression were noted. Analogous to the in vitro findings, rats fed the soluble fiber pectin exhibited a time-dependent increase in colonic NHE3, but not NHE2, protein, mRNA, and brush-border activity. These changes were region-specific, as no changes were observed in the ileum. We conclude that luminal SCFA are important physiological cues for regulating colonic Na absorptive function, allowing the colon to adapt to chronic changes in dietary carbohydrate and Na loads.

  3. Modulatory effect of troxerutin on biotransforming enzymes and preneoplasic lesions induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Rajamanickam; Vinoth Kumar, Rajenderan; Sudha, Mani; Viswanathan, Periyaswamy; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2014-02-01

    Colon cancer is the third most global oncologic problem faced by medical fraternity. Troxerutin, a flavonoid present in tea, coffee, cereal grains, and a variety of fruits and vegetables, exhibits various pharmacological and biological activities. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of troxerutin on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, colonic bacterial enzymes and the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) during 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 served as control. Group 2 received troxerutin (50 mg/kg b.w., p.o. every day) for 16 weeks. Groups 3-6 received subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg b.w.) once a week, for the first four weeks. In addition, groups 4-6 received different doses of troxerutin (12.5, 25, 50 mg/kg b.w., p.o. every day respectively) along with DMH injections. Our results reveal that DMH treated rats exhibited elevated activities of phase I enzymes such as cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, cytochrome P4502E1, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and reduced activities of phase II enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), DT-diaphorase (DTD) and uridine diphospho glucuronyl transferase (UDPGT) in the liver and colonic mucosa of control and experimental rats. Furthermore, the activities of fecal and colonic mucosal bacterial enzymes, such as β-glucronidase, β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase and mucinase were found to be significantly higher in DMH alone treated rats than those of the control rats. On supplementation with troxerutin to DMH treated rats, the alterations in the activities of the biotransforming enzymes, bacterial enzymes and the pathological changes were significantly reversed, the effect being more pronounced when troxerutin was supplemented at the dose of 25 mg/kg b.w. Thus troxerutin could be considered as a good chemopreventive agent against the formation of

  4. Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Effects on Ion Transport across Rat Colonic Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Schindele, Sabine; Pouokam, Ervice; Diener, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia causes severe damage in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, it is interesting to study how the barrier and transport functions of intestinal epithelium change under hypoxia and subsequent reoxygenation. For this purpose we simulated hypoxia and reoxygenation on mucosa-submucosa preparations from rat distal colon in Ussing chambers and on isolated crypts. Hypoxia (N2 gassing for 15 min) induced a triphasic change in short-circuit current (Isc): a transient decrease, an increase and finally a long-lasting fall below the initial baseline. During the subsequent reoxygenation phase, Isc slightly rose to values above the initial baseline. Tissue conductance (Gt) showed a biphasic increase during both the hypoxia and the reoxygenation phases. Omission of Cl− or preincubation of the tissue with transport inhibitors revealed that the observed changes in Isc represented changes in Cl− secretion. The radical scavenger trolox C reduced the Isc response during hypoxia, but failed to prevent the rise of Isc during reoxygenation. All changes in Isc were Ca2+-dependent. Fura-2 experiments at loaded isolated colonic crypts revealed a slow increase of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration during hypoxia and the reoxygenation phase, mainly caused by an influx of extracellular Ca2+. Surprisingly, no changes could be detected in the fluorescence of the superoxide anion-sensitive dye mitosox or the thiol-sensitive dye thiol tracker, suggesting a relative high capacity of the colonic epithelium (with its low O2 partial pressure even under physiological conditions) to deal with enhanced radical production during hypoxia/reoxygenation. PMID:27445839

  5. Brewers’ rice modulates oxidative stress in azoxymethane-mediated colon carcinogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bee Ling; Norhaizan, Mohd Esa; Huynh, Ky; Yeap, Swee Keong; Hazilawati, Hamzah; Roselina, Karim

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanistic action of brewers’ rice in regulating the Wnt/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)/Nrf2-signaling pathways during colon carcinogenesis in male Sprague-Dawley rats. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following five groups (six rats in each group): (G1) normal, (G2) azoxymethane (AOM) alone, (G3) AOM + 10% (weight (w)/weight (w)) brewers’ rice, (G4) AOM + 20% (w/w) brewers’ rice, and (G5) AOM + 40% (w/w) brewers’ rice. They were intraperitoneally administered 15 mg/kg body weight of AOM in saline once weekly over a two-week period and treated with an American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93G diet containing 10%, 20%, and 40% (w/w) brewers’ rice. The mRNA levels of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), β-catenin, key inflammation markers, nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-dependent transcriptional activity were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses. The colon superoxide dismutase, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide levels were also analyzed to assess the antioxidant effect of these treatments. The results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and a P value of < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The overall analyses demonstrated that the dietary administration of brewers’ rice in AOM-induced rat colon carcinogenesis resulted in the transcriptional upregulation of GSK3β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), Nrf2, and HO-1. We discovered that the dietary administration of brewers’ rice downregulated the β-catenin and NF-κB mRNA levels. A significant reduction in β-catenin expression was found in the groups administered with 20% (0.611 ± 0.034) and 40% (0.436 ± 0.045) (w/w) brewers’ rice compared with that of the group treated with AOM alone (1.000 ± 0.064) (P < 0.05). The NF-κB expression was significantly lower between the AOM-alone group (1.000 ± 0.048) and those groups fed with diets

  6. Neurological and cellular regulation of visceral hypersensitivity induced by chronic stress and colonic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Winston, J H; Sarna, S K

    2013-09-17

    The role of inflammation in inducing visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) in ulcerative colitis patients remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that acute ulcerative colitis-like inflammation does not induce VHS. However, it sets up molecular conditions such that chronic stress following inflammation exaggerates single-unit afferent discharges to colorectal distension. We used dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) to induce ulcerative colitis-like inflammation and a 9-day heterotypic chronic stress protocol in rats. DSS upregulated Nav1.8 mRNA in colon-responsive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, TRPV1 in colonic muscularis externae (ME) and BDNF in spinal cord without affecting the spike frequency in spinal afferents or VMR to CRD. By contrast, chronic stress did not induce inflammation but it downregulated Kv1.1 and Kv1.4 mRNA in DRG neurons, and upregulated TRPA1 and nerve growth factor in ME, which mediated the increase of spike frequency and VMR to CRD. Chronic stress following inflammation exacerbated spike frequency in spinal afferent neurons. TRPA1 antagonist suppressed the sensitization of afferent neurons. DSS-inflammation did not affect the composition or excitation thresholds of low-threshold and high-threshold fibers. Chronic stress following inflammation increased the percent composition of high-threshold fibers and lowered the excitation threshold of both types of fibers. We conclude that not all types of inflammation induce VHS, whereas chronic stress induces VHS in the absence of inflammation. PMID:23806714

  7. Ricinoleic acid stimulation of active anion secretion in colonic mucosa of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Racusen, L C; Binder, H J

    1979-01-01

    Perfusion of the colon with ricinoleic acid produces fluid and electrolyte accumulation. The mechanism of these changes in water and electrolyte movement is uknown. These studies were designed to determine whether ricinoleic acid effects active ion transport across isolated rat colonic mucosa. 0.5 mM Na ricinoleate produced significant increases in potential difference (3.8 +/- 0.5 mV) and short-circuit current (Isc) (99.2 +/- 10.1 muA/cm2). The increases in Isc produced by Na ricinoleate were inhibited by both removal of bicarbonate and chloride and by the presence of theophylline. The hydroxy fatty acid also resulted in a significant decrease in net Na absorption from 4.7 +/- 0.8 to 0.1 +/- 0.7 mueq/h cm2 and reversed net Cl transport from absorption (+ 4.5 +/- 0.9) to secretion (-2.2 +/- mueq/h cm2). In parallel studies 0.5 mM Na ricinoleate increased mucosal cyclic AMP content by 58%. The concentrations of Na ricinoleate required to produce detectable and maximal increases in both Isc and cyclic AMP were the same. These results provide evidence in support of the concept that hydroxy fatty acid-induced fluid and electrolyte accumulation is driven by an active ion secretory process. PMID:220281

  8. Structure-Activity Relationships of Somatostatin Analogs in the Rabbit Ileum and the Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Linda E.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Rivier, Jean; Vale, Wylie; Brown, Marvin; Dharmsathaphorn, Kiertisin

    1983-01-01

    Somatostatin increases absorption of electrolytes and inhibits diarrhea in patients with endocrine tumors and short bowel syndrome. In an attempt to develop a gut-specific somatostatin analog, each amino acid in the somatostatin molecule was replaced with L-alanine, deleted, or substituted with its D-isomer. The potency of each analog to stimulate ion transport in the rabbit ileum was then determined using the modified Ussing chamber technique. The results were compared to the ability of each analog to inhibit the stimulated release of growth hormone from cultured rat anterior pituitary cells and to inhibit the arginine-stimulated release of insulin and glucagon in the rat in vivo. Analogs that showed gut selectivity were then tested for their ion transport properties in the rat colon. Results: (a) Substitution with L-alanine or deletion of the amino acid at position 6, 7, 8, or 9 and deletion of Threonine10-produced analogs with significantly reduced ion transport properties to <4% of somatostatin's action. The substitution also markedly reduced the ability of the compounds to inhibit the release of growth hormone, insulin, and glucagon. (b) Selectivity of intestinal ion transport was achieved by any one of the following alterations: L-alanine substitution at Phenylalanine11, deletion of Phenylalanine11, substitution with D-lysine at Lysine4, or substitution with L-alanine at Lysine4. These compounds had intestinal ion transport properties of 52, 34, 139, and 94%, respectively, while demonstrating little or no inhibition of growth hormone, insulin or glucagon release. Conclusions: (a) Phenylalanine6, Phenylalanine7, Tryptophan8, and Lysine9 are required for the ion transport and other biologic actions of somatostatin, whereas Threonine10 serves as an essential spacer. (b) Alteration at Phenylalanine11 or Lysine4 yields analogs that are selective for ion transport in the rabbit ileum and rat colon. These findings should be taken into consideration when developing a

  9. Silibinin modulates caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2), an intestine specific tumor suppressor to abrogate colon cancer in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, N; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    To authenticate the colon cancer preventive potential of silibinin, the efficacy of silibinin needs to be tested by evaluating an organ-specific biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silibinin on the colonic expression of the caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2) an intestine specific tumor suppressor gene and its downstream targets in the colon of rats challenged with 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated as control and silibinin control. Rats under groups 3 and 4 were given DMH (20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) subcutaneously) once a week for 15 consecutive weeks from the 4th week of the experimental period. In addition, group 4 rats alone were treated with silibinin (50 mg/kg b.w. per os) everyday throughout the study period of 32 weeks. Histological investigation and messenger RNA and protein expression studies were performed in the colonic tissues of experimental rats. Findings of the study revealed that DMH administration significantly decreased the expression of CDX2 and Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in the colon of experimental rats. Further the decreased levels of CDX2 protein, colonic mucin content, and increased number of mast cells in the colon of DMH alone-administered rats reflects the onset of carcinogenesis. The pathological changes caused due to CDX2 suppression were attenuated by silibinin supplementation.

  10. Chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii induces death of submucosal enteric neurons and damage in the colonic mucosa of rats.

    PubMed

    Góis, Marcelo Biondaro; Hermes-Uliana, Catchia; Barreto Zago, Maísa Cristina; Zanoni, Jacqueline Nelisis; da Silva, Aristeu Vieira; de Miranda-Neto, Marcílio Hubner; de Almeida Araújo, Eduardo José; Sant'Ana, Débora de Mello Gonçales

    2016-05-01

    Intestinal epithelial secretion is coordinated by the submucosal plexus (SMP). Chemical mediators from SMP regulate the immunobiological response and direct actions against infectious agents. Toxoplasma gondii is a worldwide parasite that causes toxoplasmosis. This study aimed to determine the effects of chronic infection with T. gondii on the morphometry of the mucosa and the submucosal enteric neurons in the proximal colon of rats. Male adult rats were distributed into a control group (n = 10) and an infected group (n = 10). Infected rats received orally 500 oocysts of T. gondii (ME-49). After 36 days, the rats were euthanized and samples of the proximal colon were processed for histology to evaluate mucosal thickness in sections. Whole mounts were stained with methylene blue and subjected to immunohistochemistry to detect vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. The total number of submucosal neurons decreased by 16.20%. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-immunoreactive neurons increased by 26.95%. Intraepithelial lymphocytes increased by 62.86% and sulfomucin-producing goblet cells decreased by 22.87%. Crypt depth was greater by 43.02%. It was concluded that chronic infection with T. gondii induced death and hypertrophy in the remaining submucosal enteric neurons and damage to the colonic mucosa of rats.

  11. Chemopreventive activity of grape juice concentrate (G8000TM) on rat colon carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane.

    PubMed

    Silva, Roseane Mendes; Campanholo, Vanessa Maria de Lima Pazine; Paiotti, Ana Paula Ribeiro; Artigiani Neto, Ricardo; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Forones, Nora Manoukian

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide in both sexes, with similar geographic patterns between genders. This neoplasm has good prognosis if the disease is diagnosed at early stages. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of red grape juice on the expression of COX-2 and Ki-67 expression following colon carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane (AOM). Thirty-five rats were randomly distributed into seven groups (n=5 per group): G1: SHAM or negative control received only saline; G2 (positive control): animals received 15 mg/kg AOM; G3: animals received 1% red grape juice 2 weeks before the administration of AOM; G4: animals received 2% red grape juice 2 weeks before the administration of AOM; G5: animals received 1% red grape juice 4 weeks after the last administration of AOM; G6: animals received 2% red grape juice 4 weeks after the last administration of AOM; G7: animals received only 2% red grape juice. COX-2 mRNA expression was reduced in animals treated with 1% red grape juice before AOM induction or 2% red grape juice after AOM induction. COX-2 immunoexpression was also reduced to groups treated with red grape juice at 1% before and after AOM induction or 2% red grape juice after AOM induction. Decreased immunoexpression of Ki-67 positive cells was observed in animals treated with 1% grape juice before AOM-treated animals. Taken together, grape juice concentrate is able to exert some chemopreventive activity on rat colon carcinogenesis.

  12. Effect of fermented oatmeal soup on the cholesterol level and the Lactobacillus colonization of rat intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Molin, G; Andersson, R; Ahrné, S; Lönner, C; Marklinder, I; Johansson, M L; Jeppsson, B; Bengmark, S

    1992-04-01

    Rats were fed with freeze-dried oatmeal soup fermented by six different Lactobacillus strains from rat and man; the formula is intended for enteral feeding. The serum cholesterol levels after 10 d were lower for rats eating oatmeal as compared to a commercial product, Biosorb Sond. Colonizing ability of the administered strains were evaluated in vivo. Only Lactobacillus reuteri R21c were able to, effectively, colonizing the mucosa; it represented about 30% of the Lactobacillus population 24 d after termination of the administration. L. reuteri R21c was easily recognized by the ability to produce a yellow pigment on agar plates. The identity was confirmed by carbohydrate fermentations (API 50CH), plasmid pattern and endonuclease restriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA. PMID:1519914

  13. Effect of fermented oatmeal soup on the cholesterol level and the Lactobacillus colonization of rat intestinal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Molin, G; Andersson, R; Ahrné, S; Lönner, C; Marklinder, I; Johansson, M L; Jeppsson, B; Bengmark, S

    1992-04-01

    Rats were fed with freeze-dried oatmeal soup fermented by six different Lactobacillus strains from rat and man; the formula is intended for enteral feeding. The serum cholesterol levels after 10 d were lower for rats eating oatmeal as compared to a commercial product, Biosorb Sond. Colonizing ability of the administered strains were evaluated in vivo. Only Lactobacillus reuteri R21c were able to, effectively, colonizing the mucosa; it represented about 30% of the Lactobacillus population 24 d after termination of the administration. L. reuteri R21c was easily recognized by the ability to produce a yellow pigment on agar plates. The identity was confirmed by carbohydrate fermentations (API 50CH), plasmid pattern and endonuclease restriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA.

  14. Inositol hexaphosphate-induced enhancement of natural killer cell activity correlates with suppression of colon carcinogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Song, Yang; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-neoplastic effect of inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6 or phytic acid) on dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon tumor in rats and its effect on blood natural killer (NK) cell activity. METHODS: Healthy Wistar rats, 4 wk old, were divided into control group (fed with common food) and InsP6 group (fed with common food+2% sodium inositol hexaphosphate in the drinking water), 15 rats in each group. Both groups were injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine subcutaneously (20 mg/kg body weight) once a week for 20 wk. Rats were killed after 21 wk. The whole large intestine was isolated to determine the general condition of tumors and to test blood NK cell activity by lactate-dehydrogenase-release assay. RESULTS: Administration of InsP6 significantly increased blood NK cell activity in DMH-induced colorectal tumor in rats. InsP6 group had a smaller tumor size on average and a smaller number of tumors than the control group. Its mortality was also higher than that in control. However, the variables of body weight and tumor incidence were not significantly different between the two groups. CONCLUSION: InsP6 can increase blood NK cell activity in DMH-induced colon tumor in rats and inhibit tumor growth and metastasis in rats. PMID:16124063

  15. Moxibustion regulates inflammatory mediators and colonic mucosal barrier in ulcerative colitis rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tie-Ming; Xu, Na; Ma, Xian-De; Bai, Zeng-Hua; Tao, Xing; Yan, Hong-Chi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To observe the efficacy and mechanism of grain-sized moxibustion at different acupoints in a rat model of ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control, UC model, grain-sized moxibustion at a single acupoint (CV 12), grain-sized moxibustion at two acupoints (CV 12 and CV 4), grain-sized moxibustion at three acupoints (CV 12, CV 4, and ST 36), and medication groups (n = 8/group). The UC model was established by enema of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. Direct moxibustion was used once a day for 7 d. Disease activity index (DAI) was evaluated before and after the treatment. Morphologic changes of intestinal tissue were observed under an optical microscope. The expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) in colonic tissue was detected using Western blot, and the levels of occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) mRNAs were detected using reverse transcription PCR. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the intestinal mucosae were incomplete in the model group, glandular structures were irregular, and submucosae were edematous, hyperemic, and infiltrated with inflammatory cells. The DAI scores and expression of TNF-α and p38MAPK were increased significantly in the model group compared to controls (Ps < 0.01), while the mRNA levels of occludin and ZO-1 were reduced significantly (Ps < 0.01). Compared with the model group, colonic mucosa and the arrangement of glands were complete and regular in the treatment groups. DAI scores and the expression of TNF-α and p38MAPK were reduced significantly in moxibustion groups compared to controls (Ps < 0.01), while the mRNA levels of occludin and ZO-1 were increased significantly (Ps < 0.01). The improvements in the above indices in the three acupoints group and the medication group were superior to those in the single and two acupoints groups (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Reduction of TNF-α and p38MAPK and increased expression of

  16. Impact of colonic mucosal lipoxin A4 synthesis capacity on healing in rats with dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Ağış, Erol R; Savaş, Berna; Melli, Mehmet

    2015-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. This study evaluates the role of colonic mucosal lipoxin A4 (LXA4) synthesis in an experimental rat model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: healthy controls, DSS-induced colitis with no or vehicle therapy, misoprostol or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy groups. Disease severity and colonic mucosal LXA4 synthesis was assessed specifically during the acute phase (day 5), chronic phase (day 15) and healing phases (day 19). Both misoprostol and 5-ASA reduced histopathologic score during the acute phase and reduced disease activity score at the healing phase. In addition, misoprostol reduced histopathologic score and colon weight/length ratio during the healing phase. Only misoprostol therapy increased colonic mucosal LXA4 synthesis. Furthermore, LXA4 levels correlated negatively with disease progression (R=-0.953). Collectively, our findings suggest that misoprostol-induced LXA4 synthesis may be favorable for the healing of ulcerative colitis.

  17. Involvement of the dopaminergic system in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Miyagishi, Saori; Ohhira, Masumi

    2015-09-25

    We have recently demonstrated that orexin acts centrally in the brain to induce antinociceptive action against colonic distension through orexin 1 receptors in conscious rats. Although the dopaminergic system can induce antinociceptive action for somatic pain, the association between changes in the dopaminergic system and visceral pain perception has not been investigated. In the present study, we hypothesized that the dopaminergic system may be involved in visceral nociception, and if so, the dopaminergic system may mediate the orexin-induced visceral antinociception. Visceral sensation was evaluated using the colonic distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in conscious rats. Intracisternal injection of D1 (SKF38398) or D2 (quinpirole) dopamine receptor agonist increased the threshold volume of colonic distension-induced AWR in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with either the D1 or D2 dopamine receptor antagonist (SCH23390 or sulpiride, respectively) potently blocked the centrally injected orexin-A-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. These results suggest for the first time that dopaminergic signaling via D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in the brain may induce visceral antinociception and that the dopaminergic signaling may be involved in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension.

  18. Neonatal maternal deprivation sensitizes voltage-gated sodium channel currents in colon-specific dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shufen; Xiao, Ying; Zhu, Liyan; Li, Lin; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-02-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain in association with altered bowel movements. The underlying mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain elusive. This study was designed to examine the role for sodium channels in a rat model of chronic visceral hyperalgesia induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD). Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores were performed on adult male rats. Colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were labeled with DiI and acutely dissociated for measuring excitability and sodium channel current under whole-cell patch-clamp configurations. The expression of Na(V)1.8 was analyzed by Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR. NMD significantly increased AWR scores, which lasted for ~6 wk in an association with hyperexcitability of colon DRG neurons. TTX-resistant but not TTX-sensitive sodium current density was greatly enhanced in colon DRG neurons in NMD rats. Compared with controls, activation curves showed a leftward shift in NMD rats whereas inactivation curves did not differ significantly. NMD markedly accelerated the activation time of peak current amplitude without any changes in inactivation time. Furthermore, NMD remarkably enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels but not at mRNA levels in colon-related DRGs. The expression of Na(V)1.9 was not altered after NMD. These data suggest that NMD enhances TTX-resistant sodium activity of colon DRG neurons, which is most likely mediated by a leftward shift of activation curve and by enhanced expression of Na(V)1.8 at protein levels, thus identifying a specific molecular mechanism underlying chronic visceral pain and sensitization in patients with IBS. PMID:23139220

  19. Butyrate enemas enhance both cholinergic and nitrergic phenotype of myenteric neurons and neuromuscular transmission in newborn rat colon.

    PubMed

    Suply, Etienne; de Vries, Philine; Soret, Rodolphe; Cossais, François; Neunlist, Michel

    2012-06-15

    Postnatal changes in the enteric nervous system (ENS) are involved in the establishment of colonic motility. In adult rats, butyrate induced neuroplastic changes in the ENS, leading to enhanced colonic motility. Whether butyrate can induce similar changes during the postnatal period remains unknown. Enemas (Na-butyrate) were performed daily in rat pups between postnatal day (PND) 7 and PND 17. Effects of butyrate were evaluated on morphological and histological parameters in the distal colon at PND 21. The neurochemical phenotype of colonic submucosal and myenteric neurons was analyzed using antibodies against Hu, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Colonic motility and neuromuscular transmission was assessed in vivo and ex vivo. Butyrate (2.5 mM) enemas had no impact on pup growth and histological parameters compared with control. Butyrate did not modify the number of Hu-immunoreactive (IR) neurons per ganglia. A significant increase in the proportion (per Hu-IR neurons) of nNOS-IR myenteric and submucosal neurons and ChAT-IR myenteric neurons was observed in the distal colon after butyrate enemas compared with control. In addition, butyrate induced a significant increase in both nitrergic and cholinergic components of the neuromuscular transmission compared with control. Finally, butyrate increased distal colonic transit time compared with control. We concluded that butyrate enemas induced neuroplastic changes in myenteric and submucosal neurons, leading to changes in gastrointestinal functions. Our results support exploration of butyrate as potential therapy for motility disorders in preterm infants with delayed maturation of the ENS.

  20. Oral supplementation with troxerutin (trihydroxyethylrutin), modulates lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, R; Vinoth Kumar, R; Karthikkumar, V; Viswanathan, P; Kabalimoorthy, J; Nalini, N

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the chemopreventive potential of troxerutin on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced rat colon carcinogenesis by evaluating the antioxidant and lipid peroxidation (LPO) status. Rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group I rats served as control. Group II rats received troxerutin (50 mg/kgb.w., p.o.) for 16 weeks. Groups III-VI rats received subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kgb.w., s.c.) once a week, for the first 4 weeks. In addition to DMH, groups IV-VI rats received troxerutin at the doses of 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kgb.w., respectively. In DMH treated rats, our results showed decreased activities of antioxidants and increased levels of LPO in the liver. Moreover, LPO and antioxidants in the colon were found to be significantly diminished in DMH the treated rats. Furthermore, enhanced activity of colonic vitamin C and vitamin E levels were observed in DMH alone treated rats (group III), which was significantly reversed on troxerutin supplementation. Troxerutin at the dose of 25 mg/kgb.w. had shown profound beneficial effects by exhibiting near normal biochemical profile and well-preserved colon histology as compared to the other two tested doses (12.5 and 50 mg/kgb.w.). These findings suggest that troxerutin could serve as a novel agent for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  1. Reduced susceptibility to azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci formation and colon cancer in growth hormone deficient rats

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Robert E.; Goodlad, Robert A.; Poole, Aleksandra J.; Tyner, Angela L.; Robey, R. Brooks; Swanson, Steven M.; Unterman, Terry G.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the role of GH in colon carcinogenesis, we examined the formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACFs) and tumor development in wild type (WT) and GH-deficient, spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs) exposed to the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). Design ACF were quantified by stereomicroscopy and tumor number and weights were recorded for each animal. Cell proliferation was measured by vincristine metaphase arrest, flow cytometry, and bromode-oxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Apoptosis was measured by TUNEL staining and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. IGF-I was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Hexokinase activity was measured by spectrophotometric assay. PARP cleavage, and IGF-IR, and p27kip/cip expression were measured by Western blotting. Results ACFs detected by stereomicroscopy were markedly reduced (~85%) in SDRs vs. WT rats at 10, 25, and 28 weeks after AOM. Tumor incidence, number, and weight also were reduced in SDR vs. WT animals. AOM treatment increased cell proliferation in the distal colon (where tumors occur) of WT rats but not SDRs, and these changes corresponded to increased ACF and tumor formation. Apoptosis rates were similar in AOM-treated WT and SDRs. Alterations in serum IGF-I levels may contribute to differences in the proliferative response to AOM and decreased ACF formation in SDR vs. WT rats. Conclusions We conclude that early neoplastic lesions (ACFs) were reduced in GH-deficient animals. This effect corresponds with differences in AOM-induced proliferation, but not apoptosis. These data indicate that GH is required for the full effect of AOM on colon ACF and tumor development, and that the SDR rat is a promising model for studies regarding the role of GH/IGF system in the initiation and promotion of colon cancer. PMID:19406679

  2. Extravirgin olive oil up-regulates CB₁ tumor suppressor gene in human colon cancer cells and in rat colon via epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Di Francesco, Andrea; Falconi, Anastasia; Di Germanio, Clara; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Costa, Antonio; Caramuta, Stefano; Del Carlo, Michele; Compagnone, Dario; Dainese, Enrico; Cifani, Carlo; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-03-01

    Extravirgin olive oil (EVOO) represents the typical lipid source of the Mediterranean diet, an eating habit pattern that has been associated with a significant reduction of cancer risk. Diet is the more studied environmental factor in epigenetics, and many evidences suggest dysregulation of epigenetic pathways in cancer. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of EVOO and its phenolic compounds on endocannabinoid system (ECS) gene expression via epigenetic regulation in both human colon cancer cells (Caco-2) and rats exposed to short- and long-term dietary EVOO. We observed a selective and transient up-regulation of CNR1 gene - encoding for type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB₁) - that was evoked by exposure of Caco-2 cells to EVOO (100 ppm), its phenolic extracts (OPE, 50 μM) or authentic hydroxytyrosol (HT, 50 μM) for 24 h. None of the other major elements of the ECS (i.e., CB₂; GPR55 and TRPV1 receptors; and NAPE-PLD, DAGL, FAAH and MAGL enzymes) was affected at any time point. The stimulatory effect of OPE and HT on CB₁ expression was inversely correlated to DNA methylation at CNR1 promoter and was associated with reduced proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, CNR1 gene was less expressed in Caco-2 cells when compared to normal colon mucosa cells, and again this effect was associated with higher level of DNA methylation at CNR1. Moreover, in agreement with the in vitro studies, we also observed a remarkable (~4-fold) and selective increase in CB₁ expression in the colon of rats receiving dietary EVOO supplementation for 10 days. Consistently, CpG methylation of rat Cnr1 promoter, miR23a and miR-301a, previously shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer and predicted to target CB₁ mRNA, was reduced after EVOO administration down to ~50% of controls. Taken together, our findings demonstrating CB₁ gene expression modulation by EVOO or its phenolic compounds via epigenetic mechanism, both in vitro and in vivo, may

  3. Dietary elevated sucrose modulation of diesel-induced genotoxicity in the colon and liver of Big Blue rats.

    PubMed

    Risom, Lotte; Møller, Peter; Hansen, Max; Autrup, Herman; Bornholdt, Jette; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Poulsen, Henrik E; Dragsted, Lars O; Loft, Steffen

    2003-11-01

    Earlier studies have indicated that sucrose possesses either co-carcinogenic or tumor-promoter effects in colon carcinogenesis induced by genotoxic carcinogens. In this study we investigated the role of sucrose on diesel exhaust particle (DEP)-induced genotoxicity in the colonic mucosa and liver. Big Blue rats were fed with DEP (0.8 ppm in feed) and/or sucrose (3.45% or 6.85% w/w in feed) for 3 weeks. DEP increased both DNA strand breaks and DNA adducts in colon. Interestingly, sucrose also increased the level of bulky DNA adducts in colon. DEP and sucrose had no effect on DNA strand-breaks and DNA adducts in liver. DEP and sucrose treatment did not have any effect on mutation frequency in colon and liver. Oxidative DNA damage detected as 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and endonuclease III or formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase sensitive sites was unaltered in colon and liver. The mRNA expression levels of the DNA repair enzymes N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase ( MPG), 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase ( OGG1) and ERCC1 (part of the nucleotide excision repair complex) measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were increased in liver by DEP feeding. In colon, expression was unaffected by DEP or sucrose feeding. Among biomarkers of oxidative stress, including vitamin C, malondialdehyde and protein oxidations (gamma-glutamyl semialdehyde and 2-amino adipic semialdehyde) in plasma and liver, only malondialdehyde was increased in plasma by sucrose/DEP feeding. In conclusion, sucrose feeding did not increase DEP-induced DNA damage in colon or liver. PMID:12937889

  4. pH regulation in isolated in vitro perfused rat colonic crypts.

    PubMed

    Hasselblatt, P; Warth, R; Schulz-Baldes, A; Greger, R; Bleich, M

    2000-11-01

    We investigated disorders and regulation of cytosolic pH (pHi) in isolated perfused crypts from rat distal colon using the pH-sensitive dye BCECF. This preparation allows distinct examination of either luminal or basolateral transport. The effects of luminal weak organic acids and bases on pHi were examined. The physiological concentrations of both luminal CO2/HCO3- and acetic acid/acetate acidified pHi significantly, but less than when applied from the basolateral side. Corresponding changes (luminal versus basolateral) in pHi were -0.17+/-0.04 versus -0.39+/-0.04, (n=8) and -0.15+/-0.02 versus -0.41+/-0.04, (n=8), respectively. Basolateral versus luminal application of NH3/NH4+ led to a more marked change in pHi, namely 0.35+/-0.03 versus 0.008+/-0.007 pH units, (n=19). The luminal perfusion of NH3/NH4+ was controlled by applying fura-2 acid to the luminal side and at the same time recording fura-2-specific fluorescence. Hence, the influence of luminal acid/base on colonic pHi homeostasis was limited. To examine pHi regulation, we investigated the recovery from an intracellular acid load using the NH3/NH4+ pulse method. Recovery was completely dependent on basolateral Na+, indicating that luminal acid/base transport does not play a major role in pHi homeostasis. The basolateral transporters involved in pHi recovery are probably the EIPA- and HOE694-inhibitable (IC50=0.2 and 2 micromol/l, respectively) Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 and the DIDS-inhibitable Na+-dependent HCO3- importer. PMID:11205049

  5. The electrical basis for enhanced potassium secretion in rat distal colon during dietary potassium loading.

    PubMed

    Sandle, G I; Foster, E S; Lewis, S A; Binder, H J; Hayslett, J P

    1985-04-01

    Previous studies in rat distal colon provide evidence for an active absorptive process for potassium under basal conditions, and for active potassium secretion during chronic dietary potassium loading. The present studies were performed with conventional and potassium-selective microelectrodes to determine the electrical basis for the increase in transcellular (active) potassium secretion observed during potassium loading. Compared to control tissues, potassium loading resulted in a 5-fold increase in transepithelial voltage (VT) and a 52% decrease in total resistance (RT) in the distal colon. The rise in VT was due to a decrease in apical membrane resistance and an increase in basolateral membrane voltage from -45 +/- 2 mV (cell interior negative) in control to -56 +/- 2 mV (p less than 0.001) in potassium loaded tissues. This difference in basolateral membrane voltage reflected in increase in intracellular potassium activity from 86 +/- 4 mM to 153 +/- 12 mM (P less than 0.001). In control tissues, the sequential mucosal addition of the sodium channel blocker amiloride (0.1 mM) and the potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA: 30 mM) produced no effect on the electrical measurements. However, in potassium loaded tissues, amiloride and TEA produced transepithelial changes consistent with inhibition of apical membrane conductances for sodium and potassium, respectively, reflected by increases in the resistance ratio, alpha (ratio of apical to basolateral membrane resistances). These data indicate that the decrease in apical membrane resistance during potassium loading was caused by an increase in apical membrane conductance for both potassium and sodium.

  6. Protective effect of acetaminophen against colon cancer initiation effects of 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl in rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, G M; Iatropoulos, M J; Jeffrey, A M; Shirai, T

    2002-02-01

    A previous investigation demonstrated the anticarcinogenicity of acetaminophen (APAP) against colon carcinogenesis in rats induced by 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl (DMAB). DMAB was selected as a structurally related surrogate for heterocyclic amines, formed during cooking of protein, which are believed to be involved in human colon cancer. The objective of the present study was to ascertain whether the early initiating effects of this colon carcinogen are inhibited by APAP. Six groups of male F344 rats were treated over a 6-week period as follows: (1) vehicle (corn oil) for 6 weeks; (2) APAP in the diet at 1000 ppm daily for 6 weeks; (3) 50 mg/kg DMAB by gavage once a week for the last 4 weeks; (4) 5 mg/kg DMAB as for (3); (5) 1000 ppm APAP for 6 weeks and 50 mg/kg DMAB for the last 4 weeks; and (6) 1000 ppm APAP and 5 mg/kg DMAB as for (5). Colonic tissue was within normal limits in the control and APAP groups. In the APAP only group, apical enterocytic hypertrophy and hyperaemia over the entire surface epithelium was present. In the high-dose DMAB group, in the lower third of the crypts, foci of enlarged glands with hypertrophic cells exhibiting karyomegaly and anisokaryosis (FHE) of 3+ degree of severity were evident in 100% of the animals. Also, there were increases in periglandular fibrocytes, matrix and mononuclear cells (PF). In the low-dose DMAB group both FHE and PF changes with the same degree of severity were reduced. In rats given the low dose of DMAB plus APAP, FHE and PF with the same degree of severity (3+) was absent. Both DMAB exposures increased significantly the replicating fraction of colonic enterocytes in an exposure-related fashion and the replicating fractions were significantly reduced by APAP. In 32P-postlabelling of colon, liver and urinary bladder DNA, high-dose DMAB produced 2-6 distinct dose-related spots reflecting DNA adducts. These spots were reduced or were no longer detectable in all three tissues when APAP was given 2 weeks

  7. Cholecalciferol or 25-Hydroxycholecalciferol Neither Prevents Nor Treats Adenomas in a Rat Model of Familial Colon Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Amy A; Plum, Lori A; Blaser, William J; Ford, Madeline R; Weng, Chao; Clipson, Linda; DeLuca, Hector F; Dove, William F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic studies in humans have shown associations between greater sunlight exposure, higher serum 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D3] concentrations, and reduced colon cancer risk. However, results from a limited number of vitamin D supplementation trials in humans have not shown a protective effect. Objective: We sought to determine whether adding to the diet increasing amounts of either 25(OH)D3, the stable metabolite measured in serum and associated with cancer risk, or cholecalciferol (vitamin D3), the compound commonly used for supplementation in humans, could reduce emergent adenomas (chemoprevention) or decrease the growth of existing adenomas (treatment) in the colons of vitamin D–sufficient rats carrying a truncation mutation of adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc), a model of early intestinal cancer. Methods: ApcPirc/+ rats were supplemented with either vitamin D3 over a range of 4 doses [6–1500 μg/(kg body weight · d)] or with 25(OH)D3 over a range of 6 doses [60–4500 μg/(kg body weight · d)] beginning after weaning. Rats underwent colonoscopy every other week to assess effects on adenoma number and size. At termination (140 d of age), the number of tumors in the small intestine and colon and the size of tumors in the colon were determined, and serum calcium and 25(OH)D3 measurements were obtained. Results: At lower doses (those that did not affect body weight), neither of the vitamin D compounds reduced the number of existing or emergent colonic tumors (P-trend > 0.24). By contrast, supplementation at higher doses (those that caused a suppression in body weight gain) with either 25(OH)D3 or vitamin D3 caused a dose-dependent increase in colonic tumor number in both males and females (P-trend < 0.003). Conclusions: No evidence for protection against colon tumor development was seen with lower dose supplementation with either cholecalciferol or 25-hydroxycholecalciferol. Thus, the association between sunlight exposure and the

  8. Enhanced sympathetic nerve activity induced by neonatal colon inflammation induces gastric hypersensitivity and anxiety-like behavior in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Winston, John H; Sarna, Sushil K

    2016-07-01

    Gastric hypersensitivity (GHS) and anxiety are prevalent in functional dyspepsia patients; their underlying mechanisms remain unknown largely because of lack of availability of live visceral tissues from human subjects. Recently, we demonstrated in a preclinical model that rats subjected to neonatal colon inflammation show increased basal plasma norepinephrine (NE), which contributes to GHS through the upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the gastric fundus. We tested the hypothesis that neonatal colon inflammation increases anxiety-like behavior and sympathetic nervous system activity, which upregulates the expression of NGF to induce GHS in adult life. Chemical sympathectomy, but not adrenalectomy, suppressed the elevated NGF expression in the fundus muscularis externa and GHS. The measurement of heart rate variability showed a significant increase in the low frequency-to-high frequency ratio in GHS vs. the control rats. Stimulus-evoked release of NE from the fundus muscularis externa strips was significantly greater in GHS than in the control rats. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased in the celiac ganglia of the GHS vs. the control rats. We found an increase in trait but not stress-induced anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats in an elevated plus maze. We concluded that neonatal programming triggered by colon inflammation upregulates tyrosine hydroxylase in the celiac ganglia, which upregulates the release of NE in the gastric fundus muscularis externa. The increase of NE release from the sympathetic nerve terminals concentration dependently upregulates NGF, which proportionately increases the visceromotor response to gastric distention. Neonatal programming concurrently increases anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats. PMID:27151940

  9. Possible mechanisms behind the differential effects of soy protein and casein feedings on colon cancer biomarkers in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vis, Eric H; Geerse, Gert-Jan; Klaassens, Eline S; van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Alink, Gerrit M

    2005-01-01

    In the present studies, several hypotheses were tested to explain previously reported differential effects of soy and casein on colon cancer biomarkers like cell proliferation, fecal fat, fecal bile acid, alkaline phosphatase, and magnesium excretion in rats. In Study 1, the effect of methionine, a limiting amino acid in soy protein and an amino acid that is thought to have a marked effect on colonic cell proliferation, was tested. It was concluded that methionine up to 1% in the diet had no effect on cell proliferation, using the 3H-thymidine assay. The same study revealed that fecal alkaline phosphatase excretion is a good marker for colonic epithelial damage and fecal magnesium excretion is not. In Study 2, the hypothesis was tested that soy fractions enriched with isoflavones and saponins may increase fat excretion and so influence colonic cell proliferation in rats. It was indeed shown that soy protein isolate and an ethanolic extract from soy protein isolate slightly increased fecal fat excretion (up to 1.7-fold). However, fecal water bile acid and free fatty acid concentrations were decreased after feeding soy protein-based diets compared with casein, and no difference in fecal alkaline phosphatase excretion was observed. In Study 3, the lytic potential of soy saponins and the interaction between saponins and some lytic bile acids were tested in vitro. Data suggest a protective effect from soy saponins by reducing lytic activity of cholic acid. The overall conclusion is that soy protein compared with casein influences several colon cancer risk parameters, indicating a more protective rather than a stimulating effect on colon cancer risk.

  10. Multiple mucin depleted foci, high proliferation and low apoptotic response in the onset of colon carcinogenesis of the PIRC rat, mutated in Apc.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Luceri, Cristina; Soares, Paulo Victoria; Lodovici, Maura; Caderni, Giovanna

    2015-03-15

    PIRC rats (F344/NTac-Apc (am1137) ) mutated in the Apc gene spontaneously develop colon tumors thus mimicking familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) more closely than Apc-based rodent models developing tumors mostly in the small intestine. To understand whether microscopic dysplastic lesions precede the development of macroscopic tumors, PIRC rat colon was examined for the presence of mucin depleted foci (MDF), microadenomas of the rodent and human colon. Few MDF (about 4/animal) were already present in 1-month-old rats and their number rapidly increases to about 250 in 8-month-old rats. These lesions showed Wnt signaling activation (nuclear β-catenin accumulation) and were dramatically decreased by sulindac (320 ppm), a drug with chemopreventive activity (MDF/rat at 4 months: 156 ± 8 and 38 ± 6 in controls and sulindac-treated rats, respectively, means ± SE, p < 0.001). Since altered proliferation and apoptosis could underlie the early phases of carcinogenesis, we studied these processes in the apparently normal colon mucosa (NM) of 1-month-old PIRC and wt rats. Colon proliferation (PCNA expression) was significantly higher in PIRC rats. Notably, PIRC rat NM showed resistance to apoptosis since it sustained proliferation and had lower apoptosis after a cytotoxic insult with 1,2 dimethylhydrazine. Gene expression of Myc, p21, Birc5, Ogg1, Apex1 and Sod2 were significantly up-regulated in the NM of PIRC rat. The overall results put forward PIRC rat as useful model of colon carcinogenesis, either to study the process itself or to test in vivo chemopreventive agents in both short- and long-term studies.

  11. Dietary fibers and fats alter rat colon protein kinase C activity: correlation to cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chapkin, R S; Gao, J; Lee, D Y; Lupton, J R

    1993-04-01

    Protein kinase C activity and cell proliferation in rat proximal colonic mucosa were determined following diet modification with select fibers and fats for 3 wk. Rats were assigned to one of nine dietary groups: three fibers (cellulose or pectin at 6 g/100 g diet or fiber free) x three fats (beef tallow, corn oil, fish oil at 15 g/100 g diet). Protein kinase C activity was determined by measuring the phosphorylation of a highly selective synthetic peptide derived from myelin basic protein. In vivo cell proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation into DNA. There was a significant main effect of fat (P = 0.0008) but not fiber (P = 0.375) on the ratio of membrane to cytosolic protein kinase C with diets containing fish oils resulting in the highest ratios, corn oils in the lowest ratios and beef tallow producing an intermediate ratio. There was an interactive effect of fat and fiber on the proliferative zone (P = 0.04). Pectin resulted in a significantly greater proliferative zone than did cellulose and the fiber-free diet but only when the fat source was corn oil. There was a positive correlation between proliferative zone and both membrane protein kinase C activity (r = 0.76, P = 0.02) and protein kinase C membrane:cytosol ratio (r = 0.64, P = 0.06). Although the positive relationship between proliferative zone and protein kinase C activity has been reported previously, the high membrane protein kinase C activity found with fish oil supplementation compared to the low activity found with corn oil supplementation was unexpected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Chemopreventive efficacy of green tea drinking against 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sadik, Nermin A H

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of tumour-related deaths. In the present study, the chemopreventive effect of green tea on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis was studied in male Wistar rats. The DMH group received subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg kg(-1) body weight) once a week for 30 weeks, the normal group received the vehicle of DMH, and the DMH + green tea group received DMH simultaneously with 1% green tea as their sole source of drinking fluid throughout the experimental period. In the DMH group treated with green tea, significant reductions in gene overexpressions of colonic nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), tumour necrosis factor α, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2, and NF-κB immunostaining indicates the anti-inflammatory effect of green tea in attenuating colon cancer. Moreover, the anti-angiogenic and anti-invasiveness effects of green tea were revealed as reductions of both vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-7 mRNA expression levels. These effects were confirmed by the significant reduction of serum tumour necrosis factor α, C-reactive protein levels, inhibition of tumour incidence, and nearly normal survival rate and colonic architecture. It can be concluded that green tea exerts a potent chemopreventive effect on colon carcinogenesis possibly due to the inhibition of NF-κB.

  13. Intracellular pH in isolated rat renal papillary thin limbs of Henle's loop.

    PubMed

    Dantzler, W H; Kim, Y K; Abbott, D E; Serrano, O K; Brokl, O H

    2000-05-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured in isolated, nonperfused and perfused rat papillary thin limbs of Henle's loops in N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethansulfonic acid (HEPES)- or HEPES/bicarbonate-buffered medium at pH 7.4 using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5,6-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). Resting pHi was about 6.7 in descending thin limbs (DTL) and about 6.9 in ascending thin limbs (ATL), even with a medium pH of 7.4. These values appeared to reflect the acid pH of the blood in the neighboring vasa recta found in vivo. The resting pHi did not differ whether or not the medium contained bicarbonate although the total buffering capacity of the tubule cells was increased in the presence of bicarbonate. In nonperfused DTL and ATL, pHi was further acidified following an NH4Cl pulse. The rate of recovery of pHi from this level to the resting pHi was reduced by Na+ removal from the bath in both DTL and ATL and by the addition of ethylisopropylamiloride (EIPA) to the bath in the presence of Na+ in DTL. The rate of recovery was not affected by Cl- removal from the bath or K+ (75 mM) or 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) addition to the bath in either DTL or ATL. These results suggest that the common, amiloride-sensitive, basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger plays a role in the regulation of pHi in rat papillary DTL but that a different basolateral Na+/H+ exchanger or a luminal Na+/H+ exchanger is important in rat papillary ATL.

  14. An electron microscopical study of chronic ulcers of the colon in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Chronic colonic ulcers in the rat were produced by the administration of a hydrogen peroxide enema. Lesions of up to 10 months' duration were obtained by this method and a selection was examined ultrastructurally. It was hoped that the study would reveal causes for the chronicity of the lesions. From previous work it appeared that there was no failure of epithelial migration from the edge of the wound. The majority of cells at the ulcer margins demonstrated features of regeneration similar to those seen in other tissues, and that there were no specific changes concomitant with chronic ulceration. The majority of epithelial cells at the ulcer edge showed features of differentiation which indicated that there was no obvious fault in this process so essential to the basic requirements of tissue repair. It is possible that chronicity is produced by a failure of the epithelio-mesenchymal interaction mechanisms which, potentiated by an ischaemia resulting from submucosal vascular damage, results in the consequential death of migrating epithelial cells. This hypothesis is supported by the appearance of a squamous metaplasia in the healing lesions, a process which is commonly attributed to a chronic inflammatory response which may be induced by a relative vascular insufficiency. Images Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:836769

  15. Alteration of the rat cecal microbiome during colonization with the helminth Hymenolepis diminuta

    PubMed Central

    McKenney, Erin A; Williamson, Lauren; Yoder, Anne D; Rawls, John F; Bilbo, Staci D; Parker, William

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome is now widely recognized as being important in health and disease, and makes up a substantial subset of the biome within the ecosystem of the vertebrate body. At the same time, multicellular, eukaryotic organisms such as helminths are being recognized as an important component of the biome that shaped the evolution of our genes. The absence of these macroscopic organisms during the early development and life of humans in Western culture probably leads to a wide range of human immunological diseases. However, the interaction between the microbiome and macroscopic components of the biome remains poorly characterized. In this study, the microbiome of the cecum in rats colonized for 2 generations with the small intestinal helminth Hymenolepis diminuta was evaluated. The introduction of this benign helminth, which is of considerable therapeutic interest, led to several changes in the cecal microbiome. Most of the changes were within the Firmicutes phylum, involved about 20% of the total bacteria, and generally entailed a shift from Bacilli to Clostridia species in the presence of the helminth. The results point toward ecological relationships between various components of the biome, with the observed shifts in the microbiome suggesting potential mechanisms by which this helminth might exert therapeutic effects. PMID:25942385

  16. Alteration of the rat cecal microbiome during colonization with the helminth Hymenolepis diminuta.

    PubMed

    McKenney, Erin A; Williamson, Lauren; Yoder, Anne D; Rawls, John F; Bilbo, Staci D; Parker, William

    2015-01-01

    The microbiome is now widely recognized as being important in health and disease, and makes up a substantial subset of the biome within the ecosystem of the vertebrate body. At the same time, multicellular, eukaryotic organisms such as helminths are being recognized as an important component of the biome that shaped the evolution of our genes. The absence of these macroscopic organisms during the early development and life of humans in Western culture probably leads to a wide range of human immunological diseases. However, the interaction between the microbiome and macroscopic components of the biome remains poorly characterized. In this study, the microbiome of the cecum in rats colonized for 2 generations with the small intestinal helminth Hymenolepis diminuta was evaluated. The introduction of this benign helminth, which is of considerable therapeutic interest, led to several changes in the cecal microbiome. Most of the changes were within the Firmicutes phylum, involved about 20% of the total bacteria, and generally entailed a shift from Bacilli to Clostridia species in the presence of the helminth. The results point toward ecological relationships between various components of the biome, with the observed shifts in the microbiome suggesting potential mechanisms by which this helminth might exert therapeutic effects.

  17. Effect of Ozone Therapy (OT) on Healing of Colonic Anastomosis in a Rat Model of Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Erginel, Başak; Erginel, Turgay; Aksoy, Bilgin; Dokucu, Ali İhsan

    2014-01-01

    significantly more oedema and necrosis in the control group rats, and collagen deposition in the anastomotic tissue was significantly higher in the ozone-treated groups on postoperative day 7. Hydroxyproline levels were significantly higher in groups O0 and O24 compared to the peritonitis group (P). Conclusion: Ozone therapy has a beneficial effect on anastomotic healing of the colon in the presence of peritonitis. PMID:25337422

  18. Comprehensive study of the intestinal stage of listeriosis in a rat ligated ileal loop system.

    PubMed

    Pron, B; Boumaila, C; Jaubert, F; Sarnacki, S; Monnet, J P; Berche, P; Gaillard, J L

    1998-02-01

    The intestinal stage of listeriosis was studied in a rat ligated ileal loop system. Listeria monocytogenes translocated to deep organs with similar efficiencies after inoculation of loops with or without Peyer's patches. Bacterial seeding of deep organs was demonstrated as early as 15 min after inoculation. It was dose dependent and nonspecific, as the delta inlAB, the delta hly, and the delta actA L. monocytogenes mutants and the nonpathogenic species, Listeria innocua, translocated similarly to wild-type L. monocytogenes strains. The levels of uptake of listeriae by Peyer's patches and villous intestine were similar and low, 50 to 250 CFU per cm2 of tissue. No listeria cells crossing the epithelial sheet of Peyer's patches and villous intestine were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The lack of significant interaction of listeriae and the follicle-associated epithelium of Peyer's patches was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The follicular tissue of Peyer's patches was a preferential site of Listeria replication. With all doses tested, the rate of bacterial growth was 10 to 20 times higher in Peyer's patches than in villous intestine. At early stages of Peyer's patch infection, listeriae were observed inside mononuclear cells of the dome area. Listeriae then disseminated throughout the follicular tissue except for the germinal center. The virulence determinants hly and, to a lesser extent, actA, but not inlAB, were required for the completion of this process. This study suggests that Peyer's patches are preferential sites for replication rather than for entry of L. monocytogenes, due to the presence of highly permissive mononuclear cells whose nature remains to be defined.

  19. Effects of four regulating-intestine prescriptions on pathology and ultrastructure of colon tissue in rats with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Heng; Qiu, Ming-Yi; Mei, Jia-Jun; Shen, Guan-Xin; Liu, Song-Lin; Chen, Rui

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe different histomorphologic changes of ulcerative colitis (UC) rats that were treated with four regulating-intestine prescriptions (FRIP), to investigate the curative effects of FRIP and to analyze their treatment mechanism. METHODS: The UC rat model was made by the method of 2,4-dinitro chloro benzene (DNCB) immunity and acetic acid local enema. Ninety-eight SD rats were randomly divided into seven groups, namely, the normal control group, model group, salicylazosulfapyridine (SASP) group, Wumeiwan (WMW) group, Baitouwengtang (BTWT) group, Senglingbaishusan (SLBSS) group, and Tongxieyaofang (TXYF) group. Each group had 14 rats (with equal ratio of male and female). The six animal model groups of UC -SASP, TXYF, WMW, BTWT, SLBSS, TXYF-were treated by distilled water except the normal control group. Changes of the rat’s general conditions after treatment were respectively observed, the colon tissue damage scores were given out, the pathology of colonic mucosa and changes of ultrastructure were analyzed. RESULTS: Different pathological changes on histology were shown after treatment by FRIP. The colon tissue damage score in model group was higher than that of FRIP groups and SASP group (q = 4.59, 4.77, P<0.05 or q = 5.48, 6.25, 5.97, P<0.01). The scores of WMW group, BTWT group and SLBSS group were lower than that of SASP (q = 4.13, P<0.05 or q = 5.31, 5.12, P<0.01). There was no remarkable difference between the damage score of TXYF group and SASP group (q = 3.75, P>0.05). In addition, some apoptosis cells were found in the pathologic control group. CONCLUSION: The model made with DNCB and acetic acid was successful, and FRIP had better curative effect and WMW was the best curative effect, BTW, SLBSS and TXYF were similar to SASP, and we discovered that apoptosis was possibly related to UC. PMID:16097047

  20. Lactic acid fermentation of germinated barley fiber and proliferative function of colonic epithelial cells in loperamide-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong Ryae; Choi, Joon Hyuk

    2010-08-01

    To develop a functional food from the dietary fiber fraction of germinated barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (GBF), lactic acid fermentation was attempted using Lactobacillus acidophilus, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Bifidobacterium bifidus. The quality characteristics of the lactic acid-fermented product and its effect on gastrointestinal function in an animal model were examined. The anaerobic fermentation of 1% and 2% GBF yielded lactic acid bacteria at 8.9 +/- 1.0 x 10(8) and 1.6 +/- 0.2 x 10(9) colony-forming units/mL, and it was considered acceptable for consumption by sensory assessment. To determine the effect on gastrointestinal function, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with three types of diets: a normal chow diet and chow diets supplemented with 10% lactic acid bacteria or a yogurt fermented with 2% GBF (GBFY). The rats fed GBFY for 6 weeks gained less body weight, excreted more fecal mass, and had improved gastrointestinal transit as examined with barium sulfate. The effect of GBFY on colonic epithelial proliferation was investigated through loperamide (LPM)-induced constipation in rats. The rats fed with GBFY for 6 weeks were intraperitoneally administered LPM twice daily for 7 days. GBFY supplementation decreased fecal excretion and moisture content in feces and depleted goblet cells as observed by hematoxylin and eosin stain. However, the rats supplemented with GBFY prior to the LPM administration had enhanced bowel movement, mucin secretion, and production of short-chain fatty acids compared with values for the LPM-alone group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the GBFY supplement increased the numbers of nuclei stained positively for Ki-67 and extended from the base to the middle zone of crypts. These results indicate that GBFY alleviates constipation via the proliferation of the colonic crypts in LPM-administered rats.

  1. Closed-loop Continuous Infusions of Etomidate and Etomidate Analogs in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cotten, Joseph F.; Le Ge, Ri; Banacos, Natalie; Pejo, Ervin; Husain, S. Shaukat; Williams, James H.; Raines, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Etomidate is a sedative–hypnotic that is often given as a single intravenous bolus but rarely as an infusion because it suppresses adrenocortical function. Methoxycarbonyl etomidate and (R)-ethyl 1-(1-phenylethyl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (carboetomidate) are etomidate analogs that do not produce significant adrenocortical suppression when given as a single bolus. However, the effects of continuous infusions on adrenocortical function are unknown. In this study, we compared the effects of continuous infusions of etomidate, methoxycarbonyl etomidate, and carboetomidate on adrenocortical function in a rat model. Methods A closed-loop system using the electroencephalographic burst suppression ratio as the feedback was used to administer continuous infusions of etomidate, methoxycarbonyl etomidate, or carboetomidate to Sprague–Dawley rats. Adrenocortical function was assessed during and after infusion by repetitively administering adrenocorticotropic hormone 1–24 and measuring serum corticosterone concentrations every 30 min. Results The sedative–hypnotic doses required to maintain a 40% burst suppression ratio in the presence of isoflurane, 1%, and the rate of burst suppression ratio recovery on infusion terminationvaried(methoxycarbonyletomidate>carboetomidate > etomidate). Serum corticosterone concentrations were reduced by 85% and 56% during 30-min infusions of etomidate and methoxycarbonyl etomidate, respectively. On infusion termination, serum corticosterone concentrations recovered within 30 min with methoxycarbonyl etomidate but persisted beyond an hour with etomidate. Carboetomidate had no effect on serum corticosterone concentrations during or after continuous infusion. Conclusions Our results suggest that methoxycarbonyl etomidate and carboetomidate may have clinical utility as sedative–hypnotic maintenance agents when hemodynamic stability is desirable. PMID:21572317

  2. Regional differences in oxalate absorption by rat intestine: evidence for excessive absorption by the colon in steatorrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, D R; Sillery, J; McDonald, G B

    1975-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that steatorrhoea can be associated with excessive absorption of dietary oxalate. We examined the influence of bile salts, Ca++, and long-chain fatty acid on the absorption of oxalate and water by rat intestine in vivo. Absorption was measured under steady-state conditions during single-pass infusions. Each intestinal segment served as its own control. In jejunum, 10 mM taurocholate, the principal salt in rat bile, depressed absorption of oxalate and water. Absorption was not depressed further by Ca++ or linoleic acid. In ileum, 10 mM taurocholate did not inhibit absorption. Linoleic acid, 2 mM, depressed absorption of both oxalate and water. In colon 10 mM taurocholate decreased absorption. Net water transport was depressed further when linoleic acid was added to the infusion, but oxalate absorption was enhanced. Ca++ negated these effects of linoleic acid. It is concluded that long-chain fatty acids may enhance the absorption of oxalate from the rat colon. This observation may be relevant to understanding hyperoxaluria in patients with steatorrhoea. PMID:1158192

  3. Oral Feeding of Probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis: Colonic Morphological Changes in Rat Model of TNBS-Induced Colitis.

    PubMed

    Javed, Najma H; Alsahly, Musaad B; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. It has been proposed that modifying the bacterial flora in intestine with probiotics may decrease the inflammatory process and prevent relapses in UC. We investigated the possible protective and therapeutic effects of a single strand of probiotic, Bifidobacterium infantis (BI), on colonic inflammation, in rats with regular feedings. Two groups of Lewis rats were prepared (n = 8). The first group was the control, sham-fed group (n = 4). The other group was the experimental BI-fed group (n = 4). Colitis was induced in both groups by intrarectal administration of TNBS under light anesthesia. The sham-fed colitis induced groups received a daily oral gavage feeding of 1.0 mL distilled water, whereas the B. infantis-fed group received 0.205 g of B. infantis dissolved in 1.0 mL distilled water daily. The change in body weight and food and water intake was recorded over the course of each study and analyzed. The rats were euthanized and tissues from the descending colon were harvested and analyzed microscopically and histologically. Results of our study indicated significant reduction in inflammation, mucosal damage, and preservation of goblet cells, as compared to the control animals. Modulation of gastrointestinal (GI) flora suggests a promising field in developing strategies for prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases by dietary modifications. PMID:27127686

  4. Cyclooxygenase as a target in chemoprevention by probiotics during 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Walia, Sohini; Kamal, Rozy; Kanwar, Sarbjit Singh; Dhawan, Davinder Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effects of potential probiotics in regulating the activity of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) along with other morphological and histological analysis during 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. The rats were divided into 6 groups viz., normal control, Lactobacillus plantarum (AdF10) treated, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) treated, DMH treated, AdF10 + DMH treated and LGG + DMH treated. Probiotics were supplemented to rats at dose levels of 2 × 10(10) cells per day for 6 days in a week. All the treatments were continued for a period of 16 wk. DMH treatment resulted in a statistically significant increase in the levels of total sialic acid (TSA). However, on supplementation with probiotics, a significant reduction in TSA was observed. DMH treatment brought about a significant increase in the expression of COX-2. But, supplementation of probiotics brought down the protein expression to moderate level. Further, supplementation with probiotics was also able to reduce tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity and average tumor size. Therefore, treatment with probiotics has the potential of providing protection against colon cancer by suppressing the COX-2 expression as one of the protective mechanisms. PMID:25811420

  5. Oral Feeding of Probiotic Bifidobacterium infantis: Colonic Morphological Changes in Rat Model of TNBS-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Najma H.; Alsahly, Musaad B.; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. It has been proposed that modifying the bacterial flora in intestine with probiotics may decrease the inflammatory process and prevent relapses in UC. We investigated the possible protective and therapeutic effects of a single strand of probiotic, Bifidobacterium infantis (BI), on colonic inflammation, in rats with regular feedings. Two groups of Lewis rats were prepared (n = 8). The first group was the control, sham-fed group (n = 4). The other group was the experimental BI-fed group (n = 4). Colitis was induced in both groups by intrarectal administration of TNBS under light anesthesia. The sham-fed colitis induced groups received a daily oral gavage feeding of 1.0 mL distilled water, whereas the B. infantis-fed group received 0.205 g of B. infantis dissolved in 1.0 mL distilled water daily. The change in body weight and food and water intake was recorded over the course of each study and analyzed. The rats were euthanized and tissues from the descending colon were harvested and analyzed microscopically and histologically. Results of our study indicated significant reduction in inflammation, mucosal damage, and preservation of goblet cells, as compared to the control animals. Modulation of gastrointestinal (GI) flora suggests a promising field in developing strategies for prevention and treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases by dietary modifications. PMID:27127686

  6. Dietary selenomethionine increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in rat liver and colon mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Yan, Lin; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Uthus, Eric O

    2011-08-01

    The regulation of site-specific DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been considered as a leading mechanism by which certain nutrients exert their anticancer property. This study was to investigate whether selenium (Se) affects the methylation of globe genomic DNA and the exon-specific p53 gene. Three groups of rats (n = 6-7/group) were fed the AIN-93G basal diet supplemented with 0 [Se deficient (D)], 0.15 [Se adequate (A)], or 4 mg [Se supranutritional (S)] (Se as l-selenomethionine)/kg diet for 104 d, respectively. Rats fed the A or S diet had greater plasma and liver glutathione peroxidase activity, liver thioredoxin reductase activity, and plasma homocysteine concentration than those fed the D diet. However, compared with the A diet, rats fed the S diet did not further increase these Se-dependent enzyme activities or homocysteine concentration. In contrast, Se concentrations in kidney, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and plasma were increased in a Se-dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, rats fed the S diet had significantly less global liver genomic DNA methylation than those fed the D diet. However, the S diet significantly increased the methylation of the p53 gene (exons 5-8) but not the β-actin gene (exons 2-3) DNA in liver and colon mucosa compared with those fed the D diet. Taken together, long-term Se consumption not only affects selenoprotein enzyme activities, homocysteine, tissue Se concentrations, and global genomic DNA methylation but also increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in a Se-dose-dependent manner in rat liver and colon mucosa.

  7. Impaired barrier function by dietary fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) in rats is accompanied by increased colonic mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Vink, Carolien; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2008-01-01

    Background Dietary non-digestible carbohydrates stimulate the gut microflora and are therefore presumed to improve host resistance to intestinal infections. However, several strictly controlled rat infection studies showed that non-digestible fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) increase, rather than decrease, translocation of Salmonella towards extra-intestinal sites. In addition, it was shown that FOS increases intestinal permeability already before infection. The mechanism responsible for this adverse effect of FOS is unclear. Possible explanations are altered mucosal integrity due to changes in tight junctions or changes in expression of defense molecules such as antimicrobials and mucins. To examine the mechanisms underlying weakening of the intestinal barrier by FOS, a controlled dietary intervention study was performed. Two groups of 12 rats were adapted to a diet with or without FOS. mRNA was collected from colonic mucosa and changes in gene expression were assessed for each individual rat using Agilent rat whole genome microarrays. Results Among the 997 FOS induced genes we observed less mucosal integrity related genes than expected with the clear permeability changes. FOS did not induce changes in tight junction genes and only 8 genes related to mucosal defense were induced by FOS. These small effects are unlikely the cause for the clear increase in intestinal permeability that is observed. FOS significantly increased expression of 177 mitochondria-related genes. More specifically, induced expression of genes involved in all five OXPHOS complexes and the TCA cycle was observed. These results indicate that dietary FOS influences intestinal mucosal energy metabolism. Furthermore, increased expression of 113 genes related to protein turnover, including proteasome genes, ribosomal genes and protein maturation related genes, was seen. FOS upregulated expression of the peptide hormone proglucagon gene, in agreement with previous studies, as well as three other peptide

  8. Soluble Fiber Dextrin and Soluble Corn Fiber Supplementation Modify Indices of Health in Cecum and Colon of Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Brenda K.; Bauer, Laura L.; Swanson, Kelly S.; Tappenden, Kelly A.; Fahey, George C.; de Godoy, Maria R. C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate health outcomes resulting from dietary supplementation of novel, low-digestible carbohydrates in the cecum and colon of Sprague-Dawley rats randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups for 21 days: 5% cellulose (Control), Pectin, soluble fiber dextrin (SFD), or soluble corn fiber (SCF). Rats fed Pectin had a higher average daily food intake, but no differences in final body weights or rates of weight gain among treatments were observed. No differences were observed in total short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) or branched-chain fatty acid (BCFA) concentrations in the cecum and colon of rats fed either SFD or SCF. The SFD and SCF treatments increased cecal propionate and decreased butyrate concentrations compared to Control or Pectin. Pectin resulted in increased BCFA in the cecum and colon. Supplementation of SFD and SCF had no effect on cecal microbial populations compared to Control. Consumption of SFD and SCF increased total and empty cecal weight but not colon weight. Gut histomorphology was positively affected by SFD and SCF. Increased crypt depth, goblet cell numbers, and acidic mucin were observed in both the cecum and colon of rats supplemented with SFD, SCF, and Pectin. These novel, low-digestible carbohydrates appear to be beneficial in modulating indices of hindgut morphology when supplemented in the diet of the rat. PMID:23381099

  9. Effect of dietary cellulose on cell proliferation and progression of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Heitman, D W; Ord, V A; Hunter, K E; Cameron, I L

    1989-10-15

    The effects of different levels of dietary cellulose on colonic crypt mitotic activity and colon carcinogenesis were studied in 190 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were divided into groups and fed a basal fiber-free diet supplemented with either 0, 5, or 15% pure cellulose (w/w), for periods of 10 weeks (initiation stage) or 32 weeks (promotional stage). Half of the rats in each group were given weekly s.c. injections of 9.5 mg 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (the base) (DMH) for 8 weeks. Some of the rats were killed at 10 weeks while most were killed 22 weeks later. In some groups the dietary cellulose level was changed to a different level at 10 weeks. Food intake and body weight data showed that the rats within each experiment were isocalorically fed. There was a direct correlation between crypt height and the percentage of cellulose in the diet. Addition of 5 or 15% dietary cellulose during the initiation stage of carcinogenesis resulted in a significant increase in crypt height. Increasing dietary cellulose after the initiation stage (0 to 5% and 5 to 15%) or maintaining a high dietary cellulose level throughout both the initiation and promotional stages (15%) resulted in a significant increase in crypt height. A DMH-induced increase in mitotic activity that was observed during the initiation stage was no longer evident after the 22-week promotional stage. The significant DMH-induced increases in proliferative zone height and crypt height that were initially observed during the initiation stage were also observed after the 22-week promotional stage. These data indicate that the initial DMH-induced increases observed in proliferative zone height and crypt height are irreversible. Addition of 5 or 15% cellulose was found to suppress DMH-enhanced mitotic activity in the crypts of the descending colon during the initiation stage of carcinogenesis. This finding was correlated with a significantly lower incidence of adenocarcinomas in rats maintained on 5 or 15% cellulose

  10. δ- and γ-tocopherols, but not α-tocopherol, inhibit colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane-treated F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fei; Li, Guangxun; Liu, Anna B; Lee, Mao-Jung; Yang, Zhihong; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung; Yang, Chung S

    2012-04-01

    The cancer preventive activity of vitamin E has been extensively discussed, but the activities of specific forms of tocopherols have not received sufficient attention. Herein, we compared the activities of δ-tocopherol (δ-T), γ-T, and α-T in a colon carcinogenesis model. Male F344 rats, seven weeks old, were given two weekly subcutaneous injections of azoxymethane (AOM) each at a dose of 15 mg/kg body weight. Starting 1 week before the AOM injection, the animals were maintained on a modified AIN76A diet, or the same diet containing 0.2% of δ-T, γ-T, α-T, or a γ-T-rich mixture of tocopherols (γ-TmT), until the termination of the experiment at 8 weeks after the second AOM injection. δ-T treatment showed the strongest inhibitory effect, decreasing the numbers of aberrant crypt foci by 62%. γ-T and γ-TmT were also effective, but α-T was not. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that δ-T and γ-T treatments reduced the levels of 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine and the expression of cyclin D1 in the colon, preserved the expression of PPAR-γ, and decreased the serum levels of prostaglandin E2 and 8-isoprostane. Supplementation with 0.2% δ-T, γ-T, or α-T increased the respective levels of tocopherols and their side-chain degradation metabolites in the serum and colon tissues. Rather high concentrations of δ-T and γ-T and their metabolites were found in colon tissues. Our study provides the first evidence for the much higher cancer preventive activity of δ-T and γ-T than α-T in a chemically induced colon carcinogenesis model. It further suggests that δ-T is more effective than γ-T.

  11. The effect of red beet (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) fiber on alimentary hypercholesterolemia and chemically induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bobek, P; Galbavý, S; Mariássyová, M

    2000-06-01

    The effect of diet supplemented with 5% and 15% cellulose or with 15% fiber isolated from red beet (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) on the development of alimentary hypercholesterolemia and chemically induced colon carcinoma was studied in male Wistar rats. Hypercholesterolemia was induced by a diet containing 0.3% of cholesterol and colon carcinoma was induced by treatment with dimethylhydrazine (20 mg/kg, 12 doses applied s.c. in one-week intervals). Fibrous matter isolated from red beet contained 89% fiber, of which 9% was in water soluble form. Animals were killed 14 weeks after the application of dimethylhydrazine (i.e. 26 weeks after starting on the diets). Red beet fiber diet (and not the increased cellulose intake) caused a reduction of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels (by 30 and 40%, respectively) and a significant increase in the fraction of cholesterol carried in HDL. This diet induced also a significant decrease (almost by 30%) of cholesterol content in aorta. Higher cellulose content in the diet and even more so the administration of red beet fiber caused a significant reduction of conjugated dienes content in plasma, erythrocytes and in liver. Also observed were increases in the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase in erythrocytes and in colon and activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase in liver. The presence of both higher cellulose content and red beet fiber in the diet significantly reduced the incidence of precancerous lesions--aberrant crypt foci--in the colon. The diet containing red beet fiber did not affect significantly the incidence of colon tumours although the number of animals bearing tumours was reduced by 30%.

  12. Inhibition of ileal and colonic ornithine decarboxylase activity by alpha-difluoromethylornithine in rats: transient atrophic changes and loss of postresectional adaptive growth.

    PubMed

    Kingsnorth, A N; Abu-Khalaf, M; LaMuraglia, G M; McCann, P P; Diekema, K A; Ross, J S; Malt, R A

    1986-06-01

    To determine the role of putrescine synthesis in adaptive hyperplasia of the ileum and colon, DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an enzyme-activated, irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the enzyme controlling putrescine biosynthesis, was fed to rats after excision of the proximal half of the small bowel. A rise in ODC activity (280% in the proximal ileum, 62% in the proximal colon) and a rise in putrescine content (220% in the proximal ileum, 250% in the proximal colon) normally accompanied characteristic cytochemical adaptive increases in the ileum and colon at day 6. Inclusion of 1% DFMO (2.1 gm/kg/day) in drinking water for 12 hours before operation and for 14 days thereafter decreased ODC activity by 85% to 96%, reduced levels of putrescine and spermidine and measurements of the adaptive response by 50% in the ileum, and abolished the adaptive response in the colon. During the first 10 days of DFMO feeding, villous atrophy and other hypoplastic changes occurred in control rats, but by 14 days of DFMO feeding atrophy and hypoplasia were no longer present. Although DFMO inhibits adaptive hyperplasia occurring in the ileum and colon of rats after resection of the proximal half of the small bowel, spontaneous recovery of villous atrophy occurs during further DFMO feeding and may protect the host during chemotherapy.

  13. Bromelain improves decrease in defecation in postoperative rats: modulation of colonic gene expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Wen, Suping; Huang, Tom H W; Li, George Q; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D; Li, Yuhao

    2006-01-25

    Ileus continues to be a common consequence of abdominal surgery, causing significant patient discomfort and often leading to more serious problems. The therapy available is limited, hence, ileus remains an important clinical problem. Activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) directly modulates intestinal dysmotility after bowel manipulation and plays an essential role in initiating intestinal inflammation. Nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB is known to be a critical component of iNOS gene transcriptional activation in response to inflammatory stimuli. Bromelain is a crude extract from the pineapple stem, which is sold as a nutritional supplement to "promote digestive health" and as an anti-inflammatory medication in some developed countries. Here, we have found that oral administration of bromelain improves decrease in defecation in abdominal postoperative rats. Results showed that bromelain increased the wet weight, dry weight, water content and number of fecal pellets in laparotomized plus mechanically manipulated rats, suggesting improvement of postoperative ileus. Furthermore, bromelain treatment inhibited overexpressed iNOS mRNA and restored down-regulated inhibitor kappaBalpha mRNA in the colon of the postoperative rats. From the in vitro experiments, bromelain inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrite overproduction in macrophage cell lines and LPS-induced NF-kappaB luciferase reporter gene expression in RAW264.7 macrophages transfected with NF-kappaB luciferase reporter gene. Thus, our findings suggest that bromelain improves decrease in defecation in postoperative rats, at least in part, by inhibiting colonic iNOS overexpression via NF-kappaB pathway. Our data indicates that bromelain may benefit patients with postoperative ileus.

  14. Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Yam (Dioscorea batatas Decne.) on Azoxymethane-induced Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci in F344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Son, In Suk; Lee, Jeong Soon; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kwon, Chong Suk

    2014-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea batatas Decne.) has long been used as a health food and oriental folk medicine because of its nutritional fortification, tonic, anti-diarrheal, anti-inflammatory, antitussive, and expectorant effects. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are known to be implicated in a range of diseases, may be important progenitors of carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the modulatory effect of yam on antioxidant status and inflammatory conditions during azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis in male F344 rats. We measured the formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), hemolysate antioxidant enzyme activities, colonic mucosal antioxidant enzyme gene expression, and colonic mucosal inflammatory mediator gene expression. The feeding of yam prior to carcinogenesis significantly inhibited AOM-induced colonic ACF formation. In yam-administered rats, erythrocyte levels of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase were increased and colonic mucosal gene expression of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), Mn-SOD, and GPx were up-regulated compared to the AOM group. Colonic mucosal gene expression of inflammatory mediators (i.e., nuclear factor kappaB, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-1beta) was suppressed by the yam-supplemented diet. These results suggest that yam could be very useful for the prevention of colon cancer, as they enhance the antioxidant defense system and modulate inflammatory mediators. PMID:25054106

  15. Microbial colonization influences composition and T-cell receptor V beta repertoire of intraepithelial lymphocytes in rat intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Helgeland, L; Vaage, J T; Rolstad, B; Midtvedt, T; Brandtzaeg, P

    1996-01-01

    Studies in mice have shown that the composition of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) may be markedly altered by gut microbial colonization. Such modulation was studied in a rat model by the use of germ-free and conventionalized animals from which IEL from the small intestine were isolated and analysed by flow cytometry. Conventionalization caused expansion as well as phenotypic alterations of T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha/beta + IEL in that the proportions of CD4+ and CD8 alpha beta + TCR alpha/beta + cells were increased, while the double negative (CD4- CD8-) fraction was reduced. microbial colonization also influenced the TCR V beta repertoire of CD8+ IEL in that the proportions of V beta 8.2+ and V beta 10+ cells were increased, whereas V beta 8.5+ and V beta 16+ cells were relatively decreased. Moreover, conventionalization influenced the levels of TCR cell surface expression in the same V beta subsets. Three-colour flow-cytometric analysis demonstrated that skewing of the V beta repertoire was most pronounced in the CD8 alpha alpha + subset, although the numerical increase of IEL mainly included the CD8 alpha beta + subset. In contrast to IEL, the TCR V beta repertoire in mesenteric lymph nodes was unchanged after intestinal colonization. These results confirm that TCR alpha/beta + IEL subpopulations respond dynamically to the microbial gut flora and suggest that their V beta repertoire can be shaped by luminal microbial antigens. PMID:9014812

  16. Comparative analysis of theophylline and cholera toxin in rat colon reveals an induction of sealing tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Markov, Alexander G; Falchuk, Evgeny L; Kruglova, Natalia M; Rybalchenko, Oksana V; Fromm, Michael; Amasheh, Salah

    2014-11-01

    Claudin tight junction proteins have been identified to primarily determine intestinal epithelial barrier properties. While functional contribution of single claudins has been characterized in detail, information on the interplay with secretory mechanisms in native intestinal epithelium is scarce. Therefore, effects of cholera toxin and theophylline on rat colon were analyzed, including detection of sealing claudins. Tissue specimens were stripped off submucosal tissue layers and mounted in Ussing chambers, and short-circuit current (ISC) and transepithelial resistance (TER) were recorded. In parallel, expression and localization of claudins was analyzed and histological studies were performed employing hematoxylin-eosin staining and light and electron microscopy. Theophylline induced a strong increase of ISC in colon tissue specimens. In parallel, a decrease of TER was observed. In contrast, cholera toxin did not induce a significant increase of ISC, whereas an increase of TER was detected after 120 min. Western blots of membrane fractions revealed an increase of claudin-3 and -4 after incubation with cholera toxin, and theophylline induced an increase of claudin-4. In accordance, confocal laser-scanning microscopy exhibited increased signals of claudin-3 and -4 after incubation with cholera toxin, and increased signals of claudin-4 after incubation with theophylline, within tight junction complexes. Morphological analyses revealed no general changes of tight junction complexes, but intercellular spaces were markedly widened after incubation with cholera toxin and theophylline. We conclude that cholera toxin and theophylline have different effects on sealing tight junction proteins in native colon preparations, which may synergistically contribute to transport functions, in vitro.

  17. Human oral isolate Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 induces a pro-inflammatory response in germ-free rat colons

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Rachel C.; Ulluwishewa, Dulantha; Young, Wayne; Ryan, Leigh J.; Henderson, Gemma; Meijerink, Marjolein; Maier, Eva; Wells, Jerry M.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli are thought to be beneficial for human health, with lactobacilli-associated infections being confined to immune-compromised individuals. However, Lactobacillus fermentum AGR1487 negatively affects barrier integrity in vitro so we hypothesized that it caused a pro-inflammatory response in the host. We compared germ-free rats inoculated with AGR1487 to those inoculated with another L. fermentum strain, AGR1485, which does not affect in vitro barrier integrity. We showed that rats inoculated with AGR1487 had more inflammatory cells in their colon, higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers, and increased colonic gene expression of pro-inflammatory pathways. In addition, our in vitro studies showed that AGR1487 had a greater capacity to activate TLR signaling and induce pro-inflammatory cytokines in immune cells. This study indicates the potential of strains of the same species to differentially elicit inflammatory responses in the host and highlights the importance of strain characterization in probiotic approaches to treat inflammatory disorders. PMID:26843130

  18. Neurokinin A increases short-circuit current across rat colonic mucosa: a role for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Tien, X Y; Wallace, L J; Kachur, J F; Won-Kim, S; Gaginella, T S

    1991-01-01

    1. Neurokinin A (NKA) is a mammalian tachykinin distributed principally in the nervous system, including the myenteric innervation of the gut. 2. NKA may be involved in neurogenic inflammation and as a modulatory factor in the diarrhoea associated with mucosal inflammation of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis). 3. We evaluated the effect of NKA on the short-circuit current ISC, assumed to reflect electrogenic chloride secretion, across muscle-stripped rat colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. 4. Serosal addition of NKA produced a concentration-dependent (0.1-100 nM) increase in ISC with an EC50 (half-maximal effective concentration) value of 7.5 nM. The maximum (mean +/- S.E.M.) increase in ISC (microA/cm2) for NKA was 111 +/- 10. 5. Tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM) and bumetanide (10 microM), but not atropine (1.0 microM), hexamethonium (100 microM) or pyrilamine (10 microM), significantly inhibited NKA-induced increases in ISC. 6. The response to NKA was attenuated by 45 min pre-treatment with antisera raised against vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Moreover, prior desensitization to VIP attenuated the effect of NKA. 7. These studies suggest that NKA increases ISC in rat colon, in part, through a non-cholinergic neural mechanism involving VIP. PMID:1653854

  19. PhyloChip microarray analysis reveals altered gastrointestinal microbial communities in a rat model of colonic hypersensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, T.A.; Holmes, S.; Alekseyenko, A.V.; Shenoy, M.; DeSantis, T.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Winston, J.; Sonnenburg, J.; Pasricha, P.J.; Spormann, A.

    2010-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, episodic gastrointestinal disorder that is prevalent in a significant fraction of western human populations; and changes in the microbiota of the large bowel have been implicated in the pathology of the disease. Using a novel comprehensive, high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip) we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the microbial community of the large bowel in a rat model in which intracolonic acetic acid in neonates was used to induce long lasting colonic hypersensitivity and decreased stool water content and frequency, representing the equivalent of human constipation-predominant IBS. Our results revealed a significantly increased compositional difference in the microbial communities in rats with neonatal irritation as compared with controls. Even more striking was the dramatic change in the ratio of Firmicutes relative to Bacteroidetes, where neonatally irritated rats were enriched more with Bacteroidetes and also contained a different composition of species within this phylum. Our study also revealed differences at the level of bacterial families and species. The PhyloChip is a useful and convenient method to study enteric microflora. Further, this rat model system may be a useful experimental platform to study the causes and consequences of changes in microbial community composition associated with IBS.

  20. Effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus KFRI342 on the development of chemically induced precancerous growths in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin-Hee; Shim, Youn Young; Cha, Seong-Kwan; Reaney, Martin J T; Chee, Kew Mahn

    2012-03-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus KFRI342, isolated from the Korean traditional food kimchi, was investigated for its suitability as a dietary probiotic. The effects of L. acidophilus KFRI342 on the development of chemically induced (1,2-dimethylhydrazine; DMH) precancerous cytological changes of the colon were investigated in rats. Forty-five male F344 rats were randomly divided into three dietary groups. The control group received a high-fat diet (HF), a second group received a high-fat diet containing the carcinogen (HFC), and a final group received a high-fat diet containing the carcinogen and L. acidophilus KFRI342 (HFCL). L. acidophilus KFRI342 was administered orally three times per week at 2×10(9) c.f.u. ml(-1). L. acidophilus KFRI342 treatments decreased the number of Escherichia coli in faecal samples, the enzyme activities of β-glucuronidase and β-glucosidase, and plasma triglyceride concentration compared to the HF and HFC treatments (P<0.05). L. acidophilus KFRI342 consumption also decreased the ratio of aberrant crypts to aberrant crypt foci incidence and the number of aberrant crypts in HFCL rats. Therefore, L. acidophilus showed potential probiotic activity as an inhibitor of DMH-induced symptoms in live rats. Our in vivo studies indicate that L. acidophilus from kimchi may be suitable as a probiotic for human use. PMID:22034161

  1. Punicic Acid a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Inhibits TNFα-Induced Neutrophil Hyperactivation and Protects from Experimental Colon Inflammation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boussetta, Tarek; Raad, Houssam; Lettéron, Philippe; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Marie, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Background Neutrophils play a major role in inflammation by releasing large amounts of ROS produced by NADPH-oxidase and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The proinflammatory cytokine TNFα primes ROS production through phosphorylation of the NADPH-oxidase subunit p47phox on Ser345. Conventional anti-inflammatory therapies remain partially successful and may have side effects. Therefore, regulation of neutrophil activation by natural dietary components represents an alternative therapeutic strategy in inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of punicic acid, a conjugated linolenic fatty acid from pomegranate seed oil on TNFα-induced neutrophil hyperactivation in vitro and on colon inflammation in vivo. Methodology and Principal Findings We analyzed the effect of punicic acid on TNFα-induced neutrophil upregulation of ROS production in vitro and on TNBS-induced rat colon inflammation. Results show that punicic acid inhibited TNFα-induced priming of ROS production in vitro while preserving formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced response. This effect was mediated by the inhibition of Ser345-p47phox phosphorylation and upstream kinase p38MAPK. Punicic acid also inhibited fMLP- and TNFα+fMLP-induced MPO extracellular release from neutrophils. In vivo experiments showed that punicic acid and pomegranate seed oil intake decreased neutrophil-activation and ROS/MPO-mediated tissue damage as measured by F2-isoprostane release and protected rats from TNBS-induced colon inflammation. Conclusions/Significance These data show that punicic acid exerts a potent anti-inflammatory effect through inhibition of TNFα-induced priming of NADPH oxidase by targeting the p38MAPKinase/Ser345-p47phox-axis and MPO release. This natural dietary compound may provide a novel alternative therapeutic strategy in inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:19649246

  2. Effect of fedotozine on the cardiovascular pain reflex induced by distension of the irritated colon in the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Langlois, A; Diop, L; Rivière, P J; Pascaud, X; Junien, J L

    1994-12-27

    The effect of fedotozine was evaluated in a model of colonic hypersensibility to balloon distension in anesthetized rats. Acetic acid (0.6%, intracolonically) significantly enhanced the hypotension reflex response to colonic distension (P < 0.05). At a noxious pain pressure (75 mm Hg), fedotozine ((+)-(-1R)-1-phenyl-1-[(3,4,5- trimethoxy)benzyloxymethyl]-N,N-dimethyl-n-propylamine) had no effect at 0.6 and 1 mg/kg i.v. in saline-treated rats and higher doses were required to produce antinociception (ED50 = 2.57 mg/kg i.v.). By contrast, fedotozine at 0.6 and 1 mg/kg i.v. displayed 38 and 54% antinociception (P < 0.05) respectively, in acetic acid-treated animals, leading to a decrease in its ED50 (1.15 mg/kg i.v.). Similar results were obtained with (+/-)-trans-N-methyl-N-[2-(pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzo[b]-thiophene- 4-acetamide (PD-117,302), a kappa-opioid receptor agonist, while the antinociceptive action of morphine and a kappa-opioid receptor agonist, trans-(+/-)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-(2-[1- pyrrolidinyl]cyclohexyl)benzenacetamide ((+/-)-U-50,488H), was identical in control and acetic acid-treated animals. Nor-binaltorphimine, a selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, reversed the enhanced antinociceptive activity of fedotozine and PD-117,302. It is concluded that acetic acid induces colonic hypersensibility to painful mechanical stimuli and that some but not all kappa-opioid receptor ligands can have enhanced efficacy in this pathological situation. PMID:7705424

  3. n-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate carcinogen-directed non-coding microRNA signatures in rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Laurie A.; Wang, Naisyin; Shah, Manasvi S.; Lupton, Joanne R.; Ivanov, Ivan; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    We have hypothesized that dietary modulation of intestinal non-coding RNA [microRNA (miRNA)] expression may contribute to the chemoprotective effects of nutritional bioactives (fish oil and pectin). To fully understand the effects of these agents on the expression of miRNAs, Sprague–Dawley rats were fed diets containing corn oil or fish oil with pectin or cellulose and injected with azoxymethane (AOM, a colon-specific carcinogen) or saline (control). Real-time polymerase chain reaction using miRNA-specific primers and Taq Man™ probes was carried out to quantify effects on miRNA expression in colonic mucosa. From 368 mature miRNAs assayed, at an early stage of cancer progression (10 week post AOM injection), let-7d, miR-15b, miR-107, miR-191 and miR-324-5p were significantly (P < 0.05) affected by diet × carcinogen interactions. Overall, fish oil fed animals exhibited the smallest number of differentially expressed miRNAs (AOM versus saline treatment). With respect to the tumor stage (34 week post AOM injection), 46 miRNAs were dysregulated in adenocarcinomas compared with normal mucosa from saline-injected animals. Of the 27 miRNAs expressed at higher (P < 0.05) levels in tumors, miR-34a, 132, 223 and 224 were overexpressed at >10-fold. In contrast, the expression levels of miR-192, 194, 215 and 375 were dramatically reduced (≤0.32-fold) in adenocarcinomas. These results demonstrate for the first time the utility of the rat AOM model and the novel role of fish oil in protecting the colon from carcinogen-induced miRNA dysregulation. PMID:19825969

  4. Dietary folate protects against the development of macroscopic colonic neoplasia in a dose responsive manner in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y I; Salomon, R N; Graeme-Cook, F; Choi, S W; Smith, D E; Dallal, G E; Mason, J B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Diminished folate status is associated with enhanced colorectal carcinogenesis. This study investigated the potential chemopreventive role of dietary folate in the dimethylhydrazine colorectal cancer model. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing either 0, 2 (daily dietary requirement), 8 or 40 mg folate/kg diet for 20 weeks. After five weeks of diet, rats were injected with dimethyl-hydrazine (44 mg/kg) weekly for 15 weeks. Fifteen weeks after the first injection of dimethylhydrazine, all rats were killed. Folate status was determined, and the entire colorectum from each rat was analysed for macroscopic and microscopic neoplasms. RESULTS: Plasma and colonic folate concentrations correlated directly with dietary folate levels (p < 0.005). The incidence of microscopic neoplasms was similar among the four groups. However, the incidence and the average number of macroscopic tumours per rat decreased progressively with increasing dietary folate levels up to 8 mg/kg diet (p < 0.05). In the strongly procarcinogenic milieu used in this study, folate supplementation at 20 times the basal requirement was associated with rates of macroscopic tumour development that were intermediate, and not statistically distinct, from rates observed at either 0 or 8 mg/kg diet. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that in this rat model, (a) increasing dietary folate up to four times the basal requirement leads to a progressive reduction in the evolution of macroscopic neoplasms from microscopic foci; and (b) folate supplementation beyond four times the requirement does not convey further benefit. PMID:9014775

  5. Non-neuronal release of ACh plays a key role in secretory response to luminal propionate in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Takaji; Inoue, Ryo; Matsumoto, Megumi; Yajima, Masako

    2011-02-15

    Colonic chloride secretion is induced by chemical stimuli via the enteric nervous reflex. We have previously demonstrated that propionate stimulates chloride secretion via sensory and cholinergic systems of the mucosa in rat distal colon. In this study, we demonstrate non-neuronal release of ACh in the secretory response to propionate using an Ussing chamber. Mucosa preparations from the colon, not including the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, were used. Luminal addition of propionate and serosal addition of ACh caused biphasic changes in short-circuit current (Isc). TTX (1 μm) had no effects, while atropine (10 μm) significantly inhibited the Isc response to propionate and abolished that to ACh. In response to luminal propionate stimulation, ACh was released into the serosal fluid. A linear relationship was observed between the maximal increase in Isc and the amounts of ACh released 5 min after propionate stimulation. This ACh release induced by propionate was not affected by atropine and bumetanide, although both drugs significantly reduced the Isc responses to propionate. Luminal addition of 3-chloropropionate, an inactive analogue of propionate, abolished both ACh release and Isc response produced by propionate. RT-PCR analysis indicated that isolated crypt cells from the distal colon expressed an enzyme of ACh synthesis (ChAT) and transporters of organic cation (OCTs), but not neuronal CHT1 and VAChT. The isolated crypt cells contained comparable amounts of ACh to the residual muscle tissues including nerve plexuses. In conclusion, the non-neuronal release of ACh from colonocytes coupled with propionate stimulation plays a key role in chloride secretion, via the paracrine action of ACh on muscarinic receptors of colonocytes.

  6. Effect in a rat model of heparinized peritoneal dialysis catheters on bacterial colonization and the healing of the exit site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y L; Cho, S; Kim, J C; Cho, D K; Kim, Y J; Larm, O; Mathiesen, T; Lindholm, B; Bergström, J

    2001-01-01

    We performed a prospective, double-blind, randomized study to evaluate whether stable surface heparinization of silicone peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters prevents bacterial colonization or biofilm formation and improves healing of the exit site. Heparinized catheters were implanted in 20 Sprague-Dawley rats (group H) and non heparinized catheters in another 20 (group C). The PD catheters, constructed of silicon tubing with two polyester cuffs, were patterned after the standard Tenckhoff catheter. A covalent multipoint method of attachment onto polymeric surfaces was used for stable, permanent chemical immobilization of heparin on the PD catheter. Dialysis exchanges (25-mL instillation volume) were performed twice daily for 4 weeks through the permanent catheter. Prophylactic antibiotics were not used. The exit sites were evaluated at 2-week intervals. The extent of biofilm coverage on the intraperitoneal portion of the catheter (obtained at the end of the experiment) was assessed, and sonicated fluid from the catheter tip was cultured for evaluating bacterial colonization of the catheter. Exit-site scores in group H were lower than in group C (p = 0.052) at the end of week 4. Bacterial colonization tended to be less common in group H [2 of 12 catheters (17%)] than in group C [8 of 15 catheters (53%); p = 0.058], but the extent of biofilm, the peritonitis rate, and the inflammation score of tissue adjacent to the cuff were not different between the groups. Those data suggest that heparinized PD catheters can be a practical approach to the prevention of bacterial colonization and can improve healing of the exit site.

  7. Excitation of rat colonic afferent fibres by 5-HT3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Gareth A; Coldwell, Jonathan R; Schindler, Marcus; Bland Ward, Philip A; Jenkins, David; Lynn, Penny A; Humphrey, Patrick P A; Blackshaw, L Ashley

    2002-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract contains most of the body's 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and releases large amounts after meals or exposure to toxins. Increased 5-HT release occurs in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and their peak plasma 5-HT levels correlate with pain episodes. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists reduce symptoms of IBS clinically, but their site of action is unclear and the potential for other therapeutic targets is unexplored. Here we investigated effects of 5-HT on sensory afferents from the colon and the expression of 5-HT3 receptors on their cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Distal colon, inferior mesenteric ganglion and the lumbar splanchnic nerve bundle (LSN) were placed in a specialized organ bath. Eighty-six single fibres were recorded from the LSN. Three classes of primary afferents were found: 70 high-threshold serosal afferents, four low-threshold muscular afferents and 12 mucosal afferents. Afferent cell bodies were retrogradely labelled from the distal colon to the lumbar DRG, where they were processed for 5-HT3 receptor-like immunoreactivity. Fifty-six percent of colonic afferents responded to 5-HT (between 10−6 and 10−3 M) and 30 % responded to the selective 5-HT3 agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT (between 10−6 and 10−2 M). Responses to 2-methyl-5-HT were blocked by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist alosetron (2 × 10−7 M), whereas responses to 5-HT were only partly inhibited. Twenty-six percent of L1 DRG cell bodies retrogradely labelled from the colon displayed 5-HT3 receptor-like immunoreactivity. We conclude that colonic sensory neurones expressing 5-HT3 receptors also functionally express the receptors at their peripheral endings. Our data reveal actions of 5-HT on colonic afferent endings via both 5-HT3 and non-5-HT3 receptors. PMID:12411529

  8. DNA damage and aberrant crypt foci as putative biomarkers to evaluate the chemopreventive effect of annatto (Bixa orellana L.) in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Agner, Aniele R; Bazo, Ana P; Ribeiro, Lúcia R; Salvadori, Daisy M F

    2005-04-01

    Chemoprevention opens new perspectives in the prevention of cancer and other degenerative diseases. Use of target-organ biological models at the histological and genetic levels can markedly facilitate the identification of such potential chemopreventive agents. Colon cancer is one of the highest incidence rates throughout the world and some evidences have indicated carotenoids as possible agents that decrease the risk of colorectal cancer. In the present study, we evaluate the activity of annatto (Bixa orellana L.), a natural food colorant rich in carotenoid, on the formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) induced by dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rat colon. Further, we investigate, the effect of annatto on DMH-induced DNA damage, by the comet assay. Male Wistar rats were given s.c. injections of DMH (40 mg/kg body wt.) twice a week for 2 weeks to induce ACF. They also received experimental diets containing annatto at 20, 200 or 1000 ppm for five 5 weeks before (pre-treatment), or 10 weeks after (post-treatment) DMH treatment. In both protocols the rats were sacrificed on week 15th. For the comet assay, the animals were fed with the same experimental diets for 2 weeks. Four hours before the sacrifice, the animals received an s.c. injection of DMH (40 mg/kg body wt.). Under such conditions, dietary administration of 1000 ppm annatto neither induce DNA damage in blood and colon cells nor aberrant crypt foci in rat distal colon. Conversely, annatto was successful in inhibiting the number of crypts/colon (animal), but not in the incidence of DMH-induced ACF, mainly when administered after DMH. However, no antigenotoxic effect was observed in colon cells. These findings suggest possible chemopreventive effects of annatto through their modulation of the cryptal cell proliferation but not at the initiation stage of colon carcinogenesis. PMID:15781219

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the rat colon reveals proximal-distal differences in histone modifications and proto-oncogene expression.

    PubMed

    Triff, Karen; Konganti, Kranti; Gaddis, Sally; Zhou, Beiyan; Ivanov, Ivan; Chapkin, Robert S

    2013-12-15

    Since disease susceptibility of the intestine exhibits an anatomical bias, we propose that the chromatin landscape, especially the site-specific epigenetic differences in histone modification patterns throughout the colonic longitudinal axis, contributes to the differential incidence of site-specific pathology. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the chromatin structure associated with gene expression profiles in the rat proximal and distal colon by globally correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation next-generation sequencing analysis (ChIP-Seq) with mRNA transcription (RNA-Seq) data. Crypts were isolated from the proximal and distal colonic regions from rats maintained on a semipurified diet, and mRNA gene expression profiles were generated by RNA-Seq. The remaining isolated crypts were formaldehyde-cross-linked and chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and RNA polymerase II. Globally, RNA-Seq results indicate that 9,866 genes were actively expressed, of which 540 genes were differentially expressed between the proximal and distal colon. Gene ontology analysis indicates that crypt location significantly affected both chromatin and transcriptional regulation of genes involved in enterocyte movement, lipid metabolism, lymphatic development, and immune cell trafficking. Gene function analysis indicates that the PI3-kinase signaling pathway was regulated in a site-specific manner, e.g., proto-oncogenes, JUN, FOS, and ATF, were upregulated in the distal colon. Middle and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) were also detected in the colon, including select lncRNAs formerly only detected in the rat nervous system. In summary, distinct combinatorial patterns of histone modifications exist in the proximal versus distal colon. These site-specific differences may explain the differential effects of chemoprotective agents on cell transformation in the ascending (proximal) and descending (distal) colon.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of the rat colon reveals proximal-distal differences in histone modifications and proto-oncogene expression

    PubMed Central

    Triff, Karen; Konganti, Kranti; Gaddis, Sally; Zhou, Beiyan; Ivanov, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Since disease susceptibility of the intestine exhibits an anatomical bias, we propose that the chromatin landscape, especially the site-specific epigenetic differences in histone modification patterns throughout the colonic longitudinal axis, contributes to the differential incidence of site-specific pathology. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the chromatin structure associated with gene expression profiles in the rat proximal and distal colon by globally correlating chromatin immunoprecipitation next-generation sequencing analysis (ChIP-Seq) with mRNA transcription (RNA-Seq) data. Crypts were isolated from the proximal and distal colonic regions from rats maintained on a semipurified diet, and mRNA gene expression profiles were generated by RNA-Seq. The remaining isolated crypts were formaldehyde-cross-linked and chromatin immunoprecipitated with antibodies against H3K4me3, H3K9me3, and RNA polymerase II. Globally, RNA-Seq results indicate that 9,866 genes were actively expressed, of which 540 genes were differentially expressed between the proximal and distal colon. Gene ontology analysis indicates that crypt location significantly affected both chromatin and transcriptional regulation of genes involved in enterocyte movement, lipid metabolism, lymphatic development, and immune cell trafficking. Gene function analysis indicates that the PI3-kinase signaling pathway was regulated in a site-specific manner, e.g., proto-oncogenes, JUN, FOS, and ATF, were upregulated in the distal colon. Middle and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) were also detected in the colon, including select lncRNAs formerly only detected in the rat nervous system. In summary, distinct combinatorial patterns of histone modifications exist in the proximal versus distal colon. These site-specific differences may explain the differential effects of chemoprotective agents on cell transformation in the ascending (proximal) and descending (distal) colon. PMID:24151245

  11. Gastric, intestinal and colonic absorption of a series of beta-blockers in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vilà, J I; Calpena, A C; Obach, R; Domenech, J

    1992-08-01

    Gastric, intestinal and colonic absorption rates of a series of eleven beta-blockers (alprenolol hydrochloride, atenolol, bunolol hydrochloride, penbutolol sulphate, pronethalol hydrochloride, metoprolol, oxprenolol, bevantolol, bufuralol, propranolol hydrochloride and timolol maleate) were estimated using Doluisio's method. The gastric absorption rate was very low and the absorption rate constant could not be assessed accurately in all cases. In the small intestine, the absorption rate constants, Ka, at pH 6.2 ranged between 0.38 h-1 for atenolol and 4.28 h-1 for penbutolol. In the colon, the rate of drug absorption at pH 7.5 ranged between 0.12 h-1 for atenolol and 2.15 h-1 for penbutolol. In most cases, colonic absorption rate constants were of the same order as those obtained in the small intestine, demonstrating the good penetrability through colonic membrane of the series studied. The relationship between absorption rate constants found in the small intestine and colon and the partition constant ([1/Rf]-1), was studied for this non-homologous series of beta-blocker drugs. In both cases, the functional hyperbolic absorption model proposed by Wagner and Sedman [1973] was the most representative.

  12. Repeated Water Avoidance Stress Alters Mucosal Mast Cell Counts, Interleukin-1β Levels with Sex Differences in the Distal Colon of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Yong Sung; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Ham, Min Hee; Lee, Hye Seung; Jo, Wonjun; Shim, Youngkwang; Choi, Yoon Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study was aimed at evaluating differences in the effects of repeated water avoidance stress (rWAS) on colonic movement, mucosal mast cell counts, cytokine levels, and visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distension (CRD) in rats of both sexes. Methods Wistar rats were divided into stress and no-stress groups. Rats in the stress group were exposed to rWAS (1 hr/day) for 10 days. Mucosal mast cells were immunohistochemically stained with anti-mast cell tryptase antibody and counted. The colonic mucosal cytokine levels were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The VMR to CRD (visceral analgesia) was assessed by using a barostat and noninvasive manometry. Results The mean number of fecal pellets in the rWAS group increased significantly as compared with that in the no-stress group in both sexes. After adjustment for body weight, the female rats had a significantly higher pellet output than the male rats. The mucosal mast cell count of the female rWAS group was higher than that of the male rWAS group (13.0 ± 0.9 vs 8.8 ± 0.6; P < 0.001). The colonic mucosal interleukin-1β level was also higher only in the female rats of the rWAS group than in those of the no-stress group. On days 10 and 11, a decrease in VMR to CRD was observed at 40 and 60 mmHg in both sexes of the rWAS group, without a sex-based difference. Conclusions The colonic response to stress appeared to be more sensitive in the female rats than in the male rats. However, stress-induced visceral analgesia had no sex-related difference and the underlying mechanism needs to be further evaluated. PMID:27466288

  13. High-protein diet modifies colonic microbiota and luminal environment but not colonocyte metabolism in the rat model: the increased luminal bulk connection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinxin; Blouin, Jean-Marc; Santacruz, Arlette; Lan, Annaïg; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Wilkanowicz, Sabina; Benetti, Pierre-Henri; Tomé, Daniel; Sanz, Yolanda; Blachier, François; Davila, Anne-Marie

    2014-08-15

    High-protein diets are used for body weight reduction, but consequences on the large intestine ecosystem are poorly known. Here, rats were fed for 15 days with either a normoproteic diet (NP, 14% protein) or a hyperproteic-hypoglucidic isocaloric diet (HP, 53% protein). Cecum and colon were recovered for analysis. Short- and branched-chain fatty acids, as well as lactate, succinate, formate, and ethanol contents, were markedly increased in the colonic luminal contents of HP rats (P < 0.05 or less) but to a lower extent in the cecal luminal content. This was associated with reduced concentrations of the Clostridium coccoides and C. leptum groups and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii in both the cecum and colon (P < 0.05 or less). In addition, the microbiota diversity was found to be higher in the cecum of HP rats but was lower in the colon compared with NP rats. In HP rats, the colonic and cecal luminal content weights were markedly higher than in NP rats (P < 0.001), resulting in similar butyrate, acetate, and propionate concentrations. Accordingly, the expression of monocarboxylate transporter 1 and sodium monocarboxylate transporter 1 (which is increased by higher butyrate concentration) as well as the colonocyte capacity for butyrate oxidation were not modified by the HP diet, whereas the amount of butyrate in feces was increased (P < 0.01). It is concluded that an increased bulk in the large intestine content following HP diet consumption allows maintenance in the luminal butyrate concentration and thus its metabolism in colonocytes despite modified microbiota composition and increased substrate availability.

  14. Light and electron microscopic cytochemistry of glycoconjugates in the rectosigmoid colonic epithelium of the mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Thomopoulos, G N; Schulte, B A; Spicer, S S

    1983-10-01

    The several cell types in mouse and rat rectosigmoid colon have been examined with light and electron microscopic methods for localizing and characterizing complex carbohydrates. Mucous cells, also termed vacuolated cells, and goblet cells comprised most of the deep crypt epithelium in both species, and absorptive columnar cells and goblet cells mainly populated the more superficial epithelium of the upper crypts and main lumen. Occasional tuft cells and enteroendocrine cells were also encountered. Transitional cells structurally intermediate between mucous cells and absorptive cells contained granules characteristic of mucous cells and vesicles like those of columnar absorptive cells. These intermediate cells supported the concept of replacement of mucous by absorptive cells through transformation of mucous into absorptive cells. The intermediate cells also contained numerous lysosomes often in apparent fusion with mucous granules, indicating crinophagic disposal of mucous granules as a mechanism in the cell transformation. Glycoconjugate in absorptive cell vesicles resembled that coating the apical plasmalemma and appeared to represent the source of the glycocalyx of the brush border. Complex carbohydrate in these vesicles differed cytochemically from that of the mucous cell granules, which release their content into the crypt lumen. The absorptive cell vesicles, therefore, constitute an organelle distinct from the mucous cell granules rather than an atrophic form of the latter in a more mature cell. Goblet cells differed in failing to transform morphologically with age but changed in the cytochemical characteristic of their secretion during migration up the crypts. Terminal N-acetylglucosamine residues diminished, while terminal sialic acid-galactose dimers increased during the upward migration, indicating activation of glycosyl transferase synthesis in relation to goblet cell maturation. Glycoconjugate in secretion of mucous cell granules differed markedly from

  15. Studies on polyamine and ornithine metabolism in rat colon: effects of two synergistically. Acting inducers of ornithine decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in rat colon mucosa was determined by the release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from radiolabeled ornithine in the presence (total enzyme) or absence (holoenzyme) of added pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP). Total leucine incorporation into acid-precipitable protein over 30 minute was calculated by dividing the /sup 3/H-leucine in protein by the specific activity of the intracellular leucine. Amino acids, polyamines, and PLP-semicarbazide were quantified by high pressure liquid chromatography. Ornithine aminotransaminase activity (OAT) was measured as the quantity of pyrolline (5-carboxy) produced from alpha-ketoglutarate and ornithine. After 10 weeks on a high or no vitamin B/sub 6/ diet, no change in basal ODC activity was seen; however, sodium deoxycholate instillation in vitamin B/sub 6/ deficient rats led to a large increase in total but not holo-ODC activity. In rats fed normal chow diet, no increases in mucosal PLP levels were seen after either treatment. Increases in general protein synthesis rate could not account for the peaks in ODC activity after either stimulus. Putrescine increases were proportional to peaks of ODC activity after either stimulus, while spermine levels remained depressed for 18 hours after starvation/refeeding. Ornithine levels were increased after either stimulus, and this increase was linked to decreases in OAT activity, indicating short-term coordination of overall ornithine metabolism to favor polyamine biosynthesis.

  16. Effect of the ghrelin receptor agonist TZP-101 on colonic transit in a rat model of postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graeme L; Venkova, Kalina; Hoveyda, Hamid R; Thomas, Helmut; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley

    2009-02-14

    Ghrelin, the natural ligand of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (ghrelin receptor), is an orexigenic gut hormone with prokinetic action in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Previously we have shown in a rodent model of postoperative ileus that the synthetic ghrelin receptor agonist TZP-101 prevents the delay in gastric emptying and improves small intestinal transit. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether TZP-101 affects colonic transit and food intake in rats with postoperative ileus. Fasted rats were treated with morphine and subjected to laparotomy under isoflurane anesthesia. Following surgery the animals were placed in clean home cages and fecal pellet output and food intake were monitored for 48 h. TZP-101 or vehicle were administered as 3 i.v. bolus infusions at 0 h, 2 h and 4 h post-surgery. TZP-101 (0.03-1 mg/kg) dose-dependently decreased the time to first bowel movement and increased fecal pellet output measured at 12 h and 24 h post-surgery compared to the vehicle. The administration of TZP-101 was not associated with a significant alteration in food intake. In conclusion, this study provides the first experimental evidence that a novel ghrelin receptor agonist improves large bowel function in rats with postoperative ileus, suggesting that TZP-101 may be useful in the clinic to accelerate upper gastrointestinal transit and to shorten the time to the first bowel movement following surgery. PMID:19121631

  17. THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF MALE F344/N RATS EXPOSED TO THIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory


    THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF MALE F344/N
    RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES IN THE DRINKING WATER

    The trihalomethanes (THM), bromoform (TBM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM), administered by corn oil gavage were found to increase large...

  18. TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    David R. Geter', Tanya M. Moore', Michael H. George', Steve R. Kilburn', Gloria Huggins-Clark', James W. Allen', and Anthony B. DeAngelo' 'National H...

  19. VEHICLE AND MODE OF ADMINISTRATION EFFECTS ON THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF MALE F344/N RATS EXPOSED TO BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vehicle and Mode of Administration Effects on the Induction of Aberrant Crypt Foci in the Colons of Male F344/N Rats Exposed to Bromodichloromethane.

    David R. Geter, Michael H. George, Tanya M. Moore, Steve Kilburn, Gloria Huggins-Clark, and Anthony B. DeAngelo. Submited ...

  20. Probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus suppresses DMH-induced procarcinogenic fecal enzymes and preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci in early colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Verma, Angela; Shukla, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Diet makes an important contribution to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk implying risks for CRC are potentially reducible. Therefore, the probiotics have been suggested as the prophylactic measure in colon cancer. In this study, different probiotics were used to compare their protective potential against 1,2 dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced chemical colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats. Animals belonging to different probiotic groups were fed orally with 1 × 10(9) lactobacilli daily for 1 week, and then a weekly injection of DMH was given intraperitoneally for 6 wks with daily administration of probiotic. Lactobacillus GG and L.acidophilus + DMH-treated animals had maximum percent reduction in ACF counts. A significant decrease (P < 0.05) in fecal nitroreductase activity was observed in L.casei + DMH and L.plantarum + DMH-treated rats whereas β-glucuronidase activity decreased in L.GG + DMH and L.acidophilus + DMH-treated rats. Animals treated with Bifidobacterium bifidum + DMH had significant decreased β-glucosidase activity. However, not much difference was observed in the colon morphology of animals belonging to various probiotic + DMH-treated rats compared with DMH-treated alone. The results indicated that probiotics, L.GG, and L.acidophilus can be used as the better prophylactic agents for experimental colon carcinogenesis. PMID:23368917

  1. Dietary resistant starch type 3 prevents tumor induction by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and alters proliferation, apoptosis and dedifferentiation in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Marinovic, Morana; Florian, Simone; Müller-Schmehl, Katrin; Glatt, Hansruedi; Jacobasch, Gisela

    2006-09-01

    Some epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that consumption of resistant starch is preventive against colon cancer. Resistant starch leads to a fermentation-mediated increase in the formation of short-chain fatty acids, with a particularly high butyrate fraction in large bowel. Butyrate is considered to be protective against colon cancer because it causes growth arrest and apoptosis and regulates expression of proteins involved in cellular dedifferentiation in various tumor cell lines in culture. We sought to investigate these processes under conditions of a carcinogenicity experiment in vivo. In the present study, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-treated Sprague-Dawley rats were fed standard diet (n=12) or diet with 10% hydrothermally modified Novelose 330, a resistant starch type 3 (RS3), replacing digestible starch (n=8). After 20 weeks tumor number, epithelial proliferation, apoptosis, immunoreactivity of carcinogenesis-related proteins [protein kinase C-delta (PKC-delta), heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and gastrointestinal glutathione peroxidase (GI-GPx)], as well as mucin properties were evaluated in proximal and distal colon in situ. No tumors developed under RS3 diet, compared to a tumor incidence of 0.6+/-0.6 (P<0.05) under the standard diet. RS3 decreased the number of proliferating cells, the length of the proliferation zone and the total length of the crypt in the distal colon, but not proximal colon, and enhanced apoptosis in both colonic segments. It induced PKC-delta and HSP25 expression, but inhibited GI-GPx expression in the epithelium of distal colon. RS3 increased the number of predominantly acidic mucin containing goblet cells in the distal colon, but had no effect on the goblet cell count. We conclude that hydrothermally treated RS3 prevented colon carcinogenesis, and that this effect was mediated by enhanced apoptosis of damaged cells accompanied by changes in parameters of dedifferentiation in colonic mucosa.

  2. Neonatal colonic inflammation sensitizes voltage-gated Na(+) channels via upregulation of cystathionine β-synthetase expression in rat primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ruobing; Tao, Jingde; Wang, Yongmeng; Zhou, Youlang; Wu, Geping; Xiao, Ying; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2013-05-01

    The pathogenesis of pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood, and treatment remains difficult. We have previously reported that colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were hyperactive in a rat model of IBS induced by neonatal colonic inflammation (NCI). This study was designed to examine plasticity of voltage-gated Na(+) channel activities and roles for the endogenous hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) in chronic visceral hyperalgesia. Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores were recorded in response to graded colorectal distention in adult male rats as a measure of visceral hypersensitivity. Colon-specific DRG neurons were labeled with 1,1'-dioleyl-3,3,3',3-tetramethylindocarbocyanine methanesulfonate and acutely dissociated for measuring Na(+) channel currents. Western blot analysis was employed to detect changes in expressions of voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(V)) channel subtype 1.7, Na(V)1.8, and CBS. NCI significantly increased AWR scores when compared with age-matched controls. NCI also led to an ~2.5-fold increase in Na(+) current density in colon-specific DRG neurons. Furthermore, NCI dramatically enhanced expression of Na(V)1.7, Na(V)1.8, and CBS in colon-related DRGs. CBS was colocalized with Na(V)1.7 or -1.8 in colon-specific DRG neurons. Administration of O-(carboxymethyl)hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor for CBS, remarkably suppressed Na(+) current density and reduced expression of Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.8. More importantly, intraperitoneal or intrathecal application of AOAA attenuated AWR scores in NCI rats in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that NCI enhances Na(+) channel activity of colon DRG neurons, which is most likely mediated by upregulation of CBS expression, thus identifying a potential target for treatment for chronic visceral pain in patients with IBS. PMID:23449670

  3. Restoration of the integrity of rat caeco-colonic mucosa by resistant starch, but not by fructo-oligosaccharides, in dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Noëlle M; Martin, Lucile J; Toquet, Claire S; Laboisse, Christian L; Nguyen, Patrick G; Siliart, Brigitte S; Dumon, Henri J; Champ, Martine M J

    2003-07-01

    Butyrate is recognised as efficient in healing colonic inflammation, but cannot be used as a long-term treatment. Dietary fibre that produces a high-butyrate level when fermented represents a promising alternative. We hypothesised that different types of dietary fibre do not have the same efficiency of healing and that this could be correlated to their fermentation characteristics. We compared short-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and type 3 resistant starch (RS) in a previously described dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model. Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats received water (control rats) or DSS (50 g DSS/l for 7 d then 30 g DSS/l for 7 (day 7) or 14 (day 14) d). The rats were fed a basal diet (BD), or a FOS or RS diet creating six groups: BD-control, BD-DSS, FOS-control, FOS-DSS, RS-control and RS-DSS. Caeco-colonic inflammatory injuries were assessed macroscopically and histologically. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were quantified in caeco-colon, portal vein and abdominal aorta. At days 7 and 14, caecal and distal macroscopic and histological observations were improved in RS-DSS compared with BD-DSS and also with FOS-DSS rats. Caeco-colonic SCFA were reduced in FOS-DSS and RS-DSS groups compared with healthy controls. The amount of butyrate was higher in the caecum of the RS-DSS rats than in the BD-DSS and FOS-DSS rats, whereas distal butyrate was higher in FOS-DSS rats. Partially explained by higher luminal levels of SCFA, especially butyrate, the healing effect of RS confirms the involvement of some types of dietary fibre in inflammatory bowel disease. Moreover, the ineffectiveness of FOS underlines the importance of the type of dietary substrate.

  4. Dietary butyrylated high-amylose starch reduces azoxymethane-induced colonic O(6)-methylguanine adducts in rats as measured by immunohistochemistry and high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Le Leu, Richard K; Scherer, Benjamin L; Mano, Mark T; Winter, Jean M; Lannagan, Tamsin; Head, Richard J; Lockett, Trevor; Clarke, Julie M

    2016-09-01

    O(6)-methyl guanine (O(6)MeG) adducts are major toxic, promutagenic, and procarcinogenic adducts involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. Resistant starch and its colonic metabolite butyrate are known to protect against oncogenesis in the colon. In this study, we hypothesized that a dietary intervention that specifically delivers butyrate to the large bowel (notably butyrylated high-amylose maize starch [HAMSB]) would reduce colonic levels of O(6)MeG in rats shortly after exposure to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) alkylating agent azoxymethane (AOM) when compared with a low-amylose maize starch (LAMS). A further objective was to validate an immunohistochemistry (IHC) method for quantifying O(6)MeG against a high-performance liquid chromatography method using fluorescence and diode array detection. Rats were fed either LAMS or HAMSB diets for 4 weeks followed by a single injection of AOM or saline and killed 6 hours later. After AOM exposure, both IHC and high-performance liquid chromatography method using fluorescence and diode array detection measured a substantially increased quantity of DNA adducts in the colon (P<.001). Both techniques demonstrated equally that consumption of HAMSB provided a protective effect by reducing colonic adduct load compared with the LAMS diet (P<.05). In addition, IHC allowed visualization of the O(6)MeG distribution, where adduct load was reduced in the lower third of the crypt compartment in HAMSB-fed rats (P=.036). The apoptotic response to AOM was higher in the HAMSB-fed rats (P=.002). In conclusion, the reduction in O(6)MeG levels and enhancement of the apoptotic response to DNA damage in the colonic epithelium through consumption of HAMSB provide mechanistic insights into how HAMSB protects against colorectal tumorigenesis.

  5. Bioluminescent Imaging Reveals Novel Patterns of Colonization and Invasion in Systemic Escherichia coli K1 Experimental Infection in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Witcomb, Luci A.; Collins, James W.; McCarthy, Alex J.; Frankel, Gadi

    2015-01-01

    Key features of Escherichia coli K1-mediated neonatal sepsis and meningitis, such as a strong age dependency and development along the gut-mesentery-blood-brain course of infection, can be replicated in the newborn rat. We examined temporal and spatial aspects of E. coli K1 infection following initiation of gastrointestinal colonization in 2-day-old (P2) rats after oral administration of E. coli K1 strain A192PP and a virulent bioluminescent derivative, E. coli A192PP-lux2. A combination of bacterial enumeration in the major organs, two-dimensional bioluminescence imaging, and three-dimensional diffuse light imaging tomography with integrated micro-computed tomography indicated multiple sites of colonization within the alimentary canal; these included the tongue, esophagus, and stomach in addition to the small intestine and colon. After invasion of the blood compartment, the bacteria entered the central nervous system, with restricted colonization of the brain, and also invaded the major organs, in line with increases in the severity of symptoms of infection. Both keratinized and nonkeratinized surfaces of esophagi were colonized to a considerably greater extent in susceptible P2 neonates than in corresponding tissues from infection-resistant 9-day-old rat pups; the bacteria appeared to damage and penetrate the nonkeratinized esophageal epithelium of infection-susceptible P2 animals, suggesting the esophagus represents a portal of entry for E. coli K1 into the systemic circulation. Thus, multimodality imaging of experimental systemic infections in real time indicates complex dynamic patterns of colonization and dissemination that provide new insights into the E. coli K1 infection of the neonatal rat. PMID:26351276

  6. Dietary butyrylated high-amylose starch reduces azoxymethane-induced colonic O(6)-methylguanine adducts in rats as measured by immunohistochemistry and high-pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Le Leu, Richard K; Scherer, Benjamin L; Mano, Mark T; Winter, Jean M; Lannagan, Tamsin; Head, Richard J; Lockett, Trevor; Clarke, Julie M

    2016-09-01

    O(6)-methyl guanine (O(6)MeG) adducts are major toxic, promutagenic, and procarcinogenic adducts involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. Resistant starch and its colonic metabolite butyrate are known to protect against oncogenesis in the colon. In this study, we hypothesized that a dietary intervention that specifically delivers butyrate to the large bowel (notably butyrylated high-amylose maize starch [HAMSB]) would reduce colonic levels of O(6)MeG in rats shortly after exposure to the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) alkylating agent azoxymethane (AOM) when compared with a low-amylose maize starch (LAMS). A further objective was to validate an immunohistochemistry (IHC) method for quantifying O(6)MeG against a high-performance liquid chromatography method using fluorescence and diode array detection. Rats were fed either LAMS or HAMSB diets for 4 weeks followed by a single injection of AOM or saline and killed 6 hours later. After AOM exposure, both IHC and high-performance liquid chromatography method using fluorescence and diode array detection measured a substantially increased quantity of DNA adducts in the colon (P<.001). Both techniques demonstrated equally that consumption of HAMSB provided a protective effect by reducing colonic adduct load compared with the LAMS diet (P<.05). In addition, IHC allowed visualization of the O(6)MeG distribution, where adduct load was reduced in the lower third of the crypt compartment in HAMSB-fed rats (P=.036). The apoptotic response to AOM was higher in the HAMSB-fed rats (P=.002). In conclusion, the reduction in O(6)MeG levels and enhancement of the apoptotic response to DNA damage in the colonic epithelium through consumption of HAMSB provide mechanistic insights into how HAMSB protects against colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:27632918

  7. High-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry fingerprinting of metabolites from cecum and distal colon contents of rats fed resistant starch

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Timothy J.; Jones, Roger W.; Ai, Yongfeng; Houk, Robert S.; Jane, Jay-lin; Zhao, Yinsheng; Birt, Diane F.; McClelland, John F.

    2013-12-04

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry along with statistical analysis was utilized to study metabolic profiles among rats fed resistant starch (RS) diets. Fischer 344 rats were fed four starch diets consisting of 55 % (w/w, dbs) starch. A control starch diet consisting of corn starch was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. A subgroup received antibiotic treatment to determine if perturbations in the gut microbiome were long lasting. A second subgroup was treated with azoxymethane (AOM), a carcinogen. At the end of the 8-week study, cecal and distal colon content samples were collected from the sacrificed rats. Metabolites were extracted from cecal and distal colon samples into acetonitrile. The extracts were then analyzed on an accurate-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer to obtain their metabolic profile. The data were analyzed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The PLS-DA analysis utilized a training set and verification set to classify samples within diet and treatment groups. PLS-DA could reliably differentiate the diet treatments for both cecal and distal colon samples. The PLS-DA analyses of the antibiotic and no antibiotic-treated subgroups were well classified for cecal samples and modestly separated for distal colon samples. PLS-DA analysis had limited success separating distal colon samples for rats given AOM from those not treated; the cecal samples from AOM had very poor classification. Mass spectrometry profiling coupled with PLS-DA can readily classify metabolite differences among rats given RS diets.

  8. Apple Flavonoid Phloretin Inhibits Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilm Formation and Ameliorates Colon Inflammation in Rats ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Regmi, Sushil Chandra; Kim, Jung-Ae; Cho, Moo Hwan; Yun, Hyungdon; Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Jintae

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic biofilms have been associated with persistent infections due to their high resistance to antimicrobial agents, while commensal biofilms often fortify the host's immune system. Hence, controlling biofilm formation of both pathogenic bacteria and commensal bacteria is important in bacterium-related diseases. We investigated the effect of plant flavonoids on biofilm formation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7. The antioxidant phloretin, which is abundant in apples, markedly reduced E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation without affecting the growth of planktonic cells, while phloretin did not harm commensal E. coli K-12 biofilms. Also, phloretin reduced E. coli O157:H7 attachment to human colon epithelial cells. Global transcriptome analyses revealed that phloretin repressed toxin genes (hlyE and stx2), autoinducer-2 importer genes (lsrACDBF), curli genes (csgA and csgB), and dozens of prophage genes in E. coli O157:H7 biofilm cells. Electron microscopy confirmed that phloretin reduced fimbria production in E. coli O157:H7. Also, phloretin suppressed the tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced inflammatory response in vitro using human colonic epithelial cells. Moreover, in the rat model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS), phloretin significantly ameliorated colon inflammation and body weight loss. Taken together, our results suggest that the antioxidant phloretin also acts as an inhibitor of E. coli O157:H7 biofilm formation as well as an anti-inflammatory agent in inflammatory bowel diseases without harming beneficial commensal E. coli biofilms. PMID:21930760

  9. Detection of genes expressed in Bordetella bronchiseptica colonizing rat trachea by in vivo expressed-tag immunoprecipitation method.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Kamitani, Shigeki; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Shinzawa, Naoaki; Nakamura, Keiji; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Analyses of bacterial genes expressed in response to the host environment provide clues to understanding the host-pathogen interactions that lead to the establishment of infection. In this study, a novel method named In Vivo Expressed-Tag ImmunoPrecipitation (IVET-PI) was developed for detecting genes expressed in bacteria that are recovered in a small numbers from host tissues. IVET-IP was designed to overcome some drawbacks of previous similar methods. We applied IVET-IP to Bordetella bronchiseptica colonizing rat trachea and identified 173 genes that were expressed in the bacteria over the entire course of an infection. These gene products included two transcriptional factors that are involved in the expression of filamentous hemagglutinin, adenylate cyclase toxin, and major virulence factors for the bordetellae. We consider that this method might provide novel insight into the course of Bordetella infection. PMID:25683445

  10. Detection of genes expressed in Bordetella bronchiseptica colonizing rat trachea by in vivo expressed-tag immunoprecipitation method.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Kamitani, Shigeki; Fukui-Miyazaki, Aya; Shinzawa, Naoaki; Nakamura, Keiji; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Analyses of bacterial genes expressed in response to the host environment provide clues to understanding the host-pathogen interactions that lead to the establishment of infection. In this study, a novel method named In Vivo Expressed-Tag ImmunoPrecipitation (IVET-PI) was developed for detecting genes expressed in bacteria that are recovered in a small numbers from host tissues. IVET-IP was designed to overcome some drawbacks of previous similar methods. We applied IVET-IP to Bordetella bronchiseptica colonizing rat trachea and identified 173 genes that were expressed in the bacteria over the entire course of an infection. These gene products included two transcriptional factors that are involved in the expression of filamentous hemagglutinin, adenylate cyclase toxin, and major virulence factors for the bordetellae. We consider that this method might provide novel insight into the course of Bordetella infection.

  11. Chemopreventive effects of Strobilanthes crispus leaf extract on azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Al-Henhena, Nawal; Khalifa, Shaden A. M.; Ying, Rozaida Poh Yuen; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Rouhollahi, Elham; Al-Wajeeh, Nahla Saeed; Ali, Habibah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; El-Seedi, Hesham R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, microscopic and histological studies suggest that Strobilanthes crispus ethanol extract reduce azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. S. crispus is considered a traditional medicine and used as an antioxidant. Its leaf contains a large amount of phenolic compounds to which its radical scavenging role is attributed and enhance its ability to eradicate oxidative stress reactions. The study was designed to determine the chemopreventive effect of S. crispus ethanol extract in vivo and in vitro by elucidating the effect of the extract on intermediate biomarkers which can be used as effective predictors of colon cancer. S. crispus was analyzed for DPPH free radical scavenging, nitric oxide (NO) and ferric acid reduction. The results indicated that S. crispus oral administration significantly inhibited colorectal carcinogenesis induced by AOM as revealed by the reduction in the number of ACF. S. crispus down-regulated the expression of PCNA, Bcl2 and β-catenin. Additionally, it exerted a pronounced inhibitory effect on MDA and NO levels and stimulatory effect on CAT and GPx activities. These results demonstrate that S. crispus is a chemopreventive agent for colorectal cancer through the suppression of early and intermediate carcinogenic phases that may be related to its flavonoid content. PMID:26307342

  12. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming-Wei; Liu, Shao-Zhuang; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Zhang, Xiang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats. METHODS Diabetic rats, which were induced by high-fat diet (HFD), nicotinamide and low-dose streptozotocin, underwent sham operations, SG, SG with jejuno-ileal loop (SG-JI) and SG with jejuno-jejunal loop (SG-JJ) followed by postoperative HFD. Then, at the time points of baseline and 2, 12 and 24 wk postoperatively, we determined and compared several variables, including the area under the curve for the results of oral glucose tolerance test (AUCOGTT), serum levels of triglyceride, cholesterol and ghrelin in fasting state, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), body weight, calorie intake, glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and insulin secretions after glucose gavage at dose of 1 g/kg. RESULTS At 2 wk postoperatively, rats that underwent SG, SG-JJ and SG-JI, compared with sham-operated (SHAM) rats, demonstrated lower body weight, calorie intake and ghrelin (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), enhanced secretion of insulin and GLP-1 after glucose gavage (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), improved AUCOGTT, HOMA-IR, fasting serum triglyceride and cholesterol (AUCOGTT: 1616.9 ± 83.2, 837.4 ± 83.7, 874.9 ± 97.2 and 812.6 ± 81.9, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; HOMA-IR: 4.31 ± 0.54, 2.94 ± 0.22, 3.17 ± 0.37 and 3.41 ± 0.22, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Triglyceride: 2.35 ± 0.17, 1.87 ± 0.23, 1.98 ± 0.30 and 2.04 ± 0.21 mmol/L, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Cholesterol: 1.84 ± 0.21, 1.53 ± 0.20, 1.52 ± 0.20 and 1.46 ± 0.23 mmol/L). At 12 wk postoperatively, rats receiving SG-JJ and SG-JI had lower body weight, reduced levels of triglyceride and cholesterol and elevated level of GLP-1 compared to those receiving SG (P < 0.05 vs SG). At 24 wk after surgery, compared with SG, the advantage of SG-JJ and SG-JI for glucolipid metabolism was still evident (P < 0.05 vs SG). SG-JI had a better performance in lipid metabolism and GLP-1 secretion of rats than did SG-JJ. CONCLUSION

  13. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming-Wei; Liu, Shao-Zhuang; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Zhang, Xiang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats. METHODS Diabetic rats, which were induced by high-fat diet (HFD), nicotinamide and low-dose streptozotocin, underwent sham operations, SG, SG with jejuno-ileal loop (SG-JI) and SG with jejuno-jejunal loop (SG-JJ) followed by postoperative HFD. Then, at the time points of baseline and 2, 12 and 24 wk postoperatively, we determined and compared several variables, including the area under the curve for the results of oral glucose tolerance test (AUCOGTT), serum levels of triglyceride, cholesterol and ghrelin in fasting state, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), body weight, calorie intake, glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and insulin secretions after glucose gavage at dose of 1 g/kg. RESULTS At 2 wk postoperatively, rats that underwent SG, SG-JJ and SG-JI, compared with sham-operated (SHAM) rats, demonstrated lower body weight, calorie intake and ghrelin (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), enhanced secretion of insulin and GLP-1 after glucose gavage (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), improved AUCOGTT, HOMA-IR, fasting serum triglyceride and cholesterol (AUCOGTT: 1616.9 ± 83.2, 837.4 ± 83.7, 874.9 ± 97.2 and 812.6 ± 81.9, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; HOMA-IR: 4.31 ± 0.54, 2.94 ± 0.22, 3.17 ± 0.37 and 3.41 ± 0.22, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Triglyceride: 2.35 ± 0.17, 1.87 ± 0.23, 1.98 ± 0.30 and 2.04 ± 0.21 mmol/L, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; Cholesterol: 1.84 ± 0.21, 1.53 ± 0.20, 1.52 ± 0.20 and 1.46 ± 0.23 mmol/L). At 12 wk postoperatively, rats receiving SG-JJ and SG-JI had lower body weight, reduced levels of triglyceride and cholesterol and elevated level of GLP-1 compared to those receiving SG (P < 0.05 vs SG). At 24 wk after surgery, compared with SG, the advantage of SG-JJ and SG-JI for glucolipid metabolism was still evident (P < 0.05 vs SG). SG-JI had a better performance in lipid metabolism and GLP-1 secretion of rats than did SG-JJ. CONCLUSION

  14. Desacetyl bisacodyl-induced epithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colon and rectum.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Takuya; Karaki, Shin-ichiro; Tateoka, Takashi; Kuwahara, Atsukazu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the mode of desacetyl bisacodyl (DAB)-induced secretory action in intestinal tissues using an Ussing chamber assay. DAB is the active metabolite of the laxative bisacodyl. In mucosal-submucosal preparations, mucosal application of DAB induced a transient decrease followed by subsequent increases in short-circuit current and tissue conductance in a concentration-dependent manner. DAB-induced responses occurred from the middle colon to the rectal segment but not in the proximal colon. Moreover, these responses were not observed under chloride (Cl(-))-free conditions or in the presence of DAB on the serosal side of the mucosalsubmucosal specimens. Treatment with tetrodotoxin had no effect on the DAB-induced responses; however, mucosal treatment with a COX inhibitor piroxicam resulted in the elimination of responses. These results suggest that DAB may contribute to the laxative action by inducing Cl(-) secretion which is associated with the COX signaling pathway. This study also demonstrated that the DAB target molecule is present on the mucosal side from the middle colon to the rectal segment. PMID:26912136

  15. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  16. Treatment with recombinant lubricin attenuates osteoarthritis by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhuang; Xu, Changpeng; Li, Xue; Song, Jinqi; Yu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a most commonly multifactorial degenerative joint disease along with the aging population, particularly in postmenopausal women. During the onset of OA, articular cartilage and subchondral bone act in concert as a functional unit. This present study is to investigate the effects of early or late treatment with recombinant lubricin on the onset of osteoarthritis (OA) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. We found that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuated the onset of OA by positive feedback loop between articular cartilage and subchondral bone, although late treatment contributed to a lesser effect compared with early treatment. Specifically, treatment with recombinant lubricin protected articular cartilage from degeneration, demonstrated by lower proteoglycan loss, lower OARSI scores, less calcification cartilage zone and reduced immunostaining for collagen X (Col X) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13) but increased the expression of lubricin, in comparison with vehicle-treated OVX rat group. Further, chondroprotective effects of lubricin normalized bone remodeling in subchondral bone underneath. It's suggested that treatment with recombinant lubricin inhibited the elevation of TRAP and Osterix positive cells in OVX rats and led to the normalization of subchondral bone microarchitectures with the suppression of subsidence of bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) and the increase of trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) in vehicle-treated OVX rats. What's more, the normalization of subchondral bone in turn attenuated the articular cartilage erosion by inhibiting vascular invasion from subchondral bone to calcified cartilage zone, exemplified by inhibiting the elevation of CD31 positive cells in calcified cartilage and angiography in subchondral bone. Together, these results shed light that both early and late recombinant lubricin treatments attenuate the onset of OA by balancing the interplay between articular

  17. Development of closed-loop neural interface technology in a rat model: combining motor cortex operant conditioning with visual cortex microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Marzullo, Timothy Charles; Lehmkuhle, Mark J; Gage, Gregory J; Kipke, Daryl R

    2010-04-01

    Closed-loop neural interface technology that combines neural ensemble decoding with simultaneous electrical microstimulation feedback is hypothesized to improve deep brain stimulation techniques, neuromotor prosthetic applications, and epilepsy treatment. Here we describe our iterative results in a rat model of a sensory and motor neurophysiological feedback control system. Three rats were chronically implanted with microelectrode arrays in both the motor and visual cortices. The rats were subsequently trained over a period of weeks to modulate their motor cortex ensemble unit activity upon delivery of intra-cortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the visual cortex in order to receive a food reward. Rats were given continuous feedback via visual cortex ICMS during the response periods that was representative of the motor cortex ensemble dynamics. Analysis revealed that the feedback provided the animals with indicators of the behavioral trials. At the hardware level, this preparation provides a tractable test model for improving the technology of closed-loop neural devices.

  18. Anti-inflammatory properties of a pomegranate extract and its metabolite urolithin-A in a colitis rat model and the effect of colon inflammation on phenolic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Larrosa, Mar; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Yáñez-Gascón, María J; Selma, María V; Azorín-Ortuño, María; Toti, Simona; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Dolara, Piero; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2010-08-01

    Whether the beneficial effects of pomegranate are due to the ellagitannins or to their microbiota-derived urolithins is not known. Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of pomegranate intake and its main microbiota-derived metabolite urolithin-A (UROA) on colon inflammation and to assess whether UROA is the main anti-inflammatory compound. In addition, the effect of the inflammation on the phenolic metabolism was also explored. Male Fisher rats were fed with 250 mg kg(-1) day(-1) pomegranate extract (PE) or 15 mg kg(-1) day(-1) UROA for 25 days. Dextran sodium sulfate (5%) (DSS) was administered for the five last days and then rats were euthanized. DSS is a well-known model of inflammatory bowel disease. Colon tissue damage, microbiota changes, antioxidant status, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), nitric oxide production, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES), gene expression (microarrays and RT-PCR) and polyphenol metabolism (LC-MS-MS) were evaluated. Both PE and UROA decreased inflammation markers (iNOS, cycloxygenase-2, PTGES and PGE(2) in colonic mucosa) and modulated favorably the gut microbiota. The G(1) to S cell cycle pathway was up-regulated in both groups. UROA group showed various down-regulated pathways, including that of the inflammatory response. PE, but not UROA, decreased oxidative stress in plasma and colon mucosa. Only UROA preserved colonic architecture. The normal formation of urolithins in PE-fed rats was prevented during inflammation. Our results suggest that UROA could be the most active anti-inflammatory compound derived from pomegranate ingestion in healthy subjects, whereas in colon inflammation, the effects could be due to the nonmetabolized ellagitannin-related fraction.

  19. Involvement of a CCK-dependent capsaicin-sensitive afferent pathway in the inhibitory effect of pinaverium bromide on the colonic motor response to eating in rats.

    PubMed

    Fioramonti, J; Christen, M O; Dupre, I; Bueno, L

    1997-01-01

    The effects of pinaverium bromide on the stimulation of colonic motility induced by meal and cholecystokinin (CCK) were investigated in rats chronically fitted with intraparietal electrodes on the proximal colon and previously treated or not by capsaicin. Pinaverium bromide inhibited in a dose-related manner (2-50 mg/kg, per os) the increase in colonic spike burst frequency induced by a 3 g meal or CCK-8 (2 micrograms/kg, i.v.). The CCK-A and CCK-B antagonists, devazepide and L 365260 (100 micrograms/kg, i.p.), respectively, inhibited the postprandial colonic motor response while only L 365260 reduced the CCK-induced stimulation. The effects of pinaverium bromide and CCK antagonists were not observed in capsaicin-treated animals. Moreover, CCK-8 (2 micrograms/kg, i.v.) did not stimulate colonic motility after capsaicin treatment. The inhibition of postprandial colonic motility by pinaverium bromide, given orally at therapeutic doses, involves a CCK-dependent pathway which requires the integrity of capsaicin-sensitive afferents. PMID:9243254

  20. Colon-derived uremic biomarkers induced by the acute toxicity of Kansui radix: A metabolomics study of rat plasma and intestinal contents by UPLC-QTOF-MS(E).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Hou, Jin-Jun; Qi, Peng; Yang, Min; Yan, Bing-Peng; Bi, Qi-Rui; Feng, Rui-Hong; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Wu, Wan-Ying; Guo, De-An

    2016-07-15

    Kansui radix (KR) is a poisonous Chinese herbal medicine recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, and the acute toxicity obstructs its clinical applications. To explore its acute toxicity mechanism to enhance clinical safety, a metabolomics study based on UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS(E) was performed. Wistar rats were exposed for 4h to the aqueous and ethyl acetate extracts prepared from KR at a high dose (25g/kg). The contents of six different sections of rat intestine, including the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon, and rectum were collected as samples for the first time, as well as the rat plasma. The interesting results showed that only those rats exposed to the ethyl acetate extract showed a watery diarrhea, similar to the observed acute human toxicity. The identified biomarkers found in the plasma, such as phenol sulfate, indoxyl sulfate, and p-cresol sulfate were significantly perturbed in the rats. These biomarkers are known as colon-derived uremic compounds, which were first reported with respect to KR. The three essential amino acids which produced these biomarkers were only found in the contents of colon and rectum. A hypothesis was proposed that only the colon-derived uremic compounds induced by KR might be responsible for the acute toxicity. Three traditional process methods to reduce the toxicity of KR were compared based on these biomarkers, and different levels of toxicity modulation were observed. These results may be helpful to further understand the mechanism of acute toxicity, and the relevance of the traditional process methods to ameliorate the adverse effects of KR.

  1. Pharmacokinetic studies of mouse monoclonal antibodies to a rat colon carcinoma: I. Comparison of biodistribution in normal rats, syngeneic tumor-bearing rats, or tumor-bearing nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Laborda, J.; Douillard, J.Y.; Burg, C.; Lizzio, E.F.; Ridge, J.; Levenbook, I.; Hoffman, T. )

    1990-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of two iodine-131-({sup 131}I) labeled murine anti-rat colon carcinoma monoclonal antibodies (D3 and E4) were compared in normal Sprague Dawley rats, syngeneic BDIX rats, or nude mice bearing that tumor. Results of antibody uptake after i.v. administration were analyzed in terms of accumulation and localization indices for normal tissues and tumor. Statistically significant differences between rat and mouse tissue biodistribution were found. D3, which reacts in vitro with the tumor and several normal rat tissues, cleared quickly from the blood of rats and was specifically targeted to several normal tissues, notably the lung. Virtually no targeting to the tumor was observed. Nude mice, however, showed a slower blood clearance and specific antibody targeting only in the tumor. Similar results were seen after injection of another antibody, E4, which is tumor-specific in vitro. Data suggest that studies on the xenogeneic nude mouse model may not necessarily be relevant to the choice of monoclonal antibodies for clinical diagnostic imaging or therapy.

  2. Functional, biochemical and morphological alterations in the intestines of rats with an experimental blind-loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bloch, R; Menge, H; Lorenz-Meyer, H; Stöckert, H G; Riecken, E O

    1975-11-26

    In rat self-filling blind loops and in the contiguous regions of the intestinal tract, considerable functional impairment, accompanied by pronounced morphological transformations of the mucosa, has been observed. The histological alterations consist of mucosal hypertrophy and a reduction in the villus height: crypt length ratio, which is indicative of a hyper-regenerative change. Various enzyme activities of the epithelial cells are reduced and the absorption otinal juices is greatly altered in favour of the free acids. Two mec,anisms have 0een dicids, or meta0olites from bacterial degradation, on the absorptive epithelium; 2. Reduced cellular maturity in response to the effect of bile acids and/or bacteria on the lifespan of the cells.

  3. Effects of serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists on stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in rats: a comparative study with opioid receptor agonists, a muscarinic receptor antagonist and a synthetic polymer.

    PubMed

    Hirata, T; Keto, Y; Nakata, M; Takeuchi, A; Funatsu, T; Akuzawa, S; Sasamata, M; Miyata, K

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of serotonin (5-HT)3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3RAs) including ramosetron, alosetron, and cilansetron on colonic nociceptive threshold in rats. Furthermore, we established a restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia model in rats, and compared the inhibitory effects of 5-HT3RAs on restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea with those of loperamide, trimebutine, tiquizium and polycarbophil. The colonic nociceptive threshold was measured as the balloon pressure at the time the rat showed a nociceptive response during colonic distension by an intrarectally inserted balloon. Oral administration of ramosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)), or cilansetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)) increased the colonic nociceptive threshold in a dose-dependent manner in non-stressed rats. Restraint stress for 1 h significantly decreased the colonic nociceptive threshold, but ramosetron (0.3-3 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), cilansetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)) and trimebutine (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) significantly inhibited the decrease in the threshold. Loperamide (3-30 mg kg(-1)), tiquizium (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) and polycarbophil (1000 mg kg(-1)) did not affect the restraint stress-induced decrease in the colonic nociceptive threshold. All drugs tested in this study showed dose-dependent inhibition of restraint stress-induced diarrhoea in rats. These results indicate that, unlike existing antidiarrhoeal and spasmolytic agents, 5-HT3RAs have inhibitory effects on colonic nociception, and prevented restraint stress-induced both diarrhoea and hyperalgesia at almost the same doses in rats. This suggests that the 5-HT3RAs may be useful in ameliorating both colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:18221252

  4. Transepithelial water and urea permeabilities of isolated perfused Munich-Wistar rat inner medullary thin limbs of Henle's loop.

    PubMed

    Nawata, C Michele; Evans, Kristen K; Dantzler, William H; Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the role that water and urea fluxes play in the urine concentrating mechanism, we determined transepithelial osmotic water permeability (Pf) and urea permeability (Purea) in isolated perfused Munich-Wistar rat long-loop descending thin limbs (DTLs) and ascending thin limbs (ATLs). Thin limbs were isolated either from 0.5 to 2.5 mm below the outer medulla (upper inner medulla) or from the terminal 2.5 mm of the inner medulla. Segment types were characterized on the basis of structural features and gene expression levels of the water channel aquaporin 1, which was high in the upper DTL (DTLupper), absent in the lower DTL (DTLlower), and absent in ATLs, and the Cl-(1) channel ClCK1, which was absent in DTLs and high in ATLs. DTLupper Pf was high (3,204.5 ± 450.3 μm/s), whereas DTLlower showed very little or no osmotic Pf (207.8 ± 241.3 μm/s). Munich-Wistar rat ATLs have previously been shown to exhibit no Pf. DTLupper Purea was 40.0 ± 7.3 × 10(-5) cm/s and much higher in DTLlower (203.8 ± 30.3 × 10(-5) cm/s), upper ATL (203.8 ± 35.7 × 10(-5) cm/s), and lower ATL (265.1 ± 49.8 × 10(-5) cm/s). Phloretin (0.25 mM) did not reduce DTLupper Purea, suggesting that Purea is not due to urea transporter UT-A2, which is expressed in short-loop DTLs and short portions of some inner medullary DTLs close to the outer medulla. In summary, Purea is similar in all segments having no osmotic Pf but is significantly lower in DTLupper, a segment having high osmotic Pf. These data are inconsistent with the passive mechanism as originally proposed.

  5. Chemopreventive n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Reprogram Genetic Signatures during Colon Cancer Initiation and Progression in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Laurie A.; Nguyen, Danh V.; Hokanson, Regina M.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Isett, Robert B.; Turner, Nancy D.; Dougherty, Edward R.; Wang, Naisyin; Lupton, Joanne R.; Carroll, Raymond J.; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) decrease colon tumor formation have not been fully elucidated. Examination of genes up- or down-regulated at various stages of tumor development via the monitoring of gene expression relationships will help to determine the biological processes ultimately responsible for the protective effects of n-3 PUFA. Therefore, using a 3 × × × 2 factorial design, we used Codelink DNA microarrays containing ∼9000 genes to help decipher the global changes in colonocyte gene expression profiles in carcinogen-injected Sprague Dawley rats. Animals were assigned to three dietary treatments differing only in the type of fat (corn oil/n-6 PUFA, fish oil/n-3 PUFA, or olive oil/n-9 monounsaturated fatty acid), two treatments (injection with the carcinogen azoxymethane or with saline), and two time points (12 hours and 10 weeks after first injection). Only the consumption of n-3 PUFA exerted a protective effect at the initiation (DNA adduct formation) and promotional (aberrant crypt foci) stages. Importantly, microarray analysis of colonocyte gene expression profiles discerned fundamental differences among animals treated with n-3 PUFA at both the 12 hours and 10-week time points. Thus, in addition to demonstrating that dietary fat composition alters the molecular portrait of gene expression profiles in the colonic epithelium at both the initiation and promotional stages of tumor development, these findings indicate that the chemopreventive effect of fish oil is due to the direct action of n-3 PUFA and not to a reduction in the content of n-6 PUFA. PMID:15374999

  6. Lowbush wild blueberries have the potential to modify gut microbiota and xenobiotic metabolism in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Alison; Li, Robert W; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Kristo, Aleksandra S; Tadepalli, Shravani; Krauss, Emily; Young, Ryan; Wu, Vivian C H

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is populated by an array of microbial species that play an important role in metabolic and immune functions. The composition of microorganisms is influenced by the components of the host's diet and can impact health. In the present study, dietary enrichment of lowbush wild blueberries (LWB) was examined to determine their effect on colon microbial composition and their potential in promoting gut health. The microbial composition and functional potential of the colon microbiota from Sprague Dawley rats fed control diets (AIN93) and LWB-enriched diets (AIN93+8% LWB powder substituting for dextrose) for 6 weeks were assessed using Illumina shotgun sequencing and bioinformatics tools. Our analysis revealed an alteration in the relative abundance of 3 phyla and 22 genera as representing approximately 14 and 8% of all phyla and genera identified, respectively. The LWB-enriched diet resulted in a significant reduction in the relative abundance of the genera Lactobacillus and Enterococcus. In addition, hierarchal analysis revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of the phylum Actinobacteria, the order Actinomycetales, and several novel genera under the family Bifidobacteriaceae and Coriobacteriaceae, in the LWB group. Functional annotation of the shotgun sequences suggested that approximately 9% of the 4709 Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Gene and Genome (KEGG) hits identified were impacted by the LWB-diet. Open Reading Frames (ORFs) assigned to KEGG category xenobiotics biodegradation and metabolism were significantly greater in the LWB-enriched diet compared to the control and included the pathway for benzoate degradation [PATH:ko00362] and glycosaminoglycan degradation [PATH:ko00531]. Moreover, the number of ORFs assigned to the bacterial invasion of epithelial cells [PATH:ko05100] pathway was approximately 8 fold lower in the LWB group compared to controls. This study demonstrated that LWBs have the potential to promote gut health and

  7. Effect of a dietary fiber (beet fiber) on dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Thorup, I; Meyer, O; Kristiansen, E

    1992-01-01

    The modifying effect of a dietary fiber, Fibeta (beet fiber), on experimentally induced colorectal cancer was studied in Wistar rats. The rats were fed a powdered semisynthetic casein-based diet in which the carbohydrate pool was substituted with Fibeta as the sole source of fiber. Dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH-2HCl) was used as initiator in a dose of 20 mg/kg body wt and given by gavage once a week for 10 weeks. Throughout the experiment the rats were offered the diets with different levels of fiber in a preinitiation period of 8 weeks, during the initiation, or in a 30-week postinitiation period. The study was terminated after one year. A protective effect of the fiber was not found at any stage of the colorectal carcinogenic process. Even though differences (not statistically significant) in tumor incidences were seen, these did not reflect any effect of the high or low fiber intake during the study. Analysis for volatile fatty acids in cecal content showed that continuous feeding with a fiber-rich diet resulted in significant increase in most of the volatile fatty acids. The relative change was highest for butyric acid. These findings do not support the hypothesis that butyric acid has a protective effect on colorectal cancer. The tumor yield in the present study was low compared with that reported in the literature, and possible causes for this are discussed.

  8. Combined therapeutic efficacy of carvacrol and X-radiation against 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arivalagan, Sivaranjani; Thomas, Nisha Susan; Chandrasekaran, Balaji; Mani, Vijay; Siddique, Aktarul Islam; Kuppsamy, Thayalan; Namasivayam, Nalini

    2015-12-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers, and is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the combined therapeutic efficacy of carvacrol (CVC) and X-radiation against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon cancer. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 served as control; group 2 received 40 mg/kg b.wt of CVC orally everyday throughout the experimental period (32 weeks); groups 3-6 received subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg b.wt), once a week for the first 15 weeks; group 4 received a single dose of X-radiation at the 31st week; group 5 received CVC (40 mg/kg b.wt) two days after the last injection of DMH and continued everyday till the end of the experimental period; group 6 received CVC as in group 5 and radiation as in group 4. DMH-treated rats showed increased incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), dysplastic aberrant crypt foci (DACF), mast cell number, argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions; elevated activities of phase I enzymes, decreased activities of phase II enzymes, decreased mucin content and altered colonic and liver histology as compared to control rats. Though the individual treatments with CVC and X-radiation to DMH-treated rats reversed the above changes, the combined treatment with both CVC and X-radiation showed a marked effect. Our findings emphasize the potential role of combined therapeutic effect of CVC and X-radiation against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis. PMID:26264073

  9. Dietary phytic acid modulates characteristics of the colonic luminal environment and reduces serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Yukako; Katayama, Tetsuyuki

    2014-12-01

    Dietary phytic acid (PA; myo-inositol [MI] hexaphosphate) is known to inhibit colon carcinogenesis in rodents. Dietary fiber, which is a negative risk factor of colon cancer, improves characteristics of the colonic environment, such as the content of organic acids and microflora. We hypothesized that dietary PA would improve the colonic luminal environment in rats fed a high-fat diet. To test this hypothesis, rats were fed diets containing 30% beef tallow with 2.04% sodium PA, 0.4% MI, or 1.02% sodium PA + 0.2% MI for 3 weeks. Compared with the control diet, the sodium PA diet up-regulated cecal organic acids, including acetate, propionate, and n-butyrate; this effect was especially prominent for cecal butyrate. The sodium PA + MI diet also significantly increased cecal butyrate, although this effect was less pronounced when compared with the sodium PA diet. The cecal ratio of Lactobacillales, cecal and fecal mucins (an index of intestinal barrier function), and fecal β-glucosidase activity were higher in rats fed the sodium PA diet than in those fed the control diet. The sodium PA, MI, and sodium PA + MI diets decreased levels of serum tumor necrosis factor α, which is a proinflammatory cytokine. Another proinflammatory cytokine, serum interleukin-6, was also down-regulated by the sodium PA and sodium PA + MI diets. These data showed that PA may improve the composition of cecal organic acids, microflora, and mucins, and it may decrease the levels of serum proinflammatory cytokines in rats fed a high-fat, mineral-sufficient diet.

  10. Abnormal Savda Munziq, an Herbal Preparation of Traditional Uighur Medicine, May Prevent 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-Induced Rat Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yusup, Abdiryim; Upur, Halmurat; Umar, Anwar; Berke, Benedicte; Yimit, Dilxat; Lapham, Jaya Conser; Moore, Nicholas; Cassand, Pierrette

    2011-01-01

    The study tried to assess the chemoprotective effect of abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq) on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Male F344 rats were randomized into eight groups: Group 1 was served as control, no DMH injection was given and treated daily with normal saline. Rats in Groups 2–8 were given a single intraperitoneal injection of DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) at the beginning of the study. Group 2 was served as negative control, administered with normal saline until the end of the experiment after the single DMH injection. Groups 3–5 were served as pretreatment group, administered with ASMq ethanol extract at 400, 800 and 1600 mg/kg body weight, respectively, until the 45th day, continued by normal saline administration for another 45 days. Groups 6–8 were served as the treatment group, administered with normal saline for the first 45 days from the day of DMH injection, ASMq ethanol extract at three different doses to be administered until the end of the second 45th day. All rats were sacrificed at 91st day and the colons were analyzed for aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and crypt multiplicity. Results showed that ASMq ethanol extract reduced the number of ACF, AC and crypt multiplicity significantly (P < .05). It suggested that ASMq ethanol extract had chemoprotective effects on DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis, by suppressing the development of preneoplastic lesions, and probably exerted protection against the initiation and promotion steps of colon carcinogenesis. PMID:19561161

  11. Antitumorigenic activity of the prebiotic inulin enriched with oligofructose in combination with the probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Luceri, Cristina; Dolara, Piero; Giannini, Augusto; Biggeri, Annibale; Salvadori, Maddalena; Clune, Yvonne; Collins, Kevin J; Paglierani, Milena; Caderni, Giovanna

    2002-11-01

    Prebiotics such as fructans, and probiotics such as Lactobacilli or Bifidobacteria, or a combination of prebiotics and probiotics (synbiotics) are thought to be protective against colon cancer. Therefore, we studied whether the prebiotic inulin enriched with oligofructose (Raftilose-Synergy1, briefly, Synergy1, 10% of the diet), probiotics [Bifidobacterium lactis (Bb12) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG), each at 5x10(8) c.f.u./g diet] or synbiotics (a combination of the two) protect rats against azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer. Male F344 rats were divided into: Controls; PRE, which were fed a diet containing Synergy1; PRO, fed a diet containing LGG and Bb12; PREPRO, fed a diet containing Synergy1, LGG and BB12. Ten days after beginning the diets, rats were treated with AOM (15 mg/kg s.c. two times); dietary treatments were continued for the entire experiment. Thirty-one weeks after AOM, rats treated with Synergy1 (PRE and PREPRO groups) had a significantly lower (P < 0.001) number of tumours (adenomas and cancers) than rats without Synergy1 (colorectal tumours/rat were 1.9 +/- 1.7, 1.1 +/- 1.1, 2.2 +/- 1.4 and 0.9 +/- 1.2 in Controls, PRE, PRO and PREPRO groups, respectively, means +/- SD). A slight, not significant effect of probiotics in reducing malignant tumours was also observed (P = 0.079). Caecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were higher (P < 0.001) in the groups treated with Synergy1. Apoptosis was increased in the normal mucosa of the PRO group, while no variation was observed in the tumours. Colonic proliferation was lower in the PRE group as compared with Controls. Glutathione S-transferase placental enzyme pi type expression, and to a lesser extent, inducible NO synthase were depressed in the tumours from rats in the PRE and PREPRO groups. Cycloxygenase-2 expression was increased in the tumours of control rats but not in those from PRE, PRO or PREPRO rats. In conclusion, prebiotic administration in the diet decreases AOM-induced carcinogenesis

  12. Effect of synthetic ANP on renal and loop of Henle functions in the young rat

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.R.

    1986-08-01

    The present studies were undertaken to determine, by recollection micropuncture, the effect of a synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the absolute and fractional deliveries of water and sodium to the juxtamedullary end-descending limb. Two groups of young female Munich-Wistar rats were studied: 1) control received the vehicle only; and 2) ANP received a prime followed by the constant infusion of a synthetic rat atrial peptide (28 amino acids). With the infusion of ANP, clearance of p-( UC)aminohippurate (( UC(PAH) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) fell significantly. Despite this fall in GFR and renal plasma flow, ANP produced a 2-fold increase in urine volume and a 10-fold increase in sodium excretion. Absolute and fractional sodium deliveries to the end-descending limb increased by approx.30% in the ANP group, whereas mean juxtamedullary single-nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) remained stable. In three additional rats prepared for micropuncture of the superficial end-accessible proximal tubule, ANP reduced cortical SNGFR by approx.15%. By contrast, GFR did not decline in response to ANP in larger rats, when treated identically. The authors conclude that 1) in young rats ANP can produce a natriuresis in the absence of a rise in GFR; 2) the fall in GFR observed following ANP is due presumably to the immaturity of the animals used in these studies; and 3) ANP produces a rise in absolute and fractional water and sodium deliveries to the end-descending limb that cannot be attributed to a change in SNGFR. The relatively small rise in fractional sodium delivery to the end-descending limb, most probably due to inhibition of sodium and water reabsorption in the juxtamedullary proximal tubule and/or thin descending limb, accounts for only a smallproportion of sodium excretion in the final urine.

  13. The antinociception of oxytocin on colonic hypersensitivity in rats was mediated by inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca(2+)-NOS pathway.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liping; Li, Jing; Tang, Yan; Han, Ting; Wei, Chuanfei; Yu, Xiao; Li, Jingxin; Wang, Rong; Ma, Xuelian; Liu, Kejing; Geng, Lingyun; Liu, Shaozhuang; Yan, Bing; Liu, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of oxytocin (OT) on visceral hypersensitivity/pain and mast cell degranulation and the underlying mechanisms. We found that oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in colonic mast cells in humans and rats, as well as in human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1), rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) and mouse mastocytoma cell line (P815). OT decreased 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, colonic mast cell degranulation and histamine release after mast cell degranulation in rats. Also, OT attenuated the compound 48/80 (C48/80)-evoked histamine release in P815 cells and inward currents, responsible for the mast cell degranulation, in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against visceral hypersensitivity and mast cell degranulation were eliminated by coadministration of OTR antagonist atosiban or a nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA). Notably, OT evoked a concentration-dependent increase of intracellular Ca(2+) in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells, which was responsible for the activation of neuronal NOS (NOS1) and endothelial NOS (NOS3). Our findings strongly suggest that OT might exert the antinociception on colonic hypersensitivity through inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca(2+)-NOS pathway. PMID:27538454

  14. The antinociception of oxytocin on colonic hypersensitivity in rats was mediated by inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liping; Li, Jing; Tang, Yan; Han, Ting; Wei, Chuanfei; Yu, Xiao; Li, Jingxin; Wang, Rong; Ma, Xuelian; Liu, Kejing; Geng, Lingyun; Liu, Shaozhuang; Yan, Bing; Liu, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of oxytocin (OT) on visceral hypersensitivity/pain and mast cell degranulation and the underlying mechanisms. We found that oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in colonic mast cells in humans and rats, as well as in human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1), rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) and mouse mastocytoma cell line (P815). OT decreased 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, colonic mast cell degranulation and histamine release after mast cell degranulation in rats. Also, OT attenuated the compound 48/80 (C48/80)-evoked histamine release in P815 cells and inward currents, responsible for the mast cell degranulation, in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against visceral hypersensitivity and mast cell degranulation were eliminated by coadministration of OTR antagonist atosiban or a nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA). Notably, OT evoked a concentration-dependent increase of intracellular Ca2+ in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells, which was responsible for the activation of neuronal NOS (NOS1) and endothelial NOS (NOS3). Our findings strongly suggest that OT might exert the antinociception on colonic hypersensitivity through inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway. PMID:27538454

  15. Histochemical Detection of Collagen Fibers by Sirius Red/Fast Green Is More Sensitive than van Gieson or Sirius Red Alone in Normal and Inflamed Rat Colon

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, Luca; Pellegrini, Carolina; Blandizzi, Corrado; Dolfi, Amelio; Bernardini, Nunzia

    2015-01-01

    Collagen detection in histological sections and its quantitative estimation by computer-aided image analysis represent important procedures to assess tissue localization and distribution of connective fibers. Different histochemical approaches have been proposed to detect and quantify collagen deposition in paraffin slices with different degrees of satisfaction. The present study was performed to compare the qualitative and quantitative efficiency of three histochemical methods available for collagen staining in paraffin sections of colon. van Gieson, Sirius Red and Sirius Red/Fast Green stainings were carried out for collagen detection and quantitative estimation by morphometric image analysis in colonic specimens from normal rats or animals with 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS) induced colitis. Haematoxylin/eosin staining was carried out to assess tissue morphology and histopathological lesions. Among the three investigated methods, Sirius Red/Fast Green staining allowed to best highlight well-defined red-stained collagen fibers and to obtain the highest quantitative results by morphometric image analysis in both normal and inflamed colon. Collagen fibers, which stood out against the green-stained non-collagen components, could be clearly appreciated, even in their thinner networks, within all layers of normal or inflamed colonic wall. The present study provides evidence that, as compared with Sirius Red alone or van Gieson staining, the Sirius Red/Fast Green method is the most sensitive, in terms of both qualitative and quantitative evaluation of collagen fibers, in paraffin sections of both normal and inflamed colon. PMID:26673752

  16. Effect of dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) on colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in male Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Comer, P F; Clark, T D; Glauert, H P

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the effect of increasing dietary vitamin D on chemically induced colon carcinogenesis. Male Fischer 344 rats were first injected with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (200 mg/kg) and then fed one of five dietary levels of vitamin D as cholecalciferol (250, 1,000, 2,000, 4,000, and 10,000 IU/kg diet) for nine months. Dietary vitamin D3 had no effect on weight gain. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels were similar for the 1,000 and 2,000 IU/kg groups but varied in a dose-related manner for the other groups. Vitamin D did not significantly alter the tumor incidence in either the distal or the proximal colon. No significant differences in the labeling index were found in either the proximal or the distal colon. Within the distal colon, the proliferative zone increased in a dose-related manner. Distribution of labeled cells within the crypt compartments was not affected by dietary vitamin D. Bone and serum minerals in general were unaffected by dietary vitamin D. This study shows that, at this level of dietary calcium, vitamin D did not affect 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis.

  17. pH-sensitive microemulsion-based gels for removal of colonic ammonia: a novel preventative oral preparation for hepatic encephalopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Le; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Tian, Ge; Tian, Yan; He, Gao-Hong; Bian, Teng-Fei; Jin, Xue; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Zhen; Chang, Qing-Yong

    2015-05-01

    Microemulsions with limited stability in mimetic gastrointestinal environments have previously demonstrated potential for the effective removal of ammonia from artificial colonic fluid. Specialized pH‑sensitive microemulsion‑based gels for the removal of colonic ammonia (MBG‑RCA), however, possess relative stability in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of normal rats, indicating potential use in in vivo applications. An investigation of the effects of oral MBG‑RCA was conducted in order to evaluate the reduction of intestinal ammonia and the prevention of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in rat models. Eighty rats were allocated into eight 4‑day treatment groups: The HE model (intraperitoneal injection of thioacetamide) group; the high‑, medium‑ and low‑dose MBG‑RCA therapeutic groups (15, 10 and 5 ml/kg MBG‑RCA, respectively); and the normal, blank, lactulose and acetic acid control groups, each of which received daily treatment administration. Oral MBG‑RCA effects were identified using behavioral monitoring observed by an infrared night vision supervisory control system, electroencephalograms, blood ammonia levels, intestinal ammonia levels, liver functionality and pathological observation. High‑ and medium‑dose oral administrations of MBG‑RCA significantly decreased the blood and intestinal ammonia levels (P<0.05), improved liver functionality and reduced the clinical manifestations of HE in rats. MBG‑RCA demonstrated high clearance of rat colonic ammonia while maintaining sufficient stability in the GI tract, indicating the potential for the development of new clinically relevant oral preparations for the prevention of HE. Additionally, such preparations are advantageous in that ammonia is eliminated without the production of potentially harmful metabolic byproducts.

  18. pH-sensitive microemulsion-based gels for removal of colonic ammonia: a novel preventative oral preparation for hepatic encephalopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Le; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Tian, Ge; Tian, Yan; He, Gao-Hong; Bian, Teng-Fei; Jin, Xue; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Zhen; Chang, Qing-Yong

    2015-05-01

    Microemulsions with limited stability in mimetic gastrointestinal environments have previously demonstrated potential for the effective removal of ammonia from artificial colonic fluid. Specialized pH‑sensitive microemulsion‑based gels for the removal of colonic ammonia (MBG‑RCA), however, possess relative stability in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of normal rats, indicating potential use in in vivo applications. An investigation of the effects of oral MBG‑RCA was conducted in order to evaluate the reduction of intestinal ammonia and the prevention of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in rat models. Eighty rats were allocated into eight 4‑day treatment groups: The HE model (intraperitoneal injection of thioacetamide) group; the high‑, medium‑ and low‑dose MBG‑RCA therapeutic groups (15, 10 and 5 ml/kg MBG‑RCA, respectively); and the normal, blank, lactulose and acetic acid control groups, each of which received daily treatment administration. Oral MBG‑RCA effects were identified using behavioral monitoring observed by an infrared night vision supervisory control system, electroencephalograms, blood ammonia levels, intestinal ammonia levels, liver functionality and pathological observation. High‑ and medium‑dose oral administrations of MBG‑RCA significantly decreased the blood and intestinal ammonia levels (P<0.05), improved liver functionality and reduced the clinical manifestations of HE in rats. MBG‑RCA demonstrated high clearance of rat colonic ammonia while maintaining sufficient stability in the GI tract, indicating the potential for the development of new clinically relevant oral preparations for the prevention of HE. Additionally, such preparations are advantageous in that ammonia is eliminated without the production of potentially harmful metabolic byproducts. PMID:25591795

  19. Gut microbiota in the pharmacokinetics and colonic deglycosylation metabolism of ginsenoside Rb1 in rats: Contrary effects of antimicrobials treatment and restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, An; Zhang, Shengjie; Zhu, Dong; Dong, Yu; Shan, Jinjun; Xie, Tong; Wen, Hongmei; Di, Liuqing

    2016-10-25

    Ginsenoside Rb1, an active ingredient in Panax ginseng, was widely used for its various biological activities. To clarify the role of the gut microbiota in pharmacokinetics and metabolism of Rb1, a comprehensive and comparative study of colonic deglycosylation metabolism and systemic exposure of ginsenoside Rb1 in normal rats, antimicrobials (ATMs) treated rats, and restraint stressed rats was conducted. ATMs treated rats received oral administration of non-absorbable antimicrobial mixtures for 7 consecutive days. Restraint stressed rats were subjected to repeated restraint stress for a period of 2 h once daily for 7 days. Plasma concentration dynamics, urine and fecal excretion of Rb1 and its deglycosylation metabolites (Rd, F2, and C-K) were studied. Moreover, the in vitro metabolism of Rb1 in fecal suspension and the fecal β-d-glucosidase activity were profiled. Systemic exposure of the deglycosylation metabolites of ginsenoside Rb1 (F2, C-K) were significantly higher in restraint stressed rats, but ATMs treated rats exhibited a decreased plasma levels of F2 and C-K, compared with normal rats. Further studies illustrated that altered systemic Rb1 and its deglycosylation metabolites exposure in restraint-stressed rats and ATMs treated rats may be partially attributed to alternations in cumulative fecal excretion. The distinguishing fecal β-d-glucosidase, in vitro elimination of Rb1, and formation of these deglycosylation metabolites afforded further evidence for the in vivo data. In conclusion, the dys-regulated fecal β-d-glucosidase activity and deglycosylation metabolism may contribute to the altered pharmacokinetic of ginsenoside Rb1 and its hydrolysis metabolites after ATMs treatment or restraint stress exposure. Our results may offer valuable insights into the pharmacological changes of bioactive ginsenosides in dys-regulated gut microbiota statue. PMID:27613481

  20. Gut microbiota in the pharmacokinetics and colonic deglycosylation metabolism of ginsenoside Rb1 in rats: Contrary effects of antimicrobials treatment and restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, An; Zhang, Shengjie; Zhu, Dong; Dong, Yu; Shan, Jinjun; Xie, Tong; Wen, Hongmei; Di, Liuqing

    2016-10-25

    Ginsenoside Rb1, an active ingredient in Panax ginseng, was widely used for its various biological activities. To clarify the role of the gut microbiota in pharmacokinetics and metabolism of Rb1, a comprehensive and comparative study of colonic deglycosylation metabolism and systemic exposure of ginsenoside Rb1 in normal rats, antimicrobials (ATMs) treated rats, and restraint stressed rats was conducted. ATMs treated rats received oral administration of non-absorbable antimicrobial mixtures for 7 consecutive days. Restraint stressed rats were subjected to repeated restraint stress for a period of 2 h once daily for 7 days. Plasma concentration dynamics, urine and fecal excretion of Rb1 and its deglycosylation metabolites (Rd, F2, and C-K) were studied. Moreover, the in vitro metabolism of Rb1 in fecal suspension and the fecal β-d-glucosidase activity were profiled. Systemic exposure of the deglycosylation metabolites of ginsenoside Rb1 (F2, C-K) were significantly higher in restraint stressed rats, but ATMs treated rats exhibited a decreased plasma levels of F2 and C-K, compared with normal rats. Further studies illustrated that altered systemic Rb1 and its deglycosylation metabolites exposure in restraint-stressed rats and ATMs treated rats may be partially attributed to alternations in cumulative fecal excretion. The distinguishing fecal β-d-glucosidase, in vitro elimination of Rb1, and formation of these deglycosylation metabolites afforded further evidence for the in vivo data. In conclusion, the dys-regulated fecal β-d-glucosidase activity and deglycosylation metabolism may contribute to the altered pharmacokinetic of ginsenoside Rb1 and its hydrolysis metabolites after ATMs treatment or restraint stress exposure. Our results may offer valuable insights into the pharmacological changes of bioactive ginsenosides in dys-regulated gut microbiota statue.

  1. Probiotic Escherichia coli CFR 16 producing pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) ameliorates 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced oxidative damage in colon and liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sumeet; Singh, Ashish; Kumar, Prasant; Chaudhari, Archana; Nareshkumar, G

    2014-06-01

    Inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) genesis. Alleviation of oxidative stress is achieved by using antioxidants and probiotics. Present study investigates a synergistic effect of the probiotic Escherichia coli CFR 16 containing Vitreoscilla haemoglobin gene (vgb), green fluorescent protein (gfp) gene and pyrroloquinoline quinone (pqq) gene cluster on oxidative stress induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Adult virgin Charles foster male rats (3-4 months) weighing 200-250 g were administered with DMH (25 mg/kg body weight, s.c.) twice a week for eight consecutive weeks. Rats receiving only DMH dose showed increased lipid peroxidation in liver and intestinal tissues with reduced activity of antioxidant enzymes, i.e. superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Oral dose of E. coli CFR 16::vgb-gfp harbouring pqq gene cluster increased rat faecal PQQ concentration by twofold, reduced lipid peroxidation and retained SOD, CAT and GPx activities close to normal levels in liver and colonic tissues following DMH treatment. In addition, significant protection was found in colonic histological sections of these rat groups. This study demonstrates a protective efficacy in the following order: E. coli CFR 16 < E. coli CFR 16::vgb-gfp < vitamin C = PQQ < E. coli CFR 16::vgb-gfp (pqq).

  2. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus increases expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase-1 and expression of glutathione peroxidase-2 in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Howell, Kate; Dunshea, Frank R; Ng, Ken

    2014-03-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus on cytosolic gluthathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal specific glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) and selenoprotein P (SeP) mRNA expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon was examined. Rats were fed for 5weeks with control diet (0.15μg Se/g feed) or Se-enriched diet fortified with selenised mushroom (1μg Se/g feed). The mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly (P<0.01) up-regulated by 1.65-fold and 2.3-fold for GPx-1 and GPx-2, respectively, but were not significantly different for TrxR-1 and SeP between the 2 diet treatments. The up-regulation of GPx-1 mRNA expression was consistent with GPX-1 activity level, which was significantly (P<0.05) increased by 1.77-fold in rats fed with the Se-enriched diet compared to the control diet. The results showed that selenised A. bisporus can positively increase GPx-1 and GPx-2 gene expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon.

  3. Dietary fructooligosaccharide, xylooligosaccharide and gum arabic have variable effects on cecal and colonic microbiota and epithelial cell proliferation in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Howard, M D; Gordon, D T; Garleb, K A; Kerley, M S

    1995-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if supplementing soluble fiber (fructooligosaccharide, xylooligosaccharide or gum arabic) to a semi-elemental diet would beneficially change cecal and colonic microbiota populations and enhance epithelial cell proliferation. Experiments 1 and 2 used identical dietary regimens; mice and rats were given free access to a powdered semi-elemental diet. Animals were assigned to one of the four following treatment groups: control, no supplemental dietary fiber, fructooligosaccharide, xylooligosaccharide and gum arabic. Dietary fiber was supplied via drinking water at 30 g/L. In Experiment 1 populations of Bifidobacteria and total anaerobic flora were enumerated from the contents of the cecum and colon of weanling mice. Consumption of fructooligosaccharide increased (P < 0.05) the concentrations of Bifidobacteria and the ratio of Bifidobacteria to total anaerobic flora. In Experiment 2 tissue from the cecum and distal colon of weanling rats was examined for morphological changes of the mucosa. Consumption of xylooligosaccharide increased (P < 0.05) cecal crypt depth and labeling index relative to the other three treatments. Consumption of gum arabic and the control diet increased (P < 0.01) cecal proliferation zone. Consumption of xylooligosaccharide and the control diet increased (P < 0.01) cecal cell density (number of cells in a vertical-half of the crypt). Distal colonic crypt depth was greatest (P < 0.05) in controls and rats fed fructooligosaccharide, intermediate in those fed gum arabic, and smallest in those fed xylooligosaccharide. These results suggest that fructooligosaccharide effectively stimulates growth of Bifidobacteria and xylooligosaccharide supports a modest enhancement of cecal epithelial cell proliferation.

  4. The effects of vincristine on platelet aggregation studied by a filter loop technique in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bee, D.; Leach, E.; Martin, J. F.; Suggett, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    1 A method for measuring aggregation of platelets of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is described using a filter inserted into the flowing aortic blood in the rat. 2 Repeated infusions of ADP resulted in a fall in the calculated aggregation index without significant changes in the platelet count. 3 Vincristine (0.05 mg/kg) intravenously caused significant inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. 4 Infusion of ADP caused some peripheral vasodilatation though it is unlikely that this contributed to the effects seen to any great extent. PMID:7437636

  5. Prevention of heterocyclic amine-induced DNA damage in colon and liver of rats by different lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Zsivkovits, Markus; Fekadu, Kassie; Sontag, Gerhard; Nabinger, Ursula; Huber, Wolfgang W; Kundi, Michael; Chakraborty, Asima; Foissy, Helmuth; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2003-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of four different lactobacillus (LB) strains, namely Lactobacillus bulgaricus 291, Streptococcus thermophilus F4, S.thermophilus V3 and Bifidobacterium longum BB536, which are used for the production of yogurt, on the DNA-damaging effects of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs). Male F344 rats were treated orally with HCA mixtures containing 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole and 2-amino-3-methyl-3H- imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline, which were representative of the HCA contents found in fried beef ('beef mix') and chicken ('chicken mix'). Suspensions of LB were given by gavage to the animals simultaneously with and at different time periods before administration of the HCAs. Subsequently, the extent of DNA migration was measured in colon and liver cells in single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assays. All four strains caused complete inhibition of DNA damage induced with beef mix after administration of 1 x 1010 LB cells/animal, whereas with chicken mix only marginal (non-significant) effects were seen. The inhibition of beef-induced DNA damage was dose dependent and was still significant when 1 x 107 cells/animal were administered. Kinetics studies showed that the protective effects were still significant when LB was given 12 h before the beef mix. A comparison of the present results with chemical analytical data from in vitro experiments suggests that the strong reduction in DNA migration seen in the animals can be only partly explained by direct binding effects. The results of the present study show that LB are highly protective against the genotoxic effects of HCAs under conditions which are relevant for humans and provide a possible explanation for the reduced colon cancer rates observed in some studies in individuals with either high LB counts in their feces or with

  6. Cutaneous and colonic rat DRG neurons differ with respect to both baseline and PGE2-induced changes in passive and active electrophysiological properties.

    PubMed

    Gold, Michael S; Traub, Richard J

    2004-06-01

    This study was designed to test the hypotheses that pain syndromes associated with specific body regions reflect unique properties of sensory neurons innervating these regions and/or unique responses of these afferents to tissue damage. Acutely dissociated adult rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons retrogradely labeled from either the colon or the glabrous skin of the hindpaw were studied by whole cell patch-clamp recording in current-clamp mode. Two populations of colonic afferent neurons were studied: pelvic afferents (arising from L(6), S(1), and S(2) DRG = LS DRG) and hypogastric/lumbar colonic afferents (arising from T(13), L(1), and L(2) DRG = TL DRG). Passive and active electrophysiological properties were studied before and after application prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We observed marked differences between cutaneous and colonic sensory neurons with respect to baseline passive and active electrophysiological properties as well as both the magnitude and pattern of PGE(2)-induced changes in excitability, passive, and active properties. There were also significant differences between TL and LS neurons with respect to baseline and PGE(2)-induced changes in several passive and active electrophysiological properties. Our results suggest that differences between cutaneous and colonic neurons reflect differences in pattern and/or density of ionic currents present in the plasma membrane. More interestingly, the ionic currents underlying the PGE(2)-induced sensitization of cutaneous neurons appeared to differ from those underlying the sensitization of colonic neurons. The implication of this observation is that it may be possible, in fact necessary, to treat pain arising from specific body regions with unique therapeutic interventions. PMID:14736864

  7. Cysteamine-colon and cysteamine-duodenum lesions in rats. Attenuation by gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157, cimetidine, ranitidine, atropine, omeprazole, sulphasalazine and methylprednisolone.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarevic, Z; Balen, I; Aralica, G; Gjurasin, M; Komericki, L; Perovic, D; Ziger, T; Anic, T; Prkacin, I; Separovic, J; Stancic-Rokotov, D; Lovric-Bencic, M; Mikus, D; Staresinic, M; Aralica, J; DiBiaggio, N; Simec, Z; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Sebecic, B; Ivasovic, Z; Boban-Blagaic, A; Sjekavica, I

    2001-01-01

    Recently, we showed cysteamine-duodenal lesions without gastric acid, since they were induced also in gastrectomized rats, as in naive rats, and they were inhibited by the novel stomach pentadecapeptide BPC 157 as well as standard antiulcer drugs (i.e. cimetidine, ranitidine, omeprazole, bromocriptine, atropine). Therefore, as an advantage of considering cysteamine as a directly acting cytotoxic agent and mentioned agents as direct cytoprotective agents, the present focus was on the ulcerogenic effect of cysteamine and protective effect of gastroduodenal antiulcer agents outside upper gastrointestinal tract (i.e. in colon). Intrarectal administration of the cysteamine (200 or 400 mg/kg b.w) produced severe colon lesions (i.e. transmural inflammation with serosal involvement) in rats (30 min-72 h-experimental period), apparently distinctive from smaller lesions after non-specific irritant enema [diluted HCl solution, pH 3.8 (adjusted to pH of cysteamine solution (pH 3.8)]. All of the tested antiulcer agents were applied simultaneously with cysteamine enema (8 cm from the anus, in a volume of the 1.0 ml/rat) intraperitoneally (i.p.), intragastrically (i.g.) or intrarectally (i.r.). Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (10 microg or 10 ng/kg b.w.), given in either regimen, previously shown to have, besides others, a particular beneficial activity just in the intestinal mucosa, inhibited these cysteamine colon lesions (assessed after 30 min, 60 min, 180 min, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h following cysteamine in a dose of either 200 or 400 mg/kg i.r.). Cysteamine-colon lesions were also attenuated by standard antiulcer agents (mg/kg b.w.), given i.p., i.g., or i.r., such as ranitidine (10), cimetidine (50), omeprazole (10), atropine (10), together with methylprednisolone (1), and sulphasalazine (50, i.r.), assessed 30 min following application of 200 mg of cysteamine. Finally, standard cysteamine duodenal lesions (assessed 24 h after a subcutaneous application of 400 mg/kg of cysteamine) were

  8. Effect of nor-trimebutine on neuronal activation induced by a noxious stimulus or an acute colonic inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sinniger, Valérie; Mouchet, Patrick; Bonaz, Bruno

    2005-10-21

    Nor-trimebutine is the main metabolite of trimebutine that is used in the treatment of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Nor-trimebutine has a blocking activity on sodium channels and a potent local anesthetic effect. These properties were used to investigate the effect of nor-trimebutine on spinal neuronal activation induced by models of noxious somato-visceral stimulus and acute colonic inflammation. Nor-trimebutine was administered in rats either subcutaneously 30 min before intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid or intracolonically 30 min before intracolonic infusion of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. Abdominal contractions were counted for 1 h as a marker of abdominal pain. c-fos expression was used as a marker of neuronal activation and revealed by immunohistochemistry 1h after intraperitoneal acetic acid injection and 2 h after colonic inflammation. Nor-trimebutine decreased Fos expression in the thoraco-lumbar (peritoneal irritation) and lumbo-sacral (colonic inflammation) spinal cord in laminae I, IIo V, VII and X. This effect was also observed in the sacral parasympathetic nucleus after colonic inflammation. Nor-trimebutine induced a significant decrease of abdominal contractions following intraperitoneal acetic acid injection. These data may explain the effectiveness of trimebutine in the therapy of abdominal pain in the irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:15978629

  9. Central neuropeptide Y receptors are involved in 3rd ventricular ghrelin induced alteration of colonic transit time in conscious fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Tebbe, Johannes J; Tebbe, Clemens G; Mronga, Silke; Ritter, Michael; Schäfer, Martin KH

    2005-01-01

    Background Feeding related peptides have been shown to be additionally involved in the central autonomic control of gastrointestinal functions. Recent studies have shown that ghrelin, a stomach-derived orexigenic peptide, is involved in the autonomic regulation of GI function besides feeding behavior. Pharmacological evidence indicates that ghrelin effects on food intake are mediated by neuropeptide Y in the central nervous system. Methods In the present study we examine the role of ghrelin in the central autonomic control of GI motility using intracerobroventricular and IP microinjections in a freely moving conscious rat model. Further the hypothesis that a functional relationship between NPY and ghrelin within the CNS exists was addressed. Results ICV injections of ghrelin (0.03 nmol, 0.3 nmol and 3.0 nmol/5 μl and saline controls) decreased the colonic transit time up to 43%. IP injections of ghrelin (0.3 nmol – 3.0 nmol kg-1 BW and saline controls) decreased colonic transit time dose related. Central administration of the NPY1 receptor antagonist, BIBP-3226, prior to centrally or peripherally administration of ghrelin antagonized the ghrelin induced stimulation of colonic transit. On the contrary ICV-pretreatment with the NPY2 receptor antagonist, BIIE-0246, failed to modulate the ghrelin induced stimulation of colonic motility. Conclusion The results suggest that ghrelin acts in the central nervous system to modulate gastrointestinal motor function utilizing NPY1 receptor dependent mechanisms. PMID:15720710

  10. Role of various kinases in muscarinic M3 receptor-mediated contraction of longitudinal muscle of rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Charles D.; Kendig, Derek M.; Al-Qudah, Mohammad; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.; Grider, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal muscle layer in gut is the functional opponent to the circular muscle layer during peristalsis. Differences in innervation of the layers allow for the contraction of one layer concurrently with the relaxation of the other, enabling the passage of gut contents in a controlled fashion. Differences in development have given the cells of the two layers differences in receptor populations, membrane lipid handling, and calcium handling profiles/behaviors. The contractile activity of the longitudinal muscle is largely mediated by cholinergic neural input from myenteric plexus. Activation of muscarinic receptors leads to rapid activation of several kinases including MLC kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and Rho kinase. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) by MLC kinase (MLCK) is a prerequisite for contraction in both circular and longitudinal muscle cells. In rat colonic longitudinal muscle strips, we measured muscarinic receptor-mediated contraction following incubation with kinase inhibitors. Basal tension was differentially regulated by Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and CaMKK. Selective inhibitors of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CaMKII each reduced carbachol-induced contraction in the innervated muscle strips. These inhibitors had no direct effect on MLCK activity. Thus unlike previously reported for isolated muscle cells where CaMKII and ERK1/2 are not involved in contraction, we conclude that the regulation of carbachol-induced contraction in innervated longitudinal muscle strips involves the interplay of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CAMKII. PMID:25891767

  11. Dietary mustard seeds (Sinapis alba Linn) suppress 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced immuno-imbalance and colonic carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minggu; Yuan, Haifeng; Guo, Wen; Li, Xinyan; Jin, Lin; Brunk, Ulf T; Han, Jiahuai; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Yawei

    2012-04-01

    In a Wistar rat model, prolonged supplementation of mustard seed (MS) to the diet significantly ameliorates the induction of colorectal carcinomas by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The expression of the splenocyte major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) was found significantly enhanced, whereas that of the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) was significantly decreased. Compared to that of control animals, the proportion of spleenic B- and dendritic cells (DC) was amplified in the MS group. The expressions of MHCI, as well as that of MHCII, were increased in DC cells; whereas in B cells, MHCI expression was augmented but that of MHCII moderately decreased. The percentages of CD8+CD28+ and CD4+CD28+ cells were increased in the MS group, while the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ subset was depressed. Plasma analysis showed that DMH-exposure induced amplified amounts of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-beta, whereas MS feeding counteracted this effect but enhanced IL-2, IL12p70, IL21, TNF-alpha, and interferon-gamma. In the SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cell-line, the cytotoxicity of spleenic T-cells from MS-fed animals was significantly increased. In the DMH-exposed rats, the expression of perforin in the spleenic T-cells was dramatically decreased, whereas MS abolished this depression. In summary, dietary MS suppresses DMH-induced immuno-imbalance as well as colon carcinogenesis in rats. PMID:22420317

  12. Dose dependent inhibitory effect of dietary caraway on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colonic aberrant crypt foci and bacterial enzyme activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Deeptha, Kumaraswami; Kamaleeswari, Muthaiyan; Sengottuvelan, Murugan; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2006-11-01

    Colon cancer has become one of the major causes of cancer mortality. We determined the effect of caraway (Carum carvi L.) on the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and modulation of fecal bacterial enzyme activities in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups and all the animals were fed 15.8% peanut oil making a total of 20% fat in the diet. Group 1 served as control and group 2 animals received 90 mg/kg body weight caraway p.o. daily for 15 weeks. To induce ACF, DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) was injected subcutaneously once a week for the first four weeks (groups 3-6). In addition caraway was administered at the dose of 30, 60 and 90 mg/kg body weight everyday orally for the entire period of 15 weeks (groups 4-6). First, we analyzed ACF number (incidence), multiplicity and its distribution along the colon in all experimental groups at the end of 15 weeks. Subsequently, we also assayed the fecal bacterial enzyme activities. ACF formation and the fecal bacterial enzyme activities were found to be significantly high in DMH-alone treated group as compared to control group. Caraway supplementation at three different doses significantly suppressed ACF development, bacterial enzyme activities and modulated oxidative stress significantly as compared to the unsupplemented DMH-treated group. Results of our present study indicate that dietary caraway markedly inhibited DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis and the optimal dose of 60 mg/kg body weight was more effective than the other two doses.

  13. Meat processing and colon carcinogenesis: cooked, nitrite-treated, and oxidized high-heme cured meat promotes mucin-depleted foci in rats

    PubMed Central

    Santarelli, Raphaëlle L; Vendeuvre, Jean-Luc; Naud, Nathalie; Taché, Sylviane; Guéraud, Françoise; Viau, Michelle; Genot, Claude; Corpet, Denis E; Pierre, Fabrice H F

    2010-01-01

    Processed meat intake is associated with colorectal cancer risk, but no experimental study supports the epidemiologic evidence. To study the effect of meat processing on carcinogenesis promotion, we first did a 14-day study with 16 models of cured meat. Studied factors, in a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 design, were muscle color (a proxy for heme level), processing temperature, added nitrite, and packaging. Fischer 344 rats were fed these 16 diets, and we evaluated fecal and urinary fat oxidation and cytotoxicity, three biomarkers of heme-induced carcinogenesis promotion. A principal component analysis allowed for selection of four cured meats for inclusion into a promotion study. These selected diets were given for 100 days to rats pretreated with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. Colons were scored for preneoplastic lesions: aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF). Cured meat diets significantly increased the number of ACF/colon compared with a no-meat control diet (P = 0.002). Only the cooked nitrite-treated and oxidized high heme meat significantly increased the fecal level of apparent total N-nitroso compounds (ATNC) and the number of MDF per colon compared with the no-meat control diet (P < 0.05). This nitrite-treated and oxidized cured meat specifically increased the MDF number compared with similar non nitrite-treated meat (P = 0.03) and with similar non oxidized meat (P = 0.004). Thus, a model cured meat, similar to ham stored aerobically, increased the number of preneoplastic lesions, which suggests colon carcinogenesis promotion. Nitrite treatment and oxidation increased this promoting effect, which was linked with increased fecal ATNC level. This study could lead to process modifications to make non promoting processed meat. PMID:20530708

  14. Characterization of Changes in Global Genes Expression in the Distal Colon of Loperamide-Induced Constipation SD Rats in Response to the Laxative Effects of Liriope platyphylla

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Eun; Park, So Hae; Kwak, Moon Hwa; Go, Jun; Koh, Eun Kyoung; Song, Sung Hwa; Sung, Ji Eun; Lee, Hee Seob; Hong, Jin Tae; Hwang, Dae Youn

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the changes in global gene expression in the distal colon of constipated SD rats in response to the laxative effects of aqueous extracts of Liriope platyphylla (AEtLP), including isoflavone, saponin, oligosaccharide, succinic acid and hydroxyproline, the total RNA extracted from the distal colon of AEtLP-treated constipation rats was hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays. The AEtLP treated rats showed an increase in the number of stools, mucosa thickness, flat luminal surface thickness, mucin secretion, and crypt number. Overall, compared to the controls, 581 genes were up-regulated and 216 genes were down-regulated by the constipation induced by loperamide in the constipated rats. After the AEtLP treatment, 67 genes were up-regulated and 421 genes were down-regulated. Among the transcripts up-regulated by constipation, 89 were significantly down-regulated and 22 were recovered to the normal levels by the AEtLP treatment. The major genes in the down-regulated categories included Slc9a5, klk10, Fgf15, and Alpi, whereas the major genes in the recovered categories were Cyp2b2, Ace, G6pc, and Setbp1. On the other hand, after the AEtLP treatment, ten of these genes down-regulated by constipation were up-regulated significantly and five were recovered to the normal levels. The major genes in the up-regulated categories included Serpina3n, Lcn2 and Slc5a8, whereas the major genes in the recovered categories were Tmem45a, Rerg and Rgc32. These results indicate that several gene functional groups and individual genes as constipation biomarkers respond to an AEtLP treatment in constipated model rats. PMID:26151867

  15. Colon cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma ... In the United States, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of deaths due to cancer. Early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost ...

  16. A mutein of human basic fibroblast growth factor TGP-580 accelerates colonic ulcer healing by stimulating angiogenesis in the ulcer bed in rats.

    PubMed

    Satoh, H; Szabo, S

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we reported that TGP-580, a mutein of human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), accelerated the healing of gastric and duodenal ulcers in rats. In the present study, we examined the effect of TGP-580 on the healing of colonic ulcers. In male Sprague Dawley rats, ulcers were induced in the colon 6 cm from the anus by enema of 50 μl of 3% N-ethylmaleimide, a sulfhydryl alkylator. The lesions were examined under a dissecting microscope (x10). The concentration of bFGF in the ulcerated colon was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and both the distribution of bFGF and the density of microvessels in the ulcer bed were examined by immunohistochemical staining. The content of bFGF in the ulcerated colon was markedly increased associated with ulcer healing, and ulcer healing was significantly delayed by intravenous administration of a monoclonal antibody for bFGF (MAb 3H3) once daily for 10 days. In the ulcer bed, many cells such as fibroblasts, vascular endothelial cells and macrophages were positively stained with bFGF antiserum. TGP-580, human bFGF or dexamethasone was given intracolonally twice daily for 10 days, starting the day after ulcer induction. TGP-580 (0.2 - 20 μg/ml, 200 μl/rat) dose-dependently accelerated ulcer healing, and its effect was more than 10 times stronger than that of human bFGF. Density (μm/0.01 mm(2)) of microvessels in the ulcer bed was significantly increased by treatment with TGP-580, and there was a good correlation between the density of microvessels and the decrease of ulcerated area (R(2) = 0.633). On the other hand dexamethasone (20 μg/ml) inhibited angiogenesis in the ulcer bed and delayed ulcer healing. These results suggest that angiogenesis in the ulcer bed plays an important role in ulcer healing, and that bFGF mutein TGP-580 accelerated colonic ulcer healing, at least in part, by stimulating angiogenesis, whereas glucocorticoids may delay the healing by inhibiting angiogenesis.

  17. Effects of selective antagonism of beta-adrenoceptor sub-types on responses to isoprenaline in rat distal colon in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A.; Lamont, M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor selective antagonists, CGP 20712A and ICI 118551 respectively, on responses to isoprenaline-induced relaxation of rat distal colon were investigated in order to determine the contributions of these subtypes to relaxation. In addition, the properties of ICI D7114, a novel putative stimulant of atypical beta-adrenoceptors, were investigated. Our preliminary experiments with ICI D7114 showed that this compound lacked agonist activity in rat distal colon and in fact antagonized responses to isoprenaline. We therefore studied the antagonism of isoprenaline by ICI D7114 in more detail. 2. Longitudinal segments of rat distal colon were suspended in Krebs solution at 37 degrees C for isometric recording. The Krebs solution contained EDTA (23 microM) and prazosin (0.1 microM) and was gassed with 95/5% O2/CO2. After an initial equilibration period, reproducible contractions to a submaximal concentration of methacholine (1 microM) were obtained before carrying out a concentration-response curve (CRC) to isoprenaline in a non-cumulative manner. Four consecutive CRCs to isoprenaline were carried out in each tissue with a 1 h interval between each curve. Antagonists were present in increasing concentrations during the intervals between CRCs. Control tissues received no antagonists to allow estimation of the magnitude of time-dependent changes. 3. Isoprenaline produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of methacholine-induced contractions. CRCs to isoprenaline were reproducible with no significant time-dependent changes. Propranolol produced no shift of the isoprenaline CRC at 0.01 microM and a 5 fold shift at 0.1 microM. No further shift was observed with 1 microM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8306100

  18. Differences between the third cardiac beta-adrenoceptor and the colonic beta 3-adrenoceptor in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kaumann, A. J.; Molenaar, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. The heart of several species including man contains atypical beta-adrenoceptors, in addition to coexisting beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors. We now asked the question whether or not the third cardiac beta-adrenoceptor is identical to the putative beta 3-adrenoceptor. We compared the properties of the third cardiac beta-adrenoceptor with those of beta 3-adrenoceptors in isolated tissues of the rat. To study the third cardiac beta-adrenoceptor we used spontaneously beating right atria, paced left atria and paced left ventricular papillary muscles. As a likely model for putative beta 3-adrenoceptors we studied atypical beta-adrenoceptors of the colonic longitudinal muscle precontracted with 30 mM KCl. We used beta 3-adrenoceptor-selective agonists, antagonists and non-conventional partial agonists (ie high-affinity blockers of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors know to exert also stimulant effects through beta 3-adrenoceptors). 2. The non-conventional partial agonist (-)-CGP 12177 caused positive chronotropic effects in right atria (pD2 = 7.3) and positive inotropic effects in left atria (pD2 = 7.5). The stimulant effects of (-)-CGP 12177 were resistant to blockade by 200 nM-2 microM (-)-propranolol and 3 microM ICI 118551 (a beta 2-selective antagonist) but antagonized by 1 microM (-)-bupranolol (pKB = 6.4-6.8), 3 microM CGP 20712A (a beta 1-selective antagonist) (pKB = 6.3-6.4) and 6.6 microM SR 59230A (a beta 3-selective antagonist, pKB = 5.1-5.4). 3. The non-conventional partial agonist cyanopindolol caused positive chronotropic effects in right atria (pD2 = 7.7) and positive inotropic effects in left atria (pD2 = 7.1). The stimulant effects of cyanopindolol were resistant to blockade by 200 nM (-)-propranolol but antagonized by 1 microM (-)-bupranolol (pKB = 6.8-7.1). 4. Neither (-)-CGP 12177 nor cyanopindolol caused stimulant effects in papillary muscles at concentrations between 0.2 nM and 20 microM. 5. In the presence of 200 nM (-)-propranolol the beta 3

  19. beta-catenin is strongly elevated in rat colonic epithelium following short-term intermittent treatment with 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Dashwood, W Mohaiza; Löhr, Christiane V; Fischer, Kay A; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2008-09-01

    Colon tumors expressing high levels of beta-catenin and c-myc have been reported in male F344 rats given three short cycles of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) alternating with a high-fat (HF) diet. Using the same experimental protocol, rats were euthanized 24 h after the last dose of PhIP so as to examine early changes in colonic crypt homeostasis and beta-catenin expression, before the onset of frank tumors. PhIP/HF dosing caused a significant increase in the bromodeoxyuridine labeling index throughout the entire colon, and within the colonic crypt column cleaved caspase-3 was elevated in the basal and central zones, but reduced in the luminal region. In vehicle/HF controls, beta-catenin was immunolocalized primarily at the border between cells at the top of the crypt, whereas in rats given PhIP/HF diet there was strong cytoplasmic staining, which appeared as a gradient of increased beta-catenin extending from the base of the crypt column to the luminal region. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses confirmed that beta-catenin and c-myc were increased significantly in the colonic mucosa of rats given PhIP/HF diet. Collectively, these findings suggest that PhIP/HF cycling alters beta-catenin and c-myc expression in the colonic mucosa, resulting in expansion of the proliferative zone and redistribution of apoptotic cells from the lumen to the central and basal regions of the colonic crypt. Thus, during the early stages of colon carcinogenesis, alternating exposure to heterocyclic amines and a high-fat diet might facilitate molecular changes resulting in dysregulated beta-catenin and c-myc expression.

  20. Evidence for a trigeminal mesencephalic-hypoglossal nuclei loop involved in controlling vibrissae movements in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Ombretta; Caria, Marcello Alessandro; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Russo, Antonella; Saccone, Salvatore; Stanzani, Stefania

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies performed in rats showed that the whisker-pad motor innervation involves not only the facial nerve, but also some hypoglossal neurons whose axons travel within the trigeminal infraorbital nerve (ION) and target the extrinsic muscles surrounding the whisker-pad macrovibrissae. Furthermore, the electrical stimulation of the ION induced an increase in the EMG activity of these muscles, while the hypoglossal nucleus stimulation elicited evoked potentials and single motor unit responses. However, the existence of a neural network able to involve the XIIth nucleus in macrovibrissae whisking control was totally unknown until now. Since other recent experiments demonstrated that: (1) the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5) neurons respond to both spontaneous and artificial movements of macrovibrissae, and (2) the Me5 peripheral terminals provide a monosynaptic sensory innervation to the macrovibrissae, the present study was aimed at analyzing a possible role of the Me5 nucleus as a relay station in the sensory-motor loop that involves the XIIth nucleus neurons in rhythmic whisking control. Two tracers were used in the same animal: Fluoro Gold, which was injected into the whisker pad to retrogradely label the hypoglossal whisker-pad projection neurons, and Dil, which was instead injected into the Me5 to label its projections to these hypoglossal neurons. Results demonstrated that terminals of the Me5 neurons monosynaptically target the hypoglossal whisker-pad projection neurons. The functional role of this sensory-motor connection is discussed, with particular regard to a hypothesized proprioceptive reflex in whisker-pad extrinsic muscles that can be elicited by the activation of the Me5 macrovibrissae receptors. PMID:26645304

  1. Pectin Film Coated Pellets for Colon-targeted Delivery of Budesonide: In-vitro/In-vivo Evaluation in Induced Ulcerative Colitis in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Emami, Jaber; Tavakoli, Naser; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Rahmani, Nakisa; Dorkoosh, Farid; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to prepare colon-specific pellets of budesonide, using pectin as film coating. Pellet cores of budesonide were prepared by extrusion / spheronization technique. Pectin, in different ratios was combined with Eudragit RS30D, Eudragit NE30D or Surelease to produce film coating. The dissolution profiles of pectin coated pellets were investigated in pH of 1.2 (2 h), pH of 7.4 (4 h) and pH of 6.8 in the absence as well as presence of rat cecal contents (18 h). Finally the selected formulation was evaluated on trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) induced ulcerative colitis in rat model, in comparison with conventional UC treatments. The dissolution profiles of pectin coated pellets showed that the release of budesonide in presence of rat cecal content depended on adjuvant polymer, the ratio of pectin to polymer and film thickness. Coated pellets, prepared out of pectin and Surelease at a ratio of 1:3 at coating level of 35% (w/w), could increase budesonide release statistically in presence of rat cecal content, while they released no drug in pH of 1.2 and 7.4. Animal experiments revealed the therapeutic efficacy of pectin/Surelease-coated pellets of budesonide in alleviating the conditions of TNBS-induced colitis model as reflected by weight gain, as well as improvement of clinical, macroscopic and microscopic parameters of induced colitis. This confirmed the ability of the optimized formulation for targeted drug delivery of budesonide to colon. PMID:24250500

  2. Red meat and colorectal cancer: Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response contributes to the resistance of preneoplastic colon cells to fecal water of hemoglobin- and beef-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Surya, Reggie; Héliès-Toussaint, Cécile; Martin, Océane C; Gauthier, Thierry; Guéraud, Françoise; Taché, Sylviane; Naud, Nathalie; Jouanin, Isabelle; Chantelauze, Céline; Durand, Denys; Joly, Charlotte; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Pierre, Fabrice H; Huc, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated red meat intake with risk of colorectal cancer. Experimental studies explain this positive association by the oxidative properties of heme iron released in the colon. This latter is a potent catalyst for lipid peroxidation, resulting in the neoformation of deleterious aldehydes in the fecal water of heme-fed rats. The toxicity of fecal water of heme-fed rats was associated to such lipid peroxidation. This study demonstrated that fecal water of hemoglobin- and beef-fed rats preferentially induced apoptosis in mouse normal colon epithelial cells than in those carrying mutation on Apc (Adenomatous polyposis coli) gene, considered as preneoplastic. Highlighting the importance of lipid peroxidation and neoformation of secondary aldehydes like 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), we optimized the depletion of carbonyl compounds in the fecal water which turned out to abolish the differential apoptosis in both cell lines. To explain the resistance of preneoplastic cells towards fecal water toxicity, we focused on Nrf2, known to be activated by aldehydes, including HNE. Fecal water activated Nrf2 in both cell lines, associated with the induction of Nrf2-target genes related to aldehydes detoxification. However, the antioxidant defense appeared to be higher in preneoplastic cells, favoring their survival, as evidenced by Nrf2 inactivation. Taken together, our results suggest that Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response was involved in the resistance of preneoplastic cells upon exposure to fecal water of hemoglobin- and beef-fed rats. This difference could explain the promoting effect of red meat and heme-enriched diet on colorectal cancer, by initiating positive selection of preneoplastic cells. PMID:26992899

  3. Thromboxane A2, released by the anti-tumour drug irinotecan, is a novel stimulator of Cl- secretion in isolated rat colon.

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, H; Sato, T; Hamada, N; Yasue, M; Ikari, A; Kakinoki, B; Takeguchi, N

    1997-01-01

    1. A camptothecin derivative, irinotecan (Cpt-11), is a topoisomerase I inhibitor and has a strong activity against a broad range of human cancer. One of the side-effects of this drug is diarrhoea. Here, we tried to determine the mediator of the irinotecan-induced Cl- secretion which may underlie this diarrhoea, using isolated mucosae of rat distal colon. 2. Irinotecan increased Cl- secretory current in a concentration-dependent manner across the mucosa, set between Ussing chambers. Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) has not been reported to date as a physiological stimulant of Cl- secretion in the distal colon. However, the major part of the present irinotecan-induced current was inhibited by selective thromboxane A2 receptor antagonists (KW-3635 and ONO-3708), and a selective thromboxane synthase inhibitor (Y-20811). In fact, we found that irinotecan stimulated the release of TXA2 in a concentration-dependent manner from the isolated mucosa into the bathing solutions. 3. Furthermore, 9,11-epithio-11,12-methano-thromboxane A2 (STA2), a stable analogue of TXA2, induced Cl- secretion, which was almost completely inhibited by the TXA2 receptor antagonists. 4. In single cells of isolated crypts, STA2 depolarized the cell and increased the membrane conductance, indicating that STA2 opened the apical Cl- channel of the crypt cells. 5. We conclude, therefore, that the irinotecan-induced endogenous TXA2 is a novel stimulant of the Cl- secretion from the crypt cells of distal colon. PMID:9409477

  4. Influence of a dietary fiber on development of dimethylhydrazine-induced aberrant crypt foci and colon tumor incidence in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Thorup, I; Meyer, O; Kristiansen, E

    1994-01-01

    Formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in archived colon tissue from animals in a previous study was examined. The animals were fed a semisynthetic casein-based diet in which the carbohydrate pool was substituted with a dietary beet fiber (Fibeta) as the only source of fiber. Oral doses of dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH-2HCl, 20 mg/kg body wt) once a week for 10 weeks were used as initiator. The rats were fed different levels of the fiber in a preinitiation period, during initiation, or in a postinitiation period. In general, the results showed a statistically significant inverse relation between duration of intake of high-fiber diet and number of animals with ACF, as well as the total number of ACF and number of small ACF (1-3 crypts) per affected animal. The previously reported data showed no protective effect of the dietary fiber at any stage of the colorectal carcinogenic process. The lack of correlation between the outcome of ACF and tumors could be related to the observation that statistically significant differences between groups were seen only in the total number of ACF and number of small ACF. The hypothesis that ACF are preneoplastic lesions needs to be supported by further experimental data. The present state of knowledge could indicate that ACF represent true preneoplastic lesions progressing into colon tumors or that ACF and colon tumors represent two parallel independent events as a consequence of the cancer initiation (i.e., the ACF not being preneoplastic lesions per se).

  5. Colonic hydrogen generated from fructan diffuses into the abdominal cavity and reduces adipose mRNA abundance of cytokines in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naomichi; Tanabe, Hiroki; Adachi, Misato; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen (H2) protects against inflammation-induced oxidative stress. Nondigestible saccharides (NDSs) enhance colonic H2 production. We examined whether colonic H2 transfers to tissues in the abdominal cavity and whether it affects expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In Expts. 1 and 2, rats were fed diets containing fructooligosaccharides [FOSs; 25 (Expt. 1) and 50 g/kg (Expts. 1 and 2)] for 7 and 14 d, respectively. The no-FOS diet was used as the control diet. At the end of the experiment, H2 excretion and the portal H2 concentration were significantly greater in the FOS group than in the control group. In the FOS group, the arterial H2 concentration was no more than 1.5% of the portal H2 concentration (P = 0.03). The H2 concentration in abdominal cavity tissues, especially adipose tissue, in the FOS group was 5.6- to 43-fold of that in the control group (P < 0.05). The H2 content in the abdominal cavity in the FOS group was 11-fold of that in the control group (P < 0.05). In Expt. 3, rats were fed a high-fat diet containing FOS and inulin (50 g/kg) for 28 d. The area under the curve for H2 excretion between 0 and 28 d and portal and adipose H2 concentrations were significantly higher in the FOS and inulin groups than in the high-fat control group. Adipose mRNA abundance of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells 1 was lower in the FOS group than in the control group (P = 0.02) and those of interleukin-6 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 tended to be lower (P < 0.11). Colonic H2 generated from NDS diffuses to the abdominal cavity before transferring to abdominal tissues. Reduced cytokine expression by FOS feeding might be dependent on increased colonic H2. Colonic H2 may have important implications in the suppressive effect on metabolic syndrome via oxidative stress.

  6. The inflammatory effect of infection with Hymenolepis diminuta via the increased expression and activity of COX-1 and COX-2 in the rat jejunum and colon.

    PubMed

    Kosik-Bogacka, D I; Baranowska-Bosiacka, I; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, A; Lanocha-Arendarczyk, N; Gutowska, I; Korbecki, J; Namięta, H; Rotter, I

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Hymenolepis diminuta may affect the expression and activity of cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), resulting in the altered levels of their main products - prostaglandins (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2). The study used the same experimental model as in our previous studies in which we had observed changes in the transepithelial ion transport, tight junctions and in the indicators of oxidative stress, in both small and large intestines of rats infected with H. diminuta. In this paper, we investigated not only the site of immediate presence of the tapeworm (jejunum), but also a distant site (colon). Inflammation related to H. diminuta infection is associated with the increased expression and activation of cyclooxygenase (COX), enzyme responsible for the synthesis of PGE2 and TXB2, local hormones contributing to the enhanced inflammatory reaction in the jejunum and colon in the infected rats. The increased COX expression and activity is probably caused by the increased levels of free radicals and the weakening of the host's antioxidant defense induced by the presence of the parasite. Our immunohistochemical analysis showed that H. diminuta infection affected not only the intensity of the immunodetection of COX but also the enzyme protein localization within intestinal epithelial cells - from the entire cytoplasm to apical/basal regions of cells, or even to the nucleus. PMID:27466058

  7. Leukotrienes-mediated effects of water extracts from Sargassum horneri, a marine brown alga, on Cl- absorption in isolated rat colon.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hideki; Uchiumi, Takaoki; Lee, Jung-Bum; Ohira, Yuta; Ohkura, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Toshimitsu; Takeguchi, Noriaki

    2004-02-01

    Sargassum horneri is an edible marine brown alga distributed along the seacoast of Japan. Here we examined effects on the water-soluble (ethanol-insoluble) extracts (EIS) from Sargassum horneri on ion transports across the isolated rat colonic mucosa set in Ussing chambers. The nonpolysaccharide fraction of EIS (EIS-2) significantly decreased short-circuit current (Isc) across the mucosa, and increased the tissue conductance (Gt). The half-maximal effect of EIS-2 was obtained at 20 microg/ml. In contrast, the polysaccharide fraction of EIS (EIS-1; 100 microg/ml) had little effect on Isc and Gt. The effect of EIS-2 depended on the presence of Cl- and HCO3- but not K+ in the bathing solution. These results suggest that EIS-2 stimulates Cl)absorption in the colonic mucosa. The EIS-2-induced changes in Isc and Gt were inhibited by 3-(1-[p-chlorobenzyl]-5-[isopropyl]-3-t-butylthioindol-2-yl)-2,2-dimethyl-propanoic acid sodium (MK-886; 10 microM), a 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein inhibitor, and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate (NPPB; 100 microM), a Cl- channel blocker. EIS-2 attenuated the prostaglandin E2 (0.5 microM)-increased Isc, and the half-maximal effect of EIS-2 was obtained at 50 microg/ml. The present study suggests that the EIS-2 stimulates Cl- absorption mediated by basolateral leukotriene-sensitive Cl- channels and apical Cl-/HCO3- exchanger in the rat colonic mucosa. PMID:15040851

  8. Bio-telemetric device for measurement of left ventricular pressure-volume loops using the admittance technique in conscious, ambulatory rats

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Karthik; Feldman, Marc D; Porterfield, John E; Larson, Erik R; Jenkins, J Travis; Escobedo, Daniel; Pearce, John A

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design, construction and testing of a device to measure pressure volume loops in the left ventricle of conscious, ambulatory rats. Pressure is measured with a standard sensor, but volume is derived from data collected from a tetrapolar electrode catheter using a novel admittance technique. There are two main advantages of the admittance technique to measure volume. First, the contribution from the adjacent muscle can be instantaneously removed. Second, the admittance technique incorporates the nonlinear relationship between the electric field generated by the catheter and the blood volume. A low power instrument weighing 27 g was designed, which takes pressure-volume loops every 2 minutes and runs for 24 hours. Pressure-volume data are transmitted wirelessly to a base station. The device was first validated in thirteen rats with an acute preparation with 2-D echocardiography used to measure true volume. From an accuracy standpoint, the admittance technique is superior to both the conductance technique calibrated with hypertonic saline injections, and calibrated with cuvettes. The device was then tested in six rats with a 24-hour chronic preparation. Stability of the animal preparation and careful calibration are important factors affecting the success of the device. PMID:21606560

  9. Bixin protects hepatocytes against 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced genotoxicity but does not suppress DNA damage and pre-neoplastic lesions in the colon of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; de Andrade, Kelly Jacqueline Barbosa; Paula, Marcela Cristina Ferreira; Oliveira Acésio, Nathália; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Borges, Priscilla Scalon Freitas; Barcelos, Gustavo Rafael Mazzaron; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2014-01-01

    Bixin is a carotenoid found in the seeds of Bixa orellana L., a plant native to tropical America that is used in the food industry. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of bixin on DNA damage and pre-neoplastic lesions induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in the liver and colon of Wistar rats. The animals received bixin at daily doses of 0.1, 1.0 and 10mg/kg body weight (bw) by gavage. For the assessment of DNA damage in hepatocytes and colon cells with the comet assay, the administration of bixin was for 7 days. The animals received a single subcutaneous injection of 25mg/kg bw of DMH, and were euthanized 4h later. For the evaluation of the frequency of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), the animals were treated with the different doses of bixin for 4 weeks. Four doses of 40mg/kg bw DMH, two doses in the first week and two doses in the second week, were administered and euthanasia occurred at 4 weeks after the beginning of treatment. Bixin reduced the frequency of DNA damage in hepatocytes at the highest two doses tested (1.0 and 10mg/kg bw). On the other hand, no differences in the frequency of DNA damage in colon cells were observed between animals treated with bixin plus DMH and those treated with DMH alone. In addition, the frequency of ACF did not differ significantly between the group treated with bixin plus DMH and the DMH group. The results suggest that bixin does not suppress the formation of ACF, indicating the absence of a protective effect against colon carcinogenesis. PMID:24246722

  10. Regulative Loops, Step Loops and Task Loops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanLehn, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    This commentary suggests a generalization of the conception of the behavior of tutoring systems, which the target article characterized as having an outer loop that was executed once per task and an inner loop that was executed once per step of the task. A more general conception sees these two loops as instances of regulative loops, which…

  11. Oral colonization and cariogenicity of Streptococcus gordonii in specific pathogen-free TAN:SPFOM(OM)BR rats consuming starch or sucrose diets.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, J M; Baranowski, L K; Rogers, J D; Haase, E M; Scannapieco, F A

    2001-04-01

    still higher if animals had been inoculated with either Challis (1.41-fold) or G9B (1.64-fold), than if uninoculated, both P < 0.001, so long as the rats ate the sucrose diet. Therefore, TAN:SPFOM(OM)BR rats do not harbour ABB or S. gordonii but can be colonized by S. gordonii. Colonization levels of S. gordonii on the teeth are higher in the presence of high sucrose than with high starch-containing diets. Caries scores are augmented by sucrose compared with starch, and are further augmented by S gordonii colonization. S. gordonii is thus cariologically significant in the presence of sucrose, at least in this rat. PMID:11269866

  12. Most effective colon cancer chemopreventive agents in rats: a systematic review of aberrant crypt foci and tumor data, ranked by potency

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, Denis E.; Taché, Sylviane

    2002-01-01

    Potential chemopreventive agents for colorectal cancer are assessed in rodents. We speculated that the magnitude of the effect is meaningful, and ranked all published agents according to their potency. Data were gathered systematically from 137 articles with the aberrant crypt foci (ACF) endpoint, and 146 articles with the tumor endpoint. A table was built containing potency of each agent to reduce the number of ACF. Another table was built with potency of each agent to reduce the tumor incidence. Both tables are shown in the present paper, and on a website with sorting abilities (http://www.inra.fr/reseau-nacre/sci-memb/corpet/indexan.html). Potency was estimated by the ratio of value in control rats divided by value in treated rats. From each article, only the most potent agent was kept, except from articles reporting the effect of more than 7 agents. Among the 186 agents in the ACF table, the median agent halved the number of ACF. The most potent agents to reduce azoxymethane-induced ACF were pluronic, polyethylene glycol, perilla oil with beta-carotene, and sulindac sulfide. Among the 160 agents in the tumor table, the median agent halved the tumor incidence in rats. The most potent agents to reduce the incidence of azoxymethane-induced tumors were celecoxib, a protease inhibitor from soy, difluoromethylornithine with piroxicam, polyethylene glycol, and a thiosulfonate. For the 57 agents present in both tables, a significant correlation was found between the potencies against ACF and tumors (r=0.45, p<0.001). Without celecoxib, a major outlying point in the correlation, it reached r=0.68 (p<0.001, N=56). In conclusion, this review gathers almost all known chemopreventive agents, ranks the most promising ones against colon carcinogenesis in rats or mice, and further supports the use of ACF as surrogate endpoint for tumors in rats. PMID:12467130

  13. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    EL-SALHY, MAGDY; UMEZAWA, KAZUO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS-G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecyl thiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS-Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer-aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS-G, DSS-Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti-inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the clinical manifestation of

  14. Effects of AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors on colonic endocrine cells in rats with TNBS-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between intestinal neuroendocrine peptides/amines and the immune system appear to have an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The present study investigated the effects of activator protein (AP)-1 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitors on inflammation-induced alterations in enteroendocrine cells. A total of 48 male Wistar rats were divided into the following four groups (n=12 rats/group): Control, trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis only (TNBS group), TNBS-induced colitis with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G) treatment (DTCM-G group), and TNBS-induced colitis with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ) treatment (DHMEQ group). A total of 3 days following administration of TNBS, the rats were treated as follows: The control and TNBS groups received 0.5 ml vehicle (0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose; CMC), respectively; the DTCM-G group received DTCM-G (20 mg/kg body weight) in 0.5% CMC; and the DHMEQ group received DHMEQ (15 mg/kg body weight) in 0.5% CMC. All injections were performed intraperitoneally twice daily for 5 days. The rats were sacrificed, and tissue samples obtained from the colon were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Inflammation was evaluated using a scoring system. In addition, the sections were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and somatostatin, and immunostaining was quantified using image-analysis software. The density of cells expressing CgA, PYY and PP was significantly lower in the TNBS group compared with in the control group, whereas the density of cells expressing serotonin, oxyntomodulin and somatostatin was significantly higher in the TNBS group compared with in the control group. None of the endocrine cell types differed significantly between the control group and either the DTCM-G or DHMEQ groups. All of the colonic endocrine cell types were affected in

  15. Treatment with novel AP-1 and NF-κB inhibitors restores the colonic endocrine cells to normal levels in rats with DSS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of two anti-inflammatory agents on the abnormalities in colonic endocrine cells in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colitis was induced in male Wistar rats (n=45) using DSS; a further 15 rats without colitis were included in a healthy control group. The animals with DSS-induced colitis were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups as follows: i) DSS group, rats were treated with 0.5 ml of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC); ii) DSS‑G group, rats were treated with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)‑methyl]‑glutarimide (DTCM‑G), a novel activator protein 1 (AP-1) inhibitor, 20 mg/kg in CMC; and iii) DSS‑Q group, rats were treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin, a nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, 15 mg/kg in CMC. The treatments were administered intraperitoneally, twice daily for 5 days, after which the animals were sacrificed and tissue samples from the colon were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), enteroglucagon, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), somatostatin, leukocytes, B/T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, macrophages/monocytes and mast cells. The densities of these endocrine and immune cells were quantified by computer‑aided image analysis. The densities of CgA-, serotonin-, PYY- and enteroglucagon-producing cells were significantly higher, and those of PP- and somatostatin-producing cells were significantly lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all the immune cells were lower in the DSS‑G, DSS‑Q and control groups than in the DSS group. The densities of all endocrine cell types and immune cells in both the DSS groups treated with anti‑inflammatory agents were restored to control levels. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that there is an interaction between endocrine and immune cells during inflammation. This interaction with subsequent changes in endocrine cells is responsible for the

  16. Effects of AP‑1 and NF‑κB inhibitors on colonic endocrine cells in rats with TNBS‑induced colitis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    Interactions between intestinal neuroendocrine peptides/amines and the immune system appear to have an important role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The present study investigated the effects of activator protein (AP)‑1 and nuclear factor (NF)‑κB inhibitors on inflammation‑induced alterations in enteroendocrine cells. A total of 48 male Wistar rats were divided into the following four groups (n=12 rats/group): Control, trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)‑induced colitis only (TNBS group), TNBS‑induced colitis with 3‑[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM‑G) treatment (DTCM‑G group), and TNBS‑induced colitis with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ) treatment (DHMEQ group). A total of 3 days following administration of TNBS, the rats were treated as follows: The control and TNBS groups received 0.5 ml vehicle (0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose; CMC), respectively; the DTCM‑G group received DTCM‑G (20 mg/kg body weight) in 0.5% CMC; and the DHMEQ group received DHMEQ (15 mg/kg body weight) in 0.5% CMC. All injections were performed intraperitoneally twice daily for 5 days. The rats were sacrificed, and tissue samples obtained from the colon were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. Inflammation was evaluated using a scoring system. In addition, the sections were immunostained for chromogranin A (CgA), serotonin, peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and somatostatin, and immunostaining was quantified using image‑analysis software. The density of cells expressing CgA, PYY and PP was significantly lower in the TNBS group compared with in the control group, whereas the density of cells expressing serotonin, oxyntomodulin and somatostatin was significantly higher in the TNBS group compared with in the control group. None of the endocrine cell types differed significantly between the control group and either the DTCM‑G or DHMEQ groups. All of the colonic

  17. THE EFFECTS OF A HIGH ANIMAL FAT DIET ON THE INDUCTION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF MALE F344/N RATS EXPOSED TO TRIHALOMETHANES IN THE DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Effects of a High Animal Fat Diet on the Induction of Aberrant Crypt Foci in the Colons of Male F344/N Rats Exposed to Trihalomethanes in the Drinking Water

    Abstract

    Aberrant crypt foci (ACF), identified as the putative precursor lesion in the development of co...

  18. Yerba mate tea and mate saponins prevented azoxymethane-induced inflammation of rat colon through suppression of NF-kB p65ser(311) signaling via IkB-a and GSK-3ß reduced phosphorylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yerba mate tea (YMT) has a chemopreventive role in a variety of inflammatory diseases. The objective was to determine the capability of YMT and mate saponins to prevent azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic inflammation in rats. YMT (2% dry leaves, w/v, as a source of drinking fluid) (n = 15) and mat...

  19. Colonic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... where your body makes and stores stool. Many disorders affect the colon's ability to work properly. Some ... abdominal cramping and other symptoms Treatment for colonic diseases varies greatly depending on the disease and its ...

  20. Conceptualization and validation of an open-source closed-loop deep brain stimulation system in rat.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hemmings; Ghekiere, Hartwin; Beeckmans, Dorien; Tambuyzer, Tim; van Kuyck, Kris; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Nuttin, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) applies constant electrical stimulation to specific brain regions to treat neurological disorders. Closed-loop DBS with real-time feedback is gaining attention in recent years, after proved more effective than conventional DBS in terms of pathological symptom control clinically. Here we demonstrate the conceptualization and validation of a closed-loop DBS system using open-source hardware. We used hippocampal theta oscillations as system input, and electrical stimulation in the mesencephalic reticular formation (mRt) as controller output. It is well documented that hippocampal theta oscillations are highly related to locomotion, while electrical stimulation in the mRt induces freezing. We used an Arduino open-source microcontroller between input and output sources. This allowed us to use hippocampal local field potentials (LFPs) to steer electrical stimulation in the mRt. Our results showed that closed-loop DBS significantly suppressed locomotion compared to no stimulation, and required on average only 56% of the stimulation used in open-loop DBS to reach similar effects. The main advantages of open-source hardware include wide selection and availability, high customizability, and affordability. Our open-source closed-loop DBS system is effective, and warrants further research using open-source hardware for closed-loop neuromodulation. PMID:25897892

  1. Conceptualization and validation of an open-source closed-loop deep brain stimulation system in rat

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hemmings; Ghekiere, Hartwin; Beeckmans, Dorien; Tambuyzer, Tim; van Kuyck, Kris; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Nuttin, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) applies constant electrical stimulation to specific brain regions to treat neurological disorders. Closed-loop DBS with real-time feedback is gaining attention in recent years, after proved more effective than conventional DBS in terms of pathological symptom control clinically. Here we demonstrate the conceptualization and validation of a closed-loop DBS system using open-source hardware. We used hippocampal theta oscillations as system input, and electrical stimulation in the mesencephalic reticular formation (mRt) as controller output. It is well documented that hippocampal theta oscillations are highly related to locomotion, while electrical stimulation in the mRt induces freezing. We used an Arduino open-source microcontroller between input and output sources. This allowed us to use hippocampal local field potentials (LFPs) to steer electrical stimulation in the mRt. Our results showed that closed-loop DBS significantly suppressed locomotion compared to no stimulation, and required on average only 56% of the stimulation used in open-loop DBS to reach similar effects. The main advantages of open-source hardware include wide selection and availability, high customizability, and affordability. Our open-source closed-loop DBS system is effective, and warrants further research using open-source hardware for closed-loop neuromodulation. PMID:25897892

  2. In vivo regulation of colonic cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and P27Kip1 by dietary fish oil and butyrate in rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mee Young; Turner, Nancy D; Murphy, Mary E; Carroll, Raymond J; Chapkin, Robert S; Lupton, Joanne R

    2015-11-01

    We have shown that dietary fish oil is protective against experimentally induced colon cancer, and the protective effect is enhanced by coadministration of pectin. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that fish oil with butyrate, a pectin fermentation product, protects against colon cancer initiation by decreasing cell proliferation and increasing differentiation and apoptosis through a p27(Kip1)-mediated mechanism. Rats were provided diets of corn or fish oil, with/without butyrate, and terminated 12, 24, or 48 hours after azoxymethane (AOM) injection. Proliferation (Ki-67), differentiation (Dolichos Biflorus Agglutinin), apoptosis (TUNEL), and p27(Kip1) (cell-cycle mediator) were measured in the same cell within crypts in order to examine the coordination of cell cycle as a function of diet. DNA damage (N(7)-methylguanine) was determined by quantitative IHC analysis. Dietary fish oil decreased DNA damage by 19% (P = 0.001) and proliferation by 50% (P = 0.003) and increased differentiation by 56% (P = 0.039) compared with corn oil. When combined with butyrate, fish oil enhanced apoptosis 24 hours after AOM injection compared with a corn oil/butyrate diet (P = 0.039). There was an inverse relationship between crypt height and apoptosis in the fish oil/butyrate group (r = -0.53, P = 0.040). The corn oil/butyrate group showed a positive correlation between p27(Kip1) expression and proliferation (r = 0.61, P = 0.035). These results indicate the in vivo effect of butyrate on apoptosis and proliferation is dependent on dietary lipid source. These results demonstrate the presence of an early coordinated colonocyte response by which fish oil and butyrate protects against colon tumorigenesis.

  3. Evidence for size and charge permselectivity of rat ascending colon. Effects of ricinoleate and bile salts on oxalic acid and neutral sugar transport.

    PubMed Central

    Kathpalia, S C; Favus, M J; Coe, F L

    1984-01-01

    We have measured unidirectional transmural fluxes of oxalate and neutral sugars across rat ascending colon in vitro, under short-circuit conditions, to characterize permeability barriers selective for size and charge. Ionic oxalate appears to be transported preferentially to sodium oxalate. Mucosal addition of taurocholate (1 mM), deoxycholate (1 mM), or ricinoleate (1 mM) increased bidirectional oxalate fluxes, and the ricinoleate effects were independent of medium calcium. Bidirectional fluxes of uncharged sugar molecules fell sharply at molecular weights above 76 (molecular radius above 3 A), and oxalate transport was retarded relative to that of uncharged molecules of similar size, suggesting that there is both size and charge permselectivity. Ricinoleate increased fluxes of all neutral molecules tested but changed neither the exclusion limits nor the cation selectivity of the epithelium. Bile salts and ricinoleate increase oxalate transport, probably by making more channels available, but do not alter size and charge selectivity. PMID:6432849

  4. Effects of selective antagonism of beta-adrenoceptor sub-types on responses to isoprenaline in rat distal colon in vitro.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A; Lamont, M

    1993-12-01

    1. The effects of the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor selective antagonists, CGP 20712A and ICI 118551 respectively, on responses to isoprenaline-induced relaxation of rat distal colon were investigated in order to determine the contributions of these subtypes to relaxation. In addition, the properties of ICI D7114, a novel putative stimulant of atypical beta-adrenoceptors, were investigated. Our preliminary experiments with ICI D7114 showed that this compound lacked agonist activity in rat distal colon and in fact antagonized responses to isoprenaline. We therefore studied the antagonism of isoprenaline by ICI D7114 in more detail. 2. Longitudinal segments of rat distal colon were suspended in Krebs solution at 37 degrees C for isometric recording. The Krebs solution contained EDTA (23 microM) and prazosin (0.1 microM) and was gassed with 95/5% O2/CO2. After an initial equilibration period, reproducible contractions to a submaximal concentration of methacholine (1 microM) were obtained before carrying out a concentration-response curve (CRC) to isoprenaline in a non-cumulative manner. Four consecutive CRCs to isoprenaline were carried out in each tissue with a 1 h interval between each curve. Antagonists were present in increasing concentrations during the intervals between CRCs. Control tissues received no antagonists to allow estimation of the magnitude of time-dependent changes. 3. Isoprenaline produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of methacholine-induced contractions. CRCs to isoprenaline were reproducible with no significant time-dependent changes. Propranolol produced no shift of the isoprenaline CRC at 0.01 microM and a 5 fold shift at 0.1 microM. No further shift was observed with 1 microM. CGP 20712A had no effect on the CRC to isoprenaline at 0.1, 1 and 3 microM. ICI118551 produced little or no shift at 0.1 microM and a six fold shift with 1 microM. No further shift was observed with 3 microM. ICI D7114 produced a concentration-dependent parallel

  5. Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) and its total non-digestible fraction influence the expression of genes involved in azoxymethane-induced colon cancer in rats.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Salazar, Marcelo; Guevara-González, Ramón G; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; Guevara-Olvera, Lorenzo; Bello-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Castaño-Tostado, Eduardo; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2013-09-01

    The influence of flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) and its total non-digestible fraction (TNDF) on the expression of genes involved in azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer in Sprague Dawley rats was analyzed. The dose used in the animal model was two tablespoons of flaxseed per day, which is the dose recommended for humans. Flaxseed significantly decreased the crypt multiplicity (10.50 ± 3.5) compared with the AOM treatment (34.00 ± 11.0), which suggests that flaxseed exhibits a preventive effect against colon cancer. Both treatments (flaxseed and TNDF) influence the overexpression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial apoptosis: p53, p21, bcl-2, bax and caspase-3. Flaxseed induced the expression of p53 and p21, whereas TNDF triggered the p21-independent expression of p53. This finding suggests that both of these treatments induced cell cycle arrest. In addition, TNDF induced mitochondrial apoptosis because the TNDF + AOM group exhibited the expression of caspase-3, decreased bcl-2 expression and increased bax expression. These results suggest that the expression of the analyzed genes is associated with the presence of dietary antioxidants linked to the cell wall of flaxseed.

  6. An in vitro rat model of colonic motility to determine the effect of β-casomorphin-5 on propagating contractions.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, J E; Spencer, N J; Dunstan, K E; Lynch, A T; Haggarty, N W; Gopal, P K; Roy, N C

    2014-11-01

    Beta-casomorphin-5 (βCM-5) is a milk-derived bioactive peptide that slows gastro-intestinal transit (GIT) in vivo and blocks the peristaltic reflex in the guinea pig colon in vitro. We wanted to establish an in vitro model system in which effects of dairy-derived substances containing opioid peptides on intestinal motility can be assessed and used to predict in vivo outcomes. Because βCM-5 is an opioid agonist that acts on enteric neurons, we used this substance to compare two different isolated colonic tissue preparations to determine which would more closely mimic the in vivo response previously reported in the literature. We compared and characterized the effects of βCM-5 on spontaneous contractions in isolated segments of distal colon (1 cm length) compared with propagating contractions along the isolated intact large intestine (22 cm length). In short segments of distal colon, βCM-5 increased the tension and frequency of spontaneous contractions in a concentration-dependent manner. At 20 μM βCM-5 tension increased by 71 ± 17% and the frequency doubled (n = 9), effects inhibited by naloxone (n = 7) and therefore mediated by opioid receptors. In contrast 20 μM βCM-5 disrupted propagating contractions in the large intestine preparation. At 20 μM βCM-5 reduced the proportion of contractions initiated in the proximal colon reaching the rectum by 83 ± 11% (n = 5) and this effect was also inhibited by naloxone, consistent with altered GIT reported in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the isolated whole large intestine provides an ideal preparation that mimics the reduced propagation of GIT in vivo in response to an opioid agonist, whereas short colon segments did not. The findings of the current study reveal that preserving large segments of intact large intestine, and hence intact enteric neural circuitry provides an ideal in vitro model to investigate the effect of opioid receptor modulators on intestinal transit. PMID:25093576

  7. Innate mechanisms for Bifidobacterium lactis to activate transient pro-inflammatory host responses in intestinal epithelial cells after the colonization of germ-free rats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pedro A; Hoffmann, Micha; Szcesny, Silke; Blaut, Michael; Haller, Dirk

    2005-08-01

    Bifidobacteria comprise a dominant microbial population group in the human intestinal tract with purported beneficial health effects on the host. In this study, we characterized the molecular mechanisms for the initial interaction of probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis strain BB12 with native and intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines. We showed that B. lactis-monoassociated Fisher F344 rats transiently induce phosphorylation/activation of the NF-kappaB transcriptionally active subunit RelA and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 in native IEC at day 5 after initial bacterial colonization. In addition, Interleukin 6 (IL-6) gene expression was significantly increased at day 5, demonstrating the physiological relevance of transient transcription factor activation in IEC. In contrast, Bacteroides vulgatus-monoassociated Fisher rats revealed RelA but not p38 MAPK phosphorylation and failed to trigger significant IL-6 gene expression in native IEC. Moreover, we demonstrated that B. lactis triggers NF-kappaB RelA and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in IEC lines. Adenoviral delivery of mutant IKK-beta (Ad5dnIKKbeta) and inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway through the pharmacological inhibitor SB203580 significantly blocked B. lactis-induced IL-6 gene expression in IEC, suggesting that B. lactis triggers NF-kappaB and MAPK signaling to induce gene expression in the intestinal epithelium. Regarding the mechanisms of bacteria epithelial cell cross-talk, B. lactis-induced IL-6 gene expression was completely inhibited in TLR2 deficient mouse embryogenic fibroblasts (MEF TLR2-/-) as well as TLR2DeltaTIR transfected Mode-K cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that probiotic bacteria transiently trigger innate signal transduction and pro-inflammatory gene expression in the intestinal epithelium at early stages of bacterial colonization.

  8. Indian food ingredients and cancer prevention - an experimental evaluation of anticarcinogenic effects of garlic in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Archana; Ghosh, Samit; Bhattacharjee, Shamee; Das, Sukta

    2004-01-01

    The major food items of Indian cuisine include rice, wheat, diary products, and abundant fruits and vegetables. Beside these, there are several kinds of herbs and spices as important ingredients, containing many phytochemicals with medicinal properties, adding taste to Indian cuisine. An impressive body of data exists in support of the concept that Indian food ingredients can be used in preventive strategies aimed at reducing the incidence and mortality of different types of cancers because of their antioxidative, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties. Vital ingredients used in Indian cooking include turmeric, cloves, ginger, aniseed, mustard, saffron, cardamom and garlic Garlic is an indispensable ingredient of Indian food and this report concerns the chemopreventive efficacy of garlic in an azoxymethane induced rodent colon carcinogenesis model. The effect of garlic was evaluated in terms of aberrant crypt foci, putative preneoplastic lesions in the colon. In addition, cell proliferation and levels of apoptosis were determined and the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 protein was analyzed. Following treatment, significant inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis, as well as suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 activity were observed, associated with significant reduction in the incidence of aberrant crypt foci. The study points to combined protective effects of garlic components on colon carcinogenesis. PMID:15244513

  9. Investigation of coco-glucoside as a novel intestinal permeation enhancer in rat models.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Tanira A S; Rosa, Mónica; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Coulter, Ivan; Brayden, David J

    2014-11-01

    Due to instability in the GI tract and low intestinal permeability, peptides invariably have oral bioavailabilities below 1% and this has prevented the development of oral formulations. A mild plant-derived naturalalkyl polyglycoside (APG), coco-glucoside (CG), was studied for its capacity to enable rat intestinal permeation of the paracellular sugar marker, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran 4000 (FD4), across isolated rat jejunal and colonic mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers, as well as the polypeptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT) following intra-intestinal instillations in rats. 0.1% (w/v) CG enabled a 2.9-fold increase in the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of FD4 over the basal Papp across colonic mucosae, but it was without effect in jejunal mucosae. In situ intestinal instillations revealed that although sCT was absorbed across rat colonic loops to a greater extent than jejunal, CG still improved sCT absolute bioavailability(F) from both segments. Histopathology of rat intestinal mucosae following exposure to CG indicated only minor perturbation with adequate maintenance of secretory function. High content analysis(HCA) on Caco-2 showed that acute and chronic exposure to a range of concentrations of CG did not cause sub-lethal damage at concentrations at which it was effective as an enhancer. Overall, CG increased bioavailability of sCT across rat jejunal and colonic loops without indication of tissue damage. Thus, CG has potential as a safe and effective intestinal enhancer for oral delivery of proteins and peptides.

  10. Effects of 5-Amyno-4-(1,3-benzothyazol-2-yn)-1-(3-methoxyphenyl)-1,2-dihydro-3H-pyrrol-3-one Intake on Digestive System in a Rat Model of Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuznietsova, Halyna M.; Luzhenetska, Valentyna K.; Kotlyar, Iryna P.; Rybalchenko, Volodymyr K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pyrrol derivate 5-amyno-4-(1,3-benzothyazol-2-yn)-1-(3-methoxyphenyl)-1,2-dihydro-3H-pyrrol-3-one (D1) has shown antiproliferative activities in vitro, so investigation of the impact of D1 intake on gut organs in rats that experienced colon cancer seems to be necessary. Materials and Methods. D1 at the dose of 2.3 mg/kg was administered per os daily for 27 (from the 1st day of experiment) or 7 (from the 21st week of experiment) weeks to rats that experienced 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon cancer for 20 weeks. 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) was chosen as reference drug and was administered intraperitoneally weekly for 7 weeks (from the 21st week of experiment) at the dose of 45 mg/kg. Results. Antitumor activity of D1 comparable with the 5FU one against DMH-induced colon cancer in rats was observed (decrease of tumor number and tumor total area up to 46%). D1 attenuated the inflammation of colon, gastric and jejunal mucosa, and the liver, caused by DMH, unlike 5FU, aggravating the latter. In addition, D1 partially normalized mucosa morphometric parameters suggesting its functional restore. Conclusions. D1 possesses, comparable with 5-fluorouracil antitumor efficacy, less damaging effects on the tissues beyond cancerous areas and contributes to partial morphological and functional gut organs recovery. PMID:26504896

  11. Germinated brown rice (GBR) reduces the incidence of aberrant crypt foci with the involvement of β-catenin and COX-2 in azoxymethane-induced colon cancer in rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chemoprevention has become an important area in cancer research due to the failure of current therapeutic modalities. Epidemiological and preclinical studies have demonstrated that nutrition plays a vital role in the etiology of cancer. This study was conducted to determine the chemopreventive effects of germinated brown rice (GBR) in rats induced with colon cancer. GBR is brown rice that has been claimed to be richer in nutrients compared to the common white rice. The male Sprague Dawley rats (6 weeks of age) were randomly divided into 5 groups: (G1) positive control (with colon cancer, unfed with GBR), (G2) fed with 2.5 g/kg of GBR (GBR (g)/weight of rat (kg)), (G3) fed with 5 g/kg of GBR, (G4) fed with 10 g/kg of GBR and (G5) negative control (without colon cancer, unfed with GBR). GBR was administered orally once daily via gavage after injection of 15 mg/kg of body weight of azoxymethane (AOM) once a week for two weeks, intraperitonially. After 8 weeks of treatment, animals were sacrificed and colons were removed. Colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were evaluated histopathologically. Total number of ACF and AC, and multicrypt of ACF, and the expression of β-catenin and COX-2 reduced significantly (p < 0.05) in all the groups treated with GBR (G2, G3 and G4) compared to the control group (G1). Spearman rank correlation test showed significant positive linear relationship between total β-catenin and COX-2 score (Spearman's rho = 0.616, p = 0.0001). It is demonstrated that GBR inhibits the development of total number of ACF and AC, and multicrypt of ACF, reduces the expression of β-catenin and COX-2, and thus can be a promising dietary supplement in prevention of colon cancer. PMID:20346115

  12. Chemopreventive effect of Copaifera langsdorffii leaves hydroalcoholic extract on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced DNA damage and preneoplastic lesions in rat colon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Natural antioxidants present in common foods and beverages have drawn great attention to cancer prevention due to its health benefits, remarkable lack of toxicity and side effects. Copaifera langsdorffii, known as “copaiba”, “capaiva”, or “pau-de-óleo“, belongs to the Leguminosae family and occurs in fields and grasslands in the northern and northeastern parts of Brazil. Biological studies of Copaifera corroborate its widespread use by the population. This paper describes the effects of C. langsdorffii leaves hydroalcoholic extract on the 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced DNA damage and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon of male Wistar rats. Methods The hydroalcoholic extract of C. langsdorffii was administered to rats by gavage at daily doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg body weight. To evaluate DNA damage by the comet assay, animals received the C. langsdorffii extract for seven days and a single subcutaneous injection (sc) of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) at a dose of 40 mg/kg on day 7. Animals were sacrificed 4 h after injection of DMH, to assess DNA damage. For the ACF assay, animals were acclimatized for one week (week 1) and then treated with the C. langsdorffii extract five times a week for four weeks (weeks 2 to 5). The rats received sc injections of DMH (40 mg/kg) on days 2 and 5 of weeks 2 and 3, to induce ACF. Animals were euthanized at week 5; i.e., four weeks after the first DMH treatment. Results Animals treated with different doses of the C. langsdorffii extract combined with DMH had significantly lower frequency of DNA damage as compared with the positive control (animals treated with DMH only). The percentage of reduction in the frequency of DNA damage ranged from 14.30% to 38.8%. The groups treated with 40 and 80 mg/kg C. langsdorffii extract during and after DMH treatment presented significantly lower numbers of ACF and aberrant crypts compared with the control. Conclusion The C. langsdorffii extract significantly reduced

  13. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and heme iron induce oxidative stress biomarkers and a cancer promoting environment in the colon of rats.

    PubMed

    Guéraud, Françoise; Taché, Sylviane; Steghens, Jean-Paul; Milkovic, Lidija; Borovic-Sunjic, Suzana; Zarkovic, Neven; Gaultier, Eric; Naud, Nathalie; Héliès-Toussaint, Cécile; Pierre, Fabrice; Priymenko, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    The end products of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) peroxidation, such as malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), and isoprostanes (8-iso-PGF2α), are widely used as systemic lipid oxidation/oxidative stress biomarkers. However, some of these compounds have also a dietary origin. Thus, replacing dietary saturated fat by PUFAs would improve health but could also increase the formation of such compounds, especially in the case of a pro-oxidant/antioxidant imbalanced diet. Hence, the possible impact of dietary fatty acids and pro-oxidant compounds was studied in rats given diets allowing comparison of the effects of heme iron vs. ferric citrate and of ω-6- vs. ω-3-rich oil on the level of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress biomarkers. Rats given a heme iron-rich diet without PUFA were used as controls. The results obtained have shown that MDA and the major urinary metabolite of HNE (the mercapturic acid of dihydroxynonane, DHN-MA) were highly dependent on the dietary factors tested, while 8-iso-PGF2α was modestly but significantly affected. Intestinal inflammation and tissue fatty acid composition were checked in parallel and could only explain the differences we observed to a limited extent. Thus, the differences in biomarkers were attributed to the formation of lipid oxidation compounds in food or during digestion, their intestinal absorption, and their excretion into urine. Moreover, fecal extracts from the rats fed the heme iron or fish oil diets were highly toxic for immortalized mouse colon cells. Such toxicity can eventually lead to promotion of colorectal carcinogenesis, supporting the epidemiological findings between red meat intake and colorectal cancer risk. Therefore, the analysis of these biomarkers of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress in urine should be used with caution when dietary factors are not well controlled, while control of their possible dietary intake is needed also because of their pro-inflammatory, toxic, and even

  14. A neuro-inspired model-based closed-loop neuroprosthesis for the substitution of a cerebellar learning function in anesthetized rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogri, Roni; Bamford, Simeon A.; Taub, Aryeh H.; Magal, Ari; Giudice, Paolo Del; Mintz, Matti

    2015-02-01

    Neuroprostheses could potentially recover functions lost due to neural damage. Typical neuroprostheses connect an intact brain with the external environment, thus replacing damaged sensory or motor pathways. Recently, closed-loop neuroprostheses, bidirectionally interfaced with the brain, have begun to emerge, offering an opportunity to substitute malfunctioning brain structures. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate a neuro-inspired model-based approach to neuroprostheses. A VLSI chip was designed to implement essential cerebellar synaptic plasticity rules, and was interfaced with cerebellar input and output nuclei in real time, thus reproducing cerebellum-dependent learning in anesthetized rats. Such a model-based approach does not require prior system identification, allowing for de novo experience-based learning in the brain-chip hybrid, with potential clinical advantages and limitations when compared to existing parametric ``black box'' models.

  15. A neuro-inspired model-based closed-loop neuroprosthesis for the substitution of a cerebellar learning function in anesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Hogri, Roni; Bamford, Simeon A.; Taub, Aryeh H.; Magal, Ari; Giudice, Paolo Del; Mintz, Matti

    2015-01-01

    Neuroprostheses could potentially recover functions lost due to neural damage. Typical neuroprostheses connect an intact brain with the external environment, thus replacing damaged sensory or motor pathways. Recently, closed-loop neuroprostheses, bidirectionally interfaced with the brain, have begun to emerge, offering an opportunity to substitute malfunctioning brain structures. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate a neuro-inspired model-based approach to neuroprostheses. A VLSI chip was designed to implement essential cerebellar synaptic plasticity rules, and was interfaced with cerebellar input and output nuclei in real time, thus reproducing cerebellum-dependent learning in anesthetized rats. Such a model-based approach does not require prior system identification, allowing for de novo experience-based learning in the brain-chip hybrid, with potential clinical advantages and limitations when compared to existing parametric “black box” models. PMID:25677559

  16. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3/MicroRNA-21 Feedback Loop Contributes to Atrial Fibrillation by Promoting Atrial Fibrosis in a Rat Sterile Pericarditis Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhengrong; Chen, Xiao-jun; Qian, Cheng; Dong, Qian; Ding, Dan; Wu, Qiong-feng; Li, Jing; Wang, Hong-fei; Li, Wei-hua; Xie, Qiang; Cheng, Xiang; Liao, Yu-hua

    2016-01-01

    Background— Postoperative atrial fibrillation is a frequent complication in cardiac surgery. The aberrant activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) contributes to the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) promotes atrial fibrosis. Recent studies support the existence of reciprocal regulation between STAT3 and miR-21. Here, we test the hypothesis that these 2 molecules might form a feedback loop that contributes to postoperative atrial fibrillation by promoting atrial fibrosis. Methods and Results— A sterile pericarditis model was created using atrial surfaces dusted with sterile talcum powder in rats. The inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor-β, and tumor necrosis factor-α, along with STAT3 and miR-21, were highly upregulated in sterile pericarditis rats. The inhibition of STAT3 by S3I-201 resulted in miR-21 downregulation, which ameliorated atrial fibrosis and decreased the expression of the fibrosis-related genes, α-smooth muscle actin, collagen-1, and collagen-3; reduced the inhomogeneity of atrial conduction; and attenuated atrial fibrillation vulnerability. Meanwhile, treatment with antagomir-21 decreased STAT3 phosphorylation, alleviated atrial remodeling, abrogated sterile pericarditis–induced inhomogeneous conduction, and prevented atrial fibrillation promotion. The culturing of cardiac fibroblasts with IL-6 resulted in progressively augmented STAT3 phosphorylation and miR-21 levels. S3I-201 blocked IL-6 induced the expression of miR-21 and fibrosis-related genes in addition to cardiac fibroblast proliferation. Transfected antagomir-21 decreased the IL-6–induced cardiac fibroblast activation and STAT3 phosphorylation. The overexpression of miR-21 in cardiac fibroblasts caused the upregulation of STAT3 phosphorylation, enhanced fibrosis-related genes, and increased cell numbers. Conclusions— Our results have uncovered a novel reciprocal loop between STAT3

  17. Effects of α1- or β-adrenoceptor stimulation on work-loop and isometric contractions of isolated rat cardiac trabeculae

    PubMed Central

    Layland, Joanne; Kentish, Jonathan C

    2000-01-01

    We studied the effects of α1-or β-adrenoceptor stimulation on the contractility of isolated rat ventricular trabeculae at 24 °C using the work-loop technique, which simulates the cyclical changes in length and force that occur during the cardiac cycle. Some muscles were injected with fura-2 to monitor the intracellular Ca2+ transient. Comparison of twitch records revealed that peak force was greater and was reached earlier in work-loop contractions than in corresponding isometric contractions. This was attributed to the changes in muscle length and velocity during work-loop contractions, since the Ca2+ transients were largely unaffected by the length changes. Stimulation of α1-adrenoceptors (with 100 μm phenylephrine) increased net work, power production, the frequency for maximum work, and the frequency for maximum power production (fopt). The increase in net work was due to the positive inotropic effect of phenylephrine, which was similar at all frequencies investigated (0.33–4.5 Hz). The increase in fopt was attributed to an abbreviation of twitch duration induced by α1-stimulation at higher frequencies (> 1 Hz), even though the twitch became longer at 0.33 Hz. β-Adrenoceptor stimulation (with 5 μm isoprenaline) produced marked increases in net work, power output, the frequency for net work, and fopt. These effects were attributed both to the positive inotropic effect of β-stimulation, which was greater at higher frequencies, and to the reduction in twitch duration. β-Stimulation also abolished the frequency-dependent acceleration of twitch duration. The increase in power output and fopt with α1- as well as β-adrenoceptor stimulation suggested that both receptor types may contribute to the effects of catecholamines, released during stress or exercise, although the greater effects of β-stimulation are likely to predominate. PMID:10747193

  18. [Colonic balantidiasis].

    PubMed

    González de Canales Simón, P; del Olmo Martínez, L; Cortejoso Hernández, A; Arranz Santos, T

    2000-03-01

    Balantidium coli is a Protozoa that is not usually pathogenic in man, although epidemics have been described in tropical areas. It mainly affects the colon and clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic forms to severe dysenteric syndromes. We present a case of endoscopically diagnosed colonic balantidiasis and review the most important characteristics of this parasite-induced disease. PMID:10804691

  19. Radioprotection of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-initiated colon cancer in rats using low-dose γ rays by modulating multidrug resistance-1, cytokeratin 20, and β-catenin expression.

    PubMed

    Nabil, H M; Hassan, B N; Tohamy, A A; Waaer, H F; Abdel Moneim, A E

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiation is a widely used therapy for solid tumors. However, high-dose ionizing radiation causes apoptosis, transforms normal cells into tumor cells, and impairs immune functions, leading to the defects in the removal of damaged or tumor cells. In contrast, low-dose radiation has been reported to exert various beneficial effects in cells. This experimental study investigated the effect of γ rays at low dose on the development of colorectal tumor in a 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon cancer. Colorectal tumor model was induced in Wistar rats by subcutaneous injection of DMH (20 mg/kg) once a week for 15 weeks. Starting from zero day of DMH injection, a single low dose of whole-body γ irradiation of 0.5 Gy/week was applied to the rats. A significant reduction in lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, and elevation in the glutathione content and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase and catalase) were observed after γ irradiation comparing with DMH group. Moreover, γ ray reduced the expressions of multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1), β-catenin, and cytokeratin 20 (CK20) those increased in DMH-treated rats. However, survivin did not change with γ ray treatment. A histopathological examination of the DMH-injected rats revealed ulcerative colitis, dysplasia, anaplasia, and hyperchromasia. An improvement in the histopathological picture was seen in the colon of rats exposed to γ rays. In conclusion, the present results showed that low-dose γ ray significantly inhibited DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats by modulating CK20, MDR1, and β-catenin expression but not survivin expression.

  20. Oral delivery of insulin via polyethylene imine-based nanoparticles for colonic release allows glycemic control in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Salvioni, Lucia; Fiandra, Luisa; Del Curto, Maria Dorly; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Allevi, Raffaele; Truffi, Marta; Sorrentino, Luca; Santini, Benedetta; Cerea, Matteo; Palugan, Luca; Corsi, Fabio; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-08-01

    In this study, insulin-containing nanoparticles were loaded into pellet cores and orally administered to diabetic rats. Polyethylene imine-based nanoparticles, either placebo or loaded with insulin, were incorporated by extrusion and spheronization technology into cores that were subsequently coated with three overlapping layers and a gastroresistant film. The starting and coated systems were evaluated in vitro for their physico-technololgical characteristics, as well as disintegration and release performance. Nanoparticles-loaded cores showed homogeneous particle size distribution and shape. When a superdisintegrant and a soluble diluent were included in the composition enhanced disintegration and release performance were observed. The selected formulations, coated either with enteric or three-layer films, showed gastroresistant and release delayed behavior in vitro, respectively. The most promising formulations were finally tested for their hypoglycemic effect in diabetic rats. Only the nanoformulations loaded into the three-layer pellets were able to induce a significant hypoglycemic activity in diabetic rats. Our results suggest that this efficient activity could be attributed to a retarded release of insulin into the distal intestine, characterized by relatively low proteolytic activity and optimal absorption. PMID:27181095

  1. Oral delivery of insulin via polyethylene imine-based nanoparticles for colonic release allows glycemic control in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Salvioni, Lucia; Fiandra, Luisa; Del Curto, Maria Dorly; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Allevi, Raffaele; Truffi, Marta; Sorrentino, Luca; Santini, Benedetta; Cerea, Matteo; Palugan, Luca; Corsi, Fabio; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-08-01

    In this study, insulin-containing nanoparticles were loaded into pellet cores and orally administered to diabetic rats. Polyethylene imine-based nanoparticles, either placebo or loaded with insulin, were incorporated by extrusion and spheronization technology into cores that were subsequently coated with three overlapping layers and a gastroresistant film. The starting and coated systems were evaluated in vitro for their physico-technololgical characteristics, as well as disintegration and release performance. Nanoparticles-loaded cores showed homogeneous particle size distribution and shape. When a superdisintegrant and a soluble diluent were included in the composition enhanced disintegration and release performance were observed. The selected formulations, coated either with enteric or three-layer films, showed gastroresistant and release delayed behavior in vitro, respectively. The most promising formulations were finally tested for their hypoglycemic effect in diabetic rats. Only the nanoformulations loaded into the three-layer pellets were able to induce a significant hypoglycemic activity in diabetic rats. Our results suggest that this efficient activity could be attributed to a retarded release of insulin into the distal intestine, characterized by relatively low proteolytic activity and optimal absorption.

  2. Influence of a fat-rich diet, folic acid supplementation and a human-relevant concentration of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine on the induction of preneoplastic lesions in the rat colon.

    PubMed

    Nicken, Petra; Brauer, Nicole; Lampen, Alfonso; Steinberg, Pablo

    2012-05-01

    In the present study, the effect of three controversially discussed risk factors for colorectal cancer, a fat-rich diet (16% raw fat content), dietary folic acid supplementation (50 mg folic acid/kg lab chow) and a human-relevant concentration (0.1 ppm) of the heterocyclic aromatic amine 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), either alone or in combination, on the induction of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon of male Fischer 344 rats was analyzed. The mean number of ACF per rat in the case of the four groups fed a fat-rich diet tended to be higher than that of the four groups being fed a standard diet. However, the increase in the mean number of ACF per rat only reached statistical significance in the case of the rats receiving a fat-rich lab chow supplemented with 50 mg/kg folic acid. Moreover, a concentration of 0.1 ppm PhIP per se, either in the standard or in the fat-rich lab chow, did not lead to an increase in the mean number of ACF per rat. In conclusion, the present study provides additional evidence for a colon cancer promoting effect of folic acid supplementation when rodents are fed the compound in supraphysiological concentrations.

  3. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) alleviates arsenic-induced damages to DNA and intestinal tissues in rat and in situ intestinal loop by reinforcing antioxidant system.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Nirmallya; Sajed Ali, Sk; Deb, Bimal; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-09-01

    This study elucidates the protective role of Green tea (Camellia sinensis or CS) against arsenic-induced mutagenic DNA-breakage/intestinal (small) damages in female rats. Intestinal epithelial cells receive ingested arsenic initially. Though, the possibility of damages in this tissue is immense and the therapeutic strategies against this damage are of great concern, reports on either issue are scanty. Our earlier study on arsenic-exposed human unveils a link between carcinogenesis and mutagenic DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that supplementation of CS-extract (10 mg/mL water) with NaAsO2 (0.6 ppm)/100 g b.w. for 28 days to rats offered a significant protection against arsenic-induced oxidative damages to DNA and intestinal (small) tissues by buttressing antioxidant systems. Necrotic and apoptotic damages and their CS-protection are shown in DNA-fragmentation, comet-assay, and histoarchitecture (hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-schiff staining) results. Only arsenic exposure significantly decreased intestinal superoxide dismutase, catalase activities, and level of soluble thiol with a concomitant increase in malondialdehyde/conjugated dienes. Alteration of serum necrotic marker lactate dehydrogenase and the metabolic inflammatory marker c-reactive protein also indicate the impairment may be occurring at transcription and/or cellular signal transduction level. In addition, in situ incubation in rat intestinal loop filled for 24 h with NaAsO2 alone (250 µM) or with aqueous CS-extract (250 mg/mL) suggests that small intestinal epithelial cells are significantly protected by CS against arsenic-associated necrotic/mutagenic damages, which is observed in DNA-breakage studies. In conclusion, besides intensifying endogenous antioxidant system, CS polyphenols also offer a direct role on free radical scavenging activity that is associated to the protection from mutagenic DNA-breakages and prevention of tissue necrosis/carcinogenesis generated by arsenic.

  4. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  5. Cardiac effects of long-term active immunization with the second extracellular loop of human β1- and/or β3-adrenoceptors in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Montaudon, E; Dubreil, L; Lalanne, V; Vermot Des Roches, M; Toumaniantz, G; Fusellier, M; Desfontis, J-C; Martignat, L; Mallem, M Y

    2015-10-01

    β1- and β3-adrenoceptor (AR) auto-antibodies were detected in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. Many studies have shown that β1-AR auto-antibodies with partial agonist-like effect play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Moreover, a recent study carried out in our laboratory has shown that β3-AR antibodies (β3-ABs), produced in rats, were able to reduce cardiomyocyte contractility via β3-AR activation. The aims of this study were (1) to investigate, in isolated cardiomyocytes from rabbit, the role of Gi proteins in the β3-ABs-induced cardiac negative inotropy, (2) to determine whether β3-ABs may exhibit β3-AR antagonistic property which is characteristic of partial agonists, and (3) to determine whether long-term active immunization producing both β1-ABs and/or β3-ABs leads to the development of cardiac dysfunction in Lewis rats. Lewis rats were immunized for 6 months with peptidic sequences corresponding to the second extracellular loop of human β3-AR and/or β1-AR. Agonistic effect of β3-ABs was evaluated on electrically field-stimulated isolated cardiomyocytes from adult rabbit by measuring the cell shortening. Echocardiography and ex vivo isolated perfused heart studies were conducted on immunized rats. Finally, β-AR expression was quantified by immunofluorescence and RT-qPCR. SR58611A (10 nM), a preferential β3-AR agonist, and purified β3-ABs (25 μg/ml) induced a decrease in cell shortening (-39.71±4.9% (n=10) and -17.06±3.9% (n=10) respectively). This effect was significantly inhibited when the cardiomyocytes were preincubated with pertussis toxin (0.3 μg/ml), a Gi protein inhibitor (p<0.05). In addition, SR58611A-mediated negative inotropic effect was decreased when cardiomyocytes were preincubated with β3-ABs (p<0.0001). Echocardiography revealed a decrease in the fractional shortening and ejection fraction in rats immunized against β1-AR and both β1- and β3-AR. However, the study on isolated heart showed a

  6. In vivo studies of biotin absorption in distal rat intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have extended their previous studies of biotin absorption in rat proximal jejunum (PJ) to examine biotin absorptive capacity of rat ileum (I) and proximal colon (PC) using in vivo intestinal loop technique. Intestinal loops (2.5 cm) were filled with 0.3 ml of solution containing (/sup 3/H)-biotin and (/sup 14/C)-inulin in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Biotin absorption was determined on the basis of luminal biotin disappearance after correction for inulin recovery and averaged (pmol/loop-10 min; X +/- SEM). In related experiments, 5-cm loops of PJ, distal I (DI), or PC were filled with 0.5 ml of solution of similar composition (1.0 ..mu..M biotin). The abdominal cavity was closed and the rats were allowed to recover from anesthesia, then sacrificed 3 hr after injection. Biotin absorption averaged 96.2% (PJ), 93.2% (DI), and 25.8% (PC) of the dose administered. These differences were reflected in the radioactive biotin content of plasma and intestinal loop, kidney, and liver. These data demonstrate significant biotin absorption in rat DI and PC, as required if the intestinal microflora are to be considered as a source of biotin for the host.

  7. The Attenuation of Scutellariae radix Extract on Oxidative Stress for Colon Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 Cell and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yu; Yang, Jun; Lin, Lianjie; Lin, Yan; Zheng, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress (OS) has been regarded as one of the major pathogeneses of ulcerative colitis (UC) through damaging colon. It has been shown that Scutellariae radix (SR) extract has a beneficial effect for the prevention and treatment of UC. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether SR had a potential capacity on oxidant damage for colon injury both in vivo and in vitro. Materials and Methods: The 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) was used to induce UC rats model while 1 μg/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was for RAW264.7 cell damage. Disease activity index (DAI) was determined to response the severity of colitis. The myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in rat colon was also estimated. The 2,2’-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid assay was performed to evaluate the total antioxidant capacity of SR. Furthermore, the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation malondialdehyde (MDA) in cell supernatant and rat serum were detected by appropriate kits. In addition, an immunohistochemical assay was applied to examine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) protein expression in colon tissue. Results: The treatment with SR could significantly increase the activity of GSH-PX, CAT, and SOD associated with OS in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cell damage and TNBS-induced UC rats. However, the level of MDA was markedly reduced both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, SR significantly decreased DAI and reversed the increased MPO activity. Thus, SR could decrease the severity of acute TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Immunohistochemical assay showed that SR significantly downregulated TGF-β1 protein expression in colon tissue. Conclusion: Our data provided evidence to support this fact that SR attenuated OS in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cell and also in TNBS-induced UC rats. Thus, SR may be an interesting candidate drug for the management of UC. SUMMARY Scutellariae radix (SR

  8. The cAMP-regulated and 293B-inhibited K+ conductance of rat colonic crypt base cells.

    PubMed

    Warth, R; Riedemann, N; Bleich, M; Van Driessche, W; Busch, A E; Greger, R

    1996-05-01

    We have shown previously that secretagogues acting via the second messenger adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) activate, besides their marked effect on the luminal Cl- conductance, a K+ conductance in the basolateral membrane of colonic crypt cells. This conductance is blocked by the chromanol 293B. This K+ conductance is examined here in more detail in cell-attached (c.a.) and cell-excised (c.e.) patch- clamp studies. Addition of forskolin (5 micromol/l) to the bath led to the activation of very small-conductance (probably < 3 pS) K+ channels in c.a. patches (n = 54). These channels were reversibly inhibited by the addition of 0.1 mmol/l of 293B to the bath (n = 21). Noise analysis revealed that these channels had fast kinetics and produced a Lorentzian noise component with a corner frequency (fc) of 308 +/- 10 Hz (n = 30). The current/voltage curves of this noise indicated that the underlying ion channels were K+ selective. 293B reduced the power density of the noise (So) to 46 +/- 8.7% of its control value and shifted fc from 291 +/- 26 to 468 +/- 54 Hz (n = 8). In c.e. patches from cells previously stimulated by forskolin, the same type of current persisted in 3 out of 18 experiments when the bath solution was a cytosolic-type solution without adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) (CYT). In 15 experiments the addition of ATP (1 mmol/l) to CYT solution was necessary to induce or augment channel activity. In six experiments excision was performed into CYT + ATP solution and channel activity persisted. 293B exerted a reversible inhibitory effect. The channel activity was reduced by 5 mmol/l Ba2+ and was completely absent when K+ in the bath was replaced by Na+. These data suggest that forskolin activates a K+ channel of very small conductance which can be inhibited directly and reversibly by 293B.

  9. Colon interposition for oesophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pascal A; Gilardoni, Adrian; Trousse, Delphine; D'Journo, Xavier B; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Doddoli, Christophe; Giudicelli, Roger; Fuentes, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The choice of the colon as an oesophageal substitute results primarily from the unavailability of the stomach. However, given its durability and function, colon interposition keeps elective indications in patients with benign or malignant oesophageal disease who are potential candidates for long survival. The choice of the colonic portion used for oesophageal reconstruction depends on the required length of the graft, and the encountered colonic vascular anatomy, the last being characterised by the near-invariability of the left colonic vessels, in contrast to the vascular pattern of the right side of the colon. Accordingly, the transverse colon with all or part of the ascending colon is the substitute of choice, positioned in the isoperistaltic direction, and supplied either from the left colic vessels for long grafts or middle colic vessels for shorter grafts. Technical key points are: full mobilisation of the entire colon, identification of the main colonic vessels and collaterals, and a prolonged clamping test to ensure the permeability of the chosen nourishing pedicle. Transposition through the posterior mediastinum in the oesophageal bed is the shortest one and thereby offers the best functional results. When the oesophageal bed is not available, the retrosternal route is the preferred alternative option. The food bolus travelling mainly by gravity makes straightness of the conduit of paramount importance. The proximal anastomosis is a single-layer hand-fashioned end-to-end anastomosis to prevent narrowing. When the stomach is available, the distal anastomosis is best performed at the posterior part of the antrum for the reasons of pedicle positioning and reflux prevention, and a gastric drainage procedure is added when the oesophagus and vagus nerves have been removed. In the other cases, a Roux-en-Y jejunal loop is preferable to prevent bile reflux into the colon. Additional procedures include re-establishment of the colonic continuity, a careful closure of

  10. Positive regulation of the Egr-1/osteopontin positive feedback loop in rat vascular smooth muscle cells by TGF-{beta}, ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hong-Wei; Liu, Qi-Feng; Liu, Gui-Nan

    2010-05-28

    Previous studies identified a positive feedback loop in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in which early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) binds to the osteopontin (OPN) promoter and upregulates OPN expression, and OPN upregulates Egr-1 expression via the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. The current study examined whether transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) activity contributes to Egr-1 binding to the OPN promoter, and whether other signaling pathways act downstream of OPN to regulate Egr-1 expression. ChIP assays using an anti-Egr-1 antibody showed that amplification of the OPN promoter sequence decreased in TGF-{beta} DNA enzyme-transfected VSMCs relative to control VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), or SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly inhibited OPN-induced Egr-1 expression, and PD98059 treatment was associated with the most significant decrease in Egr-1 expression. OPN-stimulated VSMC cell migration was inhibited by SP600125 or SB203580, but not by PD98059. Furthermore, MTT assays showed that OPN-mediated cell proliferation was inhibited by PD98059, but not by SP600125 or SB203580. Taken together, the results of the current study show that Egr-1 binding to the OPN promoter is positively regulated by TGF-{beta}, and that the p38 MAPK, JNK, and ERK pathways are involved in OPN-mediated Egr-1 upregulation.

  11. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables.

  12. Space colonization.

    PubMed

    2002-12-01

    NASA interest in colonization encompasses space tourism; space exploration; space bases in orbit, at L1, on the Moon, or on Mars; in-situ resource utilization; and planetary terraforming. Activities progressed during 2002 in areas such as Mars colonies, hoppers, and biomass; space elevators and construction; and in-situ consumables. PMID:12506926

  13. Intestinal Translocation of Clinical Isolates of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis and ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli in a Rat Model of Bacterial Colonization and Liver Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Karin M.; van der Heijden, Inneke M.; Galvao, Flavio H.; Lopes, Camila G.; Costa, Silvia F.; Abdala, Edson; D’Albuquerque, Luiz A.; Levin, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a rat model of gastrointestinal colonization with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis (VRE) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli and to evaluate intestinal translocation to blood and tissues after total and partial hepatic ischemia. Methods - We developed a model of rat colonization with VRE and ESBL-E coli. Then we studied four groups of colonized rats: Group I (with hepatic pedicle occlusion causing complete liver ischemia and intestinal stasis); Group II (with partial liver ischemia without intestinal stasis); Group III (surgical manipulation without hepatic ischemia or intestinal stasis); Group IV (anesthetized without surgical manipulation). After sacrifice, portal and systemic blood, large intestine, small intestine, spleen, liver, lungs, and cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes were cultured. Endotoxin concentrations in portal and systemic blood were determined. Results – The best inocula were: VRE: 2.4×1010 cfu and ESBL-E. coli: 1.12×1010 cfu. The best results occurred 24 hours after inoculation and antibiotic doses of 750 µg/mL of water for vancomycin and 2.1 mg/mL for ceftriaxone. There was a significantly higher proportion of positive cultures for ESBL-E. coli in the lungs in Groups I, II and III when compared with Group IV (67%; 60%; 75% and 13%, respectively; p:0.04). VRE growth was more frequent in mesenteric lymph nodes for Groups I (67%) and III (38%) than for Groups II (13%) and IV (none) (p:0.002). LPS was significantly higher in systemic blood of Group I (9.761±13.804 EU/mL−p:0.01). No differences for endotoxin occurred in portal blood. Conclusion –We developed a model of rats colonized with resistant bacteria useful to study intestinal translocation. Translocation occurred in surgical procedures with and without hepatic ischemia-reperfusion and probably occurred via the bloodstream. Translocation was probably lymphatic in the ischemia-reperfusion groups

  14. Aquaporin-1 water channels in short and long loop descending thin limbs and in descending vasa recta in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S; Pallone, T; Smith, B L; Christensen, E I; Agre, P; Maunsbach, A B

    1995-06-01

    The localization of aquaporin-1 water channels (AQP-1) in nephron and vascular structures in rat kidney were characterized, because vascular bundles are known to play a key role in urinary concentration. Immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy were applied on thin cryosections or ultrathin Lowicryl sections, using an optimized freeze-substitution method. Within the vascular bundles, AQP-1 is localized in descending thin limbs (DTL) of short nephrons in apical and basolateral membranes. The expression in DTL of short nephrons is considerably lower compared with the expression in long nephrons, consistent with the known lower osmotic water permeability of this segment. Furthermore, DTL of short nephrons expressing AQP-1 continue abruptly into a thin limb segment without AQP-1. This suggests the existence of a novel thin limb epithelium in the outer medulla. Extensive expression of AQP-1 is observed in apical and basolateral membranes of DTL of long nephrons, which are localized in the periphery of the vascular bundles. The expression decreases along the axis of long nephron DTLs in correlation with the known water permeability characteristics of thin limb segments. DTLs of both short and long nephrons continue abruptly into thin limb segments without AQP-1 expression, revealing an abrupt cell-to-cell transition. In vasa recta, AQP-1 is selectively localized in the nonfenestrated endothelium of descending vasa recta, whereas the fenestrated endothelium of ascending vesa recta and peritubular capillaries do not express AQP-1. AQP-1 is localized in both apical and basolateral plasma membranes, which is logical for transendothelial water transport. Isolated perfused descending vasa recta display high water permeability, and, unlike sodium permeability, diffusional water permeability is partly inhibited by mercurials, thus substantiating the presence of mercurial-sensitive water channels in descending vasa recta. Thus AQP-1 is localized in DTL and descending

  15. Altered 13C glucose metabolism in the cortico–striato–thalamo–cortical loop in the MK-801 rat model of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Eyjolfsson, Elvar M; Nilsen, Linn Hege; Kondziella, Daniel; Brenner, Eiliv; Håberg, Asta; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    Using a modified MK-801 (dizocilpine) N-methyl--aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor hypofunction model for schizophrenia, we analyzed glycolysis, as well as glutamatergic, GABAergic, and monoaminergic neurotransmitter synthesis and degradation. Rats received an injection of MK-801 daily for 6 days and on day 6, they also received an injection of [1-13C]glucose. Extracts of frontal cortex (FCX), parietal and temporal cortex (PTCX), thalamus, striatum, nucleus accumbens (NAc), and hippocampus were analyzed using 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. A pronounced reduction in glycolysis was found only in PTCX, in which 13C labeling of glucose, lactate, and alanine was decreased. 13C enrichment in lactate, however, was reduced in all areas investigated. The largest reductions in glutamate labeling were detected in FCX and PTCX, whereas in hippocampus, striatum, and Nac, 13C labeling of glutamate was only slightly but significantly reduced. The thalamus was the only region with unaffected glutamate labeling. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) labeling was reduced in all areas, but most significantly in FCX. Glutamine and aspartate labeling was unchanged. Mitochondrial metabolites were also affected. Fumarate labeling was reduced in FCX and thalamus, whereas malate labeling was reduced in FCX, PTCX, striatum, and NAc. Dopamine turnover was decreased in FCX and thalamus, whereas that of serotonin was unchanged in all regions. In conclusion, neurotransmitter metabolism in the cortico–striato–thalamo–cortical loop is severely impaired in the MK-801 (dizocilpine) NMDA receptor hypofunction animal model for schizophrenia. PMID:21081956

  16. Up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in primary afferent pathway regulates colon-to-bladder cross-sensitization in rat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In humans, inflammation of either the urinary bladder or the distal colon often results in sensory cross-sensitization between these organs. Limited information is known about the mechanisms underlying this clinical syndrome. Studies with animal models have demonstrated that activation of primary afferent pathways may have a role in mediating viscero-visceral cross-organ sensitization. Methods Colonic inflammation was induced by a single dose of tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) instilled intracolonically. The histology of the colon and the urinary bladder was examined by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain. The protein expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel of the vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were examined by immunohistochemistry and/or western blot. The inter-micturition intervals and the quantity of urine voided were obtained from analysis of cystometrograms. Results At 3 days post TNBS treatment, the protein level of TRPV1 was increased by 2-fold (p < 0.05) in the inflamed distal colon when examined with western blot. TRPV1 was mainly expressed in the axonal terminals in submucosal area of the distal colon, and was co-localized with the neural marker PGP9.5. In sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), BDNF expression was augmented by colonic inflammation examined in the L1 DRG, and was expressed in TRPV1 positive neurons. The elevated level of BDNF in L1 DRG by colonic inflammation was blunted by prolonged pre-treatment of the animals with the neurotoxin resiniferatoxin (RTX). Colonic inflammation did not alter either the morphology of the urinary bladder or the expression level of TRPV1 in this viscus. However, colonic inflammation decreased the inter-micturition intervals and decreased the quantities of urine voided. The increased bladder activity by colonic inflammation was attenuated by prolonged intraluminal treatment with RTX or treatment with intrathecal BDNF

  17. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  18. A colonic duplication cyst causing bowel ischaemia in a 74-year-old lady

    PubMed Central

    Fenelon, Christopher; Boland, Michael R; Kenny, Brian; Faul, Peter; Tormey, Shona

    2016-01-01

    Colonic duplication cysts are rare congenital malformations that predominantly present before the age of 2 years. We report the case of a 74-year-old lady who presented with sudden onset abdominal pain. A computed tomography scan noted a calcified structure adjacent to abnormal loops of bowel. Intraoperative findings revealed an ischaemic loop of small bowel wrapped around a mass in the mesentery adjacent to the sigmoid colon. Final histology revealed a colonic duplication cyst. Colonic duplication cysts are rare entities that most commonly cause obstruction or perforation. We present the very rare case of a colonic duplication cyst causing bowel ischaemia in an elderly female. PMID:27572680

  19. Colon cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - colon cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on colon cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/colonandrectumcancer/index Colon Cancer Alliance -- www.ccalliance.org National ...

  20. Gastrointestinal bleeding and iron absorption in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giannella, R A; Toskes, P P

    1976-07-01

    Rats with surgically created self-filling jejunal blind loops and the blind loop syndrome manifested gastrointestinal bleeding and hyperabsorption of iron. Although the mean hematocrit and serum iron levels of rats with self-filling blind loops became overtly anemic and manifested low-serum iron levels. It is suggested that the documented gastrointestinal bleeding in these rats with the experimental blind loop syndrome is another manifestation of damage to the intestinal epithelium in conditions of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

  1. The chemopotential effect of Annona muricata leaves against azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci in rats and the apoptotic effect of Acetogenin Annomuricin E in HT-29 cells: a bioassay-guided approach.

    PubMed

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Firoozinia, Mohammad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2015-01-01

    Annona muricata has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. This study evaluated the chemopreventive properties of an ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAML) on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Moreover, the cytotoxic compound of EEAML (Annomuricin E) was isolated, and its apoptosis-inducing effect was investigated against HT-29 colon cancer cell line using a bioassay-guided approach. This experiment was performed on five groups of rats: negative control, cancer control, EEAML (250 mg/kg), EEAML (500 mg/kg) and positive control (5-fluorouracil). Methylene blue staining of colorectal specimens showed that application of EEAML at both doses significantly reduced the colonic ACF formation compared with the cancer control group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl-2 proteins and the up-regulation of Bax protein after administration of EEAML compared with the cancer control group. In addition, an increase in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and a decrease in the malondialdehyde level of the colon tissue homogenates were observed, suggesting the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Annomuricin E inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells with an IC50 value of 1.62 ± 0.24 μg/ml after 48 h. The cytotoxic effect of annomuricin E was further substantiated by G1 cell cycle arrest and early apoptosis induction in HT-29 cells. Annomuricin E triggered mitochondria-initiated events, including the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Prior to these events, annomuricin E activated caspase 3/7 and caspase 9. Upstream, annomuricin E induced a time-dependent upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings substantiate the usage of A. muricata leaves in ethnomedicine against cancer and highlight annomuricin E as one of the contributing compounds in the

  2. The Chemopotential Effect of Annona muricata Leaves against Azoxymethane-Induced Colonic Aberrant Crypt Foci in Rats and the Apoptotic Effect of Acetogenin Annomuricin E in HT-29 Cells: A Bioassay-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Firoozinia, Mohammad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2015-01-01

    Annona muricata has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. This study evaluated the chemopreventive properties of an ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAML) on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Moreover, the cytotoxic compound of EEAML (Annomuricin E) was isolated, and its apoptosis-inducing effect was investigated against HT-29 colon cancer cell line using a bioassay-guided approach. This experiment was performed on five groups of rats: negative control, cancer control, EEAML (250 mg/kg), EEAML (500 mg/kg) and positive control (5-fluorouracil). Methylene blue staining of colorectal specimens showed that application of EEAML at both doses significantly reduced the colonic ACF formation compared with the cancer control group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl-2 proteins and the up-regulation of Bax protein after administration of EEAML compared with the cancer control group. In addition, an increase in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and a decrease in the malondialdehyde level of the colon tissue homogenates were observed, suggesting the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Annomuricin E inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells with an IC50 value of 1.62 ± 0.24 μg/ml after 48 h. The cytotoxic effect of annomuricin E was further substantiated by G1 cell cycle arrest and early apoptosis induction in HT-29 cells. Annomuricin E triggered mitochondria-initiated events, including the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Prior to these events, annomuricin E activated caspase 3/7 and caspase 9. Upstream, annomuricin E induced a time-dependent upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings substantiate the usage of A. muricata leaves in ethnomedicine against cancer and highlight annomuricin E as one of the contributing compounds in the

  3. The chemopotential effect of Annona muricata leaves against azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci in rats and the apoptotic effect of Acetogenin Annomuricin E in HT-29 cells: a bioassay-guided approach.

    PubMed

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Rouhollahi, Elham; Karimian, Hamed; Fadaeinasab, Mehran; Firoozinia, Mohammad; Ameen Abdulla, Mahmood; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

    2015-01-01

    Annona muricata has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancer and tumors. This study evaluated the chemopreventive properties of an ethyl acetate extract of A. muricata leaves (EEAML) on azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. Moreover, the cytotoxic compound of EEAML (Annomuricin E) was isolated, and its apoptosis-inducing effect was investigated against HT-29 colon cancer cell line using a bioassay-guided approach. This experiment was performed on five groups of rats: negative control, cancer control, EEAML (250 mg/kg), EEAML (500 mg/kg) and positive control (5-fluorouracil). Methylene blue staining of colorectal specimens showed that application of EEAML at both doses significantly reduced the colonic ACF formation compared with the cancer control group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the down-regulation of PCNA and Bcl-2 proteins and the up-regulation of Bax protein after administration of EEAML compared with the cancer control group. In addition, an increase in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and a decrease in the malondialdehyde level of the colon tissue homogenates were observed, suggesting the suppression of lipid peroxidation. Annomuricin E inhibited the growth of HT-29 cells with an IC50 value of 1.62 ± 0.24 μg/ml after 48 h. The cytotoxic effect of annomuricin E was further substantiated by G1 cell cycle arrest and early apoptosis induction in HT-29 cells. Annomuricin E triggered mitochondria-initiated events, including the dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and the leakage of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. Prior to these events, annomuricin E activated caspase 3/7 and caspase 9. Upstream, annomuricin E induced a time-dependent upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 at the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these findings substantiate the usage of A. muricata leaves in ethnomedicine against cancer and highlight annomuricin E as one of the contributing compounds in the

  4. TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate and folic acid are forms of the B vitamin that are involved in the synthesis, repair and functioning of DNA and are required for the production and maintenance of cells. Low levels of folate have been associated with several forms of cancer, including colon cancer. Aberran...

  5. Colonic perianastomotic carcinogenesis in an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Rodrigo, Luis; Pinyol-Felis, Carme; Vinyas-Salas, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Background To examine the effect of anastomosis on experimental carcinogenesis in the colon of rats. Methods Forty-three 10-week-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on by performing an end-to-side ileorectostomy. Group A:16 rats received no treatment. Group B: 27 rats received 18 subcutaneous injections weekly at a dose of 21 mg/kg wt of 1–2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH), from the eighth day after the intervention. Animals were sacrificed between 25–27 weeks. The number of tumours, their localization, size and microscopic characteristics were recorded. A paired chi-squared analysis was performed comparing tumoral induction in the perianastomotic zone with the rest of colon with faeces. Results No tumours appeared in the dimethylhydrazine-free group. The percentage tumoral area was greater in the perianastomotic zone compared to tumours which had developed in the rest of colon with faeces (p = 0.014). Conclusion We found a cocarcinogenic effect due to the creation of an anastomosis, when using an experimental model of colonic carcinogenesis induced by DMH in rats. PMID:18667092

  6. Estimation of the fraction of the lactose in a high lactose diet available for fermentation in the cecum and colon of the rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, K I; Benevenga, N J; Grummer, R H

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the amount of lactose which passed into the large intestine and the lactase activity in the small intestine of rats (200 g) fed a control diet or a diet containing 30% lactose. The fraction of lactose consumed in a single 1-hour meal that escaped hydrolysis in the small intestine was estimated by measuring the area under a smooth curve of a plot of lactose:marker ratio in the terminal ileum expressed as a fraction of intake, against the fraction of the total marker that passed into the large intestine. This amounted to approximately 30% and 31.5% of the lactose consumed for the rats fed the control and 30% lactose diets, respectively. In another experiment in which the rats were fed a diet containing 30% lactose and the Cr-EDTA marker ad libitum for 1 week, approximately 43% of the lactose consumed became available for fermentation in the large intestine. This work suggests that a substantial fraction of the lactose ingested is available for fermentation in the large intestine. The lactase activity of homogenates of the small intestine of rats fed the control or high lactose diet was 106 +/- 5 or 115 +/- 4 mg lactose/30 minutes/rat (P less than 0.05), respectively. The lactase activity in the small intestine homogenate (mucosa + contents) was significantly higher than that actually available in vivo (110 +/- 7 versus 69 +/- 4 mg/30 minutes/rat).

  7. Mechanism of deoxycholic acid stimulation of the rabbit colon.

    PubMed Central

    Shiff, S J; Soloway, R D; Snape, W J

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies showed that deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulated migrating action potential complexes (MAPC) in the colon. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism of DCA-stimulated colonic motility. Myoelectrical and contractile activity were measured in New Zealand White rabbits from a loop constructed in the proximal colon. During the control period, slow waves were present at a frequency of 10.8 +/- 0.5 cycle/min and there were 1.5 +/- 0.5 MAPC/ h. After adding DCA (16 mM) to the loop the slow wave activity was unchanged. However, MAPC increased to 15.1 +/- 2.4 MAPC/h (P less than 0.001). MAPC activity was not stimulated in the colonic smooth muscle outside the loop. The intraluminal addition of procaine or tetrodotoxin to the colonic loop inhibited the DCA-stimulated increase in MAPC activity (0.2 +/- 0.2 MAPC/h) (P less than 0.005). Intravenous administration of atropine or phentolamine also inhibited MAPC activity that had been stimulated by DCA (P less than 0.005). Pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine also inhibited an increase in MAPC activity. Propranolol, trimethaphan camsylate, or hexamethonium had no effect on DCA stimulation of MAPC activity. Although the concentration of bile salt increased in the mesenteric venous outflow from the colonic loop, the intravenous administration of bile salt did not stimulate colonic MAPC activity. These studies suggest: (a) the action of DCA on smooth muscle activity is a local phenomenon, (b) the increase in MAPC activity is dependent on intact cholinergic and alpha adrenergic neurons, and (c) an increase in the concentration of bile salts in the serum is not associated with an increase in colonic MAPC activity. PMID:7076855

  8. Rollercoaster loop shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2005-11-01

    Many modern rollercoasters feature loops. Although textbook loops are often circular, real rollercoaster loops are not. In this paper, we look into the mathematical description of various possible loop shapes, as well as their riding properties. We also discuss how a study of loop shapes can be used in physics education.

  9. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-01-01

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health. PMID:24713325

  10. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-04-08

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health.

  11. Water Stream "Loop-the-Loop"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jefimenko, Oleg

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the design of a modified loop-the-loop apparatus in which a water stream is used to illustrate centripetal forces and phenomena of high-velocity hydrodynamics. Included are some procedures of carrying out lecture demonstrations. (CC)

  12. Altered myoelectric activity in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Justus, P G; Fernandez, A; Martin, J L; King, C E; Toskes, P P; Mathias, J R

    1983-09-01

    Nutrient malabsorption and diarrhea are characteristic of the blind loop syndrome. Alterations in motility have been implicated as a cause of bacterial overgrowth, but the possibility that altered motility may result from alterations in the flora has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to characterize the myoelectric activity of the small intestine in the blind loop rat model. Eight groups of rats were studied: rats with self-filling blind loops, which develop bacterial overgrowth; rats with self-emptying blind loops, which are surgical controls that do not develop overgrowth; unoperated litter mates; rats with self-filling blind loops and unoperated controls treated with chloramphenicol, 200 mg/d i.p.; rats with surgically removed self-filling blind loops; operated control rats; and gnotobiotic rats with self-filling blind loops. In the untreated rats with self-filling blind loops, there was altered myoelectric activity characterized by an increased percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials and by organized activity similar to the migrating action potential complex. Migrating action potential complex activity and percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials were significantly decreased with chloramphenicol therapy; that decrease correlated with a decrease in aerobes and anaerobes. Migrating action potential complex activity was abolished in rats with surgically removed self-filling blind loops; they also showed a significant decrease in percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials. Gnotobiotic rats with self-filling blind loops showed no alteration in myoelectric activity. These data indicate: (a) bacterial overgrowth is associated with a significant increase in percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials and migrating action potential complex activity; (b) chloramphenicol significantly reduced both percentage of slow waves occupied by action potentials and migrating action potential complex activity; and (c

  13. Spontaneous bacterial cell lysis and biofilm formation in the colon of the Cape Dune mole-rat and the laboratory rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Kotzé, Sanet H.; Holzknecht, Zoie E.; Thomas, Anitra D.; Everett, Mary Lou; Taylor, Shanna; Duckett, Larry D.; Whitesides, John; McDermott, Patrice; Lin, Shu S.

    2013-01-01

    A wide range of techniques, including highthroughput DNA sequencing methods, have been applied to the evaluation of the normal intestinal flora. However, the inability to grow many of those species in culture imposes substantial constraints on the techniques used to evaluate this important community. The presence of biofilms in the normal gut adds further complexity to the issue. In this study, a flow cytometric analysis was used to separate intact bacterial cells, cell debris, and other particulate matter based on bacteria-specific staining and particle size. In addition, an analysis of biofilm formation using fluorescent light microscopy was conducted. Using these approaches, the ratio of bacterial cell debris to intact bacterial cells as a measure of spontaneous lysis of bacterial cells in the gut of the Cape dune mole-rat (Bathyergus suillus) and the laboratory rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) was examined, and the degree of biofilm formation was semi-quantitatively assessed. The results suggest that the degree of spontaneous cell lysis was greater in the appendix than in the cecum in both the mole-rat and the rabbit. Further, the results point toward extensive epithelial-associated biofilm formation in the proximal mole-rat and rabbit large bowel, although the biofilms may be less structured than those found in laboratory rodents and in humans. PMID:21538116

  14. Schlafen 3, a novel gene, regulates colonic mucosal growth during aging

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bhaumik B.; Yu, Yingjie; Du, Jianhua; Rishi, Arun K.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Tarca, Adi L.; Wali, Anil; Majumdar, Adhip P. N.

    2009-01-01

    Although aging is associated with increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis in the colonic mucosa of Fischer 344 rats, the regulatory mechanisms are poorly understood. Gene expression profiling (Illumina platform) was carried out in freshly isolated colonic mucosal cells from young (4–6 mo old) and aged (22–24 mo old) Fischer 344 rats. Sixty-six genes were differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa between young and old animals (P < 0.05). In particular, the expression of schlafen 3, a negative regulator of proliferation, was decreased by 8- to 10-fold in the colonic mucosa of aged rats. Administration of wortmannin, which inhibited colonic mucosal proliferation in the colonic mucosa of aged rats, stimulated the expression of schlafen 3, indicating a growth regulatory role of this gene. To further determine the growth regulatory properties of schlafen 3 gene, schlafen 3 cDNA was transfected in colon cancer HCT-116 cells. This resulted in a 30–40% inhibition of cellular growth, accompanied by decreased expression of PCNA and cyclin D1 and reduced phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In conclusion, our present study demonstrates that several genes involved in proliferation and apoptosis are differentially expressed in the colonic mucosa of young and aged rats. Schlafen 3, a novel negative regulator of growth, which is markedly downregulated in the colonic mucosa of the aged, may play a role in regulating colonic mucosal growth during aging. PMID:19228883

  15. Management of colonic volvulus.

    PubMed

    Gingold, Daniel; Murrell, Zuri

    2012-12-01

    Colonic volvulus is a common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide. It can affect all parts of the colon, but most commonly occurs in the sigmoid and cecal areas. This disease has been described for centuries, and was studied by Hippocrates himself. Currently, colonic volvulus is the third most common cause of large bowel obstruction worldwide, and is responsible for ∼15% of large bowel obstructions in the United States. This article will discuss the history of colonic volvulus, and the predisposing factors that lead to this disease. Moreover, the epidemiology and diagnosis of each type of colonic volvulus, along with the various treatment options will be reviewed. PMID:24294126

  16. Look before You Loop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellis, Marilyn

    1999-01-01

    Explores looping, which involves one teacher staying with the same group of children for more than one year. Recognizes that, with today's changing demographics, looping can be a way to foster a family-like classroom atmosphere. Discusses advantages and disadvantages to looping. Includes a chart of looping opportunities and considerations;…

  17. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  18. OPE for super loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sever, Amit; Vieira, Pedro; Wang, Tianheng

    2011-11-01

    We extend the Operator Product Expansion for Null Polygon Wilson loops to the Mason-Skinner-Caron-Huot super loop dual to non MHV gluon amplitudes. We explain how the known tree level amplitudes can be promoted into an infinite amount of data at any loop order in the OPE picture. As an application, we re-derive all one loop NMHV six gluon amplitudes by promoting their tree level expressions. We also present some new all loops predictions for these amplitudes.

  19. The preprocessed doacross loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi

    1990-01-01

    Dependencies between loop iterations cannot always be characterized during program compilation. Doacross loops typically make use of a-priori knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies to carry out required synchronizations. A type of doacross loop is proposed that allows the scheduling of iterations of a loop among processors without advance knowledge of inter-iteration dependencies. The method proposed for loop iterations requires that parallelizable preprocessing and postprocessing steps be carried out during program execution.

  20. ANALYSIS OF BIOMECHANICAL PARAMETERS IN COLONIC ANASTOMOSIS

    PubMed Central

    IWANAGA, Tiago Cavalcanti; AGUIAR, José Lamartine de Andrade; MARTINS-FILHO, Euclides Dias; KREIMER, Flávio; SILVA-FILHO, Fernando Luiz; de ALBUQUERQUE, Amanda Vasconcelos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The use of measures in colonic anastomoses to prevent dehiscences is of great medical interest. Sugarcane molasses, which has adequate tolerability and compatibility in vivo, has not yet been tested for this purpose. Aim: To analyze the biomechanical parameters of colonic suture in rats undergoing colectomy, using sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape or gel. Methods: 45 Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were randomized into three groups of 15 animals: irrigation of enteric sutures with 0.9% saline solution; application of sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as tape; and sugarcane molasses polysaccharide as gel. The rats underwent colon ressection, with subsequent reanastomosis using polypropylene suture; they were treated according to their respective groups. Five rats from each group were evaluated at different times after the procedure: 30, 90 and 180 days postoperatively. The following variables were evaluated: maximum rupture force, modulus of elasticity and specific deformation of maximum force. Results: The biomechanical variables among the scheduled times and treatment groups were statistically calculated. The characteristics of maximum rupture force and modulus of elasticity of the specimens remained identical, regardless of treatment with saline, polysaccharide gel or tape, and treatment time. However, it was found that the specific deformation of maximum force of the intestinal wall was higher after 180 days in the group treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel (p=0.09). Conclusion: Compared to control, it was detected greater elasticity of the intestinal wall in mice treated with sugarcane polysaccharide gel, without changing other biomechanical characteristics, regardless of type or time of treatment. PMID:27438033

  1. CT evaluation of the colon: inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Horton, K M; Corl, F M; Fishman, E K

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is valuable for detection and characterization of many inflammatory conditions of the colon. At CT, a dilated, thickened appendix is suggestive of appendicitis. A 1-4-cm, oval, fatty pericolic lesion with surrounding mesenteric inflammation is diagnostic of epiploic appendagitis. The key to distinguishing diverticulitis from other inflammatory conditions of the colon is the presence of diverticula in the involved segment. In typhlitis, CT demonstrates cecal distention and circumferential thickening of the cecal wall, which may have low attenuation secondary to edema. In radiation colitis, the clinical history is the key to suggesting the diagnosis because the CT findings can be nonspecific. The location of the involved segment and the extent and appearance of wall thickening may help distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. In ischemic colitis, CT typically demonstrates circumferential, symmetric wall thickening with fold enlargement. CT findings of graft-versus-host disease include small bowel and colonic wall thickening, which may result in luminal narrowing and separation of bowel loops. In infectious colitis, the site and thickness of colon affected may suggest a specific organism. The amount of wall thickening in pseudomembranous colitis is typically greater than in any other inflammatory disease of the colon except Crohn disease. PMID:10715339

  2. Vasopressin regulation of epithelial colonic proliferation and permeability is mediated by pericryptal platelet-derived growth factor A.

    PubMed

    Miró, Lluïsa; Pérez-Bosque, Anna; Maijó, Mònica; Naftalin, Richard J; Moretó, Miquel

    2014-10-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has trophic effects on the rat distal colon, increasing the growth of pericryptal myofibroblasts and reducing the colonic crypt wall permeability. This study aimed to reproduce in vitro the effects of AVP observed in vivo using cultures of human CCD-18Co myofibroblasts and T84 colonic epithelial cells. Proliferation of myofibroblasts was quantified by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation; the expression of platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFA), platelet-derived growth factor B, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-β and vascular endothelial growth factor was measured by PCR and the expression of epithelial junction proteins by Western blot. Arginine vasopressin stimulated myofibroblast proliferation and the expression of PDGFA without affecting the expression of platelet-derived growth factor B, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-β or vascular endothelial growth factor. These effects were prevented when AVP receptor inhibitors were present in the medium. Pre-incubation of CCD-18Co cells with anti-PDGF antibody or with an inhibitor of the PDGF receptor abolished the effects of AVP. When colonocytes were incubated with medium obtained from myofibroblasts incubated with AVP, both cell proliferation and the expression of epithelial junction proteins increased; however, direct incubation of colonocytes with AVP did not modify these variables. These results demonstrate that AVP stimulates myofibroblast proliferation and induces PDGFA secretion, implying that PDGFA mediates local myofibroblast proliferation by an autocrine feedback loop and regulates epithelial proliferation and permeability by a paracrine mechanism. PMID:25085844

  3. Colon cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Screening for colon cancer; Colonoscopy - screening; Sigmoidoscopy - screening; Virtual colonoscopy - screening; Fecal immunochemical test; Stool DNA test; sDNA test; Colorectal cancer - screening; Rectal ...

  4. Colonic mucosectomy using laser photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.G.; Rypins, E.B.; Watson, L.R.; Nelson, J.S.; Berns, M.W.

    1989-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves photosensitizing tissue and then activating it with monochromatic light, causing necrosis. Precise control of the extent of injury should be possible by varying the energy density of the light applied to the target tissue. We tested the sensitivity of colonic tissue to PDT by injecting 10 mg/kg Photofrin II intraperitoneally in 10 rats. After 24 hr the left colon was opened and cleansed. A 1.0-cm2 area of mucosa was exposed to 630 nm (red) light produced by an argon-pumped dye laser. Pairs of rats were treated with energy densities of either 10, 20, 40, 60, or 80 J/cm2, controlled by varying exposure times. After 48 hr, we sacrificed the rats and fixed, sectioned, and stained the left colons. The depth of injury was measured with an ocular micrometer and expressed as a percentage of normal bowel wall thickness. A curve was fit to the data points by computerized nonlinear regression. The relationship between depth of injury (Y) and energy density (X) was found to fit the equation Y = 1 - aebx, where constants a = 1.15 and b = -0.0353, (R2 = 0.93, P less than 0.001). The relationship between injury and energy density is biphasic, rising rapidly from 0 to 40 J/cm2 and more slowly after this point, suggesting that colonic mucosa is more sensitive to PDT than muscularis, providing a margin of safety against perforation. Bowel perforation did not occur in this study but is predicted by extrapolation for energy densities of 100 J/cm2 or greater. These data indicate that photodynamic colonic mucosectomy is possible.

  5. Resistant starch reduces colonic and urinary p-cresol in rats fed a tyrosine-supplemented diet, whereas konjac mannan does not.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bixiao; Morioka, Sahya; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The effect of resistant starch (RS) and konjac mannan (KM) to maintain and improve the large intestinal environment was compared. Wistar SPF rats were fed the following diets for 4 weeks: negative control diet (C diet), tyrosine-supplemented positive control diet (T diet), and luminacoid supplemented diets containing either high-molecular konjac mannan A (KMAT diet), low-molecular konjac mannan B (KMBT diet), high-amylose cornstarch (HAST diet), or heat-moisture-treated starch (HMTST diet). The luminacoid-fed group had an increased content of short-chain fatty acids in the cecum. HAS caused a significant decrease in p-cresol content in the cecum, whereas KM did not. Urinary p-cresol was reduced in the HAST group compared with the T group, but not the KM fed groups. Deterioration in the large intestinal environment was only improved completely in the HAST and HMTST groups, suggesting that RS is considerably more effective than KM in maintaining the large intestinal environment.

  6. Giant colon diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Chater, C; Saudemont, A; Zerbib, P

    2015-11-01

    Giant colonic diverticulum is defined by a diverticulum whose diameter is greater than 4 cm. This is a rare entity, arising mainly in the sigmoid colon. The diagnosis is based on abdominal computed tomography that shows a gas-filled structure communicating with the adjacent colon, with a smooth, thin diverticular wall that does not enhance after injection of contrast. Surgical treatment is recommended even in asymptomatic diverticula, due to the high prevalence and severity of complications. The gold standard treatment is segmental colectomy. Some authors propose a diverticulectomy when the giant diverticulum is unique.

  7. Transverse colon conduit diversion

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.D.; Buchsbaum, H.J.

    1986-05-01

    The versatility and other advantages of the transverse colon conduit for urinary diversion have been described and implemented in 50 patients. Because most patients considered for this procedure will be at high risk because of a history of significant pelvic irradiation, underlying malignancy, poor renal function, fistula, and so forth, the technical details of surgery and patient selection cannot be minimized. The transverse colon segment is indicated for primary supravesical diversion as well as for salvage of problems related to ileal conduits. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is an unlikely long-term complication of this form of diversion because the fecal stream is absent. Now that the transverse colon conduit has been used for more than 10 years, meaningful comparisons with ileal segments should soon be available.

  8. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  9. Intestinal colonization resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Trevor D; Walker, Alan W

    2013-01-01

    Dense, complex microbial communities, collectively termed the microbiota, occupy a diverse array of niches along the length of the mammalian intestinal tract. During health and in the absence of antibiotic exposure the microbiota can effectively inhibit colonization and overgrowth by invading microbes such as pathogens. This phenomenon is called ‘colonization resistance’ and is associated with a stable and diverse microbiota in tandem with a controlled lack of inflammation, and involves specific interactions between the mucosal immune system and the microbiota. Here we overview the microbial ecology of the healthy mammalian intestinal tract and highlight the microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions that promote colonization resistance. Emerging themes highlight immunological (T helper type 17/regulatory T-cell balance), microbiota (diverse and abundant) and metabolic (short-chain fatty acid) signatures of intestinal health and colonization resistance. Intestinal pathogens use specific virulence factors or exploit antibiotic use to subvert colonization resistance for their own benefit by triggering inflammation to disrupt the harmony of the intestinal ecosystem. A holistic view that incorporates immunological and microbiological facets of the intestinal ecosystem should facilitate the development of immunomodulatory and microbe-modulatory therapies that promote intestinal homeostasis and colonization resistance. PMID:23240815

  10. Sex disparity in colonic adenomagenesis involves promotion by male hormones, not protection by female hormones

    PubMed Central

    Amos-Landgraf, James M.; Heijmans, Jarom; Wielenga, Mattheus C. B.; Dunkin, Elisa; Krentz, Kathy J.; Clipson, Linda; Ederveen, Antwan G.; Groothuis, Patrick G.; Mosselman, Sietse; Muncan, Vanesa; Hommes, Daniel W.; Shedlovsky, Alexandra; Dove, William F.; van den Brink, Gijs R.

    2014-01-01

    It recently has been recognized that men develop colonic adenomas and carcinomas at an earlier age and at a higher rate than women. In the ApcPirc/+ (Pirc) rat model of early colonic cancer, this sex susceptibility was recapitulated, with male Pirc rats developing twice as many adenomas as females. Analysis of large datasets revealed that the ApcMin/+ mouse also shows enhanced male susceptibility to adenomagenesis, but only in the colon. In addition, WT mice treated with injections of the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) showed increased numbers of colonic adenomas in males. The mechanism underlying these observations was investigated by manipulation of hormonal status. The preponderance of colonic adenomas in the Pirc rat model allowed a statistically significant investigation in vivo of the mechanism of sex hormone action on the development of colonic adenomas. Females depleted of endogenous hormones by ovariectomy did not exhibit a change in prevalence of adenomas, nor was any effect observed with replacement of one or a combination of female hormones. In contrast, depletion of male hormones by orchidectomy (castration) markedly protected the Pirc rat from adenoma development, whereas supplementation with testosterone reversed that effect. These observations were recapitulated in the AOM mouse model. Androgen receptor was undetectable in the colon or adenomas, making it likely that testosterone acts indirectly on the tumor lineage. Our findings suggest that indirect tumor-promoting effects of testosterone likely explain the disparity between the sexes in the development of colonic adenomas. PMID:25368192

  11. A study of [D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9]-substance P and [D-Trp7,9]-substance P as tachykinin partial agonists in the rat colon.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, S. J.; Jordan, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Two substance P (SP) analogues, [D-Pro2, D-Phe7, D-Trp9]-SP (DPDPDT) and [D-Trp7,9]-SP (DT79), previously described as tachykinin antagonists, have been shown to contract the rat colon muscularis mucosae preparation. The maximum response exhibited by these analogues was about 30% that of the SP maximum, suggesting that they were acting as partial agonists relative to SP. The responses to DPDPDT were unaffected by pretreatment with mepyramine, methysergide or [Sar1, Ile5, Ala8]-angiotensin II, which abolished the responses to histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and angiotensin II, respectively. Methysergide also did not affect the responses to DT79; the other antagonists were not tested against this analogue. Indomethacin and cimetidine also had no inhibitory effect. Atropine (2 microM) was present in all experiments to prevent indirect muscarinic effects. Phenoxybenzamine did not affect the dose-response curves to SP, eledoisin-related peptide (ERP), kassinin, eledoisin or physalaemin, nor did it affect the responses to individual doses of DPDPDT or DT79. However, in the absence of atropine, it shifted the carbachol dose-response curve markedly to the right, and reduced its maximum. The tachykinin antagonist [D-Pro4, D-Trp7,9,10]-SP4-11 reduced the responses to individual matched doses of DPDPDT, DT79 and SP to the same degree, whilst leaving responses to 5-HT or angiotensin II unaffected. This suggested that DPDPDT and DT79 were acting at the same receptor as SP. The inhibitory effects of DPDPDT on responses to SP, ERP and kassinin, and that of DT79 on responses to SP, were analysed. All four combinations yielded data compatible with an interaction at only one receptor, although DPDPDT appeared slightly more potent at inhibiting responses to kassinin. The results are discussed in the light of the proposed existence of multiple tachykinin receptor subtypes. The possible influence of differential metabolism of tachykinin analogues is also considered. PMID:6203595

  12. Oral 5-fluorouracil colon-specific delivery through in vivo pellet coating for colon cancer and aberrant crypt foci treatment.

    PubMed

    Bose, A; Elyagoby, A; Wong, T W

    2014-07-01

    In situ coating of 5-fluorouracil pellets by ethylcellulose and pectin powder mixture (8:3 weight ratio) in capsule at simulated gastrointestinal media provides colon-specific drug release in vitro. This study probes into pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of intra-capsular pellets coated in vivo in rats with reference to their site-specific drug release outcomes. The pellets were prepared by extrusion-spheronization technique. In vitro drug content, drug release, in vivo pharmacokinetics, local colonic drug content, tumor, aberrant crypt foci, systemic hematology and clinical chemistry profiles of coated and uncoated pellets were examined against unprocessed drug. In vivo pellet coating led to reduced drug bioavailability and enhanced drug accumulation at colon (179.13 μg 5-FU/g rat colon content vs 4.66 μg/g of conventional in vitro film-coated pellets at 15 mg/kg dose). The in vivo coated pellets reduced tumor number and size, through reforming tubular epithelium with basement membrane and restricting expression of cancer from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Unlike uncoated pellets and unprocessed drug, the coated pellets eliminated aberrant crypt foci which represented a putative preneoplastic lesion in colon cancer. They did not inflict additional systemic toxicity. In vivo pellet coating to orally target 5-fluorouracil delivery at cancerous colon is a feasible therapeutic treatment approach.

  13. Prevention of colon cancer by pre- and probiotics: evidence from laboratory studies.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B S

    1998-10-01

    Oligofructose and inulin, selective fermentable chicory fructans, have been shown to stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria which are regarded as beneficial strains in the colon. Studies were designed to evaluate inulin (Raftiline) and oligofructose (Raftilose), for their potential inhibitory properties against aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation in the colon of rats. ACF are putative preneoplastic lesions from which adenomas and carcinomas may develop. The results of this study demonstrate that dietary administration of oligofructose and inulin inhibits the formation of preneoplastic lesions in the colon suggesting the potential colon tumour inhibitory properties of chicory fructans. Since these prebiotics selectively stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria, tumour inhibitory activity of lyophilized cultures of Bifidobacterium longum (BL) against azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats and modulating effect of these cultures on colonic tumour cell proliferation, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity, and ras-p21 oncoprotein expression were investigated. Dietary administration of lyophilized cultures of BL strongly suppressed AOM-induced colon tumour development. Inhibition of colon carcinogenesis was associated with a decrease in colonic mucosal cell proliferation and colonic mucosal and tumour ODC and ras-p21 activities.

  14. Thermal power loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottschlich, Joseph M.; Richter, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The concept of a thermal power loop (TPL) to transport thermal power over relatively large distances is presented as an alternative to heat pipes and their derivatives. The TPL is compared to heat pipes, and capillary pumped loops with respect to size, weight, conservation of thermal potential, start-up, and 1-g testing capability. Test results from a proof of feasibility demonstrator at the NASA JPL are discussed. This analysis demonstrates that the development of specific thermal power loops will result in substantial weight and cost savings for many spacecraft.

  15. Multiprotein DNA Looping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose M. G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2006-06-01

    DNA looping plays a fundamental role in a wide variety of biological processes, providing the backbone for long range interactions on DNA. Here we develop the first model for DNA looping by an arbitrarily large number of proteins and solve it analytically in the case of identical binding. We uncover a switchlike transition between looped and unlooped phases and identify the key parameters that control this transition. Our results establish the basis for the quantitative understanding of fundamental cellular processes like DNA recombination, gene silencing, and telomere maintenance.

  16. Natively Unstructured Loops Differ from Other Loops

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-01-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%–70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein–protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  17. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    PubMed

    Schlessinger, Avner; Liu, Jinfeng; Rost, Burkhard

    2007-07-01

    Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions) differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested that long

  18. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  19. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    Colon cancer risk factors are things that increase the chance that you could get cancer. Some risk factors ... risk factors never get cancer. Other people get colon cancer but do not have any known risk factors. ...

  20. Invariant Connections in Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanusch, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Given a group {G}, and an abelian {C^*}-algebra {A}, the antihomomorphisms {Θ\\colon G→ {Aut}(A)} are in one-to-one with those left actions {Φ\\colon G× {Spec}(A)→ {Spec}(A)} whose translation maps {Φ_g} are continuous; whereby continuities of {Θ} and {Φ} turn out to be equivalent if {A} is unital. In particular, a left action {φ\\colon G × X→ X} can be uniquely extended to the spectrum of a {C^*}-subalgebra {A} of the bounded functions on {X} if {φ_g^*(A)subseteq A} holds for each {gin G}. In the present paper, we apply this to the framework of loop quantum gravity. We show that, on the level of the configuration spaces, quantization and reduction in general do not commute, i.e., that the symmetry-reduced quantum configuration space is (strictly) larger than the quantized configuration space of the reduced classical theory. Here, the quantum-reduced space has the advantage to be completely characterized by a simple algebraic relation, whereby the quantized reduced classical space is usually hard to compute.

  1. Blind loop syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... operations for extreme obesity As a complication of inflammatory bowel disease Diseases such as diabetes or scleroderma may slow down movement in a segment of the intestine, leading to blind loop syndrome.

  2. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  3. Possible mechanisms by which pro- and prebiotics influence colon carcinogenesis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B S

    1999-07-01

    Oligofructose and inulin, selective fermentable chicory fructans, have been shown to stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria, which are regarded as beneficial strains in the colon. Studies were designed to evaluate inulin (Raftiline) and oligofructose (Raftilose) for their potential inhibitory properties against the development of colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rats. ACF are putative preneoplastic lesions from which adenomas and carcinomas may develop in the colon. The results of this study indicate that dietary administration of oligofructose and inulin inhibits the development of ACF in the colon, suggesting the potential colon tumor inhibitory properties of chicory fructans. The degree of ACF inhibition was more pronounced in animals given inulin than in those fed oligofructose. Because these prebiotics selectively stimulate the growth of bifidobacteria, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activities, ras-p21 ontoprotein expressions and tumor inhibitory activity of lyophilized cultures of Bifidobacterium longum against chemically induced colon and mammary carcinogenesis and against colonic tumor cell proliferation were examined. Dietary administration of lyophilized cultures of B. longum strongly suppressed colon and mammary tumor development and tumor burden. Inhibition of colon carcinogenesis was associated with a decrease in colonic mucosal cell proliferation and activities of colonic mucosal and tumor ornithine decarboxylase and ras-p21. Human clinical trials are likely to broaden our insight into the importance of the pre- and probiotics in health and disease.

  4. Choking loops on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying

    2013-08-01

    We present a method for computing "choking" loops--a set of surface loops that describe the narrowing of the volumes inside/outside of the surface and extend the notion of surface homology and homotopy loops. The intuition behind their definition is that a choking loop represents the region where an offset of the original surface would get pinched. Our generalized loops naturally include the usual 2g handles/tunnels computed based on the topology of the genus-g surface, but also include loops that identify chokepoints or bottlenecks, i.e., boundaries of small membranes separating the inside or outside volume of the surface into disconnected regions. Our definition is based on persistent homology theory, which gives a measure to topological structures, thus providing resilience to noise and a well-defined way to determine topological feature size. More precisely, the persistence computed here is based on the lower star filtration of the interior or exterior 3D domain with the distance field to the surface being the associated 3D Morse function. PMID:23744260

  5. Cyanoacrylate application on colonic anastomosis: is it safe or not?

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Gürhan; Demiral, Gökhan; Bayraktar, Barış; Çelik, Yahya; Bölük, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Major complications of colonic anastomosis include fistula, bleeding, and anastomotic stricture, and the most common one is anastomotic leakage. Many organic or inorganic tissue adhesives are being used such as fibrin glue or cyanoacrylate to strengthen or protect colonic anastomosis. Up to now, a great number of studies have been carried out to investigate the effects of these biomaterials. Aim To determine the effect of cyanoacrylate application on anastomosis safety. Material and methods In this experimental study, rats were divided into two groups; a control group and an experimental group. Full-thickness incisions were done on the left colon of the rats, and then end-to-end anastomosis was performed by using 5/0 silk separated sutures. In the experimental group we applied cyanoacrylate over the sutures. The samples were taken on the 7th day. Results In the control group the average tissue hydroxyproline levels and the average bursting pressures were significantly higher than in the experimental group. Conclusions The purpose of all the experimental studies is to prevent and reduce anastomotic complications. Despite all the studies that have been done, colonic anastomosis complications continue to be a problem. As a result, we suggest that cyanoacrylate has a negative effect on the healing process of colonic anastomosis. PMID:27713784

  6. PROMOTION OF TRIHALOMETHANE-INDUCED COLON, ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI (ACF) BY A HIGH FAT DIET

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract:

    Bromodichloromethane (BOCM) and tribromomethane (TBM) enhanced neoplasia in the large intestine of rats when given by corn oil gavage; BOCM in the drinking water to male rats did not induce colon tumors, but did increase liver tumors. However, TBM and a mixture o...

  7. Esophageal Helicobacter pylori colonization aggravates esophageal injury caused by reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yun-Xiang; Wang, Wei-Hong; Dai, Yun; Teng, Gui-Gen; Wang, Shu-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate esophageal Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization on esophageal injury caused by reflux and the related mechanisms. METHODS: An esophagitis model, with acid and bile reflux, was surgically produced in male rats. The rats were randomly divided into either: (1) an esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis (EGDA) group; (2) an EGDA with H. pylori infection group; (3) a pseudo-operation with H. pylori infection group; or (4) a pseudo-operation group. All rats were kept for 36 wk. Based on the location of H. pylori colonization, the EGDA rats with H. pylori infection were subdivided into those with concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization or those with only gastric H. pylori colonization. The esophageal injuries were evaluated grossly and microscopically. The expressions of CDX2 and MUC2 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of cyclin D1, c-Myc, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by RT-PCR. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method. RESULTS: Esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) developed in rats that underwent EGDA. When comparing rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization to EGDA-only rats, the severity of injury (87.9 ± 5.2 vs 77.2 ± 8.6, macroscopically, 92.5 ± 8.0 vs 83.8 ± 5.5, microscopically, both P < 0.05) and the incidences of BE (80.0% vs 33.3%, P = 0.055) and EAC (60.0% vs 11.1%, P < 0.05) were increased. These increases were associated with upregulation of CDX2 and MUC2 mRNA (10.1 ± 5.4 vs 3.0 ± 2.9, 8.4 ± 4.6 vs 2.0 ± 3.2, respectively, Ps < 0.01) and protein (8.1 ± 2.3 vs 3.3 ± 3.1, 7.3 ± 4.0 vs 1.8 ± 2.7, respectively, all P < 0.05). The expression of Ki-67 (8.9 ± 0.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) and the presence of apoptotic cells (8.3 ± 1.1 vs 5.3 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) were also increased

  8. Trefoil factor-3 expression in human colon cancer liver metastasis.

    PubMed

    Babyatsky, Mark; Lin, Jing; Yio, Xianyang; Chen, Anli; Zhang, Jie-yu; Zheng, Yan; Twyman, Christina; Bao, Xiuliang; Schwartz, Myron; Thung, Swan; Lawrence Werther, J; Itzkowitz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from colorectal cancer are often due to liver metastasis. Trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) is expressed by normal intestinal epithelial cells and its expression is maintained throughout the colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Our previous work demonstrated a correlation between TFF3 expression and metastatic potential in an animal model of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether TFF3 is expressed in human colon cancer liver metastasis (CCLM) and whether inhibiting TFF3 expression in colon cancer cells would alter their invasive potential in vitro. Human CCLMs were analyzed at the mRNA and protein level for TFF3 expression. Two highly metastatic rat colon cancer cell lines that either natively express TFF3 (LN cells) or were transfected with TFF3 (LPCRI-2 cells), were treated with two rat TFF3 siRNA constructs (si78 and si365), and analyzed in an in vitro invasion assay. At the mRNA and protein level, TFF3 was expressed in 17/17 (100%) CCLMs and 10/11 (91%) primary colon cancers, but not in normal liver tissue. By real time PCR, TFF3 expression was markedly inhibited by both siRNA constructs in LN and LPCRI-2 cells. The si365 and si78 constructs inhibited invasion by 44% and 53%, respectively, in LN cells, and by 74% and 50%, respectively, in LPCRI-2 cells. These results provide further evidence that TFF3 contributes to the malignant behavior of colon cancer cells. These observations may have relevance for designing new diagnostic and treatment approaches to colorectal cancer.

  9. INDUCTION OF TRANSTITIONAL CELL HYPERPLASIA IN THE URINARY BLADDER AND ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLON OF RATS TREATED WITH INDIVIDUAL AND A MIXTURE OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Cancer of the urinary bladder and colon are significant human health concerns. Epidemiological studies have suggested a correlation between these cancers and the chronic consumption of drinking water containing disinfection by-products (DBPs). The present study...

  10. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization.

    PubMed

    Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo; Krueger, Andreas

    2015-09-21

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7(-/-)CCR9(-/-) (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160-200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization. PMID:26347471

  11. Colonic atresia in cattle: A prospective study of 43 cases

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Norm G.; Arighi, Mimi; Horney, F. Don; Barker, Ian K.; Livesey, Michael A.; Hurtig, Mark H.; Johnson, Roger P.

    1988-01-01

    This prospective study was initiated to document the success rate obtained in the treatment of colonic atresia in calves, identify factors that influence survival rate, and to report the histopathological appearance of the proximal blind end of the ascending colon. Forty-three calves with intestinal obstruction due to colonic atresia were admitted to the Ontario Veterinary College between September 1982 and May 1986. Parameters recorded prospectively in this study included age, breed, sex, history, vital signs, acid-base and electrolyte status, location of intestinal atresia, medical and surgical management, and outcome. The typical history and clinical signs included failure to pass meconium or feces, decreased appetite, and progressive depression and abdominal distension. The most common site of colonic atresia was the midportion of the spiral loop of the ascending colon (n = 25). Of the 43 calves, three (7%) were euthanized at surgery, 21 (49%) died in the hospital, and 19 (44%) survived and were discharged from the hospital. Four of the surviving calves died subsequent to discharge giving an overall long-term (mean 15.9 months) survival rate of 35%. No significant risk factors were identified, although experienced surgeons showed a trend towards increased survival rate. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17423141

  12. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization

    PubMed Central

    Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7−/−CCR9−/− (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160–200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization. PMID:26347471

  13. Multicongenic fate mapping quantification of dynamics of thymus colonization.

    PubMed

    Ziętara, Natalia; Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Puchałka, Jacek; Witzlau, Katrin; Reinhardt, Annika; Förster, Reinhold; Pabst, Oliver; Prinz, Immo; Krueger, Andreas

    2015-09-21

    Postnatal T cell development depends on continuous colonization of the thymus by BM-derived T lineage progenitors. Both quantitative parameters and the mechanisms of thymus seeding remain poorly understood. Here, we determined the number of dedicated thymus-seeding progenitor niches (TSPNs) capable of supporting productive T cell development, turnover rates of niche occupancy, and feedback mechanisms. To this end, we established multicongenic fate mapping combined with mathematical modeling to quantitate individual events of thymus colonization. We applied this method to study thymus colonization in CCR7(-/-)CCR9(-/-) (DKO) mice, whose TSPNs are largely unoccupied. We showed that ∼160-200 TSPNs are present in the adult thymus and, on average, 10 of these TSPNs were open for recolonization at steady state. Preconditioning of wild-type mice revealed a similar number of TSPNs, indicating that preconditioning can generate space efficiently for transplanted T cell progenitors. To identify potential cellular feedback loops restricting thymus colonization, we performed serial transfer experiments. These experiments indicated that thymus seeding was directly restricted by the duration of niche occupancy rather than long-range effects, thus challenging current paradigms of thymus colonization.

  14. The Anderson Current Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F.

    1994-01-01

    Four-wire-probe concept applied to electrical-resistance transducers. Anderson current loop is excitation-and-signal-conditioning circuit suitable for use with strain gauges, resistance thermometers, and other electrical-resistance transducers mounted in harsh environments. Used as alternative to Wheatstone bridge. Simplifies signal-conditioning problem, enabling precise measurement of small changes in resistance of transducer. Eliminates some uncertainties in Wheatstone-bridge resistance-change measurements in flight research. Current loop configuration makes effects of lead-wire and contact resistances insignificantly small. Also provides output voltage that varies linearly with change in gauge resistance, and does so at double sensitivity of Wheatstone bridge.

  15. Wilson-loop instantons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Holman, Richard; Kolb, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    Wilson-loop symmetry breaking is considered on a space-time of the form M4 x K, where M4 is a four-dimensional space-time and K is an internal space with nontrivial and finite fundamental group. It is shown in a simple model that the different vacua obtained by breaking a non-Abelian gauge group by Wilson loops are separated in the space of gauge potentials by a finite energy barrier. An interpolating gauge configuration is then constructed between these vacua and shown to have minimum energy. Finally some implications of this construction are discussed.

  16. Loop quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Dah-Wei

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an "in-a-nutshell" yet self-contained introductory review on loop quantum gravity (LQG) — a background-independent, nonperturbative approach to a consistent quantum theory of gravity. Instead of rigorous and systematic derivations, it aims to provide a general picture of LQG, placing emphasis on the fundamental ideas and their significance. The canonical formulation of LQG, as the central topic of the paper, is presented in a logically orderly fashion with moderate details, while the spin foam theory, black hole thermodynamics, and loop quantum cosmology are covered briefly. Current directions and open issues are also summarized.

  17. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizationsmore » and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.« less

  18. Livermore Compiler Analysis Loop Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R. D.

    2013-03-01

    LCALS is designed to evaluate compiler optimizations and performance of a variety of loop kernels and loop traversal software constructs. Some of the loop kernels are pulled directly from "Livermore Loops Coded in C", developed at LLNL (see item 11 below for details of earlier code versions). The older suites were used to evaluate floating-point performances of hardware platforms prior to porting larger application codes. The LCALS suite is geared toward assissing C++ compiler optimizations and platform performance related to SIMD vectorization, OpenMP threading, and advanced C++ language features. LCALS contains 20 of 24 loop kernels from the older Livermore Loop suites, plus various others representative of loops found in current production appkication codes at LLNL. The latter loops emphasize more diverse loop constructs and data access patterns than the others, such as multi-dimensional difference stencils. The loops are included in a configurable framework, which allows control of compilation, loop sampling for execution timing, which loops are run and their lengths. It generates timing statistics for analysis and comparing variants of individual loops. Also, it is easy to add loops to the suite as desired.

  19. Closing the Loop Sampler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento.

    Closing the Loop (CTL) is a science curriculum designed to introduce students to integrated waste management through awareness. This document presents five lesson plans focusing on developing an understanding of natural resources, solid wastes, conservation, and the life of landfills. Contents include: (1) "What Are Natural Resources?"; (2)…

  20. Loop Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piguet, O.

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give a short general introduction to Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG), beginning with some motivations for quantizing General Relativity, listing various attempts and then focusing on the case of LQG. Work supported in part by the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq (Brazil).

  1. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  2. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  3. A Looping Journey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Janet

    1999-01-01

    Recounts a teacher's experiences staying with the same group of children for more than one year (looping) as they progress through kindergarten and first grade. Discusses advantages of more stability and less trauma for the child, and more instructional time and less stress for the teacher. Addresses possible disadvantages of children having…

  4. Fungal infection of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Praneenararat, Surat

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are pathogens that commonly infect immunocompromised patients and can affect any organs of the body, including the colon. However, the literature provides limited details on colonic infections caused by fungi. This article is an intensive review of information available on the fungi that can cause colon infections. It uses a comparative style so that its conclusions may be accessible for clinical application. PMID:25364269

  5. COLD TEST LOOP INTEGRATED TEST LOOP RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, TJ

    2003-10-22

    A testing facility (Cold Test Loop) was constructed and operated to demonstrate the efficacy of the Accelerated Waste Retrieval (AWR) Project's planned sluicing approach to the remediation of Silos 1 and 2 at the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, Ohio. The two silos contain almost 10,000 tons of radium-bearing low-level waste, which consists primarily of solids of raffinates from processing performed on ores from the Democratic Republic of Congo (commonly referred to as ''Belgium Congo ores'') for the recovery of uranium. These silos are 80 ft in diameter, 36 ft high to the center of the dome, and 26.75 ft to the top of the vertical side walls. The test facility contained two test systems, each designed for a specific purpose. The first system, the Integrated Test Loop (ITL), a near-full-scale plant including the actual equipment to be installed at the Fernald Site, was designed to demonstrate the sluicing operation and confirm the selection of a slurry pump, the optimal sluicing nozzle operation, and the preliminary design material balance. The second system, the Component Test Loop (CTL), was designed to evaluate many of the key individual components of the waste retrieval system over an extended run. The major results of the initial testing performed during July and August 2002 confirmed that the AWR approach to sluicing was feasible. The ITL testing confirmed the following: (1) The selected slurry pump (Hazleton 3-20 type SHW) performed well and is suitable for AWR application. However, the pump's motor should be upgraded to a 200-hp model and be driven by a 150-hp variable-frequency drive (VFD). A 200-hp VFD is not much more expensive and would allow the pump to operate at full speed. (2) The best nozzle performance was achieved by using 15/16-in. nozzles operated alternately. This configuration appeared to most effectively mine the surrogate. (3) The Solartron densitometer, which was tested as an alternative mass flow measurement

  6. Pathways to Colonization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smitherman, David V., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The steps required for space colonization are many to grow from our current 3-person International Space Station, now under construction, to an infrastructure that can support hundreds and eventually thousands of people in space. This paper will summarize the author's findings from numerous studies and workshops on related subjects and identify some of the critical next steps toward space colonization. Findings will be drawn from the author s previous work on space colony design, space infrastructure workshops, and various studies that addressed space policy. In conclusion, this paper will note that significant progress has been made on space facility construction through the International Space Station program, and that significant efforts are needed in the development of new reusable Earth to Orbit transportation systems. The next key steps will include reusable in space transportation systems supported by in space propellant depots, the continued development of inflatable habitat and space elevator technologies, and the resolution of policy issues that will establish a future vision for space development.

  7. [Colonic histiocytosis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Remmele, W; Endris, R

    1977-02-01

    Macrophages accumulating various substances can be detected in the mucosa of the small and large bowel under physiological and various pathological conditions. Among these the so-called PAS-positive macrophages have attracted much attention in recent times. Abundant occurrence of such cells in the intestinal mucosa has been termed "colonic histiocytosis". The occurrence of PAS-positive macrophages was investigated in 200 unselected and otherwise normal biopsy specimens of rectal mucosa; no correlation was found between the occurrence of these cells on the one hand and any intestinal or extraintestinal disease on the other. PAS-positive macrophages were mostly found close to the surface of the mucosa or to the cryptal epithelium as well as between the crypts. It is suggested to abandon the term "colonic histiocytosis" since it induces a false impression of a disease entity in the clinician (and may be related falsely e.g. to "histiocytosis X", and since the clinician may tend to attribute unnecessary importance to this harmless finding.

  8. Inter-relationships between inflammatory mediators released from colonic mucosa in ulcerative colitis and their effects on colonic secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, T D; Hall, L; Turnberg, L A

    1993-01-01

    Metabolites of arachidonic acid have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis-they can stimulate intestinal secretion, increase mucosal blood flow, and influence smooth muscle activity. The influence on the mucosal transport function of culture medium in which colonic mucosal biopsy specimens had been incubated was investigated using rat stripped distal colonic mucosa in vitro as the assay system. Colonic tissue from patients with colitis and from control subjects was cultured. Medium from inflamed tissue contained more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) and evoked a greater electrical (secretory) response in rat colonic mucosa than control tissue medium. In inflamed tissue, cyclo-oxygenase inhibition (indomethacin) attenuated PGE2 but increased LTD4 production; conversely lipoxygenase inhibition (ICI 207968) inhibited LTD4 production but enhanced PGE2 output. Each inhibitor alone enhanced the electrical response in the rat colon. Inhibition of both enzymes (indomethacin plus ICI 207968) caused a fall in both PGE2 (82%) and LTD4 (89%) production and in the electrical response (57%). Inflamed tissue treated with a phospholipase A2 inhibitor (mepacrine) produced less PGE2, LTD4, and electrical responses when compared with inflamed tissue, either untreated (91%, 92%, and 79% respectively) or treated with cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibition. Incubation with bradykinin stimulated eicosanoid release and electrical response, while a bradykinin antagonist caused a modest inhibition. Analysis of these observations suggests that a combination of arachidonic acid derivatives accounts for about half the secretory response. Other products of phospholipase A2 activity are probably responsible for much of the remainder, leaving up to 20% the result of types of mediator not determined in this study. PMID:8491398

  9. Inner mappings of Bruck loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, Alexander

    1998-01-01

    K-loops have their origin in the theory of sharply 2-transitive groups. In this paper a proof is given that K-loops and Bruck loops are the same. For the proof it is necessary to show that in a (left) Bruck loop the left inner mappings L(b)L(a) L(ab)[minus sign]1 are automorphisms. This paper generalizes results of Glauberman [3], Kist [8] and Kreuzer [9].

  10. Loop Heat Pipes and Capillary Pumped Loops: An Applications Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan; Ku, Jentung; Swanson, Theodore; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLS) and loop heat pipes (LHPS) are versatile two-phase heat transfer devices which have recently gained increasing acceptance in space applications. Both systems work based on the same principles and have very similar designs. Nevertheless, some differences exist in the construction of the evaporator and the hydro-accumulator, and these differences lead to very distinct operating characteristics for each loop. This paper presents comparisons of the two loops from an applications perspective, and addresses their impact on spacecraft design, integration, and test. Some technical challenges and issues for both loops are also addressed.

  11. Closed-loop anesthesia.

    PubMed

    LE Guen, Morgan; Liu, Ngai; Chazot, Thierry; Fischler, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Automated anesthesia which may offer to the physician time to control hemodynamic and to supervise neurological outcome and which may offer to the patient safety and quality was until recently consider as a holy grail. But this field of research is now increasing in every component of general anesthesia (hypnosis, nociception, neuromuscular blockade) and literature describes some successful algorithms - single or multi closed-loop controller. The aim of these devices is to control a predefined target and to continuously titrate anesthetics whatever the patients' co morbidities and surgical events to reach this target. Literature contains many randomized trials comparing manual and automated anesthesia and shows feasibility and safety of this system. Automation could quickly concern other aspects of anesthesia as fluid management and this review proposes an overview of closed-loop systems in anesthesia.

  12. Determinants of RNA hairpin loop-loop complex stability.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, R S; Crothers, D M

    1995-05-19

    Complexes formed by RNA hairpin loops with complementary loop sequences derived from Escherichia coli RNA I and RNA II, which are involved in the control of DNA replication of plasmid ColE1, have been analyzed to determine the sequence and structural elements required to achieve full affinity. Of particular interest is the origin of the enhanced stability of the complex formed by hairpin loops whose loop sequences have been inverted 5' to 3' with respect to wild-type sequences. Full complementarity of the two interacting loops is required to achieve full or enhanced affinity, while the stems of the two hairpins can differ. The major determinant of enhanced affinity lies in the base-pairs formed at positions 1 and 7 of the loops, together with the two base-pairs of each stem which are closest to the loop. Sequence variation in the middle of the loops, or further down the stem away from the loops, exerts only a modest influence on complex stability. We incorporate these results into a model for the loop-loop interaction which accounts for the importance of positions one and seven and the first two nucleotides of the stem, while providing potentially unique structures for recognition by the RNA one modulator protein. PMID:7539081

  13. Determinants of RNA hairpin loop-loop complex stability.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, R S; Crothers, D M

    1995-05-19

    Complexes formed by RNA hairpin loops with complementary loop sequences derived from Escherichia coli RNA I and RNA II, which are involved in the control of DNA replication of plasmid ColE1, have been analyzed to determine the sequence and structural elements required to achieve full affinity. Of particular interest is the origin of the enhanced stability of the complex formed by hairpin loops whose loop sequences have been inverted 5' to 3' with respect to wild-type sequences. Full complementarity of the two interacting loops is required to achieve full or enhanced affinity, while the stems of the two hairpins can differ. The major determinant of enhanced affinity lies in the base-pairs formed at positions 1 and 7 of the loops, together with the two base-pairs of each stem which are closest to the loop. Sequence variation in the middle of the loops, or further down the stem away from the loops, exerts only a modest influence on complex stability. We incorporate these results into a model for the loop-loop interaction which accounts for the importance of positions one and seven and the first two nucleotides of the stem, while providing potentially unique structures for recognition by the RNA one modulator protein.

  14. Anatomically correct deformable colon phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, James A.; Barton, Michael D.; Davis, Brynmor J.; Bieszczad, Jerry; Meunier, Norm L.; Brown, Nathan W.; Kynor, David B.

    2011-03-01

    We describe a technique to build a soft-walled colon phantom that provides realistic lumen anatomy in computed tomography (CT) images. The technique begins with the geometry of a human colon measured during CT colonography (CTC). The three-dimensional air-filled colonic lumen is segmented and then replicated using stereolithography (SLA). The rigid SLA model includes large-scale features (e.g., haustral folds and tenia coli bands) down to small-scale features (e.g., a small pedunculated polyp). Since the rigid model represents the internal air-filled volume, a highly-pliable silicone polymer is painted onto the rigid model. This thin layer of silicone, when removed, becomes the colon wall. Small 3 mm diameter glass beads are affixed to the outer wall. These glass beads show up with high intensity in CT scans and provide a ground truth for evaluating performance of algorithms designed to register prone and supine CTC data sets. After curing, the silicone colon wall is peeled off the rigid model. The resulting colon phantom is filled with air and submerged in a water bath. CT images and intraluminal fly-through reconstructions from CTC scans of the colon phantom are compared against patient data to demonstrate the ability of the phantom to simulate a human colon.

  15. Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

    2009-03-31

    One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

  16. Altered motility and duration of bacterial overgrowth in experimental blind loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Justus, P G; Mcherron, L E; Ward, T T

    1984-07-01

    To better understand the pathogenesis of the increased motility previously described in the blind loop rat, we studied the relationship between duration of bacterial overgrowth and both myoelectric activity and bacterial flora in this model. Myoelectric studies and quantitative bacterial cultures were performed on self-filling and self-emptying (control) blind loop rats one, two, and three weeks postoperatively. All self-filling blind loop rats had greater random action potential activity and higher frequencies of migrating action potential complexes than controls (P less than 0.05). One-week self-filling blind loop rats had a higher frequency of migrating action potential complexes (P less than 0.05) and a higher ratio of counts of Escherichia coli to Bacteroides species (P less than 0.05) than the two- or three-week self-filling blind loop groups. Thus, qualitative changes in myoelectric activity occur during the development of bacterial overgrowth in the blind loop rat which may reflect evolving alterations in the bacterial flora.

  17. Heterogenic colonization patterns by Leptospira interrogans in Rattus norvegicus from urban slums

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Ana Amélia Nunes; Figueira, Cláudio Pereira; dos Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Costa, Federico; Ristow, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the renal colonization by Leptospira interrogans in Rattus norvegicus (rats), as it is the major natural reservoir of urban leptospirosis. We caught 72 R. norvegicus, out of which 32 were found to be positive for L. interrogans by immunofluorescence assay. From these rats, we selected 17 and divided them into six groups based on the mass-age/sex. We performed the immunohistochemistry test against L. interrogans in the kidney sections of the rats and systematically counted the colonized tubules (CTs) in 20 fields. The proportion of positive fields varied from 5% to 95%. The number of CTs in 20 fields varied from 0.5 to 85.5. These differences were not related to age or sex of the animals. The characterization of leptospiral colonization patterns in the natural reservoirs is important to better understand the host-pathogen interactions in leptospirosis. PMID:26691476

  18. Heterogenic colonization patterns by Leptospira interrogans in Rattus norvegicus from urban slums.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ana Amélia Nunes; Figueira, Cláudio Pereira; dos Reis, Mitermayer Galvão; Costa, Federico; Ristow, Paula

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the renal colonization by Leptospira interrogans in Rattus norvegicus (rats), as it is the major natural reservoir of urban leptospirosis. We caught 72 R. norvegicus, out of which 32 were found to be positive for L. interrogans by immunofluorescence assay. From these rats, we selected 17 and divided them into six groups based on the mass-age/sex. We performed the immunohistochemistry test against L. interrogans in the kidney sections of the rats and systematically counted the colonized tubules (CTs) in 20 fields. The proportion of positive fields varied from 5% to 95%. The number of CTs in 20 fields varied from 0.5 to 85.5. These differences were not related to age or sex of the animals. The characterization of leptospiral colonization patterns in the natural reservoirs is important to better understand the host-pathogen interactions in leptospirosis. PMID:26691476

  19. Effect of poly-L-arginine on intestinal absorption of hydrophilic macromolecules in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Tsutomu; Uchida, Masaki; Kuwahara, Yusuke; Shimazaki, Yohei; Ohtake, Kazuo; Kimura, Mitsutoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Jun; Ogihara, Masahiko; Morimoto, Yasunori; Natsume, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    We have already reported that poly-L-arginine (PLA) remarkably enhanced the in vivo nasal absorption of hydrophilic macromolecules without producing any significant epithelial damage in rats. In the present study, we examined whether PLA could enhance the absorption of a model hydrophilic macromolecule, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD-4), across the intestinal mucosa, as well as the nasal mucosa, by an in situ closed-loop method using the rat intestine. PLA was found to enhance the intestinal absorption of FD-4 in a concentration-dependent manner within the concentrations investigated in this study, but segment-specific differences were found to be associated with this effect (ileum>jejunum>duodenum≧colon). The factors responsible for the segment-specific differences were also investigated by intestinal absorption studies using aprotinin, a trypsin inhibitor, and an analysis of the expression of occludin, a tight junction protein. In the small intestine, the differences in the effect of PLA on the absorption of FD-4 may be related to the enzymatic degradation of PLA. In the colon, the reduced effect of PLA on the absorption of FD-4 may be related to the smaller surface area for absorption and the higher expression of occludin compared with other segments.

  20. Seizure Suppression Efficacy of Closed-Loop Versus Open-Loop Deep Brain Stimulation in a Rodent Model of Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Salam, M Tariqus; Perez Velazquez, Jose Luis; Genov, Roman

    2016-06-01

    We assess and compare the effects of both closed-loop and open-loop neurostimulation of the rat hippocampus by means of a custom low-power programmable therapeutic neurostimulation device on the suppression of spontaneous seizures in a rodent model of epilepsy. Chronic seizures were induced by intraperitoneal kainic acid injection. Two bipolar electrodes were implanted into the CA1 regions of both hippocampi. The electrodes were connected to the custom-built programmable therapeutic neurostimulation device that can trigger an electrical stimulation either in a periodic manner or upon detection of the intracerebral electroencephalographic (icEEE) seizure onset. This device includes a microchip consisting of a 256-channel icEEG recording system and a 64-channel stimulator, and a programmable seizure detector implemented in a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). The neurostimulator was used to evaluate seizure suppression efficacy in ten epileptic rats for a total of 240 subject-days (5760 subject-hours). For this purpose, all rats were randomly divided into two groups: the no-stimulation group and the stimulation group. The no-stimulation group did not receive stimulation. The stimulation group received, first, closed-loop stimulation and, next, open-loop stimulation. The no-stimulation and stimulation groups had a similar seizure frequency baseline, averaging five seizures per day. Closed-loop stimulation reduced seizure frequency by 90% and open-loop stimulation reduced seizure frequency by 17%, both in the stimulation group as compared to the no-stimulation group. PMID:26571534

  1. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  2. Colonic Interposition between the Liver and Diaphragm: "The Chilaiditi Sign".

    PubMed

    Nair, Nita; Takieddine, Zeina; Tariq, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    A 90-year-old wheelchair bound male was brought to the emergency department with complaints of worsening abdominal pain over the last 2-3 days. The patient also had difficulty in passing urine. Abdominal examination revealed tenderness in the umbilical and hypogastric area without rebound tenderness or guarding. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed a loop of colon interpositioned between the liver and the right hemidiaphragm (the Chilaiditi sign), mimicking free air. Foley's catheter was placed and the patient was managed conservatively. The patient clinically improved with improvement of the abdominal pain. PMID:27446829

  3. Closing the loop.

    PubMed

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2011-02-01

    Closed-loop algorithms can be found in every aspect of everyday modern life. Automation and control are used constantly to provide safety and to improve quality of life. Closed-loop systems and algorithms can be found in home appliances, automobiles, aviation and more. Can one imagine nowadays driving a car without ABS, cruise control or even anti-sliding control? Similar principles of automation and control can be used in the management of diabetes mellitus (DM). The idea of an algorithmic/technological way to control glycaemia is not new and has been researched for more than four decades. However, recent improvements in both glucose-sensing technology and insulin delivery together with advanced control and systems engineering made this dream of an artificial pancreas possible. The artificial pancreas may be the next big step in the treatment of DM since the use of insulin analogues. An artificial pancreas can be described as internal or external devices that use continuous glucose measurements to automatically manage exogenous insulin delivery with or without other hormones in an attempt to restore glucose regulation in individuals with DM using a control algorithm. This device as described can be internal or external; can use different types of control algorithms with bi-hormonal or uni-hormonal design; and can utilise different ways to administer them. The different designs and implementations have transitioned recently from in silico simulations to clinical evaluation stage with practical applications in mind. This may mark the beginning of a new era in diabetes management with the introduction of semi-closed-loop systems that can prevent or minimise nocturnal hypoglycaemia, to hybrid systems that will manage blood glucose (BG) levels with minimal user intervention to finally fully automated systems that will take the user out of the loop. More and more clinical trials will be needed for the artificial pancreas to become a reality but initial encouraging

  4. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease.

  5. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan; Eliakim, Rami

    2016-08-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE-the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  6. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  7. Glycoprotein degradation in the blind loop syndrome: identification of glycosidases in jejunal contents.

    PubMed

    Prizont, R

    1981-02-01

    Contents obtained from jejunum of normal controls, self-emptying and self-filling blind loop rats were analyzed for the presence of glycoprotein-degrading glycosidases. The blind loop syndrome was documented by the increased fat excretion and slower growth rate of self-filling blind loop rats 6 wk after surgery. With p-nitrophenylglycosides as substrate, the specific activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, a potential blood group A destroying glycosidase, was 0.90+/-0.40 mU/mg of protein. This level was 23-fold higher than the specific activity of normal controls. In partially purified self-filling blind loop contents, the activity of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase was 9- to 70-fold higher than activities of self-emptying and normal controls. Antibiotic treatment with chloromycetin and polymyxin decreased 24-fold the glycosidase levels in self-filling blind loops. In experiments with natural substrate, the blood group A titer of a20,000g supernate from normal jejunal homogenates decreased 128-fold after 24-h incubation with blind loop contents. Normal contents failed to diminish the blood group reactivity of the natural substrate. Furthermore, blind loop contents markedly decreased the blood group A titer of isolated brush borders. Incubation between blind loop bacteria and mucosal homogenates or isolated brush borders labeled with d-[U-(14)C]glucosamine revealed increased production of labeled ether extractable organic acids. Likewise, intraperitoneal injection of d-[U-(14)C]glucosamine into self-filling blind loop rats resulted in incorporation of the label into luminal short chain fatty acids. These results suggest that glycosidases may provide a mechanism by which blind loop bacteria obtain sugars from intestinal glycoproteins. The released sugars are used and converted by bacteria into energy and organic acids. This use of the host's glycoproteins would allow blind loop bacteria to grow and survive within the lumen independent of exogenous sources.

  8. Protein digestion and absorption in the blind loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Curtis, K J; Prizont, R; Kim, Y S

    1979-12-01

    Protein digestion and absorption was studied in rats with 6-week-old surgically constructed self-filling intestinal blind loops and steatorrhea, ie, blind-loop animals and controls were fed a 14C-labeled protein meal containing a nonabsorbable marker, 51CrCl3, and sacrificed 1 or 2 hr later. Intestinal contents were analyzed for 14C, 51Cr, protein, trypsin, and the products of digestion. At 1 hr, 14C absorption was greater in controls, but at 2 hr there was no difference in absorption between the two groups. Marker studies showed that blind-loop filling resulted in a delay of the progression of intestinal contents distally. Intraluminal trypsin and porteolysis were similar in the two groups. Endogenous protein was greater in the blind-loop animals. The early stages of the blind-loop syndrome may be characterized by delayed protein absorption secondary to blind-loop filling, which is compensated for by the distal gut resulting in an absence of overall protein malabsorption.

  9. Two loop divergences studied with one loop constrained differential renormalization

    SciTech Connect

    Seijas, Cesar . E-mail: cesar@fpaxp1.usc.es

    2007-08-15

    In the context of differential renormalization, using constrained differential renormalization rules at one-loop, we show how to obtain concrete results in two-loop calculations without making use of Ward identities. In order to do that, we obtain a list of integrals with overlapping divergences compatible with CDR that can be applied to various two-loop background field calculations. As an example, we obtain the two-loop coefficient of the beta function of QED, SuperQED and Yang-Mills theory.

  10. Urinary pH and urea concentration correlate to the bacterial colonization rate in gastric, colonic, ileal and myoperitoneal bladder augmentation.

    PubMed

    Lauvetz, R W; Monda, J M; Kramer, S A; Husmann, D A

    1995-08-01

    We investigated how various types of augmentation cystoplasty alter the native bacteriostatic properties of urine, particularly urinary urea and pH, in the Sprague-Dawley rat. The augmentation cystoplasties studied included 1 cm.2 and 2 cm.2 patches of colon, ileum and stomach as well as myoperitoneal bladder flaps. Augmentations in order of decreasing incidence of bacteriuria and urinary pH are 2 cm.2 ileal greater than 1 cm.2 ileal greater than 2 cm.2 colonic greater than 1 cm.2 colonic greater than myoperitoneal greater than cystotomy alone greater than 1 cm.2 gastric greater than 2 cm.2 gastric. Urinary urea concentrations were similar between cystotomy alone, and myoperitoneal and gastric augments. In contrast, all colonic and ileal augments had significantly lower urea concentrations compared to the aforementioned groups. Our findings suggest that the type and size of augmentation directly affect urinary pH and urea nitrogen concentration, and the incidence of bacteriuria.

  11. Accelerating the loop expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-07-29

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi/sup 4/ theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs.

  12. Ekpyrotic loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2013-08-01

    We consider the ekpyrotic paradigm in the context of loop quantum cosmology. In loop quantum cosmology the classical big-bang singularity is resolved due to quantum gravity effects, and so the contracting ekpyrotic branch of the universe and its later expanding phase are connected by a smooth bounce. Thus, it is possible to explicitly determine the evolution of scalar perturbations, from the contracting ekpyrotic phase through the bounce and to the post-bounce expanding epoch. The possibilities of having either one or two scalar fields have been suggested for the ekpyrotic universe, and both cases will be considered here. In the case of a single scalar field, the constant mode of the curvature perturbations after the bounce is found to have a blue spectrum. On the other hand, for the two scalar field ekpyrotic model where scale-invariant entropy perturbations source additional terms in the curvature perturbations, the power spectrum in the post-bounce expanding cosmology is shown to be nearly scale-invariant and so agrees with observations.

  13. High temperature storage loop :

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  14. [Blind loop syndrome].

    PubMed

    Halkic, N; Abdelmoumene, A; Kianmanesh, R; Vuilleumier, H

    2002-01-01

    Malabsorption can raise from several causes, including post surgical conditions. Noticeably, ileo-ileal anastomosis can lead to bacterial stagnation in the caecum, with recirculation of the intestinal content, and intestinal spreading of the colonic flora. We review here nine cases who were operated on in our department in the last 20 years. In five patients the syndrome appeared after an intestinal resection due to a postsurgical intestinal infarction due to adhesions. In four patients it appeared after an ileo-transverse derivation motivated by post-surgical occlusion. We conclude that any type of malabsorption appearing after abdominal surgery, even remotely from the surgical procedure should suggest this uncommon diagnosis. Surgical treatment, i.e. replacement of the intestinal anastomosis with a new termino-terminal anastomosis, is necessary and sufficient.

  15. Colonic Fermentation of Unavailable Carbohydrates from Unripe Banana and its Influence over Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Dan, Milana C T; Cardenette, Giselli H L; Sardá, Fabiana A H; Giuntini, Eliana Bistriche; Bello-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Carpinelli, Ângelo R; Lajolo, Franco M; Menezes, Elizabete Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the colonic fermentation of unavailable carbohydrates from unripe banana (mass - UBM - and starch - UBS) over parameters related to glucose and insulin response in rats. Wistar male rats were fed either a control diet, a UBM diet (5 % resistant starch - RS) or a UBS diet (10 % RS) for 28 days. In vivo (oral glucose tolerance test) and in vitro (cecum fecal fermentation, pancreatic islet insulin secretion) analyses were performed. The consumption of UBM and UBS diets by Wistar rats for 28 days improved insulin/glucose ratio. Also, pancreatic islets isolated from the test groups presented significant lower insulin secretion compared to the control group, when the same in vitro glucose stimulation was done. Total short chain fatty acids produced were higher in both experimental groups in relation to the control group. These findings suggest that UBM and UBS diets promote colonic fermentation and can influence glycemic control, improving insulin sensitivity in rats.

  16. The double loop mattress suture

    PubMed Central

    Biddlestone, John; Samuel, Madan; Creagh, Terry; Ahmad, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    An interrupted stitch type with favorable tissue characteristics will reduce local wound complications. We describe a novel high-strength, low-tension repair for the interrupted closure of skin, cartilage, and muscle, the double loop mattress stitch, and compare it experimentally with other interrupted closure methods. The performance of the double loop mattress technique in porcine cartilage and skeletal muscle is compared with the simple, mattress, and loop mattress interrupted sutures in both a novel porcine loading chamber and mechanical model. Wound apposition is assessed by electron microscopy. The performance of the double loop mattress in vivo was confirmed using a series of 805 pediatric laparotomies/laparoscopies. The double loop mattress suture is 3.5 times stronger than the loop mattress in muscle and 1.6 times stronger in cartilage (p ≤ 0.001). Additionally, the double loop mattress reduces tissue tension by 66% compared with just 53% for the loop mattress (p ≤ 0.001). Wound gapping is equal, and wound eversion appears significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) compared with the loop mattress in vitro. In vivo, the double loop mattress performs as well as the loop mattress and significantly better than the mattress stitch in assessments of wound eversion and dehiscence. There were no episodes of stitch extrusion in our series of patients. The mechanical advantage of its intrinsic pulley arrangement gives the double loop mattress its favorable properties. Wound dehiscence is reduced because this stitch type is stronger and exerts less tension on the tissue than the mattress stitch. We advocate the use of this novel stitch wherever a high-strength, low-tension repair is required. These properties will enhance wound repair, and its application will be useful to surgeons of all disciplines. PMID:24698436

  17. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on Isc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport – up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors – is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  18. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  19. [Lactobacilli and colon carcinoma--A review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shumei; Zhang, Lanwei; Shan, Yujuan

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological studies showed that incidence of colon carcinoma is increased in the world. There are many difficulties to inhibit colon carcinoma because the causes of inducing colon carcinoma were various and interactive each other. Previous evidence supported the balance of the colonic microflora was critical in inhibiting colon carcinoma and the protection by colonic microflora could be improved by ingesting lactobacilli. Therefore, the biological functions and anticancer effects of lactobacilli attract attention of researchers. In this review we discussed the causes of colon carcinoma; the anticancer mechanisms of lactobacilli on the basis of our own studies. Eventually, we summarized the effects of anticancer of different components and metabolic products extracted from lactobacilli.

  20. Loop-the-Loop: Bringing Theory into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suwonjandee, N.; Asavapibhop, B.

    2012-01-01

    During the Thai high-school physics teacher training programme, we used an aluminum loop-the-loop system built by the Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology (IPST) to demonstrate a circular motion and investigate the concept of the conservation of mechanical energy. There were 27 high-school teachers from three provinces,…

  1. Dynamic PID loop control

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  2. Pulse thermal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A pulse thermal loop heat transfer system includes a means to use pressure rises in a pair of evaporators to circulate a heat transfer fluid. The system includes one or more valves that iteratively, alternately couple the outlets the evaporators to the condenser. While flow proceeds from one of the evaporators to the condenser, heating creates a pressure rise in the other evaporator, which has its outlet blocked to prevent fluid from exiting the other evaporator. When the flow path is reconfigured to allow flow from the other evaporator to the condenser, the pressure in the other evaporator is used to circulate a pulse of fluid through the system. The reconfiguring of the flow path, by actuating or otherwise changing the configuration of the one or more valves, may be triggered when a predetermined pressure difference between the evaporators is reached.

  3. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    SciTech Connect

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-11-15

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry.

  4. The Loop Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evertz, Hans Gerd

    1998-03-01

    Exciting new investigations have recently become possible for strongly correlated systems of spins, bosons, and fermions, through Quantum Monte Carlo simulations with the Loop Algorithm (H.G. Evertz, G. Lana, and M. Marcu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 875 (1993).) (For a recent review see: H.G. Evertz, cond- mat/9707221.) and its generalizations. A review of this new method, its generalizations and its applications is given, including some new results. The Loop Algorithm is based on a formulation of physical models in an extended ensemble of worldlines and graphs, and is related to Swendsen-Wang cluster algorithms. It performs nonlocal changes of worldline configurations, determined by local stochastic decisions. It overcomes many of the difficulties of traditional worldline simulations. Computer time requirements are reduced by orders of magnitude, through a corresponding reduction in autocorrelations. The grand-canonical ensemble (e.g. varying winding numbers) is naturally simulated. The continuous time limit can be taken directly. Improved Estimators exist which further reduce the errors of measured quantities. The algorithm applies unchanged in any dimension and for varying bond-strengths. It becomes less efficient in the presence of strong site disorder or strong magnetic fields. It applies directly to locally XYZ-like spin, fermion, and hard-core boson models. It has been extended to the Hubbard and the tJ model and generalized to higher spin representations. There have already been several large scale applications, especially for Heisenberg-like models, including a high statistics continuous time calculation of quantum critical exponents on a regularly depleted two-dimensional lattice of up to 20000 spatial sites at temperatures down to T=0.01 J.

  5. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study

  6. Infrared spectroscopic characteristics of normal and malignant colonic epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupnik, Eduardo; Jackson, Michael; Bird, Ranjana P.; Smith, Ian C. P.; Mantsch, Henry H.

    1998-04-01

    IR spectroscopy is being widely used to study the biochemical changes associated with cancer. In particular, based upon the hypothesis that biochemical changes associated with cancer precede morphological manifestations of the disease, IR spectroscopy is being evaluated as a potential early diagnostic and prognostic tool. In the current study, IR spectroscopy was applied to the study of colon tissue from rats treated with the specific colon carcinogen azoxymethane, to determine whether tumor induction was associated with identifiable spectroscopic changes in the colon. Characteristic spectra were found for each layer of the colon. Spectra of normal-appearing mucosa and tumors form treated animals then compared to spectra of control mucosa. Differences between tumors and control mucosa were apparent, indicating changes in cellular biochemistry associated with tumor development. In particular, differences in absorptions attributed to nucleic acids were seen, indicating alterations in the structure of cellular DNA in malignant and carcinogen treated tissues. Interestingly, spectra of carcinogen treated rates exhibit characteristics intermediate between those of normal mucosa and tumors. Application of multivariate analysis allowed non-subjective classification of the spectra into three distinct classes with and accuracy of 86.7 percent. The separate classification of control and treated mucosa suggests that IR spectroscopy, when combined with the appropriate classifier, can indeed detect biochemical changes in tissue before physical manifestation of the disease process.

  7. Pathogenesis of mucosal injury in the blind loop syndrome. Brush border enzyme activity and glycoprotein degradation.

    PubMed

    Jonas, A; Flanagan, P R; Forstner, G G

    1977-12-01

    The effect of intestinal bacterial over-growth on brush border hydrolases and brush border glycoproteins was studied in nonoperated control rats, control rats with surgically introduced jejunal self-emptying blind loops, and rats with surgically introduced jejunal self-filling blind loops. Data were analyzed from blind loop segments, segments above and below the blind loops, and three corresponding segments in the nonoperated controls. Rats with self-filling blind loops had significantly greater fat excretion than controls and exhibited significantly lower conjugated:free bile salt ratios in all three segments. Maltase, sucrase, and lactase activities were significantly reduced in homogenates and isolated brush borders from the self-filling blind loop, but alkaline phosphatase was not affected. The relative degradation rate of homogenate and brush border glycoproteins was assessed by a double-isotope technique involving the injection of d-[6-(3)H]glucosamine 3 h and d-[U-(14)C]glucosamine 19 h before sacrifice, and recorded as a (3)H:(14)C ratio. The relative degradation rate in both homogenate and brush border fractions was significantly greater in most segments from rats with self-filling blind loops. In the upper and blind loop segments from rats with self-filling blind loops, the (3)H:(14)C ratios were higher in the brush border membrane than in the corresponding homogenates, indicating that the increased rates of degradation primarily involve membrane glycoproteins. Incorporation of d-[6-(3)H]glucosamine by brush border glycoproteins was not reduced in rats with self-filling blind loops, suggesting that glycoprotein synthesis was not affected. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of brush border glycoproteins from the contaminated segments indicated that the large molecular weight glycoproteins, which include many of the surface hydrolases, were degraded most rapidly. Brush border maltase, isolated by immunoprecipitation, had (3)H:(14)C ratios characteristic of

  8. RCD+: Fast loop modeling server.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, José Ramón; Canosa-Valls, Alejandro Jesús; Li, Yaohang; Chacón, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Modeling loops is a critical and challenging step in protein modeling and prediction. We have developed a quick online service (http://rcd.chaconlab.org) for ab initio loop modeling combining a coarse-grained conformational search with a full-atom refinement. Our original Random Coordinate Descent (RCD) loop closure algorithm h