Science.gov

Sample records for rat forced swimming

  1. Forced swim test behavior in postpartum rats.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Kostick, M L; Rogers, J A; White, C L; Tsutsui, K T

    2010-10-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether depression-like behavior can be observed in gonadally intact females that have experienced normal pregnancy. When tested on the forced swim test (FST) on postpartum days 1-7, previously pregnant rats spent slightly more time immobile, significantly less time swimming and diving, and defecated more than virgin controls. Subchronic treatment with nomifensine (DA reuptake inhibitor, 2.5mg/kg) but not sertraline (serotonin reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg) or desipramine (norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg) significantly decreased immobility on postpartum day 2. In rats pre-exposed to the FST in mid-pregnancy, neither subchronic nor chronic treatment with desipramine or sertraline decreased immobility on postpartum day 2; in contrast, chronic desipramine significantly decreased immobility in virgin controls. These results indicate that postpartum female rats, compared to virgin controls, show a reduction in some "active coping behaviors" but no significant increase in immobility when tested during the early postpartum period, unlike ovariectomized females that have undergone hormone-simulated pregnancy (HSP). Additionally, immobility that is increased by FST pre-exposure is not readily prevented by treatment with standard antidepressant medications in postpartum females. Depression-like behaviors previously observed in females that have undergone HSP may result from the more dramatic changes in estradiol, prolactin or corticosterone that occur during the early "postpartum" period, compared to the more subtle changes in these hormones that occur in actual postpartum females.

  2. Forced swimming stress induced alterations in ingestive behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, H S; Jeganathan, P S

    2003-01-01

    The effects of forced swimming stress (15 minutes per day) on body weight, food intake, blood sugar, water intake, and urine output were studied in adult male Wistar rats on the first, seventh, fourteenth and 21st days in different subgroups. There was a significant initial decrease in the body weight up to 14 days followed by a regain in the body weight, which was sustained until 21 days. Though there was no change in the food intake initially for 7 days, after 14 days a significant increase in the food intake was observed. A significant hypoglycemia was observed throughout the entire period of stress. More significant fall in the blood sugar level was observed in the initial period of exposure of stress (1-7 days). There was a significant reduction in the water intake in the stressed animals. Urine output decreased significantly up to 7 days of stress, though it got marginally increased later. Thus, repeated stress may produce a reduction in body weight only initially, which is accompanied with an initial decrease in food and water intake also. The peak response to stress was seen after 7 days of stress exposure. There was a gradual recovery back to normal in the body weight, food intake, and water intake and urine output when stress period was prolonged to 14-21 days. This is suggestive of the adaptation of the organism to repeated exposure of similar kind of stress.

  3. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) serum levels in rats after forced repeated swimming stress.

    PubMed

    Hadzovic-Dzuvo, Almira; Valjevac, Amina; Avdagić, Nesina; Lepara, Orhan; Zaćiragić, Asija; Jadrić, Radivoj; Alajbegović, Jasmin; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2011-02-01

    To estimate the effects of forced repeated swimming stress on BNP serum levels in rats. Adult male Wistar rats weighting between 280-330 g were divided into two groups: control group (n = 8) and stress group (n = 8). Rats in the stress group were exposed to forced swimming stress daily, for 7 days. The rats were forced to swim in plastic tanks (90 cm wide, 120 cm deep) containing tap water (temperature ca. 25 degrees C). The depth of water was 40 cm. Duration of each swimming session progressively increased from 10 minutes on the first day to 40 minutes on days 6 and 7. Rats were sacrificed and blood was drawn from abdominal aorta for BNP analysis immediately after the last swimming session. B-type natriuretic serum level was determined by ELISA method using RAT BNP-32 kit (Phoenix Pharmaceutical Inc.). There was no statistically significant difference between mean BNP serum level in the stress group after the swimming period (0.81 +/- 0.14 ng/ml) as compared to the unstressed group of rats (0.8 +/- 0.08 ng/ml). After the swimming period mean body weight slightly decreased in the stress group in comparison with values before stress period (296.3 g vs. 272.8 g), but this difference was not statistically significant. The stress period had no influence on food intake in the stress rat group. The workload consisting of 40-minutes long swimming session is not sufficient to provoke BNP release from myocardium in rats.

  4. Role of amygdala MAPK activation on immobility behavior of forced swim rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tung-Yi; Lin, Chih-Hung

    2006-10-02

    The role of amygdala mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in rats during a forced swim test was investigated. The variation of amygdala MAPK level was studied in control rats and early-life maternally deprived rats. A forced swim test was carried out to estimate the immobility level. The data showed that the immobility time of rats that received maternal deprivation in early life was longer than that of control rats and Western blot analysis also showed that the amygdala phospho-MAPK level in maternally deprived rats was almost two times higher than in control rats. Intra-amygdala infusion of PD098059 or U0126, MEK inhibitors, suppressed immobility behavior during the forced swim test in both rats. Western blot analysis also showed that the amygdala MAPK activities in both rats infused with MEK inhibitors were also suppressed in parallel with expression of immobility behavior. The suppressed MAPK activities as well as the restoration of immobility time returned to the original level 48 h later. These results suggest that amygdala MAPK activation might play a role in the regulation of immobility behavior in rats during the forced swim test. Moreover, it could provide a hint that amygdala MAPK activation might be involved in the formation of depression-like behavior.

  5. Right-but not left-paw use in female rats provides advantage in forced swim tests.

    PubMed

    Soyman, Efe; Tunckol, Elcin; Lacin, Emre; Canbeyli, Resit

    2015-10-15

    Left- and right-pawed adult female Wistar rats were subjected to forced swimming on two consecutive days. Compared to the right-pawed group, left- pawed rats displayed significantly increased immobility from the first to the second swim test and remained significantly more immobile in the second swim test. Both groups performed similarly in spatial learning in the Morris water maze suggesting that left- pawed rats are differentially and specifically susceptible to depressogenic treatment.

  6. Maximum acute exercise tolerance in hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats subjected to forced swimming.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Lopes, G; Alves, S B; Salerno, V P; Passos, M C F; Lisboa, P C; Moura, E G

    2008-04-01

    Thyroid dysfunction can compromise physical capacity. Here, we analyze the effects of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism on maximum swim time in rats subjected to acute forced swimming, as an indicator of anaerobic capacity. Animals were forced to swim against a load (5% of body weight) attached to the tail and were killed 48 hours after the last test. Hyperthyroid rats were treated with thyroxine (50 mug/100 g body weight, i. p. for 7 days). The hypothyroid group received 0.03% methimazole in the drinking water for 4 weeks. Thyroid state was confirmed by alterations in serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), and liver mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) activity. Hyperthyroid rats presented significantly lower visceral fat mass (VFM) and higher food intake (p<0.05) with unchanged body weight. Maximum swim time (MST), glycogen content (skeletal muscle and liver), and leptin levels were lower while corticosterone was higher (p<0.05). In hypothyroid rats body weight was lower (p<0.05), without changes in VFM. Tested at 7-day intervals, MST was lower for tests 2, 3, and 4 (p<0.05). Muscle glycogen was higher in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (p<0.05), without changes in liver. Serum corticosterone was lower, while leptin was higher (p<0.05). These results suggest that in hyperthyroid and hypothyroid rats, thyroid hormones together with corticosterone and/or leptin may impair exercise capacity differently through its known effects on glycogen metabolism.

  7. Chronic inositol treatment reduces depression-like immobility of Flinders Sensitive Line rats in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Einat, Haim; Belmaker, Robert H; Zangen, Avraham; Overstreet, D H; Yadid, Gal

    2002-01-01

    Inositol, a precursor of the PIP cycle that was reported to have therapeutic effects in depressive patients and to be effective in two animal models of depression, was evaluated in the forced swim test using the genetic Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats model of depression. Groups of rats were tested in a 2 x 2 design with Strain (FSL or Control) as one factor and Drug (Inositol or Placebo) as the second factor. Rats received chronic treatment (daily for 14 days) with inositol (1.2 g/kg) or placebo (1:2 glucose/mannitol solution). On day 14 rats were exposed to the forced swim test for 5 min and their behavior videotaped. Tapes were analyzed for three levels of activity: immobility, swimming, and vigorous struggle. Inositol countered the exaggerated immobility of FSL rats in the forced swim test, without affecting control animals. Data support our previous suggestion of inositol as a potential antidepressant.

  8. Taste aversion in rats induced by forced swimming, voluntary running, forced running, and lithium chloride injection treatments.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2006-07-30

    The present experiment compared the strengths of taste aversion learning in rats induced by forced swimming in a water pool (5, 15, 30, or 60 min), voluntary running in an activity wheel (15, 30, 60, or 120 min), forced running in a motorized wheel (60 min at the speed of 8 m/min), optional running in the apparatus consisting of an activity wheel and a side room (120 min), and a lithium chloride (LiCl, 0.15 M LiCl at 2% of body weight) injection. The rats were given an access to saccharin solution immediately followed by one of the above treatments or simply returned back to the home cages for the control group. On the next 2 days, aversion to the saccharin solution was assessed by two-bottle choice testing between it and tap water. The following results were obtained. (1) The saccharin aversion was a positive function of exercise durations in the forced swimming and voluntary running rats, and the exercise of more than 30 min induced statistically significant saccharin aversion, compared with the control rats. (2) The forced running caused relatively strong saccharin aversion. The group of forced running rats acquired the numerically strongest saccharin aversion on average among all exercised rats. (3) The optional running treatment had little effect. (4) The LiCl injection resulted in the strongest aversion among the all treatments explored here.

  9. Effect of chromium picolinate on modified forced swimming test in diabetic rats: involvement of serotonergic pathways and potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Razia; Pillai, K K

    2006-02-01

    Depression occurs frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus. Chromium picolinate, an essential trace element is recommended for diabetes and also has been reported to benefit depression, but its mechanism is still debated. To investigate the mechanism, we studied its effects on serum insulin, serum glucose and on modified forced swimming test, a behavioural paradigm for depression in rats. The study involving co-administration of sub-active doses of glimepiride, a K(+) channel blocker and chromium picolinate on blood glucose levels and modified forced swimming test was also performed to probe any role of K(+) channels in its antidiabetic and antidepressants effects. Streptozotocin (55 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was injected in rats to induce diabetes (Type 1). After a week, chromium picolinate (8 microg/ml in drinking water) was administered for 4 weeks. Normal rats received similar drug treatment. The sub-active doses of chromium picolinate (4 microg/ml in drinking water) and glimeperide (2.5 mg/kg, orally) were co-administered and their effects on modified forced swimming test and on glucose levels were measured. Chromium picolinate (8 microg/ml in drinking water) produced hypoglycaemia in diabetic and normal rats. It had no effects on the streptozotocin-induced reduction in insulin levels. Chromium picolinate (8 microg/ml in drinking water) increased swimming with subsequent decrease in immobility. The sub-active doses of chromium picolinate and glimeperide showed significant additive effects in modified forced swimming test and reduction in serum glucose concentrations, though statistically insignificant. In conclusion chromium picolinate shows antidepressant action on modified forced swimming test affecting only swimming that suggests serotonergic pathways involvement. The additive effects on swimming in modified forced swimming test and reduction in serum glucose levels shows involvement of K(+) channels in antidiabetic and antidepressant actions of

  10. Effects of desipramine and alprazolam on forced swimming behaviour of adult rats exposed to prenatal diazepam.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, C; Cannizzaro, E; Gagliano, M; Mineo, A; Sabatino, M; Cannizzaro, G

    1995-02-06

    Pregnant rats were treated with a single daily s.c. injection of diazepam (2 mg/kg) over gestation days 14-20. This treatment led to a reduction in GABA receptor complex function since adult male offspring showed a strong decrease in electrographic hippocampal responses to alprazolam and a strongly increased response to picrotoxin after intra-locus coeruleus injection of the two compounds. No difference in immobility time in the forced swimming test and in spontaneous motor activity was observed between prenatally vehicle- and diazepam-exposed offspring. Conversely, prenatal exposure to diazepam potentiated the anti-immobility effect of subchronic desipramine (10 mg/kg i.p.) and made active a dose of desipramine (5 mg/kg i.p.) that was ineffective in prenatally vehicle-exposed rats. This effect was observed only in pretested rats. Prenatal exposure to diazepam blocked the anti-immobility effect of subchronic alprazolam (15 mg/kg i.p.) in both non-pretested and pretested rats. Spontaneous motor activity was strongly reduced in all groups. These findings suggest that a persistent reduction in GABA receptor complex function, induced by prenatal exposure to diazepam, does not alter the mobility of adult progeny in the forced swimming test, but it may have consequences when drugs acting on the GABA receptor complex are used.

  11. Region- and sex-specific changes in CART mRNA in rat hypothalamic nuclei induced by forced swim stress.

    PubMed

    Balkan, Burcu; Gozen, Oguz; Koylu, Ersin O; Keser, Aysegul; Kuhar, Michael J; Pogun, Sakire

    2012-10-15

    Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) mRNA and peptides are highly expressed in the paraventricular (PVN), dorsomedial (DMH) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei of the hypothalamus. It has been suggested that these nuclei regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, autonomic nervous system activity, and feeding behavior. Our previous studies showed that forced swim stress augmented CART peptide expression significantly in whole hypothalamus of male rats. In another study, forced swim stress increased the number of CART-immunoreactive cells in female PVN, whereas no effect was observed in male PVN or in the ARC nucleus of either sex. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of forced swim stress on CART mRNA expression in PVN, DMH and ARC nuclei in both male and female rats. Twelve male (stressed and controls, n=6 each) and 12 female (stressed and controls, n=6 each) Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Control animals were only handled, whereas forced swim stress procedure was applied to the stressed groups. Brains were dissected and brain sections containing PVN, DMH and ARC nuclei were prepared. CART mRNA levels were determined by in situ hybridization. In male rats, forced swim stress upregulated CART mRNA expression in DMH and downregulated it in the ARC. In female rats, forced swim stress increased CART mRNA expression in PVN and DMH, whereas a decrease was observed in the ARC nucleus. Our results show that forced swim stress elicits region- and sex-specific changes in CART mRNA expression in rat hypothalamus that may help in explaining some of the effects of stress.

  12. Region- and sex-specific changes in CART mRNA in rat hypothalamic nuclei induced by forced swim stress

    PubMed Central

    Balkan, Burcu; Gozen, Oguz; Koylu, Ersin O.; Keser, Aysegul; Kuhar, Michael J.; Pogun, Sakire

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) mRNA and peptides are highly expressed in the paraventricular (PVN), dorsomedial (DMH) and arcuate (ARC) nuclei of the hypothalamus. It has been suggested that these nuclei regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, autonomic nervous system activity, and feeding behavior. Our previous studies showed that forced swim stress augmented CART peptide expression significantly in whole hypothalamus of male rats. In another study, forced swim stress increased the number of CART-immunoreactive cells in female PVN, whereas no effect was observed in male PVN or in the ARC nucleus of either sex. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of forced swim stress on CART mRNA expression in PVN, DMH and ARC nuclei in both male and female rats. Twelve male (stressed and controls, n=6 each) and 12 female (stressed and controls, n=6 each) Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Control animals were only handled, whereas forced swim stress procedure was applied to the stressed groups. Brains were dissected and brain sections containing PVN, DMH and ARC nuclei were prepared. CART mRNA levels were determined by in situ hybridization. In male rats, forced swim stress upregulated CART mRNA expression in DMH and downregulated it in the ARC. In female rats, forced swim stress increased CART mRNA expression in PVN and DMH, whereas a decrease was observed in the ARC nucleus. Our results show that forced swim stress elicits region and sex-specific changes in CART mRNA expression in rat hypothalamus that may help explain some of the effects of stress. PMID:22960117

  13. Stressors can affect immobility time and response to imipramine in the rat forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, Ana G; Contreras, Carlos M

    2009-02-01

    We subjected Wistar rats to the forced swim test (FST) to compare the effects of two doses of imipramine in physically stressed rats (P: unavoidable electric footshocks), emotionally stressed rats (E: odors), or non-stressed rats (C). Stress or control sessions lasted 35 days. Drug treatments began on day 21 and continued for the next 14 days. E rats were placed for 10 min, once per day for 35 days, in a small non-movement-restricting cage impregnated with urine collected from a P rat. E and P rats exhibited opposite changes in locomotion. After 21 days of stress sessions, P rats displayed the longest immobility times in the FST, followed by E rats. In the P group, on day 7 of treatment (day 28 of the study), imipramine (2.5 mg/kg) reduced immobility time to baseline values. In the E group, immobility time decreased only after 14 days of treatment with the low imipramine dose. The high dose of imipramine (5.0 mg/kg) reduced immobility time at day 7 of treatment in all groups. In conclusion, physical and emotional stress similarly increased immobility time in the FST, but emotional stress appears to be more resistant to imipramine treatment.

  14. Acute restraint stress produces behavioral despair in weanling rats in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Morales, Blandina; Contreras, Carlos M; Cueto-Escobedo, Jonathan

    2009-10-01

    Stressful experiences in the rat during early life increase the vulnerability to later signs of behavioral despair in adulthood, reflected in increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST). However, the possible immediate effects of stress in weanling rats have only been partially described. The present study tested whether a single session of mild restraint stress modifies immobility in the FST in 21-day-old Wistar rats. After evaluating any possible changes in locomotion using the open field test (OFT), the latency and total duration of immobility were assessed in a single FST session. Regardless of gender, mild restraint stress significantly reduced crossings in the OFT, shortened the latency to the first period of immobility, and increased immobility in the FST compared with a control group devoid of stress. We conclude that a single mild physical stress session, as early as postnatal day 21, produces signs of behavioral despair.

  15. Antithrombotic Protective Effects of Arg-Pro-Gly-Pro Peptide during Emotional Stress Provoked by Forced Swimming Test in Rats.

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, M E; Lyapina, L A

    2017-01-01

    Blood coagulation was enhanced and all factors (total, enzyme, and non-enzyme) of the fibrinolytic system were suppressed in rats in 60 min after forced swimming test. Argininecontaining tetrapeptide glyproline Arg-Pro-Gly-Pro administered prior to this test activated fibrinolysis and prevented hypercoagulation. Administration of this peptide in 5 min after swimming test also enhanced anticoagulant, fibrinolytic, and antithrombotic activity of the blood. Therefore, glyproline Arg-Pro-Gly-Pro exerted both preventive and curative effects on the hemostasis system and prevented enhancement of blood coagulation provoked by emotional stress modeled by forced swimming test.

  16. Water temperature determines neurochemical and behavioural responses to forced swim stress: an in vivo microdialysis and biotelemetry study in rats.

    PubMed

    Linthorst, Astrid C E; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2008-03-01

    Forced swimming is a behavioural stress model increasingly used to investigate the neurocircuitry of stress responses. Although forced swim stress clearly is a psychological stressor (anxiety, panic), its physical aspects are often neglected. There are indications that behavioural and neurochemical responses to swim stress depend on the water temperature. Thus, we investigated the responsiveness of hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission (important in the coordination of stress responses), and of behaviour and core body temperature to forced swimming at different water temperatures (19, 25 and 35 degrees C). In vivo microdialysis and biotelemetry in freely-behaving rats were used. Dialysates were analysed for serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-HIAA (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Forced swimming in water at 25 and 19 degrees C decreased core body temperature by 8 and 12 degrees C, respectively. A rapid and pronounced increase in hippocampal 5-HT and 5-HIAA was found in rats that swam at 35 degrees C, whereas biphasic responses in 5-HT and 5-HIAA were observed at 25 and 19 degrees C. Also swim stress behaviour and post-stress home cage behaviour depended on the water temperature. Comparing the serotonergic and core body temperature changes revealed that a combination of two different 5-HT and 5-HIAA responses seems to shape the neurotransmitter response. Swimming-induced increases in hippocampal extracellular concentrations of 5-HT and 5-HIAA occurred at all water temperatures, but these increases were temporarily quenched, or concentrations were transistently decreased, when core body temperature fell below 31 degrees C in water at 25 or 19 degrees C. These data demonstrate that water temperature is a key factor determining the impact of forced swim stress on behaviour and neurochemistry, and underscore that changes in these parameters should be interpreted in the light of the autonomic responses induced by this stressor.

  17. Adaptation of the pituitary-adrenal axis to daily repeated forced swim exposure in rats is dependent on the temperature of water.

    PubMed

    Rabasa, Cristina; Delgado-Morales, Raúl; Gómez-Román, Almudena; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Comparison of exposure to certain predominantly emotional stressors reveals a qualitatively similar neuroendocrine response profile as well as a reduction of physiological responses after daily repeated exposure (adaptation). However, particular physical components of the stressor may interfere with adaptation. As defective adaptation to stress can enhance the probability to develop pathologies, we studied in adult male rats (n = 10/group) swimming behavior (struggling, immobility and mild swim) and physiological responses (ACTH, corticosterone and rectal temperature) to daily repeated exposure to forced swim (20 min, 13 d) at 25 or 36 °C (swim25 or swim36). Rats were repeatedly blood-sampled by tail-nick and hormones measured by radioimmunoassay. Some differences were observed between the two swim temperature groups after the first exposure to forced swim: (a) active behaviors were greater in swim25 than swim36 groups; (b) swim25 but not swim36 caused hypothermia; and (c) swim36 elicited the same ACTH response as swim25, but plasma corticosterone concentration was lower for swim36 at 30 min post-swim. After daily repeated exposure, adaptation in ACTH secretion was observed with swim36 already on day 4, whereas with swim25 adaptation was not observed until day 13 and was of lower magnitude. Nevertheless, after repeated exposure to swim25 a partial protection from hypothermia was observed and the two swim conditions resulted in progressive reduction of active behaviors. Thus, daily repeated swim at 25 °C impairs adaptation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as compared to swim at 36 °C, supporting the hypothesis that certain physical components of predominantly emotional stressors can interfere with the process of adaptation.

  18. Prenatal stress in rats predicts immobility behavior in the forced swim test. Effects of a chronic treatment with tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Morley-Fletcher, S; Darnaudery, M; Koehl, M; Casolini, P; Van Reeth, O; Maccari, S

    2003-11-07

    Prenatally-stressed (PS) rats are characterized by a general impairment of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sleep disturbances indicating that this model has face validity with some clinical features observed in a subpopulation of depressed patients. The prolonged corticosterone secretion shown by PS rats in response to stress was positively correlated with an increased immobility behavior in the forced swim test. To investigate the predictive validity of this model, a separate group of animals was chronically treated with the antidepressant tianeptine (10 mg/kg i.p. for 21 days). Such chronic treatment reduced in PS rats immobility time in the forced swim test. These findings suggest that the PS rat is an interesting animal model for the evaluation of antidepressant treatment.

  19. Orally administered whole egg demonstrates antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test on rats.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Mao; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Ogino, Yumi; Yoshida, Junki; Tomonaga, Shozo; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2014-08-01

    Several studies have reported that vegetarian diets are associated with a higher prevalence of major depression. Therefore, we hypothesised that the consumption of animal products, especially eggs, may have positive effects on mental health, especially on major depression, because a previous study reported that egg consumption produces numerous beneficial effects in humans. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chronic whole-egg treatment on depression-like behaviours in Wistar rats, a control strain, and Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression. In both the rats, either whole-egg solution (5 ml/kg) or distilled water (5 ml/kg) was orally administrated for 35 days. During these periods, the open-field test (OFT) was conducted on the 21st day, and a forced swimming test (FST) was enforced on the 27th and 28th days. On the 36th day, the plasma and brain were collected. Chronic whole-egg treatment did not affect line crossing in the OFT, whereas it reduced the total duration of immobility in the FST on both strains. Furthermore, interestingly, the results indicated the possibility that whole-egg treatment elevated the incorporation of tryptophan into the brain, and the tryptophan concentration in the prefrontal cortex was actually increased by the treatment. This study demonstrated that whole-egg treatment exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. It is suggested that whole egg may be an excellent food for preventing and alleviating the conditions of major depression.

  20. Antioxidant and Antifatigue Properties of the Aqueous Extract of Moringa oleifera in Rats Subjected to Forced Swimming Endurance Test.

    PubMed

    Lamou, Bonoy; Taiwe, Germain Sotoing; Hamadou, André; Abene; Houlray, Justin; Atour, Mahamat Mey; Tan, Paul Vernyuy

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera on swimming performance and related biochemical parameters were investigated in male Wistar rats (130-132 g). Four groups of rats (16 per group) were fed a standard laboratory diet and given distilled water, 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg of extract, respectively, for 28 days. On day 28, 8 rats from each group were subjected to the forced swimming test with tail load (10% of body weight). The remaining 8 rats per group were subjected to the 90-minute free swim. Maximum swimming time, glycemia, lactamia, uremia, triglyceridemia, hepatic and muscle glycogen, hematological parameters, and oxidative stress parameters (superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, and malondialdehyde) were measured. Results. M. oleifera extract increased maximum swimming time, blood hemoglobin, blood glucose, and hepatic and muscle glycogen reserves. The extract also increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and decreased the blood concentrations of malondialdehyde. Furthermore, it decreased blood concentrations of lactate, triglycerides, and urea. In conclusion, the antifatigue properties of M. oleifera extract are demonstrated by its ability to improve body energy stores and tissue antioxidant capacity and to reduce the tissue build-up of lactic acid.

  1. Antioxidant and Antifatigue Properties of the Aqueous Extract of Moringa oleifera in Rats Subjected to Forced Swimming Endurance Test

    PubMed Central

    Lamou, Bonoy; Taiwe, Germain Sotoing; Hamadou, André; Abene; Houlray, Justin; Atour, Mahamat Mey; Tan, Paul Vernyuy

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera on swimming performance and related biochemical parameters were investigated in male Wistar rats (130–132 g). Four groups of rats (16 per group) were fed a standard laboratory diet and given distilled water, 100, 200, or 400 mg/kg of extract, respectively, for 28 days. On day 28, 8 rats from each group were subjected to the forced swimming test with tail load (10% of body weight). The remaining 8 rats per group were subjected to the 90-minute free swim. Maximum swimming time, glycemia, lactamia, uremia, triglyceridemia, hepatic and muscle glycogen, hematological parameters, and oxidative stress parameters (superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione, and malondialdehyde) were measured. Results. M. oleifera extract increased maximum swimming time, blood hemoglobin, blood glucose, and hepatic and muscle glycogen reserves. The extract also increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and decreased the blood concentrations of malondialdehyde. Furthermore, it decreased blood concentrations of lactate, triglycerides, and urea. In conclusion, the antifatigue properties of M. oleifera extract are demonstrated by its ability to improve body energy stores and tissue antioxidant capacity and to reduce the tissue build-up of lactic acid. PMID:26904162

  2. Effect of Vitamin C on Male Fertility in Rats Subjected to Forced Swimming Stress

    PubMed Central

    BB, Ghongane; BB, Nayak

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stress is defined as a general body response to initially threatening external or internal demands, involving the mobilization of physiological and psychological resources to deal with them. Recently, oxidative stress has become the focus of interest as a potential cause of male infertility. Normally, equilibrium exists between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant scavenging activities in the male reproductive organs. The ascorbic acid is a known antioxidant present in the testis with the precise role of protecting the latter from the oxidative damage. It also contributes to the support of spermatogensis at least in part through its capacity to maintain antioxidant in an active state. Materials and Methods: Group1: Normal Control animal received Distilled water, Group 2: Positive control (Only Stress), Group 3: Normal rats received an intermediate dose of Vitamin C (20mg/kg/day), Group 4: Stress + Low dose Vitamin C (10mg/kg/day), Group 5: Stress+ Intermediate dose Vitamin C (20mg/kg/day), Group 6: High dose Vitamin C (30mg/kg/day). On 16th day effect of stress on body weight, Reproductive organ weight, sperm parameters, and hormonal assay was studied. Results: In the present context, in stress group the sperm count, motility, testicular weight declined significantly. The intermediate dose and high dose of vitamin C showed significantly increased effect on the sperm count and motility. Conclusion: Various physiological changes produced force swimming indicates that swimming is an effective model for producing stress in albino rats. The results suggest that Vitamin C supplementation improves the stress induced reproductive infertility due to both their testosterone increase effect and their antioxidant effect. PMID:25177581

  3. Effects of chronic and acute stress on rat behaviour in the forced-swim test.

    PubMed

    Suvrathan, Aparna; Tomar, Anupratap; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2010-11-01

    Stress and depression may share common neural plasticity mechanisms. Importantly, the development and reversal of stress-induced plasticity requires time. These temporal aspects, however, are not captured fully in the forced-swim test (FST), a behavioural model for testing antidepressant efficacy, used originally in naïve animals. The present study probed whether and how a rodent model of stress affects behaviour in the FST over time. We found that the intensity and duration of stress are critical in the development of depressive symptoms in male Wistar rats (n = 37) as tested in the FST. Chronic immobilization stress (2 h/day for 10 days) elicited a range of responses, from low to high values of immobility in the FST on day 1, and subsequent immobility on day 2 was inversely related to individual day 1 values. As a whole, chronically stressed rats did not exhibit any significant change in immobility either on day 1 or day 2 compared to control rats. However, climbing behaviour was reduced uniformly from day 1 to day 2, despite the differences in immobility. In contrast, a separate group of rats (n = 30) subjected to the same chronic stressor displayed a significant reduction in open-arm exploration in the elevated plus maze, indicative of a robust increase in anxiety-like behaviour. Furthermore, when the 10-day chronic stress paradigm was reduced to a single 2-h episode of immobilization stress, it triggered a uniform day 1 to day 2 increase in immobility, which was not persistent 10 days later. These results highlight a need for closer examination of the ways in which stress-induced modulation of behaviour in the FST may be used and interpreted in future studies aimed at exploring connections between stress and depression.

  4. Stressors affect the response of male and female rats to clomipramine in a model of behavioral despair (forced swim test).

    PubMed

    Consoli, Daniele; Fedotova, Julia; Micale, Vincenzo; Sapronov, Nikolay S; Drago, Filippo

    2005-09-27

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of physical stressors (electric foot-shocks) on effect of the antidepressant drug, clomipramine and plasma corticosterone levels in male and female rats tested in a model of behavioral despair (forced swim test,). Male and female rats of the Wistar strain were injected with clomipramine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. A group of animals also received electric shocks of different intensity and duration of 24, 5 and 1 h before being subjected to forced swim test. At the end of behavioral procedures, vaginal smears were assessed in all female animals and data on immobility time were plotted according to the ovarian cycle phase. After decapitation, corticosterone plasma levels were measured by radioimmunoassay in both male and female rats. Application of mild shocks (5 ms, 0.1 mA) significantly reduced immobility time in forced swim test of untreated male rats and augmented clomipramine effect on this parameter. Moderate shocks of higher intensity or duration (5 ms, 1.0 mA) also resulted in decreased immobility time of untreated male rats, but in reduced effect of clomipramine treatment. Furthermore, application of severe shocks (10 ms, 1.0 mA) increased the immobility time in untreated animals and totally abolished clomipramine effect in forced swim test. Untreated non-shocked female rats in proestrous and estrous phases exhibited a longer immobility time as compared to diestrous animals. Immobility time appeared to be generally higher when mild, moderate or severe shocks were applied prior to behavioral testing in proestrous and estrous animals, while the behavioral response of diestrous and metestrous animals did not differ from that of controls. Clomipramine effect on immobility time was generally reduced by application of shocks of every strengths. Stress-induced plasma corticosterone levels surge correlated with intensity and duration of shocks in both male and female rats, but clomipramine treatment generally

  5. Antidepressant effect of GABA-rich monascus-fermented product on forced swimming rat model.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chia-Ying; Shi, Yeu-Ching; You, He-Pei; Lo, Yi-Hiyuan; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-04-13

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) has several well-known physiological functions including antihypertension and antidepression. In this research, we focus on the antidepressant effects of oral administration of GABA-rich Monascus-fermented product in depression animal model (forced swimming test, FST) by Sprague-Dawley rats, and try to find its possible mechanism in the brain monoamine system. GABA and the Monascus-fermented product (MFP) significantly decreased the duration of immobility time in a short-term test. In a long-term test, the antidepressant-like effect of MFP was better than that of GABA at the same dosage (2.6 mg/kg), and the efficacy of MFP was similar to that of fluoxetine. Moreover, GABA might recover the level of monoamines norepinephrine, dopamine (DA), and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in hippocampus and normalize the turnover ratio of 5-HT and DA in hippocampus and amygdala. In addition to the functions of GABA, the MFP has more potential in decreasing the turnover ratio of DA in the frontal cortex and striatum to improve depressive symptoms.

  6. Ontogeny and adolescent alcohol exposure in Wistar rats: open field conflict, light/dark box and forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Desikan, Anita; Wills, Derek N; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2014-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that heavy drinking and alcohol abuse and dependence peak during the transition between late adolescence and early adulthood. Studies in animal models have demonstrated that alcohol exposure during adolescence can cause a modification in some aspects of behavioral development, causing the "adolescent phenotype" to be retained into adulthood. However, the "adolescent phenotype" has not been studied for a number of behavioral tests. The objective of the present study was to investigate the ontogeny of behaviors over adolescence/young adulthood in the light/dark box, open field conflict and forced swim test in male Wistar rats. These data were compared to previously published data from rats that received intermittent alcohol vapor exposure during adolescence (AIE) to test whether they retained the "adolescent phenotype" in these behavioral tests. Three age groups of rats were tested (post-natal day (PD) 34-42; PD55-63; PD69-77). In the light/dark box test, younger rats escaped the light box faster than older adults, whereas AIE rats returned to the light box faster and exhibited more rears in the light than controls. In the open field conflict test, both younger and AIE rats had shorter times to first enter the center, spent more time in the center of the field, were closer to the food, and consumed more food than controls. In the forced swim test no clear developmental pattern emerged. The results of the light/dark box and the forced swim test do not support the hypothesis that adolescent ethanol vapor exposure can "lock-in" all adolescent phenotypes. However, data from the open field conflict test suggest that the adolescent and the AIE rats both engaged in more "disinhibited" and food motivated behaviors. These data suggest that, in some behavioral tests, AIE may result in a similar form of behavioral disinhibition to what is seen in adolescence.

  7. The highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A receptor antagonist, EMD 281014, significantly increases swimming and decreases immobility in male congenital learned helpless rats in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh G; Bartoszyk, Gerd D; Edwards, Emmeline; Ashby, Charles R

    2004-04-01

    We examined the effect of the highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2A) receptor antagonist 7-[4-[2-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-ethyl]-piperazine-1-carbonyl]-1H-indole-3-carbonitrile HCl (EMD 281014) in congenital learned helpless male rats in the forced swim test. The administration of EMD-281014 (0.3-30 mg/kg i.p.) to congenital learned helpless rats dose-dependently and significantly (at 10 and 30 mg/kg) decreased immobility and increased swimming compared to vehicle-treated animals. Thus, EMD 281014 produces effects in the forced swim test resembling those of antidepressants.

  8. Prior cold water swim stress alters immobility in the forced swim test and associated activation of serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Drugan, R C; Hibl, P T; Kelly, K J; Dady, K F; Hale, M W; Lowry, C A

    2013-12-03

    Prior adverse experience alters behavioral responses to subsequent stressors. For example, exposure to a brief swim increases immobility in a subsequent swim test 24h later. In order to determine if qualitative differences (e.g. 19°C versus 25°C) in an initial stressor (15-min swim) impact behavioral, physiological, and associated neural responses in a 5-min, 25°C swim test 24h later, rats were surgically implanted with biotelemetry devices 1 week prior to experimentation then randomly assigned to one of six conditions (Day 1 (15 min)/Day 2 (5 min)): (1) home cage (HC)/HC, (2) HC/25°C swim, (3) 19°C swim/HC, (4) 19°C swim/25°C swim, (5) 25°C swim/HC, (6) 25°C swim/25°C swim. Core body temperature (Tb) was measured on Days 1 and 2 using biotelemetry; behavior was measured on Day 2. Rats were transcardially perfused with fixative 2h following the onset of the swim on Day 2 for analysis of c-Fos expression in midbrain serotonergic neurons. Cold water (19°C) swim on Day 1 reduced Tb, compared to both 25°C swim and HC groups on Day 1, and, relative to rats exposed to HC conditions on Day 1, reduced the hypothermic response to the 25°C swim on Day 2. The 19°C swim on Day 1, relative to HC exposure on Day 1, increased immobility during the 5-min swim on Day 2. Also, 19°C swim, relative to HC conditions, on Day 1 reduced swim (25°C)-induced increases in c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons within the dorsal and interfascicular parts of the dorsal raphe nucleus. These results suggest that exposure to a 5-min 19°C cold water swim, but not exposure to a 5-min 25°C swim alters physiological, behavioral and serotonergic responses to a subsequent stressor.

  9. Repeated forced swimming impairs prepulse inhibition and alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor and astroglial parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila Boque; Müller, Liz Girardi; Viana, Alice Fialho; Hertzfeldt, Vivian; Lunardi, Paula Santana; Zanotto, Caroline; Nardin, Patrícia; Ravazzolo, Ana Paula; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate perturbations and altered neurotrophin levels have been strongly associated with the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Environmental stress is a risk factor for mood disorders, disrupting glutamatergic activity in astrocytes in addition to cognitive behaviours. Despite the negative impact of stress-induced neuropsychiatric disorders on public health, the molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress has yet to be fully elucidated. Exposure to repeated swimming has proven useful for evaluating the loss of cognitive function after pharmacological and behavioural interventions, but its effect on glutamate function has yet to be fully explored. In the present study, rats previously exposed to repeated forced swimming were evaluated using the novel object recognition test, object location test and prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. In addition, quantification of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein levels, glutamate uptake, glutathione, S100B, GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and calmodulin were evaluated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after various swimming time points. We found that swimming stress selectively impaired PPI but did not affect memory recognition. Swimming stress altered the frontal cortical and hippocampal BDNF expression and the activity of hippocampal astrocytes by reducing hippocampal glutamate uptake and enhancing glutathione content in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data support the assumption that astrocytes may regulate the activity of brain structures related to cognition in a manner that alters complex behaviours. Moreover, they provide new insight regarding the dynamics immediately after an aversive experience, such as after behavioural despair induction, and suggest that forced swimming can be employed to study altered glutamatergic activity and PPI disruption in rodents.

  10. Effects of pramipexole on the duration of immobility during the forced swim test in normal and ACTH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Kouhei; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Miyaoka, Junya; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Asanuma, Masato; Sendo, Toshiaki; Gomita, Yutaka

    2009-07-01

    The dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist pramipexole has clinically been proven to improve depression or treatment-resistant depression. However, the involvement of the dopamine receptor system on the effect of pramipexole on depression remains unclear. We examined the influence of pramipexole on the duration of immobility during the forced swim test in normal and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated rats and further analyzed the possible role of dopamine receptors in this effect. Additionally, the mechanism by which pramipexole acts in this model was explored specifically in relation to the site of action through the use of microinjections into the intramedial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Pramipexole (0.3-1 mg/kg) significantly decreased the duration of immobility in normal and ACTH-treated rats. This effect was blocked by L-741,626, a D2 receptor antagonist, and nafadotride, a D3 receptor antagonist, in normal rats. Furthermore, infusions of pramipexole into the intranucleus accumbens, but not the medial prefrontal cortex, decreased the immobility of normal and ACTH-treated rats during the forced swim test. Taken together, the results of these experiments suggested that pramipexole, administered into the intranucleus accumbens rather than the medial prefrontal cortex, exerted an antidepressant-like effect on ACTH-treated rats via the dopaminergic system. The immobility-decreasing effect of pramipexole may be mediated by dopamine D2 and D3 receptors.

  11. The swim force as a body force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John

    2015-11-01

    Net (as opposed to random) motion of active matter results from an average swim (or propulsive) force. It is shown that the average swim force acts like a body force - an internal body force [Yan and Brady, Soft Matter, DOI:10.1039/C5SM01318F]. As a result, the particle-pressure exerted on a container wall is the sum of the swim pressure [Takatori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2014, 113, 028103] and the `weight' of the active particles. A continuum mechanical description is possible when variations occur on scales larger than the run length of the active particles and gives a Boltzmann-like distribution from a balance of the swim force and the swim pressure. Active particles may also display `action at a distance' and accumulate adjacent to (or be depleted from) a boundary without any external forces. In the momentum balance for the suspension - the mixture of active particles plus fluid - only external body forces appear.

  12. Influence of enrichment on behavioral and neurogenic effects of antidepressants in Wistar rats submitted to repeated forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Possamai, Fernanda; dos Santos, Juliano; Walber, Thais; Marcon, Juliana C; dos Santos, Tiago Souza; Lino de Oliveira, Cilene

    2015-04-03

    Repeated forced swimming test (rFST) may detect gradual effects of antidepressants in adult rats. Antidepressants, as enrichment, affected behavior and neurogenesis in rats. However, the influence of enrichment on behavioral and neurogenic effects of antidepressants is unknown. Here, effects of antidepressants on rFST and hippocampal neurogenesis were investigated in rats under enriched conditions. Behaviors of male Wistar rats, housed from weaning in standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE), were registered during rFST. The rFST consisted of 15min of swimming (pretest) followed by 5min of swimming in the first (test), seventh (retest 1) and fourteenth (retest 2) days after pretest. One hour before the test, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of saline (1ml/kg), fluoxetine (2.5mg/kg) or imipramine (2.5 or 5mg/kg). These treatments were performed daily until the day of the retest 2. After retest 2, rats were euthanized for the identification of markers for neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Fluoxetine or imipramine decreased immobility in retests 1 and 2, as compared to saline. EE abolished these differences. In EE, fluoxetine or imipramine (5mg/kg) reduced immobility time in retest 2, as compared to the test. Independent of the housing conditions, fluoxetine and imipramine (5mg/kg) increased the ratio of immature neurons per progenitor cell in the hippocampus. In summary, antidepressants or enrichment counteracted the high immobility in rFST. Enrichment changed the effects of antidepressants in rFST depending on the type, and the dose of a substance but failed to change neurogenesis in control or antidepressant treated-rats. Effects of antidepressants and enrichment on rFST seemed neurogenesis-independent.

  13. Swimming-based pica in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2016-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that voluntary or forced running in activity wheels yields pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) in rats (Nakajima, 2016; Nakajima and Katayama, 2014). The present study provides experimental evidence that a single 40-min session of swimming in water also generates pica in rats, while showering rats with water does not produce such behavior. Because kaolin intake has been regarded as a measure of nausea in rats, this finding suggests that swimming activity, as well as voluntary or forced running, induces nausea in rats.

  14. Differential Rearing Alters Forced Swim Test Behavior, Fluoxetine Efficacy, and Post-Test Weight Gain in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Arndt, David L; Peterson, Christy J; Cain, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a key role in the etiology of depression. The rodent forced swim test (FST) is commonly used as a preclinical model of depression, with increases in escape-directed behavior reflecting antidepressant effects, and increases in immobility reflecting behavioral despair. Environmental enrichment leads to serotonergic alterations in rats, but it is unknown whether these alterations may influence the efficacy of common antidepressants. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in enriched (EC), standard (SC), or isolated (IC) conditions. Following the rearing period, fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 23.5 hrs, 5 hrs, and 1 hr before locomotor and FST measures. Following locomotor testing and FST exposure, rats were weighed to assess fluoxetine-, FST-, and environmental condition-induced moderations in weight gain. Results revealed an antidepressant effect of environmental enrichment and a depressant effect of isolation. Regardless of significant fluoxetine effects on locomotor activity, fluoxetine generally decreased swimming and increased immobility in all three environmental conditions, with IC-fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) rats and EC-fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) rats swimming less than vehicle counterparts. Subchronic 20 mg/kg fluoxetine also induced significant weight loss, and differential rearing appeared to moderate weight gain following FST stress. These results suggest that differential rearing has the ability to alter FST behaviors, fluoxetine efficacy, and post-stressor well-being. Moreover, 20 mg/kg fluoxetine, administered subchronically, may lead to atypical effects of those commonly observed in the FST, highlighting the importance and impact of both environmental condition and dosing regimen in common animal models of depression.

  15. Differential Rearing Alters Forced Swim Test Behavior, Fluoxetine Efficacy, and Post-Test Weight Gain in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, David L.; Peterson, Christy J.; Cain, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental factors play a key role in the etiology of depression. The rodent forced swim test (FST) is commonly used as a preclinical model of depression, with increases in escape-directed behavior reflecting antidepressant effects, and increases in immobility reflecting behavioral despair. Environmental enrichment leads to serotonergic alterations in rats, but it is unknown whether these alterations may influence the efficacy of common antidepressants. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in enriched (EC), standard (SC), or isolated (IC) conditions. Following the rearing period, fluoxetine (10 or 20 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 23.5 hrs, 5 hrs, and 1 hr before locomotor and FST measures. Following locomotor testing and FST exposure, rats were weighed to assess fluoxetine-, FST-, and environmental condition-induced moderations in weight gain. Results revealed an antidepressant effect of environmental enrichment and a depressant effect of isolation. Regardless of significant fluoxetine effects on locomotor activity, fluoxetine generally decreased swimming and increased immobility in all three environmental conditions, with IC-fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) rats and EC-fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) rats swimming less than vehicle counterparts. Subchronic 20 mg/kg fluoxetine also induced significant weight loss, and differential rearing appeared to moderate weight gain following FST stress. These results suggest that differential rearing has the ability to alter FST behaviors, fluoxetine efficacy, and post-stressor well-being. Moreover, 20 mg/kg fluoxetine, administered subchronically, may lead to atypical effects of those commonly observed in the FST, highlighting the importance and impact of both environmental condition and dosing regimen in common animal models of depression. PMID:26154768

  16. Repeated forced swim stress differentially affects formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour and the endocannabinoid system in stress normo-responsive and stress hyper-responsive rat strains.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Elaine M; Okine, Bright N; Olango, Weredeselam M; Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2016-01-04

    Repeated exposure to a homotypic stressor such as forced swimming enhances nociceptive responding in rats. However, the influence of genetic background on this stress-induced hyperalgesia is poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of repeated forced swim stress on nociceptive responding in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats versus the Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat strain, a genetic background that is susceptible to stress, negative affect and hyperalgesia. Given the well-documented role of the endocannabinoid system in stress and pain, we investigated associated alterations in endocannabinoid signalling in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and amygdala. In SD rats, repeated forced swim stress for 10 days was associated with enhanced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour, compared with naive, non-stressed SD controls. In contrast, WKY rats exposed to 10 days of swim stress displayed reduced late phase formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour. Swim stress increased levels of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) mRNA in the ipsilateral side of the dorsal spinal cord of SD rats, an effect not observed in WKY rats. In the amygdala, swim stress reduced anandamide (AEA) levels in the contralateral amygdala of SD rats, but not WKY rats. Additional within-strain differences in levels of CB1 receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) mRNA and levels of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) were observed between the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the dorsal horn and/or amygdala. These data indicate that the effects of repeated stress on inflammatory pain-related behaviour are different in two rat strains that differ with respect to stress responsivity and affective state and implicate the endocannabinoid system in the spinal cord and amygdala in these differences.

  17. Conditioned ethanol aversion in rats induced by voluntary wheel running, forced swimming, and electric shock: an implication for aversion therapy of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2004-01-01

    This study was planned to demonstrate rats' acquisition of aversion to ethanol solution consumed before voluntary running, forced swimming, or electric shock delivery. Wistar rats under water deprivation were allotted to four groups of eight rats each, and all rats were allowed to drink 5% ethanol solution for 15 min. Immediately after the ethanol drinking, rats of Group Run were put into the individual running wheels for 15 min, those of Group Swim were put into the individual swimming pools for 15 min, those of Group Shock received electric shocks for 15 min (15 0.45-mA shocks of 0.7s with the intershock interval of 1 min) in the individual small chambers, and those of Group Control were directly returned back to the home cages. This procedure was repeated for six days, followed by a two-day choice test of ethanol aversion where a bottle containing 5% ethanol solution and a bottle of tap water were simultaneously presented for 15 min. In the test, Groups Run, Swim, and Shock drank ethanol solution significantly less than tapwater, while Group Control drank both fluids equally. The effects of running, swimming, and shock were equivalent. The successful demonstration of acquired ethanol aversion induced by exercise (running and swimming) or shock in rats suggests an avenue for clinical application of exercise and shock treatments for human alcoholics, though there are many issues to be resolved before the practical use.

  18. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Lindera obtusiloba Extracts on the Immobility Behavior of Rats in the Forced Swim Test.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dong Wook; Lee, Mi-Sook; Her, Song; Cho, Suengmok; Lee, Chang-Ho; Kim, In-Ho; Han, Daeseok

    2016-02-27

    Lindera obtusiloba extracts are commonly used as an alternative medicine due to its numerous health benefits in Korea. However, the antidepressant-like effects of L. obtusiloba extracts have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we aimed to determine whether L. obtusiloba extracts exhibited antidepressant-like activity in rats subjected to forced swim test (FST)-induced depression. Acute treatment of rats with L. obtusiloba extracts (200 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly reduced immobility time and increased swimming time without any significant change in climbing. Rats treated with L. obtusiloba extracts also exhibited a decrease in the limbic hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to the FST, as indicated by attenuation of the corticosterone response and decreased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the hippocampus CA3 region. In addition, L. obtusiloba extracts, at concentrations that were not affected by cell viability, significantly decreased luciferase activity in response to cortisol in a concentration-dependent manner by the glucocorticoid binding assay in HeLa cells. Our findings suggested that the antidepressant-like effects of L. obtusiloba extracts were likely mediated via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Further studies are needed to evaluate the potential of L. obtusiloba extracts as an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of depression.

  19. Low-level laser therapy attenuates creatine kinase levels and apoptosis during forced swimming in rats.

    PubMed

    Sussai, Daniela Aparecida; Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo de; Dourado, Doroty Mesquita; Belchior, Ana Carulina Guimarães; dos Reis, Filipe Abdalla; Pereira, Daniel Martins

    2010-01-01

    Studies suggest that high-intensity physical exercise can cause damage to skeletal muscles, resulting in muscle soreness, fatigue, inflammatory processes and cell apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on a decrease in creatine kinase (CK) levels and cell apoptosis. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two equal groups: group 1 (control), resistance swimming; group 2 (LLLT), resistance swimming with LLLT. They were subjected to a single application of indium gallium aluminum phosphide (InGaAlP) laser immediately following the exercise for 40 s at an output power of 100 mW, wavelength 660 nm and 133.3 J/cm(2). The groups were subdivided according to sample collection time: 24 h and 48 h. CK was measured before and both 24 h and 48 h after the test. Samples of the gastrocnemius muscle were processed to determine the presence of apoptosis using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick end labeling. (There was a significant difference in CK levels between groups (P < 0.0001) as well as between the 24 h and 48 h levels in the control group, whereas there was no significant intra-group difference in the LLLT group at the same evaluation times. In the LLLT group there were 66.3 +/- 13.2 apoptotic cells after 24 h and 39.0 +/- 6.8 apoptotic cells after 48 h. The results suggest that LLLT influences the metabolic profile of animals subjected to fatigue by lowering serum levels of CK. This demonstrates that LLLT can act as a preventive tool against cell apoptosis experienced during high-intensity physical exercise.

  20. The Mouse Forced Swim Test

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T.; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed. PMID:22314943

  1. The mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E; Piantadosi, Sean C; Gould, Todd D

    2012-01-29

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed.

  2. Melatonin improve the sperm quality in forced swimming test induced oxidative stress in nandrolone treated Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Minaii, Bagher; Moayeri, Ardeshir; Shokri, Saeed; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Golmohammadi, Taghi; Malek, Fatemeh; Barbarestani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of melatonin on the sperm quality and testis weight after the combination of swimming exercise and nandrolone decanoate (DECA). Two groups of male Wistar rats were treated for eight weeks as follows; group A consist of CO (control), Sham, N (DECA), S (swimming) and NS (DECA plus swimming); and group B: Sham M (sham melatonin), M (melatonin), MN (melatonin plus DECA), MS (melatonin plus swimming), MNS (melatonin, DECA plus swimming). The motility of sperm was significantly improved in melatonin groups in comparison to N, S and NS groups (P≤0.05).  The left testes weight was decreased in N, NS and MNS groups, and the right testes weight was decreased in N,S,NS, MS and MNS groups in compare with the control group. This study concluded that melatonin probably could improve the sperm motility and sex organs weight after the combination of DECA and exercise.

  3. Forced swim test induces divergent global transcriptomic alterations in the hippocampus of high versus low novelty-seeker rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many neuropsychiatric disorders, including stress-related mood disorders, are complex multi-parametric syndromes. Susceptibility to stress and depression is individually different. The best animal model of individual differences that can be used to study the neurobiology of affect regards spontaneous reactions to novelty. Experimentally, when naive rats are exposed to the stress of a novel environment, they display a highly variable exploratory activity and are classified as high or low responders (HR or LR, respectively). Importantly, HR and LR rats do not seem to exhibit a substantial differentiation in relation to their ‘depressive-like’ status in the forced swim test (FST), a widely used animal model of ‘behavioral despair’. In the present study, we investigated whether FST exposure would be accompanied by phenotype-dependent differences in hippocampal gene expression in HR and LR rats. Results HR and LR rats present a distinct behavioral pattern in the pre-test session but develop comparable depressive-like status in the second FST session. At 24 h following the second FST session, HR and LR rats (stressed and unstressed controls) were sacrificed and hippocampal samples were independently analyzed on whole rat genome Illumina arrays. Functional analysis into pathways and networks was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. Notably, hippocampal gene expression signatures between HR and LR rats were markedly divergent, despite their comparable depressive-like status in the FST. These molecular differences are reflected in both the extent of transcriptional remodeling (number of significantly changed genes) and the types of molecular pathways affected following FST exposure. A markedly higher number of genes (i.e., 2.28-fold) were statistically significantly changed following FST in LR rats, as compared to their HR counterparts. Notably, genes associated with neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity were induced in the

  4. Forced swim test induces divergent global transcriptomic alterations in the hippocampus of high versus low novelty-seeker rats.

    PubMed

    Pitychoutis, Pothitos M; Sanoudou, Despina; Papandreou, Margarita; Nasias, Dimitris; Kouskou, Marianna; Tomlinson, Craig R; Tsonis, Panagiotis A; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zeta

    2014-02-25

    Many neuropsychiatric disorders, including stress-related mood disorders, are complex multi-parametric syndromes. Susceptibility to stress and depression is individually different. The best animal model of individual differences that can be used to study the neurobiology of affect regards spontaneous reactions to novelty. Experimentally, when naive rats are exposed to the stress of a novel environment, they display a highly variable exploratory activity and are classified as high or low responders (HR or LR, respectively). Importantly, HR and LR rats do not seem to exhibit a substantial differentiation in relation to their 'depressive-like' status in the forced swim test (FST), a widely used animal model of 'behavioral despair'. In the present study, we investigated whether FST exposure would be accompanied by phenotype-dependent differences in hippocampal gene expression in HR and LR rats. HR and LR rats present a distinct behavioral pattern in the pre-test session but develop comparable depressive-like status in the second FST session. At 24 h following the second FST session, HR and LR rats (stressed and unstressed controls) were sacrificed and hippocampal samples were independently analyzed on whole rat genome Illumina arrays. Functional analysis into pathways and networks was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. Notably, hippocampal gene expression signatures between HR and LR rats were markedly divergent, despite their comparable depressive-like status in the FST. These molecular differences are reflected in both the extent of transcriptional remodeling (number of significantly changed genes) and the types of molecular pathways affected following FST exposure. A markedly higher number of genes (i.e., 2.28-fold) were statistically significantly changed following FST in LR rats, as compared to their HR counterparts. Notably, genes associated with neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity were induced in the hippocampus of LR rats in response

  5. Chronic treatment with fluoxetine and sertraline prevents forced swimming test-induced hypercontractility of rat detrusor muscle.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Sirri; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Bas, Duygu B; Aksoz, Elif; Savli, Evren; Ilkaya, Fatih; Kesim, Yuksel

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake inhibitors represent important targets for the development of new treatments for detrusor overactivity and urinary incontinence. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of the forced swimming test (FST) on the contractile response of isolated rat detrusor muscle and to examine the effects of in vivo treatments of fluoxetine and sertraline on altered detrusor muscle contractility. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg ip) and sertraline (10 mg/kg ip) were administered once a day for 14 days. Rats were exposed to the FST on the 15th day. After the test, detrusor muscles were removed and placed in organ baths, and the contraction responses induced by carbachol, potassium chloride (KCl) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were recorded. The contractile responses of detrusor muscle strips to carbachol and electrical field stimulation were found to be increased at all carbachol doses and frequencies, respectively. FST also increased the contractile responses to KCl, which is used to test the differences in postreceptor-mediated contractions. The hypercontractile responses of detrusor strips to carbachol, EFS and KCl were abolished by treatment with both fluoxetine and sertraline. These treatments also decreased the immobility duration in the FST consistent with an antidepressant-like effect in this test. The results of this study provide the first evidence that FST increases contractility of the rat detrusor muscle, and this hypercontractility was abolished by chronic treatments of fluoxetine and sertraline at antidepressant doses by decreasing the postreceptor-mediated events.

  6. Neonatal administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor Lu 10-134-C increases forced swimming-induced immobility in adult rats: a putative animal model of depression?

    PubMed

    Hansen, H H; Sánchez, C; Meier, E

    1997-12-01

    Chronic administration of the tricyclic antidepressant clomipramine to neonatal rats from postnatal days 8 to 21 is reported to induce several behavioral changes in adult life, and it may serve as an animal model of human depressive disorder. Findings include increased immobility time in the forced swim test and locomotor hyperactivity in the open field test. Clomipramine is a serotonergic reuptake inhibitor, which suggests that altered development of the serotonergic system could account for the observed behavioral changes in the adult rat. The present study was carried out with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) to investigate whether the serotonin system, in particular, is involved in the neonatal animal model. The substance, Lu 10-134-C (LU), was characterized in monoamine reuptake and receptor binding assays and found to be an SSRI. Rats received LU during postnatal days 8 to 21 (2.5-15 mg/kg b. i.d.), and they were assessed in open field, forced swim and social interaction tests at the age of 4 months. Behavior of LU-treated rats and saline controls did not differ in the open field and social interaction tests. However, in the forced swim tests LU-treated neonates showed prolonged immobility time compared with saline controls. In conclusion, chronic LU treatment during neonatal life produces long-term changes in the forced swim test, but not in the open field and social interaction tests. The behavioral changes in the forced swim test suggest that the central serotonergic system may be involved in the putative neonatal animal model of depression.

  7. Melatonin affects the immobility time of rats in the forced swim test: the role of serotonin neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Micale, Vincenzo; Arezzi, Anna; Rampello, Liborio; Drago, Filippo

    2006-10-01

    The efficacy of melatonin or its derivatives in depressive patients has been recently considered for clinical application. However, the evidence for its effect on experimental models of depression is not consolidated. Here, the effects of melatonin on the model of forced swim test (FST) paradigm were studied in male rats of the Wistar strain after acute intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 0.1, 0.5 or 1 mg/kg of the hormone. Melatonin at doses of 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, but not of 0.1 mg/kg, decreased the immobility of rats in the FST paradigm suggesting a possible antidepressant-like activity. The dose of 0.5 mg/kg appeared to be as potent as clomipramine 50 mg/kg in reducing the immobility time of rats in the FST paradigm. The effect of melatonin on immobility time of rats in the FST paradigm was abolished by the simultaneous injection of the non-selective melatonin antagonist, luzindole (0.25 mg/kg, subcutaneously). Similarly, administration of small quantities of serotonin (5-HT, 5 ng/1 microl) or of the 5-HT(2A)/5-HT(2C) receptor agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (2 ng/1 microl) injected into the amygdale totally suppressed the reduction of immobility time in the FST paradigm induced by melatonin 0.5 mg/kg. These results may suggest that effects of melatonin on the behavioral reaction of rats in the FST paradigm are due to an interaction of the hormone with central 5-HT neurotransmission.

  8. Acute treatment with 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, tropisetron, reduces immobility in intact female rats exposed to the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Gabriela; Maswood, Sharmin

    2006-10-01

    The effects of tropisetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, were evaluated in adult Fischer female rats exposed to the Forced Swim Test (FST). Rats selected on the days of proestrus or estrus was immersed in a cylinder of water for 2 consecutive days. Rats were exposed to the FST for 15 min on day 1 (pretest), followed by a 5-min session (test), 24 h later. The proestrous-estrous group consisted of rats that were exposed to the FST on their proestrous stage (pretest); then 24 h later the same rats were exposed to the FST on their estrous stage (test). Rats in the estrous-diestrous group were exposed to the FST on their estrous stage (pretest) and 24 h later on their diestrous stage (test). Rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline or 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg tropisetron 30 min prior to exposure to the cylinder on the test day. Immobility, swimming, and struggling behaviors were scored for 5 min. There was a significant decline in immobility after treatment with 2.0 mg/kg tropisetron in both groups. In addition, a significant decline in swimming was observed in the estrous rats (proestrous-estrous group) after treatment with 2.0 mg/kg tropisetron. There were no significant effects of tropisetron on struggling in any groups examined.

  9. Sertraline behavioral response associates closer and dose-dependently with cortical rather than hippocampal serotonergic activity in the rat forced swim stress.

    PubMed

    Mikail, Hudu G; Dalla, Christina; Kokras, Nikolaos; Kafetzopoulos, Vasilios; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Z

    2012-09-10

    The rat Forced Swim Test (FST) is widely used to investigate the response to antidepressant treatment. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) elongate swimming duration during the FST, while climbing duration is unaffected. In the present study, we aimed to correlate behavioral effects of the SSRI sertraline in the FST with respective changes in the serotonergic activity of the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Male rats were subjected to the standard FST (two swim sessions in two consecutive days) and between the two sessions they received three i.p. injections of sertraline (10 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg) or vehicle. All rats were killed immediately after the second FST session. Unstressed animals received the same administration schemes and were killed in equivalent time-points. Serotonin and its metabolite 5-HIAA were assayed in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ED) and their ratio 5-HIAA/5-HT was calculated. Sertraline enhanced swimming and decreased immobility duration at both doses. Serotonergic activity was not altered by the 2-day swim stress in either brain region, while subchronic sertraline treatment enhanced 5-HT levels and decreased 5-HIAA/5-HT in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. The serotonin turnover rate (5-HIAA/5-HT ratio) decrease is probably indicative of reduced 5-HT metabolism, as a result of 5-HT reuptake inhibition. This effect was significant in the prefrontal cortex of unstressed rats only after a higher dose of sertraline. In the prefrontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus, immobility duration was negatively correlated with 5-HT tissue levels, whereas swimming duration was positively correlated with 5-HT. These results indicate that after antidepressant treatment, behavior during the FST can be predictive of respective serotonergic changes, especially in the prefrontal cortex. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of ingestion of rice bran drink in rats subjected to forced swimming and elevated plus maze tests.

    PubMed

    Faccin, Gerson Luis; Amante, Edna Regina; Tramonte, Vera Lucia Cardoso Garcia; Pinto, Márcia Teixeira; Wazlawik, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Bran cereals are known to contain substantial concentrations of important nutrients, bioactive compounds, fiber, minerals, proteins, lipids, and vitamins. The vitamins present in rice bran include those of the B complex (B(1) and B(3)), which affect the central nervous system (natural antidepressant and tranquilizer effects) acting in schizophrenia, neuralgia, and fatigue. The elevated plus maze (EPM) test is a model widely used for the study of anxiety in animals. The forced swimming (FS) test is the model used most often for evaluating the antidepressant activity in animal models in pharmacology. This study examined the behavior of 32 male Wistar rats, 21 days old, in the FS and EPM tests after treatment with strawberry- or chocolate-flavored rice bran drink for 28 days. The concentration of adrenocorticotropic hormone in the plasma of the animals was determined at the beginning and end of treatment. The values found (<1.0 mg/dL) showed no significant difference between the test and control groups in the periods analyzed. In the EPM, ingesting the chocolate-flavored drink showed an anxiogenic trend in the rats, and the strawberry-flavored rice bran drink led to an anxiolytic profile, although the difference was not statistically significant (P > .05). In the FS test, the duration of immobility of rats in groups consuming rice bran drinks was higher than in the control group, but without a statistically significant difference (P > .05). However, this result may indicate a tendency toward an effect on the central nervous system of the animals after the ingestion of the rice bran beverage.

  11. The depressive-like behaviors are correlated with decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in rat brain following chronic forced swim stress.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoli; Lin, Wenjuan; Li, Junfa; Pan, Yuqin; Wang, Weiwen

    2006-12-15

    In the present study, 40 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into forced swim stress group and controls, with 20 rats in each group (10 for behavioral tests, 10 for protein detection). The forced swim stress group received swim stress for 14 consecutive days, and the controls were stress-free. After stress, 20 rats were tested for behavioral observation using body weight gain, open field, elevated plus-maze and saccharin preference test, and 20 rats were decapitated for protein detection. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) and phospho-Erk (P-Erk) in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were determined using western blot. It was found that the body weight gain of stressed animals during the 7 stressed days and the 14 stressed days was significantly decreased compared to that of controls. Stressed animals spent less time in open arms and longer time in closed arms. The stressed animals demonstrated decreased locomotor activity and increased grooming in open field. The saccharin solution intake and the ratio of saccharin solution intake to total liquid intake were both decreased in the stressed group. Stressed animals showed decreased P-Erk2 and decreased ratio of P-Erk2 to total Erk2 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, but their Erk1/2 was increased in the prefrontal cortex with no change in hippocampus. The saccharin solution intake positively correlated with the P-Erk2 in the hippocampus and negatively correlated with the Erk2 in the prefrontal cortex. In conclusion, chronic forced swim stress was a good animal model of depression, and it induced depressive-like behavior and decreased P-Erk2 in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in rats. The depressive-like behaviors were correlated with decreased phosphorylation of Erk, which suggested that the dysfunction of Erk activity might be one of biological mechanisms underlying depression induced by stress.

  12. Repeated forced swim stress has additive effects in anxiety behavior and in cathecolamine levels of adult rats exposed to deltamethrin.

    PubMed

    Habr, Soraya F; Macrini, Daclé J; Florio, Jorge C; Bernardi, Maria M

    2014-01-01

    Deltamethrin (DTM) is a type II pyrethroid insecticide that elicits autonomic and neuroendocrine responses that indicate high levels of stress, presumably caused by the neurotoxic effect of the insecticide. This study investigated the effect of DTM exposure (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and an additional stress induced in the forced swim test (FST) in behavioral tasks related to anxiety, serum corticosterone levels, and striatal neurotransmitter levels. Open field behavior and social interaction were evaluated after DTM administration (10 mg kg(-1), p.o). DTM per se reduced rearing frequency in the open field, but no alterations in locomotion frequency or immobility duration were detected. Stress increased immobility duration compared with non-stressed animals. DTM reduced social interaction and increased corticosterone levels, and these effects were enhanced in stressed animals. Mainly stress affected dopaminergic and serotoninergic activity. In anxiety behavior and in both neurotransmitters and metabolites levels it was observed an additive effect of stress in DTM treated rat data. These results indicate that DTM enhanced the anxiogenic responses and stress had an additive effect over the DTM stress. The neurochemical data did not indicate an interaction between stress and DTM exposure. The present results maybe important for implementing pyrethroid insecticide safety standards.

  13. Effects of co-administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine with metyrapone on immobility time and plasma corticosterone concentration in rats subjected to the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Rogóz, Zofia; Skuza, Grazyna; Leśkiewicz, Monika; Budziszewska, Bogusława

    2008-01-01

    Major depression is frequently associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and glucocorticoid synthesis inhibitors have been shown to exert antidepressant action. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of co-administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine with metyrapone on immobility time and plasma corticosterone concentration in male Wistar rats subjected to the forced swim test. Metyrapone alone (50 mg/kg, but not 25 mg/kg) reduced the immobility time of rats in the forced swim test; moreover, both doses tested (25 and 50 mg/kg), dose-dependently decreased the stress-induced plasma corticosterone concentration. Joint administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine (10 mg/kg) and metyrapone (25 mg/kg - a dose inactive per se) exhibited antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test in rats. WAY 100636 (a 5-HT(1A) antagonist), but not prazosin (an alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist), used in doses ineffective in the forced swim test, inhibited the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of fluoxetine or tianeptine with metyrapone (25 mg/kg). Combined treatment of fluoxetine or tianeptine and metyrapone inhibited stress-induced corticosterone secretion to a similar extent as metyrapone alone. The obtained results indicate that metyrapone potentiates the antidepressant-like activity of fluoxetine or tianeptine and that, among other mechanisms, 5-HT(1A) receptors may play some role in this effect. Moreover, metyrapone exerts a beneficial effect on the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. These findings suggest that the co-administration of metyrapone and an antidepressant drug may be useful for the treatment of drug-resistant depression and/or depression associated with a high cortisol level.

  14. Influence of ACTH on the effects of imipramine, desipramine and lithium on duration of immobility of rats in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Araki, Hiroaki; Gomita, Yutaka

    2002-01-01

    We examined the effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) on the immobilization of rats in the forced swim test with the administration of imipramine, desipramine, or lithium. A single administration of either imipramine (10-30 mg/kg, i.p.) or desipramine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased the duration of immobility in normal rats in a dose-dependent manner. Lithium (10-100 mg/kg, p.o.), however, had no affect on the performance of rats in the forced swim test. ACTH (100 microg/day), administered subcutaneously to rats for 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, had no apparent effect on the duration of immobility in this test. The immobility-decreasing effect induced by a single administration of either imipramine (10-30 mg/kg, i.p.) or desipramine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was blocked by chronic administration of ACTH for 3-14 days. The reduction of immobility, induced by chronic administration of imipramine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) for 15 days, was blocked by treatment with ACTH for 14 days. When lithium (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 15 days concurrently with imipramine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), we observed a significant decrease in immobility in rats treated with ACTH for 14 days. We suggest that chronic treatment of rats with ACTH may prove to be an effective model of tricyclic antidepressants-treatment-resistant depression.

  15. Social isolation in adolescence alters behaviors in the forced swim and sucrose preference tests in female but not in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suzie; Flashner, Bess; Chiu, Melissa; Hoeve, Elizabeth ver; Luz, Sandra; Bhatnagar, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Social interactions in rodents are rewarding and motivating and social isolation is aversive. Accumulating evidence suggests that disruption of the social environment in adolescence has long-term effects on social interactions, on anxiety-like behavior and on stress reactivity. In previous work we showed that adolescent isolation produced increased reactivity to acute and to repeated stress in female rats, whereas lower corticosterone responses to acute stress and decreased anxiety-related behavior were noted in isolated males. These results indicate a sex specific impact on the effects of social stress in adolescence. However, little is known about whether social isolation impacts behaviors related to affect and whether it does so differently in male and female rats. The present study investigated the impact of adolescent social isolation from day 30-50 of age in male and female Sprague Dawley rats on behavior in the forced swim test at the end of adolescence and in adulthood and on behavior in the sucrose preference test in adulthood. Adult female rats that were isolated in adolescence exhibited increased climbing on the first and second day of the forced swim test and showed an increased preference for sucrose compared to adult females that were group-housed in adolescence. There were no effects in male rats. The results indicate that social isolation in adolescence produces a stable and active behavioral phenotype in adult female rats. PMID:21907226

  16. Tipepidine, a non-narcotic antitussive, exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in adrenocorticotropic hormone-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Ogata, Yukino; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether tipepidine exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated rats, which is known as a treatment-resistant depression model, and we studied the pharmacological mechanisms of the effects of tipepidine. Male Wistar rats (5-7 weeks old) were used in this study. Tipepidine (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test in ACTH-treated rats. The anti-immobility effect of tipepidine was blocked by a catecholamine-depleting agent, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (300 mg/kg, s.c.), but not by a serotonin-depleting agent, p-chlorophenylalanine. The anti-immobility effect of tipepidine was also blocked by a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 (0.02 mg/kg, s.c.) and an adrenaline α2 receptor antagonist, yohimbine (2 mg/kg, i.p.). In microdialysis technique, tipepidine (40 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the extracellular dopamine level of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in ACTH-treated rats. These results suggest that tipepidine exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in ACTH-treated rats, and that the effect of tipepidine is mediated by the stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors and adrenaline α2 receptors. The results also suggest that an increase in the extracellular dopamine level in the NAc may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of tipepidine in ACTH-treated rats.

  17. Antifatigue Effect of Luteolin-6-C-Neohesperidoside on Oxidative Stress Injury Induced by Forced Swimming of Rats through Modulation of Nrf2/ARE Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Fang-fang; Guo, Ying; Li, Jing-wan

    2017-01-01

    Luteolin-6-C-neohesperidoside (LN) is a flavonoid isolated from moso bamboo leaf. This study was performed to evaluate the antifatigue effect of LN on a rat model undergoing the weight-loaded forced swimming test (FST). Briefly, male Sprague-Dawley rats (20–22 weeks old) were forced to undertake exhaustive swimming every other day for 3 weeks. Each swimming session was followed by the administration of distilled water, LN (25–75 mg/kg), or ascorbic acid (100 mg/kg) 1 h later. Oral administration of LN significantly improved exercise endurance; normalized alterations in energy metabolic markers; and decreased serum lactic acid, lactate dehydrogenase, and blood urea nitrogen levels of rats that underwent FST. Moreover, LN enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant capacity, as measured by enzyme activity assays, RT-PCR, and Western blotting, as well as decreasing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 and increasing the level of anti-inflammatory (IL-10) in the liver and skeletal muscle. These results suggested that LN reduces both physical and mental effects of chronic fatigue, probably by attenuating oxidative stress injury and inflammatory responses in the liver and skeletal muscle. This study thus supports the use of LN in functional foods for antifatigue and antioxidant effects. PMID:28588747

  18. In the rat forced swimming test, NA-system mediated interactions may prevent the 5-HT properties of some subacute antidepressant treatments being expressed.

    PubMed

    Rénéric, Jean-Philippe; Bouvard, Manuel; Stinus, Luis

    2002-04-01

    In the rat forced swimming test (FST), reuptake inhibitors selective of either serotonin (5-HT) or noradrenaline (NA) decrease immobility duration, and increase, respectively, swimming and climbing behaviour. In this study, an almost total 6-OHDA-induced NA-depletion prevented the behavioural effects of desipramine, but not fluoxetine. Interestingly, the serotonin/noradrenaline-reuptake-inhibitor milnacipran, as well as a (desipramine+fluoxetine) combination, could produce both swimming and climbing behaviour in NA-lesioned rats, but not in non-lesioned. The new antidepressant mirtazapine, which enhances both 5-HT and NA transmissions, supposedly through the antagonizing of alpha(2)-adrenoreceptors, dose-dependently reduced immobility and increased climbing behaviour. Interestingly, a (mirtazapine+fluoxetine) combination treatment resulted in additive anti-immobility effects and in the summation of fluoxetine-induced swimming with mirtazapine-induced climbing. Taken together, these data suggest that the NA system mediates presynaptic inhibiting interactions on the 5-HT system, that may involve alpha(2)-receptors, and that may limit the efficacy of mixed serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibition in subacute antidepressant treatments.

  19. Effects of bupropion on the forced swim test and release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens in ACTH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Yagi, Takahiko; Kitagawa, Kouhei; Shinomiya, Kazuaki; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Asanuma, Masato; Gomita, Yutaka

    2010-08-01

    The dopamine reuptake inhibitor bupropion has clinically been proven to improve depression and treatment-resistant depression. We examined its influence on the duration of immobility during the forced swim test in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated rats and further analyzed the possible role of dopamine receptors in this effect. Additionally, the mechanism by which bupropion acts in this model was explored specifically in relation to the site of action through the use of microinjections into the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Bupropion significantly decreased the duration of immobility in normal and ACTH-treated rats. This effect was blocked by D2 and D3 receptor antagonists in normal rats. Furthermore, infusions of bupropion into the nucleus accumbens, but not medial prefrontal cortex, decreased the immobility of normal and ACTH-treated rats during the forced swim test. Bupropion treatment plus repeated ACTH treatment significantly increased the extracellular dopamine concentration. These findings suggest the antidepressant-like effect of bupropion to be related to levels of dopamine in the rat nucleus accumbens.

  20. Involvement of serotonin receptor subtypes in the antidepressant-like effect of TRIM in the rat forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ulak, Güner; Mutlu, Oguz; Tanyeri, Pelin; Komsuoglu, F Ipek; Akar, Füruzan Yildiz; Erden, B Faruk

    2010-05-01

    Depression is a common illness with severe morbidity and mortality. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors are shown to elicit antidepressant-like effect in various animals models. It is widely known that serotonin plays an important role in the antidepressant-like effect of drugs. The aim of this study is to investigate the involvement of 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2) receptor subtypes in the antidepressant-like effect of TRIM, a nNOS inhibitor, in the rat forced swimming test (FST). TRIM displays an antidepressant-like activity in FST which is blocked by pretreatment with the NOS substrate l-arginine. Depletion of endogenous serotonin using para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA; 3x150mg/kg, i.p.) partially attenuated TRIM (50mg/kg)-induced reductions in immobility time in FST. Pretreatment with methiothepin (0.1mg/kg, i.p, a non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist), cyproheptadine (3mg/kg i.p, a 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist) or ketanserin (5mg/kg i.p, a 5HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist) prevented the effect of TRIM (50mg/kg) in the FST. WAY 100635 (0.1mg/kg i.p, a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist) and GR 127935 (3mg/kg i.p, a selective 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor antagonist) slightly reversed the immobility-reducing effect of TRIM in the FST, but this failed to reach a statistically significant level. The results of this study demonstrate that antidepressant-like effect of TRIM in the FST seems to be mediated, at least in part, by an interaction with 5-HT(2) receptors while non-significant effects were obtained with 5-HT(1) receptors.

  1. Comparison of time-dependent effects of (+)-methamphetamine or forced swim on monoamines, corticosterone, glucose, creatine, and creatinine in rats.

    PubMed

    Herring, Nicole R; Schaefer, Tori L; Tang, Peter H; Skelton, Matthew R; Lucot, James P; Gudelsky, Gary A; Vorhees, Charles V; Williams, Michael T

    2008-05-30

    Methamphetamine (MA) use is a worldwide problem. Abusers can have cognitive deficits, monoamine reductions, and altered magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings. Animal models have been used to investigate some of these effects, however many of these experiments have not examined the impact of MA on the stress response. For example, numerous studies have demonstrated (+)-MA-induced neurotoxicity and monoamine reductions, however the effects of MA on other markers that may play a role in neurotoxicity or cell energetics such as glucose, corticosterone, and/or creatine have received less attention. In this experiment, the effects of a neurotoxic regimen of (+)-MA (4 doses at 2 h intervals) on brain monoamines, neostriatal GFAP, plasma corticosterone, creatinine, and glucose, and brain and muscle creatine were evaluated 1, 7, 24, and 72 h after the first dose. In order to compare MA's effects with stress, animals were subjected to a forced swim test in a temporal pattern similar to MA administration [i.e., (30 min/session) 4 times at 2 h intervals]. MA increased corticosterone from 1-72 h with a peak 1 h after the first treatment, whereas glucose was only increased 1 h post-treatment. Neostriatal and hippocampal monoamines were decreased at 7, 24, and 72 h, with a concurrent increase in GFAP at 72 h. There was no effect of MA on regional brain creatine, however plasma creatinine was increased during the first 24 h and decreased by 72 h. As with MA treatment, forced swim increased corticosterone more than MA initially. Unlike MA, forced swim reduced creatine in the cerebellum with no change in other brain regions while plasma creatinine was decreased at 1 and 7 h. Glucose in plasma was decreased at 7 h. Both MA and forced swim increase demand on energy substrates but in different ways, and MA has persistent effects on corticosterone that are not attributable to stress alone.

  2. [Effect of Acupuncture Intervention on c-jun N-terminal Kinase Signaling in the Hippocampus in Rats with Forced Swimming Stress].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Xu, Ke; Bao, Wu-ye; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xu-hui; Xu, Ming-min; Yu, Miao; Zhang, Chun-tao; Zhao, Bing-cong; Wu, Ji-hong; Tu, Ya

    2016-02-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture on c-jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling in the hippocampus in rats with forced-swimming stress, so as to reveal its underlying mechanism in relieving depression-like motor response. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 8 groups as control, control + JNK inhibitor (SP 600125) , model, model + SP 600125, acupuncture, acupuncture + SP 600125, Fluoxetine (an anti-depressant) , and Fluoxetine + SP 600125 (n = 6 in each group). The depression-like behavior (immobility) model was established by forcing the rat to swim in a glass-cylinder and solitary raise. Acupuncture stimulation was applied to "Baihui" (GV-20) and "Yintang" (GV 29) for 20 min before forced swimming and once again 24 h later.. The rats of the Fluoxetine and Fluoxetine+ SP 600125 groups were treated by intragastric administration of fluoxetine 10 mL (1.8 mg)/kg before forced swimming and once again 24 h thereafter. The rats of the model + SP 600125 and acupuncture + SP 600125 groups were treated by intraperitoneal injection of SP 600125 (10 mg/kg) 90 min before forced swimming and 30 min before acupuncture intervention, respectively. The immobility duration of rats in the water glass-cylinder was used to assess their depression-like behavior response. The expression levels of protein kinase kinase 4 (MKK 4), MKK 7, JNK, and phosphorylated JNK (p-JNK) in the hippocampus were detected by Western blot. Compared to the control group, the duration of immobility, and the expression levels of hippocampal MKK 4, MKK 7, and p-JNK proteins were significantly increased in the model group (P < 0.01). While in comparison with the model group, the duration of immobility in the model + SP 600125, acupuncture, acupuncture + SP 600125, Fluoxetine and Fluoxetine + SP 600125 groups, the expression levels of hippocampal MKK 4 and MKK 7 proteins in the Fluoxetine + SP 600125 group, and those of p-JNK protein in the acupuncture, acupuncture + SP 600125, model + SP

  3. Repeated electroconvulsive stimuli have long-lasting effects on hippocampal BDNF and decrease immobility time in the rat forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingjin; Suemaru, Katsuya; Cui, Ranji; Araki, Hiroaki

    2007-03-27

    Electroconvulsive therapy is considered an effective treatment for severe depression. However, the mechanisms for its long-lasting antidepressant efficacy are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated changes of the immobility time in the forced swim test and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein after withdrawal from 14-day repeated electroconvulsive stimuli (ECS, 50 mA, 0.2 s) in rats. Immobility time in the forced swim test was markedly decreased 6 h after withdrawal following 14-day ECS treatment. Thereafter, prolongation of the withdrawal period gradually diminished the decreasing effect of immobility time, but significant effects persisted for up to 3 days after the withdrawal. Locomotor activity in the open-field test increased 6 h after withdrawal from the ECS treatment, and the enhanced effect persisted for at least 7 days. The BDNF protein level in the hippocampus was markedly increased 6 h after the withdrawal, and remained high for at least 7 days. These findings provide further evidence that repeated ECS has long-lasting effect on increase in BDNF and locomotor activity and decrease in immobility time in the forced swim test.

  4. Effects of forced swimming stress on thyroid function, pituitary thyroid-stimulating hormone and hypothalamus thyrotropin releasing hormone expression in adrenalectomy Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiuyan; Liu, Aihua; Ma, Yanan; Wang, Anyi; Guo, Xinhong; Teng, Weiping; Jiang, Yaqiu

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the impact that is imposed on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis of adrenalectomy male Wistar rats by stress caused by swimming, the blood level of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), the expression of TSHβ mRNA at the pituitary and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) expression at the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were measured. A total of 50 male Wistar rats of 6–8 weeks of age and with an average weight of 190–210 grams were randomly divided into the following two groups: The surgical (without adrenal glands) and non-surgical (adrenalectomy) group. These two groups were then divided into the following five groups, according to the time delay of sacrifice following forced swim (10 min, 2 h, 12 h and 24 h) and control (not subjected to swimming) groups. A bilateral adrenalectomy animal model was established. Serum TSH in the blood was measurement by chemiluminescent immunoassay, and cerebrum tissue were excised for the measurement of TRH expression using an immunohistochemistry assay. In addition, pituitaries were excised for the extraction of total RNA. Finally, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed for quantitation of TSHβ. Following swimming, the serum T3, T4 and TSH, the TSHβ mRNA expression levels in the pituitary and the TRH expression in the PVN of the surgical group were gradually increased. In the non-surgical group, no significant differences were observed in the serum T3, T4 and TSH levels compared with the control group. The TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary showed a similar result. Furthermore, the TRH expression at PVN was gradually increased and stress from swimming could increase the blood T4, T3 and TSH levels, TSHβ mRNA expression at the pituitary and TRH expression at the PVN in adrenalectomy Wistar rats. Moreover, the index in the surgical group changed significantly compared with the non-surgical group. In conclusion, the

  5. A medicinal herb, Melissa officinalis L. ameliorates depressive-like behavior of rats in the forced swimming test via regulating the serotonergic neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hang; Chou, Mei-Ling; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Lai, Yi-Syuan; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Hao, Cherng-Wei; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2015-12-04

    Depression is a serious psychological disorder that causes extreme economic loss and social problems. However, the conventional medications typically cause side effects that result in patients opting to out of therapy. Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L., MO) is an old and particularly reliable medicinal herb for relieving feelings of melancholy, depression and anxiety. The present study aims to investigate the antidepressant-like activity of water extract of MO (WMO) by evaluating its influence on the behaviors and the relevant neurotransmitters of rats performed to forced swimming test. Two phases of the experiment were conducted. In the acute model, rats were administered ultrapure water (control), fluoxetine, WMO, or the indicated active compound (rosmarinic acid, RA) three times in one day. In the sub-acute model, rats were respectively administered ultrapure water (control), fluoxetine, or three dosages of WMO once a day for 10 days. Locomotor activity and depression-like behavior were examined using the open field test and the forced swimming test, respectively. The levels of relevant neurotransmitters and their metabolites in the frontal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus, and striatum were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. In the acute model, WMO and RA significantly reduced depressive-like behavior but the type of related neurotransmitter could not be determined. The results indicated that the effect of WMO administration on the reduction of immobility time was associated with an increase in swimming time of the rats, indicative of serotonergic neurotransmission modulation. Chromatography data validated that the activity of WMO was associated with a reduction in the serotonin turnover rate. The present study shows the serotonergic antidepressant-like activity of WMO. Hence, WMO may offer a serotonergic antidepressant activity to prevent depression and to assist in conventional therapies. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. The selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 decreases immobility time in the forced swim test and affects cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Cornelius G; Bilang-Bleuel, Alicia; De Carli, Sonja; Linthorst, Astrid C E; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists can block the retention of the immobility response in the forced swimming test. Recently, we showed that forced swimming evokes a distinct spatiotemporal pattern of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and neocortex. In the present study, we found that chronic treatment of rats with the selective GR antagonist ORG 34116 decreased the immobility time in the forced swim test, increased baseline levels of phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) in the DG and neocortex and affected the forced swimming-induced changes in P-CREB levels in a time- and site-specific manner. Overall, we observed that, in control rats, forced swimming evoked increases in P-CREB levels in the DG and neocortex, whereas in ORG 34116-treated animals a major dephosphorylation of P-CREB was observed. These observations underscore an important role of GRs in the control of the phosphorylation state of CREB which seems to be of significance for the immobility response in the forced swim test and extend the molecular mechanism of action of GRs in the brain.

  7. Mechanism of synergistic action following co-treatment with pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline in the forced swimming test in rats.

    PubMed

    Rogóz, Zofia; Skuza, Grazyna

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of combined treatment of male Wistar rats with pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline in the forced swimming test. The obtained results showed that co-treatment with pramipexole (0.1 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or sertraline (5 mg/kg) (in doses inactive per se) exhibited antidepressant-like activity in the forced swimming test. Sulpiride (a dopamine D(2/3) receptor antagonist) and WAY 100635 (a 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist), either being ineffective in the forced swimming test, inhibited the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline. However, SCH 23390 (a dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist) only partly did not alter the effect of pramipexole given jointly with antidepressant drugs; on the other hand, S 33084 (a dopamine D(3) receptor antagonist) only partly decreased (in a statistically insignificant manner) that effect. Moreover, progesterone and BD 1047 (a sigma(1) receptor antagonist) counteracted the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of pramipexole and sertraline (but not pramipexole and fluoxetine). In that test, active behavior did not reflect the increases in general activity, since combined administration of pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline failed to enhance the locomotor activity of rats. None of the tested drugs (SCH 23390, sulpiride, S 33084, WAY 100635, BD 1047 and progesterone) - alone or in combination with pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline - changed locomotor activity. The results described in the present paper indicate that co-administration of pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline may induce a more pronounced antidepressive activity than does treatment with pramipexole alone, and that in addition to other mechanisms, dopamine D(2/3) and 5-HT(1A) receptors may contribute to the antidepressant-like activity of pramipexole and fluoxetine or sertraline in the forced swimming test in rats

  8. Effect of the use-dependent, nicotinic receptor antagonist BTMPS in the forced swim test and elevated plus maze after cocaine discontinuation in rats.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brandon J; Pearson, Laura S; Buccafusco, Jerry J

    2010-04-26

    Withdrawal from cocaine use often is associated with anxiety and depressive states. In this study the use-dependent, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist bis-(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinyl) sebacate (BTMPS) was studied for its ability to reduce these symptoms in two rat models of anxiety and depression. Rats were administered saline vehicle, or two escalating doses of cocaine, for a period of 5 days and they were evaluated during the period after cocaine discontinuation in the elevated plus maze (anxiety) and the forced swim test (affect). BTMPS (0.25, 0.5, or 0.75mg/kg) was co-administered with saline or cocaine in the dependence phase. Withdrawal from cocaine administration alone resulted in reductions in both the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus maze test, as well as entries into, and out of, the open arms of the maze. Withdrawal from cocaine also resulted in a reduction of escape behaviors, and the time to first immobility, in the forced swim test. Treatment with BTMPS produced a reversal of cocaine-induced anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus maze, including an increase (up to 68%) in time spent in the open arms of the maze and an increase in the number of crossings between open and enclosed arms. BTMPS also reduced depressive-like behaviors associated with the forced swim test, including up to a 62% increase in the time to first immobility and a 50% increase in escape behavior. These results provide proof of concept for the development and use of cholinergic compounds in the treatment of substance abuse.

  9. Effects of imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands on the immobility, swimming and climbing in the forced swim test in rats following discontinuation of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Frankowska, Małgorzata; Gołda, Anna; Wydra, Karolina; Gruca, Piotr; Papp, Mariusz; Filip, Małgorzata

    2010-02-10

    We tested if discontinuation of cocaine self-administration can lead to the development of depressive-like symptoms in the forced swim test expressed as changes in immobility, swimming and climbing behaviors in rats. A "yoked" procedure in which rats were run simultaneously in groups of three, with two rats received the passive injection of cocaine or saline, was employed. Later, we examined whether acute treatment with the classical antidepressant imipramine or GABA(B) receptor ligands could alter the increases in immobility recorded after discontinuation of self-administered cocaine. We found a significant increase (44%) in the immobility time 3 days following discontinuation of cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion/2h daily) self-administration for 14 days; such enhancement resembled that observed in rats following the chronic mild stress. Acute administration with imipramine (15 or 30 mg/kg), the GABA(B) receptor agonists baclofen (0.125 mg/kg) and SKF 97541 (0.005 mg/kg), the positive allosteric modulator CGP 7930 (0.3mg/kg) or the antagonist SCH 50911 (0.3mg/kg) counteracted the cocaine discontinuation-induced enhancement in the immobility time. The enhanced immobility time in rats that self-administered cocaine (but not given cocaine passively) may reflect the motivated or cognitive processes of reinforced responding of cocaine and could be a potential driver of the addiction process per se. Moreover, either blockade or stimulation of GABA(B) receptors by their ligands in very low doses attenuated the enhanced immobility time in rats after discontinuation of cocaine self-administration and these findings extend preclinical studies demonstrating the potential involvement of GABA(B) receptor ligands to reduce cocaine craving.

  10. Ozone modulates the effects of imipramine on immobility in the forced swim test, and nonspecific parameters of hippocampal oxidative stress in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mokoena, Mmalebuso L; Harvey, Brian H; Oliver, Douglas W; Brink, Christiaan B

    2010-06-01

    Depression has been associated with oxidative stress. There is increased awareness of the role of environmental toxins in the development of mood disorders. Ozone, a pro-oxidant and environmental pollutant, has been noted to have central nervous system effects. We investigated the effects of acute and chronic ozone inhalation on the response of imipramine in the forced-swim test (FST) and on biomarkers of oxidative stress in rat hippocampus. Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to 0, 0.25 or 0.7 ppm ozone per inhalation 4 h daily for either 30 days (chronic) or once (acute). Animals were then injected intraperitoneally with imipramine (10 mg/kg) or saline 24, 5 and 1 h before the forced-swim test. Hippocampal superoxide accumulation and lipid peroxidation were measured. Imipramine evoked an antidepressant-like effect independent of acute or chronic ozone exposure. However, 0.7 ppm acute ozone and 0.25 ppm chronic ozone attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of imipramine. The ozone exposures also elevated hippocampal superoxide accumulation and lipid peroxidation. Importantly, imipramine reversed the lipid peroxidation induced by chronic ozone, thereby preventing cellular damage induced by oxidative stress. Ozone exposure presents a feasible model with etiological validity to investigate oxidative stress in depression and antidepressant action.

  11. Antidepressant-like effects of the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the root bark of Morus alba on the immobility behavior of rats in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dong Wook; Kim, Yun Tai; Park, Ji-Hae; Baek, Nam-In; Han, Daeseok

    2014-06-12

    In this study, the antidepressant-like effects of Morus alba fractions in rats were investigated in the forced swim test (FST). Male Wistar rats (9-week-old) were administered orally the M. alba ethyl acetate (EtOAc 30 and 100 mg/kg) and M. alba n-butanol fractions (n-BuOH 30 and 100 mg/kg) every day for 7 consecutive days. On day 7, 1 h after the final administration of the fractions, the rats were exposed to the FST. M. alba EtOAc fraction at the dose of 100 mg/kg induced a decrease in immobility behavior (p < 0.01) with a concomitant increase in both climbing (p < 0.05) and swimming (p < 0.05) behaviors when compared with the control group, and M. alba EtOAc fraction at the dose of 100 mg/kg decreased the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to the stress, as indicated by an attenuated corticosterone response and decreased c-fos immunoreactivity in the hippocampal and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) region. These findings demonstrated that M. alba EtOAc fraction have beneficial effects on depressive behaviors and restore both altered c-fos expression and HPA activity.

  12. Reduced effectiveness of escitalopram in the forced swimming test is associated with increased serotonin clearance rate in food-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    France, Charles P; Li, Jun-Xu; Owens, William A; Koek, Wouter; Toney, Glenn M; Daws, Lynette C

    2009-07-01

    Efficacy of antidepressant drugs is often limited. One of the limiting factors may be diet. This study shows that the effect of escitalopram in the forced swimming test is diminished in rats by food restriction that decreased body weight by 8%. The primary target for escitalopram is the serotonin (5-HT) transporter. Using high-speed chronoamperometry to measure 5-HT clearance in vivo in rats fed the same food-restricted diet, the rate of 5-HT clearance from extracellular fluid in brain was dramatically increased. Increased 5-HT transporter function under conditions of dietary restriction might contribute to the decreased effect of escitalopram. These results suggest that diet plays an integral role in determining efficacy of antidepressant drugs, and might well generalize to other psychoactive drugs that impinge upon the 5-HT transporter.

  13. A role for serotonin in the antidepressant activity of NG-Nitro-L-arginine, in the rat forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Gigliucci, Valentina; Buckley, Kathleen Niamh; Nunan, John; O'Shea, Karen; Harkin, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    The present study determined regional serotonin (5-HT) synthesis and metabolism changes associated with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) and the influence of 5-HT receptor blockade in the antidepressant-like actions of L-NA in the forced swimming test (FST). Regional effects of L-NA (5,10 and 20mg/kg i.p.) on tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activity, the rate limiting enzyme for 5-HT synthesis, were determined by measuring accumulation of the transient intermediate 5-hydoxytryptophan (5-HTP) following in vivo administration of the amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor, NSD 1015 (100mg/kg). L-NA (5-20mg/kg) dose dependently increased 5-HTP accumulation, particularly in the amygdaloid cortex, following exposure to the FST. L-NA also provoked an increase in regional brain 5-HIAA concentrations and in the 5-HIAA:5-HT metabolism ratio. Co-treatment with NSD-1015 failed to consistently modify the antidepressant-like effects of L-NA in the FST. Sub-active doses of L-NA (1mg/kg) and the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor fluoxetine (2.5mg/kg) acted synergistically to increase swimming in the test. Co-treatment with the non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist metergoline (1, 2 and 4mg/kg), attenuated the L-NA (20mg/kg)-induced reduction in immobility and increase in swimming behaviours. Metergoline alone however provoked an increase in immobility and reduction in swimming behaviours in the test. A similar response was obtained following co-treatment with the preferential 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin (5mg/kg) and the 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist RO-430440 (5mg/kg). Co-treatment with the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (0.3mg/kg) or the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist GR 127935 (4mg/kg) failed to influence the antidepressant-like activity of L-NA. Taken together these data provide further support for a role for 5-HT in the antidepressant-like properties of NOS inhibitors.

  14. Effects of (+)-8-OH-DPAT on the duration of immobility during the forced swim test and hippocampal cell proliferation in ACTH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ayaka; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato; Sendo, Toshiaki

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of ACTH on the immobilization of rats in the forced swim test and hippocampal cell proliferation after administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, R-(+)-8-hydroxy-2-di-n-propylamino tetralin ((+)-8-OH-DPAT). Chronic treatment with (+)-8-OH-DPAT (0.01-0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) significantly decreased the duration of immobility in saline- and ACTH-treated rats. Chronic administration of ACTH caused a significant decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation. However, (+)-8-OH-DPAT significantly normalized cell proliferation in ACTH-treated rats. We then investigated the effects of (+)-8-OH-DPAT on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cyclin D1 (elements of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB)-BDNF and Wnt signaling pathways, respectively) in the hippocampus of saline- and ACTH-treated rats. ACTH treatment significantly decreased the expression of cyclin D1, while treatment with (+)-8-OH-DPAT normalized the expression of cyclin D1 in ACTH-treated rats. However, the expression of BDNF did not change in either saline- or ACTH-treated rats. These findings suggest that the antidepressant effects of (+)-8-OH-DPAT in treatment-resistant animals may be attributed to an enhancement of hippocampal cell proliferation, at least in part due to an enhancement of cyclin D1 expression.

  15. A2 noradrenergic neurons regulate forced swim test immobility.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyungwoo; Kerman, Ilan A

    2016-10-15

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat is a widely used animal model of depression, which is characterized by dysregulation of noradrenergic signaling. We previously demonstrated that WKY rats show a unique behavioral profile on the forced swim test (FST), characterized by high levels of immobility upon initial exposure and a greater learning-like response by further increasing immobility upon re-exposure than the genetically related Wistar rats. In the current study we aimed to determine whether altered activation of brainstem noradrenergic cell groups contributes to this behavioral profile. We exposed WKY and Wistar rats, to either 5min of forced swim or to the standard two-day FST (i.e. 15min forced swim on Day 1, followed by 5min on Day 2). We then stained their brains for FOS/tyrosine hydroxylase double-immunocytochemistry to determine potential differences in the activation of the brainstem noradrenergic cell groups. We detected a relative hyperactivation in the locus coeruleus of WKY rats when compared to Wistars in response to both one- and two-day forced swim. In contrast, within the A2 noradrenergic cell group, WKY rats exhibited diminished levels of FOS across both days of the FST, suggesting their lesser activation. We followed up these observations by selectively lesioning the A2 neurons, using anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase-conjugated saporin, in Wistar rats, which resulted in increased FST immobility on both days of the test. Together these data indicate that the A2 noradrenergic cell group regulates FST behavior, and that its hypoactivation may contribute to the unique behavioral phenotype of WKY rats.

  16. Effects of chronic forced swim stress on hippocampal brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor (TrkB) immunoreactive cells in juvenile and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Szalewska, Ewa; Spodnik, Edyta; Klejbor, Ilona; Morys, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    A type of stress stimulation and age are claimed to affect the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor - tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) in the hippocampal regions differentially. This study aimed to explore the influence of chronic (15 min daily for 21 days) forced swim stress (FS) exposure on the BDNF and TrkB containing neurons in the hippocampal CA1, CA3 pyramidal cell layers and dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell layer in juvenile (P28) and aged (P360) rats. An immunofluorescence (-ir) method was used to detect BDNF-ir and TrkB-ir cells. Under chronic FS exposure, in the group of juvenile rats a significant decrease in the density of BDNF immunoreactive neurons was observed in CA1 and DG (P less than <0.001), unlike CA3, where it remained unaltered just as the density of TrkB-ir cells in CA1 and DG, but in CA3 the number of TrkB-ir cells was found to grow (P less than 0.05) in comparison with control groups. After chronic FS exposure of aged (P360) rats, the density of BDNF-ir and TrkB-ir cells did not decline in any of the subregions of the hippocampus. In all subfields of the hippocampus, the denseness of BDNF-positive neurons was significantly higher in P360 stressed group, compared with P28 stressed group, but the density of TrkB-ir fell more markedly in P360 than in P28. In conclusion, chronic FS stress influenced the number of BDNF and TrkB immunoreactive neurons only in juvenile animals. The age of rats tested in the chronic forced swim test was a decisive factor determining changes in the density of BDNF-ir and TrkB-ir in the hippocampal structures.

  17. Further evidence for conditioned taste aversion induced by forced swimming.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2005-01-31

    A series of experiments with rats reported that aversion to a taste solution can be established by forced swimming in a water pool. Experiment 1 demonstrated that correlation of taste and swimming is a critical factor for this phenomenon, indicating associative (i.e., Pavlovian) nature of this learning. Experiment 2 showed that this learning obeys the Pavlovian law of strength, by displaying a positive relationship between the duration of water immersion in training and the taste aversion observed in subsequent testing. Experiment 3 revealed that swimming rather than being wet is the critical agent, because a water shower did not endow rats with taste aversion. Experiment 4 found that taste aversion was a positive function of water level of the pools in training (0, 12 or 32 cm). These results, taken together, suggest that energy expenditure caused by physical exercise might be involved in the development of taste aversion.

  18. Forced swim test: What about females?

    PubMed

    Kokras, Nikolaos; Antoniou, Katerina; Mikail, Hudu G; Kafetzopoulos, Vasilios; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zeta; Dalla, Christina

    2015-12-01

    In preclinical studies screening for novel antidepressants, male and female animals should be used. However, in a widely used antidepressant test, the forced swim test (FST), sex differences between males and females are not consistent. These discrepancies may discourage the inclusion of females in FST studies. In order to overcome this problem and provide a detailed insight regarding the use of female animals in the FST, we designed the following experiment and we performed a thorough analysis of the relevant literature. Male and female Wistar adult rats were subjected to the FST and sertraline was used as an antidepressant in two doses (10 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg, 3 injections in 24 h). Rodents were subjected in the two FST sessions during all possible combinations of the estrous cycle stages. We found that females exhibited higher levels of immobility than males and this sex difference was alleviated following antidepressant treatment. Sertraline at both doses enhanced swimming in both sexes, but females appeared more responsive to lower sertraline doses regarding immobility levels. Surprisingly, the high sertraline dose enhanced climbing particularly in proestrous and diestrous. Marked sex differences were also observed in the frequency of head swinging, with females exhibiting lower counts than males. Conclusively, when screening for new antidepressants, it is recommended to use standard FST procedures and if possible to include females in all phases of the cycle. Using only one dose of an investigational drug in females in certain phases of the cycle could result to false negative results.

  19. Forced swimming test increases superoxide anion positive cells and angiotensin II positive cells in the cerebrum and cerebellum of the rat.

    PubMed

    Pedreanez, Adriana; Arcaya, Jose Luis; Carrizo, Edgardo; Mosquera, Jesus

    2006-12-11

    Situations of stress are capable of inducing depression and oxidative stress in the brain. Previous reports have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) induces the production of superoxide anion (O(2)(-)), and impairment of endothelial function in cerebral microvessels in vivo. Substances that reduce angiotensin functions may be important in the treatment of depression. These data suggest a role for both Ang II and O(2)(-) in depression; thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of forced swimming test (FST), a model of stress/depression, on the cellular expression of Ang II and O(2)(-) in the central nervous system. To induce stress/depression, rats were subjected to FST daily (30 min) for 15 days. Unstressed animals were used as controls. Motor activity was automatically analyzed daily before swimming. Cerebrum and cerebellum frozen sections were studied for O(2)(-) by a histochemical method and for Ang II producing cells by a polyclonal antibody. In the FST group, struggle time, total horizontal activity, ambulatory movements, and vertical movements, were significantly decreased when the data from the 1st and 15th day were compared. Food intake and body weight gain also decreased when unstressed and FST rats were compared at the 15th day. Increased number of cerebrum and cerebellum O(2)(-), and Ang II positive cells, were observed in FST rats. Significant correlation was found between O(2)(-) positive cells and Ang II positive cell in the cerebrum. These results suggest that stress/depression situations could be involved in the increase of Ang II and oxidative stress in the central nervous system, with possible implications in the depressive condition.

  20. Water spray-induced grooming is negatively correlated with depressive behavior in the forced swimming test in rats.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Noboru; Narikiyo, Kimiya; Masuda, Akira; Aou, Shuji

    2016-05-01

    Rodents show grooming, a typical self-care behavior, under stress and non-stress conditions. Previous studies revealed that grooming under stress conditions such as the open-field test (OFT) or the elevated plus-maze test (EPM) is associated with anxiety, but the roles of grooming under non-stress conditions are not well understood. Here, we examined spray-induced grooming as a model of grooming under a non-stress condition to investigate the relationship between this grooming and depression-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test, and we compared spray-induced grooming with OFT- and EPM-induced grooming. The main finding was that the duration of spray-induced grooming, but not that of OFT/EPM-induced grooming, was negatively correlated with the duration of immobility in the FST, an index of depression-like behavior. The results suggest that spray-induced grooming is functionally different from the grooming in the OFT and EPM and is related to reduction of depressive behavior.

  1. Effects of prolonged ethanol vapor exposure on forced swim behavior, and neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing factor levels in rat brains.

    PubMed

    Walker, Brendan M; Drimmer, David A; Walker, Jennifer L; Liu, Tianmin; Mathé, Aleksander A; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2010-09-01

    Depressive symptoms in alcohol-dependent individuals are well-recognized and clinically relevant phenomena. The etiology has not been elucidated although it is clear that the depressive symptoms may be alcohol independent or alcohol induced. To contribute to the understanding of the neurobiology of chronic ethanol use, we investigated the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol vapor exposure on behaviors in the forced swim test (FST) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) levels in specific brain regions. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to intermittent ethanol vapor (14 h on/10 h off) or air exposure for 2 weeks and were then tested at three time points corresponding to acute withdrawal (8-12 h into withdrawal) and protracted withdrawal (30 and 60 days of withdrawal) in the FST. The behaviors that were measured in the five-min FST consisted of latency to immobility, swim time, immobility time, and climbing time. The FST results showed that the vapor-exposed animals displayed depressive-like behaviors; for instance, decreased latency to immobility in acute withdrawal and decreased latency to immobility, decreased swim time and increased immobility time in protracted withdrawal, with differences between air- and vapor-exposed animals becoming more pronounced over the 60-day withdrawal period. NPY levels in the frontal cortex of the vapor-exposed animals were decreased compared with the control animals, and CRF levels in the amygdala were correlated with increased immobility time. Thus, extended ethanol vapor exposure produced long-lasting changes in FST behavior and NPY levels in the brain.

  2. The Post-Ovariectomy Interval Affects the Antidepressant-Like Action of Citalopram Combined with Ethynyl-Estradiol in the Forced Swim Test in Middle Aged Rats.

    PubMed

    Vega Rivera, Nelly M; Gallardo Tenorio, Alfredo; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Estrada Camarena, Erika

    2016-05-03

    The use of a combined therapy with low doses of estrogens plus antidepressants to treat depression associated to perimenopause could be advantageous. However the use of these combinations is controversial due to several factors, including the time of intervention in relation to menopause onset. This paper analyzes whether time post-OVX influences the antidepressant-like action of a combination of ethynyl-estradiol (EE₂) and citalopram (CIT) in the forced swim test (FST). Middle-aged (15 months old) female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and after one or three weeks treated with EE₂ (1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat, s.c.; -48 h) or CIT (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and tested in the FST. In a second experiment, after one or three weeks of OVX, rats received a combination of an ineffective dose of EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat, s.c., -48 h) plus CIT (2.5 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and subjected to the FST. Finally, the uteri were removed and weighted to obtain an index of the peripheral effects of EE₂ administration. EE₂ (2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat) reduced immobility after one but not three weeks of OVX. In contrast, no CIT dose reduced immobility at one or three weeks after OVX. When EE₂ (1.25 µg/rat) was combined with CIT (2.5 mg/kg) an antidepressant-like effect was observed at one but not three weeks post-OVX. The weight of the uteri augmented when EE₂ was administrated three weeks after OVX. The data suggest that the time post-OVX is a crucial factor that contributes to observe the antidepressant-like effect of EE₂ alone or in combination with CIT.

  3. Effects of Forced Swimming Stress on ERK and Histone H3 Phosphorylation in Limbic Areas of Roman High- and Low-Avoidance Rats

    PubMed Central

    Piludu, Maria Antonietta; Poddighe, Laura; Serra, Maria Pina; Quartu, Marina; Corda, Maria Giuseppa; Giorgi, Osvaldo

    2017-01-01

    Stressful events evoke molecular adaptations of neural circuits through chromatin remodeling and regulation of gene expression. However, the identity of the molecular pathways activated by stress in experimental models of depression is not fully understood. We investigated the effect of acute forced swimming (FS) on the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 (pERK) and histone H3 (pH3) in limbic brain areas of genetic models of vulnerability (RLA, Roman low-avoidance rats) and resistance (RHA, Roman high-avoidance rats) to stress-induced depression-like behavior. We demonstrate that FS markedly increased the density of pERK-positive neurons in the infralimbic (ILCx) and the prelimbic area (PrLCx) of the prefrontal cortex (PFCx), the nucleus accumbens, and the dorsal blade of the hippocampal dentate gyrus to the same extent in RLA and RHA rats. In addition, FS induced a significant increase in the intensity of pERK immunoreactivity (IR) in neurons of the PFCx in both rat lines. However, RHA rats showed stronger pERK-IR than RLA rats in the ILCx both under basal and stressed conditions. Moreover, the density of pH3-positive neurons was equally increased by FS in the PFCx of both rat lines. Interestingly, pH3-IR was higher in RHA than RLA rats in PrLCx and ILCx, either under basal conditions or upon FS. Finally, colocalization analysis showed that in the PFCx of both rat lines, almost all pERK-positive cells express pH3, whereas only 50% of the pH3-positive neurons is also pERK-positive. Moreover, FS increased the percentage of neurons that express exclusively pH3, but reduced the percentage of cells expressing exclusively pERK. These results suggest that (i) the distinctive patterns of FS-induced ERK and H3 phosphorylation in the PFCx of RHA and RLA rats may represent molecular signatures of the behavioural traits that distinguish the two lines and (ii) FS-induced H3 phosphorylation is, at least in part, ERK-independent. PMID:28107383

  4. Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency does not alter the effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment on central serotonin turnover or behavior in the forced swim test in female rats.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Robert K; Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; Lipton, Jack W

    2013-12-01

    While translational evidence suggests that long-chain omega-3 fatty acid status is positively associated with the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs, the neurochemical mechanisms mediating this interaction are not known. Here, we investigated the effects of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid insufficiency on the neurochemical and behavioral effects of chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Female rats were fed diets with (CON, n=56) or without (DEF, n=40) the n-3 fatty acids during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90), and one half of each group was administered FLX (10mg/kg/day) for 30days (P60-P90) prior to testing. In adulthood (P90), regional brain serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic (5-HIAA) concentrations, presynaptic markers of 5-HT neurotransmission, behavioral responses in the forced swim test (FST), and plasma FLX and norfluoxetine (NFLX) concentrations were investigated. Peri-adolescent n-3 insufficiency led to significant reductions in cortical docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-25%, p≤0.0001) and DEF+FLX (-28%, p≤0.0001) rats. Untreated DEF rats exhibited significantly lower regional 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios compared with untreated CON rats, but exhibited similar behavioral responses in the FST. In both CON and DEF rats, chronic FLX treatment similarly and significantly decreased 5-HIAA concentrations and the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens, brainstem tryptophan hydroxylase-2 mRNA expression, and immobility in the FST. While the FLX-induced reduction in 5-HIAA concentrations in the prefrontal cortex was significantly blunted in DEF rats, the reduction in the 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio was similar to CON rats. Although plasma FLX and NFLX levels were not significantly different in DEF and CON rats, the NFLX/FLX ratio was significantly lower in DEF+FLX rats. These preclinical data demonstrate that n-3 fatty acid deficiency does not significantly reduce the effects of chronic

  5. Flavonoid-rich fraction of the Monodora tenuifolia seed extract attenuates behavioural alterations and oxidative damage in forced-swim stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Ekeanyanwu, Raphael Chukwuma; Njoku, Obioma Uzoma

    2015-03-01

    The antidepressant effects of the flavonoid-rich fraction of Monodora tenuifolia seed extract were examined by assessing the extent of attenuation of behavioural alterations and oxidative damage in the rats that were stressed by forced swim test. Compared with the model control group, the altered behavioural parameters were attenuated significantly (P < 0.05) in the group treated with the flavonoid-rich fraction (100 and 200 mg·kg(-1)), comparable to the group treated with the standard drug, fluoxetine (10 mg·kg(-1)). The flavonoid-rich fraction and fluoxetine improved significantly (P < 0.05) the activities of the antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and catalase as well as other biochemical parameters such as reduced glutathione, protein, and nitrite in the brain of the stressed rats. These results suggested that the flavonoid-rich fraction of Monodora tenuifolia seed extract exerted the antidepressant-like effects which could be useful in the management of stress induced disease. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Age-related changes in the antidepressant-like effect of desipramine and fluoxetine in the rat forced-swim test.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Nazario, Maribel; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2016-02-01

    Some reports suggest that older patients are less responsive to antidepressants than young adults, but this idea has not been fully supported. Here, we investigated the role of aging in the behavioral effects of the antidepressants, desipramine (DMI) (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (FLX) (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) in young adults (3-5 months), middle-aged (MA, 12-15 months), and senescent (SE, 23-25 months) male rats in the forced-swim test. In addition, locomotor activity and motor coordination were assessed as side-effects. DMI and fluoxetine produced an antidepressant-like effect in YA and MA animals, although in the latter group, a shift to the right in the dose-response curve was found for DMI. Importantly, neither drug was effective in SE animals. Motor side-effects were produced mainly by DMI in MA and SE rats. Therefore, a decrease in the antidepressant-like effect is associated strongly with senescence as well as an increased vulnerability to motor side-effects, particularly of tricyclics. This study is significant because SE animals are scarcely studied in pharmacological screening tests, and our findings might be useful for improving antidepressant treatments for the increasing aged population.

  7. Ultrasonic vocalizations during intermittent swim stress forecasts resilience in subsequent forced swim and spatial learning tests.

    PubMed

    Drugan, Robert C; Warner, Timothy A; Papallo, Tristan A; Castracane, Laura L; Stafford, Nathaniel P

    2014-02-01

    The examination of stress resilience has substantially increased in recent years. However, current paradigms require multiple behavioral procedures, which themselves may serve as secondary stressors. Therefore, a novel predictor of stress resilience is needed to advance the field. Ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) have been observed as a behavioral correlate of stress in various rodent species. It was recently reported that rats that emitted ultrasonic vocalizations during intermittent swim stress (ISS) later showed resilience when tested on an instrumental swim escape test. In the current study, we extend this earlier observation on two additional behavioral endpoints. Rats were subjected to ISS, and USVs were recorded. Twenty-four hours later, behavioral performance was evaluated in either the forced swim test or Morris water maze. Rats that emitted ultrasonic vocalizations were resilient to the effects of ISS as indicated by performance similar to controls on both measures. These results extend the original findings that ISS-induced USVs are associated with resilience and are related to subsequent aversively motivated behavior. Such a non-invasive forecast of stress responsivity will allow future work to utilize USVs to examine the neural correlates of initial stress resistance/resilience, thereby eliminating potential confounds of further behavioral testing. Future studies can utilize USVs to target potentially unappreciated neural systems to provide novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies for treatment-resistant depression.

  8. Ultrasonic vocalizations during intermittent swim stress forecasts resilience in subsequent forced swim and spatial learning tests.

    PubMed

    Drugan, Robert C; Warner, Timothy A; Papallo, Tristan A; Castracane, Laura L; Stafford, Nathaniel P

    2013-10-25

    The examination of stress resilience has substantially increased in recent years. However, current paradigms require multiple behavioral procedures, which themselves may serve as secondary stressors. Therefore, a novel predictor of stress resilience is needed to advance the field. Ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) have been observed as a behavioral correlate of stress in various rodent species. It was recently reported rats that emitted ultrasonic vocalizations during intermittent swim stress (ISS) later showed resilience when tested on an instrumental swim escape test. In the current study we extend this earlier observation on two additional behavioral endpoints. Rats were subjected to ISS, and USVs were recorded. Twenty-four hours later, behavioral performance was evaluated in either the forced swim test or Morris water maze. Rats that emitted ultrasonic vocalizations were resilient to the effects of ISS as indicated by performance similar to controls on both measures. These results extend the original findings that ISS-induced USVs are associated with resilience and is related to subsequent aversively motivated behavior. Such a non-invasive forecast of stress responsivity will allow future work to utilize USVs to examine the neural correlates of initial stress resistance/resilience, thereby eliminating potential confounds of further behavioral testing. Future studies can utilize USVs to target potentially unappreciated neural systems to provide novel pharmacotherapeutic strategies for treatment-resistant depression. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Facilitating antidepressant-like actions of estrogens are mediated by 5-HT1A and estrogen receptors in the rat forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Camarena, E; López-Rubalcava, C; Fernández-Guasti, A

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that 17beta-estradiol (E2) induces antidepressant-like actions per se and potentiates those produced by fluoxetine (FLX) in the forced swimming test (FST). The aim of the present work was to explore the participation of serotonin 1A receptors (5-HT1A) and estrogen receptors (ERs) in the antidepressant-like actions of E2, FLX or their combination in the FST. Although all antidepressants reduce behavioral immobility, antidepressants that modulate serotonergic neurotransmission increase swimming behavior whereas those that modulate the catecholaminergic neurotransmission increase climbing behavior. Thus, using this animal model, it is possible to infer which neurotransmitter system is modulating the action of an antidepressant compound. Ovariectomized female Wistar rats were used in all experiments. In the first experiment, an effective dose of E2 (10 microg/rat, -48 h) was combined with several doses (0.5, 1.0 and 2 mg/kg) of RU 58668 (a pure ER antagonist) 48 h previous to the FST. The second experiment evaluated the action of (1 mg/kg, -48 h or -23, -5 and -1 h) WAY 100635 (5-HT1A receptor antagonist) on the antidepressant-like action of FLX (10 mg/kg, -23, -5 and -1 h). In the third experiment, the effect of RU 58668 (2 mg/kg, -48) or WAY 100635 (1 mg/kg, -48 h) on the antidepressant-like action of the combination of a sub-optimal dose of E2 (2.5 microg/rat, -48 h) plus a non-effective dose of FLX (2.5 mg/kg, -23,-5 and -1 h) was evaluated. The results showed that RU 58668, the antagonist to the ER, canceled the antidepressant-like action of E2 in a dose-dependent manner. The antagonist to the 5-HT1A receptor blocked the antidepressant action of FLX only when administered simultaneously with FLX, i.e. -23, -5 and -1 h before the FST. Finally, the administration of both RU 58668, and WAY100635 canceled the antidepressant-like action of the combination of E2/FLX. These results imply that both 5-HT1A receptors and ERs participate in the

  10. Effects of imipramine and bupropion on the duration of immobility of ACTH-treated rats in the forced swim test: involvement of the expression of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Fujitani, Yoshika; Kitagawa, Kouhei; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Sagara, Hidenori; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Sendo, Toshiaki; Gomita, Yutaka

    2008-02-01

    We examined the effect of chronic administration of imipramine and bupropion, monoamine reuptake inhibitors, on the duration of immobility in the forced swim test and serotonin (5-HT)(2A) receptor function in the form of 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in rats chronically treated with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The immobility-decreasing effect of bupropion without imipramine did not influence the chronic ACTH treatment. The effect on the expression of 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA of chronic ACTH treatment was decreased by bupropion, but not imipramine. These results suggest that bupropion has the effect of reducing immobility time in the forced swim test in the tricyclic antidepressant-resistant depressive model induced by chronic ACTH treatment in rats, and that decreased 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels may be involved in this phenomenon.

  11. The Post-Ovariectomy Interval Affects the Antidepressant-Like Action of Citalopram Combined with Ethynyl-Estradiol in the Forced Swim Test in Middle Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vega Rivera, Nelly M.; Gallardo Tenorio, Alfredo; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Estrada Camarena, Erika

    2016-01-01

    The use of a combined therapy with low doses of estrogens plus antidepressants to treat depression associated to perimenopause could be advantageous. However the use of these combinations is controversial due to several factors, including the time of intervention in relation to menopause onset. This paper analyzes whether time post-OVX influences the antidepressant-like action of a combination of ethynyl-estradiol (EE2) and citalopram (CIT) in the forced swim test (FST). Middle-aged (15 months old) female Wistar rats were ovariectomized and after one or three weeks treated with EE2 (1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat, s.c.; −48 h) or CIT (1.25, 2.5, 5.0 or 10 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and tested in the FST. In a second experiment, after one or three weeks of OVX, rats received a combination of an ineffective dose of EE2 (1.25 µg/rat, s.c., −48 h) plus CIT (2.5 mg/kg, i.p./3 injections in 24 h) and subjected to the FST. Finally, the uteri were removed and weighted to obtain an index of the peripheral effects of EE2 administration. EE2 (2.5 or 5.0 µg/rat) reduced immobility after one but not three weeks of OVX. In contrast, no CIT dose reduced immobility at one or three weeks after OVX. When EE2 (1.25 µg/rat) was combined with CIT (2.5 mg/kg) an antidepressant-like effect was observed at one but not three weeks post-OVX. The weight of the uteri augmented when EE2 was administrated three weeks after OVX. The data suggest that the time post-OVX is a crucial factor that contributes to observe the antidepressant-like effect of EE2 alone or in combination with CIT. PMID:27153072

  12. A comparative pharmacological investigation of three samples of 'Guduchi ghrita' for adaptogenic activity against forced swimming induced gastric ulceration and hematological changes in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Savrikar, Shriram S; Dole, Vilas; Ravishankar, B; Shukla, Vinay J

    2010-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the impact of formulation factors and adjuvants on the expression of biological activity of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers. The adaptogenic effect of three samples of Guduchi ghrita, prepared using plain ghee (clarified butter) obtained from three different sources was studied in albino rats and compared with expressed juice of stem of Guduchi. The test preparations were evaluated against forced-swimming induced hypothermia, gastric ulceration and changes in the hematological parameters. The test drug given in the form of 'ghrita' produced better effect in comparison to the expressed juice. Among the three 'ghrita' preparations evaluated, only the 'Solapur Guduchi ghrita' (SGG) was found to produce significant inhibition of stress hypothermia and gastric ulceration. The other two preparations 'Nanded Guduchi ghrita' (NGG), and 'Wardha Guduchi ghrita' (WGG) could produce only a marginal effect. In hematological parameters 'Guduchi' juice produced better reversal of the stress-induced changes in comparison to the test 'ghrita' preparations. The present study provides evidence highlighting the importance of formulation factors for the expression of biological activity.

  13. Antidepressant-like effects of mGluR1 and mGluR5 antagonists in the rat forced swim and the mouse tail suspension tests.

    PubMed

    Belozertseva, I V; Kos, T; Popik, P; Danysz, W; Bespalov, A Y

    2007-02-01

    Drugs that act to reduce glutamatergic neurotransmission such as NMDA receptor antagonists exert antidepressant-like effects in a variety of experimental paradigms, but their therapeutic application is limited by undesired side effects. In contrast, agents that reduce glutamatergic tone by blocking type I metabotropic glutamate receptors have been suggested to have more a favorable side-effect profile. The present study aimed to compare the effects of mGluR1 antagonist (EMQMCM; JNJ16567083, 3-ethyl-2-methyl-quinolin-6-yl)-(4-methoxy-cyclohexyl)-methanone methanesulfonate, 0.156-10 mg/kg) and mGluR5 antagonist (MTEP, [(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine, 1.25-10 mg/kg) in two behavioral screening assays commonly used to assess antidepressant-like activity. In the modified forced swim test in rats, imipramine (used as a positive control) decreased immobility (MED 40 mg/kg) and increased the duration of escape-oriented (climbing and diving; MED 20 mg/kg) behaviors. Both EMQMCM and MTEP decreased the floating duration (MED 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg) and increased the duration of mobile behaviors (paddling and swimming; MED 2.5 and 5 mg/kg). EMQMCM but not MTEP increased the duration of escape behaviors (climbing and diving; MED 1.25 mg/kg). In the mouse tail suspension test, EMQMCM (5 but not 2.5, 10 and 25 mg/kg), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP, 10 but not 1 mg/kg) and MTEP (MED 25 mg/kg) decreased immobility scores. For EMQMCM, the dose-effect relationship was biphasic. With the exception of EMQMCM (10 mg/kg), locomotor activity in mice was not affected by treatments. The present study therefore suggests that acute blockade of mGluR5 and also of mGluR1 exerts antidepressant-like effects in behavioral despair tests in rats and mice.

  14. N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid consumption produces neurobiological effects associated with prevention of depression in rats after the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongsoon; Moon, Hyoun-Jung; Kim, Seok-Hyeon

    2012-08-01

    Epidemiological data and clinical trials suggest that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have preventive and therapeutic effects on depression; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. The present study aimed to examine the behavioral effects and antidepressant mechanism of n-3 PUFA using a forced swimming test. Eleven-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an American Institute of Nutrition-93M diet containing 0%, 0.5% or 1% EPA and DHA relative to the total energy intake in their diet for 12 weeks (n=8 per group). Total dietary intake, body weight and hippocampus weights were not significantly different among groups. The groups administered 0.5% and 1% EPA+DHA diets had significantly higher levels of n-3 PUFA in their brain phospholipids compared to those in the control group. The immobility time was significantly decreased and the climbing time was significantly increased in the 0.5% and 1% EPA+DHA groups compared with those in the 0% EPA+DHA group. Plasma serotonin concentration and hippocampus c-AMP response element binding protein (CREB) expression were significantly increased in the 0.5% and 1% EPA+DHA groups compared with those in the 0% EPA+DHA group. Conversely, interleukin (IL)-6 expression was significantly reduced in the 0.5% and 1% EPA+DHA groups compared with that in the 0% EPA+DHA group. However, there were no dose-dependent effects of n-3 PUFA and no significant differences in expressions of IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, brain-derived neurotrophic factor or phosphorylated CREB. In conclusion, long-term intake of EPA+DHA induced antidepressant-like effects in rats and overexpression of CREB via decreased IL-6 expression.

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficient Male Rats Exhibit Abnormal Behavioral Activation in the Forced Swim Test Following Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment: Association with Altered 5-HT1A and Alpha2A Adrenergic Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Able, Jessica A.; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n=34) or without (DEF, n=30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n=14) and DEF (n=12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (−26%, p=0.0001) and DEF+FLX (−32%, p=0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF+FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON+FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF+FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF+FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON+FLX rats. DEF+FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats. PMID:24360505

  16. Tethered swimming can be used to evaluate force contribution for short-distance swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Keskinen, Kari L; Badillo, Juan J; Marques, Mário C

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to compare stroke and the physiological responses between maximal tethered and free front crawl swimming and (b) to evaluate the contribution of force exertion for swimming performance over short distances. A total of 34 male swimmers, representing various levels of competitive performance, participated in this study. Each participant was tested in both a 30-second maximal tethered swimming test and a 50-m free swimming test. The tethered force parameters, the swimming speed, stroke (stroke rate [SR]), and the physiological responses (increase in blood lactate concentration [ΔBLa], heart rate, and rate of perceived exertion) were recorded and calculated. The results showed no differences in stroke and the physiological responses between tethered and free swimming, with a high level of agreement for the SR and ΔBLa. A strong correlation was obtained between the maximum impulse of force per stroke and the speed (r = 0.91; p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the maximum impulse and SR in the tethered condition explained 84% of the free swimming performance. The relationship between the swimming speed and maximum force tended to be nonlinear, whereas linear relationships were observed with the maximum impulse. This study demonstrates that tethered swimming does not significantly alter stroke and the physiological responses compared with free swimming, and that the maximum impulse per stroke should be used to evaluate the balance between force and the ability to effectively apply force during sprint swimming. Consequently, coaches can rely on tethered forces to identify strength deficits and improve swimming performance over short distances.

  17. Influence of the brain sexual differentiation process on despair and antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine in the rat forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M L; Martínez-Mota, L; Estrada-Camarena, E; Fernández-Guasti, A

    2014-03-07

    Sex differences exist in the depressive disorder prevalence and response to treatment. Several studies suggest that females respond better than males to the action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), suggesting that gonadal hormones modulate mood and the response to these drugs. Sexual steroid hormones exert organizational actions (perennial and on early development) and activational effects (transient and on differentiated tissues). The aim of this study was to analyze sex differences in the forced swim test (FST) in animals without treatment and after fluoxetine (FLX, 0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0mg/kg). Initially, we compared male and female adult rats under control conditions or after altering their sexual differentiation process (at day 5 postnatally, PN, 60μg of testosterone propionate to females and male castration to induce or preclude masculinization, respectively). To further analyze if the sex differences depend on organizational or activational steroid hormone action we tested the same animals before and after adult gonadectomy. To prevent variations depending upon the estrous cycle, control and masculinized females were tested in estrus. Control females showed lower immobility and required lower doses of FLX (5mg/kg), to show an antidepressant-like effect, than males (10mg/kg), even after adult gonadectomy. In control males adult orchidectomy prevented FLX's action. Neonatally masculinized females exhibited analogous levels of immobility than control ones; before ovariectomy they responded to FLX similar to controls, but after the surgery they did not respond to fluoxetine. Neonatally orchidectomized males exhibited similar immobility values and response to FLX than control females. The findings suggest that the sex difference in despair depends on the hormones organizational effects and, in males, the response to FLX relies on organizational and activational actions.

  18. The Effect of Swimming Experience on Acquisition and Retention of Swimming-Based Taste Aversion Learning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2010-01-01

    Swimming endows rats with an aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. The present study explored whether the experience of swimming before or after the taste-swimming trials interferes with swimming-based taste aversion learning. Experiment 1 demonstrated that a single preexposure to 20 min of swimming was as effective as four or…

  19. The Effect of Swimming Experience on Acquisition and Retention of Swimming-Based Taste Aversion Learning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2010-01-01

    Swimming endows rats with an aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. The present study explored whether the experience of swimming before or after the taste-swimming trials interferes with swimming-based taste aversion learning. Experiment 1 demonstrated that a single preexposure to 20 min of swimming was as effective as four or…

  20. Swimming Response of Individual Paramecia to Variable Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ilyong; Wagman, Michael; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2011-03-01

    Experiments demonstrate that swimming paramecia exhibit a negative force-kinetic response. In particular, upward swimming paramecia exert a stronger propulsive force as they fight their tendency to sediment. This response is remarkable because it suggests that paramecia can sense forces as small as their apparent weight, which is less than 100 pN. We are investigating the origins of this response by applying variable magnetic forces to individual swimming paramecia and measuring how their swimming trajectories change. We conduct the experiments at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory where it is possible to achieve forces sufficient to stall the swimmers. We will present our latest data on how paramecia adjust the geometry of their helical trajectories under varying forces. This work is supported by the NSF through PHY0750360 and the NHMFL.

  1. Requirement of AMPA receptor stimulation for the sustained antidepressant activity of ketamine and LY341495 during the forced swim test in rats.

    PubMed

    Koike, Hiroyuki; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2014-09-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, and group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2/3) receptor antagonists produce antidepressant effects in animal models of depression, which last for at least 24h, through the transient increase in glutamate release, leading to activation of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic (AMPA) receptor. Both ketamine and an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist reportedly increase the expression of GluR1, an AMPA receptor subunit, within 24h, which may account for the sustained enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission following ketamine administration. However, whether the sustained increase in AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission is associated with the antidepressant effects of ketamine and mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists has not yet been investigated. In the present study, to address this question, we tested whether AMPA receptor stimulation at 24h after a single injection of ketamine or an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, (2S)-2-amino-2-[(1S,2S)-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl]-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoic acid (LY341495) was necessary for the antidepressant effect of these compounds using a forced swim test in rats. A single injection of ketamine or LY341495 at 24h before the test significantly decreased the immobility time. An AMPA receptor antagonist, 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX), administered 30min prior to the test significantly and dose-dependently reversed the antidepressant effects of ketamine and LY341495, while NBQX itself had no effect on the immobility time. Our findings suggest that AMPA receptor stimulation at 24h after a single injection of ketamine or LY341495 is required to produce the anti-immobility effects of these compounds. Moreover, the present results provide additional evidence that an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist may share some of neural mechanisms with ketamine to exert antidepressant effects.

  2. Open-Space Forced Swim Model of Depression for Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Eric A.; Lin, Yan

    2011-01-01

    This protocol describes a simplified method for inducing a chronic depression-like state in mice that is based on the repeated open-space forced swim method for rats originally developed by Sun and Alkon (2003). The method consists of swimming mice daily in lukewarm water (32-34°C) in rat tub cages 24 × 43 × 23 cm w × h × l, for 15 min/day for 4 days, and thereafter once per week. This procedure produces a progressive decrease in distance swum and a concomitant increase in immobility (floating) in about 70 percent of the mice (Swiss Webster males), both of which persist unaltered for weeks and generalize to other tests of depression (tail suspension). The model has predictive, face and construct validity in that it is responsive to chronic antidepressants and coping responses but not to anxiolytics or antipsychotics, represents an inescapable stress that produces generalized passivity, and is accompanied by changes in neural activity and brain cell proliferation that are characteristic of depression and believed to contribute to the disorder. It is less effective in producing anhedonia than other models probably because it is less stressful. The model has a number of advantages over previous methods in that it utilizes very mild stress, is short in duration, is easily standardized, requires only a video camera and either a manual or automatic behavioral scoring system to measure immobility and distance swum, and can be readily used for time course studies of onset of drug action. Moreover, since it utilizes a greater swimming area than the traditional (Porsolt) method it can be used to study interactions of depressive behavior with behavioral flexibility and perseveration. Finally, its use of mice makes it readily amenable to genetic and molecular analyses. PMID:21207368

  3. Geometric Aspects of Force Controllability for a Swimming Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khapalov, A. Y.

    2008-02-15

    We study controllability properties (swimming capabilities) of a mathematical model of an abstract object which 'swims' in the 2-D Stokes fluid. Our goal is to investigate how the geometric shape of this object affects the forces acting upon it. Such problems are of interest in biology and engineering applications dealing with propulsion systems in fluids.

  4. Omega-3 fatty acid deficient male rats exhibit abnormal behavioral activation in the forced swim test following chronic fluoxetine treatment: association with altered 5-HT1A and alpha2A adrenergic receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n = 34) or without (DEF, n = 30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n = 14) and DEF (n = 12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-26%, p = 0.0001) and DEF + FLX (-32%, p = 0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF + FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON + FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF + FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF + FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON + FLX rats. DEF + FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats.

  5. 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinoline produces an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swim test and chronic mild stress model of depression in the rat: Neurochemical correlates.

    PubMed

    Możdżeń, Edyta; Papp, Mariusz; Gruca, Piotr; Wąsik, Agnieszka; Romańska, Irena; Michaluk, Jerzy; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna

    2014-04-15

    1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinoline (TIQ) is an exo- and endogenous amine naturally present in mammalian brain which displays antidepressant-like effect in various animal models: the forced swim test (FST) and chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm in rats. To elucidate this action we compared the effects of TIQ with imipramine, a classic antidepressant drug and one of the most clinically effective. Applied behavioral tests showed that TIQ produced an antidepressant-like effect with a potency comparable to that of imipramine. TIQ (25-50mg/kg i.p.), similarly to imipramine (10-30mg/kg i.p.), reduced the immobility time in FST and completely reversed the decrease in sucrose intake caused by CMS in the rat. In addition, in order to avoid the possible psychostimulating effect of TIQ we examined the influence of its administration on locomotor activity in rats. TIQ, like imipramine, produced a reduction in horizontal locomotor activity. This suggested that TIQ did not have psychostimulant properties and that prolonged swimming in the FST was a result of an increased motivation to escape from the stressful situation. The biochemical analyses have shown that TIQ activates monoaminergic systems as a reversible monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor and free radical scavenger. Beyond the activation of noradrenaline and serotonin systems, TIQ also moderately affects the dopamine system. On the basis of the presented behavioral and biochemical studies we suggest that TIQ is a potential new antidepressant which may be effective for the depression therapy in a clinical setting.

  6. Repeated exposure to corticosterone increases depression-like behavior in two different versions of the forced swim test without altering nonspecific locomotor activity or muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Marks, Wendie; Fournier, Neil M; Kalynchuk, Lisa E

    2009-08-04

    We have recently shown that repeated high dose injections of corticosterone (CORT) reliably increase depression-like behavior on a modified one-day version of the forced swim test. The main purpose of this experiment was to compare the effect of these CORT injections on our one-day version of the forced swim test and the more traditional two-day version of the test. A second purpose was to determine whether altered behavior in the forced swim test could be due to nonspecific changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength. Separate groups of rats received a high dose CORT injection (40 mg/kg) or a vehicle injection once per day for 21 consecutive days. Then, half the rats from each group were exposed to the traditional two-day forced swim test and the other half were exposed to our one-day forced swim test. After the forced swim testing, all the rats were tested in an open field and in a wire suspension grip strength test. The CORT injections significantly increased the time spent immobile and decreased the time spent swimming in both versions of the forced swim test. However, they had no significant effect on activity in the open field or grip strength in the wire suspension test. These results show that repeated CORT injections increase depression-like behavior regardless of the specific parameters of forced swim testing, and that these effects are independent of changes in locomotor activity or muscle strength.

  7. A comparative pharmacological investigation of three samples of 'Guduchi ghrita' for adaptogenic activity against forced swimming induced gastric ulceration and hematological changes in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Savrikar, Shriram S.; Dole, Vilas; Ravishankar, B.; Shukla, Vinay J.

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the impact of formulation factors and adjuvants on the expression of biological activity of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers. The adaptogenic effect of three samples of Guduchi ghrita, prepared using plain ghee (clarified butter) obtained from three different sources was studied in albino rats and compared with expressed juice of stem of Guduchi. The test preparations were evaluated against forced–swimming induced hypothermia, gastric ulceration and changes in the hematological parameters. The test drug given in the form of 'ghrita' produced better effect in comparison to the expressed juice. Among the three 'ghrita' preparations evaluated, only the 'Solapur Guduchi ghrita' (SGG) was found to produce significant inhibition of stress hypothermia and gastric ulceration. The other two preparations 'Nanded Guduchi ghrita' (NGG), and 'Wardha Guduchi ghrita' (WGG) could produce only a marginal effect. In hematological parameters 'Guduchi' juice produced better reversal of the stress-induced changes in comparison to the test 'ghrita' preparations. The present study provides evidence highlighting the importance of formulation factors for the expression of biological activity. PMID:20814518

  8. Oxidative Balance in Rats during Adaptation to Swimming Load.

    PubMed

    Elikov, A V

    2016-12-01

    The main parameters of free radical oxidation and antioxidant defense in the blood plasma, erythrocytes, and homogenates of skeletal muscles, heart, liver, lungs, and kidneys were studied in adult outbred albino male rats with different degree of adaptation to moderate exposure to swimming. The rats were trained to swim regularly over 1 month. Changes in oxidative balance varied in organs and tissues and depended on the level of training. Malonic dialdehyde content in the erythrocytes after swimming increased by 13.8% in non-trained animals, but decreased by 19.2% in trained rats. Parameters of blood plasma reflect the general oxidative balance of organs and tissues.

  9. Relationship between tethered forces and the four swimming techniques performance.

    PubMed

    Morouço, Pedro; Keskinen, Kari L; Vilas-Boas, Joao Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify the relationships between competitive performance and tether forces according to distance swam, in the four strokes, and to analyze if relative values of force production are better determinants of swimming performance than absolute values. The subjects (n = 32) performed a 30 s tethered swimming all-out effort. The competitive swimming velocities were obtained in the distances 50, 100 and 200 m using official chronometric values of competitions within 25 days after testing protocol. Mean force and velocity (50 m event) show significant correlations for front crawl (r = .92, p < .01), backstroke (r = .81, p < .05), breaststroke (r = .94, p < .01) and butterfly (r = .92, p < .01). The data suggests that absolute values of force production are more associated to competitive performance than relative values (normalized to body mass). Tethered swimming test seems to be a reliable protocol to evaluate the swimmer stroking force production and a helpful estimator of competitive performance in short distance competitive events.

  10. Swim-stress-induced antinociception in young rats.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, H. C.; Kitchen, I.

    1989-01-01

    1. Opioid and non-opioid mechanisms have been implicated in the phenomenon of stress-induced antinociception in adult rodents. We have studied stress-induced antinociception in developing rats and characterized differences in the neurochemical basis of this effect in pre- and post-weanling animals. 2. Twenty and 25 day old rats were stressed using warm water (20 degrees C) swimming for 3 or 10 min periods and antinociception was assessed by the tail immersion test (50 degrees C). 3. A 3 min swim in 20 and 25 day old rats produced marked antinociception which was blocked by naloxone, Mr 1452, 16-methyl cyprenorphine and levallorphan but not Mr 1453 or N-methyl levallorphan. The delta-opioid receptor antagonist ICI 174,864 attenuated stress-induced antinociception in 25 day old rats but was without effect in 20 day old animals. 4. A 10 min swim in 25 day old rats produced antinociception which was non-opioid in nature. In contrast, antinociception was not observed in 20 day old rats after a 10 min swim-stress. 5. Pretreatment of animals with dexamethasone blocked 3 min swim-stress antinociception in 20 and 25 day old animals but had no effect on antinociception induced by a 10 min swim. 6. Swim-stress-induced antinociception can be observed in young rats and dissociated into opioid and non-opioid types dependent on the duration of swimming stress. The non-opioid type appears to develop more slowly and cannot be observed in preweanling rats. The opioid type is a predominantly mu-receptor phenomenon in preweanling animals but delta-receptor components are observable in postweanling rats. PMID:2720296

  11. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-06-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  12. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  13. Ovarian and uterine alterations following forced swimming: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Saadat, Seyedeh Nazanin; Mohammadghasemi, Fahimeh; Ebrahimi, Hannan; Rafati Sajedi, Hanieh; Chatrnour, Gelayol

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical exercise is known to be a stressor stimulus that leads to reproductive disruption. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of forced swimming on the uterus and ovaries in mice. Materials and Methods: Adult mice (N=24) were divided into the following three groups: A, control; B, swimming in water (10oC); and C, swimming in water (23oC). Swimmers swam for 5 min daily for 5 consecutive days/ wk during 2 wks. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine serum estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone levels. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study apoptotic cells or estrogen receptor (ER) expression in uterine epithelial cells and ovaries. ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Results: Swimming in both groups reduced the serum FSH and estradiol levels (p<0.01) without having a significant effect on the serum testosterone level or percentage of apoptosis in ovarian and uterine tissues (p<0.01) compared with controls. A significant reduction in the number of ERs in the uterus and ovaries, and secondary and graafian follicles were observed in groups B and C compared with controls (p<0.01); however the number of primordial and primary follicles were not significantly changed in the ovaries. Conclusion: Forced swimming of 2 wks duration reduces the serum levels of FSH and estradiol without having effects on apoptosis in the ovaries or uteri of mice. Over a long period of time, forced swimming may have an adverse effect on fertility. PMID:27921086

  14. Enhanced anti-immobility effects of Sanggenon G isolated from the root bark of Morus alba combined with the α2-antagonist yohimbine in the rat forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dong Wook; Baek, Nam-In; Kim, Yun Tai; Lee, Changho; Kim, In-Ho; Han, Daeseok

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether Sanggenon G, an active compound isolated from the root bark of Morus alba, exhibited enhanced anti-immobility activity with the addition of the α2-antagonist yohimbine in rats subjected to forced swim test (FST)-induced depression. Fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) treatment in rats reduced the immobility time, and pretreatment with yohimbine significantly enhanced the antidepressant-like behavior of fluoxetine at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg. Similarly, Sanggenon G significantly decreased the immobility time, reducing immobility by a maximum of 43.9 % when treated at a dose of 20 mg/kg. Furthermore, pretreatment with yohimbine significantly enhanced the antidepressant-like behavior of Sanggenon G at 5 and 10 mg/kg. Our findings suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of Sanggenon G could be facilitated by concomitant use of the α2-antagonist. Further studies are needed to evaluate the potential of Sanggenon G as an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of depression.

  15. Involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the short and long-lasting antidepressant-like activity of NMDA receptor antagonists (zinc and Ro 25-6981) in the forced swim test in rats.

    PubMed

    Pochwat, Bartłomiej; Rafało-Ulińska, Anna; Domin, Helena; Misztak, Paulina; Nowak, Gabriel; Szewczyk, Bernadeta

    2017-10-01

    Short and long acting NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonists exert their antidepressant-like effects by activating signaling pathways involved in the synthesis of synaptic proteins and formation of new synaptic connections in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of rats. The blockade of the ERK pathway abolishes ketamine and Ro 25-6981 antidepressant potency. However, the role of ERK in the antidepressant-like activity of short acting NMDAR antagonists is still unclear. More puzzling is the fact that the precise role of ERK in the short and long lasting effects of long-acting NMDAR antagonists is unknown. In this study, we show that zinc, (Zn) a short-acting NMDAR antagonist evokes only transient ERK activation, which is observed 7 min after its administration in the PFC of rats. In contrast to Zn, the long acting NMDAR antagonist Ro 25-6981 produces persistent ERK activation lasting up to 24 h. Pretreatment with the MAPK/ERK inhibitor (U0126) totally abolished Zn and Ro 25-6981 antidepressant-like activities in the forced swim test in rats. However, when U0126 is administered 15 min after Zn or Ro 25-6981 both compounds maintain their short-lasting antidepressant-like activity. On the other hand, posttreatment with U0126 significantly attenuated the long lasting antidepressant-like activity of Ro 25-6981. These results indicate that the activation of ERK is crucial for the short- and long lasting antidepressant-like activity observed in the FST in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic Fluoxetine Treatment Upregulates the Activity of the ERK1/2-NF-κB Signaling Pathway in the Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex of Rats Exposed to Forced-Swimming Stress.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jingqiu; Yang, Kun; Yu, Xue; Wang, Jing-Lan; Li, Jie; Zhang, Yong; Li, Hengfen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether or not the antidepressant actions of fluoxetine (FLX) are correlated with extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in the hippocampus (HC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) of rats. A total of 108 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 18 rats each. Group 1 was the control group, while group 2 comprised the depressed model in which rats were subjected to 28 days of forced-swimming stress (FST); groups 3-6 were also subjected to 28 days of FST and treated with FLX once a day for 1 day (group 3; F1d), 1 week (group 4; F1w), 2 weeks (group 5; F2w), or 4 weeks (group 6; F4w). The control group was not subjected to FST or treated with FLX. Behavior tests that included the Morris water maze (MWM) and saccharin preference were performed, and ERK1/2 and NF-κB proteins were assayed using Western blot. The rats in the control group and in groups 5 and 6 (F2w and F4w, respectively) had a significantly shorter average escape latency, needed more attempts in order to successfully cross the platform, and had a greater saccharin preference than those in the depressed group (p < 0.05). In the depressed group, the phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) and phosphorylated NF-κB (p-NF-κB) expression in the HC and PFC were lower than in the control group (p < 0.05). Treatment with FLX reversed the changes in the expression of p-ERK1/2 and p-NF-κB in rats in the F2w and F4w groups. In this study, FLX treatment for 2 weeks or longer reversed the impaired spatial learning, memory, and anhedonia observed in the depressed model rats and upregulated the activities of the ERK1/2-NF-κB signaling pathway. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Swimming exercise attenuates psychological dependence and voluntary methamphetamine consumption in methamphetamine withdrawn rats

    PubMed Central

    Damghani, Fatemeh; Bigdeli, Imanollah; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Fadaei, Atefeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study evaluated the effect of swimming exercise during spontaneous methamphetamine (METH) withdrawal on the anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and voluntary METH consumption in METH-dependent rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were repeatedly administered with bi-daily doses of METH (2 mg/kg, subcutaneous) over a period of 14 days. Exercised rats were submitted to swimming sessions (45 min/day, five days per week, for 14 days) during spontaneous METH-withdrawal. Then, all animals were tested for the assessment of anxiety by using the elevated plus-maze (EPM), the grooming behaviors (OCD), and depression using forced swimming test (FST) and voluntary METH consumption using a two-bottle choice (TBC) paradigm for the assessment of craving. Results: The results showed that the swimmer METH-withdrawn rats exhibited an increase in EPM open arm time and entries and a reduction of immobility and grooming behaviors compared with the sedentary METH groups. Also, voluntary METH consumption was less in the swimmer METH-withdrawn rats than the sedentary METH groups throughout 5–8 days. Conclusion: This study showed that regular swimming exercise reduced voluntary METH consumption in animal models of craving by reducing anxiety, OCD, and depression in the METH-withdrawn rats. Thus, physical training may be ameliorating some of the withdrawal behavioral consequences of METH. PMID:27482339

  18. Total sleep deprivation decreases immobility in the forced-swim test.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Faustino; Kim, Joseph; Poland, Russell E

    2004-06-01

    Sleep deprivation can exert antidepressant effects in humans in less than 24 h, making it the fastest acting antidepressant treatment. However, it is rarely used clinically because the effect disappears once the subject goes back to sleep. An understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effect of sleep deprivation should help to develop new rapidly acting antidepressant strategies. In the present report, an animal model of depression (the forced-swim test) was used to determine whether the effects of total sleep deprivation parallel those obtained with antidepressant drugs. Using the disk-over-water method, rats deprived of sleep for 24 h exhibited increased swimming behavior when compared to cage control rats, mimicking the effects of serotonergic antidepressants. After 48 h, sleep-deprived rats exhibited increased swimming when compared to both cage control and stimulus control rats, demonstrating that the effect is due to sleep deprivation per se, and not to extraneous factors inherent in the sleep deprivation protocol (such as stress and movement). We believe that this paradigm can be used to study the neurobiological mechanisms of rapid antidepressant effects induced by sleep deprivation.

  19. Head shaking in the forced swim test: A robust but unexplored sex difference.

    PubMed

    Kokras, Nikolaos; Polissidis, Alexia; Antoniou, Katerina; Dalla, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Preclinical psychopharmacology research needs novel behavioral indices and improved animal models for both sexes. The forced swim test (FST) is the most popular test for screening antidepressant potential. Sex differences in FST behaviors, such as immobility and swimming, are not consistent among laboratories. Reliable indices, sensitive to sex differences, are required. We identified a robust sex difference in the frequency of headshakes during the standard two session FST, with male rats exhibiting higher number of head shakes than females. Furthermore, we explored whether strain, ageing, sex- and stress-hormone levels influence this sex difference. Experiments in middle-aged and senescent Wistar rats, as well as in gonadectomized and adrenalectomized with corticosterone replacement young adult males and females, revealed that sex differences in headshakes during FST are not influenced by age or corticosterone, but are abolished following castration of male rats. Interestingly, headshake frequency correlated positively with testosterone, but not corticosterone levels. Finally, testing of Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in a single 5min FST session revealed that headshake frequency is sensitive to antidepressant treatment with female rats exhibiting opposite responses to treatment than male FSL rats. Mirtazapine, a 5-HT2 antagonist, enhanced headshakes in females and decreased them in male FSL rats. Based on current data and the available literature, sex differences in headshake frequency should be linked to analogous sex differences in serotonin receptors. Headshake frequency during the FST is an additional valuable behavioral index, sensitive to sex differences, gonadal hormones and antidepressants modulating serotonin receptors.

  20. Intensity of swimming exercise influences tracheal reactivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Aline F.; Silva, Alexandre S.; Souza, Iara L. L.; Pereira, Joedna C.; Martins, Italo R. R.; Silva, Bagnólia A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies that evaluate the mechanisms for increased airway responsiveness are very sparse, although there are reports of exercise-induced bronchospasm. Therefore, we have evaluated the tracheal reactivity and the rate of lipid peroxidation after different intensities of swimming exercise in rats. Thus, male Wistar rats (age 8 weeks; 250–300 g) underwent a forced swimming exercise for 1 h whilst carrying attached loads of 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8% of their body weight (groups G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8, respectively; n=5 each). Immediately after the test, the trachea of each rat was removed and suspended in an organ bath to evaluate contractile and relaxant responses. The rate of lipid peroxidation was estimated by measuring malondialdehyde levels. According to a one-way ANOVA, all trained groups showed a significant decrease in the relaxation induced by aminophylline (10−12–10−1 M) (pD2=3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.3 and 3.2, respectively for G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8) compared to the control group (pD2=4.6) and the Emax values of G5, G6, G8 groups were reduced by 94.2, 88.0 and 77.0%, respectively. Additionally, all trained groups showed a significant increase in contraction induced by carbachol (10−9–10−3 M) (pD2=6.0, 6.5, 6.5, 7.2 and 7.3, respectively for G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8) compared to the control group (pD2=5.7). Lipid peroxidation levels of G3, G4 and G5 were similar in both the trachea and lung, however G6 and G8 presented an increased peroxidation in the trachea. In conclusion, a single bout of swimming exercise acutely altered tracheal responsiveness in an intensity-related manner and the elevation in lipid peroxidation indicates a degree of oxidative stress involvement. PMID:26497013

  1. Intensity of swimming exercise influences tracheal reactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Brito, Aline F; Silva, Alexandre S; Souza, Iara L L; Pereira, Joedna C; Martins, Italo R R; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2015-01-01

    Studies that evaluate the mechanisms for increased airway responsiveness are very sparse, although there are reports of exercise-induced bronchospasm. Therefore, we have evaluated the tracheal reactivity and the rate of lipid peroxidation after different intensities of swimming exercise in rats. Thus, male Wistar rats (age 8 weeks; 250-300 g) underwent a forced swimming exercise for 1h whilst carrying attached loads of 3, 4, 5, 6 and 8% of their body weight (groups G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8, respectively; n=5 each). Immediately after the test, the trachea of each rat was removed and suspended in an organ bath to evaluate contractile and relaxant responses. The rate of lipid peroxidation was estimated by measuring malondialdehyde levels. According to a one-way ANOVA, all trained groups showed a significant decrease in the relaxation induced by aminophylline (10(-12)-10(-1) M) (pD2=3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.3 and 3.2, respectively for G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8) compared to the control group (pD2=4.6) and the Emax values of G5, G6, G8 groups were reduced by 94.2, 88.0 and 77.0%, respectively. Additionally, all trained groups showed a significant increase in contraction induced by carbachol (10(-9)-10 (-3) M) (pD2=6.0, 6.5, 6.5, 7.2 and 7.3, respectively for G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8) compared to the control group (pD2=5.7). Lipid peroxidation levels of G3, G4 and G5 were similar in both the trachea and lung, however G6 and G8 presented an increased peroxidation in the trachea. In conclusion, a single bout of swimming exercise acutely altered tracheal responsiveness in an intensity-related manner and the elevation in lipid peroxidation indicates a degree of oxidative stress involvement.

  2. Individual differences in the elevated plus-maze and the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Estanislau, Celio; Ramos, Anna Carolina; Ferraresi, Paula Daniele; Costa, Naiara Fernanda; de Carvalho, Heloisa Maria Cotta Pires; Batistela, Silmara

    2011-01-01

    The elevated plus-maze is an apparatus composed of enclosed and open (elevated) arms and time spent in the open arms by a rat can be increased/decreased by anxiolytic/anxiogenic agents. In the forced swim test, floating behavior is used as an index of behavioral despair and can be decreased by antidepressant agents. As the comorbidity between anxiety and depression is a remarkable issue in human behavioral disorders, a possible relationship between the behaviors seen in the cited tests is of great relevance. In the present study, fifty-four male rats (Rattus norvegicus) were submitted to a plus-maze session and to a 2-day forced swim protocol. According to their time in the open arms, they were divided into three groups: Low Open, Medium Open and High Open. Some plus-maze measures were found to be coherent with time in the open arms and are suggested to also be reliable anxiety indexes. In the forced swim test, the Low Open group showed decreases in floating duration from forced swim Session 1 to Session 2, an alteration opposite to that observed in the other groups (particularly, the Medium Open group). The Low Open group also showed increases in floating latency, again in sharp contrast with the alteration found in the other groups. Accordingly, positive and negative correlation were found between time in the open arms and floating duration and latency, respectively. Results are compared to previous studies and mediation of the effect by reactivity to aversive stimulation or alterations induced by open arm exposure is discussed.

  3. A Forced Damped Oscillation Framework for Undulatory Swimming Provides New Insights into How Propulsion Arises in Active and Passive Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in locomotion is to understand how muscle forcing produces apparently complex deformation kinematics leading to movement of animals like undulatory swimmers. The question of whether complicated muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics is central to the understanding of how animals control movement. In this work, a forced damped oscillation framework is applied to a chain-link model for undulatory swimming to understand how forcing leads to deformation and movement. A unified understanding of swimming, caused by muscle contractions (“active” swimming) or by forces imparted by the surrounding fluid (“passive” swimming), is obtained. We show that the forcing triggers the first few deformation modes of the body, which in turn cause the translational motion. We show that relatively simple forcing patterns can trigger seemingly complex deformation kinematics that lead to movement. For given muscle activation, the forcing frequency relative to the natural frequency of the damped oscillator is important for the emergent deformation characteristics of the body. The proposed approach also leads to a qualitative understanding of optimal deformation kinematics for fast swimming. These results, based on a chain-link model of swimming, are confirmed by fully resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Prior results from the literature on the optimal value of stiffness for maximum speed are explained. PMID:23785272

  4. A forced damped oscillation framework for undulatory swimming provides new insights into how propulsion arises in active and passive swimming.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce E; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in locomotion is to understand how muscle forcing produces apparently complex deformation kinematics leading to movement of animals like undulatory swimmers. The question of whether complicated muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics is central to the understanding of how animals control movement. In this work, a forced damped oscillation framework is applied to a chain-link model for undulatory swimming to understand how forcing leads to deformation and movement. A unified understanding of swimming, caused by muscle contractions ("active" swimming) or by forces imparted by the surrounding fluid ("passive" swimming), is obtained. We show that the forcing triggers the first few deformation modes of the body, which in turn cause the translational motion. We show that relatively simple forcing patterns can trigger seemingly complex deformation kinematics that lead to movement. For given muscle activation, the forcing frequency relative to the natural frequency of the damped oscillator is important for the emergent deformation characteristics of the body. The proposed approach also leads to a qualitative understanding of optimal deformation kinematics for fast swimming. These results, based on a chain-link model of swimming, are confirmed by fully resolved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Prior results from the literature on the optimal value of stiffness for maximum speed are explained.

  5. Probable involvement of serotonin in the increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier by forced swimming. An experimental study using Evans blue and 131I-sodium tracers in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H S; Westman, J; Navarro, J C; Dey, P K; Nyberg, F

    1995-12-14

    The possibility that endogenous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) participates in alteration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following short-term forced swimming (FS) exercise was examined in a rat model. Subjection of conscious young (age 8-9 weeks, 80-90 g) animals to continuous FS (at a water temperature of 30 +/- 1 degrees C) for 30 min, increased the permeability of the BBB to Evans blue albumin (EBA) and 131I-sodium in six and nine brain regions, respectively. The EBA staining was noted in posterior cingulate cortex, parietal, occipital cortices, cerebellar vermis, medial lateral cerebellar cortices and dorsal surface of hippocampus. In addition to these brain regions, the BBB permeability to 131I-sodium was further extended to caudate nucleus, thalamus and hypothalamus. This effect of FS on the BBB permeability was absent in adult (age 24-30 weeks, 300-400 g) animals. Measurement of 5-HT showed a profound increase of plasma and brain in young rats by 180% and 250%, respectively, from the control group. Adult animals showed only a minor increase in brain and plasma 5-HT levels. In young animals, pretreatment with p-CPA (a 5-HT synthesis inhibitor) and indomethacin (a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor) prevented the FS induced increase in BBB permeability and 5-HT levels. Destruction of serotonergic neurons with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) reduced the breakdown of the BBB and attenuated the brain 5-HT level without affecting the plasma 5-HT. Cyproheptadine, ketanserin (5-HT2 receptor antagonists) and vinblastine (a vesicular transport inhibitor) prevented the increased permeability of the BBB alone. The plasma and brain 5-HT continued to remain high. These observations suggest that (i) 5-HT plays an important role in the breakdown of BBB permeability in FS, (ii) this effect of 5-HT on BBB permeability is mediated by 5-HT2 receptors, and (iii) FS induced increase in BBB permeability is age dependent.

  6. Orchiectomy modifies the antidepressant-like response of nicotine in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Jaime, H; Limón-Morales, O; Arteaga-Silva, M; Hernández-González, M; Guadarrama-Cruz, G; Alarcón-Aguilar, F; Vázquez-Palacios, G

    2010-11-02

    Several studies have demonstrated that nicotine (NIC) exhibits antidepressant-like effects. In addition, it has been suggested that sexual hormones participate in the antidepressant actions of antidepressives. The present study was designed to analyze the effect of orchiectomy and the supplementation of testosterone propionate (TP) or 17β-estradiol (E(2)) on the antidepressant properties of NIC using the forced swimming test (FST), as well as to determine possible changes in the FST during different time periods after orchiectomy. In order to evaluate the influences of orchiectomy on the effects of NIC, the study first evaluated the effects of different time periods on orchiectomized rats (15, 21, 30, 45 and 60 days) that were subjected to the FST. Then, different doses of NIC (0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 mg/kg, sc) were administered for 14 days to both intact and orchiectomized rats (after 21 day) which were then also subjected to the FST. Finally, the influence of the TP or E(2) supplementation on the antidepressant-like effect of NIC on orchiectomized rats (after 21 days) was also analyzed. Results reveal that orchiectomy significantly increased immobility behavior and decreased swimming and climbing up to 60 days after castration. In contrast, NIC decreased immobility behavior and increased swimming in intact rats; whereas orchiectomy suppressed this antidepressant effect of NIC. Only with E(2) supplementation was it possible to restore the sensitivity of the castrated rats to NIC. These results suggest that E(2) was able to facilitate the antidepressant response of NIC in orchiectomized rats. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intensity of swimming exercise influences aortic reactivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Brito, A.F.; Silva, A.S.; Souza, I.L.L.; Pereira, J.C.; da Silva, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is known to cause a vasodilatory response; however, the correlation between the vasorelaxant response and different training intensities has not been investigated. Therefore, this study evaluated the vascular reactivity and lipid peroxidation after different intensities of swimming exercise in rats. Male Wistar rats (aged 8 weeks; 250-300 g) underwent forced swimming for 1 h whilst tied to loads of 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8% of their body weight, respectively (groups G3, G4, G5, G6 and G8, respectively; n=5 each). Immediately after the test, the aorta was removed and suspended in an organ bath. Cumulative relaxation in response to acetylcholine (10−12-10−4 M) and contraction in response to phenylephrine (10−12-10−5 M) were measured. Oxidative stress was estimated by determining malondialdehyde concentration. The percentages of aorta relaxation were significantly higher in G3 (7.9±0.20), G4 (7.8±0.29), and G5 (7.9±0.21), compared to the control group (7.2±0.04), while relaxation in the G6 (7.4±0.25) and G8 (7.0±0.06) groups was similar to the control group. In contrast, the percentage of contraction was significantly higher in G6 (8.8 ±0.1) and G8 (9.7±0.29) compared to the control (7.1±0.1), G3 (7.3±0.2), G4 (7.2±0.1) and G5 (7.2±0.2%) groups. Lipid peroxidation levels in the aorta were similar to control levels in G3, G4 and G5, but higher in G6 and G8, and significantly higher in G8 (one-way ANOVA). These results indicate a reduction in vasorelaxing activity and an increase in contractile activity in rat aortas after high-intensity exercise, followed by an increase in lipid peroxidation. PMID:26397974

  8. Swimming propulsion forces are enhanced by a small finger spread.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Reis, Victor M; Kjendlie, Per L; Alves, Francisco B; Vilas-Boas, João P; Machado, Leandro; Silva, António J; Rouboa, Abel I

    2010-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of finger spread on the propulsive force production in swimming using computational fluid dynamics. Computer tomography scans of an Olympic swimmer hand were conducted. This procedure involved three models of the hand with differing finger spreads: fingers closed together (no spread), fingers with a small (0.32 cm) spread, and fingers with large (0.64 cm) spread. Steady-state computational fluid dynamics analyses were performed using the Fluent code. The measured forces on the hand models were decomposed into drag and lift coefficients. For hand models, angles of attack of 0 degrees, 15 degrees, 30 degrees, 45 degrees, 60 degrees, 75 degrees, and 90 degrees, with a sweep back angle of 0 degrees, were used for the calculations. The results showed that the model with a small spread between fingers presented higher values of drag coefficient than did the models with fingers closed and fingers with a large spread. One can note that the drag coefficient presented the highest values for an attack angle of 90 degrees in the three hand models. The lift coefficient resembled a sinusoidal curve across the attack angle. The values for the lift coefficient presented few differences among the three models, for a given attack angle. These results suggested that fingers slightly spread could allow the hand to create more propulsive force during swimming.

  9. Swimming

    MedlinePlus

    ... eat while you swim — you could choke. continue Lakes and Ponds Lots of kids swim in streams, lakes, or ponds. Take extra care when swimming in ... can't always see the bottom of the lake or pond, so you don't always know ...

  10. Effect of bacoside extract from Bacopa monniera on physical fatigue induced by forced swimming.

    PubMed

    Anand, T; Phani Kumar, G; Pandareesh, M D; Swamy, M S L; Khanum, Farhath; Bawa, A S

    2012-04-01

    The antifatigue effect of bacoside extract (BME) from Bacopa monniera (L.) Wettst. was investigated. Rats were subjected to weight-loaded forced swim test (WFST) every alternate day for 3 weeks. The BME at a dosage of 10 mg/kg body weight was administered orally to rats for 2 weeks in order to evaluate the following biomarkers of physical fatigue: swimming time, change in body weight, lipid peroxidation, lactic acid (LA), glycogen, antioxidant enzyme activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and blood parameters, namely blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatine kinase (CK). The exhaustive swimming time was increased by 3-fold in the BME supplemented group compared with that of the control group on day 13. The BME treatment lowered malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in brain, liver and muscle tissues by 11.2%, 16.2% and 37.7%, respectively, compared with the control exercised group (p < 0.05). The BME also reduced the LA, serum BUN and CK activities significantly compared with that of the control. Administration of BME significantly protected the depletion of SOD and CAT activities. The HSP-70 expression studies by western blot also confirmed the antifatigue property of BME. The present study thus indicates that BME ameliorates the various impairments associated with physical fatigue.

  11. Swimming-Induced Taste Aversion and Its Prevention by a Prior History of Swimming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2004-01-01

    In two experiments, the evidence showed that 20 min of forced swimming by rats caused aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. When one of two taste solutions (sodium saccharin or sodium chloride, counterbalanced across rats) was paired with swimming and the other was not, the rats' intakes of these two solutions showed less…

  12. Swimming-Induced Taste Aversion and Its Prevention by a Prior History of Swimming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2004-01-01

    In two experiments, the evidence showed that 20 min of forced swimming by rats caused aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. When one of two taste solutions (sodium saccharin or sodium chloride, counterbalanced across rats) was paired with swimming and the other was not, the rats' intakes of these two solutions showed less…

  13. The Relationship Between Propulsive Force in Tethered Swimming and 200-m Front Crawl Performance.

    PubMed

    Santos, Karini B; Bento, Paulo C B; Pereira, Gleber; Rodacki, André L F

    2016-09-01

    Santos, KB, Bento, PCB, Pereira, G, and Rodacki, ALF. The relationship between propulsive force in tethered swimming and 200-m front crawl performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2500-2507, 2016-The aims of this study were to determine whether propulsive force (peak force, mean force, impulse, and rate of force development) and stroke rate change during 2 minutes of front crawl tethered swimming and to correlate them with the stroke rate and swimming velocity in 200-m front crawl swimming. Twenty-one swimmers (21.6 ± 4.8 years, 1.78 ± 0.06 m, 71.7 ± 8.1 kg), with 200-m front crawl swimming performance equivalent to 78% of the world record (140.4 ± 10.1 seconds), were assessed during 2 minutes of maximal front crawl tethered swimming (propulsive forces and stroke rate) and 200-m front crawl swimming (stroke rate and clean velocity). Propulsive forces decreased between the beginning and the middle instants (∼20%; p ≤ 0.05) but remained stable between the middle and the end instants (∼6%; p > 0.05). The peak force was positively correlated with the clean velocity in the 200-m front crawl swimming (mean r = 0.61; p < 0.02). The stroke rates of the tethered swimming and 200-m front crawl swimming were positively correlated (r = 45; p≤ 0.01) at the middle instant. Therefore, the propulsive force and stroke rate changed throughout the 2 minutes of tethered swimming, and the peak force is the best propulsive force variable tested that correlated with 200-m front crawl swimming performance.

  14. Postpartum depression in rats: differences in swim test immobility, sucrose preference and nurturing behaviors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jamie Winderbaum; Grizzell, J Alex; Philpot, Rex M; Wecker, Lynn

    2014-10-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a common disorder affecting both mothers and their offspring. Studies of PPD in laboratory animals have typically assessed either immobility on forced swim testing or sucrose preference in ovariectomized rats following hormone supplementation and withdrawal or in stress models. To date, few studies have related these measures to maternal behaviors, a potential indicator of depressive-like activity postpartum. Because a single measure may be insufficient to characterize depression, the present study determined the distribution of depressive-like behaviors in Sprague-Dawley rats postpartum. Nurturing and non-nurturing behaviors exhibited by undisturbed dams were recorded during the first 12 days postpartum, and immobility in the forced swim test and sucrose preference were determined thereafter. A median-split analysis indicated that 19% of dams exhibited high sucrose preference and low immobility, 30% exhibited either only high immobility or only low sucrose preference, and 21% exhibited both high immobility and low preference. Dams exhibiting depressive-like activity on either or both tests displayed increased self-directed behaviors and decreased active nurturing during the dark phase of the diurnal cycle. This is the first study to characterize undisturbed nurturing and non-nurturing behaviors, and use both sucrose preference and immobility in the forced swim test, to classify PPD endophenotypes exhibited by rat dams following parturition. The present study underscores the idea that multiple tests should be used to characterize depressive-like behavior, which is highly heterogeneous in both the human and laboratory animal populations.

  15. Buspirone enhances immobility in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Y; Nagatani, T

    1996-11-01

    We studied the effects of buspirone and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) on duration of immobility in mice in the forced swim test. Buspirone [3-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (IP)] potently and dose dependently increased the duration of immobility in mice. In contrast, following a single dose of 8-OH-DPAT (1-3 mg/kg, IP), there was a dose-dependent decrease in the duration of immobility. Pretreatment with the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (200 mg/kg, IP, 3 days before further drug treatment) did not alter the effects of buspirone or 8-OH-DPAT. The increase in the duration of immobility induced by buspirone (3 mg/kg, IP) was blocked by NAN-190 [1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-(4-[2-phthalimido]butyl)-piperazine hydrobromide, 1 mg/kg, IP], a postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. However, the effect of 8-OH-DPAT (1 mg/kg, IP) was not blocked by NAN-190 (1 mg/kg, IP). The effect of buspirone (3 mg/kg, IP) was blocked by apomorphine (0.3 mg/kg, IP), a dopamine receptor agonist. Based on the results of this study, it is suggested that the effects of buspirone and of 8-OH-DPAT on immobility in the forced swim test may occur through different mechanisms.

  16. Drag force and jet propulsion investigation of a swimming squid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Mahdi; Bahadır Olcay, Ali; Gokçen, Gökhan; Heperkan, Hasan A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, CAD model of a squid was obtained by taking computer tomography images of a real squid. The model later placed into a computational domain to calculate drag force and performance of jet propulsion. The drag study was performed on the CAD model so that drag force subjected to real squid was revealed at squid's different swimming speeds and comparison has been made with other underwater creatures (e.g., a dolphin, sea lion and penguin). The drag coefficient (referenced to total wetted surface area) of squid is 0.0042 at Reynolds number 1.6x106 that is a %4.5 difference from Gentoo penguin. Besides, jet flow of squid was simulated to observe the flow region generated in the 2D domain utilizing dynamic mesh method to mimic the movement of squid's mantle cavity.

  17. Just Keep Swimming: Neuroendocrine, Metabolic, and Behavioral Changes After a Forced Swimming Test in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; Barcellos, Heloísa Helena de Alcântara; Idalencio, Renan; Marqueze, Alessandra; Fagundes, Michele; Rossini, Mainara; Variani, Cristiane; Balbinoti, Francine; Tietböhl, Tássia Michele Huff; Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we show that an adaptation of the spinning test can be used as a model to study the exercise-exhaustion-recovery paradigm in fish. This forced swimming test promotes a wide range of changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-interrenal axis functioning, intermediary metabolism, as well in fish behavior at both exercise and recovery periods. Our results pointed that this adapted spinning test can be considered a valuable tool for evaluating drugs and contaminant effects on exercised fish. This can be a suitable protocol both to environmental-to evaluate contaminants that act in fish energy mobilization and recovery after stressors-and translational perspectives-effects of drugs on exercised or stressed humans.

  18. Effects of swimming activity on the copulatory behavior of sexually active male rats.

    PubMed

    Allouh, M Z

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity has long been associated with better sexual function. This study investigated the effects of moderate swimming exercise on the copulatory behavior of sexually potent male rats. Two sets of sexually potent male rats -highly active and moderately active- were identified depending on baseline sexual activity. Each of the two sets of rats was further randomly divided into two groups (swimming and sedentary). There were 16 rats in each of the four study groups (highly active swimming, highly active sedentary, moderately active swimming and moderately active sedentary). The copulatory behavior parameters and serum testosterone levels were measured and compared between the rats of the swimming and sedentary groups following a month long training period in which rats were made to swim for 1 h every alternate day. Swimming significantly improved the sexual performance of highly active rats, as indicated by increased intromission frequency and intromission ratio, compared with the sedentary controls. Swimming improved both sexual desire and performance, as indicated by reduced mount latency and increased intromission ratio, respectively, in swimming moderately active rats compared with the sedentary moderately active controls. Therefore, swimming activity improves the copulatory behavior of both highly active and moderately active male rats.

  19. Swimming: Effects on Stress Urinary Incontinence and the Expression of Nerve Growth Factor in Rats Following Transabdominal Urethrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Il Gyu; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Bo Kyun; Shin, Mal Soon; Kim, Chang Ju; Yim, Sung Jin; Bang, Yu Jeong; Choi, In Ho

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) commonly occurs in women, and it has an enormous impact on quality of life. Surgery, drugs, and exercise have been recommended for the treatment of this disease. Among these, exercise is known to be effective for the relief of symptoms of SUI; however, the efficacy and underlying mechanisms of the effect of exercise on SUI are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of swimming the symptom of SUI in relation to the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in rats. Methods Transabdominal urethrolysis was used to induce SUI, in Sprague-Dawley rats. The experimental groups were divided into the following three groups: sham-operation group, transabdominal urethrolysis-induced group, and transabdominal urethrolysis-induced and swimming group. The rats in the swimming group were forced to swim for 30 minutes once daily starting 2 weeks after SUI induction and continuing for 4 weeks. For this study, determination of abdominal leak point pressure and immunohistochemistry for NGF in the urethra and in the neuronal voiding centers (medial preoptic nucleus [MPA], ventrolateral periaqueductal gray [vlPAG], pontine micturition center [PMC], and spinal cord [L4-L5]) were performed. Results Transabdominal urethrolysis significantly reduced the abdominal leak point pressure, thereby contributing to the induction of SUI. Abdominal leak point pressure, however, was significantly improved by swimming. The expression of NGF in the urethra and in the neuronal voiding centers (MPA, vlPAG, PMC, and L4-L5) relating to micturition was enhanced by the induction of SUI. Swimming, however, significantly suppressed SUI-induced NGF expression. Conclusions Swimming alleviated symptoms of transabdominal urethrolysis-induced SUI, as assessed by an increase in abdominal leak point pressure. The underlying mechanisms of these effects of swimming might be ascribed to the inhibitory effect of swimming on NGF expression. PMID:21811696

  20. AMPA Receptor-mTOR Activation is Required for the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Sarcosine during the Forced Swim Test in Rats: Insertion of AMPA Receptor may Play a Role.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuang-Ti; Tsai, Mang-Hung; Wu, Ching-Hsiang; Jou, Ming-Jia; Wei, I-Hua; Huang, Chih-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Sarcosine, an endogenous amino acid, is a competitive inhibitor of the type I glycine transporter and an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) coagonist. Recently, we found that sarcosine, an NMDAR enhancer, can improve depression-related behaviors in rodents and humans. This result differs from previous studies, which have reported antidepressant effects of NMDAR antagonists. The mechanisms underlying the therapeutic response of sarcosine remain unknown. This study examines the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor (AMPAR) activation, which are involved in the antidepressant-like effects of several glutamatergic system modulators. The effects of sarcosine in a forced swim test (FST) and the expression levels of phosphorylated mTOR signaling proteins were examined in the absence or presence of mTOR and AMPAR inhibitors. In addition, the influence of sarcosine on AMPAR trafficking was determined by analyzing the phosphorylation of AMPAR subunit GluR1 at the PKA site (often considered an indicator for GluR1 membrane insertion in neurons). A single injection of sarcosine exhibited antidepressant-like effects in rats in the FST and rapidly activated the mTOR signaling pathway, which were significantly blocked by mTOR inhibitor rapamycin or the AMPAR inhibitor 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX) pretreatment. Moreover, NBQX pretreatment eliminated the ability of sarcosine to stimulate the phosphorylated mTOR signaling proteins. Furthermore, GluR1 phosphorylation at its PKA site was significantly increased after an acute in vivo sarcosine treatment. The results demonstrated that sarcosine exerts antidepressant-like effects by enhancing AMPAR-mTOR signaling pathway activity and facilitating AMPAR membrane insertion. Highlights-A single injection of sarcosine rapidly exerted antidepressant-like effects with a concomitant increase in the activation of the mammalian

  1. AMPA Receptor–mTOR Activation is Required for the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Sarcosine during the Forced Swim Test in Rats: Insertion of AMPA Receptor may Play a Role

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuang-Ti; Tsai, Mang-Hung; Wu, Ching-Hsiang; Jou, Ming-Jia; Wei, I-Hua; Huang, Chih-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Sarcosine, an endogenous amino acid, is a competitive inhibitor of the type I glycine transporter and an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) coagonist. Recently, we found that sarcosine, an NMDAR enhancer, can improve depression-related behaviors in rodents and humans. This result differs from previous studies, which have reported antidepressant effects of NMDAR antagonists. The mechanisms underlying the therapeutic response of sarcosine remain unknown. This study examines the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptor (AMPAR) activation, which are involved in the antidepressant-like effects of several glutamatergic system modulators. The effects of sarcosine in a forced swim test (FST) and the expression levels of phosphorylated mTOR signaling proteins were examined in the absence or presence of mTOR and AMPAR inhibitors. In addition, the influence of sarcosine on AMPAR trafficking was determined by analyzing the phosphorylation of AMPAR subunit GluR1 at the PKA site (often considered an indicator for GluR1 membrane insertion in neurons). A single injection of sarcosine exhibited antidepressant-like effects in rats in the FST and rapidly activated the mTOR signaling pathway, which were significantly blocked by mTOR inhibitor rapamycin or the AMPAR inhibitor 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX) pretreatment. Moreover, NBQX pretreatment eliminated the ability of sarcosine to stimulate the phosphorylated mTOR signaling proteins. Furthermore, GluR1 phosphorylation at its PKA site was significantly increased after an acute in vivo sarcosine treatment. The results demonstrated that sarcosine exerts antidepressant-like effects by enhancing AMPAR–mTOR signaling pathway activity and facilitating AMPAR membrane insertion. Highlights – A single injection of sarcosine rapidly exerted antidepressant-like effects with a concomitant increase in the activation of the

  2. Is swimming exercise or cold exposure for rats?

    PubMed

    Harri, M; Kuusela, P

    1986-02-01

    Rats were trained by daily swimming sessions (up to 3 h per day) for at least 6 weeks in water at 30, 36 and 38 degrees C. After this training, the adaptive changes obtained were compared with those typical of cold-acclimated (cold-specific changes) and running-trained (training-specific changes) rats. The most typical training-specific change, an increased activity of oxidative muscle enzymes was negligible for swimming-trained rats, while the lowered activity of muscle lactate dehydrogenase was evident for all trained groups. Cold-specific changes, such as increased food intake, increased calorigenic response to injected noradrenaline, an increase both in mass and metabolic capacity of brown adipose tissue, and maintenance of the stores of ascorbic acid and muscle glycogen during cold exposure, were observed for rats trained at 36 and 30 degrees C. The cold tolerance test in cold air did not make any distinct difference between the rats trained at different water temperatures, while in cool water the 30 degrees C -swimmers were clearly superior to other groups, that is, their cooling rate was slowest. Other adaptive changes were found, to a variable extent, for all trained groups. These included loss of body fat, cardiac hypertrophy, reduced urinary catecholamine excretion after test swimmings either in cold or warm water, increased tail-skin temperature response to isoprenaline, and a higher tail-skin temperature in response to cold. Generally, however, the adaptive changes observed for 30- and 36 degrees C-swimmers were similar, while the changes observed for 38 degrees C-swimmers were different. The latter group neither displayed any cardiac enlargement nor any cold-specific changes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Factors influencing behavior in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Olena V; Kanekar, Shami; D'Anci, Kristen E; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-06-13

    The forced swim test (FST) is a behavioral test in rodents which was developed in 1978 by Porsolt and colleagues as a model for predicting the clinical efficacy of antidepressant drugs. A modified version of the FST added the classification of active behaviors into swimming and climbing, in order to facilitate the differentiation between serotonergic and noradrenergic classes of antidepressant drugs. The FST is now widely used in basic research and the pharmaceutical screening of potential antidepressant treatments. It is also one of the most commonly used tests to assess depressive-like behavior in animal models. Despite the simplicity and sensitivity of the FST procedure, important differences even in baseline immobility rates have been reported between different groups, which complicate the comparison of results across studies. In spite of several methodological papers and reviews published on the FST, the need still exists for clarification of factors which can influence the procedure. While most recent reviews have focused on antidepressant effects observed with the FST, this one considers the methodological aspects of the procedure, aiming to summarize issues beyond antidepressant action in the FST. The previously published literature is analyzed for factors which are known to influence animal behavior in the FST. These include biological factors, such as strain, age, body weight, gender and individual differences between animals; influence of preconditioning before the FST: handling, social isolation or enriched environment, food manipulations, various kinds of stress, endocrine manipulations and surgery; schedule and routes of treatment, dosage and type of the drugs as well as experimental design and laboratory environmental effects. Consideration of these factors in planning experiments may result in more consistent FST results.

  4. Effects of various Eleutherococcus senticosus cortex on swimming time, natural killer activity and corticosterone level in forced swimming stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho

    2004-12-01

    The cortex of Eleutherococcus senticosus (Rupr. & Maxim.) Maxim. has been used extensively in Russia, China, Korea and Japan as an adaptogen whose properties are the ability to increase as non-specific body resistance to stress and fatigue. Although it has been reported that Eleutherococcus senticosus has anti-fatigue and anti-stress actions, their actions are still unclear on the relationship between immune system, especially natural killer (NK) activity and endocrine system (corticosterone level). We compared the effects of the water extracts (A, B, C, D and E) of five Eleutherococcus senticosus cortex on the swimming time, NK activity and blood corticosterone level using forced swimming stressed mice. Among five kinds, C, D and E extracts significantly prolonged the swimming time. C and D extracts inhibited the reduction of NK activity and the corticosterone elevation induced by forced swimming. The contents of eleutheroside E, isoflaxidin and eleutherosides B plus E were in the order C > D > E > B > A and C > E > D > A > B extracts, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that eleutheroside E may be contributed to the anti-fatigue action, the recovery of the reduction of NK activity and the inhibition of corticosterone elevation induced by swimming stress.

  5. Swimming Activity Prevents the Unloading Induced Loss of Bone Mass, Architecture, and Strength in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Falcai, Maurício J.; Leoni, Graziela Bianchi; de Sousa Neto, Manoel Damião; Volpon, Jose B.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether swimming activity associated with a three-week period of hypoactivity could prevent the deleterious effects of disuse on the tibias of tail-suspended rats. Forty Wistar rats were divided into five groups: (HS) permanently hindlimb suspension rats; (HS + Swim) rats submitted to unloading interrupted by swimming exercise; (HS + WB) hindlimb suspension rats with interruption for regular weight bearing for the same length of time as the HS+Swim rats; (Control) control rats that were allowed regular cage activities; and (Control + Swim) control rats that underwent swimming exercise. At the end of the experiment, bone mineral density, bone strength, and trabecular quantification were analyzed. The hindlimb-suspended rats exhibited bone quality loss (significant decrease in BMD, bone strength, and deterioration of trabecular and cortical bone architecture; decrease in BV/TV, TbN, TbTh, ConnD, CtV, and CtTh; and increase in TbSp) when compared to control rats. In contrast, trained rats showed a significant increase of 43% in bone mass, 29% in bone strength, 58% in trabecular thickness, 85% in bone volume, 27% in trabeculae number, and 30% in cortical volume, when compared to the hindlimb-suspended rats. We conclude that swimming activity not only ameliorates but also fully prevents the deleterious effects on bone quality in osteopenic rats. PMID:26090414

  6. Reliability assessment of an automated forced swim test device using two mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Kurtuncu, Murat; Luka, Lance J; Dimitrijevic, Nikola; Uz, Tolga; Manev, Hari

    2005-11-30

    The Porsolt forced swim test (FST) is one of the most widely used behavioral tests in the evaluation of the antidepressant effects of drugs. It is based on the fact that these drugs reduce the depression-related behaviors of learned helplessness. The model has been modified for use in mice. In contrast to rats, mice are exposed to forced swimming only once and their immobility behavior is measured and considered a "depression-like" phenotype. Like many other behavioral tests, FST can be affected by observer-related artifacts. In recent years, automated testing systems have been developed to decrease artifacts that may greatly influence the interpretation of results. In this work, we used two strains of mice, i.e., C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6J, which differ in their FST immobility times. We employed a new commercially available automated FST device and a blinded observer-based FST, and we examined their ability to measure behavioral differences between these two mouse strains. Our results suggest that the tested automated FST system generates reliable data comparable to results obtained by trained observers.

  7. How does muscle forcing lead to translational motion in undulatory swimming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Amneet; Patankar, Neelesh

    2010-11-01

    Swimming organisms show variety of complex deformations during their movement. In this work we enquire whether complex muscle forcing is required to create the observed deformation kinematics that cause movement. We interrogate how the muscle forcing leads to the forward translational momentum of an organism. A set of linearized equations of motion, using a spring-link model, is derived for undulatory swimming. We do not consider observed body deformations to be composed of active and passive components. Instead, swimming is treated as a forced oscillation problem. Forcing can be due to the muscles (active swimming) or due to the surrounding fluid (passive swimming). In either case, the forcing triggers the first few fundamental deformation modes of the body which in turn drive the axial translational motion. We explain the reason for observing only the first few fundamental modes. It is seen that simple forcing patterns can trigger complex looking deformation kinematics that lead to movement. We show that there is range of frequency at which the body responds well (i.e. the swimming speed increases with frequency), but after that range the body does not respond well to higher frequencies. It is found, consistent with prior work, that anisotropy in drag enables swimming.

  8. Role of serotonin 1A receptors in the median raphe nucleus on the behavioral consequences of forced swim stress.

    PubMed

    Almeida, P V G; Trovo, M C; Tokumoto, A M; Pereira, A C; Padovan, C M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the intense research on the neurobiology of stress, the role of serotonin (5-HT)1A receptors still remains to be elucidated. In the hippocampus, post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors activation induces anxiolytic effects in animals previously exposed to stressful situations. However, little is known about somatodendritic 5-HT1A receptors in the median raphe nucleus (MRN). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of 5-HT1A receptors located in the MRN in rats exposed to forced swim stress. After recovering from surgery, rats were forced to swim for 15 min in a cylinder. Intra-MRN injections of saline, 8-OH-DPAT (3 nmol/0.2 µL) and/or WAY-100635 (0.3 nmol/0.2 µL) were performed immediately before or after pre-exposure or 24 h later (immediately before test). Non-stressed rats received the same treatment 24 h or 10 min before test. Our data showed that 8-OH-DPAT increased latency to display immobility while decreasing time spent immobile in almost all experimental conditions. These effects were not prevented by previous treatment with WAY-100635. No effects of different treatments were described in non-stressed animals. Taken together, our data suggest that in addition to activation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT7 receptors may also be involved in the behavioural consequences of exposure to swim stress.

  9. Immobility behavior during the forced swim test correlates with BNDF levels in the frontal cortex, but not with cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila Boque; Viana, Alice Fialho; Nardin, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze

    2015-03-01

    The forced swim test (FST) is widely used to evaluate the antidepressant-like activity of compounds and is sensitive to stimuli that cause depression-like behaviors in rodents. The immobility behavior observed during the test has been considered to represent behavioral despair. In addition, some studies suggest that the FST impairs rats' performance on cognitive tests, but these findings have rarely been explored. Thus, we investigated the effects of the FST on behavioral tests related to neuropsychiatric diseases that involve different cognitive components: novel object recognition (NOR), the object location test (OLT) and prepulse inhibition (PPI). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the frontal cortex and hippocampus were evaluated. The rats were forced to swim twice (15-min session followed by a 5-min session 24h later) and underwent cognitive tests 24h after the last swimming exposure. The FST impaired the rats' performance on the OLT and reduced the PPI and acoustic startle responses, whereas the NOR was not affected. The cognitive impairments were not correlated with an immobility behavior profile, but a significant negative correlation between the frontal BDNF levels and immobility behavior was identified. These findings suggest a protective role of BDNF against behavioral despair and demonstrate a deleterious effect of the FST on spatial memory and pre-attentive processes, which point to the FST as a tool to induce cognitive impairments analogous to those observed in depression and in other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Automated analysis of antidepressants' effect in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Morozova, Maryana V; Kulikov, Viktor A; Kirichuk, Valeri S; Popova, Nina K

    2010-08-15

    The forced swim test (FST) is a commonly used procedure of preclinical screening of drugs for the antidepressant activity. It has high predictive validity for a large group of antidepressant drugs blocking serotonin and noradrenaline reuptakes and improvement of immobility time evaluation in the FST is an important problem of preclinical psychopharmacology. Here a new automated version of the FST was developed. This version includes 4 inventions: (1) transmitted lighting instead of reflected lighting, (2) mouse silhouette tracking, (3) automated choice of immobility threshold and (4) the permutation test of drug's effect. Experiment was carried out on adult males of C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mouse strains. The mice were treated with tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (15 and 30 mg/kg, i.p.). Mouse was placed in water tank, its movements were recorded by a rater and the silhouette alterations were automatically tracked. The sequence of silhouette alterations was scanned for immobility bouts with a threshold algorithm. Threshold was gradually altered and the value which maximized the difference between control and treated groups was chosen. The immobility values obtained with the procedure were compared with the permutation test. The data obtained with this procedure did not differ from those obtained by the rater. Imipramine dose dependently attenuated immobility time in C57BL/6 mice without any effect on BALB/c mice. The new procedure has been implemented in the EthoStudio software. It provides an objective automated evaluation of immobility time in the FST.

  11. Maternal Forced Swimming Reduces Cell Proliferation in the Postnatal Dentate Gyrus of Mouse Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Wasinski, Frederick; Estrela, Gabriel R.; Arakaki, Aline M.; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Klempin, Friederike; Araújo, Ronaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise positively affects the metabolism and induces proliferation of precursor cells in the adult brain. Maternal exercise likewise provokes adaptations early in the offspring. Using a high-intensity swimming protocol that comprises forced swim training before and during pregnancy, we determined the effect of maternal swimming on the mouse offspring's neurogenesis. Our data demonstrate decreased proliferation in sublayers of the postnatal dentate gyrus in offspring of swimming mother at postnatal day (P) 8 accompanied with decreased survival of newly generated cells 4 weeks later. The reduction in cell numbers was predominantly seen in the hilus and molecular layer. At P35, the reduced amount of cells was also reflected by a decrease in the population of newly generated immature and mature neurons of the granule cell layer. Our data suggest that forced maternal swimming at high-intensity has a negative effect on the neurogenic niche development in postnatal offspring. PMID:27621701

  12. Swimming

    MedlinePlus

    ... hurt your neck very badly. Test the pool's water temperature before you plunge in. Cold water can shock your body and make your blood ... t swim in the dark. Go into the water slowly to make sure the temperature feels comfortable and it's not too cold. If ...

  13. Studies of Ciliated Microorganism Swimming with and against a Magnetic Field Tuned Apparent Weight Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ilyong; Mickalide, Harry; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2012-11-01

    There is a class of microorganisms that are small enough to swim at low Reynolds number but large enough for gravity to influence their behavior. Remarkably, Paramecia exert a stronger (weaker) propulsion force when swimming against (with) their apparent weight force, W -->. To investigate the source of the swimming speed response, we are examining how the trajectories of single swimmers change when they reverse their direction relative to W -->. We characterize their helical trajectories with three parameters that we can relate to their beating of their cilia using a simple model. The latest results will be described.

  14. A proposal for refining the forced swim test in Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ana Paula Ramos; Vieira, Cintia; Bohner, Lauren O L; Silva, Cristiane Felisbino; Santos, Evelyn Cristina da Silva; De Lima, Thereza Christina Monteiro; Lino-de-Oliveira, Cilene

    2013-08-01

    The forced swim test (FST) is a preclinical test to the screening of antidepressants based on rats or mice behaviours, which is also sensitive to stimulants of motor activity. This work standardised and validated a method to register the active and passive behaviours of Swiss mice during the FST in order to strength the specificity of the test. Adult male Swiss mice were subjected to the FST for 6 min without any treatment or after intraperitoneal injection of saline (0.1 ml/10 g), antidepressants (imipramine, desipramine, or fluoxetine, 30 mg/kg) or stimulants (caffeine, 30 mg/kg or apomorphine, 10mg/kg). The latency, frequency and duration of behaviours (immobility, swimming, and climbing) were scored and summarised in bins of 6, 4, 2 or 1 min. Parameters were first analysed using Principal Components Analysis generating components putatively related to antidepressant (first and second) or to stimulant effects (third). Antidepressants and stimulants affected similarly the parameters grouped into all components. Effects of stimulants on climbing were better distinguished of antidepressants when analysed during the last 4 min of the FST. Surprisingly, the effects of antidepressants on immobility were better distinguished from saline when parameters were scored in the first 2 min. The method proposed here is able to distinguish antidepressants from stimulants of motor activity using Swiss mice in the FST. This refinement should reduce the number of mice used in preclinical evaluation of antidepressants.

  15. Effect of baclofen, a GABAB-agonist, on forced swimming-induced immobility in mice.

    PubMed

    Aley, K O; Kulkarni, S K

    1990-01-01

    The effect of baclofen, a GABAB-agonist, was studied on both forced swimming-induced immobility and isoprenaline-induced enhancement of forced swimming-induced immobility in mice. (+/-) Baclofen (0.5 and 1 mg/kg), and (-) baclofen (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) attenuated forced swimming-induced immobility. The effect of baclofen was not reversed by bicuculline, a GABAA-antagonist. Baclofen also reduced isoprenaline-induced enhancement of forced swimming-induced immobility. On concomitant administration of a subeffective dose of baclofen with a subeffective dose of propranolol, desipramine and amitriptyline, a potentiating effect was observed. These results are corroborative of our previous finding that GABAergic agents, particularly GABAB-receptors, play a role in the modulation of despair behavior in mice and in the action of antidepressant drugs. Baclofen (5 mg/kg) did not produce any significant effect on forced swimming-induced immobility, but reduced significantly the locomotor activity of the animals. Lower doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) of baclofen, which reduced the forced swimming-induced immobility, did not affect the locomotor activity. At higher and lower tissue concentrations of the drug, involvement of different receptor populations is suggested.

  16. Arctigenin enhances swimming endurance of sedentary rats partially by regulation of antioxidant pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ruo-ming; Sun, Yan-yan; Zhou, Ting-ting; Zhu, Zhi-yuan; Zhuang, Jing-jing; Tang, Xuan; Chen, Jing; Hu, Li-hong; Shen, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan found in traditional Chinese herbs, has been determined to exhibit a variety of pharmacological activities, including anti-tumor, anti-inflammation, neuroprotection, and endurance enhancement. In the present study, we investigated the antioxidation and anti-fatigue effects of arctigenin in rats. Methods: Rat L6 skeletal muscle cell line was exposed to H2O2 (700 μmol/L), and ROS level was assayed using DCFH-DA as a probe. Male SD rats were injected with arctigenin (15 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 6 weeks, and then the weight-loaded forced swimming test (WFST) was performed to evaluate their endurance. The levels of antioxidant-related genes in L6 cells and the skeletal muscles of rats were analyzed using real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Results: Incubation of L6 cells with arctigenin (1, 5, 20 μmol/L) dose-dependently decreased the H2O2-induced ROS production. WFST results demonstrated that chronic administration of arctigenin significantly enhanced the endurance of rats. Furthermore, molecular biology studies on L6 cells and skeletal muscles of the rats showed that arctigenin effectively increased the expression of the antioxidant-related genes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (Gsr), glutathione peroxidase (GPX1), thioredoxin (Txn) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), through regulation of two potential antioxidant pathways: AMPK/PGC-1α/PPARα in mitochondria and AMPK/p53/Nrf2 in the cell nucleus. Conclusion: Arctigenin efficiently enhances rat swimming endurance by elevation of the antioxidant capacity of the skeletal muscles, which has thereby highlighted the potential of this natural product as an antioxidant in the treatment of fatigue and related diseases. PMID:25152028

  17. Arctigenin enhances swimming endurance of sedentary rats partially by regulation of antioxidant pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruo-ming; Sun, Yan-yan; Zhou, Ting-ting; Zhu, Zhi-yuan; Zhuang, Jing-jing; Tang, Xuan; Chen, Jing; Hu, Li-hong; Shen, Xu

    2014-10-01

    Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan found in traditional Chinese herbs, has been determined to exhibit a variety of pharmacological activities, including anti-tumor, anti-inflammation, neuroprotection, and endurance enhancement. In the present study, we investigated the antioxidation and anti-fatigue effects of arctigenin in rats. Rat L6 skeletal muscle cell line was exposed to H2O2 (700 μmol/L), and ROS level was assayed using DCFH-DA as a probe. Male SD rats were injected with arctigenin (15 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ip) for 6 weeks, and then the weight-loaded forced swimming test (WFST) was performed to evaluate their endurance. The levels of antioxidant-related genes in L6 cells and the skeletal muscles of rats were analyzed using real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Incubation of L6 cells with arctigenin (1, 5, 20 μmol/L) dose-dependently decreased the H2O2-induced ROS production. WFST results demonstrated that chronic administration of arctigenin significantly enhanced the endurance of rats. Furthermore, molecular biology studies on L6 cells and skeletal muscles of the rats showed that arctigenin effectively increased the expression of the antioxidant-related genes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (Gsr), glutathione peroxidase (GPX1), thioredoxin (Txn) and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), through regulation of two potential antioxidant pathways: AMPK/PGC-1α/PPARα in mitochondria and AMPK/p53/Nrf2 in the cell nucleus. Arctigenin efficiently enhances rat swimming endurance by elevation of the antioxidant capacity of the skeletal muscles, which has thereby highlighted the potential of this natural product as an antioxidant in the treatment of fatigue and related diseases.

  18. Force-free swimming of a model helical flagellum in viscoelastic fluids

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Powers, Thomas R.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    We precisely measure the force-free swimming speed of a rotating helix in viscous and viscoelastic fluids. The fluids are highly viscous to replicate the low Reynolds number environment of microorganisms. The helix, a macroscopic scale model for the bacterial flagellar filament, is rigid and rotated at a constant rate while simultaneously translated along its axis. By adjusting the translation speed to make the net hydrodynamic force vanish, we measure the force-free swimming speed as a function of helix rotation rate, helix geometry, and fluid properties. We compare our measurements of the force-free swimming speed of a helix in a high-molecular weight silicone oil with predictions for the swimming speed in a Newtonian fluid, calculated using slender-body theories and a boundary-element method. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment in the Newtonian case verifies the high accuracy of our experiments. For the viscoelastic fluid, we use a polymer solution of polyisobutylene dissolved in polybutene. This solution is a Boger fluid, a viscoselastic fluid with a shear-rate-independent viscosity. The elasticity is dominated by a single relaxation time. When the relaxation time is short compared to the rotation period, the viscoelastic swimming speed is close to the viscous swimming speed. As the relaxation time increases, the viscoelastic swimming speed increases relative to the viscous speed, reaching a peak when the relaxation time is comparable to the rotation period. As the relaxation time is further increased, the viscoelastic swimming speed decreases and eventually falls below the viscous swimming speed. PMID:22106263

  19. Impact of water temperature and stressor controllability on swim stress-induced changes in body temperature, serum corticosterone, and immobility in rats.

    PubMed

    Drugan, Robert C; Eren, Senem; Hazi, Agnes; Silva, Jennifer; Christianson, John P; Kent, Stephen

    2005-10-01

    The present study compared the effects of three different water temperatures (20, 25, and 30 degrees C) and stressor controllability on several physiological and behavioral endpoints in an intermittent swim stress paradigm. The escape latency of rats in the 20 and 25 degrees C water was less than that observed for the 30 degrees C group. Both escape and yoked groups at 20 and 25 degrees C exhibited moderate to severe hypothermia following the swim stress session that returned to prestress levels 30-40 min post-stress. At 30 degrees C core body temperature (Tb) only decreased by 1 degree C for either swim group. Following swim, serum corticosterone (CORT) levels were significantly elevated in both escape and yoked groups in comparison to confined and home cage controls. The confined control group showed a significant elevation that was approximately halfway between the home cage control and the swim stress groups. At 30 degrees C, there was still a significant elevation of serum CORT in both swim groups in comparison to confined and home cage controls. Therefore, 30 degrees C appears to be the optimal water temperature to evaluate stress controllability effects in the current paradigm. In a final experiment, swim stressor controllability effects were examined in a 5 min forced swim test (FST) 24 h following the initial stress exposure. Rats exposed to yoked-inescapable swim stress at 30 degrees C exhibited more immobility than their escapable swim stress and confined counterparts, while the escape and confined controls did not differ. These results demonstrate that the behavioral deficits observed in the FST are attributable to the stress of inescapable swim and not swim stress per se.

  20. The involvement of serotonergic system in the antidepressant effect of zinc in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Wróbel, Andrzej; Blicharska, Eliza; Cichy, Agnieszka; Dybała, Małgorzata; Siwek, Agata; Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Piotrowska, Anna; Brański, Piotr; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2009-03-17

    Recent preclinical data indicated the antidepressant-like activity of zinc in different tests and models of depression. The present study investigates the involvement of the serotonergic system in zinc activity in the forced swim test (FST) in mice and rats. The combined treatment of sub-effective doses of zinc (hydroaspartate, 2.5 mg Zn/kg) and citalopram (15 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) but not with reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduces the immobility time in the FST in mice. These treatments had no influence on the spontaneous locomotor activity. Moreover, while the antidepressant-like effect of zinc (5 mg/kg) in the FST was significantly blocked by pretreatment with inhibitor of serotonin synthesis, p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA, 3x200 mg/kg), 5HT-2(A/C) receptor antagonist, ritanserin (4 mg/kg) or 5HT-1A receptor antagonist, WAY 1006335 (0.1 mg/kg), the zinc-induced reduction in the locomotor activity was not affected by these serotonin modulator agents. These results indicate the specific involvement of the serotonergic system in antidepressant but not the motion behavior of zinc in mice. Also, an increase in the swimming but not climbing parameter of the rat FST observed following zinc administration (2.5 and 5 mg Zn/kg) indicates the serotonin pathway participation. This present data indicates that the antidepressant-like activity of zinc observed in the FST involves interaction with the serotonergic system.

  1. Effects of Swimming on Functional Recovery after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Baltzley, Ryan; Bunger, Michelle; Baldini, Angela; Burke, Darlene A.; Magnuson, David S.K.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most promising rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury is weight-supported treadmill training. This strategy seeks to re-train the spinal cord below the level of injury to generate a meaningful pattern of movement. However, the number of step cycles that can be accomplished is limited by the poor weight-bearing capability of the neuromuscular system after injury. We have begun to study swimming as a rehabilitation strategy that allows for high numbers of steps and a high step-cycle frequency in a standard rat model of contusive spinal cord injury. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of swimming as a rehabilitation strategy in rats with contusion injuries at T9. We used a swimming strategy with or without cutaneous feedback based on original work in the chick by Muir and colleagues. Adult female rats (n = 27) received moderately-severe contusion injuries at T9. Walking and swimming performance were evaluated using the Open-Field Locomotor Scale (BBB; Basso et al., 1995) and a novel swimming assessment, the Louisville Swimming Scale (LSS). Rats that underwent swim-training with or without cutaneous feedback showed a significant improvement in hindlimb function during swimming compared to untrained animals. Rats that underwent swim-training without cutaneous feedback showed less improvement than those trained with cutaneous feedback. Rats in the non-swimming group demonstrated little improvement over the course of the study. All three groups showed the expected improvement in over-ground walking and had similar terminal BBB scores. These findings suggest that animals re-acquire the ability to swim only if trained and that cutaneous feedback improves the re-training process. Further, these data suggest that the normal course of recovery of over-ground walking following moderately-severe contusion injuries at T9 is the result of a re-training process. PMID:16774475

  2. Chromatin Alterations in Response to Forced Swimming Underlie Increased Prodynorphin Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Brian; Fang, Nancy; Blackwell-Mayer, Brandan; Chen, Shasha; Yuferov, Vadim; Zhou, Yan; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    Antagonism of the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) has been reported to have anti-depressant-like properties. The dynorphin/KOR system is a crucial neurochemical substrate underlying the pathologies of addictive diseases, affective disorders and other disease states. However, the molecular underpinnings and neuroanatomical localization of the dysregulation of this system have not yet been fully elucidated. Utilizing the Porsolt Forced Swim Test (FST), an acute stressor commonly used as in rodent models measuring antidepressant efficacy, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subject to forced swimming for 15 minutes, treated 1 hour with vehicle or nor-BNI (5 or 10 mg/kg), and then 1 day later subject to FST for five minutes. In accordance with previous findings, nor-BNI dose dependently increased climbing time and reduced immobility. In comparison to control animals not exposed to FST, we observed a significant elevation in prodynorphin (pDyn) mRNA levels following FST using real-time optical PCR in the caudate putamen but not in the nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, amygdala, frontal cortex, or hippocampus. Nor-BNI treatment did not affect pDyn mRNA levels in comparison to animals that received vehicle. The corresponding brain regions from the opposite hemisphere were analyzed for underlying chromatin modifications of the prodynorphin gene promoter region using chromatin immunoprecipitation with antibodies against specifically methylated histones H3K27Me2, H3K27Me3, H3K4Me2, and H3K4Me3, as well as CREB-1 and MeCP2. Significant alterations in proteins bound to DNA in the Cre-3, Cre-4, and Sp1 regions of the prodynorphin promoter were found in the caudate putamen of the FST saline-treated animals compared to control animals, with no changes observed in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes resulting in elevated dynorphin levels specifically in the caudate putamen may in part underlie the enduring effects of stress. PMID:22698692

  3. A biomechanical review of the techniques used to estimate or measure resistive forces in swimming.

    PubMed

    Sacilotto, Gina B D; Ball, Nick; Mason, Bruce R

    2014-02-01

    Resistive or drag forces encountered during free swimming greatly influence the swim performance of elite competitive swimmers. The benefits in understanding the factors which affect the drag encountered will enhance performance within the sport. However, the current techniques used to experimentally measure or estimate drag values are questioned for their consistency, therefore limiting investigations in these factors. This paper aims to further understand how the resistive forces in swimming are measured and calculated. All techniques outlined demonstrate both strengths and weaknesses in the overall assessment of free swimming. By reviewing all techniques in this area, the reader should be able to select which one is best depending on what researchers want to gain from the testing.

  4. Interactions between internal forces, body stiffness, and fluid environment in a neuromechanical model of lamprey swimming

    PubMed Central

    Tytell, Eric D.; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Williams, Thelma L.; Cohen, Avis H.; Fauci, Lisa J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal movements result from a complex balance of many different forces. Muscles produce force to move the body; the body has inertial, elastic, and damping properties that may aid or oppose the muscle force; and the environment produces reaction forces back on the body. The actual motion is an emergent property of these interactions. To examine the roles of body stiffness, muscle activation, and fluid environment for swimming animals, a computational model of a lamprey was developed. The model uses an immersed boundary framework that fully couples the Navier–Stokes equations of fluid dynamics with an actuated, elastic body model. This is the first model at a Reynolds number appropriate for a swimming fish that captures the complete fluid-structure interaction, in which the body deforms according to both internal muscular forces and external fluid forces. Results indicate that identical muscle activation patterns can produce different kinematics depending on body stiffness, and the optimal value of stiffness for maximum acceleration is different from that for maximum steady swimming speed. Additionally, negative muscle work, observed in many fishes, emerges at higher tail beat frequencies without sensory input and may contribute to energy efficiency. Swimming fishes that can tune their body stiffness by appropriately timed muscle contractions may therefore be able to optimize the passive dynamics of their bodies to maximize peak acceleration or swimming speed. PMID:21037110

  5. Interactions between internal forces, body stiffness, and fluid environment in a neuromechanical model of lamprey swimming.

    PubMed

    Tytell, Eric D; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Williams, Thelma L; Cohen, Avis H; Fauci, Lisa J

    2010-11-16

    Animal movements result from a complex balance of many different forces. Muscles produce force to move the body; the body has inertial, elastic, and damping properties that may aid or oppose the muscle force; and the environment produces reaction forces back on the body. The actual motion is an emergent property of these interactions. To examine the roles of body stiffness, muscle activation, and fluid environment for swimming animals, a computational model of a lamprey was developed. The model uses an immersed boundary framework that fully couples the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics with an actuated, elastic body model. This is the first model at a Reynolds number appropriate for a swimming fish that captures the complete fluid-structure interaction, in which the body deforms according to both internal muscular forces and external fluid forces. Results indicate that identical muscle activation patterns can produce different kinematics depending on body stiffness, and the optimal value of stiffness for maximum acceleration is different from that for maximum steady swimming speed. Additionally, negative muscle work, observed in many fishes, emerges at higher tail beat frequencies without sensory input and may contribute to energy efficiency. Swimming fishes that can tune their body stiffness by appropriately timed muscle contractions may therefore be able to optimize the passive dynamics of their bodies to maximize peak acceleration or swimming speed.

  6. Effects of Opioid Peptides on Changes in Lipid Metabolism in Rats Subjected to Swimming Stress.

    PubMed

    Solin, A V; Lyashev, A Yu; Lyashev, Yu D

    2017-01-01

    Blood levels of nonesterified fatty acids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL increased in rats subjected to forced swimming stress. Administration of opioid peptides dynorphin A(1-13), DSLET, or DAGO reduced stress-induced disturbances in lipid metabolism. Dynorphin A(1-13) and DAGO produced the most pronounced effects and prevented an increase in concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL as soon as 39 h after treatment. Only DSLET increased HDL content in the plasma of stressed rats. The observed effects can be explained by the stress-limiting effects of opioids, e.g. attenuation of the effect of catecholamines on the adipose tissue and inhibition of the generation LPO products suppressing activity of the cholesterol metabolizing enzyme.

  7. Physical Forces Shape Group Identity of Swimming Pseudomonas putida Cells

    PubMed Central

    Espeso, David R.; Martínez-García, Esteban; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Goñi-Moreno, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The often striking macroscopic patterns developed by motile bacterial populations on agar plates are a consequence of the environmental conditions where the cells grow and spread. Parameters such as medium stiffness and nutrient concentration have been reported to alter cell swimming behavior, while mutual interactions among populations shape collective patterns. One commonly observed occurrence is the mutual inhibition of clonal bacteria when moving toward each other, which results in a distinct halt at a finite distance on the agar matrix before having direct contact. The dynamics behind this phenomenon (i.e., intolerance to mix in time and space with otherwise identical others) has been traditionally explained in terms of cell-to-cell competition/cooperation regarding nutrient availability. In this work, the same scenario has been revisited from an alternative perspective: the effect of the physical mechanics that frame the process, in particular the consequences of collisions between moving bacteria and the semi-solid matrix of the swimming medium. To this end, we set up a simple experimental system in which the swimming patterns of Pseudomonas putida were tested with different geometries and agar concentrations. A computational analysis framework that highlights cell-to-medium interactions was developed to fit experimental observations. Simulated outputs suggested that the medium is compressed in the direction of the bacterial front motion. This phenomenon generates what was termed a compression wave that goes through the medium preceding the swimming population and that determines the visible high-level pattern. Taken together, the data suggested that the mechanical effects of the bacteria moving through the medium created a factual barrier that impedes to merge with neighboring cells swimming from a different site. The resulting divide between otherwise clonal bacteria is thus brought about by physical forces—not genetic or metabolic programs. PMID

  8. Clarification of Unsteady Fluid Forces Acting on Limbs in Swimming Using an Underwater Robot Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Motomu; Takahashi, Akemi

    The objective of this study was to clarify the unsteady characteristics of the fluid force acting on limbs during swimming. For this objective, an underwater robot arm, which has five degrees-of-freedom in order to perform the various complicated limb motions during swimming, was developed. In the previous study, an experiment to measure the unsteady fluid force was conducted for four swimming strokes of the upper and lower limbs. In this paper, the unsteady fluid force model was firstly formulated. Second, the simulation of experimental conditions was conducted. Two fluid force coefficients, which are the parameters in the fluid force model, were identified using optimizing calculation, so that the discrepancies of the forces and moments between the experiment and simulation were minimized. In addition, fluid force models which are dependant only on the limbs’ shapes were determined. Good agreement between the experiment and simulation with the determined fluid force model indicated the validity of the determined model. The identified fluid model will be useful for mechanical analyses of various swimming motions in future studies.

  9. Do stress hormones connect environmental effects with behavior in the forced swim test?

    PubMed

    Pintér, Ottó; Domokos, Ágnes; Mergl, Zsuzsa; Mikics, Éva; Zelena, Dóra

    2011-01-01

    Forced swim test (FST) is a widely used test for antidepressant development. Depression is a stress related disease, as hormones of the stress-axis can modify mood. However it is not clear, how the appearance of depressive-like behavior (floating) in FST is connected with changes in the stress-hormone levels. We hypothesized, that different manipulations would alter the behavior through changes in stress-hormone levels. First the effect of environmental alterations was studied. Increasing water-temperature enhanced floating time together with a decrease in adrenocorticotropin levels. During the dark phase of the day rats spent more time with floating independently from the actual lighting. Neither the phase nor the actual lighting had significant effect on adrenocorticotropin concentrations with higher corticosterone levels during the dark phase. At greater water depth rats float less but the size of animals had no effect. Water depth did not influence adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone responses, but the size of the rats significantly affected both factors. Secondly, administration of imipramine reduced floating and adrenocorticotropin level without affecting corticosterone. Despite the known connection between depression and stress we did not find a correlation between floating behavior and hormone levels. As an alternative mechanism imipramine-induced heart rate and core body temperature decrease was found by telemetric approach. This study is the first summary in rats examining the effect of wide range of environmental alterations during FST. It seems likely that both brain monoamines and stress-axis take part in the development of depression, but these pathways are regulated independently.

  10. Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol enhances an increase of plasma corticosterone levels induced by forced swim-stress.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazunori; Koushi, Emi; Irie, Keiichi; Higuchi, Sei; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Kinjo, Junei; Egashira, Nobuaki; Oishi, Ryozo; Uchida, Naoki; Nagai, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Ryoji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2009-12-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on susceptibility to stress. We reported that THC significantly prolonged the immobility time during the forced swim-stress. The selective cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist O-2050 significantly reduced the enhancement of immobility by THC. We investigated the effect of THC on levels of stress hormone corticosterone under non-stress and forced swim-stress conditions. THC did not affect plasma corticosterone levels under non-stress conditions. However, THC, together with forced swim-stress, significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels. This effect was inhibited by O-2050. This evidence suggests that THC, under stressful conditions, enhances the susceptibility of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis to stress via the CB(1) receptor, thereby increasing the risk of depression.

  11. Delta-opiod receptor-mediated forced swimming stress-induced antinociception in the formalin test.

    PubMed

    Kamei, J; Hitosugi, H; Misawa, M; Nagase, H; Kasuya, Y

    1993-01-01

    Forced swimming stress-induced antinociception (FSSIA) was assessed using the formalin test. Male ICR mice, weighing about 30 g, were forced to swim in water at 20 degrees C for 3 min. In unstressed mice, SC injection of formalin (0.5%) to the hindpaw caused a biphasic response: an immediate nociceptive response (first phase) followed by a tonic response (second phase). Although forced swimming stress (FSS) had no effect on the duration of the first-phase response, FSS significantly reduced the duration of the second-phase response. The effect of FSSIA on the second-phase response was blocked by naltrindole (1 mg/kg, SC), a selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist, but not by beta-funaltrexamine (20 mg/kg, SC), a selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist. These results indicate that FSS may selectively reduce the second phase of the formalin-induced nociceptive response, primarily through delta-opioid receptors.

  12. Swimming Training Induces Liver Mitochondrial Adaptations to Oxidative Stress in Rats Submitted to Repeated Exhaustive Swimming Bouts

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Frederico D.; Stamm, Daniel N.; Della-Pace, Iuri D.; Dobrachinski, Fernando; de Carvalho, Nélson R.; Royes, Luiz Fernando F.; Soares, Félix A.; Rocha, João B.; González-Gallego, Javier; Bresciani, Guilherme

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Although acute exhaustive exercise is known to increase liver reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and aerobic training has shown to improve the antioxidant status in the liver, little is known about mitochondria adaptations to aerobic training. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the aerobic training on oxidative stress markers and antioxidant defense in liver mitochondria both after training and in response to three repeated exhaustive swimming bouts. Methods Wistar rats were divided into training (n = 14) and control (n = 14) groups. Training group performed a 6-week swimming training protocol. Subsets of training (n = 7) and control (n = 7) rats performed 3 repeated exhaustive swimming bouts with 72 h rest in between. Oxidative stress biomarkers, antioxidant activity, and mitochondria functionality were assessed. Results Trained group showed increased reduced glutathione (GSH) content and reduced/oxidized (GSH/GSSG) ratio, higher superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity, and decreased lipid peroxidation in liver mitochondria. Aerobic training protected against exhaustive swimming ROS production herein characterized by decreased oxidative stress markers, higher antioxidant defenses, and increases in methyl-tetrazolium reduction and membrane potential. Trained group also presented higher time to exhaustion compared to control group. Conclusions Swimming training induced positive adaptations in liver mitochondria of rats. Increased antioxidant defense after training coped well with exercise-produced ROS and liver mitochondria were less affected by exhaustive exercise. Therefore, liver mitochondria also adapt to exercise-induced ROS and may play an important role in exercise performance. PMID:23405192

  13. Immobility in the forced swim test is adaptive and does not reflect depression.

    PubMed

    Molendijk, Marc L; de Kloet, E Ronald

    2015-12-01

    The forced swim test is based on the progressive immobility a rodent displays when immersed in a beaker filled with water from where no escape is possible. While the test was originally designed to identify the antidepressant potential of drugs, over the past decade a rapidly growing number of publications (more than 2000) portray this immobility response anthropomorphically as a measure for depression and despair. This is incorrect. The response to the forced swim stressor should be considered for what it shows: a switch from active to passive behavior in the face of an acute stressor, aligned to cognitive functions underlying behavioral adaptation and survival.

  14. Oxidative stress status and placental implications in diabetic rats undergoing swimming exercise after embryonic implantation.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Gustavo Tadeu; Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Ribeiro, Viviane Maria; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2015-05-01

    The potential benefits and risks of physical exercise on fetal development during pregnancy remain unclear. The aim was to analyze maternal oxidative stress status and the placental morphometry to relate to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) from diabetic female rats submitted to swimming program after embryonic implantation. Pregnant Wistar rats were distributed into 4 groups (11 animals/group): control-nondiabetic sedentary rats, control exercised-nondiabetic exercised rats, diabetic-diabetic sedentary rats, and diabetic exercised-diabetic exercised rats. A swimming program was used as an exercise model. At the end of pregnancy, the maternal oxidative stress status, placental morphology, and fetal weight were analyzed. The swimming program was not efficient to reduce the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. This fact impaired placental development, resulting in altered blood flow and energy reserves, which contributed to a deficient exchange of nutrients and oxygen for the fetal development, leading to IUGR. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Oxidative Stress Status and Placental Implications in Diabetic Rats Undergoing Swimming Exercise After Embryonic Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Débora Cristina; Sinzato, Yuri Karen; Ribeiro, Viviane Maria; Rudge, Marilza Vieira Cunha; Calderon, Iracema Mattos Paranhos

    2015-01-01

    The potential benefits and risks of physical exercise on fetal development during pregnancy remain unclear. The aim was to analyze maternal oxidative stress status and the placental morphometry to relate to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) from diabetic female rats submitted to swimming program after embryonic implantation. Pregnant Wistar rats were distributed into 4 groups (11 animals/group): control—nondiabetic sedentary rats, control exercised—nondiabetic exercised rats, diabetic—diabetic sedentary rats, and diabetic exercised—diabetic exercised rats. A swimming program was used as an exercise model. At the end of pregnancy, the maternal oxidative stress status, placental morphology, and fetal weight were analyzed. The swimming program was not efficient to reduce the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. This fact impaired placental development, resulting in altered blood flow and energy reserves, which contributed to a deficient exchange of nutrients and oxygen for the fetal development, leading to IUGR. PMID:25361551

  16. Clarification of Unsteady Fluid Forces Acting on Limbs in Swimming Using an Underwater Robot Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Motomu; Takahashi, Akemi

    The objective of this study was to clarify the unsteady characteristics of the fluid forces acting on limbs during swimming. For this objective, an underwater robot arm was developed in this paper. The robot arm has five degrees-of-freedom in order to perform the various complicated limb motions during swimming. In addition, by changing the hand replica into the foot one, the robot also can perform the lower limb motions. The joint torques and the resultant thrust can be measured by the force sensors attached to the robot. In a circulating water tank, an experiment to measure the fluid forces was conducted for four swimming strokes of the upper and lower limbs. From the experiment, it was found that even the slight difference of the fluid forces between slightly different swimming motions can be quantified by the developed experimental system. In addition, it was suggested that ‘nipping’ the water by both lower limbs during the kick of the breaststroke almost does not affect thrust generation. The developed experimental system with the robot arm is useful not only for measuring the unsteady fluid forces, but also for flow visualization in future studies.

  17. Effect of swimming exercise on three-dimensional trabecular bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yong-In; Sone, Teruki; Ohnaru, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Kensuke; Fukunaga, Masao

    2015-11-01

    Swimming is generally considered ineffective for increasing bone mass in humans, at least compared with weight-bearing sports. However, swimming exercise has sometimes been shown to have a strong positive effect on bone mass in small animals. This study investigated the effects of swimming on bone mass, strength, and microarchitecture in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. OVX or sham operations were performed on 18-wk-old female Fisher 344 rats. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham sedentary (Sham-CON), sham swimming exercised (Sham-SWI), OVX sedentary (OVX-CON), and OVX swimming exercised (OVX-SWI). Rats in exercise groups performed swimming in a water bath for 60 min/day, 5 days/wk, for 12 wk. Bone mineral density (BMD) in right femurs was analyzed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Three-dimensional trabecular architecture at the distal femoral metaphysis was analyzed using microcomputed tomography (μCT). Geometrical properties of diaphyseal cortical bone were evaluated in the midfemoral region using μCT. The biomechanical properties of femurs were analyzed using three-point bending. Femoral BMD was significantly decreased following ovariectomy. This change was suppressed by swimming. Trabecular bone thickness, number, and connectivity were decreased by ovariectomy, whereas structure model index (i.e., ratio of rod-like to plate-like trabeculae) increased. These changes were also suppressed by swimming exercise. Femurs displayed greater cortical width and maximum load in SWI groups than in CON groups. Together, these results demonstrate that swimming exercise drastically alleviated both OVX-induced decreases in bone mass and mechanical strength and the deterioration of trabecular microarchitecture in rat models of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Aerobic and Anaerobic Swimming Force Evaluation in One Single Test Session for Young Swimmers.

    PubMed

    de Barros Sousa, Filipe Antônio; Rodrigues, Natalia Almeida; Messias, Leonardo Henrique Dalcheco; Queiroz, Jair Borges; Manchado-Gobatto, Fulvia Barros; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre

    2017-03-02

    This study aims to propose and validate the tethered swimming lactate minimum test (TSLacmin) estimating aerobic and anaerobic capacity in one single test session, using force as measurement parameter. 6 male and 6 female young swimmers (age=15.7±1.1 years; height=173.3±9.5 cm; weight=66.1±9.5 kg) performed 4 sessions comprising i) an all-out 30 s test and incremental test (TSLacmin); ii) 30 min of tethered swimming at constant intensity (2 sessions); iii) free-swimming time trials used to calculate critical velocity. Tethered swimming sessions used an acquisition system enabling maximum (Fmax) and mean (Fmean) force measurement and intensity variation. The tethered all-out test lasting 30 s resulted in hyperlactatemia of 7.9±2.0 mmol·l(-1). TSLacmin presented a 100% success applicability rate, which is equivalent to aerobic capacity in 75% of cases. TSLacmin intensity was 37.7±7.3 N, while maximum force in the all-out test was 105±27 N. Aerobic and anaerobic TSLacmin parameters were significantly related to free-swimming performance (r=-0.67 for 100 m and r=-0.80 for 200 m) and critical velocity (r=0.80). TSLacmin estimates aerobic capacity in most cases, and both aerobic and anaerobic force parameters are well related to critical velocity and free swimming performance.

  19. The effect of acute swimming exercise on plasma melatonin levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Uzun, A; Baltaci, A K; Kilic, M; Mogulkoc, R

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to determine the changes in plasma melatonin levels of rats performing acute swimming exercise, immediately following the exercise and after 24 and 48 hours. The study included 40 Spraque Dawley species adult male rats divided in to 4 groups as follows: group 1: general control group, group 2: swimming group A, the animals were decapitated after performing 30-minute acute swimming exercise, group 3: Swimming group B, the animals were decapitated 24 hours after performing 30-minute acute swimming exercise and group 4: swimming group C, the animals were decapitated 48 hours after performing 30-minute acute swimming exercise. Blood samples were collected from all experimental animals by decapitation method and plasma melatonin levels were determined according to RIA method. The comparison of plasma melatonin levels among groups revealed that group 3 had the highest plasma melatonin levels (p<0.01). The levels in group 1 (control) and group 4 were not different. The lowest plasma melatonin levels were found in group 2 (p<0.01). The results of our study demonstrate that plasma melatonin levels that decrease immediately after acute swimming exercise increase significantly after 24 hours and restore to resting levels after 48 hours (Tab. 1, Ref. 15).

  20. Comparison of tetrahydroaminoacridine and physostigmine on scopolamine-induced free swim behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dokla, C P; Rydelek-Fitzgerald, L

    1991-01-01

    The effect of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors on free swim behavior in rats pretreated with scopolamine (0.32 mg/kg, IP) was examined. Long-Evans rats received a single 5-min testing trial in a 1.5 m black swimming pool, and swim distance in three concentric annulus corridors (peripheral, middle, and inner) and the number of body-turn transitions (greater than 45 degrees) were measured. Physostigmine (1.0 mg/kg, IP) increased swim distance in the middle and inner annulus corridors, compared to tetrahydroaminoacridine (2.0 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, IP) and scopolamine alone (control) (Ps less than 0.01), and increased body-turn transitions, compared to all the other groups (Ps less than 0.05), but had no significant effect on peripheral annulus corridor swim distance, total swim distance, or swim speed. The results suggest that physostigmine produces uniquely different free swim patterns from tetrahydroaminoacridine following cholinergic blockade. These findings have implications for investigations attempting to restore spatial learning and navigation (e.g., Morris water maze) using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors following experimentally-induced cholinergic losses.

  1. Impact of maternal melatonin suppression on forced swim and tail suspension behavioral despair tests in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Voiculescu, SE; Rosca, AE; Zeca, V; Zagrean, L; Zagrean, AM

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin is an essential hormone, which regulates circadian rhythms and has antioxidative and anticarcinogenic effects. As melatonin secretion is suppressed by light, this effect was examined on the offspring of the Wistar rat females exposed to continuous light (500 lux) during the second half of the pregnancy (day 12 to 21). Control rats were kept under a 12:12 light-dark cycle. The resulted male offspring have been behaviorally assessed for depression after postnatal day 60 by using Forced Swim Test (FST) and Tail Suspension Test (TST). Animals resulted from the melatonin deprived pregnancies have developed an abnormal response in the TST, but a normal FST behavior. Also, TST active movement was different in the melatonin suppression group compared to the control group. These findings suggest that intrauterine melatonin deprivation might be linked to the depressive like behavior in adult male offspring. PMID:25866579

  2. Variability in Measurement of Swimming Forces: A Meta-Analysis of Passive and Active Drag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havriluk, Rod

    2007-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to identify sources of true and error variance in measuring swimming drag force to draw valid conclusions about performance factor effects. Passive drag studies were grouped according to methodological differences: tow line in pool, tow line in flume, and carriage in tow tank. Active drag studies were grouped according to…

  3. Variability in Measurement of Swimming Forces: A Meta-Analysis of Passive and Active Drag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havriluk, Rod

    2007-01-01

    An analysis was conducted to identify sources of true and error variance in measuring swimming drag force to draw valid conclusions about performance factor effects. Passive drag studies were grouped according to methodological differences: tow line in pool, tow line in flume, and carriage in tow tank. Active drag studies were grouped according to…

  4. Performance Level Differences in Swimming: A Meta-Analysis of Passive Drag Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havriluk, Rod

    2005-01-01

    The streamline is a basic position for competitive swimming starts mid turns and has been used in many studies on resistive forces. However, there is a wide yahweh, of theoretical interpretations in these studies, leading to diverse and questionable conclusions. The purpose of this study was to determine performance level differences in the…

  5. Performance Level Differences in Swimming: A Meta-Analysis of Passive Drag Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havriluk, Rod

    2005-01-01

    The streamline is a basic position for competitive swimming starts mid turns and has been used in many studies on resistive forces. However, there is a wide yahweh, of theoretical interpretations in these studies, leading to diverse and questionable conclusions. The purpose of this study was to determine performance level differences in the…

  6. Flavonoid quercetin protects against swimming stress-induced changes in oxidative biomarkers in the hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed

    Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Radhakrishnan, Ammu; Lee, Nagarajah; Kumar, Ponnusamy

    2009-10-25

    Quercetin is a bioflavonoid abundant in onions, apples, tea and red wine and one of the most studied flavonoids. Dietary quercetin intake is suggested to be health promoting, but this assumption is mainly based on mechanistic studies performed in vitro. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of quercetin on stress-induced changes in oxidative biomarkers in the hypothalamus of rats. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to forced swimming stress for 45 min daily for 14 days. Effect of quercetin at three different doses (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg body weight) on serum corticosterone and oxidative biomarkers (lipid hydroperoxides, antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidants) was estimated. Swimming stress significantly increased the serum corticosterone and lipid hydroperoxide levels. A significant decrease in total antioxidant levels and super oxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase levels was seen in the hypothalamus after stress and treatment with quercetin significantly increased these oxidative parameters and there was a significant decrease in lipid hydroperoxide levels. These data demonstrate that forced swimming stress produced a severe oxidative damage in the hypothalamus and treatment with quercetin markedly attenuated these stress-induced changes. Antioxidant action of quercetin may be beneficial for the prevention and treatment of stress-induced oxidative damage in the brain.

  7. Ventral tegmental area cholinergic mechanisms mediate behavioral responses in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Addy, N A; Nunes, E J; Wickham, R J

    2015-07-15

    Recent studies revealed a causal link between ventral tegmental area (VTA) phasic dopamine (DA) activity and pro-depressive and antidepressant-like behavioral responses in rodent models of depression. Cholinergic activity in the VTA has been demonstrated to regulate phasic DA activity, but the role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in depression-related behavior is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine whether pharmacological manipulation of VTA cholinergic activity altered behavioral responding in the forced swim test (FST) in rats. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats received systemic or VTA-specific administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, physostigmine (systemic; 0.06 or 0.125mg/kg, intra-cranial; 1 or 2μg/side), the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antagonist scopolamine (2.4 or 24μg/side), or the nicotinic AChR antagonist mecamylamine (3 or 30μg/side), prior to the FST test session. In control experiments, locomotor activity was also examined following systemic and intra-cranial administration of cholinergic drugs. Physostigmine administration, either systemically or directly into the VTA, significantly increased immobility time in FST, whereas physostigmine infusion into a dorsal control site did not alter immobility time. In contrast, VTA infusion of either scopolamine or mecamylamine decreased immobility time, consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. Finally, the VTA physostigmine-induced increase in immobility was blocked by co-administration with scopolamine, but unaltered by co-administration with mecamylamine. These data show that enhancing VTA cholinergic tone and blocking VTA AChRs has opposing effects in FST. Together, the findings provide evidence for a role of VTA cholinergic mechanisms in behavioral responses in FST.

  8. Allopregnanolone microinjected into the lateral septum or dorsal hippocampus reduces immobility in the forced swim test: participation of the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Landa, Juan Francisco; Contreras, Carlos M; García-Ríos, Rosa Isela

    2009-10-01

    Allopregnanolone is a 5α-reduced metabolite of progesterone with actions on γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptors that produce antidepressant-like effects. However, little is known about the target brain regions that mediate its antidepressant-like effects. In this study, allopregnanolone (2.0 μg/0.3 μl/rat) or its vehicle (35% cyclodextrin solution) were microinjected into the lateral septum, septofimbrial, or dorsal hippocampus of male Wistar rats that had previously received intraperitoneal injections of either saline or the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (1.0 mg/kg), and its effects were evaluated in the open field and forced swim tests. Allopregnanolone microinjected into the lateral septum or dorsal hippocampus, but not septofimbrial nucleus, induced a longer latency to the first immobility and a shorter total immobility time in the forced swim test compared with vehicle. Bicuculline pretreatment reversed the effect of allopregnanolone. None of the treatments produced significant changes in crossings in the open field test. In conclusion, allopregnanolone produces an antidepressant-like effect in rats submitted to the forced swim test through actions on GABAA receptors located in the lateral septum and dorsal hippocampus, which is consistent with the antistress effect of GABAA agonists in these particular brain structures.

  9. Backstroke swimming: exploring gender differences in passive drag and instantaneous net drag force.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Danielle P; Sayers, Mark Gregory Leigh; Burkett, Brendan

    2013-12-01

    This study explored and quantified gender differences in passive drag and instantaneous net drag force profile for elite backstroke swimmers (FINA points 938 ± 71). Nine female and ten male backstroke swimmers completed eight maximum speed trials. During the passive drag condition participants were towed at the speed achieved within the maximum effort backstroke swimming trials, while holding a supine stationary streamline position. The remaining trials, swimmers performed their natural swimming stroke, while attached to an assisted towing device. Male participant's passive (P < .001) and mean net drag force (P < .001) were significantly higher compared with female participants. In addition, there were no significant differences by gender between either the minimum or maximum net drag forces produced during the left and right arm strokes. Instantaneous net drag force profiles demonstrated differences within and between individuals and genders. The swimmers who recorded the fastest speed also recorded the smallest difference in net drag force fluctuations. The instantaneous net drag force profile within elite backstroke swimming provides further insight into stroke technique of this sport.

  10. Behavioral and pharmacological validation of the gerbil forced-swim test: effects of neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wallace-Boone, Tanya L; Newton, Amy E; Wright, Robert N; Lodge, Nicholas J; McElroy, John F

    2008-07-01

    Several studies have suggested that neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonists may have therapeutic potential as novel antidepressant drugs. To test these compounds preclinically, gerbils have become one of the preferred species in that they demonstrate close NK1 receptor homology with humans and bind NK1 antagonists with higher affinity than rats and mice. The intent of the present study was to determine whether the forced-swim test (FST), one of the most commonly used animal tests of antidepressant-like activity, could be adapted for use with the gerbil. Critical factors in the establishment of this assay included swim tank diameter, weight, and sex of the animals tested. Pharmacological validation of the FST using standard antidepressant compounds (eg fluoxetine, paroxetine, desipramine) resulted in decreased immobility time during the test, indicative of an antidepressant-like effect. Similar to results reported for the rat and mouse FST, the antipsychotic drug haloperidol increased immobility, whereas the psychostimulant, amphetamine decreased immobility, and anxiolytic drugs (eg buspirone) had no effect. Investigation into the locomotor effects of all compounds tested was consistent with previous reports in other species, with the exception of paroxetine, which produced hyperactivity at therapeutically effective doses in gerbils. In addition to standard antidepressants, NK1 antagonists (L-733060, MK-869, and CP-122721) all reduced immobility in the gerbil FST without affecting locomotor activity. Overall, these results suggest that the gerbil is an ideal species for use in the FST, and that this paradigm may have predictive validity for identifying novel antidepressant compounds.

  11. The Effect of Warm-up on Tethered Front Crawl Swimming Forces

    PubMed Central

    Neiva, Henrique; Morouço, Pedro; Silva, António J.; Marques, Mário C.; Marinho, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of warm-up on high-intensity front crawl tethered swimming and thus to better understand possible variations in the force exerted by the swimmers. Ten male national level swimmers (mean ± SD; age 15.3 ± 0.95 years old, height: 1.73 ± 5.2 m, body mass: 64.3 ± 7.8 kg, Fat mass 8.31 ± 3.1 kg) participated in this study. After a typical competition warm-up, the subjects performed a 30 s tethered swimming all-out effort in front crawl swimming technique. The same test was repeated in the day after but performed without warming up. Capillary blood lactate concentration was assessed before and after the swimming test and the Borg ratings of perceived exertion scale was used. Without a previous warm-up, the mean ± SD values of maximum and mean forces were 299.62 ± 77.56 N and 91.65 ± 14.70 N, respectively. These values were different (p<0.05) from the values obtained with warm-up (351.33 ± 81.85 N and 103.97 ± 19.11 N). Differences were also observed when regarding to the forces relative to body mass. However, the values of lactate net concentrations after the test performed with and without warm-up were not different (6.27 ± 2.36 mmol·l−1 and 6.18 ± 2.353 mmol·l −1) and the same occurs with the values of ratings of perceived exertion (15.90 ± 2.42 and 15.60 ± 2.27). These results suggest an improvement of the maximum and mean force of the swimmer on the tethered swimming due to previous warm-up. PMID:23486375

  12. The Effect of Warm-up on Tethered Front Crawl Swimming Forces.

    PubMed

    Neiva, Henrique; Morouço, Pedro; Silva, António J; Marques, Mário C; Marinho, Daniel A

    2011-09-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of warm-up on high-intensity front crawl tethered swimming and thus to better understand possible variations in the force exerted by the swimmers. Ten male national level swimmers (mean ± SD; age 15.3 ± 0.95 years old, height: 1.73 ± 5.2 m, body mass: 64.3 ± 7.8 kg, Fat mass 8.31 ± 3.1 kg) participated in this study. After a typical competition warm-up, the subjects performed a 30 s tethered swimming all-out effort in front crawl swimming technique. The same test was repeated in the day after but performed without warming up. Capillary blood lactate concentration was assessed before and after the swimming test and the Borg ratings of perceived exertion scale was used. Without a previous warm-up, the mean ± SD values of maximum and mean forces were 299.62 ± 77.56 N and 91.65 ± 14.70 N, respectively. These values were different (p<0.05) from the values obtained with warm-up (351.33 ± 81.85 N and 103.97 ± 19.11 N). Differences were also observed when regarding to the forces relative to body mass. However, the values of lactate net concentrations after the test performed with and without warm-up were not different (6.27 ± 2.36 mmol·l(-1) and 6.18 ± 2.353 mmol·l (-1)) and the same occurs with the values of ratings of perceived exertion (15.90 ± 2.42 and 15.60 ± 2.27). These results suggest an improvement of the maximum and mean force of the swimmer on the tethered swimming due to previous warm-up.

  13. Skin-friction drag analysis from the forced convection modeling in simplified underwater swimming.

    PubMed

    Polidori, G; Taïar, R; Fohanno, S; Mai, T H; Lodini, A

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with skin-friction drag analysis in underwater swimming. Although lower than profile drag, skin-friction drag remains significant and is the second and only other contribution to total drag in the case of underwater swimming. The question arises whether varying the thermal gradient between the underwater swimmer and the pool water may modify the surface shear stress distribution and the resulting skin-friction drag acting on a swimmer's body. As far as the authors are aware, such a question has not previously been addressed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of this thermal gradient by using the integral formalism applied to the forced convection theory. From a simplified model in a range of pool temperatures (20-30 degrees C) it was demonstrated that, whatever the swimming speeds, a 5.3% reduction in the skin-friction drag would occur with increasing average boundary-layer temperature provided that the flow remained laminar. However, as the majority of the flow is actually turbulent, a turbulent flow analysis leads to the major conclusion that friction drag is a function of underwater speed, leading to a possible 1.5% reduction for fast swimming speeds above 1m/s. Furthermore, simple correlations between the surface shear stress and resulting skin-friction drag are derived in terms of the boundary-layer temperature, which may be readily used in underwater swimming situations.

  14. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi)

    PubMed Central

    Palstra, Arjan P.; Mes, Daan; Kusters, Kasper; Roques, Jonathan A. C.; Flik, Gert; Kloet, Kees; Blonk, Robbert J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (Uopt in m s−1 or body lengths s−1, BL s−1) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at Uopt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. Uopt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145, 206, and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: (1) 0.70 m s−1 or 4.83 BL s−1, (2) 0.82 m s−1 or 3.25 BL s−1, and (3) 0.85 m s−1 or 2.73 BL s−1. Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of Uopt (BL s−1) = 234.07(BL)−0.779 (R2 = 0.9909) was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s−1 (“swimmers”) or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow (“resters”) in a newly designed 3600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor), were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n = 23) showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n = 23). As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR) for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31%) in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min−1, respectively, under anesthesia). Thus, growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments. PMID:25620933

  15. Forced sustained swimming exercise at optimal speed enhances growth of juvenile yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi).

    PubMed

    Palstra, Arjan P; Mes, Daan; Kusters, Kasper; Roques, Jonathan A C; Flik, Gert; Kloet, Kees; Blonk, Robbert J W

    2014-01-01

    Swimming exercise at optimal speed may optimize growth performance of yellowtail kingfish in a recirculating aquaculture system. Therefore, optimal swimming speeds (U opt in m s(-1) or body lengths s(-1), BL s(-1)) were assessed and then applied to determine the effects of long-term forced and sustained swimming at U opt on growth performance of juvenile yellowtail kingfish. U opt was quantified in Blazka-type swim-tunnels for 145, 206, and 311 mm juveniles resulting in values of: (1) 0.70 m s(-1) or 4.83 BL s(-1), (2) 0.82 m s(-1) or 3.25 BL s(-1), and (3) 0.85 m s(-1) or 2.73 BL s(-1). Combined with literature data from larger fish, a relation of U opt (BL s(-1)) = 234.07(BL)(-0.779) (R (2) = 0.9909) was established for this species. Yellowtail kingfish, either forced to perform sustained swimming exercise at an optimal speed of 2.46 BL s(-1) ("swimmers") or allowed to perform spontaneous activity at low water flow ("resters") in a newly designed 3600 L oval flume (with flow created by an impeller driven by an electric motor), were then compared. At the start of the experiment, ten fish were sampled representing the initial condition. After 18 days, swimmers (n = 23) showed a 92% greater increase in BL and 46% greater increase in BW as compared to resters (n = 23). As both groups were fed equal rations, feed conversion ratio (FCR) for swimmers was 1.21 vs. 1.74 for resters. Doppler ultrasound imaging showed a statistically significant higher blood flow (31%) in the ventral aorta of swimmers vs. resters (44 ± 3 vs. 34 ± 3 mL min(-1), respectively, under anesthesia). Thus, growth performance can be rapidly improved by optimal swimming, without larger feed investments.

  16. Effects of crude oil and swimming behavior and survival in the rice rat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, J.L.; Esher, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Oil slicks in laboratory test chambers inhibited swimming behavior of rice rats, and reduced survival at low temperature. Predisposition to enter the water and swim was greatly reduced at both high (200 ml/m2 water surface) and low (20 ml/m2) concentrations of oil. Survival was significantly affected only at high concentrations. The results may be of value in predicting the impact of oil spills on the mammal community of coastal marshes.

  17. Swimming and running through sand: resistive force theory in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Resistive force theory (RFT) is often used to analyze the movement of microscopic organisms swimming in fluids. In RFT, a body is partitioned into infinitesimal segments, each of which generates thrust and experiences drag. Linear superposition of forces from elements over the body allows prediction of swimming kinematics and kinetics. While RFT does not always show quantitative agreement with experimental measurements in fluids [e.g. Rodenborn et al., PNAS, 2013], we show that it quantitatively models the locomotion of animals and robots that move on and within dry granular media. RFT shows excellent agreement when the medium is slightly polydisperse, in the regime where frictional forces dominate material inertial forces, and when locomotion can be approximated as confined to a plane. Within a given plane (horizontal or vertical) relationships that govern the force versus orientation of an elemental intruder are functionally independent of the granular medium. We use RFT to explain features of locomotion-these include muscle activation patterns during sand-swimming by the sandfish lizard and optimum limb shape for legged robot walking. Work supported by NSF and ARL.

  18. Swimming intervention mitigates HFD-induced obesity of rats through PGC-1α-irisin pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, X-Q; Yuan, H; Li, J; Fan, J-J; Jia, S-H; Kou, X-J; Chen, N

    2016-05-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered myokine, can drive the browning of white adipocytes to control body weight or mitigate obesity progression through regulating energy metabolism. However, the underlying mechanisms or specific signal pathways of exercise-induced irisin on the management of obesity are still unclear. Totally 30 rats were subjected to high fat diet (HFD) feeding for 8 weeks to establish the rat model with obesity successfully. HFD-induced obese model rats were provided with 8 weeks swimming intervention at moderate intensity for exploring the treatment of obesity through exercise intervention. In addition, another 15 rats were subjected to HFD feeding coupled with total 16 weeks swimming intervention at a moderate intensity from the beginning of the experiment, which was used for exploring the prevention of obesity through exercise intervention. Blood and gastrocnemius samples were harvested from obese rats after swimming intervention to explore its specific signal pathways through ELISA analysis and Western blotting. HFD feeding of rats for 8 weeks could lead to the obesity due to the disorders of lipid metabolism. Totally 8 weeks swimming intervention at moderate intensity for rats with obesity could obviously alleviate the progression of obesity and 16 weeks swimming intervention from the beginning of the experiment could significantly inhibit the development of obesity. Meanwhile, swimming intervention could result in an increased phosphorylation of AMPK and up-regulation of irisin and PGC-1α as the biomarkers of energy metabolism. Exercise intervention can activate PGC-1α-dependent irisin to induce the browning of white adipocytes, thus inhibiting or alleviating the occurrence and development of obesity.

  19. On the estimation of swimming and flying forces from wake measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O

    2005-09-01

    The transfer of momentum from an animal to fluid in its wake is fundamental to many swimming and flying modes of locomotion. Hence, properties of the wake are commonly studied in experiments to infer the magnitude and direction of locomotive forces. The determination of which wake properties are necessary and sufficient to empirically deduce swimming and flying forces is currently made ad hoc. This paper systematically addresses the question of the minimum number of wake properties whose combination is sufficient to determine swimming and flying forces from wake measurements. In particular, it is confirmed that the spatial velocity distribution (i.e. the velocity field) in the wake is by itself insufficient to determine swimming and flying forces, and must be combined with the fluid pressure distribution. Importantly, it is also shown that the spatial distribution of rotation and shear (i.e. the vorticity field) in the wake is by itself insufficient to determine swimming and flying forces, and must be combined with a parameter that is analogous to the fluid pressure. The measurement of this parameter in the wake is shown to be identical to a calculation of the added-mass contribution from fluid surrounding vortices in the wake, and proceeds identically to a measurement of the added-mass traditionally associated with fluid surrounding solid bodies. It is demonstrated that the velocity/pressure perspective is equivalent to the vorticity/vortex-added-mass approach in the equations of motion. A model is developed to approximate the contribution of wake vortex added-mass to locomotive forces, given a combination of velocity and vorticity field measurements in the wake. A dimensionless parameter, the wake vortex ratio (denoted Wa), is introduced to predict the types of wake flows for which the contribution of forces due to wake vortex added-mass will become non-negligible. Previous wake analyses are re-examined in light of this parameter to infer the existence and

  20. Effect of Polysaccharide from Cordyceps militaris (Ascomycetes) on Physical Fatigue Induced by Forced Swimming.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cordyceps militaris is the one of the most important medicinal mushrooms, widely used in East Asian countries. Polysaccharide is considered to be the principal active component in C. militaris and has a wide range of biological and pharmacological properties. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of polysaccharide from C. militaris (PCM) on physical fatigue induced in animals through a forced swimming test. The mice were divided into 4 groups receiving 28 days' treatment with drinking water (exercise control) or low-, medium-, and high-dose PCM (40, 80, and 160 mg/kg/day, respectively). After 28 days, the mice were subjected to the forced swimming test; the exhaustive swimming time was measured and fatigue-related biochemical parameters, including serum lactic acid, urea nitrogen, creatine kinase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, superoxide dismutase, glutathi- one peroxidase, catalase, malondialdehyde, liver glycogen, and muscle glycogen, were analyzed. The results showed that PCM could significantly prolong the exhaustive swimming time of mice; decrease concentrations of serum lactic acid, urea nitrogen, creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and malondialdehyde; and increase liver and muscle glycogen contents and the concentrations of serum superoxide dismutase, glutathione per- oxidase, and catalase. The data suggest that PCM has an antifatigue effect, and it might become a new functional food or medicine for fatigue resistance.

  1. Force-free swimming of a model helical flagellum in viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Powers, Thomas; Breuer, Kenneth

    2011-11-01

    Many bacteria swim by rotating helical flagella. These cells often live in polymer suspensions, which are viscoelastic. Recently there have been several theoretical and experimental studies showing that viscoelasticity can either enhance or suppress propulsion, depending on the details of the microswimmer. To help clarify this situation, we study experimentally the motility of the flagellum using a scaled-up model system - a motorized helical coil that rotates along its axial direction. The rotating helix is tethered on a linear stage that advances at prescribed speeds along the axial direction. A free-swimming speed is obtained when the net force on the helix is zero. In the Newtonian case, the free-swimming speed of the helix matches the predictions from the slender body theory and the boundary element method, with increasing order of agreement as the numerical strategy improves. When the helix is immersed in a viscoelastic (Boger) fluid, we find an increase in the force-free swimming speed. The enhancement is maximized at a Deborah number of approximately one, and the magnitude depends not only on the elasticity of the fluid but also on the geometry of the helix.

  2. Determination of Force Coresponding to Maximal Lactate Steady State in Tethered Swimming

    PubMed Central

    PAPOTI, MARCELO; VITÓRIO, RICARDO; ARAÚJO, GUSTAVO G.; DA SILVA, ADELINO S. R.; SANTHIAGO, VANESSA; MARTINS, LUIZ E. B.; CUNHA, SÉRGIO A.; GOBATTO, CLAUDIO A.

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of the present investigation was to verify if the aerobic capacity (AC) measured in tethered swimming corresponds to the maximal lactate steady state (MLSS) and its correlation with 30 min and 400m free style swimming. Twenty-five swimmers were submitted to an incremental tethered swimming test (ITS) with an initial load of 20N and increments of 10N each 3min. After each stage of 3min, the athletes had 30s of interval to blood sample collections that were used to measure blood lactate concentrations ([La−]). The ACBI was determined by the abrupt increase in [La−] versus force (F). The points obtained between [La−] versus force (N) were adjusted by an exponential curve model to determine AC corresponding to 3.5mmol.l−1 (AC3.5) and 4.0mmol.l−1 (AC4.0). After these procedures, the swimmers performed maximal efforts of 30min and 400m in free style swimming. We used the distance performed in 30min and the time performed in 400m to calculate the median velocities (i.e. V30 and V400) of these protocols. After one week, in order to measure the MLSS, nine athletes performed three 30-min tethered swimming efforts with intensities of 90, 100, and 110% of ACBI. The ANOVA one-way was used to compare the ACBI, AC3.5 and AC4.0. Correlations between ACs, and between ACs and V30 and V400 (p<0.05) were determined using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. The intensity corresponding to 100% of ACBI was similar to the MLSS. It was observed significant correlations of the aerobic capacities (i.e. ACBI, AC3.5 and AC4.0) with V30 (r>0.91) and V400 (r>0.63). According to our results, it is possible to conclude that the ACBI corresponds to the MLSS, and both the AC - individually determined - and the AC - determined using fixed blood lactate concentrations of 3.5 and 4.0mmol.l−1 - can be used to predict the mean velocity of 30min and 400m in free style swimming. In addition to that, the tethered swimming system can be used for aerobic development in places

  3. Administration of orexin receptor 1 antagonist into the rostral ventromedial medulla increased swim stress-induced antinociception in rat

    PubMed Central

    Soliemani, Neda; Moslem, Alireza; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Azhdari-Zarmehri, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Intracerebroventricular injection of orexin-A (hypocretin-1) antagonist has been shown to inhibit stress-induced analgesia. However the locations of central sites that may mediate these effects have not been totally demonstrated. This study was performed to investigate the role of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) orexin receptor 1 in stress-induced analgesia (SIA). Materials and Methods: Forced swim stress in water was employed to adult male rats (200-250 g). Nociceptive responses were measured by formalin test (50 µl injection of formalin 2% subcutaneously into hind paw) and, pain related behaviors were monitored for 90 min following intra-microinjection of SB-334867 (orexin receptor 1 antagonist) into RVM. Results: Exposure to swimming stress test after administration of SB-334867 into RVM significantly reduces the formalin-induced nociceptive behaviors in phase1, interphase, and phase 2 in rats. Conclusion: The result demonstrated the involvement of OXR1 in antinociceptive behaviors induced by swim stress in RVM. PMID:27403261

  4. Effects of swimming exercise on nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve transection model

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chien-Fu; Yang, Tse-Yen; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Way, Tzong-Der; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Swimming is commonly considered to be an efficient rehabilitation exercise to treat peripheral nerve injury. However, the most effective resistance level and exercise duration is still unclear. We investigated the effects and mechanisms of swimming at various exertion levels in a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Methods: Sciatic nerve transection rats were randomized into the following four groups based on swimming duration (from the 7th day to the 28th day post-surgery): sedentary control group (SC), S10 group (10 min/3 times/week), S20 group (20 min/3 times/week), and S30 group (30 min/3 times/week) (n = 10 each). Axon regeneration, electrophysiological properties, muscular weights, macrophage infiltration, and nerve repair associated maker, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), were measured. Results: Dramatic higher successful percentages of nerve regeneration across the 10-mm gaps in swimming groups compared to the SC group. Total area of nerve regeneration significantly improved in the S10 group; however, electrophysiological properties, muscular weights, and macrophage infiltration in the regenerated nerves of rats did not differ significantly between the various exercise groups. CGRP expression was significantly increased in the spinal cord of rats in the S20 group. Conclusions: Our data indicated that CGRP-related axonal regeneration improved significantly with moderate swimming. These results should inspire new studies in physiotherapeutic practice for related human treatment. PMID:28474579

  5. A sensitive and reliable test instrument to assess swimming in rats with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Åkesson, Elisabet; Holmberg, Lena; Sundström, Erik

    2015-09-15

    For clinical translation of experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) research, evaluation of animal SCI models should include several sensorimotor functions. Validated and reliable assessment tools should be applicable to a wide range of injury severity. The BBB scale is the most widely used test instrument, but similar to most others it is used to assess open field ambulation. We have developed an assessment tool for swimming in rats with SCI, with high discriminative power and sensitivity to functional recovery after mild and severe injuries, without need for advanced test equipment. We studied various parameters of swimming in four groups of rats with thoracic SCI of different severity and a control group, for 8 weeks after surgery. Six parameters were combined in a multiple item scale, the Karolinska Institutet Swim Assessment Tool (KSAT). KSAT scores for all SCI groups showed consistent functional improvement after injury, and significant differences between the five experimental groups. The internal consistency, the inter-rater and the test-retest reliability were very high. The KSAT score was highly correlated to the cross-section area of white matter spared at the injury epicenter. Importantly, even after 8 weeks of recovery the KSAT score reliably discriminated normal animals from those inflicted by the mildest injury, and also displayed the recovery of the most severely injured rats. We conclude that this swim scale is an efficient and reliable tool to assess motor activity during swimming, and an important addition to the methods available for evaluating rat models of SCI.

  6. Using Magnetic Forces to Probe the Gravi-response of Swimming Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M., Jr.

    2004-03-01

    Paramecium Caudatum, a single celled ciliate, alters its swimming behavior when subjected to different gravity environments (e.g. centrifugation and micro-gravity). To dissect the mechanisms behind this gravi-response and that of other biological systems, we are developing the use of magnetic body forces as a means of creating a rapidly tunable, simulated variable gravity environment. Since biological materials are weakly diamagnetic, we must subject them to intense inhomogeneous magnetic fields with characteristic field-field gradient products on the order of 16 T^2/cm. We will describe experiments on Paramecium Caudatum in which we adjust their net buoyancy with magnetic forces and measure the resulting changes in their swimming behavior.

  7. The effect of hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley on forced swimming test in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na-Hyung; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Lee, Ju-Young; Go, Hoyeon; Ko, Seong-Gyu; Hong, Seung-Heon; Kim, Hyung-Min; Um, Jae-Young

    2008-11-01

    Spirulina is a true puree of a filamentous, spiral-shaped blue alga and exerts the useful properties as a source of many biochemicals. This study investigated the antidepressant-like effect of hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley on the forced swimming test in mice. After the forced swimming test, we examined the levels of several blood biochemical parameters in mice. The effect of the hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley-treated group for 2 weeks on the immobility time was significantly reduced in comparison with the control group (p < .05). Plasma level of blood urea nitrogen and lactate dehydrogenase was significantly decreased in the hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley-treated group compared with the control group (p < .05). It had no effect on the variation of creatine kinase, glucose, total protein, and albumin levels. Therefore, these results suggest that hydrolyzed Spirulina by malted barley might be a candidate among antidepressant agents.

  8. [Unpredictable chronic mild stress effects on antidepressants activities in forced swim test].

    PubMed

    Kudryashov, N V; Kalinina, T S; Voronina, T A

    2015-02-01

    The experiments has been designed to study unpredictable chronic mild stress effect on anti-depressive activities of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in forced swim test in male outbred mice. It is shown that acute treatment with fluoxetine does not produce any antidepressant effects in mice following stress of 14 days while the sub-chronic injections of fluoxetine result in more deep depressive-like behavior. In 28 daily stressed mice, antidepressant effect of fluoxetine is observed independently of the injection rates. Amitriptyline demonstrates the antidepressant activity regardless of the duration of stress or administration scheduling, but at the same time the severity of anti-immobilization effect of amitriptyline in stressed mice is weaker in compare to non-stressed trails. Thus, the injection rates and duration of unpredictable mild chronic stress are the parameters that determine the efficiency of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  9. The influence of the breathing action on net drag force production in front crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Formosa, D; Sayers, M G L; Burkett, B

    2014-12-01

    20 elite swimmers completed a total of 6 randomized net drag force trials in 2 conditions (i) 3 breathing and (ii) 3 non-breathing. Net drag force was measured using an assisted motorized dynamometer device mounted upon a Kistler force-platform. The male participants demonstrated no statistical differences in stroke rates between breathing and non-breathing trials. Female participants, however, demonstrated a statistical difference stroke rate. The male participants demonstrated that the breathing action caused a greater (26%) net drag force compared to the females (16%). To further understand the influence of breathing on swimming technique, each stroke was analyzed and comparisons were made between the breathing and non-breathing conditions. The male participants demonstrated a similar minimum net drag force when comparing the breathing and non-breathing conditions. Analysis showed that minimum net drag force and maximum net drag force for the males changed when integrating the breathing action, while female participants demonstrated similar swimming technique, regardless of condition or stroke.

  10. Endocrine and immunological correlates of behaviorally identified swim stress resilient and vulnerable rats.

    PubMed

    Levay, Elizabeth A; Govic, Antonina; Hazi, Agnes; Flannery, Graham; Christianson, John; Drugan, Robert C; Kent, Stephen

    2006-09-01

    Animal models of stress-induced depression have identified a bimodal reactivity to stress, namely 'resilience' and 'vulnerability.' Possible corresponding differences in endocrine and immunological responses between these groups have not been delineated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: stress (n=25), confined controls (n=7), and home cage controls (n=7). Stress rats were exposed to 80, 5-s inescapable cold water swim trials (15 degrees C). Twenty-four hours later, the stress rats were tested on an instrumental swim escape test (SET) but now they had access to an omnidirectional lever that terminated the stress. Immediately after the SET, trunk blood was collected to assay for serum corticosterone (CORT), and spleens were removed and natural killer cell activity (NKCA) and concanavalin A (CON-A) induced lymphocyte proliferation determined. Subjects in the stress treatment group were divided into distinct 'resilient' and 'vulnerable' categories by a median split for average escape latencies across the last 25 trials of the SET. Stress rats secreted more CORT than controls and vulnerable rats secreted greater levels than resilient rats. NKCA was greatest in control rats, and was decreased in the stress rats although the resilient and the vulnerable groups did not differ. Conversely, CON-A-induced lymphocyte proliferation was greatest in stress rats, vulnerable rats exhibiting more proliferation than resilient rats, but both were greater than both control groups. Stress animals were hypothermic throughout the swim stress procedures but exhibited a stress-induced fever following the initial swim trials. The observed differences may have important predictive and theoretical utility for vulnerable and resilient profiles.

  11. The effects of Creatine Long-Term Supplementation on Muscle Morphology and Swimming Performance in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ahmet; Ozdemir, Ercan; Gulturk, Sefa; Erdal, Sena

    2009-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) has been shown to increase the total muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Cr supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance, using an animal model. Each rat was subjected to exercise 15-minute period daily for the 12 weeks. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: no Cr supplementation (CON), no Cr supplementation and incomplete food intake (lacking lysine and methionine in diet for rats) (INCO), Cr supplementation 1 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) (CREAT-I) and Cr supplementation 2 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) (CREAT-II). Three months later, all groups adult rats exercised in swimming pool chambers. Swimming time was recorded as minute for each rat. Following swimming performance period, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation and the gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles were dissected. Serial slices of 5-7 μm were allocated paraffin wax and histochemical staining procedure of cross-sections was carried out with heamatoxylin-eosin technics. All groups gained body weight at the end of 12 weeks but there was no statistical difference among them. Swimming time values were statistical difference between CREAT-II and CON group as well as between CREAT-I and CON group (p < 0.05). In the INCO group was determined increased connective tissue cell of the muscle sample. In contrast, in the CREAT-I and CREAT-II group, the basic histological changes were large-scale muscle fibers and hypertrophic muscle cells. These results suggest that long-term creatine supplementation increased the number of muscle fibers and enhanced endurance swimming performance in rats. Key pointsThere is no study about the effects of creatine long-term supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance in rats.Long-term creatine supplementation increase muscle hypertrophy (but not body weight) and enhance endurance swimming performance in rats.The quantitative analysis indicated that the number of muscle fibers per defined area

  12. Novel insights into the behavioral analysis of mice subjected to the forced-swim test

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Faas, G C; Ferando, I; Mody, I

    2015-01-01

    The forced-swim test (FST) is one of the most widely used rodent behavioral assays, in which the immobility of animals is used to assess the effectiveness of antidepressant drugs. However, the existing, and mostly arbitrary, criteria used for quantification could lead to biased results. Here we believe we uncovered new confounding factors, revealed new indices to interpret the behavior of mice and propose an unbiased means for quantification of the FST. PMID:25871976

  13. Coping with the Forced Swim Stressor: Towards Understanding an Adaptive Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    de Kloet, E. R.; Molendijk, M. L.

    2016-01-01

    In the forced swim test (FST) rodents progressively show increased episodes of immobility if immersed in a beaker with water from where escape is not possible. In this test, a compound qualifies as a potential antidepressant if it prevents or delays the transition to this passive (energy conserving) behavioural style. In the past decade however the switch from active to passive “coping” was used increasingly to describe the phenotype of an animal that has been exposed to a stressful history and/or genetic modification. A PubMed analysis revealed that in a rapidly increasing number of papers (currently more than 2,000) stress-related immobility in the FST is labeled as a depression-like phenotype. In this contribution we will examine the different phases of information processing during coping with the forced swim stressor. For this purpose we focus on the action of corticosterone that is mediated by the closely related mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in the limbic brain. The evidence available suggests a model in which we propose that the limbic MR-mediated response selection operates in complementary fashion with dopaminergic accumbens/prefrontal executive functions to regulate the transition between active and passive coping styles. Upon rescue from the beaker the preferred, mostly passive, coping style is stored in the memory via a GR-dependent action in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. It is concluded that the rodent's behavioural response to a forced swim stressor does not reflect depression. Rather the forced swim experience provides a unique paradigm to investigate the mechanistic underpinning of stress coping and adaptation. PMID:27034848

  14. Novel insights into the behavioral analysis of mice subjected to the forced-swim test.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Faas, G C; Ferando, I; Mody, I

    2015-04-14

    The forced-swim test (FST) is one of the most widely used rodent behavioral assays, in which the immobility of animals is used to assess the effectiveness of antidepressant drugs. However, the existing, and mostly arbitrary, criteria used for quantification could lead to biased results. Here we believe we uncovered new confounding factors, revealed new indices to interpret the behavior of mice and propose an unbiased means for quantification of the FST.

  15. Coping with the Forced Swim Stressor: Towards Understanding an Adaptive Mechanism.

    PubMed

    de Kloet, E R; Molendijk, M L

    2016-01-01

    In the forced swim test (FST) rodents progressively show increased episodes of immobility if immersed in a beaker with water from where escape is not possible. In this test, a compound qualifies as a potential antidepressant if it prevents or delays the transition to this passive (energy conserving) behavioural style. In the past decade however the switch from active to passive "coping" was used increasingly to describe the phenotype of an animal that has been exposed to a stressful history and/or genetic modification. A PubMed analysis revealed that in a rapidly increasing number of papers (currently more than 2,000) stress-related immobility in the FST is labeled as a depression-like phenotype. In this contribution we will examine the different phases of information processing during coping with the forced swim stressor. For this purpose we focus on the action of corticosterone that is mediated by the closely related mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in the limbic brain. The evidence available suggests a model in which we propose that the limbic MR-mediated response selection operates in complementary fashion with dopaminergic accumbens/prefrontal executive functions to regulate the transition between active and passive coping styles. Upon rescue from the beaker the preferred, mostly passive, coping style is stored in the memory via a GR-dependent action in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. It is concluded that the rodent's behavioural response to a forced swim stressor does not reflect depression. Rather the forced swim experience provides a unique paradigm to investigate the mechanistic underpinning of stress coping and adaptation.

  16. Effects of Viscosity on the Gravi-kinesis Responses of Swimming Paramecia Studied Using Manetic Force Buoyancy Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ilyong; Valles, James M.

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that paramecia exhibit negative gravi-kinesis. They exert a stronger propulsive force when swimming up than when swimming down. This behavior is very surprising since it suggests they sense their tiny apparent weight of only ~ 80pN. In an effort to understand the mechanism of this sensing, we are testing how the viscosity of the swimming medium influences their gravi-kinetic response. We employ the technique of magnetic force buoyancy variation to simulate different effective gravity levels on swimming Paramecia. We are analyzing their swimming response employing a phenomenological model that relates the parameters describing their helical trajectories to the beating of their cilia. This work was supported by NSF PHY0750360 and at the NHMFL by NSF DMR-0084173

  17. Pharmacokinetic interaction after joint administration of zinc and imipramine in forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Wyska, Elzbieta; Szymura-Oleksiak, Joanna; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Baś, Bogusław; Niewiara, Ewa; Pomierny, Lucyna; Dybała, Małgorzata; Nowak, Gabriel

    2004-01-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical data indicate beneficial role of zinc in the antidepressant treatment. To evaluate the mechanism of interaction between zinc and antidepressants, in the present study we examined the brain zinc, imipramine and desipramine concentrations in mice treated with combinations of zinc and imipramine and subjected to the forced swim test. We have chosen doses of zinc (10 mg/kg) and imipramine (15 mg/kg) which we have previously found to be ineffective in the forced swim test when given alone. However, when administered jointly, a significant reduction in the immobility time in this test was demonstrated. In the present study, we demonstrated a significant ca. 60% reduction in the brain desipramine and non-significant reduction (ca. 40%) in brain imipramine concentrations in the group of animals treated with zinc plus imipramine compared with animals treated with imipramine alone. The brain zinc concentration in the zinc plus imipramine group was reduced when compared with the group treated with zinc or imipramine alone. Since there was no increase in brain imipramine/desipramine or zinc brain concentration after combined zinc and imipramine treatment, the data suggest that pharmacodynamic rather than pharmacokinetic interaction between zinc and imipramine is responsible for behavioral effect in the forced swim test.

  18. Age differences in the impact of forced swimming test on serotonin transporter levels in lateral septum and dorsal raphe

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Forced swimming test (FST) is an animal model which evaluates behavioral despair and the effect of antidepressants such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors; the FST modifies the expression of some receptors related to antidepressant response, but it is not known whether serotonin transporter (SERT), their main target, is affected by this test in animals of different ages. Antidepressant response has shown age-dependent variations which could be associated with SERT expression. The aim of the present study was to analyze changes in the SERT immunoreactivity (SERT-IR) in dorsal raphe and lateral septum of male rats from different age groups with or without behavioral despair induced by their exposure to the FST, since these two structures are related to the expression of this behavior. Methods Prepubertal (24 PN), pubertal (40 PN), young adult (3–5 months) and middle-aged (12 months) male rats were assigned to a control group (non-FST) or depressed group (FST, two sessions separated by 24 h). Changes in SERT-IR in dorsal raphe and lateral septum were determined with immunofluorescence. Results Pubertal and middle-aged rats showed higher levels of immobility behavior compared to prepubertal rats on the FST. SERT-IR showed an age-dependent increase followed by a moderate decrease in middle-aged rats in both structures; a decreased in SERT-IR in lateral septum and dorsal raphe of pubertal rats was observed after the FST. Conclusions Age differences were observed in the SERT-IR of structures related to behavioral despair; SERT expression was modified by the FST in lateral septum and dorsal raphe of pubertal rats. PMID:24490994

  19. Analysis of glucose and lactate in dialysate from hypothalamus of rats after exhausting swimming using microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Dong, Y; Yu, X; Shangguan, D H; Zhao, R; Han, H W; Liu, G Q

    2002-10-01

    A microbore flow injection analysis-immobilized enzyme reactor-electrochemical detection (FIA-IMER-ECD) system for glucose and lactate detection was built up. The assays were precise, sensitive and practicable for determination of glucose and lactate levels in hypothalamic dialysate. The method had been used to detect the dynamic changes of glucose and lactate levels during rat exhausting swimming and recovery. The data showed that after exhausting swimming, the concentration of glucose in hypothalamic dialysate that reflected the concentration in the hypothalamic extracellular fluid decreased. The level fell to its nadir at day 1 after the exercise and then went back to the basal level at day 3 after the swimming. However, lactate levels increased to a maximum at day 3 and went back to the basal level at day 5 after the swimming. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Measurement of hydrodynamic force generation by swimming dolphins using bubble DPIV.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Legac, Paul; Williams, Terrie M; Wei, Timothy

    2014-01-15

    Attempts to measure the propulsive forces produced by swimming dolphins have been limited. Previous uses of computational hydrodynamic models and gliding experiments have provided estimates of thrust production by dolphins, but these were indirect tests that relied on various assumptions. The thrust produced by two actively swimming bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) was directly measured using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). For dolphins swimming in a large outdoor pool, the DPIV method used illuminated microbubbles that were generated in a narrow sheet from a finely porous hose and a compressed air source. The movement of the bubbles was tracked with a high-speed video camera. Dolphins swam at speeds of 0.7 to 3.4 m s(-1) within the bubble sheet oriented along the midsagittal plane of the animal. The wake of the dolphin was visualized as the microbubbles were displaced because of the action of the propulsive flukes and jet flow. The oscillations of the dolphin flukes were shown to generate strong vortices in the wake. Thrust production was measured from the vortex strength through the Kutta-Joukowski theorem of aerodynamics. The dolphins generated up to 700 N during small amplitude swimming and up to 1468 N during large amplitude starts. The results of this study demonstrated that bubble DPIV can be used effectively to measure the thrust produced by large-bodied dolphins.

  1. Effects of a flavonoid extract from Cynomorium songaricum on the swimming endurance of rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fa-Rong; Liu, Ying; Cui, Yong-Zhi; Chan, Er-Qing; Xie, Ming-Ren; McGuire, Peter P; Yu, Fa-Hong

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a flavonoid extract from Cynomorium songaricum on the swimming endurance of rats by measuring changes of free radical scavenging enzymes, such as CuZn-SOD (copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase) and GSH-px (glutathione peroxidase), and body weights. Significant and dose-dependent antioxidant and anti-fatigue effects of flavonoids (rutin, catechin and isoquercitrin) on swimming rats were observed during 10 days of swimming exercise. After treatment with the flavonoid extract at doses of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 g/kg body weight, the CuZn-SOD and GSH-px activities in swimming rats were increased by 1.4%, 3.3%, 4.1% and 112.2%, 208.7%, 261.7%, respectively, while the levels of MDA (malondialdehyde) were decreased by 64.7%, 79.4%, and 86.4% respectively. Furthermore, the average body weight and the total swimming time were increased by 3.1%, 8.8%, 10.6%, and 7.7%, 34.5%, 61.5%, respectively. Our experimental results suggest that flavonoid supplementation could not only reduce free radical formation and scavenge free radicals, but also enhance endurance exercise performance by reducing muscle fatigue.

  2. Swimming training increases the post-yield energy of bone in young male rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsang-Hai; Hsieh, Sandy S; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Chang, Feng-Ling; Lin, Shang-Chih; Yang, Rong-Sen

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of non-weight-bearing exercise on growing bone. Male Wistar rats (7 week-old) were assigned to one baseline control group, one control group and two swimming training groups, which were trained with 2 and 4% body-weight mass added, respectively. After an 8-week training period, three groups showed significant development compared to the baseline control group. Among the three 15-week-old groups, swimming-trained rats were lower in body weight (BW), densitometry and size-related measurements. In femoral biomechanical testing, swimming training groups were significantly lower in yield moment and ultimate moment, which may be due to a significantly lower long bone cross-sectional moment of inertia. However, the two swimming groups were higher in post-yield energy absorption and displacement. Further, in estimated tissue-level biomaterial properties, no differences were shown in yield stress, strain or toughness among the three groups. Using BW as a covariate, results of ANCOVA showed no differences in size-related parameters among the three groups, and some parameters were even higher in the two swimming groups. Regarding Pearson's correlation, size-related parameters correlated well to BW and whole bone strength but not to tissue post-yield behaviors. In conclusion, when compared to age-matched control group, swimming rats showed lower bone strength and lower yield energy absolutely at the structural level, but similar yield stress and yield toughness at the tissue level. Moreover, swimming training benefited growing bone in post-yield behaviors. Further studies should investigate the parameters that contribute to this exercise-induced post-yield behavior.

  3. Lithium's effect in forced-swim test is blood level dependent but not dependent on weight loss.

    PubMed

    Bersudsky, Yuly; Shaldubina, Alona; Belmaker, R H

    2007-02-01

    The effects of lithium in models of depression are often inconsistent. We aimed to replicate a regimen that induces robust antidepressant effects in the forced-swim test. Mice were treated with three different doses of lithium chloride (LiCl) 0.25, 0.4 or 0.5% in food and the forced-swim test or open field test was performed on day 15. We yoked control mice to food deprivation to test whether lithium-induced food deprivation could cause the lithium effects in the forced-swim test. Treatment with LiCl doses leading to blood levels of 1.3 and 1.4 mmol/l led to highly significant reduction in immobility time in the forced-swim test, but the dose leading to a blood level of 0.8 mmol/l was not different from controls in immobility time. Mice yoked to lithium-induced food deprivation showed no difference in the forced-swim test compared with controls. In conclusion these results suggest that lithium effects in mice in the forced-swim test are dose dependent but not owing to lithium-induced weight loss.

  4. Pregnancy swimming causes short- and long-term neuroprotection against hypoxia-ischemia in very immature rats.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Eduardo Farias; Durán-Carabali, Luz Elena; Tosta, Andrea; Nicola, Fabrício; Schmitz, Felipe; Rodrigues, André; Siebert, Cassiana; Wyse, Angela; Netto, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    BackgroundHypoxia-ischemia (HI) is a major cause of neurological damage in preterm newborn. Swimming during pregnancy alters the offspring's brain development. We tested the effects of swimming during pregnancy in the very immature rat brain.MethodsFemale Wistar rats (n=12) were assigned to the sedentary (SE, n=6) or the swimming (SW, n=6) group. From gestational day 0 (GD0) to GD21 the rats in the SW group were made to swim for 20 min/day. HI on postnatal day (PND) 3 rats caused sensorimotor and cognitive impairments. Animals were distributed into SE sham (SESH), sedentary HIP3 (SEHI), swimming sham (SWSH), and swimming HIP3 (SWHI) groups. At PND4 and PND5, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were assessed. During lactation and adulthood, neurological reflexes, sensorimotor, anxiety-related, and cognitive evaluations were made, followed by histological assessment at PND60.ResultsAt early stages, swimming caused an increase in hippocampal BDNF levels and in the maintenance of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase function in the SWHI group. The SWHI group showed smaller lesions and the preservation of white matter tracts. SEHI animals showed a delay in reflex maturation, which was reverted in the SWHI group. HIP3 induced spatial memory deficits and hypomyelination in SEHI rats, which was reverted in the SWHI group.ConclusionSwimming during pregnancy neuroprotected the brains against HI in very immature neonatal rats.

  5. Combined intervention of dietary soybean proteins and swim training: effects on bone metabolism in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Figard, Hélène; Mougin, Fabienne; Gaume, Vincent; Berthelot, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Soybean proteins, a rich source of isoflavones, taken immediately after an ovariectomy prevent bone loss in rats. Exercise-induced stimuli are essential for bone growth. Few studies exist about the combined effects of swim training and soybean protein supplementation on bone metabolism. So, the purpose of this study was to investigate, in 48 female Sprague-Dawley rats (12 weeks old) the effects of an 8-week swim-training regimen (1 h/day, 5 days/week) and dietary soybean proteins (200 g/kg diet) on bone metabolism. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: (1) ovariectomized fed with a semisynthetic control diet; (2) ovariectomized fed with a soybean protein-enriched semisynthetic diet; (3) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with control diet; (4) ovariectomized trained to exercise and fed with a soybean protein diet. Following the treatment period, body weight gain was identical in the four groups. Soybean protein supplementation increased bone calcium content, and reduced plasma osteocalcin values, without significant modification of calcium balance and net calcium absorption. Swim training enhanced plasma and bone calcium content and calcium balance and net calcium absorption. It did not modify either plasma osteocalcin values or urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion. Both exercise and soybean protein intake increased plasma on bone calcium without modifying net calcium absorption or bone markers. In conclusion, we demonstrated, in ovariectomized rats, that swimming exercise and dietary supplementation with soy proteins do not have synergistic effects on calcium metabolism and bone markers.

  6. Prevention of atherosclerosis by Yindan Xinnaotong capsule combined with swimming in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianlu; Wang, Lan; Yang, Hongjun; You, Yun; Xu, Haiyu; Gong, Leilei; Yin, Xiaojie; Wang, Wandan; Gao, Shuangrong; Cheng, Long; Liang, Rixin; Liao, Fulong

    2015-04-08

    Yindan Xinnaotong capsule has been used for treating cardio-cerebrovascular diseases for several decades in China. Exercise training can protect against the development of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the joint effect of YXC and exercise on atherosclerosis in rats. A combined method involving low shear stress and a high-fat diet was used to establish the atherosclerosis model in rats. Partial ligation of the left common carotid artery was performed, and then the rats were divided into 9 treatment groups according to a 3 × 3 factorial design with two factors and three levels for each factor, swimming of 0, 0.5, 1 h daily and YXC administration of 0, 1, 2 g/kg p.o. daily. Next the interventions of swimming and YXC were executed for 8 weeks. After that, blood samples were collected to determine blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, haematocrit (HCT), fibrinogen (FIB), blood lipid profile (including total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C)), nitric oxide (NO), 6-keto- prostaglandin (PG) F1α, endothelin (ET) and thromboxane (TX) B2. The common carotid arteries of the rats were harvested to examine pathological changes, wall thickness and circumference, and the expression of SM22αwas assayed via immune-histochemistry. The early pathological changes were observed. The joint effects of YXC and swimming showed significant changes in the examined parameters: (1) decreases in plasma viscosity, blood viscosity and FIB; (2) increases in NO and 6-keto-PGF1α; (3) decreases in ET and TXB2; and (4) decreases in LDL-C and TG. The combination of 2 g/kg YXC and 1 h of swimming led to synergistic decreases in LDL-C and TG. The interactive effect between YXC and swimming was obvious in decreasing wall thickness. Swimming alone was able to up-regulate the expression of SM22α. In conclusion, this study indicates that the combination of YXC and swimming may

  7. Involvement of the monoaminergic system in the antidepressant-like activity of chromium chloride in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, A; Siwek, A; Wolak, M; Pochwat, B; Szewczyk, B; Opoka, W; Poleszak, E; Nowak, G

    2013-08-01

    Bio-metal chromium(III) is a crucial microelement for the proper functioning of living organisms. Previous preclinical and clinical studies reported its potential antidepressant properties. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of antidepressants and noradrenergic and dopaminergic receptor antagonists on chromium chloride (CrCl₃) activity in the forced swim test (FST) in mice and rats. Imipramine (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) and reboxetine (5 mg/kg) but not bupropion (1 mg/kg), administered jointly with CrCl₃ at a dose of 6 mg/kg, reduced the immobility time in the FST in mice. The reduction of the immobility time induced by the active dose (12 mg/kg) of CrCl₃ was completely abolished by propranolol (2 mg/kg, β-adrenoceptor antagonist), SCH 23390 (0.5 mg/kg, a dopamine D₁ receptor antagonist), and partially by prazosin (1 mg/kg, an α₁-adrenoceptor antagonist), yohimbine (1 mg/kg, an α₂-adrenoceptor antagonist) and sulpiryd (50 mg/kg, a dopamine D₂/D₃ receptor antagonist) administration. The locomotor activity was significantly reduced by CrCl₃ + reboxetine treatment, which did not influence the reboxetine enhancement of the antidepressant-like effect of CrCl₃ in the FST. Moreover, CrCl₃ at a dose of 32 mg/kg (although not at 12 mg/kg) significantly reduced the immobility and enhanced the climbing (but not swimming) time in the FST in rats, which indicates the involvement of the noradrenergic pathway in this effect. The present study indicates that the antidepressant-like activity of chromium in the FST is dependent (although to a different extent) on the noradrenergic, dopaminergic and serotonin systems.

  8. Post-activation Potentiation in Propulsive Force after Specific Swimming Strength Training.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, A C; Barroso, R; Andries, O

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether a conditioning activity (8×12.5 m with 2.5 min-interval using both hand paddles and parachute) induced post-activation potentiation in swimming propulsive force and whether a swimmer's force level affected a post-activation potentiation response. 8 competitive swimmers (5 males and 3 females, age: 18.4±1.3 years; IPS=796±56) performed a 10 s maximum tethered swimming test 8 and 4 min before (the highest value was considered as PRE), and 2.5 and 6.5 min after (POST1 and POST2, respectively) the conditioning activity. Rate of force development was not affected, but peak force in POST1 (p=0.02) and impulse in both POST1 (p=0.007) and POST2 (p=0.004) were reduced. Possibly the conditioning activity induced greater fatigue than post-activation potentiation benefits. For instance, the number of repetitions might have been excessive, and rest intervals between the conditioning activity and POST1 and POST2 were possibly too short. There were positive correlations between PRE peak force and changes in peak force and rate of force development. Although conditioning activity was detrimental, positive correlations suggest that weaker swimmers experience a deterioration of performance more than the stronger ones. This conditioning activity is not recommended for swimmers with the current competitive level before a competitive event. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Effects of swim stress and fluoxetine on 5-HT1A receptor gene expression and monoamine metabolism in the rat brain regions.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, G T; Kalinina, T S; Dygalo, N N

    2012-07-01

    Changes in gene expression of the brain serotonin (5-HT) 1A receptors may be important for the development and ameliorating depression, however identification of specific stimuli that activate or reduce the receptor transcriptional activity is far from complete. In the present study, the forced swim test (FST) exposure, the first stress session of which is already sufficient to induce behavioral despair in rats, significantly increased 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels in the brainstem, frontal cortex, and hippocampus at 24 h. In the brainstem and frontal cortex, the elevation in the receptor gene expression after the second forced swim session was not affected following chronic administration of fluoxetine, while in the cortex, both control and FST values were significantly reduced in fluoxetine-treated rats. In contrast to untreated rats, no increase in hippocampal 5-HT1A receptor mRNA was observed in response to FST in rats chronically treated with fluoxetine. Metabolism of 5-HT (5-HIAA/5-HT) in the brainstem was significantly decreased by fluoxetine and further reduced by swim stress, showing a certain degree of independence of these changes on 5-HT1A receptor gene expression that was increased in this brain region only after the FST, but not after fluoxetine. FST exposure also decreased the brainstem dopamine metabolism, which was unexpectedly positively correlated with 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels in the frontal cortex. Together, these data suggest that the effects of the forced swim stress as well as fluoxetine involve brain region-dependent alterations in 5-HT1A receptor gene transcription, some of which may be interrelated with concomitant changes in catecholamine metabolism.

  10. Granular resistive force theory explains the neuromechanical phase lag during sand-swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yang; Sharpe, Sarah; Goldman, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Undulatory locomotion is a common gait used by a diversity of animals in a range of environments. This mode of locomotion is characterized by the propagation of a traveling wave of body bending, which propels the animal in the opposite direction of the wave. Previous studies of undulatory locomotion in fluids, on land, and even within sand revealed that the wave of muscle activation progresses faster than the traveling wave of curvature. This leads to an increasing phase lag between activation and curvature at more posterior segments, known as the neuromechanical phase lag. In this study, we compare biological measurements of phase lag during the sand-swimming of the sandfish lizard to predictions of a simple model of undulatory swimming that consists of prescribed kinematics and granular resistive forces. The neuromechanical phase lag measured using electromyography (EMG) quantitatively matches the predicted phase lag between the local body curvature and torque exerted by granular resistive forces. Two effects are responsible for the phase lag in this system: the yaw motion of the body and different integration length over a traveling force pattern for different positions along the body.

  11. Varenicline has antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test and augments sertraline's effect.

    PubMed

    Rollema, Hans; Guanowsky, Victor; Mineur, Yann S; Shrikhande, Alka; Coe, Jotham W; Seymour, Patricia A; Picciotto, Marina R

    2009-03-01

    Varenicline, an alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist developed as a smoking cessation aid, showed antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test in two mouse strains. In addition, a low varenicline dose significantly enhanced the effects of moderately active doses of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline. These findings are consistent with the notion that reducing alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activity either by antagonists or by partial agonists that can partially activate or desensitize acetylcholine receptors is associated with antidepressant-like properties. These data suggest that varenicline may have antidepressant potential and can, when combined, augment antidepressant responses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  12. The antidepressant-like effect of ethynyl estradiol is mediated by both serotonergic and noradrenergic systems in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Vega-Rivera, N M; López-Rubalcava, C; Estrada-Camarena, E

    2013-10-10

    17α-Ethynyl-estradiol (EE2, a synthetic steroidal estrogen) induces antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test (FST) similar to those induced by 5-HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (dual antidepressants). However, the precise mechanism of action of EE2 has not been studied. In the present study, the participation of estrogen receptors (ERs) and the serotonergic and the noradrenergic presynaptic sites in the antidepressant-like action of EE2 was evaluated in the FST. The effects of the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (10 μg/rat; i.c.v.), the serotonergic and noradrenergic terminal destruction with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT; 200 μg/rat, i.c.v.), and N-(2-chloro-ethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4; 10mg/kg, i.p.) were studied in ovariectomized rats treated with EE2 and subjected to the FST. In addition, the participation of α2-adrenergic receptors in the antidepressant-like action of EE2 was explored using the selective α2-receptor antagonist idazoxan (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0mg/kg, i.p.). EE2 induced an antidepressant-like action characterized by a decrease in immobility behavior with a concomitant increase in swimming and climbing behaviors. The ER antagonist, 5,7-DHT, DSP4, and idazoxan blocked the effects of EE2 on the immobility behavior, whereas ICI 182,780 and 5,7-DHT affected swimming behavior. The noradrenergic compound DSP4 altered climbing behavior, while Idazoxan inhibited the increase of swimming and climbing behaviors induced by EE2. Our results suggest that the antidepressant-like action of EE2 implies a complex mechanism of action on monoaminergic systems and estrogen receptors.

  13. Assessment of the effect of prolonged forced swimming on CD-1 mice sperm morphology with and without antioxidant supplementation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, I; Diaz, A; Vaamonde, D

    2016-04-01

    As physical exercise has been shown to negatively affect sperm morphology, this study was undertaken to assess the effect of a 3-min forced swimming protocol during 50 days, with and without administration of antioxidants [N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and trans-resveratrol], on sperm morphology in CD-1 mice. Forty-four 13-week-old CD-1 mice were randomly allocated to four different groups: mice not submitted to exercise, control group (CG), mice submitted to swimming without administration of antioxidants (EX), mice submitted to swimming that received trans-resveratrol supplementation [exercise group (EX)+Resv] and mice submitted to swimming exercise that received NAC supplementation (EX+NAC). The EX showed 30.5% of spermatozoa with normal morphology, showing significant differences with regard to the CG, which showed 58.5%. The groups receiving antioxidant supplements showed significantly higher percentages of spermatozoa with normal morphology in comparison with the EX group (EX+Resv: 64.1%, EX+NAC: 48.2%). The imposed model of forced swimming caused alterations in sperm morphology. The antioxidants employed seem to be suitable antioxidants for avoiding exercise-associated sperm morphology anomalies in prolonged forced swimming exercise. Trans-resveratrol has proven to be more efficient for this purpose. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Diphenyl diselenide-supplemented diet and swimming exercise enhance novel object recognition memory in old rats.

    PubMed

    Cechella, José L; Leite, Marlon R; Rosario, Alisson R; Sampaio, Tuane B; Zeni, Gilson

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of exercise and the element selenium on mental health and cognitive performance are well documented. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the intake of a diet supplemented with diphenyl diselenide [(PhSe)2] and the swimming exercise could enhance memory in old Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats (24 months) were fed daily with standard diet chow or standard chow supplemented with 1 ppm of (PhSe)2 during 4 weeks. Animals were submitted to swimming training with a workload (3 % of body weight, 20 min/day for 4 weeks). After 4 weeks, the object recognition test (ORT) and the object location test (OLT) were performed. The results of this study demonstrated that intake of a supplemented diet with (PhSe)2 and swimming exercise was effective in improving short-term and long-term memory as well as spatial learning, increasing the hippocampal levels of phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) in old rats. This study also provided evidence that (PhSe)2-supplemented diet facilitated memory of old rats by modulating cAMP levels and stimulating CREB phosphorylation, without altering the levels of Akt.

  15. Effects of high-intensity swimming training on the bones of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Taewoong; Tanaka, Sakura; Naka, Tatsuki; Igawa, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to assess the effects of high-intensity intermittent swimming training(HIT) on bone in ovariectomized rats. [Methods] Six-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either sham operation or bilateral ovariectomy. After surgery, they were divided into the following four groups: 1) sham-operated sedentary (S), 2) sham-operated exercise training (SE), 3) OVX sedentary (O), 4) OVX exercise training (OE) 5) OVX given 17β-estradiol (OE2) and 6) OVX exercise training and given 17β-estradiol (OEE). SE, OE and OEE rats were used extremely high-intensity swim exercise. The rats repeated fourteen 20-s swimming bouts with a weight equivalent to 14, 15, and 16% of body weight for the first 5, the next 9, and the last 5 days, respectively. Between exercise bouts, a 10-s pause was allowed. HIT was originally designed as an exercise method; a method that very quickly induces an increase in the maximum oxygen intake (Tabata I et al., 1996). OEE and OE2 rats were subcutaneously injected ethanol with 25μg/kg body weight 17β-estradiol 3 times per week. [Results] Bone strength, bone mineral density and trabecular bone parameters were measured after a 8-weeks experimental period. Bone strength was significantly higher in the SE, OE, OE2 and OEE group compared with the O group. BV/TV was significant increase in the SE, OE groups compared with the O group. BMD showed no difference in the OE group compared with the O group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrate some beneficial effects of postmenopausal osteoporosis of high-intensity intermittent swimming training on bone structure and strength. PMID:27757386

  16. Antidepressant-like action of nicotine in forced swimming test and brain serotonin in mice.

    PubMed

    Suemaru, Katsuya; Yasuda, Kayo; Cui, Ranji; Li, Bingjin; Umeda, Kenta; Amano, Manabu; Mitsuhashi, Hiromi; Takeuchi, Nobuhito; Inoue, Tomoyoshi; Gomita, Yutaka; Araki, Hiroaki

    2006-07-30

    An antidepressant-like action of nicotine has been suggested in the forced swimming test. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between the antidepressant-like action of nicotine and brain serotonin (5-HT) in mice. Nicotine at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the duration of immobility time in forced swimming test. However, nicotine (0.01-1 mg/kg, s.c.) had no effect on locomotor activity in open-field test. Dopamine turnover in mouse whole brain was increased by nicotine (0.01-1 mg/kg, s.c.) in a dose-dependent manner, and nicotine at a dose of 0.05 mg/kg showed a significant increases in 5-HT turnover. Nicotine at a dose of 0.05 mg/kg markedly enhanced head twitch responses induced by (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI), a selective 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist. These findings suggest that the involvement of nicotinic and serotonergic systems in the antidepressant-like effects of nicotine.

  17. Antidepressant activity of some Hypericum reflexum L. fil. extracts in the forced swimming test in mice.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mateo, C C; Bonkanka, C X; Prado, B; Rabanal, R M

    2007-05-30

    We previously reported that oral administration of the methanol extract obtained from the aerial part in blossom of Hypericum reflexum L. fil. was active in the tetrabenazine and forced swimming test. In the present study, the effect of the aqueous, butanol and chloroform fractions obtained from the methanol extract of this species on the central nervous system was investigated in mice, particularly in animal models of depression. Antidepressant activity was detected in the butanol and chloroform fractions of this species using the forced swimming test since both fractions induced a significant reduction of the immobility time, producing no effects or only a slight depression on spontaneous motor activity when assessed in a photocell activity meter. Moreover, these fractions did not alter significantly the pentobarbital-induced sleeping time. On the other hand, the chloroform fraction produced a slight but significant hypothermia and was also effective in antagonizing the ptosis induced by tetrabenazine. Furthermore, the butanol fraction produced a slight potentiation of the head twitches and syndrome induced by 5-HTP. Taken together, these data indicate that the butanol and chloroform fractions from Hypericum reflexum possess antidepressant-like effects in mice, providing further support for the traditional use of these plants in the Canary Islands folk medicine against central nervous disorders.

  18. Resistance to the development of stress-induced behavioral despair in the forced swim test associated with elevated hippocampal Bcl-xl expression.

    PubMed

    Shishkina, Galina T; Kalinina, Tatyana S; Berezova, Inna V; Bulygina, Veta V; Dygalo, Nikolay N

    2010-12-01

    Stress may predispose individuals toward depression through down-regulation of neurogenesis and increase in apoptosis in the brain. However, many subjects show high resistance to stress in relation to psychopathology. In the present study, we assessed the possibility that individual-specific patterns of gene expression associated with cell survival and proliferation may be among the molecular factors underlying stress resilience. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), anti-apoptotic B cell lymphoma like X (Bcl-xl) and pro-apoptotic bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) expression were determined in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of rats naturally differed in despair-like behavior in the forced swim test. In the hippocampus, BDNF messenger RNA (mRNA) level was significantly down-regulated 2h after the forced swim test exposure, and at this time point, Bcl-xl mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in stressed than in untested animals. The ratios of hippocampal Bcl-xl to Bax mRNA negatively correlated with the total time spent immobile in the test. When animals were divided in two groups according to immobility responses in two consecutive swim sessions and designated as stress resilient if their immobility time did not increase in the second session as it did in stress sensitive rats, it was found that resilient rats had significantly higher Bcl-xl/Bax ratios in the hippocampus than stress sensitive animals. The data suggest that naturally occurring variations in the Bcl-xl/Bax ratio in the hippocampus may contribute to individual differences in vulnerability to stress-induced depression-like behaviors.

  19. Forced swim-induced musculoskeletal hyperalgesia is mediated by CRF2 receptors but not by TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Kovacs, Katalin J; Pasley, Jeffrey D; Nunez, Myra G; Larson, Alice A

    2013-09-01

    The exacerbation of musculoskeletal pain by stress in humans is modeled by the musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in rodents following a forced swim. We hypothesized that stress-sensitive corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors and transient receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are responsible for the swim stress-induced musculoskeletal hyperalgesia. We confirmed that a cold swim (26 °C) caused a transient, morphine-sensitive decrease in grip force responses reflecting musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in mice. Pretreatment with the CRF2 receptor antagonist astressin 2B, but not the CRF1 receptor antagonist NBI-35965, attenuated this hyperalgesia. Desensitizing the TRPV1 receptor centrally or peripherally using desensitizing doses of resiniferatoxin (RTX) failed to prevent the musculoskeletal hyperalgesia produced by cold swim. SB-366791, a TRPV1 antagonist, also failed to influence swim-induced hyperalgesia. Together these data indicate that swim stress-induced musculoskeletal hyperalgesia is mediated, in part, by CRF2 receptors but is independent of the TRPV1 receptor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Forced swim-induced musculoskeletal hyperalgesia is mediated by CRF2 receptors but not by TRPV1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E.; Kovacs, Katalin J.; Pasley, Jeff D.; Nunez, Myra G.; Larson, Alice A.

    2013-01-01

    The exacerbation of musculoskeletal pain by stress in humans is modeled by the musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in rodents following a forced swim. We hypothesized that stress-sensitive corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors and transient receptor vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are responsible for the swim stress-induced musculoskeletal hyperalgesia. We confirmed that a cold swim (26°C) caused a transient, morphine-sensitive decrease in grip force responses reflecting musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in mice. Pretreatment with the CRF2 receptor antagonist astressin 2B, but not the CRF1 receptor antagonist NBI-35965, attenuated this hyperalgesia. Desensitizing the TRPV1 receptor centrally or peripherally using desensitizing doses of resiniferatoxin (RTX) failed to prevent the musculoskeletal hyperalgesia produced by cold swim. SB-366791, a TRPV1 antagonist, also failed to influence swim-induced hyperalgesia. Together these data indicate that swim stress-induced musculoskeletal hyperalgesia is mediated, in part, by CRF2 receptors but is independent of the TRPV1 receptor. PMID:23624287

  1. A hydrodynamic analysis of fish swimming speed: wake structure and locomotor force in slow and fast labriform swimmers.

    PubMed

    Drucker, E G; Lauder, G V

    2000-08-01

    Past study of interspecific variation in the swimming speed of fishes has focused on internal physiological mechanisms that may limit the ability of locomotor muscle to generate power. In this paper, we approach the question of why some fishes are able to swim faster than others from a hydrodynamic perspective, using the technique of digital particle image velocimetry which allows measurement of fluid velocity and estimation of wake momentum and mechanical forces for locomotion. We investigate the structure and strength of the wake in three dimensions to determine how hydrodynamic force varies in two species that differ markedly in maximum swimming speed. Black surfperch (Embiotoca jacksoni) and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) swim at low speeds using their pectoral fins exclusively, and at higher speeds switch to combined pectoral and caudal fin locomotion. E. jacksoni can swim twice as fast as similarly sized L. macrochirus using the pectoral fins alone. The pectoral fin wake of black surfperch at all speeds consists of two distinct vortex rings linked ventrally. As speed increases from 1.0 to 3.0 L s(-)(1), where L is total body length, the vortex ring formed on the fin downstroke reorients to direct force increasingly downstream, parallel to the direction of locomotion. The ratio of laterally to downstream-directed force declines from 0.93 to 0.07 as speed increases. In contrast, the sunfish pectoral fin generates a single vortex ring per fin beat at low swimming speeds and a pair of linked vortex rings (with one ring only partially complete and attached to the body) at maximal labriform speeds. Across a biologically relevant range of swimming speeds, bluegill sunfish generate relatively large lateral forces with the paired fins: the ratio of lateral to downstream force remains at or above 1.0 at all speeds. By increasing wake momentum and by orienting this momentum in a direction more favorable for thrust than for lateral force, black surfperch are able

  2. Exhaustive swimming exercise related kidney injury in rats - protective effects of acetylbritannilactone.

    PubMed

    Wu, G L; Chen, Y S; Huang, X D; Zhang, L X

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of acetylbritannilactone (ABL) on renal injury induced by acute exhaustive exercise in the rat. The exhaustive exercise induced kidney injury in rats was established by exhaustive swimming (ES). ABL (26 mg/kg) or polyglycol (control) were administrated orally by gastric gavage 24 h before training. Renal function, biochemical index, renal histopathological change, oxidative stress indices, renal cell apoptosis and inflammatory molecules were checked after ES, for 6 h and 24 h. It was found that immediately after exhaustive swimming, the serum urea and creatinine were significantly higher in ES rats, and the same for serum creatine kinase. All the values were reduced in the ES rats treated with ABL. The increase of superoxide dismutase activity and decrease of malondialdehyde content in the kidney were found in rats with ABL treatment. Tubular cell apoptosis at different time points after ES were significantly reduced by the ABL treatment. The increased expression of TNF-α and NF-κB induced by ES was also significantly decreased by ABL treatment. Our results suggest that ABL protects rats from overtraining-induced kidney injury by inhibiting renal cell apoptosis and suppressing oxidative-stress generation and inhibiting inflammation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Environmental constraints on motor abilities used in grooming, swimming, and eating by decorticate rats.

    PubMed

    Whishaw, I Q; Nonneman, A J; Kolb, B

    1981-10-01

    In a number of successive tests, grooming, swimming, and eating behaviors of decorticate rats were reexamined by evoking the behaviors in various circumstances (stimulus conditions). The rats showed normal-length grooming sequences during spontaneous home cage grooming; when grooming was elicited by removing the rats from their home cage and soaking their fur by a brief swim, grooming-sequence length was abbreviated. In cold (18 degrees C) water, they swam well and with exaggerated vigor and frequently inhibited forelimb movements; in warm (37 degrees C) water, they swam poorly and paddled with all four limbs. To eat small pieces of food, they sat up and used their forepaws as do normal rats, but they frequently dropped the food; they did not use their forepaws to eat large pieces of food. When given powdered food, they first tried to grasp it in their mouth while they scratched at the floor surface with their front limbs; thereafter, they became increasingly proficient in licking it up. Thus, in a narrow range of stimulus conditions, decorticate rats can make movements resembling those of normal rats. They also improve with practice in some (eating powdered food) but not other (forepaw immobility, eating large food pellets) tasks. The study shows that in order to elucidate the role of the cortex in control of motor behavior, it is necessary to obtain "behavior profiles" of each behavior by testing the animals repeatedly and under widely varying test conditions.

  4. Antidepressant-like responses in the forced swimming test elicited by glutathione and redox modulation.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Juliana M; Dafre, Alcir Luiz; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2013-09-15

    Glutathione (GSH) displays a broad range of functions, among them a role as a neuromodulator with some neuroprotective properties. Taking into account that oxidative stress has been associated with depressive disorders, this study investigated the possibility that GSH, a major cell antioxidant, elicits an antidepressant-like effect in mice. Thus, GSH was administered by i.c.v. route to mice that were tested in the forced swimming test and in the tail suspension test, two predictive tests for antidepressant drug activity. In addition, GSH metabolism and the redox environment were modulated in order to study the possible mechanisms underlying the effects of GSH in the forced swimming test. The administration of GSH decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test (300-3000nmol/site) and tail suspension test (100-1000nmol/site), consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. GSH depletion elicited by l-buthionine sulfoximine (3.2μmol/site, i.c.v.) did not alter the antidepressant-like effect of GSH, whereas the inhibition of extracellular GSH catabolism by acivicin (100nmol/site, i.c.v.) prevented the antidepressant-like effect of GSH. Moreover, a sub-effective dose (0.01nmol/site, i.c.v.) of the oxidizing agent DTNB (5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)) potentiated the effect of GSH (100nmol/site, i.c.v.), while the pretreatment (25-100mg/kg, i.p.) with the reducing agent DTT (dl-dithiothreitol) prevented the antidepressant-like effect of GSH (300nmol/site, i.c.v.). DTNB (0.1nmol/site, i.c.v.), produced an antidepressant-like effect, per se, which was abolished by DTT (25mg/kg, i.p.). The results show, for the first time, that centrally administered GSH produces an antidepressant-like effect in mice, which can be modulated by the GSH metabolism and the thiol/disulfide reagents. The redox environment may constitute a new venue for future antidepressant-drug development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interactive effects of ghrelin and ketamine on forced swim performance: Implications for novel antidepressant strategies.

    PubMed

    Landrigan, Jeffrey; Shawaf, Farah; Dwyer, Zach; Abizaid, Alfonso; Hayley, Shawn

    2016-08-11

    The efficacy of ketamine to alleviate depressive symptoms has promoted a wealth of research exploring alternate therapeutic targets for depression. Given the caveats of ketamine treatment taken together with the increasingly greater emphasis on combinatorial therapeutic approaches to depression, we sought to asses whether the hypothalamic "hunger hormone", ghrelin, would augment the effects of ketamine. Indeed, ghrelin has recently been found to possess antidepressant potential and may be especially effective against the metabolic and feeding deficits observed with depression. Two studies were performed: 1. mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of ghrelin (80μg/kg) or saline, followed by a saline or a low or high dose of ketamine (5 or 10mg/kg) and 2. mice received 10mg/kg of ketamine together with saline or the ghrelin receptor antagonist JMV2959 (3 or 6mg/kg) and Forced Swim Test (FST) performance was assessed. In both studies, ketamine alone reduced FST immobility. Similarly, ghrelin alone reduced swim immobility suggesting an antidepressant-like response. However, ghrelin did not augment the impact of ketamine when co-administered and in fact, it appeared to antagonize its actions at the lower dose. As well, JMV2959 did not significantly influence FST performance. These data confirm the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine and further suggest that ghrelin might have similar properties. Yet, our results caution against combinatorial treatment with these agents, probably owing to unexpected allosteric or other antagonist actions.

  6. Swimming attenuates inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in a rat model of dextran sulfate sodium-induced chronic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-shan; Liu, Qin-qin; Wang, Li-feng; Yang, An-gang; Gao, Chun-fang; Li, Jun-tang

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that regular physical exercise suppresses chronic inflammation. However, the potential inhibitory effects of swimming on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced chronic colitis, and its underlying mechanisms, remain unclear. In this study, rats were orally administered DSS to induce chronic colitis, and subsequently treated with or without swimming exercise. A 7-week swimming program (1 or 1.5 hours per day, 5 days per week) ameliorated DSS-caused colon shortening, colon barrier disruption, spleen enlargement, serum LDH release, and reduction of body weight gain. Swimming for 1.5 hours per day afforded greater protection than 1 hour per day. Swimming ameliorated DSS-induced decrease in crypt depth, and increases in myeloperoxidase activity, infiltration of Ly6G+ neutrophils and TNF-a- and IFN-?-expressing CD3+ T cells, as well as fecal calprotectin and lactoferrin. Swimming inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production and decreased the protein expression of phosphorylated nuclear factor-?B p65 and cyclooxygenase 2, whereas it elevated interleukin-10 levels. Swimming impeded the generation of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide; however, it boosted glutathione levels, total antioxidant capacity, and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities. Additionally, swimming decreased caspase-3 activity and expression of apoptosis-inducing factor, cytochrome c, Bax, and cleaved-caspase-3, but increased Bcl-2 levels. Overall, these results suggest that swimming exerts beneficial effects on DSS-induced chronic colitis by modulating inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. PMID:28030847

  7. Metabolic Responses to Swimming Exercise in the Infected Rat.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-29

    Dunning rats (F-344, F, MA Bioproducts) weighing 150-200 g. ’hey were maintained on a commercial diet (Wayne-Blox, Allied Mills, Inc.) until the...Disease, edited by Kinney and Lense. Columbus, Ohio: Ross Laboratories, 19S0, p. 144-150. 4. BERGSTROM, J., L. HERMANSEN, E. HULITMAN, AND B. SALTIN. Diet ...hepatic ketogenic capacity in fed rats by anti-insulin serum and glucagon. J. Clii:. Invest. 55:1202-1209, 1975. 21. MOSES, 1L. E. Determination of oxygen

  8. Muscle protein metabolism in neonatal alloxan-administered rats: effects of continuous and intermittent swimming training

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to examine the effects of intermittent and continuous swimming training on muscle protein metabolism in neonatal alloxan-administered rats. Methods Wistar rats were used and divided into six groups: sedentary alloxan (SA), sedentary control (SC), continuous trained alloxan (CA), intermittent trained alloxan (IA), continuous trained control (CC) and intermittent trained control (IC). Alloxan (250 mg/kg body weight) was injected into newborn rats at 6 days of age. The continuous training protocol consisted of 12 weeks of swimming training in individual cylinder tanks while supporting a load that was 5% of body weight; uninterrupted swimming for 1 h/day, five days a week. The intermittent training protocol consisted of 12 weeks of swimming training in individual cylinder tanks while supporting a load that was 15% of body weight; 30 s of activity interrupted by 30 s of rest for a total of 20 min/day, five days a week. Results At 28 days, the alloxan animals displayed higher glycemia after glucose overload than the control animals. No differences in insulinemia among the groups were detected. At 120 days, no differences in serum albumin and total protein among the groups were observed. Compared to the other groups, DNA concentrations were higher in the alloxan animals that were subjected to continuous training, whereas the DNA/protein ratio was higher in the alloxan animals that were subjected to intermittent training. Conclusion It was concluded that continuous and intermittent training sessions were effective in altering muscle growth by hyperplasia and hypertrophy, respectively, in alloxan-administered animals. PMID:22309804

  9. Swimming training prevents fat deposition and decreases angiotensin II-induced coronary vasoconstriction in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Endlich, Patrick Wander; Claudio, Erick Roberto Gonçalves; da Silva Gonçalves, Washington Luiz; Gouvêa, Sonia Alves; Moysés, Margareth Ribeiro; de Abreu, Glaucia Rodrigues

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic swimming training (ST) on the deposition of abdominal fat and vasoconstriction in response to angiotensin II (ANG II) in the coronary arterial bed of estrogen deficient rats. Twenty-eight 3-month old Wistar female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary sham (SS), sedentary-ovariectomized (SO), swimming-trained sham (STS) and swimming-trained ovariectomized (STO). ST protocol consisted of a continuous 60-min session, with a 5% BW load attached to the tail, completed 5 days/week for 8-weeks. The retroperitoneal, parametrial, perirenal and inguinal fat pads were measured. The intrinsic heart rate (IHR), coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) and a concentration-response curve to ANG II in the coronary bed was constructed using the Langendorff preparation. Ovariectomy (OVX) significantly reduced 17-β-estradiol plasma levels in SO and STO groups (p<0.05). The STO group had a significantly reduced retroperitoneal and parametrial fat pad compared with the SO group (p<0.05). IHR values were similar in all groups; however, baseline CPP was significantly reduced in the SO, STS and STO groups compared with the SS group (p<0.05). ANG II caused vasoconstriction in the coronary bed in a concentration-dependent manner. The SO group had an increased response to ANG II when compared with all other experimental groups (p<0.05), which was prevented by 8-weeks of ST in the STO group (p<0.05). OVX increased ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in the coronary vascular bed and abdominal fat pad deposition. Eight weeks of swimming training improved these vasoconstrictor effects and decreased abdominal fat deposition in ovariectomized rats.

  10. Acute effects of guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart.) on mouse behaviour in forced swimming and open field tests.

    PubMed

    Campos, A R; Barros, A I S; Albuquerque, F A A; M Leal, L K A; Rao, V S N

    2005-05-01

    Guarana, a herbal extract from the seeds of Paullinia cupana Mart. has been evaluated in comparison with caffeine on mouse behaviour in forced swimming and open field tests. Guarana (25 and 50 mg/kg, p.o.) and caffeine (10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o.) each significantly reduced the duration of immobility in the forced swimming test suggesting an antidepressant-like effect in mice. At these doses, neither substance affected ambulation in the open field test. However, a high dose of guarana (100 mg/kg) and caffeine (30 mg/kg) significantly enhanced the locomotor activity in the open field test. Caffeine, but not guarana, could effectively block an adenosine agonist, cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA)-induced increase in swimming immobility suggesting that mechanism(s) other than the adenosinergic mechanism are involved in the antidepressant-like activity of guarana. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Loss of myocardial CK-MB into the circulation following 3.5 hours of swimming in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y J; Serfass, R C; Apple, F S

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to document alterations of creatine kinase-B (CK-B) in the left and right ventricles of rats and CK-MB release into the circulation following a single bout of stressful prolonged intense exercise. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, with 8% bodyweight attached to each tail, were forced to swim 3.5 hours and were then sacrificed immediately (0 h PS), 3 hours (3 h PS), 24 hours (24 h PS), and 48 hours (48 h PS) post swimming, respectively. Sedentary (control) rats were sacrificed at rest. Serum CK-MB mass increased 2.1 times (8.9 microg/L; p < 0.01 vs. controls of 4.3 microg/L) and 1.4 times (6.0 microg/L; P < 0.01 vs. controls) at 0 h PS, and 3 h PS, respectively, and returned to baseline at 24 h PS. Western blot analysis indicated that CK-B of the right ventricle decreased 14% (p < 0.05), 20% (p < 0.01), and 12% (p < 0.05) at 3h PS, 24h PS and 48h PS, respectively. The CK-B of the left ventricles decreased 34% (p < 0.05) at 0 h PS, returned to baseline at 3 h PS, and was increased 39% (P < 0.01) at 48 h PS. Our findings demonstrate that a single bout of stressful, prolonged, intense exercise resulted in CK-B subunit loss from the myocardium, resulting in increased serum CK-MB concentrations, an indication of myocardial injury.

  12. Persistence of behaviours in the Forced Swim Test in 3xTg-AD mice at advanced stages of disease.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lista, Virginia; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2014-07-01

    Forced Swimming Test (FST) models behavioural despair in animals by loss of motivation to respond or the refusal to escape. The present study characterizes the behavioural responses of 12-month-old male 3xTg-AD mice in FST as compared to age-matched no-transgenic (NTg) mice. Paradoxical results were consistently found from what would be expected from their BPSD (Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia)-like profile. The comprehensive analysis of the ethogram shown in the FST considered the intervals of the test (0-2 and 2-6min), all the elicited behavioural responses (immobility, swimming and climbing) and their features (total duration, frequency of episodes and mean duration). Both genotypes showed equal number of swimming episodes and climbing attempts during the first interval, that resulted in high swimming times, short climbing and scarce immobility. Thereafter, the NTg mice showed a behavioural shift over time and the immobility response showed up. In contrast, all the measures consistently evidenced that 3xTg-AD persisted with the previous behavioural pattern. Genotype differences consisted in less number of episodes of immobility and swimming, and a low immobility time in favour of swimming. No differences were found in 'climbing' attempts. The behavioural response observed is discussed as a lack of ability of 3xTg-AD mice to shift behaviour over time that may result of poorest cognitive flexibility and copying with stress strategies more than behavioural despair per se.

  13. Acute Aerobic Swimming Exercise Induces Distinct Effects in the Contractile Reactivity of Rat Ileum to KCl and Carbachol

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Layanne C. da Cunha; de Souza, Iara L. L.; Vasconcelos, Luiz H. C.; Brito, Aline de Freitas; Queiroga, Fernando R.; Silva, Alexandre S.; da Silva, Patrícia M.; Cavalcante, Fabiana de Andrade; da Silva, Bagnólia A.

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic exercise promotes short-term physiological changes in the intestinal smooth muscle associated to the ischemia-reperfusion process; however, few studies have demonstrated its effect on the intestinal contractile function. Thus, this work describes our observations regarding the influence of acute aerobic swimming exercise in the contractile reactivity, oxidative stress, and morphology of rat ileum. Wistar rats were divided into sedentary (SED) and acutely exercised (EX-AC) groups. Animals were acclimated by 10, 10, and 30 min of swimming exercise in intercalated days 1 week before exercise. Then they were submitted to forced swimming for 1 h with a metal of 3% of their body weight attached to their body. Animals were euthanized immediately after the exercise section and the ileum was suspended in organ baths for monitoring isotonic contractions. The analysis of lipid peroxidation was performed in order to determinate the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels as a marker of oxidative stress, and intestinal smooth muscle morphology by histological staining. Cumulative concentration-response curves to KCl were altered in the EX-AC with an increase in both its efficacy and potency (Emax = 153.2 ± 2.8%, EC50 = 1.3 ± 0.1 × 10−2 M) compared to the SED group (Emax = 100%, EC50 = 1.8 ± 0.1 × 10−2 M). Interestingly, carbachol had its efficacy and potency reduced in the EX-AC (Emax = 67.1 ± 1.4%, EC50 = 9.8 ± 1.4 × 10−7 M) compared to the SED group (Emax = 100%, EC50 = 2.0 ± 0.2 × 10−7 M). The exercise did not alter the MDA levels in the ileum (5.4 ± 0.6 μ mol/mL) in the EX-AC compared to the SED group (8.4 ± 1.7 μ mol/mL). Moreover, neither the circular nor the longitudinal smooth muscle layers thickness were modified by the exercise (66.2 ± 6.0 and 40.2 ± 2.6 μm, respectively), compared to the SED group (61.6 ± 6.4 and 34.8 ± 3.7 μm, respectively). Therefore, the ileum sensitivity to contractile agents is differentially altered by the acute aerobic

  14. Study of the clomipramine-morphine interaction in the forced swimming test in mice.

    PubMed

    Eschalier, A; Fialip, J; Varoquaux, O; Makambila, M C

    1987-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressant-morphine interactions have been extensively studied on pain tests but less often on tests predictive of antidepressant activity. The effects of clomipramine (CMI) and morphine were tested on the forced swimming test in mice after pretreatment with CMI, morphine or saline. Like CMI, though less so, morphine was significantly active. Morphine pretreatment partially inhibited the effect of CMI irrespective of the morphine pretreatment dose, but reduction of morphine activity by CMI was non-significant. Acquired tolerance to morphine occurred, but not to CMI. The mechanisms at work were discussed. CMI and desmethylclomipramine (DCMI) plasma levels remained the same after morphine pretreatment, ruling out a pharmacokinetic mechanism. The interaction implied involvement of opiate systems. CMI might have been acting on two different opiate receptor populations, one sensitive to morphine pretreatment, the other not. The mechanism of this action seems to be different from that of morphine.

  15. Antidepressant effects of ginseng total saponins in the forced swimming test and chronic mild stress models of depression.

    PubMed

    Dang, Haixia; Chen, Ying; Liu, Xinmin; Wang, Qiong; Wang, Liwei; Jia, William; Wang, Yuqing

    2009-11-13

    Ginseng total saponins (GTS) are the major active components of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, which has been used as a popular tonic herb for 2000 years in Far East countries. In the present study, two classic animal models: the forced swimming test (FST) and the chronic mild stress (CMS) model were used to evaluate the antidepressant-like activities of GTS. It was observed that GTS at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the immobility time in the FST in mice after 7-day treatment. GTS also reversed the reduction in the sucrose preference index, decrease in locomotor activity as well as prolongation of latency of feeding in the novelty environment displayed by CMS rats. In addition, HPLC-ECD and immunohistochemical staining analysis indicated that the CMS-induced decrease in monoamine neurotransmitter concentration and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus were almost completely reversed by GTS. In conclusion, GTS exerts antidepressant-like effects in two highly specific and predictive animal models of depression. The activity of GTS in antidepression may be mediated partly through enhancing the monoamine neurotransmitter concentration and BDNF expression in the hippocampus.

  16. Impact of metformin treatment and swimming exercise on visfatin levels in high-fat-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya; Wang, Changjiang; Pan, Tianrong; Luo, Li

    2014-02-01

    Visfatin is a recently discovered adipocytokine that contributes to glucose and obesity-related conditions. Until now, its responses to the insulin-sensitizing agent metformin and to exercise are largely unknown. We aim to investigate the impact of metformin treatment and/or swimming exercise on serum visfatin and visfatin levels in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), peri-renal adipose tissue (PAT) and skeletal muscle (SM) of high-fat-induced obesity rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a normal diet or a high-fat diet for 16 weeks to develop obesity model. The high-fat-induced obesity model rats were then randomized to metformin (MET), swimming exercise (SWI), or adjunctive therapy of metformin and swimming exercise (MAS), besides high-fat obesity control group and a normal control group, all with 10 rats per group. Zoometric and glycemic parameters, lipid profile, and serum visfatin levels were assessed at baseline and after 6 weeks of therapy. Visfatin levels in SAT, PAT and SM were determined by Western Blot. Metformin and swimming exercise improved lipid profile, and increased insulin sensitivity and body weight reduction were observed. Both metformin and swimming exercise down-regulated visfatin levels in SAT and PAT, while the adjunctive therapy conferred greater benefits, but no changes of visfatin levels were observed in SM. Our results indicate that visfatin down-regulation in SAT and PAT may be one of the mechanisms by which metformin and swimming exercise inhibit obesity.

  17. Prior swimming exercise favors muscle recovery in adult female rats after joint immobilization.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Ana Claudia; Ramos, Douglas Massoni; Gomes de Oliveira, Luana; Alberto da Silva, Carlos; Pertille, Adriana

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the efficacy of pre-exercise on immobilization and subsequent recovery of white gastrocnemius (WG) and soleus (SOL) muscles of female rats. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty, 8-month-old, female Wistar rats were randomly and evenly allocated to six groups: sedentary (S); immobilized sedentary (IS); immobilized/rehabilitated sedentary (IRS); trained (T); immobilized trained (IT); and immobilized/rehabilitated trained (IRT). For four months, T, IT and IRT group animals performed swimming exercise (three sessions per week, 60 minutes per session), while S, IS and IRS groups animals remained housed in cages. After this period, the left hindlimb of the animals from the IS, IRS, IT and IRT groups was immobilized for five days, with the ankle at 90°. After removal of the orthosis, animals from the IRS and IRT groups followed a rehabilitation program based on swimming (five sessions per week, 60 minutes per session) for two weeks. [Results] Immobilization significantly reduced the cross-sectional area of the white gastrocnemius muscle; no changes were observed in the soleus muscles of the trained animals. Transforming growth factor-β1 protein levels were similar among the trained groups. [Conclusion] Prior swimming prevents hypotrophy of the soleus muscle after immobilization, and protein levels reflected the adaptive capacity of the skeletal muscle.

  18. Prior swimming exercise favors muscle recovery in adult female rats after joint immobilization

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Ana Claudia; Ramos, Douglas Massoni; Gomes de Oliveira, Luana; Alberto da Silva, Carlos; Pertille, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the efficacy of pre-exercise on immobilization and subsequent recovery of white gastrocnemius (WG) and soleus (SOL) muscles of female rats. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty, 8-month-old, female Wistar rats were randomly and evenly allocated to six groups: sedentary (S); immobilized sedentary (IS); immobilized/rehabilitated sedentary (IRS); trained (T); immobilized trained (IT); and immobilized/rehabilitated trained (IRT). For four months, T, IT and IRT group animals performed swimming exercise (three sessions per week, 60 minutes per session), while S, IS and IRS groups animals remained housed in cages. After this period, the left hindlimb of the animals from the IS, IRS, IT and IRT groups was immobilized for five days, with the ankle at 90°. After removal of the orthosis, animals from the IRS and IRT groups followed a rehabilitation program based on swimming (five sessions per week, 60 minutes per session) for two weeks. [Results] Immobilization significantly reduced the cross-sectional area of the white gastrocnemius muscle; no changes were observed in the soleus muscles of the trained animals. Transforming growth factor-β1 protein levels were similar among the trained groups. [Conclusion] Prior swimming prevents hypotrophy of the soleus muscle after immobilization, and protein levels reflected the adaptive capacity of the skeletal muscle. PMID:27512267

  19. Monoamine depletion attenuates the REM sleep deprivation-induced increase in clonidine response in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Asakura, W; Matsumoto, K; Ohta, H; Watanabe, H

    1994-09-01

    Effect of monoamine depletion on the REM sleep (REMs) deprivation-induced increase in clonidine response in the forced swimming test was investigated. Mice were deprived of REMs by the small pedestal method. Clonidine HCl (10-1000 micrograms/kg, IP), an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, dose dependently increased swimming activities in group-housed and socially isolated mice used as the control groups. The dose-response relationship shifted to the left following REMs deprivation (ED50 values in the group-housed, isolated, and REMs-deprived mice were 250, 200, and 27 micrograms/kg, respectively). Monoamine depletion, induced by reserpine (5 mg/kg, IP) plus alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (250 mg/kg, IP), did not produce any changes in the effects of clonidine in the control groups. However, in REMs-deprived mice, monoamine depletion significantly decreased the effect of 100 micrograms/kg clonidine, but not that of 300 micrograms/kg clonidine on swimming activity. These results indicate that clonidine-induced increase in swimming activity in the forced swimming test is mainly mediated by postsynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptor, and that endogenous noradrenaline in the brain plays an important role in the increase of clonidine response following REMs deprivation treatment. The neuronal mechanism of the increase in clonidine response is discussed.

  20. The effect of unsteady flow due to acceleration on hydrodynamic forces acting on the hand in swimming.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shigetada; Vennell, Ross; Wilson, Barry

    2013-06-21

    This study describes the effect of hand acceleration on hydrodynamic forces acting on the human hand in angular and general motions with variable hand accelerations. Even if accelerations of a swimmer's hand are believed to have an important role in generating hydrodynamic forces on the hand, the effect of accelerations in angular and general motions on hydrodynamic forces on the swimmers hand has not been previously quantified. Understanding how hand acceleration influences force generation can provide useful information to enhance swimming performance. A hand-forearm model attached to a tri-axial load cell was constructed to measure hydrodynamic forces acting only on the hand when the model was rotated and accelerated in a swimming flume. The effect of acceleration on hydrodynamic forces on the hand was described by comparing the difference between accelerating and non-accelerating hands in different flow conditions. Hydrodynamic forces on the accelerating hand varied between 1.9 and 10 times greater than for the non-accelerating hand in angular motion and varied between 1.7 and 25 times greater than for the non-accelerating hand in general motion. These large increases occurred not only during positive acceleration phases but also during negative acceleration phases, and may be due to the added mass effect and a vortex formed on the dorsal side of the hand. This study provides new evidence for enhanced stroke techniques in swimming to generate increased propulsion by changing hand velocity during a stroke. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Swim stress activates serotonergic and non-serotonergic neurons in specific subdivisions of the rat dorsal raphe nucleus in a temperature-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kyle J.; Donner, Nina C.; Hale, Matthew W.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Physical (exteroceptive) stimuli and emotional (interoceptive) stimuli are thought to influence stress-related physiologic and behavioral responses through different neural mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that stress-induced activation of brainstem serotonergic systems is influenced by environmental factors such as temperature. In order to further investigate the effects of environmental influences on stress-induced activation of serotonergic systems, we exposed adult male Wistar rats to either home cage control conditions or a 15 min swim in water maintained at 19 °C, 25 °C, or 35 °C and conducted dual immunohistochemical staining for c-Fos, a marker of immediate-early nuclear activation, and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), a marker of serotonergic neurons. Changes in core body temperature were documented using biotelemetry. As expected, exposure to cold (19 °C) swim, relative to warm (35 °C) swim, increased c-Fos expression in the external lateral part of the parabrachial nucleus (LPBel), an important part of the spinoparabrachial pathway involved in sensation of cold, cutaneous stimuli, and in serotonergic neurons in the raphe pallidus nucleus (RPa), an important part of the efferent mechanisms controlling thermoregulatory warming responses. In addition, exposure to cold (19 °C) swim, relative to 35 °C swim, increased c-Fos expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus, ventrolateral part/periaqueductal gray (DRVL/VLPAG) and dorsal raphe nucleus, interfascicular part (DRI). Both of these subregions of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) have previously been implicated in thermoregulatory responses. Altogether, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that midbrain serotonergic neurons, possibly via activation of afferents to the DR by thermosensitive spinoparabrachial pathways, play a role in integration of physiologic and behavioral responses to interoceptive stress-related cues involved in forced swimming and exteroceptive cues related to cold

  2. The comparison of the effects of acute swimming stress on plasma corticosterone and leptin concentration in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Zareian, Parvin; Karimi, Mohammad Vahid; Dorneyani, Gita

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute swimming stress on plasma corticosterone and leptin levels in female and male rats. Thirty- seven adult male (n=20) and female (n=20) Sprague Dawley rats (200-250 g weight) were used. The leptin and corticosterone levels were measured following swimming stress (10 minutes) or no stress. Plasma leptin and corticosterone were measured by ELISA system. The plasma leptin and corticosterone levels were significantly increased in female and male rats by swimming stress. Plasma leptin level was not correlated significantly with plasma corticosterone in all groups. There were no sex differences in leptin level among stressed and non stressed rats. The results suggest that changes in plasma leptin level could not be associated with stimulation of corticosterone secretion from adrenal glands and leptin secretion is not sex dependent.

  3. Kappa-opioid receptors mediate the antidepressant-like activity of hesperidin in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Filho, Carlos B; Del Fabbro, Lucian; de Gomes, Marcelo G; Goes, André T R; Souza, Leandro C; Boeira, Silvana P; Jesse, Cristiano R

    2013-01-05

    The opioid system has been implicated as a contributing factor for major depression and is thought to play a role in the mechanism of action of antidepressants. This study investigated the involvement of the opioid system in the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in the mouse forced swimming test. Our results demonstrate that hesperidin (0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test without affecting locomotor activity in the open field test. The antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin (0.3 mg/kg) in the forced swimming test was prevented by pretreating mice with naloxone (1 mg/kg, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist) and 2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-Nmethyl-N-[(1S)-1-(3-isothiocyanatophenyl)-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethyl] acetamide (DIPPA (1 mg/kg), a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist), but not with naloxone methiodide (1 mg/kg, a peripherally acting opioid receptor antagonist), naltrindole (3 mg/kg, a selective δ-opioid receptor antagonist), clocinnamox (1 mg/kg, a selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist) or caffeine (3 mg/kg, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist). In addition, a sub-effective dose of hesperidin (0.01 mg/kg) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test when combined with a sub-effective dose of morphine (1 mg/kg). The antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in the forced swimming test on mice was dependent on its interaction with the κ-opioid receptor, but not with the δ-opioid, μ-opioid or adenosinergic receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that hesperidin possesses antidepressant-like properties and may be of interest as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of depressive disorders. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. NMDA GluN2B receptors involved in the antidepressant effects of curcumin in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Xu, Tianyuan; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Lanqing; Liu, Dexiang; Zhan, Renzhi; Yu, Shu Yan

    2013-01-10

    The antidepressant-like effect of curcumin, a major active component of Curcuma longa, has been previously demonstrated in the forced swimming test. However, the mechanism of this beneficial effect on immobility scores, which is used to evaluate antidepressants, remains largely uncharacterized. The present study attempts to investigate the effects of curcumin on depressive-like behavior with a focus upon the possible contribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype glutamate receptors in this antidepressant-like effect of curcumin. Male mice were pretreated with specific receptor antagonists to different NMDA receptor subtypes such as CPP, NVP-AAM077 and Ro25-6981 as well as to a partial NMDA receptor agonist, D-cycloserine (DCS), prior to administration of curcumin to observe the effects on depressive behavior as measured by immobility scores in the forced swim test. We found that pre-treatment of mice with CPP, a broad-spectrum competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, blocked the anti-immobility effect of curcumin, suggesting the involvement of the glutamate-NMDA receptors. While pretreatment with NVP-AAM077 (the GluN2A-preferring antagonist) did not affect the anti-immobility effect of curcumin, Ro25-6981 (the GluN2B-preferring antagonist) was found to prevent the effect of curcumin in the forced swimming test. Furthermore, pre-treatment with a sub-effective dose of DCS potentiated the anti-immobility effect of a sub-effective dose of curcumin in the forced swimming test. Taken together, these results suggest that curcumin shows antidepressant-like effects in mice and the activation of GluN2B-containing NMDARs is likely to play a predominate role in this beneficial effect. Therefore, the antidepressant-like effect of curcumin in the forced swim test may be mediated, at least in part, by the glutamatergic system.

  5. The Louisville Swim Scale: A Novel Assessment of Hindlimb Function following Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca R.; Burke, Darlene A.; Baldini, Angela D.; Shum-Siu, Alice; Baltzley, Ryan; Bunger, Michelle; Magnuson, David S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of animal studies examining the recovery of function following spinal cord injury use the BBB Open-Field Locomotor Scale as a primary outcome measure. However, it is now well known that rehabilitation strategies can bring about significant improvements in hindlimb function in some animal models. Thus, improvements in walking following spinal cord injury in rats may be influenced by differences in activity levels and housing conditions during the first few weeks post-injury. Swimming is a natural form of locomotion that animals are not normally exposed to in the laboratory setting. We hypothesized that deficits in, and functional recovery of, swimming would accurately represent the locomotor capability of the nervous system in the absence of any retraining effects. To test this hypothesis, we have compared the recovery of walking and swimming in rats following a range of standardized spinal cord injuries and two different retraining strategies. In order to assess swimming, we developed a rating system we call the Louisville Swimming Scale (LSS) that evaluates three characteristics of swimming that are highly altered by spinal cord injury— namely, hindlimb movement, forelimb dependency, and body position. The data indicate that the LSS is a sensitive and reliable method of determining swimming ability and the improvement in hindlimb function after standardized contusion injury of the thoracic spinal cord. Furthermore, the data suggests that when used in conjunction with the BBB Open-field Locomotor Scale, the LSS assesses locomotor capabilities that are not influenced by a retraining effect. PMID:17115911

  6. The cardiovascular and endocrine responses to voluntary and forced diving in trained and untrained rats

    PubMed Central

    DiNovo, Karyn. M.; Connolly, Tiffanny M.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian diving response, consisting of apnea, bradycardia, and increased total peripheral resistance, can be modified by conscious awareness, fear, and anticipation. We wondered whether swim and dive training in rats would 1) affect the magnitude of the cardiovascular responses during voluntary and forced diving, and 2) whether this training would reduce or eliminate any stress due to diving. Results indicate Sprague-Dawley rats have a substantial diving response. Immediately upon submersion, heart rate (HR) decreased by 78%, from 453 ± 12 to 101 ± 8 beats per minute (bpm), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased 25%, from 143 ± 1 to 107 ± 5 mmHg. Approximately 4.5 s after submergence, MAP had increased to a maximum 174 ± 3 mmHg. Blood corticosterone levels indicate trained rats find diving no more stressful than being held by a human, while untrained rats find swimming and diving very stressful. Forced diving is stressful to both trained and untrained rats. The magnitude of bradycardia was similar during both voluntary and forced diving, while the increase in MAP was greater during forced diving. The diving response of laboratory rats, therefore, appears to be dissimilar from that of other animals, as most birds and mammals show intensification of diving bradycardia during forced diving compared with voluntary diving. Rats may exhibit an accentuated antagonism between the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system, such that in the autonomic control of HR, parasympathetic activity overpowers sympathetic activity. Additionally, laboratory rats may lack the ability to modify the degree of parasympathetic outflow to the heart during an intense cardiorespiratory response (i.e., the diving response). PMID:19923359

  7. Anxiolytic effects of buspirone and MTEP in the Porsolt Forced Swim Test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kaziya M; Coelho, Michal A; Sern, Kimberly R; Class, MacKayla A; Bocz, Mark D; Szumlinski, Karen K

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, a reduction in floating behavior or immobility in the Porsolt forced swim test (FST) is employed as a predictor of antidepressant efficacy. However, over the past several years, our studies of alcohol withdrawal-induced negative affect consistently indicate the coincidence of increased anxiety-related behaviors on various behavioral tests with reduced immobility in the FST. Further, this behavioral profile correlates with increased mGlu5 protein expression within limbic brain regions. As the role for mGlu5 in anxiety is well established, we hypothesized that the reduced immobility exhibited by alcohol-withdrawn mice when tested in the FST might reflect anxiety, possibly a hyper-reactivity to the acute swim stressor. Herein, we evaluated whether or not the decreased FST immobility during alcohol withdrawal responds to systemic treatment with a behaviorally-effective dose of the prototypical anxiolytic, buspirone (5 mg/kg). We also determined the functional relevance of the withdrawal-induced increase in mGlu5 expression for FST behavior by comparing the effects of buspirone to a behaviorally effective dose of the mGlu5 negative allosteric modulator MTEP (3 mg/kg). Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a 14-day, multi-bottle, binge-drinking protocol that elicits hyper-anxiety and increases glutamate-related protein expression during early withdrawal. Control animals received only water. At 24hr withdrawal, animals from each drinking condition were subdivided into groups and treated with an IP injection of buspirone, MTEP, or vehicle, 30min prior to the FST. Drug effects on general locomotor activity were also assessed. As we reported previously, alcohol-withdrawn animals exhibited significantly reduced immobility in the FST compared to water controls. Both buspirone and MTEP significantly increased immobility in alcohol-withdrawn animals, with a modest increase also seen in water controls. No significant group differences were observed for

  8. The synchronizing research on structure of microcirculation and dynamic changes of monoamine neurotransmitter in the rat endbrain after exhaustive swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qiongjia; Li, He; Xiong, Ruo-Hong; Su, Quan-Sheng; Tan, Jin; Dai, Yi; Xu, Ming

    2003-12-01

    The changes of microconfiguration and dynamic changes of monoamines, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine(DA), in the rat endbrain after exhaustive swimming were observed in order to provide objective reference for evaluation of exercise central fatigue. Thirty-six male SD rates were divided randomly into 4 groups: group control (G1); group immediate after exhaustive swimming (G2); group 24 hours after exhaustive swimming (G3) and group 48 hours after exhaustive swimming (G4), 9 in each group. After adaptive swimming for 4 days, rats in G2, G3 and G4 took loaded swimming in ratio of 5 g for every 100g body weight (5%) till exhaustion. After decapitation, the endbrains of the rats in each group were taken for ordinary electron microscopic observation of change of microcofiguration and measurement of contents of 5-HT, NE and DA by fluorometric photometer. The ultrastructure of the endbrain cortex in G2 had apparent changes. In G3, improvement of ultrastructure of microcirculation in endbrain were observed; In G4, structure of microcirculation almost recovered to normal level. The level of 5-HT and NE in the endbrain of exhaustive swimming rat increased significantly, up to the highest in G3 (24h). It was therefore demonstrated that the configuration change of microcirculation and change of 5-HT and NE contents in rat endbrain after exhaustive exercise were synchronous and that the recovery of the configuration change of microcirculation was faster than change of 5-HT and NE contents, the ultrastructure change of microcirculation being reversible. These results indicate that the improvement of microcirculation in endbrain can help promote recovery of sporting central fatigue.

  9. Participation of estrogen receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of prolame on the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Lemini, C; Cruz-López, B; Martínez-Mota, L

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen therapy may produce antidepressant-like actions, but the side effects, such as thromboembolic events, may restrict its use among women. The 17β-aminoestrogens (AEs) [prolame [17β-(3-hidroxy-1-propylamino)-1,3,5(10)-estratrien-3-ol)], butolame [17β-(3-hidroxy-1-butylamino)-1,3,5(10)-estratrien-3-ol)], and pentolame [17β-(5-hidroxy-1-pentylamino)-1,3,5(10)-estratrien-3-ol)] induce estrogenic and anticoagulant actions, effects that could prove advantageous in an estrogen therapy; however, their antidepressant-like effects have not been described. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of these 17β-AEs (prolame, butolame and pentolame) in the forced swimming test (FST), an animal model sensitive to antidepressant drugs, and to establish the role of estrogen receptors in such actions. Ovariectomized female rats treated with prolame (10-200 μg/rat) showed a reduction in immobility and an increase in active behaviors in the FST, while this effect was not produced by butolame and pentolame (10-200 μg/rat). The antidepressant-like effect of prolame was similar to that of 17β-estradiol (E2, 5-20 μg/rat), sharing with it a biphasic profile but at higher doses. Antidepressant-like actions of prolame and E2 were not associated with changes in locomotor activity. With respect to a control group tamoxifen (15 mg/kg) by itself produced no changes in all behavioral evaluations, but canceled the antidepressant-like effect of prolame and E2. It is concluded that estrogen receptors participate in antidepressant-like effect of both estrogens in the FST. Antidepressant-like activity of different AEs is discussed considering their differences in chemical structure and the schedule used. Our results show additional central actions of prolame besides its pro-sexual, anti-coagulant, estrogenic and anxiolytic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Propulsive force calculations in swimming frogs. II. Application of a vortex ring model to DPIV data.

    PubMed

    Stamhuis, Eize J; Nauwelaerts, Sandra

    2005-04-01

    Frogs propel themselves by kicking water backwards using a synchronised extension of their hind limbs and webbed feet. To understand this propulsion process, we quantified the water movements and displacements resulting from swimming in the green frog Rana esculenta, applying digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to the frog's wake. The wake showed two vortex rings left behind by the two feet. The rings appeared to be elliptic in planform, urging for correction of the observed ring radii. The rings' long and short axes (average ratio 1.75:1) were about the same size as the length and width of the propelling frog foot and the ellipsoid mass of water accelerated with it. Average thrust forces were derived from the vortex rings, assuming all propulsive energy to be compiled in the rings. The calculated average forces (F(av)=0.10+/-0.04 N) were in close agreement with our parallel study applying a momentum-impulse approach to water displacements during the leg extension phase. We did not find any support for previously assumed propulsion enhancement mechanisms. The feet do not clap together at the end of the power stroke and no "wedge-action" jetting is observed. Each foot accelerates its own water mantle, ending up in a separate vortex ring without interference by the other leg.

  11. Swimming training prevents coronary endothelial dysfunction in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Claudio, E.R.G.; Almeida, S.A.; Mengal, V.; Brasil, G.A.; Santuzzi, C.H.; Tiradentes, R.V.; Gouvea, S.A.; Bissoli, N.S.; Santos, R.L.; Abreu, G.R.

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency and hypertension are considered major risk factors for the development of coronary heart disease. On the other hand, exercise training is considered an effective form to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of swimming training (SW) on coronary vascular reactivity in female ovariectomized hypertensive rats are not known. We aimed to evaluate the effects of SW on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation in ovariectomized hypertensive rats. Three-month old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, n=50) were divided into four groups: sham (SH), sham plus swimming training (SSW), ovariectomized (OVX), and ovariectomized plus swimming training (OSW). The SW protocol (5 times/week, 60 min/day) was conducted for 8 weeks. The vasodilatory response was measured in isolated hearts in the absence and presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME, 100 µM). Cardiac oxidative stress was evaluated in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence, while the expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD-2 and catalase) and their activities were assessed by western blotting and spectrophotometry, respectively. Vasodilation in SHR was significantly reduced by OVX, even in the presence of L-NAME, in conjunction with an increased oxidative stress. These effects were prevented by SW, and were associated with a decrease in oxidative stress. Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2) and catalase expression increased only in the OSW group. However, no significant difference was found in the activity of these enzymes. In conclusion, SW prevented the endothelial dysfunction in the coronary bed of ovariectomized SHR associated with an increase in the expression of antioxidant enzymes, and therefore may prevent coronary heart disease in hypertensive postmenopausal women. PMID:28099583

  12. Muscle fiber specific antioxidative system adaptation to swim training in rats: influence of intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Gonchar, Olga

    2005-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of intermittent hypoxia at rest and in combination with long-term high-intensity swimming exercise on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense system adaptation in skeletal muscles differing in fiber type composition. High-intensity chronic exercise was performed as swimming training with load that corresponded to ~ 75 % VO2max (30 min·day(-1), 5 days·wk(-1), for 4 wk). Intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) consisted of repeated episodes of hypoxia (12%O2, 15 min), interrupted by equal periods of recovery (5 sessions/day, for 2 wk). Sessions of IHT were used during the first two weeks and during the last two weeks of chronic exercise. Oxidative (red gastrocnemius and soleus, mix) and glycolytic (white gastrocnemius) muscles were sampled. Our results indicated that high-intensity swim training in combination with sessions of IHT induced more profound antioxidative adaptations in skeletal muscles than the exercise training only. This adaptation has muscle fiber type specificity and is reflected in significantly elevated superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in highly oxidative muscle only. Training adaptation of GSH system (reduced glutathione content, activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, NADPH-supplying enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) occurred both in slow- and fast-twitch muscles. However, this process was more effective in oxidative muscles. IHT attenuated the increase in TBARS content induced by high-intensity swimming training. The test on exercise tolerance demonstrated a significant elevation of the swimming time to exhaustion after IHT at rest and after IHT in conjunction with high-intensity exercise in comparison with untrained and chronically exercised rats. These results confirmed that sessions of IHT might improve exercise tolerance and increase maximal work capacity. Key PointsSingle high-intensity exercise induces a significant increase in TBARS content

  13. The forced swimming-induced behavioural immobility response involves histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in dentate gyrus granule neurons via activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen- and stress-activated kinase signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Yalini; Droste, Susanne K; Arthur, J Simon C; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2008-05-01

    The hippocampus is involved in learning and memory. Previously, we have shown that the acquisition of the behavioural immobility response after a forced swim experience is associated with chromatin modifications and transcriptional induction in dentate gyrus granule neurons. Given that both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 signalling pathway are involved in neuroplasticity processes underlying learning and memory, we investigated in rats and mice whether these signalling pathways regulate chromatin modifications and transcriptional events participating in the acquisition of the immobility response. We found that: (i) forced swimming evoked a transient increase in the number of phospho-acetylated histone H3-positive [P(Ser10)-Ac(Lys14)-H3(+)] neurons specifically in the middle and superficial aspects of the dentate gyrus granule cell layer; (ii) antagonism of NMDA receptors and inhibition of ERK1/2 signalling blocked forced swimming-induced histone H3 phospho-acetylation and the acquisition of the behavioural immobility response; (iii) double knockout (DKO) of the histone H3 kinase mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK) 1/2 in mice completely abolished the forced swimming-induced increases in histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in dentate granule neurons and the behavioural immobility response; (iv) blocking mineralocorticoid receptors, known not to be involved in behavioural immobility in the forced swim test, did not affect forced swimming-evoked histone H3 phospho-acetylation in dentate neurons; and (v) the pharmacological manipulations and gene deletions did not affect behaviour in the initial forced swim test. We conclude that the forced swimming-induced behavioural immobility response requires histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction in distinct dentate granule neurons through recruitment of the NMDA/ERK/MSK 1/2 pathway.

  14. Behavioral analysis during the forced swimming test using a joystick device.

    PubMed

    Gersner, Roman; Dar, Dalit E; Shabat-Simon, Maytal; Zangen, Abraham

    2005-04-30

    The behavioral test described by Porsolt in 1977 for screening potential antidepressant drugs is extensively used both in basic research and in the pharmaceutical industry. The measured behavior is the immobility time during the swimming test (preformed in rodents), which decreases upon acute antidepressant treatment. Several research groups have suggested some modifications on the original Porsolt paradigm and its analysis. Nevertheless, there are still inaccuracies resulting from either undefined intermediate behaviors or from considering the movement of the whole body as one unit without analyzing the motion of the limbs. Herein, we propose a novel and simple scoring method, based on continuous measurement of the limbs motion, using a joystick, a computer screen and simple software. We validated the method, using antidepressant drugs and studied examples of false positives and false negatives of the traditional Porsolt paradigm. The proposed method is easy to use, it accounts for all range of movements and the analysis is relatively fast. Moreover, the results obtained using this analysis method show a normal Gaussian distribution in a population of rats (while the traditional Porsolt analysis does not) which allows selective breeding of 'motivated' and 'depressed' lines of animals.

  15. Locomotor forces on a swimming fish: three-dimensional vortex wake dynamics quantified using digital particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Drucker; Lauder

    1999-01-01

    Quantifying the locomotor forces experienced by swimming fishes represents a significant challenge because direct measurements of force applied to the aquatic medium are not feasible. However, using the technique of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV), it is possible to quantify the effect of fish fins on water movement and hence to estimate momentum transfer from the animal to the fluid. We used DPIV to visualize water flow in the wake of the pectoral fins of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) swimming at speeds of 0.5-1.5 L s(-)(1), where L is total body length. Velocity fields quantified in three perpendicular planes in the wake of the fins allowed three-dimensional reconstruction of downstream vortex structures. At low swimming speed (0.5 L s(-)(1)), vorticity is shed by each fin during the downstroke and stroke reversal to generate discrete, roughly symmetrical, vortex rings of near-uniform circulation with a central jet of high-velocity flow. At and above the maximum sustainable labriform swimming speed of 1.0 L s(-)(1), additional vorticity appears on the upstroke, indicating the production of linked pairs of rings by each fin. Fluid velocity measured in the vicinity of the fin indicates that substantial spanwise flow during the downstroke may occur as vortex rings are formed. The forces exerted by the fins on the water in three dimensions were calculated from vortex ring orientation and momentum. Mean wake-derived thrust (11.1 mN) and lift (3.2 mN) forces produced by both fins per stride at 0.5 L s(-)(1) were found to match closely empirically determined counter-forces of body drag and weight. Medially directed reaction forces were unexpectedly large, averaging 125 % of the thrust force for each fin. Such large inward forces and a deep body that isolates left- and right-side vortex rings are predicted to aid maneuverability. The observed force balance indicates that DPIV can be used to measure accurately large-scale vorticity in the wake of

  16. Evidences that maternal swimming exercise improves antioxidant defenses and induces mitochondrial biogenesis in the brain of young Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Marcelino, T B; Longoni, A; Kudo, K Y; Stone, V; Rech, A; de Assis, A M; Scherer, E B S; da Cunha, M J; Wyse, A T S; Pettenuzzo, L F; Leipnitz, G; Matté, C

    2013-08-29

    Physical exercise during pregnancy has been considered beneficial to mother and child. Recent studies showed that maternal swimming improves memory in the offspring, increases hippocampal neurogenesis and levels of neurotrophic factors. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of maternal swimming during pregnancy on redox status and mitochondrial parameters in brain structures from the offspring. Adult female Wistar rats were submitted to five swimming sessions (30 min/day) prior to mating with adult male Wistar rats, and then trained during the pregnancy (five sessions of 30-min swimming/week). The litter was sacrificed when 7 days old, when cerebellum, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum were dissected. We evaluated the production of reactive species and antioxidant status, measuring the activities of superoxide-dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-peroxidase (GPx), as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants. We also investigated a potential mitochondrial biogenesis regarding mitochondrion mass and membrane potential, through cytometric approaches. Our results showed that maternal swimming exercise promoted an increase in reactive species levels in cerebellum, parietal cortex, and hippocampus, demonstrated by an increase in dichlorofluorescein oxidation. Mitochondrial superoxide was reduced in cerebellum and parietal cortex, while nitrite levels were increased in cerebellum, parietal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. Antioxidant status was improved in cerebellum, parietal cortex, and hippocampus. SOD activity was increased in parietal cortex, and was not altered in the remaining brain structures. CAT and GPx activities, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant potential, were increased in cerebellum, parietal cortex, and hippocampus of rats whose mothers were exercised. Finally, we observed an increased mitochondrial mass and membrane potential, suggesting mitochondriogenesis, in cerebellum and parietal cortex of pups subjected to

  17. Age-related changes in adaptive macronutrient intake in swimming male and female Lou rats.

    PubMed

    Boghossian, S; Veyrat-Durebex, C; Alliot, J

    2000-05-01

    To evaluate the age-related changes in capacity to adjust the nutrient intake to needs, self-selecting male and female Lou/C/jall rats of 4, 6, 12, 16 and 23 months of age were submitted to a swimming exercise. They were given 6 consecutive days of moderate intensity training (3 x 15 minutes per day). Exercise and postexercise periods were compared with results from the pretraining period. During swimming, a body weight loss and a decrease in both caloric intake and fat selection were observed. This effect was more marked in older groups compared to 4 month-old groups. An increase in protein intake was observed in females, specially in older groups, whereas no effect was seen in males. The ability to increase caloric ingestion and regain weight during the postexercise period decreased with advancing age and was better in females than in males. We also showed an age-related effect on the recovery of initial nutrient intake rate that was more pronounced and more precocious for males. Moreover, males tended to decrease their protein intake, whereas females significantly increased it. The present findings suggest a decrease of capacity of adjusting feeding behavior to metabolic needs in aged rats, may be due to a deterioration of the central control of food intake.

  18. Effects of dietary restriction or swimming on lymphocytes and macrophages functionality from old rats.

    PubMed

    Meneguello-Coutinho, Marcela; Caperuto, Erico; Bacurau, Aline Villa Nova; Chamusca, Grabriela; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Tibana, Ramires Alsamir; Pereira, Guilherme Borges; Navalta, James Wilfred; Wasinski, Frederick; Cavaglieri, Claudia Regina; Prestes, Jonato; Costa Rosa, Luis Fernando Bicudo Pereira; Bacurau, Reury Frank

    2014-01-01

    Although aging compromises the functionality of macrophages (MΦ) and lymphocytes (LY), and dietary restriction (DR) and exercise partially counterbalance immunosenescence, it is unknown what effects of both strategies have on the functionality of these immune cells. Rats were randomly distributed into adult control (AD), older group (OLD), older submitted to 50% of DR (DR) and older submitted to swimming (EX) (n = 10 in each group). The function of immune cells (proliferative index, phagocytic capacity and H₂O₂ production), the weight and protein content of lymphoid organs (thymus and spleen), plasma glutamine concentration, interleukins (IL-1, IL-2, IL-6) and, immunoglobulins (IgA and IgG) were analysed. There was an increase of 74% in body weight in aged animals as compared with the AD group, while body weight reduced 19% in the DR as compared with the OLD group. Swimming training stimulated MΦ phagocytosis, while the EX group presented a decrease of the proliferative capacity of LY from the mesenteric lymph nodes (44% and 62%, respectively), when stimulated with ConA and LPS as compared with the old rats. These data demonstrated that DR and exercise affects differentially MΦ and LY function.

  19. Evidence for the involvement of extinction-associated inhibitory learning in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Campus, P; Colelli, V; Orsini, C; Sarra, D; Cabib, S

    2015-02-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) remains one of the most used tools for screening antidepressants in rodent models. Nonetheless, the nature of immobility, its main behavioral measure, is still a matter of debate. The present study took advantage of our recent finding that mice of the inbred DBA/2J strain require a functioning left dorsolateral striatum (DLS) to consolidate long-term memory of FST to test whether immobility is the outcome of stress-related learning. Infusion of the GABA-A agonist muscimol in the left DLS immediately after a single experience of FST prevented and infusion in the left or the right amygdala impaired recall of the acquired levels of immobility in a probe test performed 24h later. Post-training left DLS infusion of muscimol, at a dose capable of preventing retention of FST-induced immobility, did not influence 24h retention of inhibitory avoidance training or of the escape response acquired in a water T-maze. However, this same treatment prevented 24h retention of the extinction training of the consolidated escape response. These results indicate that a left DLS-centered memory system selectively mediates memory consolidation of FST and of escape extinction and support the hypothesis that immobility is the result of extinction-like inhibitory learning involving all available escape responses due to the inescapable/unavoidable nature of FST experience.

  20. Inhibition of Progesterone Metabolism Mimics the Effect of Progesterone Withdrawal on Forced Swim Test Immobility

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Deborah A.

    2007-01-01

    Withdrawal from high levels of progesterone in rodents has been proposed as a model for premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. Forced swim test (FST) immobility, used to model depression, was assessed in intact female DBA/2J mice following progesterone withdrawal (PWD) or treatment with the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride. Following 5 daily progesterone injections (5 mg/kg IP) FST immobility increased only in mice withdrawn for 3 days (p < .05). In another experiment, 3 days of PWD significantly decreased levels of progesterone compared to 0 days of withdrawal, but progesterone levels at 3 days of PWD did not differ from vehicle-treated controls. In a final study, mice received daily injections of progesterone (5 mg/kg IP) for 8 days, with 0 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, or 100 mg/kg finasteride co-administered for the last three days. Mice that received 100 mg/kg finasteride, but not 50 mg/kg finasteride, displayed increased FST immobility. PWD and finasteride treatment, both of which reduce allopregnanolone levels, were associated with increased FST immobility in female DBA/2J mice. These findings suggest that decreased levels of the GABAergic neurosteroid allopregnanolone contributes to symptoms of PWD. Future studies of PWD may provide information about human conditions that are associated with hormone changes such as premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. PMID:17597197

  1. Papaver Rhoeas L. Hydroalcoholic Extract Exacerbates Forced Swimming Test-Induced Depression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Osanloo, Naser; Najafi-Abedi, Akram; Jafari, Fatemeh; Javid, Farshid; Pirpiran, Mohsen; Memar Jafari, Mohammad-Reza; Mousavi Khosravi, Seyed Ali; Rahimzadeh Behzadi, Mohammad; Ranjbaran, Mina; Sahraei, Hedayat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Depression is one of the most frequent psychiatric disorders in the world with occurs with higher incidence in women. In the present study, the effect of water-alcoholic extract of Papaver rhoeas L. on forced swimming test (FST) in Swiss-Webster mice were examined. Methods: We used Swiss-Webster mice (20–25 g) to execute FST on them. The plant extract (1, 10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) was injected to the animals 30 minutes before each session. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) was used as standard antidepressant drug. In another group of animals, 30 minutes after extract administration, blood samples were taken from retro-orbital sinus for corticosterone assay. Yet in third group, the drugs were injected to the animals and 30 minutes later, their activities were tested in an open field apparatus. Results: Our experiments showed that the extract efficiently reduced FST time both in male and female mice dose-dependently. This effect was comparable with fluoxetine. In addition, corticosterone assay indicated that plasma corticosterone in animals which received extract was higher than those amounts in fluoxetine and saline controls. Moreover, the animals did not show any motor activity deficit in all doses of the extract and fluoxetine compared to saline control. Conclusion: The extract of Papaver rhoeas can reduce immobility time which is comparable to the effect of fluoxetine. Also the effect of the extract is contrary to its effects on plasma corticosterone level and or animals’ activity. PMID:27563412

  2. The Rodent Forced Swim Test Measures Stress-Coping Strategy, Not Depression-like Behavior.

    PubMed

    Commons, Kathryn G; Cholanians, Aram B; Babb, Jessica A; Ehlinger, Daniel G

    2017-03-22

    The forced swim test (FST) measures coping strategy to an acute inescapable stress and thus provides unique insight into the neural limb of the stress response. Stress, particularly chronic stress, is a contributing factor to depression in humans and depression is associated with altered response to stress. In addition, drugs that are effective antidepressants in humans typically promote active coping strategy in the FST. As a consequence, passive coping in the FST has become loosely equated with depression and is often referred to as "depression-like" behavior. This terminology oversimplifies complex biology and misrepresents both the utility and limitations of the FST. The FST provides little construct- or face-validity to support an interpretation as "depression-like" behavior. While stress coping and the FST are arguably relevant to depression, there are likely many factors that can influence stress coping strategy. Importantly, there are other neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by altered responses to stress and difficulty in adapting to change. One of these is autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and several mouse genetic models of ASD exhibit altered stress-coping strategies in the FST. Here we review evidence that argues a more thoughtful consideration of the FST, and more precise terminology, would benefit the study of stress and disorders characterized by altered response to stress, which include but are not limited to depression.

  3. Evidences for the agmatine involvement in antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Kotagale, Nandkishor R; Tripathi, Sunil J; Aglawe, Manish M; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Taksande, Brijesh G

    2013-06-01

    Although bupropion has been widely used in the treatment of depression, the precise mechanism of its therapeutic actions is not fully understood. The present study investigated the role of agmatine in an antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test. The antidepressant like effect of bupropion was potentiated by pretreatment with agmatine (10-20mg/kg, ip) and by the drugs known to increase endogenous agmatine levels in brain viz., l-arginine (40 μg/mouse, icv), an agmatine biosynthetic precursor, ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor, dl-α-difluoromethyl ornithine hydrochloride, DFMO (12.5 μg/mouse, icv), diamine oxidase inhibitor, aminoguanidine (6.5 μg/mouse, icv) and agmatinase inhibitor, arcaine (50 μg/mouse, icv) as well as imidazoline I1 receptor agonists, moxonidine (0.25mg/kg, ip) and clonidine (0.015 mg/kg, ip) and imidazoline I2 receptor agonist, 2-(2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazoline hydrochloride, 2-BFI (5mg/kg, ip). Conversely, prior administration of I1 receptor antagonist, efaroxan (1mg/kg, ip) and I2 receptor antagonist, idazoxan (0.25mg/kg, ip) blocked the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and its synergistic combination with agmatine. These results demonstrate involvement of agmatine in the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and suggest agmatine and imidazoline receptors as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of depressive disorders.

  4. Intracerebroventricular administration of neuronostatin induces depression-like effect in forced swim test of mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ai-min; Ji, Yue-ke; Su, Shu-fang; Yang, Shao-bin; Lu, Song-song; Mi, Ze-yun; Yang, Qing-zhen; Chen, Qiang

    2011-09-01

    Neuronostatin is a recently discovered endogenous bioactive peptide that is encoded by pro-mRNA of somatostatin. In the present study, we investigated the effect of neuronostatin on mood regulation in the forced swim test of mice. Our results showed intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of neuronostatin produced an increase in the immobility time, suggesting that neuronostatin induced depression-like effect. In order to rule out the possibility that neuronostatin had increased immobility time by a non-specific reduction in general activity, the effect of neuronostatin on locomotor activity was examined. Neuronostatin had no influence on locomotor activity in mice. In addition, the depression-like effect of neuronostatin was completely reversed by melanocortin 3/4 receptor antagonist SHU9119 or GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline, but not by opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. These data suggested that the depression-like effect induced by i.c.v. administered neuronostatin was dependent upon the central melanocortin system and GABAA receptor. In conclusion, the results of this study report that neuronostatin induces depression-like effect. These findings reveal that neuronostatin is a new neuropeptide with an important role in regulating depressive behavior.

  5. Inhibition of progesterone metabolism mimics the effect of progesterone withdrawal on forced swim test immobility.

    PubMed

    Beckley, Ethan H; Finn, Deborah A

    2007-10-01

    Withdrawal from high levels of progesterone in rodents has been proposed as a model for premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression. Forced swim test (FST) immobility, used to model depression, was assessed in intact female DBA/2J mice following progesterone withdrawal (PWD) or treatment with the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride. Following 5 daily progesterone injections (5 mg/kg IP) FST immobility increased only in mice withdrawn for 3 days (p<.05). In another experiment, 3 days of PWD significantly decreased levels of progesterone compared to 0 days of withdrawal, but progesterone levels at 3 days of PWD did not differ from vehicle-treated controls. In a final study, mice received daily injections of progesterone (5 mg/kg IP) for 8 days, with 0 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, or 100 mg/kg finasteride co-administered for the last three days. Mice that received 100 mg/kg finasteride, but not 50 mg/kg finasteride, displayed increased FST immobility. PWD and finasteride treatment, both of which reduce allopregnanolone levels, were associated with increased FST immobility in female DBA/2J mice. These findings suggest that decreased levels of the GABAergic neurosteroid allopregnanolone contribute to symptoms of PWD. Future studies of PWD may provide information about human conditions that are associated with hormone changes such as premenstrual syndrome or postpartum depression.

  6. Swimming training attenuates oxidative damage and increases enzymatic but not non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nonato, L F; Rocha-Vieira, E; Tossige-Gomes, R; Soares, A A; Soares, B A; Freitas, D A; Oliveira, M X; Mendonça, V A; Lacerda, A C; Massensini, A R; Leite, H R

    2016-09-29

    Although it is well known that physical training ameliorates brain oxidative function after injuries by enhancing the levels of neurotrophic factors and oxidative status, there is little evidence addressing the influence of exercise training itself on brain oxidative damage and data is conflicting. This study investigated the effect of well-established swimming training protocol on lipid peroxidation and components of antioxidant system in the rat brain. Male Wistar rats were randomized into trained (5 days/week, 8 weeks, 30 min; n=8) and non-trained (n=7) groups. Forty-eight hours after the last session of exercise, animals were euthanized and the brain was collected for oxidative stress analysis. Swimming training decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels (P<0.05) and increased the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) (P<0.05) with no effect on brain non-enzymatic total antioxidant capacity, estimated by FRAP (ferric-reducing antioxidant power) assay (P>0.05). Moreover, the swimming training promoted metabolic adaptations, such as increased maximal workload capacity (P<0.05) and maintenance of body weight. In this context, the reduced TBARS content and increased SOD antioxidant activity induced by 8 weeks of swimming training are key factors in promoting brain resistance. In conclusion, swimming training attenuated oxidative damage and increased enzymatic antioxidant but not non-enzymatic status in the rat brain.

  7. Swimming training attenuates oxidative damage and increases enzymatic but not non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Nonato, L.F.; Rocha-Vieira, E.; Tossige-Gomes, R.; Soares, A.A.; Soares, B.A.; Freitas, D.A.; Oliveira, M.X.; Mendonça, V.A.; Lacerda, A.C.; Massensini, A.R.; Leite, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well known that physical training ameliorates brain oxidative function after injuries by enhancing the levels of neurotrophic factors and oxidative status, there is little evidence addressing the influence of exercise training itself on brain oxidative damage and data is conflicting. This study investigated the effect of well-established swimming training protocol on lipid peroxidation and components of antioxidant system in the rat brain. Male Wistar rats were randomized into trained (5 days/week, 8 weeks, 30 min; n=8) and non-trained (n=7) groups. Forty-eight hours after the last session of exercise, animals were euthanized and the brain was collected for oxidative stress analysis. Swimming training decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels (P<0.05) and increased the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) (P<0.05) with no effect on brain non-enzymatic total antioxidant capacity, estimated by FRAP (ferric-reducing antioxidant power) assay (P>0.05). Moreover, the swimming training promoted metabolic adaptations, such as increased maximal workload capacity (P<0.05) and maintenance of body weight. In this context, the reduced TBARS content and increased SOD antioxidant activity induced by 8 weeks of swimming training are key factors in promoting brain resistance. In conclusion, swimming training attenuated oxidative damage and increased enzymatic antioxidant but not non-enzymatic status in the rat brain. PMID:27706439

  8. Antidepressant-like effects of L-theanine in the forced swim and tail suspension tests in mice.

    PubMed

    Yin, Cui; Gou, Lingshan; Liu, Yi; Yin, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Ling; Jia, Genguang; Zhuang, Xuemei

    2011-11-01

    L-theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide), an amino acid component of green tea, has been shown to reduce mental and physical stress, and to improve memory function. In this study, the antidepressant effect of L-theanine was investigated in mice using the forced swim test, tail suspension test, open-field test and reserpine test. L-theanine produced an antidepressant-like effect, since the administration of L-theanine at doses of 1, 4 and 20 mg/kg for 10 successive days significantly reduced the immobility time in both the forced swim test and tail suspension test, compared with the control group, without accompanying changes in ambulation in the open-field test. Moreover, L-theanine significantly antagonized reserpine-induced ptosis and hypothermia. Taken together, these results indicate that L-theanine possessed an antidepressant-like effect in mice, which may be mediated by the central monoaminergic neurotransmitter system.

  9. Sensitivity during the forced swim test is a key factor in evaluating the antidepressant effects of abscisic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Cong-Cong; Shu, Yu-Mian; Chen, Fang-Han; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2016-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA), a crucial phytohormone, is distributed in the brains of mammals and has been shown to have antidepressant effects in the chronic unpredictable mild stress test. The forced swim test (FST) is another animal model that can be used to assess antidepressant-like behavior in rodents. Here, we report that the antidepressant effects of ABA are associated with sensitivities to the FST in mice. Based on mean immobility in the 5-min forced swim pre-test, ICR mice were divided into short immobility mice (SIM) and long immobility mice (LIM) substrains. FST was carried out 8 days after drug administration. Learned helplessness, as shown by increased immobility, was only observed in SIM substrain and could be prevented by an 8-day ABA treatment. Our results show that ABA has antidepressant effects in SIM substrain and suggest that mice with learned helplessness might be more suitable for screening potential antidepressant drugs.

  10. Antidepressant-like effects of the novel kappa opioid antagonist MCL-144B in the forced-swim test.

    PubMed

    Reindl, J D; Rowan, K; Carey, A N; Peng, X; Neumeyer, J L; McLaughlin, J P

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonists reduce stress- and depression-like behaviors. We hypothesized that administration of a novel opioid mixed agonist/antagonist capable of antagonist activity at the KOR would attenuate forced-swim stress (FSS)-induced immobility, an animal model of depression-like behavior. C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to antinociceptive and repeated FSS testing after pretreatment with a graded dose of a novel bivalent morphinan compound, bis(N-cyclobutylmethylmorphinan-3-yl) sebacoylate dihydrochloride (MCL-144B). MCL-144B demonstrated dose- and time-dependent antinociception and KOR-mediated antagonism. In support of the hypothesis, pretreatment with MCL-144B dose-dependently attenuated stress-induced antinociception and immobility in the forced-swim test.

  11. Effect of caffeine on the metabolism of rats exercising by swimming.

    PubMed

    Denadai, B S

    1994-10-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that caffeine improves endurance exercise performance but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Possibilities include increased free fatty acid (FFA) oxidation with consequent sparing of muscle glycogen as well as enhancement of neuromuscular function during exercise. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of caffeine on liver and muscle glycogen of 3-month old, male Wistar rats (250-300 g) exercising by swimming. Caffeine (5 mg/kg) dissolved in saline (CAF) or 0.9% sodium chloride (SAL) was administered by oral intubation (1 microliter/g) to fed rats 60 min before exercise. The rats (N = 8-10 per group) swam bearing a load corresponding to 5% body weight for 30 or 60 min. FFA levels were significantly elevated to 0.475 +/- 0.10 mEq/l in CAF compared to 0.369 +/- 0.06 mEq/l in SAL rats at the beginning of exercise. During exercise, a significant difference in FFA levels between CAF and SAL rats was observed at 30 min (0.325 +/- 0.06 vs 0.274 +/- 0.05 mEq/l) but not at 60 min (0.424 +/- 0.13 vs 0.385 +/- 0.10 mEq/l). Blood glucose showed an increase due to caffeine only at the end of exercise (CAF = 142.1 +/- 27.4 and SAL = 120.2 +/- 12.9 mg/100 ml). No significant difference in liver or muscle glycogen was observed in CAF as compared to SAL rats, at rest or during exercise. Caffeine increased blood lactate only at the beginning of exercise (CAF = 2.13 +/- 0.2 and SAL = 1.78 +/- 0.2 mmol/l). These data indicate that caffeine (5 mg/kg) has no glycogen-sparing effect on rats exercising by swimming even though the FFA levels of CAF rats were significantly higher at the beginning of exercise.

  12. Does Swimming Exercise Affect Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats Treated with Gum Acacia?

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A.; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A.; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2014-01-01

    Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine –induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

  13. The Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonist CORT 108297 Decreases Neuroendocrine Stress Responses and Immobility in the Forced Swim Test

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Matia B.; Wulsin, Aynara C.; Rice, Taylor; Wick, Dayna; Myers, Brent; McKlveen, Jessica; Flak, Jonathan N.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne; Herman, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical studies have employed treatment with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists in an attempt to limit the deleterious behavioral and physiological effects of excess glucocorticoids. Here, we examined the effects of GR antagonists on neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses, using two compounds: mifepristone, a GR antagonist that is also a progesterone receptor antagonist, and CORT 108297, a specific GR antagonist lacking anti-progestin activity. Given its well-documented impact on neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses, imipramine (tricyclic antidepressant) served as a positive control. Male rats were treated for five days with mifepristone (10 mg/kg), CORT 108297 (30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg), imipramine (10mg/kg) or vehicle and exposed to forced swim test (FST) or restraint stress. Relative to vehicle, imipramine potently suppressed adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) responses to FST and restraint exposure. Imipramine also decreased immobility in the FST, consistent with antidepressant actions. Both doses of CORT 108297 potently suppressed peak corticosterone responses to FST and restraint stress. However, only the higher dose of CORT 108297 (60mg/kg) significantly decreased immobility in the FST. In contrast, mifepristone induced protracted secretion of corticosterone in response to both stressors, and modestly decreased immobility in the FST. Taken together, the data indicate distinct effects of each compound on neuroendocrine stress responses and also highlight dissociation between corticosterone responses and immobility in the FST. Within the context of the present study, our data suggest CORT 108297 may be an attractive alternative for mitigating neuroendocrine and behavioral states associated with excess glucocorticoid secretion. PMID:24530653

  14. Learning and memory in the forced swimming test: effects of antidepressants having varying degrees of anticholinergic activity.

    PubMed

    Enginar, Nurhan; Yamantürk-Çelik, Pınar; Nurten, Asiye; Güney, Dilvin Berrak

    2016-07-01

    The antidepressant-induced reduction in immobility time in the forced swimming test may depend on memory impairment due to the drug's anticholinergic efficacy. Therefore, the present study evaluated learning and memory of the immobility response in rats after the pretest and test administrations of antidepressants having potent, comparatively lower, and no anticholinergic activities. Immobility was measured in the test session performed 24 h after the pretest session. Scopolamine and MK-801, which are agents that have memory impairing effects, were used as reference drugs for a better evaluation of the memory processes in the test. The pretest administrations of imipramine (15 and 30 mg/kg), amitriptyline (7.5 and 15 mg/kg), trazodone (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg), and moclobemide (10 and 20 mg/kg) were ineffective, whereas the pretest administrations of scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) decreased immobility time suggesting impaired "learning to be immobile" in the animals. The test administrations of imipramine (30 mg/kg), amitriptyline (15 mg/kg), moclobemide (10 mg/kg), scopolamine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg), and MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) decreased immobility time, which suggested that the drugs exerted antidepressant activity or the animals did not recall that attempting to escape was futile. The test administrations of trazodone (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg) produced no effect on immobility time. Even though the false-negative and positive responses made it somewhat difficult to interpret the findings, this study demonstrated that when given before the pretest antidepressants with or without anticholinergic activity seemed to be devoid of impairing the learning process in the test.

  15. Sex and age differences in the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Olivares-Nazario, Maribel; Reyes, Rebeca; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    This study compared in males and females of three representative ages: young adults (3-5months old), middle-aged (12-15months old) and senescent (23-25months old) the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine (FLX, 5.0 and 10mg/kg) in the forced swim test (FST). Intact (non gonadectomized) rats were evaluated. Young adult females were chosen in proestrus/estrus or in metestrus/diestrus, while middle-aged and senescent females were selected in metestrus/diestrus. Locomotion and motor coordination were also recorded. Under basal conditions (without FLX), young adult and middle-aged females showed less immobility than males. This sex difference disappeared at senescence because males diminished their levels of immobility. Thus, senescent males showed lower immobility than middle-aged and young males. FLX (5 and 10mg/kg) produced similar actions in young females irrespective of their estrous cycle phase, therefore, these subgroups were pooled in a single one. Young adult and middle aged females clearly responded to 5 and 10mg/kg of FLX with a reduction in immobility, while young adult and middle-aged males only did to 10mg/kg. In senescent females 10mg/kg FLX reduced immobility. Remarkably, in senescent males this FLX dose did not produce an antidepressant-like effect. FLX marginally affected locomotion; however, at its highest dose (10mg/kg), and only in senescent males, interfered with motor coordination tested in the rotarod. These data show that sex and aging influence behavioral despair without treatment and after FLX.

  16. The selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist CORT 108297 decreases neuroendocrine stress responses and immobility in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Matia B; Wulsin, Aynara C; Rice, Taylor; Wick, Dayna; Myers, Brent; McKlveen, Jessica; Flak, Jonathan N; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne; Herman, James P

    2014-04-01

    Pre-clinical and clinical studies have employed treatment with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists in an attempt to limit the deleterious behavioral and physiological effects of excess glucocorticoids. Here, we examined the effects of GR antagonists on neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses, using two compounds: mifepristone, a GR antagonist that is also a progesterone receptor antagonist, and CORT 108297, a specific GR antagonist lacking anti-progestin activity. Given its well-documented impact on neuroendocrine and behavioral stress responses, imipramine (tricyclic antidepressant) served as a positive control. Male rats were treated for five days with mifepristone (10mg/kg), CORT 108297 (30mg/kg and 60mg/kg), imipramine (10mg/kg) or vehicle and exposed to forced swim test (FST) or restraint stress. Relative to vehicle, imipramine potently suppressed adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) responses to FST and restraint exposure. Imipramine also decreased immobility in the FST, consistent with antidepressant actions. Both doses of CORT 108297 potently suppressed peak corticosterone responses to FST and restraint stress. However, only the higher dose of CORT 108297 (60mg/kg) significantly decreased immobility in the FST. In contrast, mifepristone induced protracted secretion of corticosterone in response to both stressors, and modestly decreased immobility in the FST. Taken together, the data indicate distinct effects of each compound on neuroendocrine stress responses and also highlight dissociation between corticosterone responses and immobility in the FST. Within the context of the present study, our data suggest that CORT 108297 may be an attractive alternative for mitigating neuroendocrine and behavioral states associated with excess glucocorticoid secretion.

  17. Computer assisted video analysis of swimming performance in a forced swim test: simultaneous assessment of duration of immobility and swimming style in mice selected for high and low swim-stress induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Lisowski, Paweł; Sliwa, Adam T; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2008-10-20

    In behavioral pharmacology, two problems are encountered when quantifying animal behavior: 1) reproducibility of the results across laboratories, especially in the case of manual scoring of animal behavior; 2) presence of different behavioral idiosyncrasies, common in genetically different animals, that mask or mimic the effects of the experimental treatments. This study aimed to develop an automated method enabling simultaneous assessment of the duration of immobility in mice and the depth of body submersion during swimming by means of computer assisted video analysis system (EthoVision from Noldus). We tested and compared parameters of immobility based either on the speed of an object (animal) movement or based on the percentage change in the object's area between the consecutive video frames. We also examined the effects of an erosion-dilation filtering procedure on the results obtained with both parameters of immobility. Finally, we proposed an automated method enabling assessment of depth of body submersion that reflects swimming performance. It was found that both parameters of immobility were sensitive to the effect of an antidepressant, desipramine, and that they yielded similar results when applied to mice that are good swimmers. The speed parameter was, however, more sensitive and more reliable because it depended less on random noise of the video image. Also, it was established that applying the erosion-dilation filtering procedure increased the reliability of both parameters of immobility. In case of mice that were poor swimmers, the assessed duration of immobility differed depending on a chosen parameter, thus resulting in the presence or lack of differences between two lines of mice that differed in swimming performance. These results substantiate the need for assessing swimming performance when the duration of immobility in the FST is compared in lines that differ in their swimming "styles". Testing swimming performance can also be important in the

  18. Subtype-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists enhance the responsiveness to citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Christensen, Jeppe K; Olsen, Gunnar M; Peters, Dan; Mirza, Naheed R; Redrobe, John P

    2011-10-01

    Nicotine increases serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal activity and facilitates serotonin and noradrenaline release. Accordingly, nicotine enhances antidepressant-like actions of reuptake inhibitors selective for serotonin or noradrenaline in the mouse forced swim test and the mouse tail suspension test. Both high-affinity α4β2 and low-affinity α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are implicated in nicotine-mediated release of serotonin and noradrenaline. The present study therefore investigated whether selective agonism of α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors would affect the mouse forced swim test activity of two antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, namely the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. Subthreshold and threshold doses of citalopram (3 and 10 mg/kg) or reboxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg) were tested alone and in combination with the novel α4β2-selective partial nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, NS3956 (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) or the α7-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, PNU-282987 (10 and 30 mg/kg). Alone, NS3956 and PNU-282987 were devoid of activity in the mouse forced swim test, but both 1.0 mg/kg NS3956 and 30 mg/kg PNU-282987 enhanced the effect of citalopram and also reboxetine. The data suggest that the activity of citalopram and reboxetine in the mouse forced swim test can be enhanced by agonists at either α4β2 or α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, suggesting that both nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes may be involved in the nicotine-enhanced action of antidepressants.

  19. Repeated swimming stress and responsiveness of the isolated rat pacemaker to the chronotropic effect of noradrenaline and isoprenaline: role of adrenal corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Spadari, R C; De Moraes, S

    1988-01-01

    1. Repeated swimming stress (three daily sessions) resulted in an increased plasma corticosterone level and subsensitivity of the isolated rat pacemaker to noradrenaline and isoprenaline. 2. Repeated swimming stress was found to decrease the affinity of beta 1-adrenoreceptors for metoprolol. 3. Bilateral adrenalectomy performed 2 days before repeated swimming stress abolished the development of pacemaker subsensitivity to noradrenaline and isoprenaline and the decrease in beta 1-adrenoreceptors affinity for metoprolol. 4. It is concluded that adrenal corticosteroids, at least partially, mediate the swimming stress-induced subsensitivity of the isolated rat pacemaker to noradrenaline and isoprenaline.

  20. Effect of swimming on myostatin expression in white and red gastrocnemius muscle and in cardiac muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Matsakas, Antonios; Bozzo, Cyrille; Cacciani, Nicola; Caliaro, Francesca; Reggiani, Carlo; Mascarello, Francesco; Patruno, Marco

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that swimming training might impact differentially myostatin expression in skeletal muscles, depending on fibre type composition, and in cardiac muscle of rats. Myostatin expression was analysed by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry of the red deep portion (mainly composed of slow and type II A fibres) and in the superficial, white portion (composed of fast type II X and II B fibres) of the gastrocnemius muscle in adult male Wistar rats: (i) subjected to two consecutive swimming bouts for 3 h; (ii) subjected to intensive swimming training for 4 weeks; and (iii) sedentary control rats. Myostatin mRNA content was in all cases higher in white than in red muscles. Two bouts of swimming did not alter myostatin expression, whereas swimming training for 4 weeks resulted in a significant reduction of myostatin mRNA contents, significant both in white and red muscles but more pronounced in white muscles. Western blot did not detect any change in the amount of myostatin protein. Immunohistochemistry showed that, in control rats, myostatin was localized in presumptive satellite cells of a few muscle fibres. After training, the number of myostatin-positive spots decreased significantly. Myostatin mRNA content in cardiac muscle was lower than in skeletal muscle and was significantly increased by swimming training. In conclusion, the results obtained showed that intense training caused a decreased expression of myostatin mRNA in white and red skeletal muscles but an increase in cardiac muscle.

  1. A complex interaction between glycine/NMDA receptors and serotonergic/noradrenergic antidepressants in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Kasperek, Regina; Wróbel, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    Both clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate the antidepressant activity of the functional NMDA receptor antagonists. In this study, we assessed the effects of two glycine/NMDA receptor ligands, namely L-701,324 (antagonist) and D: -cycloserine (a partial agonist) on the action of antidepressant drugs with different pharmacological profiles in the forced swim test in mice. Swim sessions were conducted by placing mice individually in glass cylinders filled with warmed water for 6 min. The duration of behavioral immobility during the last 4 min of the test was evaluated. The locomotor activity of mice was measured with photoresistor actimeters. L-701,324 and D: -cycloserine given with reboxetine (administered in subeffective doses) did not change the behavior of animals in the forced swim test. A potentiating effect was seen when both tested glycine site ligands were given concomitantly with imipramine or fluoxetine in this test. The lesion of noradrenaline nerve terminals produced by DSP-4 neither altered the baseline activity nor influenced the antidepressant-like action of L-701,324 or D: -cycloserine. The depletion of serotonin by p-CPA did not alter baseline activity in the forced swim test. However, it completely antagonized the antidepressant-like action produced by L-701,324 and D: -cycloserine. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effects of imipramine, fluoxetine and reboxetine were abolished by D: -serine, a full agonist of glycine/NMDA receptors. The present study demonstrates that glycine/NMDA receptor functional antagonists enhance the antidepressant-like action of serotonin, but not noradrenaline-based antidepressants and such their activity seems to depend on serotonin rather than noradrenaline pathway.

  2. Similarities in the development of place and cue navigation by rats in a swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Brown, R W; Whishaw, I Q

    2000-12-01

    The development of place and cue spatial navigation was evaluated in 18-, 19-, and 20-day-old males in the Morris water task (MWT). Past work has suggested that place and cue learning develop at different rates, suggesting that the two aspects of spatial navigation have different neural substrates. In the present study, a new training methodology was used in which animals received spaced training trials, drying and warming in between trials to maintain body temperature, and two probe trial-dependent measures to evaluate spatial memory performance. All ages of rats had lower latencies on the cue task than on the place task. Nevertheless, 18-day-old rats did not learn either task as measured by acquisition latencies and probe trial-dependent measures. The 19- and 20-day-old rats learned both the place and cue tasks as measured by acquisition latency and direct swims to the correct platform location on the probe trial, and both 19- and 20-day-old rats demonstrated a strong spatial bias to the former platform location on the place probe trial but not on the cue probe trial. The finding that developmental onset of place and cue spatial navigation is rapid and complete by day 19 is discussed in relation to contemporary theories of spatial navigation. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Prediction of human efficacious antidepressant doses using the mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Eunice; Swanson, Steven; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2017-09-06

    The forced swim test (FST) is a commonly used preclinical animal behavioural model for prediction of antidepressant activity in humans. While the FST may qualitatively predict efficacy, less is known about the quantitative translation of FST data to human efficacious doses. Assessing quantitative translation allows better predictions of human efficacious doses and a higher chance of success in the drug development process. Dose-response and time-course FST experiments were carried out on mice using four marketed antidepressants (citalopram, desipramine, bupropion, desvenlafaxine) in addition to ketamine, all with varying mechanisms of action. Population pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) analysis methods were applied to analyse the PK and immobility data, and the accuracy of the translation of FST data to human doses was evaluated using both area under the curve (AUC) and concentration-based approaches. The results showed that for the five antidepressants, average human AUC at clinically relevant doses were up to 38-fold higher than mouse AUC at doses associated with 50% of maximal efficacy in the FST (ED50). Using a concentration approach, human peak and trough drug concentrations at clinically relevant doses were generally associated with concentrations of at least 65% (EC65) and 20% (EC20) of maximal effect in mice, respectively. The FST is a useful tool to predict antidepressant efficacy across a variety of drugs with different mechanisms of actions. However, human doses can be over-or under-predicted many fold when using the traditional approach of estimating based upon ED50 AUC in mice. It is recommended that a concentration approach be used, where concentrations associated with 80% (EC80) and 30% (EC30) of maximal effect in the mouse are used as general targets for human maximum and trough concentrations, respectively, in the prediction of clinically efficacious doses of new, potential antidepressant agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. The forced swim test as a model of depressive-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Yankelevitch-Yahav, Roni; Franko, Motty; Huly, Avrham; Doron, Ravid

    2015-03-02

    The goal of the present protocol is to describe the forced swim test (FST), which is one of the most commonly used assays for the study of depressive-like behavior in rodents. The FST is based on the assumption that when placing an animal in a container filled with water, it will first make efforts to escape but eventually will exhibit immobility that may be considered to reflect a measure of behavioral despair. This test has been extensively used because it involves the exposure of the animals to stress, which was shown to have a role in the tendency for major depression. Additionally, the FST has been shown to share some of the factors that are influenced or altered by depression in humans, including changes in food consumption, sleep abnormalities and drug-withdrawal-induced anhedonia. The main advantages of this procedure are that it is relatively easy to perform and that its results are easily and quickly analyzed. Moreover, its sensitivity to a broad range of antidepressant drugs that makes it a suitable screening test is one of the most important features leading to its high predictive validity. Despite its appeal, this model has a number of disadvantages. First, the issue of chronic augmentation is problematic in this test because in real life patients need to be treated for at least several weeks before they experience any relief from their symptoms. Last, due to the aversiveness of the FST, it is important to take into account possible influences it might have on brain structure/function if brain analyses are to be carried out following this procedure.

  5. The Forced Swim Test as a Model of Depressive-like Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yankelevitch-Yahav, Roni; Franko, Motty; Huly, Avrham; Doron, Ravid

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present protocol is to describe the forced swim test (FST), which is one of the most commonly used assays for the study of depressive-like behavior in rodents. The FST is based on the assumption that when placing an animal in a container filled with water, it will first make efforts to escape but eventually will exhibit immobility that may be considered to reflect a measure of behavioral despair. This test has been extensively used because it involves the exposure of the animals to stress, which was shown to have a role in the tendency for major depression. Additionally, the FST has been shown to share some of the factors that are influenced or altered by depression in humans, including changes in food consumption, sleep abnormalities and drug-withdrawal-induced anhedonia. The main advantages of this procedure are that it is relatively easy to perform and that its results are easily and quickly analyzed. Moreover, its sensitivity to a broad range of antidepressant drugs that makes it a suitable screening test is one of the most important features leading to its high predictive validity. Despite its appeal, this model has a number of disadvantages. First, the issue of chronic augmentation is problematic in this test because in real life patients need to be treated for at least several weeks before they experience any relief from their symptoms. Last, due to the aversiveness of the FST, it is important to take into account possible influences it might have on brain structure/function if brain analyses are to be carried out following this procedure. PMID:25867960

  6. Alpha-lipoic acid and N-acetylcysteine protects intensive swimming exercise-mediated germ-cell depletion, pro-oxidant generation, and alteration of steroidogenesis in rat testis.

    PubMed

    Jana, Kuladip; Dutta, Ananya; Chakraborty, Pratip; Manna, Indranil; Firdaus, Syed Benazir; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Chattopadhyay, Ratna; Chakravarty, Baidyanath

    2014-09-01

    Prolonged and strenuous exercise has been proposed as a possible source of male-factor infertility. Forced intensive swimming has also been identified as one source of a dysfunctional male reproduction system. The present study evaluated the possible protective role of α-lipoic acid and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on intensive swimming-induced germ-cell depletion in adult male rats. Forced exhaustive swimming of 1 hr/day, 6 days/week for 8 consecutive weeks resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in epididymal sperm; testicular androgenic enzyme activities; and plasma and intra-testicular testosterone; and produced different types of germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium cycle. Conversely, plasma corticosterone levels and sperm-head abnormalities increased. Western-blot analysis showed a considerable decrease in testicular StAR protein expression whereas reverse-transcriptase PCR analysis showed no significant change in cytochrome P450scc (Cyp11a1) gene expression. Significant (P < 0.05) elevation in testicular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content versus reduction in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, and caspase-3 activities along with a depletion in the glutathione pool, mitochondrial membrane potential (▵ψm ), and intracellular ATP generation. A considerable level of DNA damage in testicular spermatogenic cells were also noted following forced extensive swimming. Alpha-lipoic acid and NAC supplementation prevented the swimming-induced testicular spermatogenic and steroidogenic disorders by lowering ROS generation. We therefore conclude that intensive forced swimming causes germ-cell depletion through the generation of ROS and depletion of steroidogenesis in the testis, which can be protected by the co-administration of α-lipoic acid and NAC.

  7. Silkworm pupae powder ingestion increases fat metabolism in swim-trained rats

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sung Pil

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Many researchers are trying to solve the metabolic syndrome by utilizing a variety of nutritional control and exercise. Of those, silkworm pupae peptides are known to inhibit the synthesis of fat. Therefore, we examine the effect of fat metabolism by supplying silkworm pupae (SP) for 5-week in swim-trained rats. [Methods] Animals were divided into four groups as a group (n = 32) fed a normal diet (CO) with exercise training (CE); a group fed a silkworm pupa diet (SPC) with an exercise training (SPE), respectively. [Results] Abdominal fat pads (abdominal and epididymal) weight were lowest in SPE. The serum triglyceride, total cholesterol concentrations were lower in the SP and the SPE. HDL-cholesterol, however, was not different between groups. Liver AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) was increased in the CE and the SPE. Liver PPAR-α (Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha) was increased in the SPC and SPE. L-FABP (liver fatty acids binding protein) was increased by SP ingestion. Liver CPT-1 (carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1) protein expression was increased by exercise training only. [Conclusion] In the present study showed that the silkworm pupae intake and/or swimming exercise training activates fat metabolism to reduce the concentration of serum lipids. Thus, the silkworm pupae intake leads to a reduction in fat storage, this is considered to be effective in the inhibition of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25566449

  8. Effects of swimming training on tissue glycogen content in experimental thyrotoxic rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Luiz Fernando Paulino; Teixeira, Inaian Pignatti; Aparecido da Silva, Glaucio; Dalia, Rodrigo Augusto; Júnior, Marcelo Costa; Bertolini, Natalia Oliveira; Rostom de Mello, Maria Alice; Luciano, Eliete

    2012-05-01

    Thyrotoxicosis, a condition in which there is an excessive amount of circulating thyroid hormones, leads to reduced glycogen content in different tissues. In this study we analyzed the effects of aerobic swimming training on liver, heart, and skeletal muscle glycogen content in experimentally induced thyrotoxicosis. Wistar male rats were divided into euthyroid sedentary (ES, n = 12), euthyroid trained (ET, n = 11), thyrotoxic sedentary (TS, n = 12), and thyrotoxic trained (TT, n = 10) groups. Thyrotoxic groups received daily i.p. doses of T4 (sodium levothyroxine, 25 µg/100 g body mass) through the experimental period, and trained groups swam for 1 h at 80% of the aerobic-anaerobic transition intensity, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Heart and liver glycogen stores were ∼30% lower in T4 treated compared with nontreated groups, but were not changed by training status. On the other hand, glycogen content in mixed fiber type gastrocnemius of TT was 1.5- to 2.3-fold greater than those in other groups, whereas no significant differences were found for the slow soleus muscle. Increased gastrocnemius but not soleus, liver, or heart glycogen indicates that in mild long-term thyrotoxicosis chronic swimming affects glycogen stores in a tissue-specific manner.

  9. [Evaluation of grip strength in normal and obese Wistar rats submitted to swimming with overload after median nerve compression].

    PubMed

    Coradinia, Josinéia Gresele; Kakihata, Camila Mayumi Martin; Kunz, Regina Inês; Errero, Tatiane Kamada; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2015-01-01

    To verify the functionality through muscle grip strength in animals with obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) and in control animals, which suffered compression of the right median nerve, and treated with swimming with overload. During the first five days of life, neonatal Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of MSG. The control group received a hypertonic saline solution. Forty-eight rats were divided into six groups: G1 (control); G2 (control + injury); G3 (control + injury + swimming); G4 (obese); G5 (obese + injury); G6 (obese + injury + swimming). The animals in groups G2, G3, G5 and G6 were submitted to compression of the median nerve and G3 and G6 groups were treated, after injury, with swimming exercise with load for three weeks. The swimming exercise had a progressive duration, according to the week, of 20, 30 and 40minutes. Muscle strength was assessed using a grip strength meter preoperatively and on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st days after surgery. The results were expressed and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. When the grip strength was compared among assessments regardless of group, in the second assessment the animals exhibited lower grip strength. G1 and G4 groups had greater grip strength, compared to G2, G3, G4 and G6. The swimming exercise with overload has not been effective in promoting improvement in muscle grip strength after compression injury of the right median nerve in control and in obese-MSG rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of the swimming activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using photonic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Han; Chang, Bo-Jui; Huang, Ying-Jung; Fan, Chia-Chieh; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chi, Sien; Hsu, Long

    2005-08-01

    Swimming activity of flagella is a main factor of the motility of bacteria. Flagella expressed on the surface of bacterial species serve as a primary means of motility including swimming. We propose to use optical tweezers to analyze the swimming activity of bacteria. The sample bacteria in the work is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and it is a gram-negative bacterium and often causes leading to burn wound infections, urinary-tract infections, and pneumonia. The single polar flagellum of P. aeruginosa has been demonstrated to be important virulence and colonization factor of this opportunistic pathogen. We demonstrate a gene to regulate the bacterial swimming activity in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by biological method. However, the change of flagellar morphology was not observed by electron microscopy analysis, suggesting that the gene regulates the flagellar rotation that could not be detected by biological method. PFM exhibits a spatial resolution of a few nanometers to detect the relative position of the probe at an acquisition rate over 1 MHz. By binding a probe such as a bead or a quantum dot on the flagella, we expect the rotation of the probe due to the flagella could be detected. It is expected that the study of the swimming activity of P. aeruginosa provide potent method for the pathogenic role of the flagella in P. aeruginosa.

  11. Treadmill running and swimming imposes distinct cardiovascular physiological adaptations in the rat: focus on serotonergic and sympathetic nervous systems modulation.

    PubMed

    Baptista, S; Piloto, N; Reis, F; Teixeira-de-Lemos, E; Garrido, A P; Dias, A; Lourenço, M; Palmeiro, A; Ferrer-Antunes, C; Teixeira, F

    2008-12-01

    Physical exercise may improve the metabolic and haemodynamic responses, but the beneficial effects seem to depend on intensity, duration and muscular mass recruitment, which may vary between different types of protocols. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of two distinct moderate/long-term aerobic training protocols in the normal Wistar rat, the treadmill running and the swimming, on several important parameters related to cardiovascular (CV) physiological adaptations, namely: lipid profile, haemorheological measures, lipid peroxidation, peripheral serotonergic system (SS) modulation and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation. In both groups under training an HDL-c increment versus the sedentary control was demonstrated. There was a noticeable increase in ADP-induced platelet aggregation in the exercised rats, together with higher PDW and MPV values. The RBC patterns were altered in both groups under training; in the swimming one, however, significantly higher RBC and HCT and lower MCH and MCHC values were found, suggesting renovation of the RBCs. Plasma and platelet SS measures were generally higher in both groups under training, being noticeably relevant the 5-HT and 5-HIAA increment in the treadmill. In opposition, concerning the plasma and platelet NE and E concentrations, the rise was remarkably higher in the rats under a swimming protocol. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, despite the similar beneficial effects on lipid profile, different aerobic exercise protocols may produce distinct CV physiological adaptations. Therefore, treadmill running was more influent than swimming concerning peripheral SS modulation while swimming was more important on SNS activation, thus recommending a judicious choice of the protocol to be tested in works which make use of rat models of exercise to study physiological or pathophysiological conditions.

  12. Effect of melatonin on element distribution in the liver tissue of diabetic rats subjected to forced exercise.

    PubMed

    Bicer, M; Akil, M; Baltaci, A K; Mogulkoc, R; Sivrikaya, A; Akkus, H

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of melatonin supplementation on elements in the liver of diabetic rats subjected to acute swimming exercise. Eighty adult male rats were equally divided into eight groups. Group 1, general control. Group 2, melatonin-supplemented control. Group 3, melatonin-supplemented diabetic control. Group 4, swimming control. Group 5, melatonin-supplemented swimming. Group 6, melatonin-supplemented diabetic swimming. Group 7, diabetic swimming. Group 8, diabetic control. Liver tissue samples were analyzed for lead, cobalt, molybdenum, chrome, sulphur, magnesium, manganese, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, copper, iron, calcium, zinc, selenium. The highest cobalt, chrome values were found in the groups 7, 8 and the groups 5, 6 respectively. Groups 3 and 7 had the highest copper values. Iron and potassium values were higher in the groups 1 and 4. Group 6 had increased magnesium value, and groups 6, 7, 8 were found to have the highest manganese levels. The highest lead values were found in the groups 5 and 6. Group 6 had the highest selenium levels. The highest zinc levels were established in 1 and 2. Groups 1, 2, 5 and 6 were found to have the highest calcium values. The results of our study indicate that melatonin supplementation in diabetes and forced exercise significantly alters the element metabolism in the liver (Tab. 3,Ref. 33).

  13. Blunted response of pituitary type 1 and brown adipose tissue type 2 deiodinases to swimming training in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, D L; Fortunato, R S; Neto, R A L; da Silva Silvestre, D H; Nigro, M; Frankenfeld, T G P; Werneck-de-Castro, J P S; Carvalho, D P

    2012-10-01

    Ovariectomy leads to significant increase in body weight, but the possible peripheral mechanisms involved in weight gain are still unknown. Since exercise and thyroid hormones modulate energy balance, we aimed to study the effect of swimming training on body weight gain and brown adipose tissue (BAT) type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase responses in ovariectomized (Ox) or sham-operated (Sh) rats. Rats were submitted to a period of 8-week training, 5 days per week with progressive higher duration of exercise protocol. Swimming training program did not totally prevent the higher body mass gain that follows ovariectomy in rats (16.5% decrease in body mass gain in Ox trained rats compared to 22% decrease in sham operated trained animals, in relation to the respective sedentary groups), but training of Ox animals impaired the accumulation of subcutaneous fat pads. Interestingly, swimming training upregulates pituitary type 1 (p<0.001 vs. all groups) and BAT type 2 iodothyronine deiodinases (p<0.05 vs. ShS and OxS) in sham operated but not in Ox rats, indicating an impaired pituitary and peripheral response to exercise in Ox rats. However, BAT mitochondrial O2 consumption significantly increased by swimming training in both sham and Ox groups, indicating that Ox BAT mitochondria responds normally to exercise stimulus, but does not result in a significant reduction of body weight. In conclusion, increased body mass gain produced by Ox is not completely impaired by 8 weeks of high intensity physical training, showing that these animals sustain higher rate of body mass gain independent of being submitted to higher energy expenditure.

  14. Effects of repeated treatment with phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors on cAMP signaling, hippocampal cell proliferation, and behavior in the forced-swim test.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lan; O'Callaghan, James P; O'Donnell, James M

    2011-08-01

    The effects of repeated treatment with the phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) inhibitors rolipram, piclamilast, and 4-(2-(3-(cyclopentyloxy)-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-phenylethyl)pyridine (CDP840), which differ in their interactions with high- and low-affinity binding conformers of the enzyme, were contrasted to those of acute treatment on cAMP signaling, hippocampal cell proliferation, and immobility in the forced-swim test in rats. Repeated treatment with rolipram (1 and 3 mg/kg), piclamilast (0.3 and 1 mg/kg), or CDP840 (10 and 30 mg/kg) for 16 days increased cAMP and phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In addition, repeated treatment with the PDE4 inhibitors increased proliferation and survival of newborn cells in the hippocampus and produced antidepressant-like effects on behavior, as evidenced by decreased immobility in the forced-swim test. Acute treatment with rolipram (3 mg/kg), piclamilast (1 mg/kg), or CDP840 (30 mg/kg) induced transient increases in cAMP and pCREB in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, but the dose and time dependence of these effects did not parallel the behavioral effects. Compared with rolipram and piclamilast, repeated treatment with CDP840 exerted lesser effects on neural and behavioral measures, probably because of its weak interaction with the high-affinity binding conformer of PDE4. This suggests the relative importance of the high-affinity binding conformer in the mediation of the long-term effects of PDE4 inhibition on cAMP/pCREB signaling, hippocampal cell proliferation, and antidepressant-like effects on behavior.

  15. Effects of Methyl Jasmonate on Acute Stress Responses in Mice Subjected to Forced Swim and Anoxic Tests.

    PubMed

    Aluko, Oritoke M; Umukoro, Solomon; Annafi, Olajide S; Adewole, Folashade A; Omorogbe, Osarume

    2015-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MJ) is an anti-stress hormone released by plants in response to external stressors and aids adaptation to stress. In this study, we evaluated the anti-stress activity of MJ using the forced swim endurance test (FSET) and anoxic tolerance test in mice. Male Swiss mice were given MJ (25-100 mg/kg, i.p) 30 min before the FSET and anoxic test were carried out. The first occurrence of immobility, duration of immobility, time spent in active swimming, and latency to exhaustion were assessed in the FSET. The onset to anoxic convulsion was measured in the anoxic tolerance test. MJ significantly (p < 0.05) delayed the first occurrence of immobility and shortened the period of immobility, which indicates anti-stress property. MJ also increased the time spent in active swimming and prolonged the latency to exhaustion, which further suggests anti-stress activity. In addition, it also exhibited anti-stress property as evidenced by prolonged latency to first appearance of anoxic convulsions. The results of this study suggest that MJ demonstrated anti-stress activity and may be useful as an energizer in times of body weakness or exhaustion. Although more studies are necessary before concluding on how MJ exerts its anti-stress activity, the present data suggest an action similar to adaptogens in boosting energy and resilience in the face of stress.

  16. Effects of Methyl Jasmonate on Acute Stress Responses in Mice Subjected to Forced Swim and Anoxic Tests

    PubMed Central

    Aluko, Oritoke M.; Umukoro, Solomon; Annafi, Olajide S.; Adewole, Folashade A.; Omorogbe, Osarume

    2015-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MJ) is an anti-stress hormone released by plants in response to external stressors and aids adaptation to stress. In this study, we evaluated the anti-stress activity of MJ using the forced swim endurance test (FSET) and anoxic tolerance test in mice. Male Swiss mice were given MJ (25–100 mg/kg, i.p) 30 min before the FSET and anoxic test were carried out. The first occurrence of immobility, duration of immobility, time spent in active swimming, and latency to exhaustion were assessed in the FSET. The onset to anoxic convulsion was measured in the anoxic tolerance test. MJ significantly (p < 0.05) delayed the first occurrence of immobility and shortened the period of immobility, which indicates anti-stress property. MJ also increased the time spent in active swimming and prolonged the latency to exhaustion, which further suggests anti-stress activity. In addition, it also exhibited anti-stress property as evidenced by prolonged latency to first appearance of anoxic convulsions. The results of this study suggest that MJ demonstrated anti-stress activity and may be useful as an energizer in times of body weakness or exhaustion. Although more studies are necessary before concluding on how MJ exerts its anti-stress activity, the present data suggest an action similar to adaptogens in boosting energy and resilience in the face of stress. PMID:26839844

  17. Increased depressive behaviour in females and heightened corticosterone release in males to swim stress after adolescent social stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Iva Z; Wilton, Aleena; Styles, Amy; McCormick, Cheryl M

    2008-06-26

    We previously reported that males undergoing chronic social stress (SS) (daily 1h isolation and new cage partner on days 30-45 of age) in adolescence habituated (decreased corticosterone release) to the homotypic stressor, but females did not. Here, we report that adolescent males exposed to chronic social stress had potentiated corticosterone release to a heterotypic stressor (15 min of swim stress) compared to acutely stressed and control males. The three groups of males did not differ in depressive-like behaviour (time spent immobile) during the swim stress. Corticosterone release in socially stressed females was elevated 45 min after the swim stress compared to acutely stressed and control females, and socially stressed females exhibited more depressive behaviour (longer durations of immobility and shorter durations of climbing) than the other females during the swim stress. Separate groups of rats were tested as adults several weeks after the social stress, and there were no group differences in corticosterone release after the swim stress. The only group difference in behaviour among the adults was more time spent climbing in socially stressed males than in controls. Thus, there are sex-specific effects of social stress in adolescence on endocrine responses and depressive behaviour to a heterotypic stressor, but, unlike for anxiety, substantial recovery is evident in adulthood in the absence of intervening stress exposures.

  18. Antidepressant-like effects of ketamine, norketamine and dehydronorketamine in forced swim test: Role of activity at NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Sałat, Kinga; Siwek, Agata; Starowicz, Gabriela; Librowski, Tadeusz; Nowak, Gabriel; Drabik, Urszula; Gajdosz, Ryszard; Popik, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Ketamine produces rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects in patients. The involvement of ketamine metabolites in these actions has been proposed. The effects of ketamine and its metabolites norketamine and dehydronorketamine on ligand binding to 80 receptors, ion channels and transporters was investigated at a single concentration of 10 μM. The affinities of all three compounds were then assessed at NMDA receptors using [3H]MK-801 binding. The dose-response relationships of all 3 compounds in the forced swim test were also investigated in mice 30 min after IP administration. The effects of ketamine and norketamine (both 50 mg/kg) were then examined at 30 min, 3 days and 7 days post administration. Among the 80 potential targets examined, only NMDA receptors were affected with a magnitude of >50% by ketamine and norketamine at the concentration of 10 μM. The Ki values of ketamine, norketamine and dehydronorketamine at NMDA receptors were 0.119±0.01, 0.97±0.1 and 3.21±0.3 μM, respectively. Ketamine and norketamine reduced immobility with minimum effective doses (MEDs) of 10 and 50 mg/kg, respectively; dehydronorketamine did not affect immobility at doses of up to 50 mg/kg. Neither ketamine nor norketamine reduced immobility in the forced swim test 3 and 7 days following administration. Further, oral administration of ketamine (5-50 mg/kg) did not affect immobility. We demonstrate that ketamine and norketamine but not dehydronorketamine given acutely at subanesthetic doses reduced immobility in the forced swim test. These antidepressant-like effects appear attributable to NMDA receptor inhibition.

  19. Ketamine-enhanced immobility in forced swim test: a possible animal model for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chindo, Ben A; Adzu, Bulus; Yahaya, Tijani A; Gamaniel, Karniyus S

    2012-08-07

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and highly complex psychiatric disorder characterised by cognitive dysfunctions, negative and positive symptoms. The major challenge in schizophrenia research is lack of suitable animal models that mimic the core behavioural aspects and symptoms of this devastating psychiatric disorder. In this study, we used classical and atypical antipsychotic drugs to examine the predictive validity of ketamine-enhanced immobility in forced swim test (FST) as a possible animal model for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. We also evaluated the effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) on the ketamine-enhanced immobility in FST. Repeated administration of a subanaesthetic dose of ketamine (30 mg kg(-1), i.p., daily for 5 days) enhanced the duration of immobility in FST 24 h after the final injection. The effect, which persisted for at least 21 days after withdrawal of the drug, was neither observed by single treatment with ketamine (30 mg kg(-1) i.p.) nor repeated treatment with amphetamine (1 and 2 mg kg(-1) i.p., daily for 5 days). The enhancing effects of ketamine (30 mg kg(-1) day(-1) i.p.) on the duration of immobility in the FST were attenuated by clozapine (1, 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) i.p.), risperidone (0.25 and 0.5 mg kg(-1) i.p.) and paroxetine (1 and 5 mg kg(-1) i.p.). Haloperidol (0.25 and 0.50 mg kg(-1) day(-1) i.p.) failed to attenuate the ketamine-enhanced immobility in the FST. The repeated ketamine administration neither affects locomotor activity nor motor coordination in rats under the same treatment conditions with the FST, suggesting that the effects of ketamine on the duration of immobility in this study was neither due to motor dysfunction nor peripheral neuromuscular blockade. Our results suggest that repeated treatment with subanaesthetic doses of ketamine enhance the duration of immobility in FST, which might be a useful animal model for the negative symptoms (particularly the depressive features) of

  20. Dose-dependent influence of buspirone on the activities of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Redrobe, J P; Bourin, M

    1998-07-01

    Recent clinical data suggest that buspirone may enhance the efficacy and/or reduce the latency to therapeutic effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in unipolar major depressive disorder. The present study, using the mouse forced swimming test, was performed to investigate further the mechanisms involved in the potential antidepressant-enhancing effects of buspirone. Prior administration of buspirone (0.06 mg kg(-1), i.p.) significantly enhanced the anti-immobility effects of subactive doses of fluvoxamine (4 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), paroxetine (4 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), citalopram (4 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01) and sertraline (2 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01) in the forced swimming test. However, pretreatment with buspirone did not induce antidepressant-like effects when tested in combination with fluoxetine (4 mg kg(-1), i.p.). Each antidepressant tested reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test [citalopram (16 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), fluoxetine (32 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), fluvoxamine (32 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01), paroxetine (16 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01) and sertraline (16 mg kg(-1), i.p.; P < 0.01)]. Pretreatment with buspirone (0.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.), or its major metabolite 1-PP (0.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.), attenuated all SSRI-induced anti-immobility effects (P < 0.01). Concomitant studies of locomotor activity ruled out any stimulant or sedative effects of the interactions. The results of the present study suggested that low dose buspirone enhanced the activity of subactive doses of SSRIs in the mouse forced swimming test, probably via an action at 5-HT1A receptors. On the other hand, a high dose of buspirone attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of active doses of these drugs, possibly via the generation of an active metabolite (1-PP) acting at alpha2-adrenoreceptors.

  1. Swimming eliminates the weight gain and abdominal fat associated with ovariectomy in the retired breeder rat despite high-fat diet selection.

    PubMed

    Melton, S A; Hegsted, M; Keenan, M J; Zhang, Y; Morris, S; Potter Bulot, L; O'Neil, C E; Morris, G S

    2000-08-01

    The effects of swim-training on choice of dietary fat, carbohydrate or protein, weight gain, energy intake, and energy efficiency were examined in ovariectomized and sham-operated retired breeder rats. After a 3 week training period of increased duration, rats swam for 75 min per session (5 days per week) for 4 weeks. Ovariectomized rats gained more weight than sham rats, while swimming reduced weight gain and abdominal fat. As a percentage of total intake, macronutrient choices (weight and energy) were similar for all groups, ovariectomized animals consumed more food and more energy, compared with sham animals. All rats freely chose the majority of their food (g) as carbohydrate and the majority of energy (kJ) as fat. Results indicate that a moderate intensity training program of swimming prevented the weight gain following ovariectomy in older rats despite their excessive caloric intake of fat.

  2. The involvement of NMDA and AMPA receptors in the mechanism of antidepressant-like action of zinc in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, B; Poleszak, E; Sowa-Kućma, M; Wróbel, A; Słotwiński, S; Listos, J; Wlaź, P; Cichy, A; Siwek, A; Dybała, M; Gołembiowska, K; Pilc, A; Nowak, Gabriel

    2010-06-01

    Antidepressant-like activity of zinc in the forced swim test (FST) was demonstrated previously. Enhancement of such activity by joint administration of zinc and antidepressants was also shown. However, mechanisms involved in this activity have not yet been established. The present study examined the involvement of the NMDA and AMPA receptors in zinc activity in the FST in mice and rats. Additionally, the influence of zinc on both glutamate and aspartate release in the rat brain was also determined. Zinc-induced antidepressant-like activity in the FST in both mice and rats was antagonized by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA, 75 mg/kg, i.p.) administration. Moreover, low and ineffective doses of NMDA antagonists (CGP 37849, L-701,324, D-cycloserine, and MK-801) administered together with ineffective doses of zinc exhibit a significant reduction of immobility time in the FST. Additionally, we have demonstrated the reduction of immobility time by AMPA receptor potentiator, CX 614. The antidepressant-like activity of both CX 614 and zinc in the FST was abolished by NBQX (an antagonist of AMPA receptor, 10 mg/kg, i.p.), while the combined treatment of sub-effective doses of zinc and CX 614 significantly reduces the immobility time in the FST. The present study also demonstrated that zinc administration potentiated a veratridine-evoked glutamate and aspartate release in the rat's prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The present study further suggests the antidepressant properties of zinc and indicates the involvement of the NMDA and AMPA glutamatergic receptors in this activity.

  3. Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, reduces antidepressant-like activity of paroxetine in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wyska, Elżbieta; Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, has recently been reported to influence the antidepressant activity of some antidepressant drugs. The present study was undertaken to investigate the involvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate/PDE5 (NO/cGMP/PDE5) signaling pathway in the antidepressant activity of paroxetine and to assess the interaction between paroxetine and sildenafil, in the forced swim test in mice. Swim trials were conducted by placing mice in glass cylinders filled with water for 6 min. Total behavioral immobility was measured during the last 4 min of the test. Changes in locomotor activity were measured with photoresistor actimeters. Serum and brain paroxetine concentrations were assayed by the HPLC method. Paroxetine at a dose of 1 mg/kg significantly decreased immobility time in the forced swim test, while sildenafil (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) in a dose-dependent manner reduced the antidepressant activity of paroxetine. Pharmacokinetic studies did not show any significant changes in paroxetine concentration in serum and brain tissue as compared to paroxetine treatment alone. The results suggest that paroxetine may exert its antidepressant action by decreasing cGMP levels and sildenafil, as a drug which has the opposite effect on the processes mediated via the NO/cGMP/PDE5 signaling pathway, may decrease the efficacy of paroxetine. However, the co-administration of paroxetine with sildenafil resulted in a potent reduction (80%) of locomotor activity, which suggests that the reversal of antidepressant action of paroxetine may have been a result of locomotor deficits. Further studies are required to explain the mechanism underlying this phenomenon.

  4. Species Specific Behavioural Patterns (Digging and Swimming) and Reaction to Novel Objects in Wild Type, Wistar, Sprague-Dawley and Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stryjek, Rafał; Modlińska, Klaudia; Pisula, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to analyse species-specific forms of behaviour (digging and swimming) and response to novelty in laboratory rats and their wild type counterparts at a very early stage of laboratorization. Three behavioural phenomena were taken into account: burrowing, spontaneous swimming, and neophobic behaviour. Principal Findings Wild-type rats and three strains of laboratory rats were involved in experiments: Warsaw-Wild-Captive-Pisula-Stryjek (WWCPS), Wistar, Sprague-Dawley, and Brown Norway rats were compared in spontaneous swimming test, while WWCPS and Wistar rats were studied in burrowing and neophobia experiments. Wild rats were found to be faster at building tunnels than Wistar rats and at constructing more complex burrow systems. The experiment on neophobia showed that Wistar rats exhibited less neophobic responses and were more often trapped. WWCPS rats showed highly neophobic behaviour and were rarely trapped in this experiment. The experiment on swimming showed that WWCPS rats showed more complex water tank related activity than their laboratory counterparts. They swam and explored under surface environment. Conclusions The three experiments showed profound behavioural differences in quasi-natural forms of behaviour between wild type rats (WWCPS) and three laboratory strains frequently used in behavioural studies. PMID:22815778

  5. Chelidonic acid evokes antidepressant-like effect through the up-regulation of BDNF in forced swimming test

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Yang, Shi-Young; Kim, Hee-Yun; Kim, Na-Rae; Jang, Jae-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Depression is usually accompanied by neuro-inflammatory reactions. Chelidonic acid, in particular, has shown anti-inflammatory effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-depressant effects of chelidonic acid and to discuss the potential mechanisms of a forced swimming test. Chelidonic acid was administered orally once a day for 14 days. On the 14th day, chelidonic acid resulted in a significant decrease in immobility time during the forced swimming test without alteration of locomotor activity, in an open field test. Chelidonic acid also increased the number of nissl bodies in the hippocampus. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylation in the hippocampus were up-regulated by the administration of chelidonic acid. Chelidonic acid administration significantly increased the mRNA expression of hippocampal estrogen receptor-β. The levels of hippocampal interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were effectively attenuated by the administration of chelidonic acid. In addition, chelidonic acid significantly increased the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), dopamine, and norepinephrine compared with those levels for the mice that were administered distilled water in the hippocampus. These results suggest that chelidonic acid might serve as a new therapeutic strategy for the regulation of depression associated with inflammation. PMID:27037280

  6. Chelidonic acid evokes antidepressant-like effect through the up-regulation of BDNF in forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Yang, Shi-Young; Kim, Hee-Yun; Kim, Na-Rae; Jang, Jae-Bum; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2016-08-01

    Depression is usually accompanied by neuro-inflammatory reactions. Chelidonic acid, in particular, has shown anti-inflammatory effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-depressant effects of chelidonic acid and to discuss the potential mechanisms of a forced swimming test. Chelidonic acid was administered orally once a day for 14 days. On the 14th day, chelidonic acid resulted in a significant decrease in immobility time during the forced swimming test without alteration of locomotor activity, in an open field test. Chelidonic acid also increased the number of nissl bodies in the hippocampus. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylation in the hippocampus were up-regulated by the administration of chelidonic acid. Chelidonic acid administration significantly increased the mRNA expression of hippocampal estrogen receptor-β. The levels of hippocampal interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α were effectively attenuated by the administration of chelidonic acid. In addition, chelidonic acid significantly increased the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), dopamine, and norepinephrine compared with those levels for the mice that were administered distilled water in the hippocampus. These results suggest that chelidonic acid might serve as a new therapeutic strategy for the regulation of depression associated with inflammation. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  7. Comparative evaluation of forced swim test and tail suspension test as models of negative symptom of schizophrenia in rodents.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Manavi; Jaiswal, Manoj; Palit, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the administration of NMDA antagonist can induce negative symptoms of schizophrenia which can be tested through the enhanced immobility observed in the forced swim test (FST). In the present study, we have compared the effects of acute as well as chronic administration of a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, ketamine on FST, and another behaviour despair model, tail suspension test (TST). Our observations suggest that chronic ketamine administration induced a state of enhanced immobility in FST, but such findings were not replicated in the TST model. Further, in FST, treatment with clozapine reverses the ketamine-induced immobility in mice, whereas it enhances the immobility duration in the TST model. However, haloperidol showed no protective effects in both models. The data suggests that although both of these tests show common behavioural measure of feeling despair, however, the underlying pathophysiology seems to be different. Hence, forced swim test but not tail suspension test can be used as a model of negative symptom of psychosis in mice.

  8. Reduced immobility in the forced swim test in mice with a targeted deletion of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) gene.

    PubMed

    Pechnick, Robert N; Chesnokova, Vera M; Kariagina, Anastasia; Price, Shannon; Bresee, Catherine J; Poland, Russell E

    2004-04-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of polypeptides that are rapidly released in response to tissue injury, infection, and inflammation. Besides their effects in the periphery, cytokines also affect the central nervous system (CNS). There has been increasing interest in the potential role of cytokines in the behavioral features of depressive disorders. One cytokine that might be a candidate for a role in the etiology of depression is leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF mRNA has been detected in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, and basal forebrain nuclei. The role of LIF in the CNS has not been fully elucidated. Based upon the hypothesis that cytokines might have a role in depression, the present study characterized the behavior of mice with a targeted disruption of the LIF gene (LIF knockouts) in the forced swim test, an animal model used to measure depressive-like behavior and the response to antidepressants. It was found that LIF knockout mice show reduced immobility in the forced swim test, suggesting that LIF might have a potential role in the etiology of some forms of depression.

  9. Antidepressant-like effect of harmane and other beta-carbolines in the mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Farzin, Davood; Mansouri, Nazanin

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of harmane, norharmane and harmine on the immobility time in the mouse forced swim test (FST) - an animal model of depression. After 30 min of the beta-carbolines injections, mice were placed individually in a vertical glass cylinder (height, 25 cm; diameter, 12 cm) containing water about 15 cm deep at 22+/-1 degrees C and forced to swim. Treatment of animals with harmane (5-15 mg/kg, i.p.), norharmane (2.5-10 mg/kg, i.p.) and harmine (5-15 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced dose-dependently the time of immobility. Their antidepressant-like effects were not affected by pretreatment with reserpine at the dose of 5 mg/kg, i.p., 18 h before the test, which did not modify the immobility time. Conversely, when flumazenil (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered 30 min before the test, it was able to antagonize completely the antidepressant-like effects of harmane, norharmane and harmine. It was concluded that harmane, norharmane and harmine reduce the immobility time in this test, suggesting an antidepressant-like effect, via an inverse-agonistic mechanism located in the benzodiazepine receptors.

  10. Boxfish swimming paradox resolved: forces by the flow of water around the body promote manoeuvrability

    PubMed Central

    Van Wassenbergh, S.; van Manen, K.; Marcroft, T. A.; Alfaro, M. E.; Stamhuis, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    The shape of the carapace protecting the body of boxfishes has been attributed an important hydrodynamic role in drag reduction and in providing automatic, flow-direction realignment and is therefore used in bioinspired design of cars. However, tight swimming-course stabilization is paradoxical given the frequent, high-performance manoeuvring that boxfishes display in their spatially complex, coral reef territories. Here, by performing flow-tank measurements of hydrodynamic drag and yaw moments together with computational fluid dynamics simulations, we reverse several assumptions about the hydrodynamic role of the boxfish carapace. Firstly, despite serving as a model system in aerodynamic design, drag-reduction performance was relatively low compared with more generalized fish morphologies. Secondly, the current theory of course stabilization owing to flow over the boxfish carapace was rejected, as destabilizing moments were found consistently. This solves the boxfish swimming paradox: destabilizing moments enhance manoeuvrability, which is in accordance with the ecological demands for efficient turning and tilting. PMID:25505133

  11. Chronic aerobic swimming exercise promotes functional and morphological changes in rat ileum

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha Araujo, Layanne Cabral; de Souza, Iara Leão Luna; Vasconcelos, Luiz Henrique César; de Freitas Brito, Aline; Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; Silva, Alexandre Sérgio; da Silva, Patrícia Mirella; de Andrade Cavalcante, Fabiana; da Silva, Bagnólia Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have reported the gastrointestinal (GI) effects promoted by the physical exercise. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the influence of swimming exercise on the contractile reactivity, lipid peroxidation and morphology of rat ileum. Wistar rats were divided into sedentary (SED) and groups exercised for two (EX2), four (EX4), six (EX6) or eight (EX8) weeks, 5 days/week. Animals were killed; the ileum was removed and suspended in organ baths where the isotonic contractions were recorded. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by MDA (malondialdehyde) measurement with TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) assay and morphology by histological staining. Cumulative concentration-response curves to KCl were attenuated, as the Emax values were changed from 100% (SED) to 63.1±3.9 (EX2), 48.8±3.8 (EX4), 19.4±1.8 (EX6) and 59.4±2.8% (EX8). Similarly, cumulative concentration-response curves to carbamylcholine hydrochloride (CCh) were attenuated, as the Emax values were changed from 100% (SED) to 74.1±5.4 (EX2), 75.9±5.2 (EX4) and 62.9±4.6 (EX6), but not in the EX8 (89.7±3.4%). However, CCh potency was increased in this latter, as the EC50 was altered from 1.0±0.1×10−6 (SED) to 2.1±0.4×10−7 (EX8). MDA concentration was altered only in EX4 (44.3±4.4) compared with SED (20.6±3.6 μmol/l). Circular layer was reduced in SED when compared with the exercised groups. Conversely, longitudinal layer was increased. In conclusion, chronic swimming exercise reduces the ileum contraction, equilibrates the oxidative damage and promotes changes in tissue size to establish an adaptation to the exercise. PMID:26424698

  12. Desipramine and citalopram attenuate pretest swim-induced increases in prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral division of the central nucleus of the amygdala in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Sun Hye; Cho, Jin Hee; Cho, Yun Ha; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Shin, Kyung Ho

    2014-10-01

    Dynorphin in the nucleus accumbens shell plays an important role in antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test (FST), but it is unclear whether desipramine and citalopram treatments alter prodynorphin levels in other brain areas. To explore this possibility, we injected mice with desipramine and citalopram 0.5, 19, and 23 h after a 15-min pretest swim and observed changes in prodynorphin expression before the test swim, which was conducted 24 h after the pretest swim. The pretest swim increased prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST) and lateral division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeL). This increase in prodynorphin immunoreactivity in the dBNST and CeL was blocked by desipramine and citalopram treatments. Similar changes in prodynorphin mRNA levels were observed in the dBNST and CeL, but these changes did not reach significance. To understand the underlying mechanism, we assessed changes in phosphorylated CREB at Ser(133) (pCREB) immunoreactivity in the dBNST and central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Treatment with citalopram but not desipramine after the pretest swim significantly increased pCREB immunoreactivity only in the dBNST. These results suggest that regulation of prodynorphin in the dBNST and CeL before the test swim may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of desipramine and citalopram in the FST and suggest that changes in pCREB immunoreactivity in these areas may not play an important role in the regulation of prodynorphin in the dBNST and CeA.

  13. Swimming exercise and diphenyl diselenide-supplemented diet affect the serum levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines differently depending on the age of rats.

    PubMed

    Leite, Marlon R; Cechella, José L; Mantovani, Anderson C; Duarte, Marta M M F; Nogueira, Cristina W; Zeni, Gilson

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the inflammatory process is one of the main factors that contribute to aging. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2-supplemented diet (1p.p.m., 4weeks) and swimming exercise (3% of body weight, 20min per day, 4weeks) on the serum levels of cytokines in Wistar rats of different ages. The results demonstrated an increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα and INFγ) and a decrease in the levels of IL-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, with age. In middle-age rats, the swimming exercise and (PhSe)2-supplemented diet decreased serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased the levels of IL-10. By contrast, in old rats the swimming exercise protocol increased the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased the levels IL-10. Diet supplemented with (PhSe)2 did not alter the serum levels of cytokines in old rats. Middle-age and old rats subjected to swimming exercise and supplemented with (PhSe)2 in the diet had a decrease in the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and an increase in the levels of IL-10. This study demonstrated that swimming exercise and (PhSe)2-supplemented diet affect the serum levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines differently depending on the age of rats. (PhSe)2 supplemented in the diet had an anti-inflammatory effect, similar to that of induced by swimming exercise, in middle-age rats and reversed the pro-inflammatory effects of swimming exercise in old rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Resveratrol Administration on the Element Metabolism in the Blood and Brain Tissues of Rats Subjected to Acute Swimming Exercise.

    PubMed

    Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim; Arslangil, Dilek; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Patlar, Suleyman

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine how resveratrol administration affects the element metabolism in the blood and brain cortex tissues of rats subjected to an acute swimming exercise. The study was carried out on Wistar-Albino-type adult male rats supplied by the Center. Group 1 is the control group. Group 2 is the swimming control group. Group 3 is the resveratrol (10 mg/kg/day) + swimming group. Group 4 is the resveratrol (10 mg/kg/day) group. Blood and brain cortex tissues were analyzed for some elements. The acute swimming exercise led to increases in the rats' serum iron, selenium, lead, cobalt, and boron levels, while the resveratrol-swimming group has increases in copper, phosphorus, and calcium values. The brain cortex tissue of the resveratrol-swimming group had significantly higher molybdenum levels than others. The results obtained in the study indicate that acute swimming exercise altered the distribution of elements in the serum to a considerable extent; however, resveratrol's affect is limited. Especially, resveratrol supplementation may have a regulatory affect on serum iron and magnesium levels.

  15. Swimming exercise increases serum irisin level and reduces body fat mass in high-fat-diet fed Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yun; Li, Hongwei; Shen, Shi-Wei; Shen, Zhen-Hai; Xu, Ming; Yang, Cheng-Jian; Li, Feng; Feng, Yin-Bo; Yun, Jing-Ting; Wang, Ling; Qi, Hua-Jin

    2016-05-13

    It has been shown that irisin levels are reduced in skeletal muscle and plasma of obese rats; however, the effect of exercise training on irisin level remains controversial. We aim to evaluate the association of swimming exercise with serum irisin level and other obesity-associated parameters. Forty healthy male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: a normal diet and sedentary group (ND group), normal diet and exercise group (NDE group), high-fat diet and sedentary group (HFD group), and high-fat diet and exercise group (HFDE group. After 8 consecutive weeks of swimming exercise, fat mass and serum irisin level was determined. Higher serum irisin levels were detected in the HFDE group (1.15 ± 0.28 μg/L) and NDE group (1.76 ± 0.17 μg/L) than in the HFD group (0.84 ± 0.23 μg/L) or the ND group (1.24 ± 0.29 μg/L), respectively (HFDE group vs. HFD group, P < 0.05; NDE group vs. ND group, P < 0.01). Pearson's correlation analysis showed that serum irisin level negatively correlated with TG level (r = -0.771, P < 0.05), percentage fat mass (r = -0.68, P < 0.05), fat mass (r = -0.576, P < 0.05), visceral fat mass (r = -0.439, P < 0.05) and TC level (r = -0.389, P < 0.05). The fat mass, visceral fat mass and percentage fat mass were lower in the HFDE group than the HFD group (all P values < 0.01). Swimming exercise decreases body fat mass in high-fat-fed Wistar rats, which may be attributable to elevated irisin levels induced by swimming exercise.

  16. Finasteride administration potentiates the disruption of prepulse inhibition induced by forced swim stress.

    PubMed

    Pallarès, M; Llidó, A; Mòdol, L; Vallée, M; Darbra, S

    2015-08-01

    Acute stress has been demonstrated to alter sensory gating processes, measured by the prepulse inhibition of the startle response (PPI). It is well known that brain and plasma levels of the neurosteroid allopregnanolone (ALLO) increase after acute environmental stress, fact that has been considered a homeostatic mechanism in restoring normal function following stress. Thus, it is of great interest to study the contribution of stress-altered plasma ALLO levels on PPI function. For this purpose, animals were injected with finasteride, an ALLO synthesis inhibitor, and submitted to swim stress before PPI testing. In order to obtain ALLO plasma levels, a separate set of animals that followed the same experimental procedure was used. We hypothesize that the blockade of ALLO production in response to stress can increase the stress-induced PPI disruption. In accordance with other authors, our results indicate that acute swim stress disrupted the normal PPI evolution (increase) related to the increase in prepulse intensities, and also decreased PPI at the highest prepulse intensity level (15 db above background). Finasteride potentiated the PPI decrease induced by swim stress in the intermediate prepulse intensity (10 db above background). As expected, plasma ALLO levels were increased in stressed animals and this increase was neutralized by prior finasteride administration. These results indicate that the neutralization of the physiological plasma ALLO levels increase after acute stress potentiates stress-induced PPI disruption. This data suggests that alterations in homeostatic ALLO synthesis mechanism may be linked to some neuropsychiatric disorders related to stress, such as anxiety/depression disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Altered responsiveness to cocaine and increased immobility in the forced swim test associated with elevated cAMP response element-binding protein expression in nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Pliakas, A M; Carlson, R R; Neve, R L; Konradi, C; Nestler, E J; Carlezon, W A

    2001-09-15

    Drugs of abuse regulate the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in striatal regions, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc). To explore how regulation of CREB in the NAc affects behavior, we used herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors to elevate CREB expression in this region or to overexpress a dominant-negative mutant CREB (mCREB) that blocks CREB function. Rats treated with HSV-mCREB in place conditioning studies spent more time in environments associated with cocaine, indicating increased cocaine reward. Conversely, rats treated with HSV-CREB spent less time in cocaine-associated environments, indicating increased cocaine aversion. Studies in which drug-environment pairings were varied to coincide with either the early or late effects of cocaine suggest that CREB-associated place aversions reflect increased cocaine withdrawal. Because cocaine withdrawal can be accompanied by symptoms of depression, we examined how altered CREB function in the NAc affects behavior in the forced swim test (FST). Elevated CREB expression increased immobility in the FST, an effect that is opposite to that caused by standard antidepressants and is consistent with a link between CREB and dysphoria. Conversely, overexpression of mCREB decreased immobility, an effect similar to that caused by antidepressants. Moreover, the kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine decreased immobility in HSV-CREB- and HSV-mCREB-treated rats, suggesting that CREB-mediated induction of dynorphin (an endogenous kappa receptor ligand) contributes to immobility behavior in the FST. Exposure to the FST itself dramatically increased CREB function in the NAc. These findings raise the possibility that CREB-mediated transcription within the NAc regulates dysphoric states.

  18. Influance of regular swimming on serum levels of CRP, IL-6, TNF-α in high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ghiasi, Rafighe; Ghadiri Soufi, Farhad; Mohaddes, Gisou; Alihemmati, Alireza; Somi, Mohammad H; Ebrahimi, Hadi; Mirzaie Bavil, Fariba; Alipour, Mohammad R

    2016-10-01

    Due to key role of inflammation in pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), aim of this study was evaluating the influance of regular swimming on serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interlukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in high-fat diet-induced diabetic rats. Fourty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control, diabetic, exercise and diabetic-exercise groups (n = 10). Diabetes was induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin (35 mg/kg, i.p.). In exercise groups, after induction of diabetes, animals were subjected to swimming (60 min/5 days a week) for 10 weeks. At the end of training, rats were anestatized and blood samples and pancreatic tissues were collected and used for evaluation of CRP, IL-6, TNF-α and pancreatic histopatholology. Our results showed significantly increase in lymphocytes, monocytes and decrease in neutrophils in diabetic rats (p < 0.01), which these parameters significantly reversed to control levels by induction of swimming (p < 0.01). In diabetic group, the levels of CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α increased (p < 0.01), and swimming decreased these factors significantly. Histopathological results of this study also showed that swimming can prevent damage induced by diabetes. The present study indicates that swim training is associated with improved inflammation and inflammatory mediators and pancreatic damage.

  19. Optimization of Anguilliform Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Stefan; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-03-01

    Anguilliform swimming is investigated by 3D computer simulations coupling the dynamics of an undulating eel-like body with the surrounding viscous fluid flow. The body is self-propelled and, in contrast to previous computational studies of swimming, the motion pattern is not prescribed a priori but obtained by an evolutionary optimization procedure. Two different objective functions are used to characterize swimming efficiency and maximum swimming velocity with limited input power. The found optimal motion patterns represent two distinct swimming modes corresponding to migration, and burst swimming, respectively. The results support the hypothesis from observations of real animals that eels can modify their motion pattern generating wakes that reflect their propulsive mode. Unsteady drag and thrust production of the swimming body are thoroughly analyzed by recording the instantaneous fluid forces acting on partitions of the body surface.

  20. Boxfish swimming paradox resolved: forces by the flow of water around the body promote manoeuvrability.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenbergh, S; van Manen, K; Marcroft, T A; Alfaro, M E; Stamhuis, E J

    2015-02-06

    The shape of the carapace protecting the body of boxfishes has been attributed an important hydrodynamic role in drag reduction and in providing automatic, flow-direction realignment and is therefore used in bioinspired design of cars. However, tight swimming-course stabilization is paradoxical given the frequent, high-performance manoeuvring that boxfishes display in their spatially complex, coral reef territories. Here, by performing flow-tank measurements of hydrodynamic drag and yaw moments together with computational fluid dynamics simulations, we reverse several assumptions about the hydrodynamic role of the boxfish carapace. Firstly, despite serving as a model system in aerodynamic design, drag-reduction performance was relatively low compared with more generalized fish morphologies. Secondly, the current theory of course stabilization owing to flow over the boxfish carapace was rejected, as destabilizing moments were found consistently. This solves the boxfish swimming paradox: destabilizing moments enhance manoeuvrability, which is in accordance with the ecological demands for efficient turning and tilting. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Swimming exercise training prior to acute myocardial infarction attenuates left ventricular remodeling and improves left ventricular function in rats.

    PubMed

    Dayan, Anat; Feinberg, Micha S; Holbova, Radka; Deshet, Naamit; Scheinowitz, Mickey

    2005-01-01

    The effect of exercise training prior to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) on left ventricular (LV) remodeling is poorly understood. This study investigated the protective effect of 3 weeks of swimming exercise training prior to AMI on cardiac morphology and function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 35) were randomly assigned to 3 groups: swimming training (n = 14, 90 min, 5 days/wk, 3 wk), sedentary (n =14), and controls (n = 7, no exercise, no MI). At the end of the training/sedentary period, rats were subjected to AMI (ExMI and SedMI) induced by surgical ligation of the left coronary artery. Thereafter, the rats remained sedentary for a 4-wk recovery period. Trans-thoracic echocardiography was performed in each group at the end of the exercise/sedentary period (pre-AMI), 24 hr after AMI, and following recovery (4 wk after AMI). No differences were observed in LV dimensions and function pre-AMI among the 3 groups; however, LV-end systolic diameter (LVESD) and LV-end systolic area (LVES-area) were significantly lower in the prior trained rats, 24 hr post-AMI with no additional change 4 wk post-AMI, during remodeling. Both LV-shortening fraction (SF%) and fractional area change (FAC%) were higher in the trained animals 4 wk post-AMI (39+/-12% vs 23+/-8%; p 0.002, and 48+/-14% vs. 38+/-9%; p 0.07, respectively). In conclusion, 3 wk of swimming exercise training prior to AMI significantly attenuated LV remodeling and improved LV function, despite no changes in LV dimensions or systolic function at the end of the exercise session. The data suggest that even a short-term training period is sufficient to induce cardiac protection.

  2. Swimming Training Modulates Nitric Oxide-Glutamate Interaction in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla in Normotensive Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raquel, Hiviny de A.; Masson, Gustavo S.; Barna, Barbara Falquetto; Zanluqui, Nágela G.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Michelini, Lisete C.; Martins-Pinge, Marli C.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of swimming training on nitric oxide (NO) modulation to glutamate microinjection within the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in conscious freely moving rats. Male Wistar rats were submitted to exercise training (Tr) by swimming or kept sedentary (Sed) for 4 weeks. After the last training session, RVLM guide cannulas and arterial/venous catheters were chronically implanted. Arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex control of HR (loading/unloading of baroreceptors) were recorded in conscious rats at rest. Pressor response to L-glutamate in the RVLM was compared before and after blockade of local nitric oxide (NO) production. In other Tr and Sed groups, brain was harvested for gene (qRT-PCR) and protein (immunohistochemistry) expression of NO synthase (NOS) isoforms and measurement of NO content (nitrite assay) within the RVLM. Trained rats exhibited resting bradycardia (average reduction of 9%), increased baroreflex gain (Tr: −4.41 ± 0.5 vs. Sed: −2.42 ± 0.31 b/min/mmHg), and unchanged resting MAP. The pressor response to glutamate was smaller in the Tr group (32 ± 4 vs. 53 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05); this difference disappeared after RVLM pretreatment with carboxy-PTIO (NO scavenger), Nw-Propyl-L-Arginine and L-NAME (NOS inhibitors). eNOS immunoreactivity observed mainly in RVLM capillaries was higher in Tr, but eNOS gene expression was reduced. nNOS gene and protein expression was slightly reduced (−29 and −9%, respectively, P > 0.05). Also, RVLM NO levels were significantly reduced in Tr (−63% vs. Sed). After microinjection of a NO-donor, the attenuated pressor response of L-glutamate in Tr group was restored. Data indicate that swimming training by decreasing RVLM NO availability and glutamatergic neurotransmission to locally administered glutamate may contribute to decreased sympathetic activity in trained subjects. PMID:27378935

  3. Effect of desipramine and citalopram treatment on forced swimming test-induced changes in cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) immunoreactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sung; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Sun Hye; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Jeong Min; Shin, Kyung Ho

    2014-05-01

    Recent study demonstrates antidepressant-like effect of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in the forced swimming test (FST), but less is known about whether antidepressant treatments alter levels of CART immunoreactivity (CART-IR) in the FST. To explore this possibility, we assessed the treatment effects of desipramine and citalopram, which inhibit the reuptake of norepinephrine and serotonin into the presynaptic terminals, respectively, on changes in levels of CART-IR before and after the test swim in mouse brain. Levels of CART-IR in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST), and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were significantly increased before the test swim by desipramine and citalopram treatments. This increase in CART-IR in the AcbSh, dBNST, and PVN before the test swim remained elevated by desipramine treatment after the test swim, but this increase in these brain areas returned to near control levels after test swim by citalopram treatment. Citalopram, but not desipramine, treatment increased levels of CART-IR in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and the locus ceruleus (LC) before the test swim, and this increase was returned to control levels after the test swim in the CeA, but not in the LC. These results suggest common and distinct regulation of CART by desipramine and citalopram treatments in the FST and raise the possibility that CART in the AcbSh, dBNST, and CeA may be involved in antidepressant-like effect in the FST.

  4. N-palmitoylethanolamide, an endocannabinoid, exhibits antidepressant effects in the forced swim test and the tail suspension test in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Ling; Deng, Xian-Qing; Li, Ying-Jun; Li, Ying-Chun; Quan, Zhe-Shan; Sun, Xian-Yu

    2011-01-01

    The antidepressant-like effects of N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a putative endocannabinoid, was investigated in mice using the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swimming test (FST). In TST, PEA (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) produced a statistically significant reduction in immobility (50, 32, and 34%, respectively, vs. the control group), whereas fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) reduced immobility by 38%. In FST, PEA (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) produced a statistically significant reduction in immobility (15, 21, and 36%, respectively), whereas fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) reduced immobility by 18%. Moreover, PEA (20 mg/kg) did not significantly change motor activity in a spontaneous behavioral test. In conclusion, PEA (dose range of 5-40 mg/kg) administered orally reduced immobility in TST and FST, comparable to the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine, and had no effect on spontaneous activity in mice.

  5. The hydrophobic dipeptide Leu-Ile inhibits immobility induced by repeated forced swimming via the induction of BDNF.

    PubMed

    Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Nitta, Atsumi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Morishita, Koji; Liu, Wenting; Ibi, Daisuke; Alkam, Tursun; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2011-07-07

    Depression has recently become a serious problem in society worldwide. However, we lack appropriate therapeutic tools, since the causes of depression remain unclear. Degeneration of neuronal cells and a decrease in neurogenesis have been suggested recently as two of the factors responsible for depression-like behavior. Furthermore, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is also suggested to be an important factor in recovering from such behavior. We have previously demonstrated that the hydrophobic dipeptide leucyl-isoleucine (Leu-Ile) induces BDNF in cultured neuronal cells. We therefore investigated possible antidepressant-like effects of Leu-Ile in an animal model using the repeated forced swim test (FST). Mice were forced to swim for 6 min once a day in a cylinder containing water. The mice were treated with Leu-Ile s.c. or p.o. immediately after each FST. Five-day repeated Leu-Ile treatment significantly increased BDNF mRNA levels and activated the BDNF/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway in the hippocampi of the mice. While 2-week repeated FST increased immobility time, Leu-Ile treatment for 2 weeks offset this increase. In C57BL/6J-BDNF heterozygous knockout (BDNF(+/-)) mice, Leu-Ile failed to reduce the immobility time increased by repeated FST. We next investigated the extent of cell proliferation in the hippocampus as 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine (BrdU) uptake into hippocampal cells. Repeated FST significantly reduced the number of BrdU-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, while this deficit was prevented by repeated Leu-Ile treatment. These results suggest that Leu-Ile has an antidepressant-like effect, at least in part by supporting cell proliferation through the BDNF signaling pathway.

  6. Lack of NMDA-AMPA interaction in antidepressant-like effect of CGP 37849, an antagonist of NMDA receptor, in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Dybała, Małgorzata; Siwek, Agata; Poleszak, Ewa; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2008-11-01

    The NMDA receptor antagonist, CGP 37849-induced reduction in immobility time in the forced swim test in mice was not antagonized by pre-treatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX. This is the first demonstration of the antidepressant effect of the NMDA antagonist not being dependent on the AMPA transmission.

  7. Swimming improves high-fat induced insulin resistance by regulating lipid and energy metabolism and the insulin pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, An; Wang, Chao; Ren, Luping; Zhao, Jiajun

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the preventive and therapeutic effects of swimming on insulin resistance in high-fat-fed rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups and fed for 8 weeks as follows: i) the control (Con) group fed a control diet; ii) the high-fat (HF) group fed a high-fat diet; iii) the treatment (ST) group fed a high-fat diet and trained with swimming from the 4th week; and iv) the prevention (SP) group fed a high-fat diet and trained with swimming from the 1st week of the experiment. A hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was used to evaluate the insulin sensitivity of the rats. The ultrastructure of the liver cells was observed by electron microscopy. Hepatic lipid accumulation was observed by Oil Red O staining. Quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to detect the expression of proteins related to lipid metabolism, energy metabolism and insulin signaling transduction. After 8 weeks of feeding, compared with the Con group, the glucose infusion rate (GIR) was significantly decreased; a significant lipid accumulation was observed in the liver, while the ultrastructure of the liver cells was damaged in the HF group. Proteins related to lipid metabolism in the liver and skeletal muscle, including FAT and FABP were upregulated, while CPT1 and PPAR levels were downregulated in the HF group. The levels of the energy-metabolism-related molecules, AMPKα2, PGC1α, PGC1β and MFN2 were downregulated in skeletal muscle in the HF group. The expression levels of insulin signaling transduction molecules, INSR, IRS1, PI3K/p85, AKT2 and GLUT4, as well as the phosphorylation levels of INSR, IRS1, PI3K/p85 and AKT2 were lower in skeletal muscles in the HF rats. Compared with HF group, the GIR levels were significantly increased in the ST and SP groups. Lipid accumulation and damage to the ultrastructure of the liver cells were improved in both groups. The expression of molecules related to lipid metabolism in the liver and skeletal

  8. Creatine Supplementation Induces Alteration in Cross-Sectional Area in Skeletal Muscle Fibers of Wistar Rats Under Swimming Training

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Fernando Farias Dos; Moura, José A. A.; Curi, Rui; Fernandes, Luiz C.

    2002-01-01

    Creatine has been shown to increase the total muscle mass. In this study, we investigated the effect of oral creatine monohydrate supplementation on cross-sectional area of type I, IIA and IIB fibers of gastrocnemius, extensor digitorum longus - EDL and soleus muscles from male Wistar rats subjected to swimming training for 33 days. Four groups were set up: sedentary with no supplementation (CON), sedentary with creatine supplementation (3.3 mg creatine per g chow) (CR), exercised with no supplementation (EX) and exercised with supplementation (CREX). The rats performed in a special swimming pool and swam five times a week for 1 hour each day, with a extra lead weight corresponding to 15% of their body weight. At the end of 33 days, skeletal muscles of the animals were dissected and the samples got immediately frozen using liquid nitrogen. Muscle samples were allocated to slices of 10 μm by a cryostat at -20°C, which was followed by histochemical analysis in order to identify fiber types of the muscles, and morphometrical analysis to calculate the muscle fiber areas. All groups gained body weight at the end of 33 days but there was no statistical difference among them. The EX and CREX rats had a larger food intake than the sedentary groups (CON and CR), and the CREX group had a larger food intake than CR rats. The cross-sectional area of type I and IIA fibers of the soleus muscle, type IIA and IIB fibers of EDL muscle and type IIA and IIB fibers of the white portion of gastrocnemius muscle were greater in the EX and CREX groups in comparison to sedentary rats. In addition, these fibers were greater in the CREX rats than in the EX group. There was no change in the cross sectional area of type I fibers in EDL muscle among all groups studied. Our results suggest that creatine supplementation enhances the exercise related muscle fiber hypertrophy in rodents. PMID:24701129

  9. Swim training increases glucose output from liver perfused in situ with glucagon in fed and fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Réjean; Robert, Geneviève; Milot, Martin; Massicotte, Denis; Péronnet, François; Lavoie, Carole

    2004-08-01

    The effect of endurance swim training (3 hours per day, 5 days/week, for 10 weeks) on hepatic glucose production (HGP) in liver perfused in situ for 60 minutes with glucagon and insulin was studied in Sprague-Dawley rats. The experiments were performed in fed rats and in rats fasted for 24 hours, but with lactate (8 mmol/L) added to the perfusion medium. Liver glycogen content was significantly lower in fasted than fed rats (fasted untrained and trained: 14 +/- 4 and 11 +/- 3 micromol glycosyl U/g of liver wet weight (WW); fed untrained and trained: 205 +/- 11 and 231 +/- 11 micromol glycosyl U/g of liver WW; not significantly different in trained and untrained rats). Glucagon increased HGP in the 4 experimental groups, but the increases were more rapid and pronounced in trained than in untrained rats in both fed and fasted states. HGP values (area under the curve [AUC] in micromol/g of liver WW) were significantly higher in trained fed (112.1 +/- 7.1 v 85.9 +/- 12.2 in untrained rats) than in trained fasted rats (50.8 +/- 4.4 v 34.7 +/- 3.6 in untrained rats). When compared with untrained rats, the total amount of glucose released by the liver in response to glucagon in trained rats was approximately 30% higher in the fed state and approximately 45% larger in the fasted state. These results indicate that endurance training increases the response of both glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis to glucagon.

  10. Impact of Four Week Swimming Exercise with Alpha-Tocopherol Supplementation on Fertility Potential in Healthy Rats.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Abolfazl; Saremi, Abbas; Shavandi, Nader; Foroutan Nia, Ali

    2017-08-29

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 4 week intensive swimming exercise and alpha-tocopherol supplementation on testicular oxidative stress and spermatogenesis in rats. 40 male rats were randomly assigned to Control (C), Sham (S), Exercise (E) and Exercise + supplement (ES) groups. Exercise training performed for 4 weeks (1session/day, 6days/week). Each session included 180 minutes of swimming. In ES group, alpha-ocopherol was injected at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day. 48 hours after last training session, all rats were killed and gonads of them were removed from their body for histological and biochemical assays. All statistical analysis was performed by SPSS 16. P values less than 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Total testicular antioxidant capacity increased significantly in E (P = .003) and ES groups (P = .001) whereas there was no significant difference between C and E group in testicle Malondialdehyde (a lipid peroxidation marker) level (P = .999) and spermatogenesis quality (P = .381). Testicle Malondialdehyde level decreased (P = .009) and spermatogenesis quality was improved significantly in ES group (P = .001). Alpha-tocopherol supplementation is effective in order to improve spermatogenesis process in athletes who exercise with high intensity.

  11. Elastic swimming I: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Yu, Tony; Hosoi, Anette

    2006-03-01

    We consider the problem of swimming at low Reynolds number by oscillating an elastic filament in a viscous liquid, as investigated by Wiggins and Goldstein (1998, Phys Rev Lett). In this first part of the study, we characterize the optimal forcing conditions of the swimming strategy and its optimal geometrical characteristics.

  12. Expression of the Mir-133 and Bcl-2 could be affected by swimming training in the heart of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Parisa; Alihemmati, Alireza; NourAzar, Alireza; Yousefi, Hadi; Mortazavi, Safieh; Ahmadiasl, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The beneficial and more potent role of exercise to prevent heart apoptosis in ovariectomized rats has been known. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of swimming training on cardiac expression of Bcl-2, and Mir-133 levels and glycogen changes in the myocyte. Materials and Methods: Forty animals were separated into four groups as control, sham, ovariectomy (OVX) and ovariectomized group with 8 weeks swimming training (OVX.E). Training effects were evaluated by measuring lipid profiles, Bcl-2 and Mir-133 expression levels in the cardiac tissue. Grafts were analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for Bcl-2 mRNA and Mir-133 and by Western blot for Bcl-2 protein. Results: Ovariectomy down-regulated Bcl-2 and Mir-133 expression levels in the cardiac tissue, and swimming training up-regulated their expression significantly (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our results showed that regular exercise as a physical replacement therapy could prevent and improve the effects of estrogen deficiency in the cardia. PMID:27279981

  13. The impacts of swimming exercise on hippocampal expression of neurotrophic factors in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei; Dang, Rui-Li; Li, Huan-De; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zhu, Wen-Ye; Xue, Ying; Tang, Mi-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Depression is associated with stress-induced neural atrophy in limbic brain regions, whereas exercise has antidepressant effects as well as increasing hippocampal synaptic plasticity by strengthening neurogenesis, metabolism, and vascular function. A key mechanism mediating these broad benefits of exercise on the brain is induction of neurotrophic factors, which instruct downstream structural and functional changes. To systematically evaluate the potential neurotrophic factors that were involved in the antidepressive effects of exercise, in this study, we assessed the effects of swimming exercise on hippocampal mRNA expression of several classes of the growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NGF, NT-3, FGF2, VEGF, and IGF-1) and peptides (VGF and NPY) in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Our study demonstrated that the swimming training paradigm significantly induced the expression of BDNF and BDNF-regulated peptides (VGF and NPY) and restored their stress-induced downregulation. Additionally, the exercise protocol also increased the antiapoptotic Bcl-xl expression and normalized the CUMS mediated induction of proapoptotic Bax mRNA level. Overall, our data suggest that swimming exercise has antidepressant effects, increasing the resistance to the neural damage caused by CUMS, and both BDNF and its downstream neurotrophic peptides may exert a major function in the exercise related adaptive processes to CUMS.

  14. Changes in monoamine levels in mouse brain elicited by forced-swimming stress, and the protective effect of a new monoamine oxidase inhibitor, RS-8359.

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Naoi, M; Nakahara, D; Ohta, T; Nagatsu, T

    1993-01-01

    As a stress model, a forced swimming test was applied to mice; and a typical behavioral change, an immobile posture, was recognized. This affected the brain monoamine levels significantly. The norepinephrine concentration was reduced, while that of its product was increased; and in the case of dopamine, both the amount of the amine and its product were increased. Stress increased the levels of serotonin and its product in the brain. The effects of RS-8359, (+/-)-4-(4-cyanophenyl)amino-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-5H-cyclopenta[d ]- pyrimidine, a new inhibitor of type A monoamine oxidase, on the behavioral and biochemical changes caused by forced swimming were also investigated. RS-8359 significantly improved the immobile posture elicited by the forced swimming test. It reduced the increased turnover of norepinephrine and serotonin systems caused by swimming. These results suggest that the effect of RS-8359 on behavioral and biochemical changes by stress may be mainly due to its effects on norepinephrine and serotonin systems, presumably by the inhibition of type A monoamine oxidase.

  15. Rutin, a flavonoid and principal component of saussurea involucrata, attenuates physical fatigue in a forced swimming mouse model.

    PubMed

    Su, Kang-Yi; Yu, Chao Yuan; Chen, Yue-Wen; Huang, Yi-Tsau; Chen, Chun-Ting; Wu, Hsueh-Fu; Chen, Yi-Lin Sophia

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antifatigue effects of rutin, a flavonoid extracted from the ethyl acetate extract of S. involucrata. Mice were subjected to a weight-loaded forced swim test (WFST) on alternate days for 3 wk. Rutin was administered orally to the mice for 7 days in dosages of 15, 30, and 60 mg/kg body weight, and several biomarkers of physical fatigue were evaluated: swimming time, change in body weight, lipid peroxidation, lactic acid (LA), glycogen, and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). On Day 7, the rutin-treated mice had a 3-fold longer exhaustive swimming time than the control mice, as well as significantly reduced blood LA concentrations. The 15, 30, and 60 mg/kg body weight rutin-supplemented groups displayed 11.2%, 22.5%, and 37.7% reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations, respectively, in brain and muscle tissues compared with the control exercised group. Our results indicated that the administration of rutin protected the mice against the depletion of SOD and GPx activities significantly. Following 7 days of rutin treatment, we sacrificed the mice and analyzed their soleus muscle and brain for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α coactivator (PGC-1α) and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) mRNA expression. We observed that rutin treatment increased PGC-1α and SIRT1 mRNA and protein expression. The changes in these markers of mitochondrial biogenesis were associated with increased maximal endurance capacity. The application of 2D gel electrophoresis to analyze the rutin-responsive protein profiles in the WFST mouse brain further revealed the upregulation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1, myelin basic protein, Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) alpha, and TPI, indicating that rutin might inhibit anxiety through the upregulation of the expression of anxiety-associated proteins. Western blot analysis of MAPK expression further confirmed the antianxiety effects

  16. Influence of sildenafil on the antidepressant activity of bupropion and venlafaxine in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wyska, Elżbieta; Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies highlight the involvement of the nitrergic system in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. Sildenafil, a selective PDE5 inhibitor, was shown to abolish the anti-immobility effects of bupropion, venlafaxine and s-citalopram in mice. In this study we assessed the effects of sildenafil on the activity of bupropion and venlafaxine in the forced swim test in mice. Swim trials were conducted by placing mice in glass cylinders filled with water for 6min and the duration of the behavioral immobility during the last 4min of the test was evaluated. Locomotor activity was evaluated with photoresistor actimeters. Brain and serum concentrations of the studied antidepressants were determined by HPLC method. Sildenafil at a dose of 20mg/kg, but not 5 and 10mg/kg, significantly increased the anti-immobility action of bupropion (20mg/kg). The antidepressant activity of venlafaxine (2mg/kg) was potentiated by joint administration with sildenafil at doses of 10 and 20mg/kg. Since the combined treatments did not increase the locomotor activity, the antidepressant-like effects were not related to non-specific behavioral activation. Data from pharmacokinetic studies revealed that sildenafil increased bupropion and venlafaxine levels in serum without affecting their concentrations in the brain. The present study demonstrates the enhancement of anti-immobility action of bupropion and venlafaxine by sildenafil co-administration. The observed changes might have been partly due to pharmacokinetic interactions. However, mechanisms underlying the effects of sildenafil on the antidepressant activity of bupropion and venlafaxine should be carefully evaluated in further studies.

  17. Swimming and the heart.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Jason M; Khanna, Neel; Chesler, Roseann; Salciccioli, Louis

    2013-09-20

    Exercise training is accepted to be beneficial in lowering morbidity and mortality in patients with cardiac disease. Swimming is a popular recreational activity, gaining recognition as an effective option in maintaining and improving cardiovascular fitness. Swimming is a unique form of exercise, differing from land-based exercises such as running in many aspects including medium, position, breathing pattern, and the muscle groups used. Water immersion places compressive forces on the body with resulting physiologic effects. We reviewed the physiologic effects and cardiovascular responses to swimming, the cardiac adaptations to swim training, swimming as a cardiac disease risk factor modifier, and the effects of swimming in those with cardiac disease conditions such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and the long-QT syndrome.

  18. Sildenafil, a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, enhances the activity of two atypical antidepressant drugs, mianserin and tianeptine, in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wyska, Elżbieta; Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr

    2012-08-07

    Sildenafil, a selective phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, has recently been reported to abolish anti-immobility action of antidepressant drugs, i.e., bupropion, venlafaxine and S-citalopram, in the forced swim test in mice. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of sildenafil on the potential of two atypical antidepressants, namely mianserin and tianeptine. Swim sessions were conducted by placing mice in glass cylinders filled with water for 6 min and the duration of the behavioral immobility during the last 4 min of the test was evaluated. Locomotor activity was measured with photoresistor actimeters. To evaluate the potential pharmocokinetic interaction, total brain concentrations of the studied antidepressants were determined by HPLC method. Sildenafil at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg did not affect the activity of mianserin (20 mg/kg) in the forced swim test. Interestingly, at higher doses (5 and 10 mg/kg), sildenafil significantly enhanced the anti-immobility action of mianserin. Likewise, sildenafil (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) robustly augmented the antidepressant activity of tianeptine (30 mg/kg). Mianserin alone, as well as in a combination with sildenafil at the highest dose, caused a potent reduction in locomotor activity. However, the changes in motor activity did not interfere with the data obtained in the forced swim test. Sildenafil significantly increased the total brain tianeptine concentration. No alteration in mianserin level in the brain after sildenafil co-administration was observed. The present study suggests that sildenafil enhances the activity of mianserin and tianeptine in the forced swim test in mice. The changes in the antidepressant activity of mianserin evoked by sildenafil co-administration were related to pharmacodynamic interaction while the interaction between tianeptine and sildenafil was, at least in part, pharmacokinetic in nature.

  19. The effect of acute swim stress and training in the water maze on hippocampal synaptic activity as well as plasticity in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats: revisiting swim-induced LTP reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Heena; Frey, Julietta U

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is a cellular model of learning and memory. An early form of LTP (E-LTP) can be reinforced into its late form (L-LTP) by various behavioral interactions within a specific time window ("behavioral LTP-reinforcement"). Depending on the type and procedure used, various studies have shown that stress differentially affects synaptic plasticity. Under low stress, such as novelty detection or mild foot shocks, E-LTP can be transformed into L-LTP in the rat dentate gyrus (DG). A reinforcing effect of a 2-min swim, however, has only been shown in (Korz and Frey (2003) J Neurosci 23:7281-7287; Korz and Frey (2005) J Neurosci 25:7393-7400; Ahmed et al. (2006) J Neurosci 26:3951-3958; Sajikumar et al., (2007) J Physiol 584.2:389-400) so far. We have reinvestigated these studies using the same as well as an improved recording technique which allowed the recording of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) and the population spike amplitude (PSA) at their places of generation in freely moving rats. We show that acute swim stress led to a long-term depression (LTD) in baseline values of PSA and partially fEPSP. In contrast to earlier studies a LTP-reinforcement by swimming could never be reproduced. Our results indicate that 2-min swim stress influenced synaptic potentials as well as E-LTP negatively.

  20. Investigation of flow mechanism of a robotic fish swimming by using flow visualization synchronized with hydrodynamic force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Guang-Kun; Shen, Gong-Xin; Huang, Shuo-Qiao; Su, Wen-Han; Ke, Yu

    When swimming in water by flapping its tail, a fish can overcome the drag from uniform flow and propel its body. The involved flow mechanism concerns 3-D and unsteady effects. This paper presents the investigation of the flow mechanism on the basis of a 3-D robotic fish model which has the typical geometry of body and tail with periodic flapping 2-freedom kinematical motion testing in the case of St = 0.78, Re = 6,600 and phase delay mode (φ = - 75°), in which may have a greater or maximum propulsion (without consideration of the optimal efficiency). Using a special technique of dye visualization which can clearly show vortex sheet and vortices in detail and using the inner 3-component force balance and cable supporting system with the phase-lock technique, the 3-D flow structure visualized in the wake of fish and the hydrodynamic force measurement were synchronized and obtained. Under the mentioned flapping parameters, we found the key flow structure and its evolution, a pair of complex 3-D chain-shape vortex (S-H vortex-rings, S1 - H1 and S2 - H2, and their legs L1 and L2) flow structures, which attach the leading edge and the trailing edge, then shed, move downstream and outwards and distribute two antisymmetric staggering arrays along with the wake of the fish model in different phase stages during the flapping period. It is different with in the case of St = 0.25-0.35. Its typical flow structure and evolution are described and the results prove that they are different from the viewpoints based on the investigation of 2-D cases. For precision of the dynamic force measurement, in this paper it was provided with the method and techniques by subtracting the inertial forces and the forces induced by buoyancy and gravity effect in water, etc. from original data measured. The evolution of the synchronized measuring forces directly matching with the flow structure was also described in this paper.

  1. Investigation of flow mechanism of a robotic fish swimming by using flow visualization synchronized with hydrodynamic force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Guang-Kun; Shen, Gong-Xin; Huang, Shuo-Qiao; Su, Wen-Han; Ke, Yu

    2007-11-01

    When swimming in water by flapping its tail, a fish can overcome the drag from uniform flow and propel its body. The involved flow mechanism concerns 3-D and unsteady effects. This paper presents the investigation of the flow mechanism on the basis of a 3-D robotic fish model which has the typical geometry of body and tail with periodic flapping 2-freedom kinematical motion testing in the case of St = 0.78, Re = 6,600 and phase delay mode ( φ = -75°), in which may have a greater or maximum propulsion (without consideration of the optimal efficiency). Using a special technique of dye visualization which can clearly show vortex sheet and vortices in detail and using the inner 3-component force balance and cable supporting system with the phase-lock technique, the 3-D flow structure visualized in the wake of fish and the hydrodynamic force measurement were synchronized and obtained. Under the mentioned flapping parameters, we found the key flow structure and its evolution, a pair of complex 3-D chain-shape vortex (S-H vortex-rings, S1-H1 and S2-H2, and their legs L1 and L2) flow structures, which attach the leading edge and the trailing edge, then shed, move downstream and outwards and distribute two anti-symmetric staggering arrays along with the wake of the fish model in different phase stages during the flapping period. It is different with in the case of St = 0.25-0.35. Its typical flow structure and evolution are described and the results prove that they are different from the viewpoints based on the investigation of 2-D cases. For precision of the dynamic force measurement, in this paper it was provided with the method and techniques by subtracting the inertial forces and the forces induced by buoyancy and gravity effect in water, etc. from original data measured. The evolution of the synchronized measuring forces directly matching with the flow structure was also described in this paper.

  2. Effects of swimming exercise on high-fat diet-induced low bone mineral density and trabecular bone microstructure in rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun-Seok; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Cheol

    2017-06-30

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of swimming exercise on high-fat diet-induced low bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone microstructure in rats. Eight-week-old male Sprague- Dawley (SD) rats were divided into a normal diet group (n = 9) and a high-fat diet group (n = 15). Three rats in each group were sacrificed after 8 weeks of high-fat diet to evaluate the association between high-fat diet and bone health. The other 18 rats were reassigned to 3 groups (normal diet control, NC; high-fat diet control, HC; high-fat diet + Exercise, HEx) for up to another 8 weeks. Rats in the exercise group were trained for a swimming exercise program (1 h/day, 5 times/ week for 8 weeks). All rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last bout of exercise to analyze the BMD and trabecular bone microstructure in the femur and tibia, using micro-computed tomography. First, the effect of high-fat diet on bone health was examined. It was observed that BMD, percent bone volume (BV/TV), and trabecular number (Tb.N) of the femur and tibia were lower in rats in the high-fat diet group than in those in the normal diet group (p < .05). In addition, BMD, BV/TV, and Tb.N of the femur and tibia were significantly increased in rats that underwent the 8-week swimming exercise program, compared to the corresponding values in rats in the HC group (p < .05). These results indicate that high-fat diets negatively affect bone health; however, these negative effects can be improved by exercises such as swimming.

  3. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Hydrodynamic Force Acting on a Swimmer’S Hand in a Swimming Competition

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yohei; Hino, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    A stroke-analysis system based on a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation has been developed to evaluate the hydrodynamic forces acting on a swimmer’s hand. Using the present stroke-analysis system, a stroke technique of top swimmers can be recognized with regard to the hydrodynamic forces. The developed analysis system takes into account the effect of a transient stroke motion including acceleration and a curved stroke path without using assumptions such as a quasi-static approach. An unsteady Navier-Stokes solver based on an unstructured grid method is employed as the CFD method to calculate a viscous flow around a swimmer’s hand which can cope with the complicated geometry of hands. The CFD method is validated by comparison with experiments in steady-state and transient conditions. Following the validations, a stroke-analysis system is proposed, in which a hand moves in accordance with a stroke path measured by synchronized video cameras, and the fluid forces acting on the hand are computed with the CFD method. As a demonstration of the stroke-analysis system, two world class swimmers’ strokes in a race of 200 m freestyle are analyzed. The hydrodynamic forces acting on the hands of the top swimmers are computed, and the comparison of two swimmers shows that the stroke of the faster swimmer, who advanced at 1.84 m·s-1 during the stroke-analysis, generated larger thrust with higher thrust efficiency than that of the slower swimmer, who advanced at 1.75 m·s-1. The applicability of the present stroke analysis system has been proved through this analysis. Key Points The stroke-analysis system using CFD technique has been established. The stroke path and the hand orientation are obtained from a swimming competition with two synchronized underwater video camera, and used for the input data to the CFD analysis. The hydrodynamic force acting on the swimmer’s hand and thrust efficiency are analyzed, and the stroke technique can be evaluated. PMID

  4. Involvement of NMDA receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of tramadol in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Chamanara, Mohsen; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Imran-Khan, Muhammad; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-09-01

    Tramadol is an analgesic agent that is mainly used to treat moderate to severe pain. There is evidence that tramadol may have antidepressant property. However, the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of tramadol have not been elucidated yet. Considering that fact that N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor signaling may play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression, the aim of the present study was to investigate the role of NMDA receptor signaling in the possible antidepressant-like effects of tramadol in the mouse forced swimming test (mFST). We found that tramadol exerted antidepressant-like effects at high dose (40mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) in the mFST. Co-administration of non-effective doses of NMDA receptor antagonists (ketamine [1mg/kg, i.p.], MK-801 [0.05mg/kg, i.p.], or magnesium sulfate [10mg/kg, i.p.]) with sub-effective dose of tramadol (20mg/kg, i.p.) exerted significant antidepressant-like effects in the mFST. The antidepressant-like effects of tramadol (40mg/kg) was also inhibited by pre-treatment with non-effective dose of the NMDA receptor agonist NMDA (75mg/kg, i.p.). Our data suggest a role for NMDA receptor signaling in the antidepressant-like effects of tramadol in the mFST. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of 5-HT1A receptors in the forced swimming wheel test in reserpine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, K; Nagatani, T; Takao, K; Hashimoto, S

    1993-01-01

    The antidepressant-like effect of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin(8-OH-DPAT), a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, was studied in the forced swimming wheel test in reserpine-treated mice. 8-OH-DPAT and the antidepressant imipramine, dose-dependently increased the number of turns of a water wheel made by mice. This effect of imipramine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was enhanced by reserpine treatment 24 hr before the test. The effect of 8-OH-DPAT (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) was also enhanced in reserpine-treated mice. This enhanced effect of 8-OH-DPAT was blocked by pretreatment with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonists, (-)-propranolol (3 mg/kg, i.p.) and NAN-190 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), but was not blocked by a beta-blocker, (-)-atenolol (3 mg/kg, i.p.). 8-OH-DPAT did not affect locomotor activity in the reserpinized mice and did not affect the reduction of monoamine content induced by reserpine. These results suggest that the effect of 8-OH-DPAT in increasing the number of turns of the wheel made by mice was exerted through a 5-HT1A receptor and that this effect did not reflect only changes in the locomotor activity of the mice.

  6. Cotinine reduces depressive-like behavior and hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor downregulation after forced swim stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Grizzell, J Alex; Mullins, Michelle; Iarkov, Alexandre; Rohani, Adeeb; Charry, Laura C; Echeverria, Valentina

    2014-12-01

    Cotinine, the predominant metabolite of nicotine, appears to act as an antidepressant. We have previously shown that cotinine reduced immobile postures in Porsolt's forced swim (FS) and tail suspension tests while preserving the synaptic density in the hippocampus as well as prefrontal and entorhinal cortices of mice subjected to chronic restraint stress. In this study, we investigated the effect of daily oral cotinine (5 mg/kg) on depressive-like behavior induced by repeated, FS stress for 6 consecutive days in adult, male C57BL/6J mice. The results support our previous report that cotinine administration reduces depressive-like behavior in mice subjected or not to high salience stress. In addition, cotinine enhanced the expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the hippocampus of mice subjected to repetitive FS stress. Altogether, the results suggest that cotinine may be an effective antidepressant positively influencing mood through a mechanism involving the preservation of brain homeostasis and the expression of critical growth factors such as VEGF. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. [Effect of amantadine or 3-cyclopentyl adamantanamine on the immobility of adult or aged mice, in the forced swim test].

    PubMed

    Vamvakidès, A

    2000-12-01

    Amantadine (AMA), an antiparkinsonian drug, (20 mg/Kg, ip) or 3-cyclopentyl adamantanamine (AdCP), an AMA derivative synthesized recently, (20 mg/Kg, ip) induced an anti-immobility effect-comparable to those of imipramine (IMI), an antidepressive drug, (30 mg/Kg, ip) - in the forced swim test (FST), on adult (4 months) Balb-C mice. In contrast, on aged (10 months) Balb-C mice, only AdCP (20 or 40 mg/Kg, ip) was active in the FST. It is suggested that the inactivity of AMA or IMI on the aged Balb-C mice could be the consequence of their NMDA (i.e., N-methyl-D-aspartic acid sensitive) receptors failure. This NMDA receptors dysfunction could render non significant the antagonism of the mice immobility in the FST, induced by AMA or IMI, which could result (in part for IMI) from the anti-NMDA effect of these drugs. In contrast AdCP, which may principally act by glycinergic A (strychnine sensitive) effect, inhibiting the release of the brain monoamines and glutamate, conserved its activity in the FST on aged mice. In conclusion, it seems that the neurochemical profile of the drugs studied in the FST, could be useful for understanding their anti-immobility effect and for a rational approach of their possible clinical use as antidepressant.

  8. Berberine produces antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test and in the tail suspension test in mice.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen-Huang; Lo, Kuan-Lin; Lee, Yi-Hsuen; Hung, Tai-Huang; Lin, Ying-Chih

    2007-08-23

    This study investigated the effect of berberine (BER) in the mouse forced swim test (FST) and in the tail suspension test (TST), two models predictive of antidepressant activity. We also investigated the antidepressant-like mechanism of BER by the combination of the desipramine [DES, an inhibitor of reuptake of noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT)], maprotiline (MAP, selective NA reuptake inhibitor), fluoxetine (FLU, selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor) and moclobemide [MOC, monoamine oxidase (MAO) A inhibitor). Then we further measured the levels of monoamines [NA, dopamine (DA) and 5-HT) in mice striatum, hippocampus and frontal cortex. The results show that BER (10, 20 mg/kg, p.o.), significantly reduced the immobility time during the FST and the TST. The immobility time after treatment with BER (20 mg/kg, p.o.) in FST was augmented by DES, FLU and MOC, and not affected by MAP. Furthermore, BER (20 mg/kg, p.o.) increased NA and 5-HT levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Our findings support the view that BER exerts antidepressant-like effect. The antidepressant-like mechanism of BER may be related to the increase in NA and 5-HT levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex.

  9. Stress-evoked tyrosine phosphorylation of signal regulatory protein α regulates behavioral immobility in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Murata, Takaaki; Kusakari, Shinya; Hayashi, Yuriko; Takao, Keizo; Maruyama, Toshi; Ago, Yukio; Koda, Ken; Jin, Feng-Jie; Okawa, Katsuya; Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Okazawa, Hideki; Murata, Yoji; Furuya, Nobuhiko; Matsuda, Toshio; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Matozaki, Takashi

    2010-08-04

    Severe stress induces changes in neuronal function that are implicated in stress-related disorders such as depression. The molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress remain primarily unknown, however. Signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPalpha) is an Ig-superfamily protein that undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation and binds the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp2. Here we show that mice expressing a form of SIRPalpha that lacks most of the cytoplasmic region manifest prolonged immobility (depression-like behavior) in the forced swim (FS) test. FS stress induced marked tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPalpha in the brain of wild-type mice through activation of Src family kinases. The SIRPalpha ligand CD47 was important for such SIRPalpha phosphorylation, and CD47-deficient mice also manifested prolonged immobility in the FS test. Moreover, FS stress-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of both the NR2B subunit of the NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor and the K+-channel subunit Kvbeta2 was regulated by SIRPalpha. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of SIRPalpha is important for regulation of depression-like behavior in the response of the brain to stress.

  10. NMDA/glutamate mechanism of antidepressant-like action of magnesium in forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Kedzierska, Ewa; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wróbel, Andrzej; Fidecka, Sylwia; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2007-12-01

    Antidepressant-like activity of magnesium in forced swim test (FST) was demonstrated previously. Also, enhancement of such activity by joint administration of magnesium and antidepressants was shown. However, the mechanism(s) involved in such activity remain to be established. In the present study we examined the involvement of NMDA/glutamate pathway in the magnesium activity in FST in mice. In the present study we investigated the effect of NMDA agonists on magnesium-induced activity in FST and the influence of NMDA antagonists with sub-effective doses of magnesium in this test. Magnesium-induced antidepressant-like activity was antagonized by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA). Moreover, low, ineffective doses of NMDA antagonists (CGP 37849, L-701,324, d-cycloserine, and MK-801) administered together with low and ineffective doses of magnesium exhibit significant reduction of immobility time in FST. The active in FST doses of examined agents did not alter the locomotor activity (with an exception of increased activity induced by MK-801). The present study indicates the involvement of NMDA/glutamate pathway in the antidepressant-like activity of magnesium in mouse FST and further suggests antidepressant properties of magnesium.

  11. Antidepressant-like effect of chromium chloride in the mouse forced swim test: involvement of glutamatergic and serotonergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Anna; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Siwek, Agata; Dybała, Małgorzata; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Poleszak, Ewa; Nowak, Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) (III), an essential microelement of living organisms, was reported to exhibit potential antidepressant properties in preclinical and clinical studies. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of CrCl(3) ip administration in the forced swim test (FST) in mice and the involvement of glutamatergic and serotonergic receptors in the antidepressant-like activity of chromium. CrCl(3) in a dose of 12 mg/kg, but not in doses of 6 or 32 mg/kg, reduced the immobility time in the FST. The locomotor activity was reduced by CrCl(3) in a dose of 32 mg/kg. Moreover, the reduction of the immobility time induced by the active dose (12 mg/kg) of CrCl(3) was completely abolished by NBQX (10 mg/kg; an antagonist of the AMPA receptor) pretreatment and partially inhibited by ritanserin (4 mg/kg; an antagonist of 5-HT(2A/C) receptor), WAY 1006335 (0.1 mg/kg; an antagonist of 5-HT(1A) receptor) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (75 mg/kg; agonist of NMDA receptor) administration. The present study demonstrates the antidepressant-like activity of chromium in the mouse FST and indicates the major role of the AMPA receptor and participation of NMDA glutamatergic and 5-HT(1) and 5-HT(2A/C) serotonin receptors in this activity.

  12. The effect of forced swim stress on morphine sensitization: Involvement of D1/D2-like dopamine receptors within the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Charmchi, Elham; Zendehdel, Morteza; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-10-03

    Nucleus accumbens (NAc) plays an essential role in morphine sensitization and suppression of pain. Repeated exposure to stress and morphine increases dopamine release in the NAc and may lead to morphine sensitization. This study was carried out in order to investigate the effect of forced swim stress (FSS), as a predominantly physical stressor and morphine on the development of morphine sensitization; focusing on the function of D1/D2-like dopamine receptors in the NAc in morphine sensitization. Eighty-five adult male Wistar rats were bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the NAc and various doses of SCH-23390 (0.125, 0.25, 1 and 4μg/0.5μl/NAc) as a D1 receptor antagonist and sulpiride (0.25, 1 and 4μg/0.5μl/NAc) as a D2 receptor antagonist were microinjected into the NAc, during a sensitization period of 3days, 5min before the induction of FSS. After 10min, animals received subcutaneous morphine injection (1mg/kg). The procedure was followed by 5days free of antagonist, morphine and stress; thereafter on the 9th day, the nociceptive response was evaluated by tail-flick test. The results revealed that the microinjection of sulpiride (at 1 and 4μg/0.5μl/NAc) or SCH-23390 (at 0.25, 1 and 4μg/0.5μl/NAc) prior to FSS and morphine disrupts the antinociceptive effects of morphine and morphine sensitization. Our findings suggest that FSS can potentiate the effect of morphine and causes morphine sensitization which induces antinociception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Galanin (1-15) enhancement of the behavioral effects of Fluoxetine in the forced swimming test gives a new therapeutic strategy against depression.

    PubMed

    Flores-Burgess, Antonio; Millón, Carmelo; Gago, Belen; Narváez, Manuel; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Mengod, Guadalupe; Narváez, José Angel; Fuxe, Kjell; Santín, Luis; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida

    2017-03-10

    The pharmacological treatment of major depression is mainly based on drugs elevating serotonergic (5-HT) activity. Specifically, selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors, including Fluoxetine (FLX), are the most commonly used for treatment of major depression. However, the understanding of the mechanism of action of FLX beyond its effect of elevating 5-HT is limited. The interaction between serotoninergic system and neuropeptides signalling could be a key aspect. We examined the ability of the neuropeptide Galanin(1-15) [GAL(1-15)] to modulate the behavioral effects of FLX in the forced swimming test (FST) and studied feasible molecular mechanisms. The data show that GAL(1-15) enhances the antidepressant-like effects induced by FLX in the FST, and we demonstrate the involvement of GALR1/GALR2 heteroreceptor complex in the GAL(1-15)-mediated effect using in vivo rat models for siRNA GALR1 or GALR2 knockdown. Importantly, 5-HT1A receptors (5HT1AR) also participate in the GAL(1-15)/FLX interactions since the 5HT1AR antagonist WAY100635 blocked the behavioral effects in the FST induced by the coadministration of GAL(1-15) and FLX. The mechanism underlying GAL(1-15)/FLX interactions affected the binding characteristics as well as the mRNA levels of 5-HT1AR specifically in the dorsal hippocampus while leaving unaffected mRNA levels and affinity and binding sites of this receptor in the dorsal raphe. The results open up the possibility to use GAL(1-15) as for a combination therapy with FLX as a novel strategy for treatment of depression.

  14. Repeated forced swim stress enhances CFA-evoked thermal hyperalgesia and affects the expressions of pCREB and c-Fos in the insular cortex.

    PubMed

    Imbe, H; Kimura, A; Donishi, T; Kaneoke, Y

    2014-02-14

    Stress affects brain activity and promotes long-term changes in multiple neural systems. Exposure to stressors causes substantial effects on the perception and response to pain. In several animal models, chronic stress produces lasting hyperalgesia. The insular (IC) and anterior cingulate cortices (ACC) are the regions exhibiting most reliable pain-related activity. And the IC and ACC play an important role in pain modulation via the descending pain modulatory system. In the present study we examined the expression of phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) and c-Fos in the IC and ACC after forced swim stress (FS) and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection to clarify changes in the cerebral cortices that affect the activity of the descending pain modulatory system in the rats with stress-induced hyperalgesia. FS (day 1, 10min; days 2-3, 20min) induced an increase in the expression of pCREB and c-Fos in the anterior IC (AIC). CFA injection into the hindpaw after the FS shows significantly enhanced thermal hyperalgesia and induced a decrease in the expression of c-Fos in the AIC and the posterior IC (PIC). Quantitative image analysis showed that the numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the left AIC and PIC were significantly lower in the FS+CFA group (L AIC, 95.9±6.8; L PIC, 181.9±23.1) than those in the naive group (L AIC, 151.1±19.3, p<0.05; L PIC, 274.2±37.3, p<0.05). These findings suggest a neuroplastic change in the IC after FS, which may be involved in the enhancement of CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia through dysfunction of the descending pain modulatory system. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801(dizocilpine), a NMDA receptor antagonist in mouse forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-03-01

    L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling pathway involved in depression. With this information, the present study aimed to study the involvement of this signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like action of MK-801 (dizocilpine; N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist) in the mouse forced-swim test. Total immobility period was recorded in mouse forced swim test for 6 min. MK-801 (5-25 microg/kg., ip) produced a U-shaped curve in reducing the immobility period. The antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was prevented by pretreatment with L-arginine (750 mg/kg, ip) [substrate for nitric oxide synthase (NOS)]. Pretreatment of mice with 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (25 mg/kg, ip) [a specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor] produced potentiation of the action of subeffective dose of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip). In addition, treatment of mice with methylene blue (10 mg/kg, ip) [direct inhibitor of both nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylate cyclase] potentiated the effect of MK-801 (5 microg/kg, ip) in the forced-swim test. Further, the reduction in the immobility period elicited by MK-801 (10 microg/kg, ip) was also inhibited by pretreatment with sildenafil (5 mg/kg, ip) [phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor]. The various modulators used in the study and their combination did not produce any changes in locomotor activity per se and in combination with MK-801. MK-801 however, at higher doses (25 microg/kg, ip) produced hyperlocomotion. The results demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide signaling pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801 in mouse forced-swim test.

  16. Is Forced Swimming Immobility a Good Endpoint for Modeling Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia? - Study of Sub-Anesthetic Ketamine Repeated Administration Effects.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gilda; Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila B; Pranke, Mariana A; Betti, Andresa H; Rates, Stela M K

    2017-01-01

    Immobility time in the forced swimming has been described as analogous to emotional blunting or apathy and has been used for characterizing schizophrenia animal models. Several clinical studies support the use of NMDA receptor antagonists to model schizophrenia in rodents. Some works describe the effects of ketamine on immobility behavior but there is variability in the experimental design used leading to controversial results. In this study, we evaluated the effects of repeated administration of ketamine sub-anesthetic doses in forced swimming, locomotion in response to novelty and novel object recognition, aiming a broader evaluation of the usefulness of this experimental approach for modeling schizophrenia in mice. Ketamine (30 mg/kg/day i.p. for 14 days) induced a not persistent decrease in immobility time, detected 24h but not 72h after treatment. This same administration protocol induced a deficit in novel object recognition. No change was observed in mice locomotion. Our results confirm that repeated administration of sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine is useful in modeling schizophrenia-related behavioral changes in mice. However, the immobility time during forced swimming does not seem to be a good endpoint to evaluate the modeling of negative symptoms in NMDAR antagonist animal models of schizophrenia.

  17. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 improves reference memory performance and decreases immobility in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Isacson, Ruben; Nielsen, Elisabet; Dannaeus, Karin; Bertilsson, Göran; Patrone, Cesare; Zachrisson, Olof; Wikström, Lilian

    2011-01-10

    We have earlier shown that the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 stimulates neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and excerts anti-parkinsonian behavior. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exendin-4 treatment on hippocampus-associated cognitive and mood-related behavior in adult rodents. To investigate potential effects of exendin-4 on hippocampal function, radial maze and forced swim test were employed. The time necessary to solve a radial maze task and the duration of immobility in the forced swim test were significantly reduced compared to respective vehicle groups if the animals had received exendin-4 during 1-2weeks before testing. In contrast to the positive control imipramine, single administration of exendin-4 1h before the challenge in the forced swim test had no effect. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine, a marker for DNA synthesis, as well as doublecortin expression was increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following chronic treatment with exendin-4 compared to vehicle-treated controls. The neurogenic effect of exendin-4 on hippocampus was confirmed by quantitative PCR showing an upregulation of mRNA expression for Ki-67, doublecortin and Mash-1. Since exendin-4 significantly improves hippocampus-associated behavior in adult rodents, it may be a candidate for alleviation of mood and cognitive disorders.

  18. Increased water temperature renders single-housed C57BL/6J mice susceptible to antidepressant treatment in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Bächli, Heidi; Steiner, Michel A; Habersetzer, Ursula; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2008-02-11

    To investigate genotype x environment interactions in the forced swim test, we tested the influence of water temperature (20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 30 degrees C) on floating behaviour in single-housed male C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice. We observed a contrasting relationship between floating and water temperature between the two strains, with C57BL/6J floating more and BALB/c floating less with increasing water temperature, independent of the lightening conditions and the time point of testing during the animals' circadian rhythm. Both strains showed an inverse relationship between plasma corticosterone concentration and water temperature, indicating that the differences in stress coping are unrelated to different perception of the aversive encounter. Treatment with desipramine (20mg/kg, i.p.) caused a reduction in immobility time in C57BL/6J mice if the animals were tested at 30 degrees C water temperature, with no effect at 25 degrees C and no effects on forced swim stress-induced corticosterone secretion. The same treatment failed to affect floating behaviour in BALB/c at any temperature, but caused a decrease in plasma corticosterone levels. Taken together we demonstrate that an increase in water temperature in the forced swim test exerts opposite effects on floating behaviour in C57BL/6J and BALB/c and renders single-housed C57BL/6J mice, but not BALB/c mice, susceptible to antidepressant-like behavioral effects of desipramine.

  19. Training-dependent decay in performance produced by the neuroleptic cis(Z)-flupentixol on spatial navigation by rats in a swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Whishaw, I Q; Mittleman, G; Evenden, J L

    1989-01-01

    Rats were trained on place or cue spatial navigation tasks in a swimming pool and then given the neuroleptic, alpha-flupentixol. Initial experiments showed that regardless of testing schedule, including blocks of trials given concurrently or separated by 7 or 30 days, drugged rats showed a trial-by-trial decay in latency and accuracy of responding although they continued to swim. The rate of decay increased with increases in drug dosage. Further experiments showed that: 1) Performance decay was specifically related to conditioned components of the test environment. Animals required to swim in a different test, or to struggle, showed less decay than rats exposed to the test platform only or required to perform all aspects of the task. 2) Decay was not due to nonspecific effects of neuroleptic treatment because rats injected and replaced in their home cage, and then subsequently reinjected and tested performed like rats treated and tested for the first time. 3) A trial-dependent decay of performance was also obtained in hippocampectomized and decorticate rats, suggesting that at least part of the major action of the drug is on subcortical systems. The results are discussed with respect to hypotheses of neuroleptic action and with respect to their possible relevance to experience-dependent changes in animal analogues of Parkinson's disease. Finally, it is suggested that behavior may be organized in subsystems, which when active, become selectively sensitive to neuroleptics.

  20. Simulations of optimized anguilliform swimming.

    PubMed

    Kern, Stefan; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-12-01

    The hydrodynamics of anguilliform swimming motions was investigated using three-dimensional simulations of the fluid flow past a self-propelled body. The motion of the body is not specified a priori, but is instead obtained through an evolutionary algorithm used to optimize the swimming efficiency and the burst swimming speed. The results of the present simulations support the hypothesis that anguilliform swimmers modify their kinematics according to different objectives and provide a quantitative analysis of the swimming motion and the forces experienced by the body. The kinematics of burst swimming is characterized by the large amplitude of the tail undulations while the anterior part of the body remains straight. In contrast, during efficient swimming behavior significant lateral undulation occurs along the entire length of the body. In turn, during burst swimming, the majority of the thrust is generated at the tail, whereas in the efficient swimming mode, in addition to the tail, the middle of the body contributes significantly to the thrust. The burst swimming velocity is 42% higher and the propulsive efficiency is 15% lower than the respective values during efficient swimming. The wake, for both swimming modes, consists largely of a double row of vortex rings with an axis aligned with the swimming direction. The vortex rings are responsible for producing lateral jets of fluid, which has been documented in prior experimental studies. We note that the primary wake vortices are qualitatively similar in both swimming modes except that the wake vortex rings are stronger and relatively more elongated in the fast swimming mode. The present results provide quantitative information of three-dimensional fluid-body interactions that may complement related experimental studies. In addition they enable a detailed quantitative analysis, which may be difficult to obtain experimentally, of the different swimming modes linking the kinematics of the motion with the forces

  1. Desipramine restricts estral cycle oscillations in swimming.

    PubMed

    Contreras, C M; Martínez-Mota, L; Saavedra, M

    1998-10-01

    1. Desipramine (DMI) is a tricyclic antidepressant which reduces the immobility in rats forced to swim; however, it is unknown whether estral cycle phases impinge on DMI actions on immobility in daily swimming tests during several weeks. 2. In female wistar rats, vaginal smears taken before testing defined four estral phases. Afterwards, the authors assessed the latency for the first period of immobility in five-min forced swim tests practiced on 21-day DMI (DMI group), 21-day washout saline given after a 21-day DMI treatment (washout-saline group), or non-treated rats (control group). 3. We observed a longer latency for the first period of immobility in proestrus-estrus from the control and washout-saline groups. The 21-day treatment with DMI (2.1 mg/kg i.p., once a day) significantly (p < 0.001) increased the latency by about 160% from control regardless of the estral cycle phase. 4. It is concluded that proestrus-estrus relates to increased struggling behavior. DMI enhances struggling behavior independently of hormonal state.

  2. Long-term effects of nicotine on the forced swimming test in mice: an experimental model for the study of depression caused by smoke.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, Carmen; Tedesco, Michele; Bellomo, Maria; Caputi, Achille P; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2006-10-01

    Large evidence showing an association between depression and tobacco smoking is known. Nicotine is the active chemical responsible for smoking addiction, and its withdrawal may induce in smokers greater sensitivity to stress. Our aim has been to investigate the links between tobacco addiction and depression by studying the long-term effects of repeated administration of nicotine followed by dependence, to forced swimming test, serotonin content and 5-HT(1A) expression in diencephalon. Dependence has been induced by daily subcutaneous injection in mice of nicotine (2mg/kg four injections daily) for 15 days and assessed after nicotine withdrawal with an abstinence scale; control animals received daily subcutaneous injection of saline for the same period. Experiments on forced swimming test have been carried out at t=0 (last day of nicotine or saline treatment), and 15, 30, 45 and 60 days after saline or nicotine withdrawal. Both control mice and nicotine mice have been pre-treated with oral 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (12.5-50mg/kg), precursor of serotonin, before forced swimming test. Nicotine mice have shown on forced swimming test a significant increase of immobility time compared to control mice. This increase was not evident in nicotine mice treated with 5-hydroxy-tryptophan and treatment with the selective serotonin receptorial antagonist WAY 100635 (WAY) abolished 5-hydroxy-tryptophan effects. Evaluation of diencephalic serotonin, performed at t=0 showed an increase of diencephalic serotonin content, while serotonin measured 15, 30, 45 and 60 days after nicotine withdrawal, was significantly reduced in nicotine mice compared to control mice. Western blot analysis showed a great reduction of 5-HT(1A) receptor expression in nicotine mice measured at t=0 (last day of treatment) and at 15 and 30 days after nicotine withdrawal compared to control mice. Our results show that (i) behavioural alterations estimated with forced swimming test and (ii) changes in diencephalic

  3. Protective effects of forced exercise against methylphenidate-induced anxiety, depression and cognition impairment in rat

    PubMed Central

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Larijani, Setare Farokhi; Khajehamedi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methylphenidate (MPH), a neural stimulant, can cause damages to brain; the chronic neurochemical and behavioral effects of MPH remain unclear. Exercise lowers stress and anxiety and can act as non-pharmacologic neuroprotective agent. In this study protective effects of exercise in MPH-induced anxiety, depression and cognition impairment were investigated. Materials and Methods: Seventy adult male rats were divided randomly into five groups. Group 1 served as negative control, received normal saline (0.2 ml/rat) for 21 days, group 2 and 3 (as positive controls) received MPH (10 and 20 mg/kg) for 21 days. Groups 4 and 5 concurrently were treated with MPH (10 and 20 mg/kg) and forced exercise for 21 days. On day 21, Elevated Plus Maze (EPM), Open Field Test (OFT), Forced Swim Test (FST) and Tail Suspension Test (TST) were used to investigate the level of anxiety and depression in animals. In addition between 17th and 21th days, Morris Water Maze (MWM) was applied to evaluate the effect of MPH on spatial learning and memory. Results: MPH-treated animals indicated a reflective depression and anxiety in a dose-dependent manner in FST, EPM and TST which were significantly different from the control group and also can significantly attenuate the motor activity and anxiety in OFT. Forced exercise by treadmill can attenuate MPH-induced anxiety, depression and motor activity alteration in OFT. MPH also can disturb learning and memory in MWM and forced exercise can neutralize this effect of MPH. Conclusion: We conclude that forced exercise can be protective in brain against MPH-induced anxiety, depression and cognition alteration. PMID:26322282

  4. Effects of cold water swimming on blood rheological properties and composition of fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes of untrained older rats.

    PubMed

    Teległów, Aneta; Dabrowski, Zbigniew; Marchewka, Anna; Tabarowski, Zbigniew; Bilski, Jan; Jaśkiewicz, Jerzy; Gdula-Argasińska, Joanna; Głodzik, Jacek; Lizak, Dorota; Kepińska, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    This is the first report on the effects of a single bout of swimming to exhaustion in cold water on rat erythrocyte deformability, aggregation and fatty acid composition in erythrocyte membranes. The results indicate that there was a significant decrease in body temperature of experimental rats swimming in water at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C when compared to the control. Erythrocyte aggregation indices did not change after swimming in water at 4 degrees C whereas erythrocyte deformability increased at shear stress 1,13 [Pa] and 15,96 [Pa]. Physical effort performed in water at 4 degrees C when compared to the control group resulted in an increase in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acid content in erythrocyte membranes that influenced the increase in their fluidity and permeability even though that of polyunsaturated n-6 fatty acids decreased. Physical effort performed in 25 degrees C water resulted in an increase in saturated fatty acid content and a decrease in all polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated n-6 fatty acids when compared to the control group. Swimming of untrained old rats in cold water affected rheological properties oferythrocytes in a negligible way while changes in the fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes were more pronounced.

  5. Effects of ifenprodil on the antidepressant-like activity of NMDA ligands in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wośko, Sylwia; Serefko, Anna; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Nowak, Gabriel; Wlaź, Piotr

    2013-10-01

    Multiple pre-clinical and clinical studies clearly displayed implication of the NMDA receptors in development of depressive disorders since a variety of NMDA receptor antagonists exhibit an antidepressant-like effect. The main aim of our study was to assess the influence of ifenprodil - an allosteric modulator selectively binding at the NR2B subunit on the performance in the forced swim test in mice of various NMDA receptor ligands interacting with distinct components of the NMDA receptor complex. Ifenprodil at a dose of 10mg/kg enhanced the antidepressant-like effect of CGP 37849 (a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, 0.312mg/kg), L-701,324 (an antagonist at glycine site, 1mg/kg), MK-801 (a non-competitive antagonist, 0.05mg/kg) and d-cycloserine (a partial agonist of a glycine site, 2.5mg/kg) but it did not shorten the immobility time of animals which concurrently received an inorganic modulator of the NMDA receptor complex, such as Zn(2+) (2.5mg/kg) or Mg(2+) (10mg/kg). On the other hand, the antidepressant-like effect of ifenprodil (20mg/kg) was reversed by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (an agonist at the glutamate site, 75mg/kg) or d-serine (an agonist at the glycine site, 100nmol/mouse). In conclusion, the antidepressant-like potential of ifenprodil given concomitantly with NMDA ligands was either reinforced (in the case of both partial agonist and antagonists, except for magnesium and zinc) or diminished (in the case of conventional full agonists).

  6. The effect of GABAmimetics on the duration of immobility in the forced swim test in albino mice

    PubMed Central

    El zahaf, Najwa Ahmed; Elhwuegi, Abdalla Salem

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Studies regarding the role of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in depression are conflicting. Therefore, it was decided to examine the effect of different drugs that enhance the GABA system on the time of immobility induced by the forced swim test (FST). Materials and methods Adult albino mice were divided into several groups of six animals. Each group received an intraperitoneal injection of either imipramine (10, 20, or 30 mg/kg), diazepam (0.5, 1, or 2 mg/kg), vigabatrin (100, 200, or 300 mg/kg), zolpidem (2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg), or alprazolam (1, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg). Control groups received the appropriate vehicle. One hour after injection, the duration of immobility was measured for 5 min in the FST. The percentage change in the duration of immobility from the control was calculated for each group. The statistical test of the difference between the treated and the control groups was calculated using unpaired Student's t-test. Results Imipramine produced a significant dose-dependent decrease in the duration of immobility (78, 74, and 56%, respectively). Different doses of diazepam, vigabatrin, and zolpidem produced a significant increase in the duration of immobility (119, 126, and 128%), (116, 124, and 128%), and (108, 109, and 119%), respectively. The two low doses of alprazolam produced a significant increase (115 and 120%), while the high dose produced a significant decrease in the duration of immobility (74%). Conclusion Increasing central GABAergic activity by different mechanisms has resulted in a depressant-like activity measured as an increase in the duration of immobility in the FST model of depression. PMID:24560379

  7. Agmatine enhances the antidepressant-like effect of lithium in mouse forced swimming test through NMDA pathway.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, Gholmreza; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Imran-Khan, Muhammad; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Zolfaghari, Samira; Haddadi, Nazgol-Sadat; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-04-01

    Depression is one the world leading global burdens leading to various comorbidities. Lithium as a mainstay in the treatment of depression is still considered gold standard treatment. Similar to lithium another agent agmatine has also central protective role against depression. Since, both agmatine and lithium modulate various effects through interaction with NMDA receptor, therefore, in current study we aimed to investigate the synergistic antidepressant-like effect of agmatine with lithium in mouse force swimming test. Also to know whether if such effect is due to interaction with NMDA receptor. In our present study we found that when potent dose of lithium (30mg/kg) was administered, it significantly decreased the immobility time. Also, when subeffective dose of agmatine (0.01mg/kg) was coadministered with subeffective dose of lithium (3mg/kg), it potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of subeffective dose of lithium. For the involvement of NMDA receptor in such effect, we administered NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.05mg/kg) with a combination of subeffective dose of lithium (3mg/kg) and agmatine (0.001mg/kg). A significant antidepressant-like effect was observed. Furthermore, when subeffective dose (50 and 75mg/kg) of NMDA was given it inhibited the synergistic effect of agmatine (0.01mg/kg) with lithium (3mg/kg). Hence, our finding demonstrate that agmatine have synergistic effect with lithium which is mediated by NMDA receptor pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Strain differences in paroxetine-induced reduction of immobility time in the forced swimming test in mice: role of serotonin.

    PubMed

    Guzzetti, Sara; Calcagno, Eleonora; Canetta, Alessandro; Sacchetti, Giuseppina; Fracasso, Claudia; Caccia, Silvio; Cervo, Luigi; Invernizzi, Roberto W

    2008-10-10

    We studied the antidepressant-like effect of paroxetine in strains of mice carrying different isoforms of tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH-2), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of brain serotonin (5-HT). The effect of paroxetine alone and in combination with pharmacological treatments enhancing or lowering 5-HT synthesis or melatonin was assessed in the forced swimming test in mice carrying allelic variants of TPH-2 (1473C in C57BL/6 and 1473G in DBA/2 and BALB/c). Changes in brain 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) accumulation and melatonin levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Paroxetine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) reduced immobility time in C57BL/6J and C57BL/6N mice but had no such effect in DBA/2J, DBA/2N and BALB/c mice, even at 10 mg/kg. Enhancing 5-HT synthesis with tryptophan reinstated the antidepressant-like effect of paroxetine in DBA/2J, DBA/2N and BALB/c mice whereas inhibition of 5-HT synthesis prevented the effect of paroxetine in C57BL/6N mice. The response to paroxetine was not associated with changes in locomotor activity, brain melatonin or brain levels of the drug measured at the end of the behavioral test. These results support the importance of 5-HT synthesis in the response to SSRIs and suggest that melatonin does not contribute to the ability of tryptophan to rescue the antidepressant-like effect of paroxetine.

  9. Antidepressant-like activity of anthocyanidins from Hibiscus rosa-sinensis flowers in tail suspension test and forced swim test

    PubMed Central

    Shewale, Pallavi B.; Patil, Rupali A.; Hiray, Yogesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Flowers of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Linn (Malvaceae) popularly known as “China-rose flowers” contain flavonoids. Flavonoids have been found to have antidepressant activity. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antidepressant activity of flavonoids in H. rosa-sinensis flowers with possible involvement of monoamines. Materials and Methods: Anti-depressant activity of methanol extract containing anthocyanins (MHR) (30 and 100 mg/kg) and anthocyanidins (AHR) (30 and 100 mg/ kg) of H. rosa-sinensis flowers were evaluated in mice using behavioral tests such as tail suspension test (TST) and forced swim test (FST). The mechanism of action involved in antidepressant activity was investigated by observing the effect of extract after pre-treatment with low dose haloperidol, prazosin and para-chlorophenylalanine (p-CPA). Results: Present study exhibited significant decrease in immobility time in TST and FST, similar to that of imipramine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) which served as a positive control. The extract significantly attenuated the duration of immobility induced by Haloperidol (50 μg/ kg, i.p., a classical D2-like dopamine receptor antagonist), Prazosin (62.5 μg/kg, i.p., an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) and p-chlorophenylalanine (100 mg/kg, i.p., × 3 days; an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis) in both TST and FST. Conclusion: It can be concluded that MHR and AHR possess potential antidepressant activity (through dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms) and has therapeutic potential in the treatment of CNS disorders and provides evidence at least at preclinical levels. PMID:23087504

  10. The effect of GABAmimetics on the duration of immobility in the forced swim test in albino mice.

    PubMed

    El Zahaf, Najwa Ahmed; Elhwuegi, Abdalla Salem

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Studies regarding the role of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in depression are conflicting. Therefore, it was decided to examine the effect of different drugs that enhance the GABA system on the time of immobility induced by the forced swim test (FST). Materials and methods Adult albino mice were divided into several groups of six animals. Each group received an intraperitoneal injection of either imipramine (10, 20, or 30 mg/kg), diazepam (0.5, 1, or 2 mg/kg), vigabatrin (100, 200, or 300 mg/kg), zolpidem (2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg), or alprazolam (1, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg). Control groups received the appropriate vehicle. One hour after injection, the duration of immobility was measured for 5 min in the FST. The percentage change in the duration of immobility from the control was calculated for each group. The statistical test of the difference between the treated and the control groups was calculated using unpaired Student's t-test. Results Imipramine produced a significant dose-dependent decrease in the duration of immobility (78, 74, and 56%, respectively). Different doses of diazepam, vigabatrin, and zolpidem produced a significant increase in the duration of immobility (119, 126, and 128%), (116, 124, and 128%), and (108, 109, and 119%), respectively. The two low doses of alprazolam produced a significant increase (115 and 120%), while the high dose produced a significant decrease in the duration of immobility (74%). Conclusion Increasing central GABAergic activity by different mechanisms has resulted in a depressant-like activity measured as an increase in the duration of immobility in the FST model of depression.

  11. Antidepressant-like effects of Sanyuansan in the mouse forced swim test, tail suspension test, and chronic mild stress model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shuo; You, Zi-Li; Zhao, Qiu-Ying; Peng, Cheng; He, Gang; Gou, Xiao-Jun; Lin, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Natural products have been widely reported as effective therapeutic alternatives for treatment of depression. Sanyuansan is a compound recipe composed of ginseng total saponins, fish oil, and valeriana. The aims of this study were to validate whether Sanyuansan has antidepressant-like effects through acute behavioral tests including the forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), locomotor activity test, and chronic mild stress (CMS) mice model of depression. C57BL/6 mice were given oral administration of 30 mg/kg imipramine, Sanyuansan, and saline, respectively. The acute behavioral tests including the TST, FST, and locomotor activity test were done after the administration of drugs for consecutively three times (24 hours, 1 hour, and 0.5 hour prior to the tests). Furthermore, the sucrose preference and the serum corticosterone level of mice in the CMS model were examined. Sanyuansan only at 900 mg/kg markedly reduced immobility time in the TST compared with the saline-treated group of mice. Sanyuansan at doses of 225 mg/kg, 450 mg/kg, and 900 mg/kg significantly reduced immobility time of mice in the FST. Sanyuansan reversed the CMS-induced anhedonia and hyperactivation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. In addition, our results showed that neither imipramine nor Sanyuansan at any dosage increased spontaneous motor activity. These results suggested that Sanyuansan induced significant antidepressant-like effects in mice in both acute and chronic animal models, which seemed unlikely to be attributed to an increase in locomotor activities of mice, and had no sedative-like effects.

  12. Antidepressant phenotype by inhibiting the phospholipase Cβ(1)--protein kinase Cγ pathway in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Nicoletta; Ghelardini, Carla

    2011-05-01

    Although great advances have recently been made in the study of signal transduction, the pathogenesis of affective disorders is still unknown. There is mounting evidence suggesting that elevated phosphoinositide-protein kinase C (PI-PKC) signal transduction pathway may be a pathophysiological feature of bipolar and major depressive disorders. The aim of the present study was to further investigated the phospholipase C-protein kinase C (PLC-PKC) cascade by evaluating the effect produced by an acute blockade of this intracellular pathway at PLC and PKC level. Adult male mice were administered with pharmacological inhibitors of PLC or PKC and then subjected to the forced swim test (FST), an animal model which emulates the behavioural despair paradigm of depression. In this study we also tested the hypothesis that it might be possible to selectively modulate depressive behaviour by inhibiting the expression of specific PLC and PKC isoforms by means of specific antisense oligonucleotides (aODNs). Administration of the PLC inhibitors neomycin and U73122 as well as of the PKC inhibitors calphostin C and chelerytrine dose-dependently reduced the immobility time in the FST producing an antidepressant-like behaviour. Selective knockdown of the PLCβ(1) and PKCγ isoforms also induced an antidepressant phenotype. Conversely, the inhibition of the expression of PLCβ(3) was unable to modify the immobility time values. The PLC and PKC modulators used, at the highest effective doses, altered neither locomotor activity nor motor coordination. We demonstrate that selective blockade of PLCβ(1)-PKCγ signalling pathway produces an antidepressant-like phenotype in mice.

  13. Immobility stress induces depression-like behavior in the forced swim test in mice: effect of magnesium and imipramine.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Kedzierska, Ewa; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wyska, Elzbieta; Szymura-Oleksiak, Joanna; Fidecka, Sylwia; Radziwoń-Zaleska, Maria; Nowak, Gabriel

    2006-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated antidepressant-like effect of magnesium (Mg) in the forced swim test (FST). Moreover, the joint administration of Mg and imipramine (IMI) at ineffective doses per se, resulted in a potent reduction in the immobility time in this test. In the present study, we examined the effect of immobility stress (IS), and Mg and/or IMI administration on FST behavior. IS induced enhancement of immobility time, which was reversed by Mg or IMI at doses ineffective in non-stressed mice (10 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg, respectively). The joint administration of Mg and IMI was effective in both IS and non-stressed animals in FST. IS did not significantly alter locomotor activity, while IMI or Mg + IMI treatment in IS mice reduced this activity. We also measured serum and brain Mg, IMI and its metabolite desipramine (DMI) concentration in mice subjected to FST and injected with Mg + IMI, both restrained and non-restrained. In the present study we demonstrated a significant increase (by 68%) in the brain IMI and a slight, non-significant reduction in DMI concentration in IS + Mg + IMI + FST vs. Mg + IMI + FST groups, which might indicate the reduction in brain IMI metabolism. The IS-induced reduction in brain IMI metabolism did not participate in the activity in FST, since no differences in such activity were noticed between IS + Mg + IMI + FST and Mg + IMI + FST groups. The present data suggest that IS-induced increase in immobility time in FST is more sensitive for detection antidepressant-like activity. However, further studies are needed to examine the effect of other antidepressants in such an experimental paradigm.

  14. Effects of swimming exercise on morphine-induced reward and behavioral sensitization in maternally-separated rat pups in the conditioned place preference procedure.

    PubMed

    Abad, Atiyeh Taghavi-Khalil; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Bigdeli, Imanollah

    2016-09-19

    This study was designed to examine the effects of swimming exercise during adolescence on morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and behavioral sensitization in maternally separated male and female rat pups. Male Wistar rats were allowed to mate with female virgin Wistar rats. Pups were separated from the dam daily for 180min during postnatal days 2-14. All pups were weaned on day 21.The exercising pups were allowed to swim (60min/d, five days per a week, for 30days) during adolescence. Then, rat pups were tested for behavioral sensitization and the CPP induced by morphine. Maternal separation produced a significant increase in morphine-induced CPP in both sexes, behavioral sensitization in male pups and tolerance to morphine-induced motor activity in female pups. Swimmer pups separated from the dam exhibited a decrease in morphine-induced CPP in both sexes and behavioral sensitization in male pups than those of their control pups. The present results have shown that swimming exercise during adolescence may exert a protective effect against morphine-induced reward and behavioral sensitization in adult male and female rats following maternal separation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  16. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  17. Caffeine enhances the antidepressant-like activity of common antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Ewa; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Pieróg, Mateusz; Wróbel, Andrzej; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used behaviorally active drug in the world which exerts its activity on central nervous system through adenosine receptors. Worrying data indicate that excessive caffeine intake applies to patients suffering from mental disorders, including depression. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the influence of caffeine on animals' behavior in forced swim test (FST) as well as the effect of caffeine (5 mg/kg) on the activity of six typical antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), desipramine (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), paroxetine (0.5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg), and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Locomotor activity was estimated to verify and exclude false-positive/negative results. In order to assess the influence of caffeine on the levels of antidepressant drugs studied, their concentrations were determined in murine serum and brains using high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that caffeine at a dose of 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST, and it was not related to changes in locomotor activity in the animals. Caffeine at a dose of 5 mg/kg potentiated the activity of all antidepressants, and the observed effects were not due to the increase in locomotor activity in the animals. The interactions between caffeine and desipramine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and reboxetine were exclusively of pharmacodynamic character, because caffeine did not cause any changes in the concentrations of these drugs neither in blood serum nor in brain tissue. As a result of joint administration of caffeine and paroxetine, an increase in the antidepressant drug concentrations in serum was observed. No such change was noticed in the brain tissue. A decrease in the antidepressant drug concentrations in brain was observed in the case of imipramine administered together with caffeine. Therefore, it can be assumed that the interactions caffeine-paroxetine and caffeine-imipramine occur at least in

  18. NK1 receptor antagonism lowers occupancy requirement for antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs in the gerbil forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Lelas, Snjezana; Li, Yu-Wen; Wallace-Boone, Tanya L; Taber, Matthew T; Newton, Amy E; Pieschl, Rick L; Davis, Carl D; Molski, Thaddeus F; Newberry, Kimberly S; Parker, Michael F; Gillman, Kevin W; Bronson, Joanne J; Macor, John E; Lodge, Nicholas J

    2013-10-01

    The known interactions between the serotonergic and neurokinin systems suggest that serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) efficacy may be improved by neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) antagonism. In the current studies combination of a subeffective dose of an SSRI (0.3 mg/kg fluoxetine or 0.03 mg/kg citalopram) with a subeffective dose of an NK1R antagonist (0.3 mg/kg aprepitant or 1 mg/kg CP-122,721) produced efficacy in the gerbil forced swim test (FST). Serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy produced by 1 mg/kg fluoxetine (lowest efficacious dose) was 52 ± 5% and was reduced to 29 ± 4% at 0.3 mg/kg, a dose that was efficacious in combination with 0.3 mg/kg aprepitant or 1 mg/kg CP-122,721; the corresponding NK1R occupancies were 79 ± 4% and 61 ± 4% for aprepitant and CP-122,721, respectively. For citalopram, SERT occupancy at the lowest efficacious dose (0.1 mg/kg) was 50 ± 4% and was reduced to 20 ± 5% at 0.03 mg/kg, a dose that was efficacious when combined with aprepitant (0.3 mg/kg). Aprepitant (10 mg/kg) augmented the serotonin elevation produced by fluoxetine (1 or 10 mg/kg) in the gerbil prefrontal cortex; i.e. NK1R antagonism can modulate serotonin responses. A novel orally-available dual-acting NK1R antagonist/SERT inhibitor BMS-795176 is described; gerbil Ki = 1.4 and 1 nM at NK1R and SERT, respectively. BMS-795176 was efficacious in the gerbil FST; efficacy was observed with 35 ± 3% SERT occupancy and 73 ± 3% NK1R occupancy. The interaction between NK1R antagonism and SERT inhibition to lower the SERT occupancy required for antidepressant-like efficacy suggests that BMS-795176 has the potential to improve efficacy with a reduction in SSRI-associated side effects.

  19. Antidepressant-like activity of sildenafil following acute and subchronic treatment in the forced swim test in mice: effects of restraint stress and monoamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Socała, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Pieróg, Mateusz; Szuster-Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Wyska, Elżbieta; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    Sildenafil is a highly effective oral agent for the treatment of erectile dysfunction of multiple etiologies. Although in clinical practice sildenafil is often used in depressed patients, its influence on the pathophysiology of depression remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antidepressant-like activity following acute and subchronic treatment with sildenafil in naïve mice as well as in mice with reserpine- and restraint stress-induced depressive-like behavior. Since corticosterone is released in response to acute stress, we also aimed to assess the influence of sildenafil on serum corticosterone level in non-stressed and stressed animals. The antidepressant activity of sildenafil was assessed in the forced swim test. Corticosterone serum level was determined by using ELISA method, while brain and serum sildenafil level via HPLC method. Sildenafil administered acutely exerted an antidepressant-like effect. Subchronic (14 days) administration of sildenafil resulted only in a weak antidepressant-like effect when evaluated 24 h after the last dose. Acute but not subchronic sildenafil administration reversed the reserpine- and stress-induced immobility in the forced swim test. The lack of effects of sildenafil after subchronic treatment could have been related to its complete elimination from the brain within 24 h from the last injection. Interestingly, acute administration of sildenafil produced a marked increase in serum corticosterone level in both non-stressed and stressed animals. Sildenafil exerts differential effects in the forced swim test after acute and subchronic administration. Further studies on the antidepressant activity of sildenafil are required.

  20. Role of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Huang, Zhen; Ip, Siu-Po; Xian, Yan-Fang; Che, Chun-Tao

    2011-10-24

    Our previous studies have showed that treating mice with piperine significantly decreased the immobility time of the animals in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, which was related to up-regulation of serotonin (5-HT) level in the brain. The purpose of this study is to explore the contribution of 5-HT receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of piperine. The results showed that pre-treating mice with methiothepin (a non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist, 0.1mg/kg, intraperitoneally), 4-(2'-methoxy-phenyl)-1-[2'-(n-2″-pyridinyl)-p-iodobenzamino-]ethyl-piperazine (a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, 1mg/kg, subcutaneously) or 1-(2-(1-pyrrolyl)-phenoxy)-3-isopropylamino-2-propanol (a 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist, 2.5mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was found to abolish the anti-immobility effect of piperine (10mg/kg, intraperitoneally) in the forced swim test. On the other hand, a sub-effective dose of piperine (1mg/kg, intraperitoneally) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect with (+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 1mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or anpirtoline (a 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, 0.25mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Taken together, these results suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in the mouse forced swim test may be mediated, at least in part, by the activation of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptors.

  1. Antidepressant-like activity of liposomal formulation containing nimodipine treatment in the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lina Clara Gayoso E Almendra Ibiapina; Rolim, Hercília Maria Lins; Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide Stela

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that intracellular calcium ion dysfunction may be an etiological factor in affective illness. Nimodipine (NMD) is a Ca(2+) channel blocker that has been extensively investigated for therapy of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In this work, we have evaluated the antidepressant-like activity of nimodipine encapsulated into liposomes (NMD-Lipo) in mice through tail suspension and forced swim assays, as well as MAOB activity. During the tail suspension test, the administration of NMD-Lipo at 0.1, 1 and 10mg/kg was able to promote a reduction in the immobility time of animals greater than the positive control (imipramine). In the forced swim test, the immobility time of mice treated with NMD-Lipo was reduced. This reduction was significantly greater than that found in the animals treated with imipramine and paroxetine. This may suggest that NMD-Lipo provides more antidepressant-like activity than in positive controls. The groups that received a combination of liposomal NMD and antidepressant drugs showed lower immobility time than the groups, which were treated only with imipramine or paroxetine. The mice treated with the combination of NMD-Lipo and reserpine presented an increase in the time of immobility compared with animals treated only with NMD-Lipo. There was a significant decrease in MAOB activity in animals treated with NMD-Lipo compared with untreated animals. The results of the tail suspension test, forced swim test and MAOB activity suggested that the antidepressant activity of NMD-Lipo may be related to an increase in the cerebral monoamine concentrations.

  2. Resilience and reduced c-Fos expression in P2X7 receptor knockout mice exposed to repeated forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Boucher, A A; Arnold, J C; Hunt, G E; Spiro, A; Spencer, J; Brown, C; McGregor, I S; Bennett, M R; Kassiou, M

    2011-08-25

    There is considerable evidence suggesting genetic factors play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression, possibly by increasing susceptibility to repeated environmental stressors. Recent linkage studies have associated a polymorphism of the gene coding for the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) with both major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. Here we assessed whether P2X7 deletion affected the behavioural and neural response to repeated stress. P2X7R knockout (P2X7-/-) mice were subjected to the forced swim test for three consecutive days and neuronal activation in response to the third exposure was assessed using c-Fos immunohistochemistry. In addition, anxiety was evaluated in another group of P2X7-/- mice using the elevated plus maze (EPM) and light dark emergence (LDE) tests. Equivalent levels of immobility were observed in P2X7-/- mice and wild-type (WT) mice on the first exposure to forced swim, but much greater immobility was seen in WT mice on second and third exposures. This suggests that P2X7-/- mice exhibit an impaired adaptive coping response to repeated stress. Reinforcing this view, c-Fos expression in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the basolateral amygdala was seen in WT mice but not P2X7-/- mice following repeated forced swim. In addition, decreased locomotor activity was detected in P2X7-/- mice without any specific effects on anxiety in the LDE test. However, P2X7-/- mice showed greater anxiety-like behaviour in the EPM. These data suggest that the P2X7R may be involved in the adaptive mechanisms elicited by exposure to repeated environmental stressors that leads to the development of depression-like behaviours. This suggests that P2X7R antagonists may be useful therapeutics for the treatment of major depression, possibly by increasing resilience in the face of repeated stress.

  3. Effects of aspirin on immobile behavior and endocrine and immune changes in the forced swimming test: comparison to fluoxetine and imipramine.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xi-ting; Shao, Feng; Xie, Xi; Chen, Lin; Wang, Weiwen

    2014-09-01

    Aspirin (ASP) is the most commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the world. Recent clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that ASP may also exert psychoactive effects. It remains unclear whether ASP has antidepressant-like activity, and any molecular mechanisms underlying such activity have yet to be elucidated. Using the forced swimming test (FST), a well-established animal model of depression widely used to screen potential antidepressants in rodents, we investigated the effects of subacute treatment with ASP (0, 6, 12, 25, and 50mg/kg, i.p.) on immobility in the FST, and on FST-induced changes in endocrine and immune parameters in rats, in comparison to the clinical antidepressants imipramine (IMI) and fluoxetine (FLU). Serum levels of corticosterone, pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. ASP dose-dependently decreased immobility in the FST, without altering the locomotor activity in the open-field test. The inhibitory effects of higher doses (25 and 50mg/kg) of ASP on immobility were similar to that of FLU and IMI at a dose of 10mg/kg. In addition, the levels of corticosterone, IL-6, and TNF-α in peripheral blood were significantly increased after the FST exposure. IMI, but not FLU and ASP at any dose tested, significantly attenuated corticosterone responses in the FST. Both FLU and IMI treatment reduced the increase of IL-6 and TNF-α levels following the FST exposure. ASP dose-dependently decreased FST-induced increase of cytokine levels, as manifested by significantly stronger effects on IL-6 and TNF-α levels at higher doses (25 and 50mg/kg) than the lowest dose of ASP (6 mg/kg). In all, these results indicate that ASP treatment dose-dependently decreased the immobility time and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the FST, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of ASP might be involved in the antidepressant-like effect.

  4. Circadian Forced Desynchrony of the Master Clock Leads to Phenotypic Manifestation of Depression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, Carl

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, a master circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus maintains the phase coherence among a wide array of behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms. Affective disorders are typically associated with disruption of this fine-tuned “internal synchronization,” but whether this internal misalignment is part of the physiopathology of mood disorders is not clear. To date, depressive-like behavior in animal models has been induced by methods that fail to specifically target the SCN regulation of internal synchronization as the mode to generate depression. In the rat, exposure to a 22-h light-dark cycle (LD22) leads to the uncoupling of two distinct populations of neuronal oscillators within the SCN. This genetically, neurally, and pharmacologically intact animal model represents a unique opportunity to assess the effect of a systematic challenge to the central circadian pacemaker on phenotypic manifestations of mood disorders. We show that LD22 circadian forced desynchrony in rats induces depressive-like phenotypes including anhedonia, sexual dysfunction, and increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST), as well as changes in the levels and turnover rates of monoamines within the prefrontal cortex. Desynchronized rats show increased FST immobility during the dark (active) phase but decreased immobility during the light (rest) phase, suggesting a decrease in the amplitude of the normal daily oscillation in this behavioral manifestation of depression. Our results support the notion that the prolonged internal misalignment of circadian rhythms induced by environmental challenge to the central circadian pacemaker may constitute part of the etiology of depression. PMID:28090585

  5. Depressive behavior in the forced swim test can be induced by TRPV1 receptor activity and is dependent on NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Kovács, Katalin J; Nunez, Myra G; Larson, Alice A

    2014-01-01

    Blocking, desensitizing, or knocking out transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors decreases immobility in the forced swim test, a measure of depressive behavior. We questioned whether enhancing TRPV1 activity promotes immobility in a fashion that is prevented by antidepressants. To test this we activated heat-sensitive TRPV1 receptors in mice by water that is warmer than body temperature (41 °C) or a low dose of resiniferatoxin (RTX). Water at 41 °C elicited less immobility than cooler water (26 °C), indicating that thermoregulatory sites do not contribute to immobility. Although a desensitizing regimen of RTX (3-5 injections of 0.1 mg/kg s.c.) decreased immobility during swims at 26 °C, it did not during swims at 41 °C. In contrast, low dose of RTX (0.02 mg/kg s.c.) enhanced immobility, but only during swims at 41 °C. Thus, activation of TRPV1 receptors, endogenously or exogenously, enhances immobility and these sites are activated by cold rather than warmth. Two distinct types of antidepressants, amitriptyline (10mg/kg i.p.) and ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p.), each inhibited the increase in immobility induced by the low dose of RTX, verifying its mediation by TRPV1 sites. When desensitization was limited to central populations using intrathecal injections of RTX (0.25 μg/kg i.t.), immobility was attenuated at both temperatures and the increase in immobility produced by the low dose of RTX was inhibited. This demonstrates a role for central TRPV1 receptors in depressive behavior, activated by conditions (cold stress) distinct from those that activate TRPV1 receptors along thermosensory afferents (heat).

  6. [Anticonvulsant and forced swim anti-immobility effects of tetrahydro-N, N-dimethyl-2,2-diphenyl-3-furanemethanamine (AE37): common action mechanism?].

    PubMed

    Vamvakidès, A

    2002-03-01

    Tetrahydro-N, N-dimethyl-2, 2-diphenyl-3-furanemethanamine (AE 37) is a newly synthesized anticonvulsant drug efficient against electrogenic (maximal electroshock: MES) or pentetrazole (PTZ) induced tonic convulsions of mice. It also antagonizes the immobility of adult or aged mice in the forced swim test (FST), which is used to detect antidepressive properties. Neurochemical changes induced by AE37 (antagonistic action on the sodium channel currents and on the receptors sensitive to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid) could generate the aforementioned pharmacological properties, whereas the partial agonistic action of AE 37 on the brain muscarinic receptors seems to confer to this drug characteristics of third generation antiepileptic.

  7. Moderate swimming exercise and caffeine supplementation reduce the levels of inflammatory cytokines without causing oxidative stress in tissues of middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Cechella, José L; Leite, Marlon R; Dobrachinski, Fernando; da Rocha, Juliana T; Carvalho, Nelson R; Duarte, Marta M M F; Soares, Félix A A; Bresciani, Guilherme; Royes, Luiz F F; Zeni, Gilson

    2014-05-01

    The levels of circulatory inflammatory markers, including interleukin (IL) IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon (INF-γ), are known to increase associated to aging. Caffeine has been reported to produce many beneficial effects for health. Exercise is considered to be a safe medicine to attenuate inflammation and cellular senescence. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a moderate-intensity swimming exercise (3 % of body weight, 20 min per day, 4 weeks) and sub-chronic supplementation with caffeine (30 mg/kg, 4 weeks) on the serum cytokine levels in middle-aged (18 months) Wistar rats. The effects of swimming exercise and caffeine on oxidative stress in muscle and liver of middle-aged rats were also investigated. The two-way ANOVA of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels demonstrated a significant exercise x caffeine interaction for IL-1β (F (1, 16) = 9.5772; p = 0.0069), IL-6 (F (1, 16) = 8.0463; p = 0.0119) and INF-γ (F (1, 16) = 15.078; p = 0.0013). The two-way ANOVA of TNF-α levels revealed a significant exercise × caffeine interaction (F (1, 16) = 9.6881; p = 0.00670). Swimming exercise and caffeine supplementation increased the ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione in the rat liver and gastrocnemius muscle. Hepatic and renal markers of damage were not modified. In conclusion, a moderate-intensity swimming exercise protocol and caffeine supplementation induced positive adaptations in modulating cytokine levels without causing oxidative stress in muscle and liver of middle-aged rats.

  8. Alterations in Plasma Glucose and Cardiac Antioxidant Enzymes Activity in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats: Effects of Trigonella foenum-graecum Extract and Swimming Training.

    PubMed

    Haghani, Karimeh; Bakhtiyari, Salar; Doost Mohammadpour, Jafar

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by chronic hyperglycemia. Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek) and swimming training have previously been reported to have hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects. We aimed to evaluate the effects of swimming training and fenugreek aqueous extract, alone and in combination, on plasma glucose and cardiac antioxidant enzymes activity of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats. We divided 70 male Wistar rats equally into 7 groups: diabetic control (DC), healthy control (HC), swimming (S), fenugreek seed extract (1.74 g/kg) (F1), fenugreek seed extract (0.87 g/kg) (F2), swimming + fenugreek seed extract (1.74 g/kg) (SF1), and swimming + fenugreek seed extract (0.87 g/kg) (SF2). We used streptozotocin for the induction of diabetes. Statistical analyses were performed using the statistical program SPSS. We did not detect any significant differences in body weight in the F1, F2, S, SF1 and SF2 groups compared with the DC group (p>0.05). The results also revealed that the hypoglycemic effect of combined swimming and fenugreek was significantly stronger (p<0.05) than either of those alone. The F1, S, SF1 and SF2 groups showed improved superoxide dismutase activity with respect to the DC group (p<0.05). Catalase activity in the F1, S, SF1 and SF2 groups were significantly higher than those of the DC group (p<0.05). Glutathione peroxidase activity in the S, SF1 and SF2 groups were significantly increased compared with the DC group (p<0.05). Our findings suggest that the combination of fenugreek seed extract and swimming could be useful for the treatment of hyperglycemia and cardiac oxidative stress induced by type 1 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Both increases in immature dentate neuron number and decreases of immobility time in the forced swim test occurred in parallel after environmental enrichment of mice.

    PubMed

    Llorens-Martín, M V; Rueda, N; Martínez-Cué, C; Torres-Alemán, I; Flórez, J; Trejo, J L

    2007-07-13

    A direct relation between the rate of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice and the immobility time in a forced swim test after living in an enriched environment has been suggested previously. In the present work, young adult mice living in an enriched environment for 2 months developed considerably more immature differentiating neurons (doublecortin-positive, DCX(+)) than control, non-enriched animals. Furthermore, we found that the more DCX(+) cells they possessed, the lower the immobility time they scored in the forced swim test. This DCX(+) subpopulation is composed of mostly differentiating dentate neurons independently of the birthdates of every individual cell. However, variations found in this subpopulation were not the result of a general effect on the survival of any newborn neuron in the granule cell layer, as 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells born during a narrow time window included in the longer lifetime period of DCX(+) cells, were not significantly modified after enrichment. In contrast, the survival of the mature population of neurons in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus in enriched animals increased, although this did not influence their performance in the Porsolt test, nor did it influence the dentate gyrus volume or granule neuronal nuclei size. These results indicate that the population of immature, differentiating neurons in the adult hippocampus is one factor directly related to the protective effect of an enriched environment against a highly stressful event.

  10. Proteomic and carbonylation profile analysis of rat skeletal muscles following acute swimming exercise.

    PubMed

    Magherini, Francesca; Gamberi, Tania; Pietrovito, Laura; Fiaschi, Tania; Bini, Luca; Esposito, Fabio; Marini, Marina; Abruzzo, Provvidenza Maria; Gulisano, Massimo; Modesti, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies by us and other groups characterized protein expression variation following long-term moderate training, whereas the effects of single bursts of exercise are less known. Making use of a proteomic approach, we investigated the effects of acute swimming exercise (ASE) on protein expression and carbonylation patterns in two hind limb muscles: the Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL) and the Soleus, mostly composed of fast-twitch and slow-twitch fibres, respectively. Carbonylation is one of the most common oxidative modifications of proteins and a marker of oxidative stress. In fact, several studies suggest that physical activity and the consequent increase in oxygen consumption can lead to increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) production, hence the interest in examining the impact of RONS on skeletal muscle proteins following ASE. Results indicate that protein expression is unaffected by ASE in both muscle types. Unexpectedly, the protein carbonylation level was reduced following ASE. In particular, the analysis found 31 and 5 spots, in Soleus and EDL muscles respectively, whose carbonylation is reduced after ASE. Lipid peroxidation levels in Soleus were markedly reduced as well. Most of the decarbonylated proteins are involved either in the regulation of muscle contractions or in the regulation of energy metabolism. A number of hypotheses may be advanced to account for such results, which will be addressed in future studies.

  11. [THE INFLUENCE OF OPIOID PEPTIDES ON LIPID PEROXIDATION AND ANTIOXIDANT ENZYME ACTIVITY IN RATS AFTER SWIMMING STRESS].

    PubMed

    Solin, A V; Lyashev, Yu D

    2015-08-01

    It was established in experiments on rats, that injection of opioid peptides DAGO (a selective igonist of opioid mu-receptors), DSLET (a selective agonist of opioid delta-receptors) or dynorpiin A (1-13) (a selective agonist of opioid kappa-receptors) decreased the stress-induced activatin of lipid peroxidation in liver tissue and plasma. A selective agonist of opioid mu-receptors) AGO manifested the most expressed activity. The using of investigating peptides caused the increase of superoxiddismutase activity in liver tissue. The reinforcement of catalase activity was )bserved in DSLET or dynorphin A (1-13). DAGO decreased its activity. The peptide effects of lifferent directions oncatalase activity in plasma were established. These effects can be explained y the stress-limiting action of peptides in entire organism, the peculiarities of opioid receptors spreading in liver tissue and by the influence of preceded load with non-complete oxidized sub stances after intensive swimming on the opioid receptor affinity.

  12. Effects of chronic swimming training and oestrogen therapy on coronary vascular reactivity and expression of antioxidant enzymes in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Claudio, Erick R G; Endlich, Patrick W; Santos, Roger L; Moysés, Margareth R; Bissoli, Nazaré S; Gouvêa, Sônia A; Silva, Josiane F; Lemos, Virginia S; Abreu, Glaucia R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of swimming training (SW) and oestrogen replacement therapy (ERT) on coronary vascular reactivity and the expression of antioxidant enzymes in ovariectomized rats. Animals were randomly assigned to one of five groups: sham (SH), ovariectomized (OVX), ovariectomized with E2 (OE2), ovariectomized with exercise (OSW), and ovariectomized with E2 plus exercise (OE2+SW). The SW protocol (5×/week, 60 min/day) and/or ERT were conducted for 8 weeks; the vasodilator response to bradykinin was analysed (Langendorff Method), and the expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD-1 and 2, catalase) and eNOS and iNOS were evaluated by Western blotting. SW and ERT improved the vasodilator response to the highest dose of bradykinin (1000 ng). However, in the OSW group, this response was improved at 100, 300 and 1000 ng when compared to OVX (p<0,05). The SOD-1 expression was increased in all treated/trained groups compared to the OVX group (p<0,05), and catalase expression increased in the OSW group only. In the trained group, eNOS increased vs. OE2, and iNOS decreased vs. SHAM (p<0,05). SW may represent an alternative to ERT by improving coronary vasodilation, most likely by increasing antioxidant enzyme and eNOS expression and augmenting NO bioavailability.

  13. Increased sensitivity to antidepressants of D3 dopamine receptor-deficient mice in the forced swim test (FST).

    PubMed

    Leggio, Gian Marco; Micale, Vincenzo; Drago, Filippo

    2008-04-01

    Evidence exists for a dopaminergic system dysregulation in mood disorders. In particular, depression may be accompanied by a relative fall of brain dopamine (DA) availability, while the increase of dopamine D2/D3 receptors (D2R/D3R) binding may reflect a compensatory change following primary reduction of mesolimbic DA levels. It is well established that D3Rs, acting as autoreceptors, inhibit DA synthesis and release, although lack of selective compounds have limited the progress in understanding D3Rs role in mood disorders. Aim of this study was to assess the behavioral responses of D3R-deficient (D3(-/-)) mice tested in the forced swim test (FST) and to evaluate their sensitivity to the treatment with different antidepressant drugs. Different groups of mice received one injection of the tricyclic compound, clomipramine (1, 5 and 10 mg/kg) or of one the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), paroxetine, sertraline or citalopram (1, 4 and 16 mg/kg), 30 min prior the behavioral test. Vehicle-injected wild type (WT) mice and D3(-/-) animals were used as controls and submitted to the same experimental procedure. In a preliminary experiment, vehicle-injected D3(-/-) mice, but not their littermates, failed to show an increased immobility time in FST as compared to intact controls, suggesting an increased resistance to injection-induced stress in the former. Clomipramine 1 mg/kg failed to affect behavioral responses of both D3(-/-) mice and WT animals. After the 5 mg/kg dose, D3(-/-) and WT mice showed a better performance in FST than vehicle-injected controls, with a lower immobility time exhibited by D3(-/-) mice than that shown by WT animals. No difference was found between WT mice treated with the highest dose of clomipramine (10 mg/kg) and the respective controls, although D3(-/-) mice exhibited a decreased immobility time as compared to vehicle-injected controls. In contrast to WT animals, when treated with 1 mg/kg sertraline and the 4 mg/kg dose of every

  14. Maternal prolactin inhibition during lactation affects physical performance evaluated by acute exhaustive swimming exercise in adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Lopes, G; Lisboa, P C; Koury, J C; Boaventura, G; Passos, M C F; Moura, E G

    2012-02-01

    Maternal prolactin inhibition at the end of lactation programs for metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism in adult offspring, which could negatively affect exercise performance. We evaluated the effects of maternal hypoprolactinemia in late lactation on physical performance in adult progeny. Lactating Wistar rats were treated with bromocriptine (BRO, 1 mg per day) or saline on days 19, 20, and 21 of lactation and offspring were followed until 180 days old. Physical performance was recorded in untrained rats at 90 and 180 days by an acute exhaustive swimming test (exercise group-Ex). At day 90, BRO offspring showed higher visceral fat mass, higher plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lower total antioxidant capacity, higher liver glycogen, lower glycemia, and normal insulinemia. Although thyroid hormones (TH) levels were unchanged, mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) activity was lower in muscle and in brown adipose tissue (BAT). At this age, BRO-Ex offspring showed higher exercise capacity, lower blood lactate, higher serum T3, and higher muscle and BAT mGPD activities. At day 180, BRO offspring showed central obesity, hypothyroidism, insulin resistance, and lower EDL (extensor digitorum longus) muscle glycogen with unaltered plasma oxidative stress markers. This group showed no alteration of exercise capacity or blood lactate. After exercise, EDL and liver glycogen were lower, while T3 levels, BAT and muscle mGPD activities were normalized. Liver glycogen seem to be related with higher exercise capacity in younger BRO offspring, while the loss of this temporary advantage maybe related to the hypothyroidism and insulin resistance developed with age.

  15. Swimming Exercise Alleviated Insulin Resistance by Regulating Tripartite Motif Family Protein 72 Expression and AKT Signal Pathway in Sprague-Dawley Rats Fed with High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jie; Yang, Bo; Ren, Cailing; Fu, Jian; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether swimming exercise could improve insulin resistance (IR) by regulating tripartite motif family protein 72 (TRIM72) expression and AKT signal pathway in rats fed with high-fat diet. Five-week-old rats were classified into 3 groups: standard diet as control (CON), high-fat diet (HFD), and HFD plus swimming exercise (Ex-HFD). After 8 weeks, glucose infusion rate (GIR), markers of oxidative stress, mRNA and protein expression of TRIM72, protein of IRS, p-AKT(Ser473), and AKT were determined in quadriceps muscles. Compared with HFD, the GIR, muscle SOD, and GSH-Px were significantly increased (p < 0.05, resp.), whereas muscle MDA and 8-OHdG levels were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01) in Ex-HFD. Expression levels of TRIM72 mRNA and protein in muscles were significantly reduced (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01), whereas protein expression levels of IRS-1, p-AKT(Ser473), and AKT were significantly increased in Ex-HFD compared with HFD (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, and p < 0.05). These results suggest that an 8-week swimming exercise improves HFD-induced insulin resistance maybe through a reduction of TRIM72 in skeletal muscle and enhancement of AKT signal transduction.

  16. Swimming Exercise Alleviated Insulin Resistance by Regulating Tripartite Motif Family Protein 72 Expression and AKT Signal Pathway in Sprague-Dawley Rats Fed with High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether swimming exercise could improve insulin resistance (IR) by regulating tripartite motif family protein 72 (TRIM72) expression and AKT signal pathway in rats fed with high-fat diet. Five-week-old rats were classified into 3 groups: standard diet as control (CON), high-fat diet (HFD), and HFD plus swimming exercise (Ex-HFD). After 8 weeks, glucose infusion rate (GIR), markers of oxidative stress, mRNA and protein expression of TRIM72, protein of IRS, p-AKTSer473, and AKT were determined in quadriceps muscles. Compared with HFD, the GIR, muscle SOD, and GSH-Px were significantly increased (p < 0.05, resp.), whereas muscle MDA and 8-OHdG levels were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01) in Ex-HFD. Expression levels of TRIM72 mRNA and protein in muscles were significantly reduced (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01), whereas protein expression levels of IRS-1, p-AKTSer473, and AKT were significantly increased in Ex-HFD compared with HFD (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, and p < 0.05). These results suggest that an 8-week swimming exercise improves HFD-induced insulin resistance maybe through a reduction of TRIM72 in skeletal muscle and enhancement of AKT signal transduction. PMID:27843952

  17. Attenuation of pCREB and Egr1 expression in the insular and anterior cingulate cortices associated with enhancement of CFA-evoked mechanical hypersensitivity after repeated forced swim stress.

    PubMed

    Imbe, Hiroki; Kimura, Akihisa

    2017-09-01

    The perception and response to pain are severely impacted by exposure to stressors. In some animal models, stress increases pain sensitivity, which is termed stress-induced hyperalgesia (SIH). The insular cortex (IC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which are typically activated by noxious stimuli, affect pain perception through the descending pain modulatory system. In the present study, we examined the expression of phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) and early growth response 1 (Egr1) in the IC and ACC at 3h (the acute phase of peripheral tissue inflammation) after complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection in naïve rats and rats preconditioned with forced swim stress (FS) to clarify the effect of FS, a stressor, on cortical cell activities in the rats showing SIH induced by FS. The CFA injection into the hindpaw induced mechanical hypersensitivity and increased the expression of the pCREB and Egr1 in the IC and ACC at 3h after the injection. FS (day 1, 10min; days 2-3, 20min) prior to the CFA injection enhanced the CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and attenuated the increase in the expression of pCREB and Egr1 in the IC and ACC. These findings suggested that FS modulates the CFA injection-induced neuroplasticity in the IC and ACC to enhance the mechanical hypersensitivity. These findings are thought to signify stressor-induced dysfunction of the descending pain modulatory system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aortic wall proteomic analysis in spontaneously hypertensive rats with a blood pressure decrease induced by 6-week load-free swimming

    PubMed Central

    FENG, HONG; LI, HAIYING; ZHANG, DERONG; ZHAO, YUNGANG; JIANG, NING; ZHAO, XIAOLING; ZHANG, YU; TAN, JUNZHEN; FANG, WEN; ZHANG, YONG; LIU, WEI

    2015-01-01

    Decreased arterial compliance is one of the earliest detectable manifestations of adverse structural and functional changes within the vessel wall in hypertension. The proteomic approach is a powerful technique to analyze a complex mixture of proteins in various settings. Physical activity level was negatively associated with blood pressure. Sixteen 4-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and 16 Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were randomly divided into four groups: i) SHR exercise group, ii) SHR rest group, iii) WKY exercise group and iv) WKY rest group. In the SHR and WKY exercise groups, rats were treated with a 6-week load-free swimming protocol (1 h/day, 5 days/week). The blood pressure of the rats was tested by the CODATM2 single non-invasive blood pressure measurement appliance. After the 6-week swimming protocol, the total aorta excluding abdominal aorta was extracted. The proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified via LC-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS. After 6-week load-free swimming, blood pressure decreased in the SHRs. Compared with sedentary SHRs, 11 spots on the 2D-gel showed a significant difference in exercised SHRs. Nine of these were chosen for further identification. There were 5 upregulated proteins (long-chain specific acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, heat shock protein β-1, isocitrate dehydrogenase subunit α, actin, α cardiac muscle 1 preprotein and calmodulin isoform 2) and 4 downregulated proteins (adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein, tubulin β-2C chain, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein precursor and mimecan). Proteomics is an effective method to identify the target proteins of exercise intervention for hypertension. PMID:26405545

  19. Effects of swim training on liver carcinogenesis in male Wistar rats fed a low-fat or high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Aguiar e Silva, Marco Aurélio; Vechetti-Junior, Ivan José; Nascimento, André Ferreira do; Furtado, Kelly Silva; Azevedo, Luciana; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the beneficial effects of swim training on the promotion-progression stages of rat liver carcinogenesis. Male Wistar rats were submitted to chemically induced liver carcinogenesis and allocated into 4 major groups, according their dietary regimen (16 weeks) and swim training of 5 days per week (8 weeks): 2 groups were fed low-fat diet (LFD, 6% fat) and trained or not trained and 2 groups were fed high-fat diet (HFD, 21% fat) and trained or not trained. At week 20, the animals were killed and liver samples were processed for histological analyses; immunohistochemical detection of persistent or remodeling preneoplastic lesions (pPNL and rPNL) expressing placental glutathione S-transferase (GST-P) enzyme; or proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cleaved caspase-3, and bcl-2 protein levels by Western blotting or malonaldehyde (MDA) and total glutathione detection by HPLC. Overall analysis indicated that swim training reduced the body weight and body fat in both LFD and HFD groups, normalized total cholesterol levels in the HFD group while decreased the MDA levels, increased glutathione levels and both number of GST-P-positive pPNL and hepatocellular adenomas in LFD group. Also, a favorable balance in PCNA, cleaved caspase-3, and bcl-2 levels was detected in the liver from the LFD-trained group in relation to LFD-untrained group. The findings of this study indicate that the swim training protocol as a result of exercise postconditioning may attenuate liver carcinogenesis under an adequate dietary regimen with lowered fat intake.

  20. The relationship between anxiety and depression in animal models: a study using the forced swimming test and elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Andreatini, R; Bacellar, L F

    1999-09-01

    The present study evaluated the correlation between the behavior of mice in the forced swimming test (FST) and in the elevated plus-maze (PM). The effect of the order of the experiments, i.e., the influence of the first test (FST or PM) on mouse behavior in the second test (PM or FST, respectively) was compared to handled animals (HAND). The execution of FST one week before the plus-maze (FST-PM, N = 10), in comparison to mice that were only handled (HAND-PM, N = 10) in week 1, decreased % open entries (HAND-PM: 33.6 +/- 2.9; FST-PM: 20.0 +/- 3.9; mean +/- SEM; P<0.02) and % open time (HAND-PM: 18.9 +/- 3.3; FST-PM: 9.0 +/- 1.9; P<0.03), suggesting an anxiogenic effect. No significant effect was seen in the number of closed arm entries (FST-PM: 9.5 (7.0-11.0); HAND-PM: 10.0 (4.0-14.5), median (interquartile range); U = 46.5; P>0.10). A prior test in the plus-maze (PM-FST) did not change % immobility time in the FST when compared to the HAND-FST group (HAND-FST: 57.7 +/- 3.9; PM-FST: 65.7 +/- 3.2; mean +/- SEM; P>0.10). Since these data suggest that there is an order effect, the correlation was evaluated separately with each test sequence: FST-PM (N = 20) and PM-FST (N = 18). There was no significant correlation between % immobility time in the FST and plus-maze indexes (% time and entries in open arms) in any test sequence (r: -0.07 to 0.18). These data suggest that mouse behavior in the elevated plus-maze is not related to behavior in the forced swimming test and that a forced swimming test before the plus-maze has an anxiogenic effect even after a one-week interval.

  1. Test-retest paradigm of the forced swimming test in female mice is not valid for predicting antidepressant-like activity: participation of acetylcholine and sigma-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Hato-Yamada, Noriko; Araki, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) in mice is widely used to predict the antidepressant activity of a drug, but information describing the immobility of female mice is limited. We investigated whether a prior swimming experience affects the immobility duration in a second FST in female mice and whether the test-retest paradigm is a valid screening tool for antidepressants. Female ICR mice were exposed to the FST using two experimental paradigms: a single FST and a double FST in which mice had experienced FST once 24 h prior to the second trail. The initial FST experience reliably prolonged immobility duration in the second FST. The antidepressants imipramine and paroxetine significantly reduced immobility duration in the single FST, but not in the double FST. Scopolamine and the sigma-1 (σ1) antagonist NE-100 administered before the second trial significantly prevented the prolongation of immobility. Neither a 5-HT1A nor a 5-HT2A receptor agonist affected immobility duration. We suggest that the test-retest paradigm in female mice is not adequate for predicting antidepressant-like activity of a drug; the prolongation of immobility in the double FST is modulated through acetylcholine and σ1 receptors.

  2. Enhancement of antidepressant-like activity by joint administration of imipramine and magnesium in the forced swim test: Behavioral and pharmacokinetic studies in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Kedzierska, Ewa; Wyska, Elzbieta; Librowski, Tadeusz; Szymura-Oleksiak, Joanna; Fidecka, Sylwia; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2005-07-01

    The effect of joint administration of imipramine (IMI) and magnesium (Mg) on antidepressant-like activity was studied in mice using forced swim test (FST). Mg doses ineffective per se (5 and 10 mg/kg) given jointly with IMI also at ineffective doses (10 and 15 mg/kg) resulted in a potent reduction in the immobility time. Since these combined treatments did not influence locomotor activity, the antidepressant-like activity was not due to non-specific behavioral activation. Moreover, we estimated the effect of joint administration of magnesium and IMI in FST on serum and brain magnesium, IMI and its active metabolite desipramine (DMI) concentrations in mice. Swim stress (mice subjected to FST) increased the magnesium concentration in serum and decreased it in the brain compared to naive animals. Moreover administration of IMI increased (normalized) magnesium brain concentration, without influence on the serum level. Joint administration of IMI and magnesium did not influence magnesium (compared with FST) or IMI and DMI (compared with IMI treatment alone) concentrations in both examined tissues. The present data demonstrated an enhancement of the antidepressant-like effect by joint administration of IMI and magnesium in the FST, and further indicate the particular role of magnesium in the antidepressant action. Since there was no increase in IMI, DMI or magnesium concentration after joint administration of magnesium and IMI, the data suggest that pharmacodynamic rather than pharmacokinetic interaction between magnesium and IMI is accountable for behavioral effect in the FST.

  3. Coordination strategies for limb forces during weight-bearing locomotion in normal rats, and in rats spinalized as neonates

    PubMed Central

    Giszter, Simon F; Davies, Michelle R; Graziani, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Some rats spinally transected as neonates (ST rats) achieve weight-supporting independent locomotion. The mechanisms of coordinated hindlimb weight support in such rats are not well understood. To examine these in such ST rats and normal rats, rats with better than 60% of weight supported steps on a treadmill as adults were trained to cross an instrumented runway. Ground reaction forces, coordination of hindlimb and forelimb forces and the motions of the center of pressure were assessed. Normal rats crossed the runway with a diagonal trot. On average hindlimbs bore about 80% of the vertical load carried by forelimbs, although this varied. Forelimbs and hindlimb acted synergistically to generate decelerative and propulsive rostrocaudal forces, which averaged 15% of body weight with maximums of 50% . Lateral forces were very small (<8% of body weight). Center of pressure progressed in jumps along a straight line with mean lateral deviations <1 cm. ST rats hindlimbs bore about 60% of the vertical load of forelimbs, significantly less compared to intact (p<0.05). ST rats showed similar mean rostrocaudal forces, but with significantly larger maximum fluctuations of up to 80% of body weight (p<0.05). Joint force-plate recordings showed forelimbs and hindlimb rostrocaudal forces in ST rats were opposing and significantly different from intact rats (p<0.05). Lateral forces were ~20% of body weight and significantly larger than in normal rats (p<0.05). Center of pressure zig-zagged, with mean lateral deviations of ~ 2cm and a significantly larger range (p<0.05). The haunches were also observed to roll more than normal rats. The locomotor strategy of injured rats using limbs in opposition was presumably less efficient but their complex gait was statically stable. Because forelimbs and hindlimbs acted in opposition, the trunk was held compressed. Force coordination was likely managed largely by the voluntary control in forelimbs and trunk. PMID:18612631

  4. The involvement of NMDA receptor/NO/cGMP pathway in the antidepressant like effects of baclofen in mouse force swimming test.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Zolfaghari, Samira; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-01-26

    In the current study, the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) system in the antidepressant-like effects of baclofen was evaluated by using animal model in forced swimming test. Followed by an open field test for the evaluation of locomotor activity, the immobility time for mice in force swimming test was recorded. Only the last four min was analyzed. Administration of Baclofen (0.5 and 1mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility interval in the FST. Prior administration of l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p.,) a nitric oxide synthase substrate or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p.) a phosphodiesterase 5 into mice suppressed the antidepressant-like activity of baclofen (1mg/kg, i.p.).Co-treatment of 7-nitroindazole (50mg/kg, i.p.,) an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p.,) a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase or MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p.) an NMDA receptor antagonist with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time in the FST as compared to the drugs when used alone. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01mg/kg) or l-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time however, simultaneous administration of these two agents in same dose with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), minimized the immobility time in the FST. Thus, our results support the role of NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-GMP pathway in the antidepressant-like action of baclofen.

  5. Dopamine D2/D3 but not dopamine D1 receptors are involved in the rapid antidepressant-like effects of ketamine in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhu, Zhuo R; Ou, Bao C; Wang, Ya Q; Tan, Zhou B; Deng, Chang M; Gao, Yi Y; Tang, Ming; So, Ji H; Mu, Yang L; Zhang, Lan Q

    2015-02-15

    Major depressive disorder is one of the most prevalent and life-threatening forms of mental illnesses. The traditional antidepressants often take several weeks, even months, to obtain clinical effects. However, recent clinical studies have shown that ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, exerts rapid antidepressant effects within 2h and are lon