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Sample records for rat forebrain subventricular

  1. Proliferating subventricular zone cells in the adult mammalian forebrain can differentiate into neurons and glia.

    PubMed Central

    Lois, C; Alvarez-Buylla, A

    1993-01-01

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) cells proliferate spontaneously in vivo in the telencephalon of adult mammals. Several studies suggest that SVZ cells do not differentiate after mitosis into neurons or glia but die. In the present work, we show that SVZ cells labeled in the brains of adult mice with [3H]thymidine differentiate directly into neurons and glia in explant cultures. In vitro labeling with [3H]thymidine shows that 98% of the neurons that differentiate from the SVZ explants are derived from precursor cells that underwent their last division in vivo. This report identifies the SVZ cells as neuronal precursors in an adult mammalian brain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8446631

  2. Visualization of growth factor receptor sites in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, R.; Araujo, D.; Nair, N.P.; Chabot, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    It is now known that various growth factors may also act in the central nervous system. Among them, it has recently been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) may possess trophic effects in the mammalian brain. We report here on the respective autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 125/I)EGF and (/sup 125/I)IGF-I receptor binding sites in the rat brain, both during ontogeny and in adulthood. It appears that (/sup 125/I)EGF sites are mostly found in the rat forebrain during brain development. On the other hand, (/sup 125/I)IGF-I sites are more widely distributed both during ontogeny and in adulthood. These results reveal the plasticity of the expression of EGF and IGF-I receptor sites in the mammalian brain. This could be relevant for the respective role of these two growth factors in the development and maintenance of neuronal function.

  3. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. )

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  4. Changes in neural stem cells in the subventricular zone in a rat model of communicating hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wu, Dongxue; Wu, Chunming; Qu, Zhenyun; Zhao, Yongshun; Li, Weihua; Wang, Jian; Li, Zhongmin

    2014-08-22

    Communicating hydrocephalus is a common type of hydrocephalus. At present, the prevalent treatment is to perform a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, which, for reasons that are not clear, is sometimes ineffective. The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles has been established as the primary site of adult neurogenesis. Following cerebral ischemia or brain injury, neural stem cells (NSCs) increase in the SVZ and can both differentiate into neurons and glial cells and respond to the injury. Neural stem cells, enabled by a complex repertoire of factors that precisely regulate the activation, proliferation, differentiation and integration of newborn cells, continuously generate new neurons. However, only a few systematic studies of the role of NSCs in hydrocephalus have been reported. In a rat model of communicating hydrocephalus, we recently showed that hydrocephalus caused the ventricular system to expand over time. We found that the number of NSCs in the SVZ peaked rapidly after hydrocephalus was established and decreased gradually over time until the cells disappeared. NSCs may be involved in the pathophysiology changes and repair process of hydrocephalus.

  5. Prenatal cocaine exposure alters progenitor cell markers in the subventricular zone of the adult rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dhyanesh Arvind; Booze, Rosemarie M.; Mactutus, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term consequences of early developmental exposure to drugs of abuse may have deleterious effects on the proliferative plasticity of the brain. The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to cocaine, using the IV route of administration and doses that mimic the peak arterial levels of cocaine use in humans, on the proliferative cell types of the subventricular zones (SVZ) in the adult (180 days-old) rat brain. Employing immunocytochemistry, the expression of GFAP+ (type B cells) and nestin+(GFAP−) (Type C and A cells) staining was quantified in the subcallosal area of the SVZ. GFAP+ expression was significantly different between the prenatal cocaine treated group and the vehicle (saline) control group. The prenatal cocaine treated group possessed significantly lower GFAP+ expression relative to the vehicle control group, suggesting that prenatal cocaine exposure significantly reduced the expression of type B neural stem cells of the SVZ. In addition, there was a significant sex difference in nestin+ expression with females showing approximately 8–13% higher nestin+ expression compared to the males. More importantly, a significant prenatal treatment condition (prenatal cocaine, control) by sex interaction in nestin+ expression was confirmed, indicating different effects of cocaine based on sex of the animal. Specifically, prenatal cocaine exposure eliminated the basal difference between the sexes. Collectively, the present findings suggest that prenatal exposure to cocaine, when delivered via a protocol designed to capture prominent features of recreational usage, can selectively alter the major proliferative cell types in the subcallosal area of the SVZ in an adult rat brain, and does so differently for males and females. PMID:22119286

  6. Development of glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat forebrain: Implications for adverse effects of glucocorticoids in preterm infants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoids are the consensus treatment to avoid respiratory distress in preterm infants but there is accumulating evidence that these agents evoke long-term neurobehavioral deficits. Earlier, we showed that the developing rat forebrain is far more sensitive to glucocorticoi...

  7. Reduced Forebrain Serotonin Transmission is Causally Involved in the Development of Compulsive Cocaine Seeking in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pelloux, Yann; Dilleen, Ruth; Economidou, Daina; Theobald, David; Everitt, Barry J

    2012-01-01

    Whereas the majority of cocaine users quit as they experience the negative consequences of drug use, some lose control over their drug taking and compulsively seek drugs. We report that 20% of rats compulsively seek cocaine despite intermittent negative outcomes after escalating their cocaine self-administration. This compulsive subgroup showed marked reductions in forebrain serotonin utilization; increasing serotonin transmission reduced their compulsive cocaine seeking. Depleting forebrain serotonin induced compulsive cocaine seeking in rats with a limited cocaine taking history; this was reversed by systemic treatment with a 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT2C) receptor agonist and mimicked by systemic treatment with a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist in intact animals. These results indicate the causal involvement of reduced serotoninergic transmission in the emergence of compulsive drug seeking after a long cocaine-taking history. PMID:22763621

  8. Reduced forebrain serotonin transmission is causally involved in the development of compulsive cocaine seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Pelloux, Yann; Dilleen, Ruth; Economidou, Daina; Theobald, David; Everitt, Barry J

    2012-10-01

    Whereas the majority of cocaine users quit as they experience the negative consequences of drug use, some lose control over their drug taking and compulsively seek drugs. We report that 20% of rats compulsively seek cocaine despite intermittent negative outcomes after escalating their cocaine self-administration. This compulsive subgroup showed marked reductions in forebrain serotonin utilization; increasing serotonin transmission reduced their compulsive cocaine seeking. Depleting forebrain serotonin induced compulsive cocaine seeking in rats with a limited cocaine taking history; this was reversed by systemic treatment with a 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT2C) receptor agonist and mimicked by systemic treatment with a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist in intact animals. These results indicate the causal involvement of reduced serotoninergic transmission in the emergence of compulsive drug seeking after a long cocaine-taking history.

  9. Receptors for GRP/bombesin-like peptides in the rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, S.S.; Moody, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    Binding sites in the rat forebrain were characterized using ( SVI-Tyr4)bombesin as a receptor probe. Pharmacology experiments indicate that gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) and the GRP fragments GRP as well as Ac-GRP inhibited radiolabeled (Tyr4)bombesin binding with high affinity. Biochemistry experiments indicated that heat, N-ethyl maleimide or trypsin greatly reduced radiolabeled (Tyr4)bombesin binding. Also, autoradiographic studies indicated that highest grain densities were present in the stria terminalis, periventricular and suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, dorsomedial and rhomboid thalamus, dentate gyrus, hippocampus and medial amygdaloid nucleus. The data suggest that CNS protein receptors, which are discretely distributed in the rat forebrain, may mediate the action of endogenous GRP/bombesin-like peptides.

  10. Relative and absolute quantification of postsynaptic density proteome isolated from rat forebrain and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dongmei; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Rush, John; Ramm, Elizabeth; Schlager, Max A; Duong, Duc M; Xu, Ping; Wijayawardana, Sameera R; Hanfelt, John; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Sheng, Morgan; Peng, Junmin

    2006-06-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) of central excitatory synapses is essential for postsynaptic signaling, and its components are heterogeneous among different neuronal subtypes and brain structures. Here we report large scale relative and absolute quantification of proteins in PSDs purified from adult rat forebrain and cerebellum. PSD protein profiles were determined using the cleavable ICAT strategy and LC-MS/MS. A total of 296 proteins were identified and quantified with 43 proteins exhibiting statistically significant abundance change between forebrain and cerebellum, indicating marked molecular heterogeneity of PSDs between different brain regions. Moreover we utilized absolute quantification strategy, in which synthetic isotope-labeled peptides were used as internal standards, to measure the molar abundance of 32 key PSD proteins in forebrain and cerebellum. These data confirm the abundance of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and PSD-95 and reveal unexpected stoichiometric ratios between glutamate receptors, scaffold proteins, and signaling molecules in the PSD. Our data also demonstrate that the absolute quantification method is well suited for targeted quantitative proteomic analysis. Overall this study delineates a crucial molecular difference between forebrain and cerebellar PSDs and provides a quantitative framework for measuring the molecular stoichiometry of the PSD. PMID:16507876

  11. Activity of basal forebrain neurons in the rat during motivated behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mink, J W; Sinnamon, H M; Adams, D B

    1983-04-01

    The activity of single neurons in the basal forebrain was recorded in the freely-moving rat with moveable fine-wire electrodes. Neural activity was observed while the water-deprived male rat was exposed to three different types of motivating stimuli that elicit locomotion in a running wheel: an estrous female rat; a drinking tube containing water; and grasping and lifting by the experimenter. The neural activity was also observed when the subject was presented with standardized sensory tests and during single pulse stimulation of other brain structures. A majority of the 76 neurons recorded in the forebrain changed their firing rate during orienting and/or locomotion in general (23 neurons) or during behavior related to only one of the specific motivational contexts: the conspecific female (4 neurons); water (7 neurons); or grasp by the experimenter (8 neurons). Whereas the neurons related to orienting and/or locomotion in general were scattered through various brain structures, those neurons related to specific motivational contexts were concentrated in specific areas: the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the medial preoptic area (conspecific female); lateral septum (water); and lateral preoptic area (water and grasp). The present results, although based on relatively few neurons, are consonant with results of research using other techniques. This indicates that analyses at the level of the single neuron promise to be useful for understanding the role of the basal forebrain in motivational systems.

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment promotes neural stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhichun; Liu, Jing; Ju, Rong

    2013-05-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage has been used clinically for many years, but its effectiveness remains controversial. In addition, the mechanism of this potential neuroprotective effect remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the influence of hyperbaric oxygen on the proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats (7 days old) subjected to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. Six hours after modeling, rats were treated with hyperbaric oxygen once daily for 7 days. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine positive and nestin positive cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats increased at day 3 after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and peaked at day 5. After hyperbaric oxygen treatment, the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine positive and nestin positive cells began to increase at day 1, and was significantly higher than that in normal rats and model rats until day 21. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that hyperbaric oxygen treatment could attenuate pathological changes to brain tissue in neonatal rats, and reduce the number of degenerating and necrotic nerve cells. Our experimental findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen treatment enhances the proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage, and has therapeutic potential for promoting neurological recovery following brain injury.

  13. Effect of tramadol on behavioral alterations and lipid peroxidation after transient forebrain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Nagakannan, Pandian; Shivasharan, Basavaraj D; Thippeswamy, Boreddy S; Veerapur, Veeresh P

    2012-11-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists are proven protective in various animal models of ischemic brain damage. Tramadol, a centrally acting opioid analgesic reportedly possesses NMDA antagonistic and GABA agonistic properties, with additional ion channel blocking activity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible neuroprotective effect of tramadol hydrochloride in a rat model of transient forebrain ischemia. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with tramadol hydrochloride at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg b.w. intraperitoneally for 4 days and were subjected to 30 min occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries followed by reperfusion for 24 h. Impairment in sensorimotor functions was evaluated by beam walking task, spontaneous locomotor activity and hanging wire test. Animals were sacrificed and the brain homogenates were used for estimating the levels of lipid peroxidation, a marker for extent of oxidative stress. Ischemic rats exhibited a significant decrease in locomotion, grip strength and increase in beam walking latency. Tramadol attenuated the post ischemic motor impairment evidenced by improvement in the performance in sensorimotor tests. The extent of lipid peroxidation was significantly (p < 0.001) reduced by tramadol pretreatment which was higher in ischemic control. This study demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of tramadol against transient forebrain ischemia in rats. PMID:22871232

  14. Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters dopamine turnover in neonatal rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; Cui, Xiaoying; Ko, Pauline; McGrath, John J; Burne, Thomas H J; Eyles, Darryl W

    2009-09-18

    There is growing evidence that low vitamin D impacts adversely on brain development. The current study investigated the impact of developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency on dopamine and serotonin metabolism in the neonatal rat brain. DVD-deficiency resulted in an altered dopaminergic metabolic profile in the forebrain, with a decrease in the conversion of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) to homovanillic acid (HVA). Correspondingly, expression of the enzyme required for this conversion, catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT), was decreased. These results suggest that DVD-deficiency influences dopamine turnover during development. PMID:19500655

  15. Agmatine protection against chlorpromazine-induced forebrain cortex injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Ivana; Ninkovic, Milica; Stojanovic, Ivana; Lavrnja, Irena; Radicevic, Tatjana; Pavlovic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether agmatine (AGM) provides protection against oxidative stress induced by treatment with chlorpromazine (CPZ) in Wistar rats. In addition, the role of reactive oxygen species and efficiency of antioxidant protection in the brain homogenates of forebrain cortexes prepared 48 h after treatment were investigated. Chlorpromazine was applied intraperitoneally (i.p.) in single dose of 38.7 mg/kg body weight (BW) The second group was treated with both CPZ and AGM (75 mg/kg BW). The control group was treated with 0.9% saline solution in the same manner. All tested compounds were administered i.p. in a single dose. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation 48 h after treatment Treatment with AGM significantly attenuated the oxidative stress parameters and restored antioxidant capacity in the forebrain cortex. The data indicated that i.p. administered AGM exerted antioxidant action in CPZ-treated animals. Moreover, reactive astrocytes and microglia may contribute to secondary nerve-cell damage and participate in the balance of destructive vs. protective actions involved in the pathogenesis after poisoning. PMID:27051340

  16. Agmatine protection against chlorpromazine-induced forebrain cortex injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Dejanovic, Bratislav; Stevanovic, Ivana; Ninkovic, Milica; Stojanovic, Ivana; Lavrnja, Irena; Radicevic, Tatjana; Pavlovic, Milos

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate whether agmatine (AGM) provides protection against oxidative stress induced by treatment with chlorpromazine (CPZ) in Wistar rats. In addition, the role of reactive oxygen species and efficiency of antioxidant protection in the brain homogenates of forebrain cortexes prepared 48 h after treatment were investigated. Chlorpromazine was applied intraperitoneally (i.p.) in single dose of 38.7 mg/kg body weight (BW) The second group was treated with both CPZ and AGM (75 mg/kg BW). The control group was treated with 0.9% saline solution in the same manner. All tested compounds were administered i.p. in a single dose. Rats were sacrificed by decapitation 48 h after treatment Treatment with AGM significantly attenuated the oxidative stress parameters and restored antioxidant capacity in the forebrain cortex. The data indicated that i.p. administered AGM exerted antioxidant action in CPZ-treated animals. Moreover, reactive astrocytes and microglia may contribute to secondary nerve-cell damage and participate in the balance of destructive vs. protective actions involved in the pathogenesis after poisoning. PMID:27051340

  17. Gypenosides Protected the Neural Stem Cells in the Subventricular Zone of Neonatal Rats that Were Prenatally Exposed to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lun; Yang, Kun-Qi; Fu, Wen-Yan; Shang, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Jing, Fang-Miao; Li, Lin-Lin; Xin, Hua; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) can cause severe mental retardation in children who are prenatally exposed to ethanol. The effects of prenatal and early postnatal ethanol exposure on adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been investigated; however, the effects of prenatal ethanol exposure on the subventricular zone (SVZ) have not. Gypenosides (GPs) have been reported to have neuroprotective effects in addition to other bioactivities. The effects of GPs on neural stem cells (NSCs) in the FASD model are unknown. Here, we test the effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on the neonatal SVZ, and the protection potential of GPs on NSCs in FASD rats. Our results show that prenatal ethanol exposure can suppress the cell proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in the neonatal SVZ and that GPs (400 mg/kg/day) can significantly increase the cell proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells inhibited by ethanol. Our data indicate that GPs have neuroprotective effects on the NSCs and can enhance the neurogenesis inhibited by ethanol within the SVZ of neonatal rats. These findings provide new evidence for a potential therapy involving GPs for the treatment of FASD. PMID:25464383

  18. Differential prepuberal handling modifies behaviour and excitatory amino acids in the forebrain of the Naples High-Excitability rats.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, L A; Gironi Carnevale, U A; Sica, A; Arra, C; Topo, E; Di Giovanni, M; D'Aniello, A; Sadile, A G

    2009-03-01

    Naples High-Excitability (NHE) rats model the mesocortical variant of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Recently, a high level of excitatory amino acids (EAA) has been found in the forebrain of NHE rats. The aim of this study was to verify the effect of postnatal stimulation in prepuberal rats on forebrain EAA. Thus, prepuberal NHE and Naples Random Bred (NRB) control rats were daily handled (PS) or they were left undisturbed throughout (NO-PS). One hour after the last stimulation, PS and NO-PS rats were exposed to a spatial novelty in a Làt-maze and one day later to a non-reinforced Olton maze. In both tests the horizontal (HA) and vertical (frequency - VA and duration of rearing - RD) components of behaviour indexed activity and non-selective attention (NSA). Moreover, in the Olton maze the position of the number of arms visited before first repetition (FE) and to criterion (NVTC), indexed selective spatial attention (SSA). Amino acids were detected by HPLC in prefrontal cortex (PFC), striatum (STR), hippocampus (HPC) and hypothalamus (HYP). Results indicate that (i) in the Làt-maze, only for HA, NO-PS NHE rats were more active than PS, (ii) in the Olton maze NO-PS rats of both lines showed shorter rearing durations than PS, (iii) EAA level was higher in NHE than in NRB rats and (iv) NO-PS vs. PS treatment increased level of EAA across the forebrain in both rat lines. In contrast in NHE NO-PS rats L-glutamate (L-Glu) decreased in HYP and L-aspartate (L-Asp) decreased in HPC. In conclusion, postnatal stimulation in prepuberal rats significantly affects forebrain excitatory amino acids and behaviour in NHE line. Thus EAA are modulated by genetic determinants and environmental (epigenetic) factors.

  19. The cerebral metabolic effects of manipulating glutamatergic systems within the basal forebrain in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Browne, S E; Muir, J L; Robbins, T W; Page, K J; Everitt, B J; McCulloch, J

    1998-02-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptor-mediated manipulations of the cortical cholinergic input arising from the basal forebrain differentially affect cognitive function. We used [14C]-2-deoxyglucose autoradiography in conscious rats to map the effects of excitatory amino acid agonist infusions into the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) on cerebral functional activity, as reflected by local rates of glucose utilization. Acute stimulation of NBM neurones by local infusion of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), 15 min before glucose use measurement, resulted in glucose use reductions in nine cortical regions innervated by NBM efferents including prefrontal, frontal, sensorimotor and cingulate cortices. NMDA infusions altered glucose use in two cortical areas. Both AMPA and NMDA markedly increased glucose use in the striatum and globus pallidus, with concomitant perturbations in striato-pallidal projection targets including the substantia nigra, entopeduncular nucleus, subthalamic nucleus and lateral habenular nucleus. In contrast, the GABAA agonist muscimol did not affect glucose use in the NBM or neocortical regions, but induced glucose use increases in several subcortical nuclei including the substantia nigra and entopeduncular nucleus. The delayed effects of excitotoxic lesions were assessed 3 weeks after basal forebrain infusions of AMPA, NMDA, ibotenate or quisqualate. Statistically significant glucose use changes only occurred in the hypothalamus after NMDA, and the NBM after ibotenate infusions, although reduced cortical metabolism was apparent following AMPA-induced lesions of the NBM. Results support a dissociation between the functional sequelae of NMDA and non-NMDA receptor-mediated events in the basal forebrain, and long-term compensatory functional adaptation following cortical denervation.

  20. Basal forebrain neurons suppress amygdala kindling via cortical but not hippocampal cholinergic projections in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferencz, I; Leanza, G; Nanobashvili, A; Kokaia, M; Lindvall, O

    2000-06-01

    Intraventricular administration of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin in rats has been shown to cause a selective loss of cholinergic afferents to the hippocampus and cortical areas, and to facilitate seizure development in hippocampal kindling. Here we demonstrate that this lesion also accelerates seizure progression when kindling is induced by electrical stimulations in the amygdala. However, whereas intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin facilitated the development of the initial stages of hippocampal kindling, the same lesion promoted the late stages of amygdala kindling. To explore the role of various parts of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in amygdala kindling, selective lesions of the cholinergic projections to either hippocampus or cortex were produced by intraparenchymal injections of 192 IgG-saporin into medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band or nucleus basalis, respectively. Cholinergic denervation of the cortical regions caused acceleration of amygdala kindling closely resembling that observed after the more widespread lesion induced by intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin. In contrast, removal of the cholinergic input to the hippocampus had no effect on the development of amygdala kindling. These data indicate that basal forebrain cholinergic neurons suppress kindling elicited from amygdala, and that this dampening effect is mediated via cortical but not hippocampal projections.

  1. Selective depletion of Mac-1-expressing microglia in rat subventricular zone does not alter neurogenic response early after stroke.

    PubMed

    Heldmann, Ursula; Mine, Yutaka; Kokaia, Zaal; Ekdahl, Christine T; Lindvall, Olle

    2011-06-01

    Ischemic stroke induces migration of newly formed neuroblasts, generated by neural stem cells in the adult rat subventricular zone (SVZ), towards the injured striatum where they differentiate into mature neurons. Stroke also leads to accumulation of microglia in the SVZ but their role for neurogenesis is unclear. Here we developed a method for selective depletion of the macrophage antigen complex-1 (Mac-1)-expressing microglia population in the SVZ by intraventricular injection of the immunotoxin Mac-1-saporin in rats. We found that the vast majority of Mac-1+ cells were Iba-1+ microglia. The Mac-1+ population was heterogeneous and included both a small proliferative pool of cells, which was not affected by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and a larger subpopulation that changed morphologically into a semi-activated state in response to the insult. This subpopulation did not increase its expression of the phagocytic marker ED1 but exhibited high levels of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM-2), associated with alternative microglia activation. A minor portion of the SVZ Mac-1+ cells originated from the blood early after stroke, but this macrophage population became much more substantial at later stages. Almost 80% reduction of Mac-1-expressing microglia, caused by Mac-1 saporin delivered just before and at 1 week after MCAO, did not alter the numbers of newly formed neuroblasts in the striatum or their migratory distance. These findings indicate that the Mac-1-expressing microglia in the SVZ do not play a major role either for the number of neuroblasts which exit the SVZ or their migration in the striatum early following stroke.

  2. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Signaling Does Not Stimulate Subventricular Zone Neurogenesis in Adult Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Rui P.; Garcia-Verdugo, José Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    In rodents, the adult subventricular zone (SVZ) generates neuroblasts which migrate to the olfactory bulb (OB) and differentiate into interneurons. Recent work suggests that the neurotrophin Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) can enhance adult SVZ neurogenesis, but the mechanism by which it acts is unknown. Here, we analyzed the role of BDNF and its receptor TrkB in adult SVZ neurogenesis. We found that TrkB is the most prominent neurotrophin receptor in the mouse SVZ, but only the truncated, kinase-negative isoform (TrkB-TR) was detected. TrkB-TR is expressed in SVZ astrocytes and ependymal cells, but not in neuroblasts. TrkB mutants have reduced SVZ proliferation and survival and fewer new OB neurons. To test if this effect is cell-autonomous, we grafted SVZ cells from TrkB knockout mice (TrkB-KO) into the SVZ of wild-type mice (WT). Grafted progenitors generated neuroblasts that migrated to the OB in the absence of TrkB. The survival and differentiation of granular interneurons and Calbindin+ periglomerular interneurons seemed unaffected by the loss of TrkB, while dopaminergic periglomerular neurons were reduced. Intra-ventricular infusion of BDNF yielded different results depending on the animal species, having no effect on neuron production from mouse SVZ, while decreasing it in rats. Interestingly, mice and rats also differ in their expression of the neurotrophin receptor, p75. Our results indicate that TrkB is not essential for adult SVZ neurogenesis and do not support the current view that delivering BDNF to the SVZ can enhance adult neurogenesis. PMID:19074010

  3. Severe instead of mild hyperglycemia inhibits neurogenesis in the subventricular zone of adult rats after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Tan, S; Zhi, P K; Luo, Z K; Shi, J

    2015-09-10

    Accumulated evidence suggests that enhanced neurogenesis stimulated by ischemic injury contributes to stroke outcome. However, it is unclear whether hyperglycemia, which is frequently tested positive in patients with acute ischemic stroke, influences stroke-induced neurogenesis. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of hyperglycemia on stroke-induced neurogenesis in a rat model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. For this purpose, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (220-250 g) were subjected to 90 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Glucose was administered during ischemia to produce target blood levels ranging from 4.83 ± 0.94 mM (normoglycemia) to 20.76 ± 1.56 mM. To label proliferating cells in ischemic ipsilateral subventricular zone (SVZ) of lateral ventricles, 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected 24h after MCAO. Brains were harvested 2h post-BrdU to evaluate the effects of hyperglycemia on infarct volume and SVZ cell proliferation. Rats that were severely hyperglycemic (19.26 ± 1.48 mM to 20.76 ± 1.56 mM) during ischemia had 24.26% increase in infarct volume (P<0.05) and more serious neurological function deficits (P<0.05). The severe hyperglycemic rats also showed dramatically decreased proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) (P<0.05) and down-regulation of the phosphorylation of cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) (P<0.05)and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) (P<0.05) in ipsilateral SVZ. But the above-mentioned detrimental effects were not observed in rats that were rendered with mild hyperglycemia (9.43 ± 1.39-10.13 ± 1.24 mM). Our findings indicate that severe instead of mild hyperglycemia exacerbates ischemic injury and inhibits stroke-induced SVZ neurogenesis by a mechanism involving suppression of CREB and BDNF signaling.

  4. Preischemic Administration of Sevoflurane Does not Exert Dose-dependent Effects on the Outcome of Severe Forebrain Ischemia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoshihide; Kanazawa, Kaoru; Nasu, Ikuko

    2015-07-01

    We previously showed that preischemic administration of high-dose isoflurane worsened the outcome from severe forebrain ischemia in rats. Conversely, high doses of sevoflurane have been reported to improve the outcome from forebrain ischemia when the insult is moderate. To clarify the dose-dependent effects of sevoflurane on severe forebrain ischemia, we performed an outcome study using an identical protocol to that in our previous study with isoflurane. Fasting male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent surgical preparation for forebrain ischemia under halothane anesthesia. Anesthesia was changed to fentanyl/nitrous oxide to eliminate the halothane, after which 30 minutes of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, or 2.5 minimum alveolar concentration sevoflurane was administered. Ten minutes of ischemia was induced by bilateral carotid occlusion plus systemic hypotension, in which cessation of electroencephalographic activity was confirmed. Sevoflurane was discontinued and anesthesia continued with fentanyl/nitrous oxide for an additional 100 minutes. Outcome evaluation at 5 days postischemia included seizure incidence, mortality rate, neuromotor score, and histologic injuries to the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 and CA3. Different doses of sevoflurane did not statistically affect seizure incidence (10.0% to 18.2%), mortality rate (20.0% to 46.7%), cortical damage (mild to moderate degree), or hippocampal CA1 damage (93.7% to 96.7% neuronal necrosis) or CA3 damage (36.3% to 41.7%). Dose-dependent effects of sevoflurane were not observed for any of the outcome variables assessed in this rat model of severe forebrain ischemia. PMID:25390656

  5. Effects of prenatal exposure to ethanol on neocortical development: II. Cell proliferation in the ventricular and subventricular zones of the rat.

    PubMed

    Miller, M W

    1989-09-15

    Prenatal exposure to ethanol alters the generation of neocortical neurons; ethanol reduces the numbers of neurons generated between gestational day (G) 12 and G19 but paradoxically increases neuronogenesis after G19. The present study used [3H]thymidine autoradiography to examine the effects of ethanol on the proliferation of cells in the two cortical germinal zones, the ventricular and subventricular zones. Pregnant rats were fed one of three diets: a liquid ethanol-containing (6.7% v/v) diet (Et), a nutritionally matched isocaloric liquid diet (Ct), or chow and water (Ch). Fetuses were administered with [3H]thymidine on G13, G17, or G20 and killed 45-60 minutes later. Autoradiographs were prepared to identify radiolabeled and mitotic cells. Additional brains from 13-23-day-old fetuses were processed for cytoarchitectonic analyses. The size of the lateral ventricles in the fetuses was not significantly affected by the prenatal exposure. Both the ventricular and subventricular zones were evident throughout the period from G13 to G23. In all three groups, the ventricular zone was thickest from G13 to G17, but from G15 on, the ventricular zone of Et-treated fetuses was significantly thinner than those of either controls. On G13, G17, and G20, the labeling index (the ratio of radiolabeled cells to the total population) was significantly less in Et-treated fetuses. The mitotic index was similar in Et-, Ch-, and Ct-treated fetuses. The subventricular zone of all fetuses was most prominent during later fetal ages and it was thicker in Et-treated fetuses than in controls. Moreover, the labeling and mitotic indices for the subventricular zone of Et-treated rats were significantly greater than for controls. Thus, ethanol had different effects on the two neocortical germinal zones: the proliferation of ventricular cells was inhibited, whereas the proliferation of subventricular cells was stimulated. These data suggest that ethanol-induced changes in neuronogenesis result

  6. Analeptic activity produced by TRH microinjection into basal forebrain area of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, A.; Carino, M.A.; Lai, H.

    1986-03-05

    Earlier, Kalivas and Horita demonstrated that the analeptic effect of TRH was mediated in part by cholinergic neurons in the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB). Since the MS-DBB constitutes part of the cholinergic basal forebrain system, the present study investigated whether the area designated as the n. basalis of Meynert (NBM) was also sensitive to TRH in producing an antipentobarbital effect. Saline or TRH (0.5 ..mu..l) was microinjected via bilateral stainless steel cannulae implanted stereotaxically into the NBM using the coordinates of Wenk et al. Accuracy of cannula placement was confirmed by histological examination. Rats treated with PB (40 mg/kg, i.p.) lost their righting reflex for 130 +/- 28 min. Intrabasalis injection of TRH (but not saline) in doses of 0.1-1.0 ..mu..g exerted analeptic activity as follows: 0.1 ..mu..g = 81 +/- 21 min; 0.5 ..mu..g = 65 +/- 19 min; 1.0 ..mu..g = 45 +/- 10 min. All of these doses exerted significant shortening of narcosis duration of pentobarbitalized rats. The analeptic effect of TRH was blocked by atropine pretreatment, indicating that it was mediated via cholinergic mechanisms. High affinity, sodium-dependent /sup 3/H-choline uptake by cortical synaptosomes prepared from these animals was also increased by TRH. These results suggest that the cholinergic neurons of NBM are highly sensitive to TRH and contributes to the analeptic effect of TRH.

  7. Distribution of neurotensin/neuromedin N mRNA in rat forebrain: Unexpected abundance in hippocampus and subiculum

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M.J.; Miller, M.A.; Dorsa, D.M.; Bullock, B.P.; Helloni, R.H. Jr.; Dobner, P.R.; Leeman, S.E. )

    1989-07-01

    The authors have used in situ hybridization to determine the regional distribution of mRNA encoding the neurotensin/neuromedin N (NT/N) precursor in the forebrain of the adult male rat. Cells containing NT/N mRNA are widely distributed in the forebrain. These areas include the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, preoptic area, hypothalamus, amygdala, accumbens nucleus, caudate-putamen, and piriform and retrosplenial cortex. In general, the regional distribution of NT/N mRNA corresponds to the previously determined distribution of neurotensin-immunoreactive cell bodies; however, several notable exceptions were observed. The most striking difference occurs specifically in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, where intense labeling is associated with the pyramidal cell layer despite the reported absence of neurotensin-immunoreactive cells in this region. A second major discrepancy between NT/N mRNA abundance and neurotensin-immunoreactivity occurs in the intensely labeled subiculum, a region that contains only scattered neurotensin-immunoreactive cells in the adult. These results suggest that, in specific regions of the forebrain, NT/N precursor is processed to yield products other than neurotensin. In addition, these results provide an anatomical basis for studying the physiological regulation of NT/N mRNA levels in the forebrain.

  8. Fos immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain induced by electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lee Wei; Temel, Yasin; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Blokland, Arjan; Steinbusch, Harry

    2009-10-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) matter induces panic- or fear-like responses with intense emotional distress and severe anxiety. In this study, we evoked panic-like behaviour by dlPAG stimulation and evaluated the effect on neuronal activation in different brain regions. The number of c-Fos immunoreactive (c-Fos-ir) cells was measured semi-quantitatively through series of stained rat brain sections. Our results demonstrate strong neural activation in the medial prefrontal cortex, orbital cortex, anterior olfactory nuclei, secondary motor cortex, and the somatosensory cortex. Moderate increases in the number of c-Fos-ir cells were detected in various regions, including the hypothalamus, amygdala, and striatum. Additionally, there was mild expression of c-Fos-ir cells in the hippocampus, thalamus, and habenula regions. In conclusion, we have shown that deep brain stimulation of the dlPAG produced a distinctive pattern of neuronal activation across forebrain regions as compared to the sham and control animals.

  9. Growth cones isolated from developing rat forebrain: uptake and release of GABA and noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Gordon-Weeks, P R; Pearce, B R

    1985-08-01

    A growth cone-enriched fraction isolated from neonatal rat forebrain was shown to accumulate gamma-amino [3H]butyric acid ([3H]-GABA) and [3H]noradrenaline ([3H]NA). Uptake of both neurotransmitters was sodium- and temperature-dependent and exhibited saturation kinetics with Km values of 17.7 microM and 4.5 microM respectively and Vmax values of 114 pmol/min/mg protein and 59 pmol/min/mg protein respectively. Electron microscopic autoradiography showed that about 50% of isolated growth cones can accumulate [3H]GABA. Inhibitor studies showed that beta-alanine was a relatively weak inhibitor of [3H]GABA uptake compared to nipecotic acid and diamino-butyric acid. Growth cone fractions preloaded with [3H]GABA and [3H]NA demonstrated a K+ (25 mM) -induced release of both neurotransmitters. Of the K+-stimulated release of [3H]GABA 50% was Ca2+-dependent, whereas the release of [3H]NA was entirely Ca2+-independent.

  10. Effects of neonatal handling on the basal forebrain cholinergic system of adult male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Pondiki, S; Stamatakis, A; Fragkouli, A; Philippidis, H; Stylianopoulou, F

    2006-10-13

    Neonatal handling is an early experience which results in improved function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, increased adaptability and coping as a response to stress, as well as better cognitive abilities. In the present study, we investigated the effect of neonatal handling on the basal forebrain cholinergic system, since this system is known to play an important role in cognitive processes. We report that neonatal handling results in increased number of choline-acetyl transferase immunopositive cells in the septum/diagonal band, in both sexes, while no such effect was observed in the other cholinergic nuclei, such as the magnocellular preoptic nucleus and the nucleus basalis of Meynert. In addition, neonatal handling resulted in increased M1 and M2 muscarinic receptor binding sites in the cingulate and piriform cortex of both male and female rats. A handling-induced increase in M1 muscarinic receptor binding sites was also observed in the CA3 and CA4 (fields 3 and 4 of Ammon's horn) areas of the hippocampus. Furthermore, a handling-induced increase in acetylcholinesterase staining was found only in the hippocampus of females. Our results thus show that neonatal handling acts in a sexually dimorphic manner on one of the cholinergic parameters, and has a beneficial effect on BFCS function, which could be related to the more efficient and adaptive stress response and the superior cognitive abilities of handled animals.

  11. Nicotinic agonists modulate basal forebrain control of cortical cerebral blood flow in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Linville, D G; Williams, S; Raszkiewicz, J L; Arneric, S P

    1993-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated that electrical microstimulation of the cholinergic (basal forebrain, BF) elicits profound increases in cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) that are selectively attenuated by nicotinic receptor antagonists. This study sought to determine whether nicotinic receptor agonists such as (-)-nicotine, and related agents, can enhance the increases in CBF elicited by electrical stimulation of the BF of urethane-anesthetized rats. The magnitude of cortical CBF responses, measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry, increased progressively with higher frequencies (range = 6.25-50 Hz) to a maximum of 248% of control. (-)-Nicotine and (-)-lobeline each further enhanced the responses to BF stimulation, with (-)-nicotine having the most potent effect (up to 350%). (+)-Nicotine and (-)-cotinine were without effect, suggesting stereoselectivity and that the effects were not mediated by the major metabolite of (-)-nicotine. In contrast, (-)-cystisine, another nicotinic receptor agonist, modestly inhibited the BF-elicited increase in CBF suggesting nicotinic receptor subtype selectivity in mediating the response. Arecoline, a potent muscarinic agonist, was without effect suggesting that muscarinic mechanisms are not involved in the mediation of this response. None of the nicotinic agents had overt effects on heart rate or blood pressure in the dose ranges examined. In experiments targeting the site of action of the nicotinically mediated enhancement, (-)-nicotine microinjections into the BF elicited profound increases in cortical CBF, whereas similar injections into the cerebral cortex were without effect suggesting that nicotine receptors mediating CBF increases are localized to the BF.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8229773

  12. The age-dependent change in olfactory periglomerular neuronal populations is not affected by interrupting subventricular neuroblast migration in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Contreras-García, Jatziri I; Rodríguez-Castañeda, Leticia; Gómez-Lira, Gisela; Ramírez-Hernández, Rogelio; Villafán, Horacio; Granados-Rojas, Leticia; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Mendoza Torreblanca, Julieta G

    2012-07-26

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is rich in the number and variety of neurotransmitter and neuropeptide containing cells, in particular in the glomerular layer. Several reports suggest that numbers of some periglomerular phenotypes could change depending on age. However, it is unclear whether the different classes of periglomerular interneurons are modified or are maintained stable throughout life. Thus, our first objective was to obtain the absolute number of cells belonging to the different periglomerular phenotypes at adulthood. On the other hand, the olfactory bulb is continously supplied with newly generated periglomerular neurons produced by stem cells located in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory stream. Previously, we demonstrated that the implantation of a physical barrier completely prevents SVZ neuroblast migration towards the OB. Then, another objective of this study was to evaluate whether stopping the continuous supply of SVZ neuroblasts modified the different periglomerular populations throughout time. In summary, we estimated the total number of TH-IR, CalB-IR, CalR-IR and GAD-IR cells in the OB glomerular layer at several time points in control and barrier implanted adult rats. In addition, we estimated the volume of glomerular, granular and complete OB. Our main finding was that the number of the four main periglomerular populations is age-dependent, even after impairment of subventricular neuroblast migration. Furthermore, we established that these changes do not correlate with changes in the volume of glomerular layer.

  13. Distribution of metabotropic glutamate 2 and 3 receptors in the rat forebrain: Implication in emotional responses and central disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Gu, Guibao; Lorrain, Daniel S; Wei, Hongbing; Cole, Rebecca L; Zhang, Xin; Daggett, Lorrie P; Schaffhauser, Herve J; Bristow, Linda J; Lechner, Sandra M

    2008-03-01

    The receptor localization of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu) 2 and 3 was examined by using in situ hybridization and a well-characterized mGlu2-selective antibody in the rat forebrain. mGlu2 was highly and discretely expressed in cell bodies in almost all of the key regions of the limbic system in the forebrain, including the midline and intralaminar structures of the thalamus, the association cortices, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the medial mammillary nucleus, and the lateral and basolateral nuclei of the amygdala. Moreover, presynaptic mGlu2 terminals were found in most of the forebrain structures, especially in the lateral part of the central nucleus of the amygdala, and the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Although some overlaps exist, such as in the hippocampus and the amygdala, the expression of mGlu3 mRNA, however, appeared to be more disperse, compared with that of mGlu2 mRNA. These distribution results support previous behavioral studies that the mGlu2 and 3 receptors may play important roles in emotional responses. In addition to its expression in glia, mGlu3 was distinctively expressed in cells in the GABAergic reticular nucleus of the thalamus. Local infusion of a non-selective mGlu2/3 agonist, LY379268, in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus, significantly reduced GABA release, suggesting that mGlu3 may also play a role in central disinhibition. PMID:18242587

  14. Astaxanthin limits fish oil-related oxidative insult in the anterior forebrain of Wistar rats: putative anxiolytic effects?

    PubMed

    Mattei, Rita; Polotow, Tatiana G; Vardaris, Cristina V; Guerra, Beatriz A; Leite, José Roberto; Otton, Rosemari; Barros, Marcelo P

    2011-09-01

    The habitual consumption of marine fish is largely associated to human mental health. Fish oil is particularly rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that are known to play a role in several neuronal and cognitive functions. In parallel, the orange-pinkish carotenoid astaxanthin (ASTA) is found in salmon and displays important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Many neuronal dysfunctions and anomalous psychotic behavior (such as anxiety, depression, etc.) have been strongly related to the higher sensitivity of cathecolaminergic brain regions to oxidative stress. Thus, the aim of this work was to study the combined effect of ASTA and fish oil on the redox status in plasma and in the monoaminergic-rich anterior forebrain region of Wistar rats with possible correlations with the anxiolytic behavior. Upon fish oil supplementation, the downregulation of superoxide dismutase and catalase activities combined to increased "free" iron content resulted in higher levels of lipid and protein oxidation in the anterior forebrain of animals. Such harmful oxidative modifications were hindered by concomitant supplementation with ASTA despite ASTA-related antioxidant protection was mainly observed in plasma. Although it is clear that ASTA properly crosses the brain-blood barrier, our data also address a possible indirect role of ASTA in restoring basal oxidative conditions in anterior forebrain of animals: by improving GSH-based antioxidant capacity of plasma. Preliminary anxiolytic tests performed in the elevated plus maze are in alignment with our biochemical observations.

  15. Isolation and partial characterisation of neuronal growth cones from neonatal rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Weeks, P R; Lockerbie, R O

    1984-09-01

    We have devised a method for the isolation of viable neuronal growth cones from neonatal rat forebrain. The method involves differential and density gradient centrifugation and exploits the relatively low buoyant density (approximately 1.018 g/cm3) of growth cones. There are no known biochemical markers for growth cones and it was necessary therefore to monitor for their presence during the isolation using transmission electron microscopy. Several criteria were used to identify isolated growth cones including the presence of filopodia, an extensive system of branching, tubular smooth endoplasmic reticulum and a region rich in microfilaments subjacent to the plasma membrane. These morphological features are similar to those of growth cones identified unequivocally in intact developing brain and in tissue culture. Electron microscopical analysis showed that greater than 90% of membrane-bound, identifiable objects in one fraction were growth cones by these criteria. The major contaminant consisted of membrane sacs and vesicles of unidentified origin. There were only small amounts of isolated rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Isolated growth cones were roughly spherical in shape with a diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.5 micron (mean +/- 1 SD). They usually contained mitochondria, large granular vesicles and small vesicles, and occasionally contained coated vesicles, lysosomes, lamellar bodies and multivesicular bodies, and only very rarely, intermediate filaments. Occasionally, growth cones had rudimentary synapses on them. The viability of isolated growth cones was investigated by observing their behaviour in short-term culture. After a few hours in culture on poly-D-lysine-coated coverslips, growth cones flattened down and extended filopodia-like processes. This behaviour was inhibited by cytochalasin B and reversibly by cold (4 degrees C). We conclude that physiologically active growth cones can be isolated rapidly and in large numbers by the method described here.

  16. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation in isolated neuronal growth cones from developing rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Eddé, B; Prochiantz, A

    1989-03-01

    We have shown recently that neuronal growth cones isolated from developing rat forebrain possess an appreciable activity of adenylate cyclase, which produces cyclic AMP and can be stimulated by various neurotransmitter receptor agonists and by forskolin. To investigate cyclic AMP-mediated biochemical mechanisms in isolated growth cones, we have centered the present study on cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation. One-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis showed that cyclic AMP analogs increased incorporation of 32P into several phosphoproteins in molecular mass ranges of 50-58 and 76-82 kilodaltons, including those of 82, 76, and 51 kilodaltons. Two-dimensional electrophoresis, using isoelectric focusing in the first dimension, resolved phosphorylated alpha- and beta-tubulin species, actin, a very acidic protein (isoelectric point 4.0) with a molecular mass of 93 kilodaltons, and two proteins (x and x') closely neighboring beta-tubulin. Two other phosphoproteins seen in the gels had molecular masses of 56 and 51 kilodaltons (respective isoelectric points, 4.5 and 4.4) and, along with the 93-kilodalton phosphoprotein, were highly enriched in the isolated growth cones. Only the tubulin and actin species were major proteins in the isolated growth cones. Cyclic AMP analogs enhanced incorporation of 32P into phosphoproteins x and x', and, as assessed by immunoprecipitation, into beta-tubulin. Peptide digest experiments suggested that phosphoproteins x and x' are unrelated to beta-tubulin. Nonequilibrium two-dimensional electrophoresis resolved many phosphoproteins, of which a 79- and 75-kilodalton doublet, a 74-kilodalton species, and a 58-kilodalton doublet showed enhanced incorporation of 32P in the presence of cyclic AMP.

  17. Topographic organization of the basal forebrain projections to the perirhinal, postrhinal, and entorhinal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies have shown that the basal forebrain (BF) modulates cortical activation via its projections to the entire cortical mantle. However, the organization of these projections is only partially understood or, for certain areas, unknown. In this study, we examined the topographic organization of cholinergic and noncholinergic projections from the BF to the perirhinal, postrhinal, and entorhinal cortex by using retrograde tracing combined with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunohistochemistry in rats. The perirhinal and postrhinal cortex receives major cholinergic and noncholinergic input from the caudal BF, including the caudal globus pallidus and substantia innominata and moderate input from the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, whereas the entorhinal cortex receives major input from the rostral BF, including the medial septum and the vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band. In the perirhinal cases, cholinergic projection neurons are distributed more caudally in the caudal globus pallidus than noncholinergic projection neurons. Compared with the perirhinal cases, the distribution of cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons projecting to the postrhinal cortex shifts slightly caudally in the caudal globus pallidus. The distribution of cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons projecting to the lateral entorhinal cortex extends more caudally in the BF than to the medial entorhinal cortex. The ratio of ChAT-positive projection neurons to total projection neurons is higher in the perirhinal/postrhinal cases (26-48%) than in the entorhinal cases (13-30%). These results indicate that the organization of cholinergic and noncholinergic projections from the BF to the parahippocampal cortex is more complex than previously described. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2503-2515, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26780730

  18. The olfactory conditioning in the early postnatal period stimulated neural stem/progenitor cells in the subventricular zone and increased neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb of rats.

    PubMed

    So, K; Moriya, T; Nishitani, S; Takahashi, H; Shinohara, K

    2008-01-01

    The olfactory memory acquired during the early postnatal period is known to be maintained for a long period, however, its neural mechanism remains to be clarified. In the present study, we examined the effect of olfactory conditioning during the early postnatal period on neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb of rats. Using the bromodeoxyuridine-pulse chase method, we found that the olfactory conditioning, which was a paired presentation of citral odor (conditioned stimulus) and foot shock (unconditioned stimulus) in rat pups on postnatal day 11, stimulated the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the anterior subventricular zone (aSVZ), but not in the olfactory bulb, at 24 h after the conditioning. However, the number of newborn cells in the olfactory bulb was increased at 2 weeks, but not 8 weeks, after such conditioning. Neither the exposure of a citral odor alone nor foot shock alone affected the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the aSVZ at 24 h after and the number of newborn cells in the olfactory bulb at 2 weeks after. The majority of newborn cells in the olfactory bulb of either the conditioned rats or the unconditioned rats expressed the neural marker NeuN, thus indicating that the olfactory conditioning stimulated neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb. These results suggest that olfactory conditioning during the early postnatal period temporally stimulates neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb of rats.

  19. Comprehensive Mapping of Regional Expression of the Clock Protein PERIOD2 in Rat Forebrain across the 24-h Day

    PubMed Central

    Harbour, Valerie L.; Weigl, Yuval; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a light-entrainable clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms by synchronizing oscillators throughout the brain and body. Notably, the nature of the relation between the SCN clock and subordinate oscillators in the rest of the brain is not well defined. We performed a high temporal resolution analysis of the expression of the circadian clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2) in the rat forebrain to characterize the distribution, amplitude and phase of PER2 rhythms across different regions. Eighty-four LEW/Crl male rats were entrained to a 12-h: 12-h light/dark cycle, and subsequently perfused every 30 min across the 24-h day for a total of 48 time-points. PER2 expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry and analyzed using automated cell counts. We report the presence of PER2 expression in 20 forebrain areas important for a wide range of motivated and appetitive behaviors including the SCN, bed nucleus, and several regions of the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and cortex. Eighteen areas displayed significant PER2 rhythms, which peaked at different times of day. Our data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized regional distribution of rhythms of a clock protein expression in the brain that provides a sound basis for future studies of circadian clock function in animal models of disease. PMID:24124556

  20. Pain sensitivity following loss of cholinergic basal forebrain (CBF) neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vierck, C J; Yezierski, R P; Wiley, R G

    2016-04-01

    Flexion/withdrawal reflexes are attenuated by spinal, intracerebroventricular (ICV) and systemic delivery of cholinergic agonists. In contrast, some affective reactions to pain are suppressed by systemic cholinergic antagonism. Attention to aversive stimulation can be impaired, as is classical conditioning of fear and anxiety to aversive stimuli and psychological activation of stress reactions that exacerbate pain. Thus, in contrast to the suppressive effects of cholinergic agonism on reflexes, pain sensitivity and affective reactions to pain could be attenuated by reduced cerebral cholinergic activation. This possibility was evaluated in the present study, using an operant test of escape from nociceptive thermal stimulation (10 °C and 44.5 °C) before and after destruction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. ICV injection of 192 IgG-saporin produced widespread loss of basal forebrain cholinergic innervation of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Post-injection, escape from thermal stimulation was decreased with no indication of recovery for upto 19 weeks. Also, the normal hyperalgesic effect of sound stress was absent after ICV 192-sap. Effects of cerebral cholinergic denervation or stress on nociceptive licking and guarding reflexes were not consistent with the effects on operant escape, highlighting the importance of evaluating pain sensitivity of laboratory animals with an operant behavioral test. These results reveal that basal forebrain cholinergic transmission participates in the cerebral processing of pain, which may be relevant to the pain sensitivity of patients with Alzheimer's disease who have prominent degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. PMID:26812034

  1. A Novel Biopsy Method for Isolating Neural Stem Cells from the Subventricular Zone of the Adult Rat Brain for Autologous Transplantation in CNS Injuries.

    PubMed

    Aligholi, Hadi; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Gorji, Ali; Azari, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Despite all attempts the problem of regeneration in damaged central nervous system (CNS) has remained challenging due to its cellular complexity and highly organized and sophisticated connections. In this regard, stem cell therapy might serve as a viable therapeutic approach aiming either to support the damaged tissue and hence to reduce the subsequent neurological dysfunctions and impairments or to replace the lost cells and re-establish damaged circuitries. Adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) are one of the outstanding cell sources that can be isolated from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles. These cells can differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Implanting autologous NS/PCs will greatly benefit the patients by avoiding immune rejection after implantation, better survival, and integration with the host tissue. Developing safe and efficient methods in small animal models will provide us with the opportunity to optimize procedures required to achieve successful human autologous NS/PC transplantation in near future. In this chapter, a highly controlled and safe biopsy method for harvesting stem cell containing tissue from the SVZ of adult rat brain is introduced. Then, isolation and expansion of NS/PCs from harvested specimen as well as the techniques to verify proliferation and differentiation capacity of the resulting NS/PCs are discussed. Finally, a method for assessing the biopsy lesion volume in the brain is described. This safe biopsy method in rat provides a unique tool to study autologous NS/PC transplantation in different CNS injury models. PMID:27604747

  2. Time course of behavioral changes following basal forebrain cholinergic damage in rats: Environmental enrichment as a therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Paban, V; Jaffard, M; Chambon, C; Malafosse, M; Alescio-Lautier, B

    2005-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to study changes in behavior following immunolesioning of the basal forebrain cholinergic system. Rats were lesioned at 3 months of age by injection of the 192 IgG-saporin immunotoxin into the medial septum area and the nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and then tested at different times after surgery (from days 7-500) on a range of behavioral tests, administered in the following order: a nonmatching-to-position task in a T-maze, an object-recognition task, an object-location task, and an open-field activity test. The results revealed a two-way interaction between post-lesion behavioral testing time and memory demands. In the nonmatching-to-position task, memory deficits appeared quite rapidly after surgery, i.e. at a post-lesion time as short as 1 month. In the object-recognition test, memory impairments appeared only when rats were tested at late post-lesion times (starting at 15 months), whereas in the object-location task deficits were apparent at early post-lesion times (starting from 2 months). Taking the post-operative time into account, one can hypothesize that at the shortest post-lesion times, behavioral deficits are due to pure cholinergic depletion, while as the post-lesion time increases, one can speculate the occurrence of a non-cholinergic system decompensation process and/or a gradual degeneration process affecting other neuronal systems that may contribute to mnemonic impairments. Interestingly, when middle-aged rats were housed in an enriched environment, 192 IgG-saporin-lesioned rats performed better than standard-lesioned rats on both the nonmatching-to-position and the object-recognition tests. Environment enrichment had significant beneficial effects in 192 IgG-saporin-lesioned rats, suggesting that lesioned rats at late post-lesion times (over 1 year) still have appreciable cognitive plasticity.

  3. Time course of behavioral changes following basal forebrain cholinergic damage in rats: Environmental enrichment as a therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Paban, V; Jaffard, M; Chambon, C; Malafosse, M; Alescio-Lautier, B

    2005-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to study changes in behavior following immunolesioning of the basal forebrain cholinergic system. Rats were lesioned at 3 months of age by injection of the 192 IgG-saporin immunotoxin into the medial septum area and the nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and then tested at different times after surgery (from days 7-500) on a range of behavioral tests, administered in the following order: a nonmatching-to-position task in a T-maze, an object-recognition task, an object-location task, and an open-field activity test. The results revealed a two-way interaction between post-lesion behavioral testing time and memory demands. In the nonmatching-to-position task, memory deficits appeared quite rapidly after surgery, i.e. at a post-lesion time as short as 1 month. In the object-recognition test, memory impairments appeared only when rats were tested at late post-lesion times (starting at 15 months), whereas in the object-location task deficits were apparent at early post-lesion times (starting from 2 months). Taking the post-operative time into account, one can hypothesize that at the shortest post-lesion times, behavioral deficits are due to pure cholinergic depletion, while as the post-lesion time increases, one can speculate the occurrence of a non-cholinergic system decompensation process and/or a gradual degeneration process affecting other neuronal systems that may contribute to mnemonic impairments. Interestingly, when middle-aged rats were housed in an enriched environment, 192 IgG-saporin-lesioned rats performed better than standard-lesioned rats on both the nonmatching-to-position and the object-recognition tests. Environment enrichment had significant beneficial effects in 192 IgG-saporin-lesioned rats, suggesting that lesioned rats at late post-lesion times (over 1 year) still have appreciable cognitive plasticity. PMID:15780463

  4. DOSE-RELATED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN FOREBRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE, LOW-LEVEL CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE IN NEONATAL RATS

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Anamika; Liu, Jing; Ayoubi, Patricia; Pope, Carey

    2010-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide (OP) and putative developmental neurotoxicant in humans. The acute toxicity of CPF is elicited by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. We characterized dose-related (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) gene expression profiles and changes in cell signaling pathways 24 hr following acute CPF exposure in seven day-old rats. Microarray experiments indicated that approximately 9% of the 44,000 genes were differentially expressed following either one of the four CPF dosages studied (546, 505, 522, and 3,066 genes with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg CPF). Genes were grouped according to dose-related expression patterns using K-means clustering while gene networks and canonical pathways were evaluated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis®. Twenty clusters were identified and differential expression of selected genes was verified by RT-PCR. The four largest clusters (each containing from 276–905 genes) constituted over 50% of all differentially expressed genes and exhibited up-regulation following exposure to the highest dosage (2 mg/kg CPF). The total number of gene networks affected by CPF also rose sharply with the highest dosage of CPF (18, 16, 18 and 50 with 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg CPF). Forebrain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly reduced (26%) only in the highest dosage group. Based on magnitude of dose-related changes in differentially expressed genes, relative numbers of gene clusters and signaling networks affected, and forebrain ChE inhibition only at 2 mg/kg CPF, we focused subsequent analyses on this treatment group. Six canonical pathways were identified that were significantly affected by 2 mg/kg CPF (MAPK, oxidative stress, NFKB, mitochondrial dysfunction, arylhydrocarbon receptor and adrenergic receptor signaling). Evaluation of different cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes suggested changes related to olfactory receptors, cell adhesion/migration, synapse

  5. Dose-related gene expression changes in forebrain following acute, low-level chlorpyrifos exposure in neonatal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Anamika; Liu Jing; Ayoubi, Patricia; Pope, Carey

    2010-10-15

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a widely used organophosphorus insecticide (OP) and putative developmental neurotoxicant in humans. The acute toxicity of CPF is elicited by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. We characterized dose-related (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) gene expression profiles and changes in cell signaling pathways 24 h following acute CPF exposure in 7-day-old rats. Microarray experiments indicated that approximately 9% of the 44,000 genes were differentially expressed following either one of the four CPF dosages studied (546, 505, 522, and 3,066 genes with 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg CPF). Genes were grouped according to dose-related expression patterns using K-means clustering while gene networks and canonical pathways were evaluated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (registered) . Twenty clusters were identified and differential expression of selected genes was verified by RT-PCR. The four largest clusters (each containing from 276 to 905 genes) constituted over 50% of all differentially expressed genes and exhibited up-regulation following exposure to the highest dosage (2 mg/kg CPF). The total number of gene networks affected by CPF also rose sharply with the highest dosage of CPF (18, 16, 18 and 50 with 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg CPF). Forebrain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was significantly reduced (26%) only in the highest dosage group. Based on magnitude of dose-related changes in differentially expressed genes, relative numbers of gene clusters and signaling networks affected, and forebrain ChE inhibition only at 2 mg/kg CPF, we focused subsequent analyses on this treatment group. Six canonical pathways were identified that were significantly affected by 2 mg/kg CPF (MAPK, oxidative stress, NF{Kappa}B, mitochondrial dysfunction, arylhydrocarbon receptor and adrenergic receptor signaling). Evaluation of different cellular functions of the differentially expressed genes suggested changes related to olfactory receptors, cell adhesion/migration, synapse

  6. A 14C-2-deoxyglucose analysis of the neural pathways of the limbic forebrain in the rat: II. The hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Watson, R E; Troiano, R; Poulakos, J; Weiner, S; Siegel, A

    1982-05-01

    An attempt was made to characterize the nature of the functional organization of the hypothalamus by observing the patterns of uptake of 14C-2-deoxyglucose (2DG) following electrical stimulation of different regions within the preoptico-hypothalamus in the rat. The experimental paradigm consisted of electrical brain stimulation delivered continuously for periods of 30 sec on and 30 sec off for 45 minutes following injection of 2DG. Brains were removed and processed for autoradiography. Activation of the medial forebrain bundle was noted following stimulation of the nucleus accumbens and lateral preoptico-hypothalamus. Activated fibers could be followed only in a caudal direction through the medial forebrain bundle and into the ventral tegmental area as a result of nucleus accumbens stimulation. Stimulation of the lateral preoptic region or of the anterior half of lateral hypothalamus produced activation of the lateral septal nucleus, lateral habenular nucleus, perifornical region, midline thalamus and ventral tegmental area. Since stimulation of the perifornical hypothalamus significantly activated the rostro-caudal extent of the midbrain cental gray, it is suggested that impulses from the lateral hypothalamus reach the lower brainstem via its connections with the perifornical hypothalamus. Ventromedial hypothalamic stimulation activated only the lateral septal nucleus, cortico-medial amygdala and medial preoptico-hypothalamus, while medial preoptico-hypothalamic stimulation resulted in increased 2DG uptake in the midbrain central gray, thus suggesting that medial hypothalamic impulses reach the brainstem by first ascending to the level of the preoptico-hypothalamus. Mammillary body stimulation orthodromically activated fibers in the mammillothalamic and mammillotegmental tracts and antidromically fibers in the fornix for a short distance.

  7. Aging of the subventricular zone neural stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Conover, Joanne C; Shook, Brett A

    2011-02-01

    The persistence of an active subventricular zone neural stem cell niche in the adult mammalian forebrain supports its continued role in the production of new neurons and in generating cells to function in repair through adulthood. Unfortunately, with increasing age the niche begins to deteriorate, compromising these functions. The reasons for this decline are not clear. Studies are beginning to define the molecular and physiologic changes in the microenvironment of the aging subventricular zone niche. New revelations from aging studies will allow for a more thorough understanding of which reparative functions are lost in the aged brain, the progression of niche demise and the possibility for therauptic intervention to improve aging brain function. PMID:22396866

  8. Trifluoperazine and dibucaine-induced inhibition of glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization in rat cultured forebrain neurones.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, K R; Sharma, T A; Reynolds, I J

    1997-11-01

    1. Glutamate receptor activation has been previously shown to result in mitochondrial depolarization and activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cultured neurones. In this study, we characterized the effects of two putative permeability transition inhibitors, namely trifluoperazine and dibucaine, on mitochondrial depolarization in rat intact, cultured forebrain neurones. 2. Permeability transition was monitored by following mitochondrial depolarization in neurones loaded with the mitochondrial membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent indicator, JC-1. Trifluoperazine (10 20 microM) and dibucaine (50-100 microM) inhibited or delayed the onset of glutamate-induced permeability transition. 3. We also investigated the effects of trifluoperazine and dibucaine on neuronal recovery from glutamate-induced Ca2+ loads. Trifluoperazine affected Ca2+ recovery in a manner similar to the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor, CGP-37157, while dibucaine had no apparent effect on Ca2+ recovery. Therefore, inhibition of permeability transition does not appear to be involved in Ca2+ recovery from glutamate-induced Ca2+ loads. 4. Trifluoperazine and dibucaine did not inhibit [3H]-dizocilpine binding at the concentrations that prevented mitochondrial depolarization. 5. These studies suggest that trifluoperazine and dibucaine inhibit permeability transition in intact neurones. Trifluoperazine also appears to inhibit mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These drugs should prove to be valuable tools in the further study of the role of mitochondrial permeability transition in glutamate-induced neuronal death.

  9. Expression of complexin I and II mRNAs and their regulation by antipsychotic drugs in the rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, S L; Burnet, P W; Harrison, P J

    2000-06-01

    Complexin (cx) I and II are homologous synaptic protein genes which are differentially expressed in mouse and human brain and differentially affected in schizophrenia. We characterized the distribution of cx I and II mRNAs in rat forebrain and examined whether their abundance, or the transcript of the synaptic marker synaptophysin, is affected by 14 days' administration of antipsychotic drugs (haloperidol, chlorpromazine, risperidone, olanzapine, or clozapine). Cx I mRNA predominated in medial habenula, medial septum-diagonal band complex, and thalamus, whereas cx II mRNA was more abundant in most other regions, including isocortex and hippocampus. Within the hippocampus, cx I mRNA was primarily expressed by interneurons and cx II mRNA by granule cells and pyramidal neurons. Localized cx II mRNA signal was seen in the dentate gyrus molecular layer, suggestive of its transport into granule cell dendrites. Antipsychotic treatment produced selective, modest effects on cx mRNA expression. Cx I mRNA was elevated by olanzapine in dorsolateral striatum and frontoparietal cortex, while the abundance of cx II mRNA relative to cx I mRNA was decreased in both areas by olanzapine and haloperidol. Chlorpromazine increased cx II mRNA in frontoparietal cortex and synaptophysin mRNA in dorsolateral striatum. In summary, the data have implications both for understanding the effects of antipsychotic medication on synaptic organization, and for synaptic protein expression studies in patients treated with the drugs.

  10. Trifluoperazine and dibucaine-induced inhibition of glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization in rat cultured forebrain neurones

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, Kari R; Sharma, Terre A; Reynolds, Ian J

    1997-01-01

    Glutamate receptor activation has been previously shown to result in mitochondrial depolarization and activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in cultured neurones. In this study, we characterized the effects of two putative permeability transition inhibitors, namely trifluoperazine and dibucaine, on mitochondrial depolarization in rat intact, cultured forebrain neurones. Permeability transition was monitored by following mitochondrial depolarization in neurones loaded with the mitochondrial membrane potential-sensitive fluorescent indicator, JC-1. Trifluoperazine (10–20 μM) and dibucaine (50–100 μM) inhibited or delayed the onset of glutamate-induced permeability transition. We also investigated the effects of trifluoperazine and dibucaine on neuronal recovery from glutamate-induced Ca2+ loads. Trifluoperazine affected Ca2+ recovery in a manner similar to the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor, CGP-37157, while dibucaine had no apparent effect on Ca2+ recovery. Therefore, inhibition of permeability transition does not appear to be involved in Ca2+ recovery from glutamate-induced Ca2+ loads. Trifluoperazine and dibucaine did not inhibit [3H]-dizocilpine binding at the concentrations that prevented mitochondrial depolarization. These studies suggest that trifluoperazine and dibucaine inhibit permeability transition in intact neurones. Trifluoperazine also appears to inhibit mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These drugs should prove to be valuable tools in the further study of the role of mitochondrial permeability transition in glutamate-induced neuronal death. PMID:9384493

  11. Development of functional thalamocortical synapses studied with current source-density analysis in whole forebrain slices in the rat.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Zoltán; Kurotani, Tohru; Higashi, Shuji; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko; Toyama, Keisuke

    2003-05-30

    We analysed the laminar distribution of transmembrane currents from embryonic (E) day 17 until adulthood after selective thalamic stimulation in slices of rat forebrain to study the development of functional thalamocortical and cortico-cortical connections. At E18 to birth a short-latency current sink was observed in the subplate and layer 6, which was decreased, but not fully abolished in a cobalt containing solution or after the application of glutamate receptor blockers (APV and DNQX). This indicated that embryonic thalamic axons were capable of conducting action potentials to the cortex and some of them had already formed functional synapses there. Between birth and P3, when thalamic axons were completing their upward growth, a sink gradually appeared more superficially in the dense cortical plate and synchronously, a current source aroused in layer 5. Both sinks and sources completely disappeared after blocking synaptic transmission. The adult-like distribution of CSDs became apparent after P7. The component in layer 6 cannot be blocked completely after this age suggesting antidromic activation. This study demonstrated that cells of the lowest layers of the cortex received functional thalamic input before birth and that thalamocortical axons formed synapses with more superficial cells as they grew into the cortical plate.

  12. Variable restricted feeding disrupts the daily oscillations of Period2 expression in the limbic forebrain and dorsal striatum in rats.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Amir, Shimon

    2012-02-01

    Predictable restricted feeding schedules limit food availability to a single meal at the same time each day, lead to the induction and entrainment of circadian rhythms in food-anticipatory activity, and shift daily rhythms of clock gene expression in areas of the brain that are important in the regulation of motivational and emotional state. In contrast, when food is delivered under a variable restricted feeding (VRF) schedule, at a new and unpredictable mealtime each day, circadian rhythms in food-anticipatory activity fail to develop. Here, we study the effects of VRF on the daily rhythm of plasma corticosterone and of clock gene expression in the limbic forebrain and dorsal striatum, of rats provided a 2-h access to a complete meal replacement (Ensure Plus) at an unpredictable time each day. VRF schedules varied the mealtimes within the 12 h of light (daytime VRF), the 12 h of dark (nighttime VRF), or across the 24 h light-dark cycle (anytime VRF). Our results show that contrary to the synchronizing effects of predictable restricted feeding, VRF blunts the daily corticosterone rhythm and disrupts daily rhythms of PER2 expression in a region-specific and mealtime-dependent manner.

  13. Variable restricted feeding disrupts the daily oscillations of Period2 expression in the limbic forebrain and dorsal striatum in rats.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Amir, Shimon

    2012-02-01

    Predictable restricted feeding schedules limit food availability to a single meal at the same time each day, lead to the induction and entrainment of circadian rhythms in food-anticipatory activity, and shift daily rhythms of clock gene expression in areas of the brain that are important in the regulation of motivational and emotional state. In contrast, when food is delivered under a variable restricted feeding (VRF) schedule, at a new and unpredictable mealtime each day, circadian rhythms in food-anticipatory activity fail to develop. Here, we study the effects of VRF on the daily rhythm of plasma corticosterone and of clock gene expression in the limbic forebrain and dorsal striatum, of rats provided a 2-h access to a complete meal replacement (Ensure Plus) at an unpredictable time each day. VRF schedules varied the mealtimes within the 12 h of light (daytime VRF), the 12 h of dark (nighttime VRF), or across the 24 h light-dark cycle (anytime VRF). Our results show that contrary to the synchronizing effects of predictable restricted feeding, VRF blunts the daily corticosterone rhythm and disrupts daily rhythms of PER2 expression in a region-specific and mealtime-dependent manner. PMID:21547532

  14. Postnatal development of nestin positive neurons in rat basal forebrain: different onset and topography with choline acetyltransferase and parvalbumin expression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kai-Hua; Li, Dong-Pei; Gu, Huai-Yu; Jie-Xu; Yao, Zhi-Bin

    2014-06-01

    Our previous studies identified a sub-population of cholinergic neurons which express nestin in the rostral part of the basal forebrain (BF) in normal adult rats. In the present study, the postnatal developmental patterns of nestin, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) and parvalbumin (PV) positive neurons were explored by means of immunohistochemistry combined with immunofluorescence double label methods. Compared with early onset of ChAT expression (from P1) and delayed onset of PV expression (from P16), nestin positive activity was detected in the BF from P9 and co-expressed by parts of the ChAT positive neurons within the same region during the whole postnatal development process. However, ChAT and PV were not coexpressed by the neurons within the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB) of BF. These results might imply a composite of separate development patterns displayed by different subpopulations of cholinergic neurons (nestin positive cholinergic neurons and nestin negative cholinergic neurons) within this region. Moreover, the topographic distribution of nestin, ChAT and PV positive neurons also showed different characteristics. In summary, our present study revealed a remarkable timing and topographic difference on the postnatal development of the nestin expression within the MS-DBB of BF compared with ChAT and PV expression. It is further suggested that nestin is re-expressed by cholinergic neurons in the BF after differentiation but not persisted from neuronal precursor cells. PMID:24657285

  15. Forebrain gene expression predicts deficits in sensorimotor gating after isolation rearing in male rats.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, Neal R; Light, Gregory A; Trim, Ryan S; Breier, Michelle R; Hines, Samantha R; Powell, Susan B

    2013-11-15

    Compared to socially housed (SH) rats, adult isolation-reared (IR) rats exhibit phenotypes relevant to schizophrenia (SZ), including reduced prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle. PPI is normally regulated by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAC). We assessed PPI, auditory-evoked local field potentials (LFPs) and expression of seven PPI- and SZ-related genes in the mPFC and NAC, in IR and SH rats. Buffalo (BUF) rats were raised in same-sex groups of 2-3 (SH) or in isolation (IR). PPI was measured early (d53) and later in adulthood (d74); LFPs were measured approximately on d66. Brains were processed for RT-PCR measures of mPFC and NAC expression of Comt, Erbb4, Grid2, Ncam1, Slc1a2, Nrg1 and Reln. Male IR rats exhibited PPI deficits, most pronounced at d53; male and female IR rats had significantly elevated startle magnitude on both test days. Gene expression levels were not significantly altered by IR. PPI levels (d53) were positively correlated with mPFC expression of several genes, and negatively correlated with NAC expression of several genes, in male IR but not SH rats. Late (P90) LFP amplitudes correlated significantly with expression levels of 6/7 mPFC genes in male rats, independent of rearing. After IR that disrupts early adult PPI in male BUF rats, expression levels of PPI- and SZ-associated genes in the mPFC correlate positively with PPI, and levels in the NAC correlate negatively with PPI. These results support the model that specific gene-behavior relationships moderate the impact of early-life experience on SZ-linked behavioral and neurophysiological markers.

  16. The effect of prefrontal stimulation on the firing of basal forebrain neurons in urethane anesthetized rat

    PubMed Central

    Gyengési, Erika; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Détári, László

    2008-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) contains a heterogeneous population of cholinergic and non-cholinergic corticopetal neurons and interneurons. Neurons firing at a higher rate during fast cortical EEG activity (f > 16Hz) were called F-cells, while neurons that increase their firing rate during high-amplitude slow-cortical waves (f < 4Hz) were categorized as S-cells. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) projects heavily to the BF, although little is know how it affects the firing of BF units. In this study, we investigated the effect of stimulation of the medial PFC on the firing rate of BF neurons (n=57) that were subsequently labeled by biocytin using juxtacellular filling (n=22). BF units were categorized in relation to tail-pinch induced and spontaneous EEG changes. Electrical stimulation of the medial PFC led to responses in 28 out of 41 F cells and in 8 out of 9 S cells. Within the sample of responsive F cells, 57% showed excitation (n=8) or excitation followed by inhibitory period (n=8). The remaining F cells expressed a short (n=6) or long inhibitory (n=6) response. In contrast, 75% of the recorded S cells (n=9) reduced their firing after prefrontal stimulation. Among the F-cells, we recovered one cholinergic neuron and one parvalbumin-containing neuron using juxtacellular filling and subsequent immunocytochemistry. While the PV cell displayed short latency facilitation, the cholinergic cell showed significant inhibition with much longer latency in response to the prefrontal stimulus. This is in agreement with previous anatomical data showing that prefrontal projections directly target mostly non-cholinergic cells, including GABAergic neurons. PMID:18355633

  17. Effects of short-term hormonal replacement on learning and on basal forebrain ChAT and TrkA content in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Raya, Judith; Plata-Cruz, Noemí; Neri-Gómez, Teresa; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Picazo, Ofir

    2011-02-23

    It has been proposed that sex steroid hormones improve performance in some cognitive tasks by regulating the basal forebrain cholinergic function. However, the molecular basis of such influence still remains unknown. Current study analyzed the performance of ovariectomized rats in an autoshaping learning task after a short-term treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2: 4 and 40μg/kg) and/or progesterone (P4: 4mg/kg). These results were correlated with basal forebrain choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and TrkA protein content. The high dose of E2 enhanced both acquisition in the autoshaping task and the content of ChAT and TrkA. P4 treatment increased ChAT and TrkA content without affecting performance of rats in the autoshaping learning task. Interestingly, the continuous and simultaneous administration of E2 plus P4 did not significantly modify behavioral and biochemical evaluated parameters. These results address the influence of both E2 and P4 on cholinergic and TrkA activity and suggest that the effects of ovarian hormones on cognitive performance involve basal forebrain cholinergic neurons.

  18. Effects of short-term hormonal replacement on learning and on basal forebrain ChAT and TrkA content in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Raya, Judith; Plata-Cruz, Noemí; Neri-Gómez, Teresa; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Picazo, Ofir

    2011-02-23

    It has been proposed that sex steroid hormones improve performance in some cognitive tasks by regulating the basal forebrain cholinergic function. However, the molecular basis of such influence still remains unknown. Current study analyzed the performance of ovariectomized rats in an autoshaping learning task after a short-term treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2: 4 and 40μg/kg) and/or progesterone (P4: 4mg/kg). These results were correlated with basal forebrain choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and TrkA protein content. The high dose of E2 enhanced both acquisition in the autoshaping task and the content of ChAT and TrkA. P4 treatment increased ChAT and TrkA content without affecting performance of rats in the autoshaping learning task. Interestingly, the continuous and simultaneous administration of E2 plus P4 did not significantly modify behavioral and biochemical evaluated parameters. These results address the influence of both E2 and P4 on cholinergic and TrkA activity and suggest that the effects of ovarian hormones on cognitive performance involve basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. PMID:21172317

  19. The hallucinogen d-lysergic acid diethylamide (d-LSD) induces the immediate-early gene c-Fos in rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Paul S; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2002-12-27

    The hallucinogen d-lysergic acid diethylamide (d-LSD) evokes dramatic somatic and psychological effects. In order to analyze the neural activation induced by this unique psychoactive drug, we tested the hypothesis that expression of the immediate-early gene product c-Fos is induced in specific regions of the rat forebrain by a relatively low, behaviorally active, dose of d-LSD (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.); c-Fos protein expression was assessed at 30 min, and 1, 2 and 4 h following d-LSD injection. A time- and region-dependent expression of c-Fos was observed with a significant increase (P<0.05) in the number of c-Fos-positive cells detected in the anterior cingulate cortex at 1 h, the shell of the nucleus accumbens at 1 and 2 h, the bed nucleus of stria terminalis lateral at 2 h and the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus at 1, 2 and 4 h following systemic d-LSD administration. These data demonstrate a unique pattern of c-Fos expression in the rat forebrain following a relatively low dose of d-LSD and suggest that activation of these forebrain regions contributes to the unique behavioral effects of d-LSD.

  20. Region-specific modulation of PER2 expression in the limbic forebrain and hypothalamus by nighttime restricted feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Khoja, Zehra; Stewart, Jane; Amir, Shimon

    2008-07-25

    Feeding schedules that restrict food access to a predictable daytime meal induce in rodents food-anticipatory behaviors, changes in physiological rhythms and shifts in the rhythm of clock gene expression in the brain and periphery. However, little is known about the effects of nighttime restricted feeding. Previously, we showed that daytime restricted access to a highly palatable complete meal replacement, Ensure Plus (Ensure), shifts the rhythm of expression of the clock protein PER2 in limbic forebrain areas including the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTov), central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA), basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dentate gyrus (DG), and induces a rhythm in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) in food deprived (restricted feeding), but not free-fed rats (restricted treat). In the present study we investigated the effects of nighttime restricted feeding (Ensure only, 2 h/night) and nighttime restricted treats (Ensure 2 h/night+free access to chow) in order to determine whether these effects were dependent on the time of day the meal was provided. We found that nighttime restricted feeding, like daytime restricted feeding, shifted the rhythm of PER2 expression in the BNSTov and CEA and peak expression was observed approximately 12 h after the mealtime. Also consistent with previous work, nighttime restricted feeding induced a rhythm of PER2 expression in the DMH and these effects occurred without affecting the rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In contrast to previous work with daytime restricted feeding, nighttime restricted feeding had no effect on PER2 rhythms in the BLA and DG. Finally, nighttime restricted treats, as was the case for daytime restricted treats, had no effect on PER2 expression in any of the brain areas studied. The present results together with our previous findings show that the effect of restricted feeding on PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain and hypothalamus depend on a negative

  1. Behavioral effects of basal forebrain cholinergic lesions in young adult and aging rats.

    PubMed

    Paban, Véronique; Chambon, Caroline; Jaffard, Magali; Alescio-Lautier, Béatrice

    2005-08-01

    The interactive effects of age and cholinergic damage were assessed behaviorally in young and middle-aged rats. Rats were lesioned at either 3 or 17 months of age by injection of 192 IgG-saporin immunotoxin into the medial septum and the nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and they were then tested on a range of behavioral tasks: a nonmatching-to-position task in a T-maze, an object-recognition task, an object-location task, and an open-field activity test. Depending on the task used, only an age or a lesion effect was observed, but there was no Age X Lesion interaction. Middle-aged and young rats responded to the cholinergic lesions in the same manner. These results show that in the middle-aged rats in which cholinergic transmission was affected, additional injury to the system was not always accompanied by major cognitive dysfunctions. PMID:16187821

  2. Forebrain Projections of Arcuate Neurokinin B Neurons Demonstrated by Anterograde Tract-Tracing and Monosodium Glutamate Lesions in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Sally J.; Burke, Michelle C.; Anderson, Miranda J.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Rance, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and kisspeptin receptor signaling are essential components of the reproductive axis. A population of neurons resides within the arcuate nucleus of the rat that expresses NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and estrogen receptor α. Here we investigate the projections of these neurons using NKB-immunocytochemistry as a marker. First, the loss of NKB-immunoreactive (ir) somata and fibers was characterized after ablation of the arcuate nucleus by neonatal injections of monosodium glutamate. Second, biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the arcuate nucleus and anterogradely labeled NKB-ir fibers were identified using dual-labeled immunofluorescence. Four major projection pathways are described: 1) Local projections within the arcuate nucleus bilaterally, 2) Projections to the median eminence including the lateral palisade zone, 3) Projections to a periventricular pathway extending rostrally to multiple hypothalamic nuclei, the septal region and BNST and dorsally to the dorsomedial nucleus and 4) Projections to a ventral hypothalamic tract to the lateral hypothalamus and medial forebrain bundle. The diverse projections provide evidence that NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons could integrate the reproductive axis with multiple homeostatic, behavioral and neuroendocrine processes. Interestingly, anterograde tract-tracing revealed NKB-ir axons originating from arcuate neurons terminating on other NKB-ir somata within the arcuate nucleus. Combined with previous studies, these experiments reveal a bilateral interconnected network of sex-steroid responsive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the rat that express NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and ERα and project to GnRH terminals in the median eminence. This circuitry provides a mechanism for bilateral synchronization of arcuate NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons to modulate the pulsatile secretion of GnRH. PMID:20038444

  3. Relation between microPET imaging and rotational behavior in a parkinsonian rat model induced by medial forebrain bundle axotomy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limin; Zhang, Wenzhong; Gong, Xiaoli; Liang, Xibin; Wang, Xiaomin

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the relation between apomorphine (APO) induced rotational behavior and the pre- and post-synaptic dopaminergic function in a parkinsonian rat model induced by medial forebrain bundle (MFB) axotomy. The brains of these rats were unilaterally lesioned by mechanical transection of the nigrostriatal dopamine pathway at the MFB. Behavioral studies were carried out by APO challenge prior to and 1, 3, and 5 weeks after MFB axotomy. MicroPET scans with [(11)C]CFT and [(11)C]raclopride were performed 2 days after the behavioral test. The two PET scans were separated by an interval of 24-48 h. Immunohistochemistry was conducted 4 days after the last PET scan. Our data showed that [(11)C]CFT binding decreased progressively 1, 3, and 5 weeks postlesion, and there was a significant nonlinear correlation between [(11)C]CFT uptake ratio (right/left) and APO induced rotations. In contrast, [(11)C]raclopride binding only increased significantly 3 weeks postlesion, and there was a positive linear correlation between [(11)C]raclopride uptake ratio (right/left) and APO induced rotations. Postmortem immunohistochemical studies confirmed the loss of both striatal dopamine fibers and nigral neurons on the lesioned side. These findings not only demonstrate the relation between APO induced rotational behavior and the pre- and post-synaptic dopamine function but also indicate the utility and validity of in vivo PET imaging in understanding disease mechanisms and progression, which should in turn lead to development of new therapies. PMID:24548854

  4. Patterns of Toxoplasma gondii cyst distribution in the forebrain associate with individual variation in predator odor avoidance and anxiety-related behavior in male Long-Evans rats

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Andrew K.; Strassmann, Patrick S.; Lee, I-Ping; Sapolsky, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is one of the world’s most successful brain parasites. T. gondii engages in parasite manipulation of host behavior and infection has been epidemiologically linked to numerous psychiatric disorders. Mechanisms by which T. gondii alters host behavior are not well understood, but neuroanatomical cyst presence and the localized host immune response to cysts are potential candidates. The aim of these studies was to test the hypothesis that T. gondii manipulation of specific host behaviors is dependent on neuroanatomical location of cysts in a time-dependent function post-infection. We examined neuroanatomical cyst distribution (53 forebrain regions) in infected rats after predator odor aversion behavior and anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus maze and open field arena, across a 6-week time course. In addition, we examined evidence for microglial response to the parasite across the time course. Our findings demonstrate that while cysts are randomly distributed throughout the forebrain, individual variation in cyst localization, beginning 3 weeks post-infection, can explain individual variation in the effects of T. gondii on behavior. Additionally, not all infected rats develop cysts in the forebrain, and attenuation of predator odor aversion and changes in anxiety-related behavior are linked with cyst presence in specific forebrain areas. Finally, the immune response to cysts is striking. These data provide the foundation for testing hypotheses about proximate mechanisms by which T. gondii alters behavior in specific brain regions, including consequences of establishment of a homeostasis between T. gondii and the host immune response. PMID:24269877

  5. Forebrain circumventricular organs mediate salt appetite induced by intravenous angiotensin II in rats.

    PubMed

    Morris, Michael J; Wilson, Wendy L; Starbuck, Elizabeth M; Fitts, Douglas A

    2002-09-13

    Two circumventricular organs, the subfornical organ (SFO) and organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT), may mediate salt appetite in response to acute intravenous infusions of angiotensin (ANG) II. Fluid intakes and mean arterial pressures were measured in rats with sham lesions or electrolytic lesions of the SFO or OVLT during an intravenous infusion of 30 ng/min ANG II. Beginning 21 h before the 90-min infusion, the rats were depleted of sodium with furosemide and given a total of 300 mg/kg captopril in 75 ml/kg water in three spaced gavages to block the usual salt appetite and to hydrate the rats. No other food or fluids were available for ingestion. Sham-lesioned rats drank 9.3+/-1.2 ml if 0.3 M NaCl alone was available and drank 8.9+/-1.6 ml of saline and 3.7+/-1.6 ml of water if both were available. Either SFO or OVLT lesions reduced the intakes of saline to <5 ml in both conditions and of water to <1 ml. Mean arterial pressure did not differ among the groups and was maintained above 100 mmHg after the depletion and captopril treatments because of the large doses of water. Thus, a full expression of salt appetite in response to an acute intravenous infusion of ANG II requires the integrity of both the SFO and OVLT. PMID:12213298

  6. Isolated neuronal growth cones from developing rat forebrain possess adenylate cyclase activity which can be augmented by various receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Hervé, D; Blanc, G; Tassin, J P; Glowinski, J

    1988-01-01

    Isolated neuronal growth cones from neonatal rat forebrain were found to contain a high specific activity of adenylate cyclase (61 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein) compared to the pelleted starting homogenate (5 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein). Forskolin at 10(-4) M increased adenylate cyclase activity in both the pelleted homogenate and growth cone fraction by 70 and 217 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein, respectively, over basal levels. The incremental effect of forskolin was 3-fold greater in the growth cone fraction than in the pelleted homogenate. However, relative to basal levels in each of the two fractions, forskolin increased adenylate cyclase activity in the growth cone fraction by only approx. 5-fold compared to 15-fold in the pelleted homogenate. Dopamine (10(-4) M), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (10(-6) M) and isoproterenol (10(-5) M) also augmented adenylate cyclase activity in the two fractions. In the growth cone fraction, dopamine and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide produced a stimulation over basal levels by approx. 20 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein while isoproterenol produced a stimulation of approx. 10 pmol cAMP/min/mg protein. The incremental effects of these receptor agonists in the growth cone fraction are approx. 5-fold greater than in the pelleted homogenate. The dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in the growth cone fraction could be blocked by the compound SCH23390, a selective D1 receptor antagonist. At saturating concentrations, all combinations of dopamine, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and isoproterenol were found to be completely additive on adenylate cyclase activity in the growth cone fraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Stimulation of 5-HT7 receptor during adolescence determines its persistent upregulation in adult rat forebrain areas.

    PubMed

    Nativio, Paola; Zoratto, Francesca; Romano, Emilia; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Pascale, Esterina; Passarelli, Francesca; Laviola, Giovanni; Adriani, Walter

    2015-11-01

    Brain serotonin 7 (5-HT7) receptors play an important functional role in learning and memory, in regulation of mood and motivation, and for circadian rhythms. Recently, we have studied the modulatory effects of a developmental exposure (under subchronic regimen) in rats with LP-211, a brain-penetrant and selective 5-HT7 receptor agonist. We aimed at further deciphering long-term sequelae into adulthood. LP-211 (0.250 mg/kg i.p., once/day) was administered for 5 days during the adolescent phase (postnatal days 43-45 to 47-49). When adult (postnatal days >70), forebrain areas were obtained for ex vivo immunohistochemistry, whose results prompted us to reconsider the brain connectivity maps presented in our previous study (Canese et al., Psycho-Pharmacol 2015;232:75-89.) Significant elevation in levels of 5-HT7 receptors were evidenced due to adolescent LP-211 exposure, in dorsal striatum (which also shows an increase of dopaminergic D2 auto-receptors) and-unexpectedly-in piriform cortex, with no changes in ventral striatum. We observed that functional connectivity from a seed on the right hippocampus was more extended than reported, also including the piriform cortex. As a whole, the cortical loop rearranged by adolescent LP-211 exposure consisted in a hippocampus receiving connections from piriform cortex and dorsal striatum, the latter both directly and through functional control over the 'extended amygdala'. Such results represent a starting point to explore neurophysiology of 5-HT7 receptors. Further investigation is warranted to develop therapies for sleep disorders, for impaired emotional and motivational regulation, for attentive and executive deficit. The 5-HT7 agonist LP-211 (0.250 mg/kg i.p., once/day) was administered for 5 days during adolescence (postnatal days 43-45 to 47-49) in rats. When adult (postnatal days >70), a significant elevation in levels of 5-HT7 receptors were evidenced in dorsal striatum and-unexpectedly-in piriform cortex. PMID:26364910

  8. Melatonin reduces cerebral edema formation caused by transient forebrain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Takashi; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Nishino, Hitoo; Torii, Kunio

    2002-12-20

    Reduction of cerebral edema, an early symptom of ischemia, is one of the most important remedies for reducing subsequent chronic neural damage in stroke. Melatonin, a metabolite of tryptophan released from the pineal gland, has been found to be effective against neurotoxicity in vitro. The present study was aimed to demonstrate the effectiveness of melatonin in vivo in reducing ischemia-induced edema using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion/reperfusion surgery. Melatonin was administered twice (6.0 mg/kg, p.o.): just prior to 1 h MCA occlusion and 1 day after the surgery. T2-weighted multislice spin-echo images were acquired 1 day after the surgery. Increases in T2-weighted signals in ischemic sites of the brain were clearly observed after MCA occlusion. The signal increase was found mainly in the striatum and in the cerebral cortex in saline-treated control rats. In the melatonin-treated group, the total volume of cerebral edema was reduced by 45.3% compared to control group (P < 0.01). The protective effect of melatonin against cerebral edema was more clearly observed in the cerebral cortex (reduced by 56.1%, P < 0.01), while the reduction of edema volume in the striatum was weak (reduced by 23.0%). The present MRI study clearly demonstrated that melatonin is effective in reducing edema formation in ischemic animals in vivo, especially in the cerebral cortex. Melatonin may be highly useful in preventing cortical dysfunctions such as motor, sensory, memory, and psychological impairments.

  9. Increases in mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain during chronic sleep restriction in rats: possible role in initiating allostatic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, J K; Deurveilher, S; Currie, R W; Fawcett, J P; Semba, K

    2014-09-26

    Chronic sleep restriction (CSR) has various negative consequences on cognitive performance and health. Using a rat model of CSR that uses alternating cycles of 3h of sleep deprivation (using slowly rotating activity wheels) and 1h of sleep opportunity continuously for 4 days ('3/1' protocol), we previously observed not only homeostatic but also allostatic (adaptive) sleep responses to CSR. In particular, non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) electroencephalogram (EEG) delta power, an index of sleep intensity, increased initially and then declined gradually during CSR, with no rebound during a 2-day recovery period. To study underlying mechanisms of these allostatic responses, we examined the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is known to regulate NREMS EEG delta activity, during the same CSR protocol. Mature BDNF protein levels were measured in the frontal cortex and basal forebrain, two brain regions involved in sleep and EEG regulation, and the hippocampus, using Western blot analysis. Adult male Wistar rats were housed in motorized activity wheels, and underwent the 3/1 CSR protocol for 27 h, for 99 h, or for 99 h followed by 24h of recovery. Additional rats were housed in either locked wheels (locked wheel controls [LWCs]) or unlocked wheels that rats could rotate freely (wheel-running controls [WRCs]). BDNF levels did not differ between WRC and LWC groups. BDNF levels were increased, compared to the control levels, in all three brain regions after 27 h, and were increased less strongly after 99 h, of CSR. After 24h of recovery, BDNF levels were at the control levels. This time course of BDNF levels parallels the previously reported changes in NREMS delta power during the same CSR protocol. Changes in BDNF protein levels in the cortex and basal forebrain may be part of the molecular mechanisms underlying allostatic sleep responses to CSR.

  10. The mRNA expression and histological integrity in rat forebrain motor and sensory regions are minimally affected by acrylamide exposure through drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, John F.; Latendresse, John R.; Delongchamp, Robert R.; Warbritton, Alan R.; Thomas, Monzy; Divine, Becky; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2009-11-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether alterations in the gene expression or overt histological signs of neurotoxicity in selected regions of the forebrain might occur from acrylamide exposure via drinking water. Gene expression at the mRNA level was evaluated by cDNA array and/or RT-PCR analysis in the striatum, substantia nigra and parietal cortex of rat after a 2-week acrylamide exposure. The highest dose tested (maximally tolerated) of approximately 44 mg/kg/day resulted in a significant decreased body weight, sluggishness, and locomotor activity reduction. These physiological effects were not accompanied by prominent changes in gene expression in the forebrain. All the expression changes seen in the 1200 genes that were evaluated in the three brain regions were <= 1.5-fold, and most not significant. Very few, if any, statistically significant changes were seen in mRNA levels of the more than 50 genes directly related to the cholinergic, noradrenergic, GABAergic or glutamatergic neurotransmitter systems in the striatum, substantia nigra or parietal cortex. All the expression changes observed in genes related to dopaminergic function were less than 1.5-fold and not statistically significant and the 5HT1b receptor was the only serotonin-related gene affected. Therefore, gene expression changes were few and modest in basal ganglia and sensory cortex at a time when the behavioral manifestations of acrylamide toxicity had become prominent. No histological evidence of axonal, dendritic or neuronal cell body damage was found in the forebrain due to the acrylamide exposure. As well, microglial activation was not present. These findings are consistent with the absence of expression changes in genes related to changes in neuroinflammation or neurotoxicity. Over all, these data suggest that oral ingestion of acrylamide in drinking water or food, even at maximally tolerable levels, induced neither marked changes in gene expression nor neurotoxicity in the motor and

  11. Increased efficacy of the 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the median forebrain bundle in small rats, by modification of the stereotaxic coordinates.

    PubMed

    Torres, E M; Lane, E L; Heuer, A; Smith, G A; Murphy, E; Dunnett, S B

    2011-08-30

    The 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion is the most widely used rat model of Parkinson's disease. A single unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the median forebrain bundle (MFB) selectively destroys dopamine neurons in the ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), removing more than 95% of the dopamine innervation from target areas. The stereotaxic coordinates used to deliver 6-OHDA to the MFB have been used in our laboratory successfully for more than 25 years. However, in recent years we have observed a decline in the success rate of this lesion. Previously regular success rates of >80% of rats lesioned, have become progressively more variable, with rates as low as 20% recorded in some experiments. Having excluded variability of the neurotoxin and operator errors, we hypothesized that the change seen might be due to the use of smaller rats at the time of first surgery. An attempt to proportionally adjust the lesion coordinates base on head size did not increase lesion efficacy. However, in support of the small rat hypothesis it was observed that, using the standard coordinates, rat's heads had a "nose-up" position in the stereotaxic fame. Adjustment of the nose bar to obtain a flat head position during surgery improved lesion success, and subsequent adjustments of the lesion coordinates to account for smaller head size led to a greatly increased lesion efficacy (>90%) as assessed by amphetamine induced rotation.

  12. Endocannabinoid levels in rat limbic forebrain and hypothalamus in relation to fasting, feeding and satiation: stimulation of eating by 2-arachidonoyl glycerol.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Tim C; Williams, Claire M; Fezza, Filomena; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2002-06-01

    Endocannabinoids are implicated in appetite and body weight regulation. In rodents, anandamide stimulates eating by actions at central CB1 receptors, and hypothalamic endocannabinoids may be under the negative control of leptin. However, changes to brain endocannabinoid levels in direct relation to feeding or changing nutritional status have not been investigated. We measured anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) levels in feeding-associated brain regions of rats, during fasting, feeding of a palatable food, or after satiation. Endocannabinoid levels were compared to those in rats fed ad libitum, at a point in their daily cycle when motivation to eat was absent. Fasting increased levels of anandamide and 2-AG in the limbic forebrain and, to a lesser extent, of 2-AG in the hypothalamus. By contrast, hypothalamic 2-AG declined as animals ate. No changes were detected in satiated rats. Endocannabinoid levels in the cerebellum, a control region not directly involved in the control of food intake, were unaffected by any manipulation. As 2-AG was most sensitive to variation during feeding, and to leptin regulation in a previous study, we examined the behavioural effects of 2-AG when injected into the nucleus accumbens shell, a limbic forebrain area strongly linked to eating motivation. 2-AG potently, and dose-dependently, stimulated feeding. This effect was attenuated by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716. These findings provide the first direct evidence of altered brain levels of endocannabinoids, and of 2-AG in particular, during fasting and feeding. The nature of these effects supports a role for endocannabinoids in the control of appetitive motivation.

  13. Proliferation and Glia-Directed Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells in the Subventricular Zone of the Lateral Ventricle and the Migratory Pathway to the Lesions after Cortical Devascularization of Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Feng; Bai, Hua-Jing; Liu, Jun-Qi; Tian, Mo; Wang, Yong-Xue; Niu, Xin; Si, Yin-Chu

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of cortical devascularization on the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle of adult rats. 60 adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group and devascularized group. At 15 and 30 days after cerebral cortices were devascularized, rats were euthanized and immunohistochemical analysis was performed. The number of PCNA-, Vimentin-, and GFAP-positive cells in the bilateral SVZ of the lateral wall and the superior wall of the lateral ventricles of 15- and 30-day devascularized groups increased significantly compared with the control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). The area density of PCNA-, Vimentin-, and GFAP-positive cells in cortical lesions of 15- and 30-day devascularized groups increased significantly compared with the control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). PCNA-, GFAP-, and Vimentin-positive cells in the SVZ migrated through the rostral migratory stream (RMS), and PCNA-, GFAP-, and Vimentin-positive cells from both the ipsilateral and contralateral dorsolateral SVZ (dl-SVZ) migrated into the corpus callosum (CC) and accumulated, forming a migratory pathway within the CC to the lesioned site. Our study suggested that cortical devascularization induced proliferation, glia-directed differentiation, and migration of NSCs from the SVZ through the RMS or directly to the corpus callosum and finally migrating radially to cortical lesions. This may play a significant role in neural repair. PMID:27294116

  14. A rat model of striatonigral degeneration generated by simultaneous injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle and quinolinic acid into the striatum.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyung Ho; Kim, Yong Hwan; Shin, Eun Sil; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2014-11-01

    A double toxin-double lesion strategy is well-known to generate a rat model of striatonigral degeneration (SND) such as multiple system atrophy-parkinsonian type. However, with this model it is difficult to distinguish SND from Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we propose a new rat model of SND, which is generated by simultaneous injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle and quinolinic acid into the striatum. Stepping tests performed 30 min after intraperitoneal L-dopa administration at 6 weeks post-surgery revealed an L-dopa response in the PD group but not the SND group. Apomorphine-induced rotation tests revealed no rotational bias in the SND group, which persisted for 2 months, but contralateral rotations in the PD group. MicroPET scans revealed glucose hypometabolism and dopamine transporter impairment on the lesioned striatum in the SND group. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunostaining in the SND group revealed that 74.7% of nigral cells on the lesioned side were lost after lesion surgery. These results suggest that the proposed simultaneous double toxin-double lesion method successfully created a rat model of SND that had behavioral outcomes, multitracer microPET evaluation, and histological aspects consistent with SND pathology. This model will be useful for future study of SND. PMID:25408589

  15. 2-Deoxy-D-glucose-induced hypothermia in anesthetized rats: Lack of forebrain contribution and critical involvement of the rostral raphe/parapyramidal regions of the medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Toshimasa

    2015-07-01

    Systemic or central administration of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG), a competitive inhibitor of glucose utilization, induces hypothermia in awake animals and humans. This response is mediated by the central nervous system, though the neural mechanism involved is largely unknown. In this study, I examined possible involvement of the forebrain, which contains the hypothalamic thermoregulatory center, and the medullary rostral raphe/parapyramidal regions (rRPa/PPy), which mediate hypoxia-induced heat-loss responses, in 2DG-induced hypothermia in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated rats. The intravenous injection of 2DG (250mgkg(-1)) elicited an increase in tail skin temperature and decreases in body core temperature and the respiratory exchange ratio, though it did not induce any significant change in the metabolic rate. These results indicate that the hypothermic response was caused by an increase in heat loss, but not by a decrease in heat production and that it was accompanied by a decrease in carbohydrate utilization and/or an increase in lipid utilization as energy substrates. Complete surgical transection of the brainstem between the hypothalamus and the midbrain had no effect on the 2DG-induced hypothermic responses, suggesting that the hindbrain, but not the forebrain, was sufficient for the responses. However, pretreatment of the rRPa/PPy with the GABAA receptor blocker bicuculline methiodide, but not with vehicle saline, greatly attenuated the 2DG-induced responses, suggesting that the 2DG-induced hypothermia was mediated, at least in part, by GABAergic neurons in the hindbrain and activation of GABAA receptors on cutaneous sympathetic premotor neurons in the rRPa/PPy. PMID:26146232

  16. In Vivo Electrochemical Evidence for Simultaneous 5-HT and Histamine Release in the Rat Substantia Nigra pars Reticulata Following Medial Forebrain Bundle Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Parastoo; Dankoski, Elyse C.; Wood, Kevin M.; Ambrose, R. Ellen; Wightman, R. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the mechanisms of serotonin (5-hydoxytryptophan (5-HT)) in the brain requires an in vivo method that combines fast temporal resolution with chemical selectivity. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is a technique with sufficient temporal and chemical resolution for probing dynamic 5-HT neurotransmission events; however, traditionally it has not been possible to probe in vivo 5-HT mechanisms. Recently, we optimized FSCV for measuring 5-HT release and uptake in vivo in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR) with electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in the rat brain. Here, we address technical challenges associated with rat DRN surgery by electrically stimulating 5-HT projections in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), a more accessible anatomical location. MFB stimulation elicits 5-HT in the SNR; furthermore, we find simultaneous release of an additional species. We use electrochemical and pharmacological methods and describe physiological, anatomical and independent chemical analyses to identify this species as histamine. We also show pharmacologically that increasing the lifetime of extracellular histamine significantly decreases 5-HT release, most likely due to increased activation of histamine H-3 receptors that inhibit 5-HT release. Despite this, under physiological conditions, we find by kinetic comparisons of DRN and MFB stimulations that the simultaneous release of histamine does not interfere with the quantitative 5-HT concentration profile. We therefore present a novel and robust electrical stimulation of the MFB that is technically less challenging than DRN stimulation to study 5-HT and histamine release in the SNR. PMID:21682723

  17. Combined damage to entorhinal cortex and cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, two early neurodegenerative features accompanying Alzheimer's disease: effects on locomotor activity and memory functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Traissard, Natalia; Herbeaux, Karine; Cosquer, Brigitte; Jeltsch, Hélène; Ferry, Barbara; Galani, Rodrigue; Pernon, Anne; Majchrzak, Monique; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2007-04-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), cognitive decline is linked to cholinergic dysfunctions in the basal forebrain (BF), although the earliest neuronal damage is described in the entorhinal cortex (EC). In rats, selective cholinergic BF lesions or fiber-sparing EC lesions may induce memory deficits, but most often of weak magnitude. This study investigated, in adult rats, the effects on activity and memory of both lesions, alone or in combination, using 192 IgG-saporin (OX7-saporin as a control) and L-N-methyl-D-aspartate to destroy BF and EC neurons, respectively. Rats were tested for locomotor activity in their home cage and for working- and/or reference-memory in various tasks (water maze, Hebb-Williams maze, radial maze). Only rats with combined lesions showed diurnal and nocturnal hyperactivity. EC lesions impaired working memory and induced anterograde memory deficits in almost all tasks. Lesions of BF cholinergic neurons induced more limited deficits: reference memory was impaired in the probe trial of the water-maze task and in the radial maze. When both lesions were combined, performance never improved in the water maze and the number of errors in the Hebb-Williams and the radial mazes was always larger than in any other group. These results (i) indicate synergistic implications of BF and EC in memory function, (ii) suggest that combined BF cholinergic and fiber-sparing EC lesions may model aspects of anterograde memory deficits and restlessness as seen in AD, (iii) challenge the cholinergic hypothesis of cognitive dysfunctions in AD, and (iv) contribute to open theoretical views on AD-related memory dysfunctions going beyond the latter hypothesis.

  18. Combined damage to entorhinal cortex and cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, two early neurodegenerative features accompanying Alzheimer's disease: effects on locomotor activity and memory functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Traissard, Natalia; Herbeaux, Karine; Cosquer, Brigitte; Jeltsch, Hélène; Ferry, Barbara; Galani, Rodrigue; Pernon, Anne; Majchrzak, Monique; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2007-04-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), cognitive decline is linked to cholinergic dysfunctions in the basal forebrain (BF), although the earliest neuronal damage is described in the entorhinal cortex (EC). In rats, selective cholinergic BF lesions or fiber-sparing EC lesions may induce memory deficits, but most often of weak magnitude. This study investigated, in adult rats, the effects on activity and memory of both lesions, alone or in combination, using 192 IgG-saporin (OX7-saporin as a control) and L-N-methyl-D-aspartate to destroy BF and EC neurons, respectively. Rats were tested for locomotor activity in their home cage and for working- and/or reference-memory in various tasks (water maze, Hebb-Williams maze, radial maze). Only rats with combined lesions showed diurnal and nocturnal hyperactivity. EC lesions impaired working memory and induced anterograde memory deficits in almost all tasks. Lesions of BF cholinergic neurons induced more limited deficits: reference memory was impaired in the probe trial of the water-maze task and in the radial maze. When both lesions were combined, performance never improved in the water maze and the number of errors in the Hebb-Williams and the radial mazes was always larger than in any other group. These results (i) indicate synergistic implications of BF and EC in memory function, (ii) suggest that combined BF cholinergic and fiber-sparing EC lesions may model aspects of anterograde memory deficits and restlessness as seen in AD, (iii) challenge the cholinergic hypothesis of cognitive dysfunctions in AD, and (iv) contribute to open theoretical views on AD-related memory dysfunctions going beyond the latter hypothesis. PMID:16760925

  19. Expression of estrogen receptor-like immunoreactivity by different subgroups of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in gonadectomized male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, R B

    1996-05-13

    Recent studies have demonstrated that estrogen administration can produce significant increases in relative levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) mRNA and protein in specific regions of the female, but not the male, rat basal forebrain. In the present study immunocytochemical techniques were used to identify and compare relative numbers of cholinergic neurons containing estrogen receptors within the medial septum, horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca, nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and striatum of gonadectomized male and female rats to determine whether there are differences in the percentage of cholinergic neurons expressing estrogen receptors which might contribute to the different regional- and sex-specific effects of estrogen which have been described. Counts of choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive cells revealed significant regional differences in the average number of cholinergic neurons/section; however, no difference between males and females in the numbers of cholinergic neurons in each of the four regions analyzed was observed. Fifty to eighty percent of the cholinergic neurons detected in both males and females contained estrogen receptor-like immunoreactivity. A small but significant difference between males and females was detected with females having slightly more (10.5%) double-labeled cells than males overall. Individual comparisons revealed that significantly more (18-33%) double-labeled cells were detected in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, but not in the medial septum, nucleus basalis, or striatum of females vs. males. There was also a small but significant regional difference in the percentage of double-labeled cells with the highest percentage (74.2%) detected in the striatum and the lowest percentage (63.4%) detected in the horizontal limb. None of these differences appear to account for the regional- and sex-specific effects of estrogen on cholinergic neurons which have been observed. We conclude that differences

  20. Adult neurogenesis and the ischemic forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lichtenwalner, Robin J; Parent, Jack M

    2006-01-01

    The recent identification of endogenous neural stem cells and persistent neuronal production in the adult brain suggests a previously unrecognized capacity for self-repair after brain injury. Neurogenesis not only continues in discrete regions of the adult mammalian brain, but new evidence also suggests that neural progenitors form new neurons that integrate into existing circuitry after certain forms of brain injury in the adult. Experimental stroke in adult rodents and primates increases neurogenesis in the persistent forebrain subventricular and hippocampal dentate gyrus germinative zones. Of greater relevance for regenerative potential, ischemic insults stimulate endogenous neural progenitors to migrate to areas of damage and form neurons in otherwise dormant forebrain regions, such as the neostriatum and hippocampal pyramidal cell layer, of the mature brain. This review summarizes the current understanding of adult neurogenesis and its regulation in vivo, and describes evidence for stroke-induced neurogenesis and neuronal replacement in the adult. Current strategies used to modify endogenous neurogenesis after ischemic brain injury also will be discussed, as well as future research directions with potential for achieving regeneration after stroke and other brain insults. PMID:15959458

  1. Prepuberal subchronic methylphenidate and atomoxetine induce different long-term effects on adult behaviour and forebrain dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin in Naples high-excitability rats.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, L A; Carnevale, U A Gironi; Treno, C; Sadile, A G; Melisi, D; Arra, C; Ibba, M; Schirru, C; Carboni, E

    2010-06-26

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate and the non-stimulant atomoxetine are two approved drugs for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of prepuberal subchronic methylphenidate and atomoxetine on adult behaviour and the forebrain neurotransmitter and metabolite content of Naples High-Excitability (NHE) rats, a genetic model for the mesocortical variant of ADHD. Male NHE rats were given a daily intraperitoneal injection (1.0mg/kg) of methylphenidate, atomoxetine or vehicle from postnatal day 29 to 42. At postnatal day 70-75, rats were exposed to spatial novelty in the Làt and radial (Olton) mazes. Behavioural analysis for indices of horizontal, vertical, non-selective (NSA) and selective spatial attention (SSA) indicated that only methylphenidate significantly reduced horizontal activity to a different extent, i.e., 39 and 16% respectively. Moreover methylphenidate increased NSA as assessed by higher leaning duration. The high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) tissue content assessment of dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin and relative metabolites in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), cortical motor area (MC), dorsal striatum (DS), ventral striatum (VS), hippocampus and mesencephalon indicated that methylphenidate decreased (i) dopamine, DOPAC, norepinephrine, MHPG, 5-HT and 5-HIAA in the PFC, (ii) dopamine, DOPAC, HVA, serotonin, 5-HIAA in the DS, (iii) dopamine, DOPAC, HVA and MHPG (but increased norepinephrine) in the VS and (iv) norepinephrine, MHPG, serotonin and 5-HIAA in the hippocampus. Atomoxetine increased dopamine and decreased MHPG in the PFC. Like methylphenidate, atomoxetine decreased dopamine, DOPAC, HVA, serotonin and 5-HIAA in the DS, but decreased MHPG in the VS. These results suggest that methylphenidate determined long-term effects on behavioural and neurochemical parameters, whereas atomoxetine affected only the latter.

  2. Sleep research in space: expression of immediate early genes in forebrain structures of rats during the nasa neurolab mission (STS-90).

    PubMed

    Centini, C; Pompeiano, O

    2007-05-01

    1. Electrophysiological and behavioural observations have shown that changes in the sleep-waking activity occur in astronauts during the space flight. Experiments performed in ground-based experiments have previously shown that the immediate early gene (IEG) c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, can be used as a molecular correlate of sleep and waking. However, while Fos expression peaks within 2-4 hours after the stimulus and returns to baseline within 6-8 hours, other IEGs as the FRA proteins which are also synthetized soon after their induction, persist in the cell nuclei for longer periods of time, ranging from 1-2 days to weeks. 2. Both Fos and FRA expression were evaluated in several adult albino rats sacrificed at different time points of the space flight, i.e. either at FD2 and FD14, i.e. at launch and about two weeks after launch, respectively, or at R + 1 and R + 13, i.e. at the reentry and about two weeks after landing. The changes in Fos and FRA expression were then compared with those obtained in ground controls. These experiments demonstrate activation of several brain areas which varies during the different phases of the space flight. Due to their different time of persistence, Fos and FRA immunohistochemistry can provide only correlative observations. In particular, FRA expression has been quite helpful to identify the occurrence of short-lasting events such as those related either to stress or to REM-sleep, whose episodes last in the rat only a few min and could hardly be detected by using only Fos expression. 3. Evidence was presented indicating that at FD2 and FD14 Fos-labeled cells were observed in several brain areas in which Fos had been previously identified as being induced by spontaneous or forced waking in ground-based experiments. In contrast to these findings FLT rats sacrificed at R + 1 showed low levels of Fos immunostaining in the cerebral cortex (neocortex) and several forebrain structures such as the hypothalamus and thalamus

  3. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Weng, Shao-Ju; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Chang, Kang-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg) or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+) were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum. PMID:26378923

  4. Feasibility and Safety of Continuous and Chronic Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation of the Medial Forebrain Bundle in the Naïve Sprague-Dawley Rat

    PubMed Central

    Furlanetti, Luciano L.; Döbrössy, Máté D.; Aranda, Iñigo A.; Coenen, Volker A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the superolateral branch of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) has provided rapid and dramatic reduction of depressive symptoms in a clinical trial. Early intracranial self-stimulation experiments of the MFB suggested detrimental side effects on the animals' health; therefore, the current study looked at the viability of chronic and continuous MFB-DBS in rodents, with particular attention given to welfare issues and identification of stimulated pathways. Methods. Sprague-Dawley female rats were submitted to stereotactic microelectrode implantation into the MFB. Chronic continuous DBS was applied for 3–6 weeks. Welfare monitoring and behavior changes were assessed. Postmortem histological analysis of c-fos protein expression was carried out. Results. MFB-DBS resulted in mild and temporary weight loss in the animals, which was regained even with continuing stimulation. MFB-DBS led to increased and long-lasting c-fos expression in target regions of the mesolimbic/mesocortical system. Conclusions. Bilateral continuous chronic MFB-DBS is feasible, safe, and without impact on the rodent's health. MFB-DBS results in temporary increase in exploration, which could explain the initial weight loss, and does not produce any apparent behavioral abnormalities. This platform represents a powerful tool for further preclinical investigation of the MFB stimulation in the treatment of depression. PMID:25960609

  5. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Weng, Shao-Ju; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Chang, Kang-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg) or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+) were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum.

  6. Spatiotemporal Progression of Microcalcification in the Hippocampal CA1 Region following Transient Forebrain Ischemia in Rats: An Ultrastructural Study.

    PubMed

    Riew, Tae-Ryong; Shin, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Hong Lim; Cho, Jeong Min; Pak, Ha-Jin; Lee, Mun-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Calcification in areas of neuronal degeneration is a common finding in several neuropathological disorders including ischemic insults. Here, we performed a detailed examination of the onset and spatiotemporal profile of calcification in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, where neuronal death has been observed after transient forebrain ischemia. Histopathological examinations showed very little alizarin red staining in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer until day 28 after reperfusion, while prominent alizarin red staining was detected in CA1 dendritic subfields, particularly in the stratum radiatum, by 14 days after reperfusion. Electron microscopy using the osmium/potassium dichromate method and electron probe microanalysis revealed selective calcium deposits within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites at as early as 7 days after reperfusion, with subsequent complete mineralization occurring throughout the dendrites, which then coalesced to form larger mineral conglomerates with the adjacent calcifying neurites by 14 days after reperfusion. Large calcifying deposits were frequently observed at 28 days after reperfusion, when they were closely associated with or completely engulfed by astrocytes. In contrast, no prominent calcification was observed in the somata of CA1 pyramidal neurons showing the characteristic features of necrotic cell death after ischemia, although what appeared to be calcified mitochondria were noted in some degenerated neurons that became dark and condensed. Thus, our data indicate that intrahippocampal calcification after ischemic insults initially occurs within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites, which leads to the extensive calcification that is associated with ischemic injuries. These findings suggest that in degenerating neurons, the calcified mitochondria in the dendrites, rather than in the somata, may serve as the nidus for further calcium precipitation in the ischemic hippocampus. PMID:27414398

  7. Spatiotemporal Progression of Microcalcification in the Hippocampal CA1 Region following Transient Forebrain Ischemia in Rats: An Ultrastructural Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Lim; Cho, Jeong Min; Pak, Ha-Jin; Lee, Mun-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Calcification in areas of neuronal degeneration is a common finding in several neuropathological disorders including ischemic insults. Here, we performed a detailed examination of the onset and spatiotemporal profile of calcification in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, where neuronal death has been observed after transient forebrain ischemia. Histopathological examinations showed very little alizarin red staining in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer until day 28 after reperfusion, while prominent alizarin red staining was detected in CA1 dendritic subfields, particularly in the stratum radiatum, by 14 days after reperfusion. Electron microscopy using the osmium/potassium dichromate method and electron probe microanalysis revealed selective calcium deposits within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites at as early as 7 days after reperfusion, with subsequent complete mineralization occurring throughout the dendrites, which then coalesced to form larger mineral conglomerates with the adjacent calcifying neurites by 14 days after reperfusion. Large calcifying deposits were frequently observed at 28 days after reperfusion, when they were closely associated with or completely engulfed by astrocytes. In contrast, no prominent calcification was observed in the somata of CA1 pyramidal neurons showing the characteristic features of necrotic cell death after ischemia, although what appeared to be calcified mitochondria were noted in some degenerated neurons that became dark and condensed. Thus, our data indicate that intrahippocampal calcification after ischemic insults initially occurs within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites, which leads to the extensive calcification that is associated with ischemic injuries. These findings suggest that in degenerating neurons, the calcified mitochondria in the dendrites, rather than in the somata, may serve as the nidus for further calcium precipitation in the ischemic hippocampus. PMID:27414398

  8. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 2; Quantitative Autoradiographic Analysis of Gaba (Benzodiazepine) and Muscarinic (Cholinergic) Receptors in the Forebrain of Rats Flown on Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Daunton, N. G.; Krasnov, I. B.; DAmelio, F.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of receptors for GABA and acetylcholine in the forebrain of rats flown on COSMOS 2044 was undertaken as part of a joint US-Soviet study to determine the effects of microgravity on the central nervous system, and in particular on the sensory and motor portions of the forebrain. Changes in binding of these receptors in tissue from animals exposed to microgravity would provide evidence for possible changes in neural processing as a result of exposure to microgravity. Tritium-labelled diazepam and Quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB) were used to visualize GABA (benzodiazepine) and muscarinic (cholinergic) receptors, respectively. The density of tritium-labelled radioligands bound to various regions in the forebrain of both flight and control animals were measured from autoradiograms. Data from rats flown in space and from ground-based control animals that were not exposed to microgravity were compared.

  9. [REACTIVE CHANGES IN THE ASTROCYTES OF FOREBRAIN NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS AFTER RESTRICTION OF BLOOD FLOW IN THE BASIN OF BOTH COMMON CAROTID ARTERIES IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Naumov, N G

    2016-01-01

    Reactive changes of astrocytes were studied in forebrain nucleus accumbens in rats (n = 12) after global cerebral ischemia induced by bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries, which is a frequently used model to assess the effectiveness of pharmacological agents that have anti-ischemic and neuroprotective properties. Under these conditions, the nucleus accumbens was in the area of partial ischemia. Morphometric study of nucleus accumbens was performed in three groups of rats (4 animals in each group) after ligation of both common carotid arteries, after a sham operation and in healthy animals. Astrocytes were demonstrated in serial sections using the reaction to glial fibrillary acidic protein counterstained with hematoxylin. 7 days after the surgery, in each animal the number of astrocytes was counted in the sections in 7 successiive squares of 0.01 mm2 each, the distance between their bodies and the capillary wall was measured within the circle of 20 μm radius, the cell body area and the length of their main processes were determined. It is found that astrocytes in the nucleus accumbens in the model of bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries for 7 days experienced a partial state of ischemia. Their reactive changes were manifested by the signs of the cytotoxic edema, damaging intermediate filament proteins in their bodies, processes and in the perivascular glial membranes. The concentration of the astrocyte cell bodies near blood capillaries is the adaptation mechanism and is a condition for the survival of cells under the restriction of blood flow in the brain. PMID:27487658

  10. Spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and sleep deprivation differently induce Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a DNA methylation and transcripts levels in the basal forebrain and frontal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Ventskovska, Olena; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Karpova, Nina N

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) regulates neuronal plasticity, slow wave activity and sleep homeostasis. Environmental stimuli control Bdnf expression through epigenetic mechanisms, but there are no data on epigenetic regulation of Bdnf by sleep or sleep deprivation. Here we investigated whether 5-methylcytosine (5mC) DNA modification at Bdnf promoters p1, p4 and p9 influences Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a expression during the normal inactive phase or after sleep deprivation (SD) (3, 6 and 12 h, end-times being ZT3, ZT6 and ZT12) in rats in two brain areas involved in sleep regulation, the basal forebrain and cortex. We found a daytime variation in cortical Bdnf expression: Bdnf1 expression was highest at ZT6 and Bdnf4 lowest at ZT12. Such variation was not observed in the basal forebrain. Also Bdnf p1 and p9 methylation levels differed only in the cortex, while Bdnf p4 methylation did not vary in either area. Factorial analysis revealed that sleep deprivation significantly induced Bdnf1 and Bdnf4 with the similar pattern for Bdnf9a in both basal forebrain and cortex; 12 h of sleep deprivation decreased 5mC levels at the cortical Bdnf p4 and p9. Regression analysis between the 5mC promoter levels and the corresponding Bdnf transcript expression revealed significant negative correlations for the basal forebrain Bdnf1 and cortical Bdnf9a transcripts in only non-deprived rats, while these correlations were lost after sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that Bdnf transcription during the light phase of undisturbed sleep-wake cycle but not after SD is regulated at least partially by brain site-specific DNA methylation.

  11. Tongxinluo Enhances Neurogenesis and Angiogenesis in Peri-Infarct Area and Subventricular Zone and Promotes Functional Recovery after Focal Cerebral Ischemic Infarction in Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhang, Jian; Dang, Chao; Liu, Gang; Liang, Zhijian; Huang, Gelun; Zhao, Weijia; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tongxinluo is a traditional Chinese medicine compound with the potential to promote the neuronal functional recovery in cerebral ischemic infarction. Objective. This study aimed to disclose whether tongxinluo promotes neurological functional recovery and neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the infarcted area and SVZ after cerebral ischemic infarction in hypertensive rats. Methods. The ischemic model was prepared by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in hypertensive rats. Tongxinluo was administrated 24 h after MCAO and lasted for 3, 7, or 14 days. Behavioral tests were performed to evaluate the protection of tongxinluo. Immunochemical staining was applied on brain tissue to evaluate the effects of tongxinluo on neurogenesis and vascularization in the MCAO model rats. Results. Postinjury administration of tongxinluo ameliorated the neuronal function deficit in the MCAO model rats. As evidenced by the immunochemical staining, BrdU+/DCX+, BrdU+/nestin+, and BrdU+ vascular endothelial cells were promoted to proliferate in SVZ after tongxinluo administration. The matured neurons stained by NeuN and vascularization by laminin staining were observed after tongxinluo administration in the peri-infarct area. Conclusion. Tongxinluo postischemia administration could ameliorate the neurological function deficit in the model rats. Possible mechanisms are related to neurogenesis and angiogenesis in the peri-infarct area and SVZ. PMID:27069496

  12. Blockade of the cerebral aqueduct in rats provides evidence of antagonistic leptin responses in the forebrain and hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Vaill, Michael I; Desai, Bhavna N; Harris, Ruth B S

    2014-02-15

    Previously, we reported that low-dose leptin infusions into the fourth ventricle produced a small but significant increase in body fat. These data contrast with reports that injections of higher doses of leptin into the fourth ventricle inhibit food intake and weight gain. In this study, we tested whether exogenous leptin in the fourth ventricle opposed or contributed to weight loss caused by third ventricle leptin infusion by blocking diffusion of CSF from the third to the fourth ventricle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received third ventricle infusions of PBS or 0.3 μg leptin/24 h from miniosmotic pumps. After 4 days, rats received a 3-μl cerebral aqueduct injection of saline or of thermogelling nanoparticles (hydrogel) that solidified at body temperature. Third ventricle leptin infusion inhibited food intake and caused weight loss. Blocking the aqueduct exaggerated the effect of leptin on food intake and weight loss but had no effect on the weight of PBS-infused rats. Leptin reduced both body fat and lean body mass but did not change energy expenditure. Blocking the aqueduct decreased expenditure of rats infused with PBS or leptin. Infusion of leptin into the third ventricle increased phosphorylated STAT3 in the VMHDM of the hypothalamus and the medial NTS in the hindbrain. Blocking the aqueduct did not change hypothalamic p-STAT3 but decreased p-STAT3 in the medial NTS. These results support previous observations that low-level activation of hindbrain leptin receptors has the potential to blunt the catabolic effects of leptin in the third ventricle.

  13. Effects of amyloid-beta on cholinergic and acetylcholinesterase-positive cells in cultured basal forebrain neurons of embryonic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kasa, Peter; Papp, Henrietta; Kasa, Peter; Pakaski, Magdolna; Balaspiri, Lajos

    2004-02-13

    The neurotoxic effects of amyloid-beta(1-42) and amyloid-beta(25-35) (A beta) on cholinergic and acetylcholinesterase-positive neurons were investigated in primary cultures derived from embryonic 18-day-old rat basal forebrain. After various time intervals, the cultures were treated with 1, 5, 10 or 20 microM A beta for different time periods. The cholinergic neurons and their axon terminals were revealed by vesicular acetylcholine transporter immunohistochemistry and the cholinoceptive cells by acetylcholinesterase histochemical staining. To assess the toxic effects of these A beta peptides on the cholinergic neurons, image analysis was applied for quantitative determination of the numbers of axon varicosities/terminals and cells. The results demonstrate that, following treatment with 1 or 5 microM A beta for 5, 10, 30, 60 or 120 min, no changes in vesicular acetylcholine transporter immunohistochemical staining were observed. However, after treatment for 30 min with 10 or 20 microM A beta, the number of stained axon varicosities was reduced, and treatment for 2 h they had disappeared. In contrast, vesicular acetylcholine transporter-positivity could be seen in some of the neuronal perikarya even after 3 days after treatment. The acetylcholinesterase staining was homogeneously distributed in the control neurons. After A beta treatment, the histochemical reaction end-product was detected in some of the neuronal perikarya or in the dendritic processes near to the soma. It is concluded that the neurotoxic effects of A beta appear more rapidly in the cholinergic axon terminals than in the cholinergic and acetylcholinesterase-positive neuronal perikarya. PMID:14725970

  14. Comparison of somatostatin and corticotrophin releasing hormone immunoreactivity in forebrain neurons projecting to taste responsive and non responsive regions of the parabrachial nucleus in rat

    PubMed Central

    Panguluri, Siva; Saggu, Shalini; Lundy, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Several forebrain areas have been shown to project to the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and exert inhibitory and excitatory influences on taste processing. The neurochemicals by which descending forebrain inputs modulate neural taste-evoked responses remain to be established. This study investigated the existence of somatostatin (SS) and corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) in forebrain neurons that project to caudal regions of the PBN responsive to chemical stimulation of the anterior tongue as well as more rostral unresponsive regions. Retrograde tracer was iontophoretically or pressure ejected from glass micropipettes, and seven days later the animals were euthanized for subsequent immunohistochemical processing for co-localization of tracer with SS and CRF in tissue sections containing the lateral hypothalamus (LH), central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and insular cortex (IC). In each forebrain site, robust labeling of cells with distinguishable nuclei and short processes was observed for SS and CRF. The results indicate that CRF neurons in each forebrain site send projections throughout the rostral caudal extent of the PBN with a greater percentage terminating in regions rostral to the anterior tongue responsive area. For SS, the percentage of double-labeled neurons was more forebrain site specific in that only BNST and CeA exhibited significant numbers of double labeled neurons. Few retrogradely labeled cells in LH co-expressed SS, while no double labeled cells were observed in IC. Again, tracer injections into rostral PBN resulted in a greater percentage of double labeled neurons in BNST and CeA compared to caudal injections. The present results suggest that some sources of descending forebrain input might utilize somatostatin and/or CRF to exert a broad influence on sensory information processing in the PBN. PMID:19699720

  15. Correlations between the degree and type of forebrain malformations and the simultaneous neuro-oncogenic properties of ethylnitrosourea after diaplacental exposure in rats, alone and in combination with X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmahl, W.; Kriegel, H.

    1985-01-01

    Single and combined treatments were performed in rats on day 13 of gestation with either ENU or ENU subsequent to various X-irradiation doses between 0.5 and 1.5 Gy. At this time of gestation, developmental anomalies of the brain are still inducible by any of these treatments, in addition to neurocarcinogenic effects after ENU alone or in combination with X-irradiation. We looked for correlations between the degree of brain malformations still detectable in the adult animals and the simultaneous occurrence of brain tumors. These evaluations were based on a histopathological analysis regarding the type and degree of malformation residues, as well as the type and distribution pattern of the tumors (especially regarding gliomas) within the forebrain. Both after ENU and X-irradiation plus ENU-treatment, the occurrence of glioma in the offspring was positively correlated with the degree of brain dysplasia. This effect was not only restricted to the total glioma incidence but also confirmed by the higher glioma multiplicity in major dysplastic brains. Additionally, gliomas were preferentially located within the subependymal layer, which simultaneously was most severely affected by the teratogenic effects after prenatal treatment. Although forebrain dysplasia generally presents a significant predisposition for glioma inducibility, this oncogenic event is apparently strictly inversely related to a certain type of forebrain malformation, namely the occurrence of heterotopic neuronal nodules within the telencephalic roof. They emerge from rosettes, which are typical radiation lesions occurring only after doses above 1.0 Gy. In none of the forebrains which still revealed rosette-residues in later life could a simultaneous occurrence of gliomas be observed.

  16. Dynamics of c-fos and ICER mRNA expression in rat forebrain following lithium chloride injection.

    PubMed

    Spencer, C M; Houpt, T A

    2001-09-30

    Lithium is commonly used as a treatment for affective disorders in humans and as a toxin to produce conditioned taste aversions in rats. LiCl administration in rats has been correlated with activation of c-fos and cAMP-mediated gene transcription in many brain regions; however, little is known about the timing or duration of gene activation. We hypothesized that c-fos gene transcription is rapidly stimulated by LiCl, followed later by the expression of the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) transcription factor, a negative modulator of cAMP-mediated gene transcription. By in situ hybridization, we analyzed the timecourse of c-fos and ICER mRNA expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON) at seven time points (0, 0.3, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 h) after intraperitoneal LiCl injection (0.15 M, 12 ml/kg, 76 mg/kg). Expression of c-fos mRNA peaked between 20 min and 1 h and returned to baseline by 3 h in the CeA, PVN and SON. ICER mRNA was detected in these regions at 20 min, peaked at 1-3 h and returned to nearly baseline 9 h following LiCl injection. The time lag between c-fos mRNA expression and ICER mRNA expression within the same regions is consistent with ICER terminating c-fos gene transcription. However, no refractory period was detected for restimulation of c-fos transcription by a second injection of LiCl during the period of peak ICER mRNA expression, suggesting the involvement of other transcriptional modulators. PMID:11589989

  17. Melanocortin receptor agonist ACTH 1-39 protects rat forebrain neurons from apoptotic, excitotoxic and inflammation-related damage.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Robert P; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Bealmear, Beverly; Benjamins, Joyce A

    2015-11-01

    Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) are commonly treated with high doses of intravenous corticosteroids (CS). ACTH 1-39, a member of the melanocortin family, stimulates production of CS by the adrenals, but melanocortin receptors are also found in the central nervous system (CNS) and on immune cells. ACTH is produced within the CNS and may have direct protective effects on glia and neurons independent of CS. We previously reported that ACTH 1-39 protected oligodendroglia (OL) and their progenitors (OPC) from a panel of excitotoxic and inflammation-related agents. Neurons are the most vulnerable cells in the CNS. They are terminally differentiated, and sensitive to inflammatory and excitotoxic insults. For potential therapeutic protection of gray matter, it is important to investigate the direct effects of ACTH on neurons. Cultures highly enriched in neurons were isolated from 2-3 day old rat brain. After 4-7 days in culture, the neurons were treated for 24h with selected toxic agents with or without ACTH 1-39. ACTH 1-39 protected neurons from death induced by staurosporine, glutamate, NMDA, AMPA, kainate, quinolinic acid, reactive oxygen species and, to a modest extent, from rapidly released NO, but did not protect against kynurenic acid or slowly released nitric oxide. Our results show that ACTH 1-39 protects neurons in vitro from several apoptotic, excitotoxic and inflammation-related insults.

  18. Perinatal and early postnatal changes in the expression of monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT2 in the rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Baud, Olivier; Fayol, Laurence; Gressens, Pierre; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre; Evrard, Philippe; Verney, Catherine

    2003-10-20

    In addition to glucose, monocarboxylates including lactate represent a major source of energy for the brain, especially during development. We studied the immunocytochemical expression of the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT2 in the rat brain between embryonic day (E) 16 and postnatal day (P) 14. At E16-18, MCT1-like immunoreactivity was found throughout the cortical anlage, being particularly marked medially in the hippocampal anlage next to the ventricle. In a complementary pattern, MCT2-like immunoreactivity was expressed along the medial and ventral border of the ventricle in the medial septum and habenula before birth. The hypothalamic area exhibited MCT2 and MCT1 positive areas from E18 on. These transient labelings revealed four main sites of monocarboxylate and/or glucose exchange: the brain parenchyma, the epithelial cells, the ependymocytes, and the glia limitans. During the first postnatal week, MCT1 immunoreactivity extended massively to the vessel walls and moderately to the developing astrocytes in the cortex. In contrast, MCT2 immunoreactivity was faint in blood vessels but massive in developing astrocytes from P3 to P7. Neither MCT2 nor MCT1 colocalized with neuronal, microglial, or oligodendrocytic markers during the first postnatal week. At P14, a part of the scattered punctate MCT2 staining could be associated with astrocytes and postsynaptic dendritic labeling. The transient pattern of expression of MCTs throughout the perinatal period suggests a potential relationship with the maturation of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:12966567

  19. Postnatal maternal separation enhances tonic GABA current of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons in juvenile rats and promotes genesis of GABAergic neurons in neocortical molecular layer and subventricular zone in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mei; Sheng, Guoxia; Li, Zhongxia; Wang, Jiangping; Ren, Keming; Jin, Xiaoming; Jiang, Kewen

    2014-03-01

    Postnatal maternal separation (PMS) has been shown to be associated with an increased vulnerability to psychiatric illnesses in adulthood. However, the underlying neurological mechanisms are not well understood. Here we evaluated its effects on neurogenesis and tonic GABA currents of cortical layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons. PMS not only increased cell proliferation in the subventricular zone, cortical layer 1 and hippocampal dentate gyrus in the adult brain, but also promoted the newly generated cells to differentiate into GABAergic neurons, and PMS adult brain maintained higher ratios of GABAergic neurons in the survival of newly generated cells within 5 days immediately post PMS. Additionally, PMS increased the tonic currents at P7-10 and P30-35 in cortical L5 pyramidal cells. Our results suggest that the newly generated GABAergic neurons and the low GABA concentration-activated tonic currents may be involved in the development of psychiatric disorders after PMS.

  20. Cyclic AMP reduces adhesion of isolated neuronal growth cones from developing rat forebrain to an astrocytic cell line from embryonic mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Autillo-Touati, A; Araud, D; Seite, R; Chneiweiss, H; Glowinski, J; Prochiantz, A

    1989-01-01

    We have recently shown that isolated neuronal growth cones from developing rat forebrain possess an appreciable activity of adenylate cyclase, producing cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which can be stimulated by various neurotransmitter receptor agonists and by forskolin [Lockerbie R. O., Hervé D., Blanc G., Tassin J. P. and Glowinski J. (1988) Devl Brain Res. 38, 19-25]. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in an in vitro adhesion assay established between [3H]GABA-labelled isolated growth cones and a Simian virus-40 transformed astrocytic cell line from embryonic mouse striatum. Adhesion of the isolated growth cones onto the astrocytic clone increased steadily up to about 45 min before it began to level off at ca 16-18% of total [3H]GABA-labelled isolated growth cones added. Adhesion of the isolated growth cones onto the astrocytic clone was much superior to that seen on polyornithine and, in particular, on non-treated tissue culture wells. Adhesion "at plateau" was independent of both temperature and extracellular Ca2+ and was markedly reduced (ca 50%) by trypsin pre-treatment of the isolated growth cones. Pre-treatment of the isolated growth cones with either forskolin or lipophilic analogues of cyclic adenosine monophosphate attenuated adhesion in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Approximately 30% reduction in adhesion to the astrocytic clone "at plateau" was observed after a 15 min pre-treatment of the isolated growth cones with forskolin at 10(-4) M or cyclic adenosine monophosphate analogues at 10(-3) M. A cyclic guanosine monophosphate analogue was without effect on adhesion of isolated growth cones. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed that isolated growth cones pre-treated with either cyclic adenosine monophosphate analogues or forskolin had a simpler morphology when attached to the astrocytic clone than isolated growth cones under control conditions. Pre-treatment of the isolated

  1. Effect of acute asenapine treatment on Fos expression in the forebrain structures under normal conditions and mild stress preconditioning in the rat.

    PubMed

    Majercikova, Zuzana; Cernackova, Alena; Horvathova, Lubica; Osacka, Jana; Pecenak, Jan; Kiss, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Asenapine (ASE) is a novel atypical antipsychotic drug approved for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Stress is an inseparable part of the human life, which may interfere with the therapeutic effect of different drugs. The aim of the present study was: (1) to delineate the quantitative and qualitative profiles of the ASE effect on Fos expression in the striatum, septum, nucleus accumbens, and the prefrontal cortex and (2) to find out whether a chronic unpredictable variable mild stress (CMS) preconditioning may modify the effect of acute ASE treatment. Stress paradigms included restrain, social isolation, crowding, swimming, and cold. The animals were exposed to CMS for 21 days and on the 22nd day received an injection of vehicle (saline 300 μl/rat s.c.) or ASE (0.3mg/kg s.c.). They were sacrificed 90 min after the treatments. Fos protein was visualized by avidin biotin peroxidase (ABC). Four groups of animals were investigated: controls+vehicle, controls+ASE, CMS+vehicle, and CMS+ASE. The number of Fos labeled neurons was calculated per total investigated area, which was selective for each structure, and also recalculated per unified sector. ASE treatment induced significant and very similar increase of the Fos expression in both ASE control and ASE CMS animals in comparison with saline control and CMS ones. Moreover, ASE induced regional differences in the number of Fos-positive neurons. In both ASE groups most pronounced response in the number of Fos profiles occurred in the dorsolateral striatum, ventrolateral septum, shell of the nucleus accumbens, and the medial prefrontal cortex. Mild Fos response was seen in the dorsomedial and ventromedial striatum and core of the nucleus accumbens. No response was seen in the dorsolateral septum. The present paper demonstrates for the first time the character of the Fos distribution in the forebrain structures induced by acute ASE treatment as well as ASE response to 21 days CMS preconditioning. The

  2. SSEA‐4 and YKL‐40 positive progenitor subtypes in the subventricular zone of developing human neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Brøchner, Christian B.

    2015-01-01

    The glycosphingolipid SSEA‐4 and the glycoprotein YKL‐40 have both been associated with human embryonic and neural stem cell differentiation. We investigated the distribution of SSEA‐4 and YKL‐40 positive cells in proliferative zones of human fetal forebrain using immunohistochemistry and double‐labeling immunofluorescence. A few small rounded SSEA‐4 and YKL‐40 labeled cells were present in the radial glial BLBP positive proliferative zones adjacent to the lateral ganglionic eminence from 12th week post conception. With increasing age, a similarly stained cell population appeared more widespread in the subventricular zone. At midgestation, the entire subventricular zone showed patches of SSEA‐4, YKL‐40, and BLBP positive cells. Co‐labeling with markers for radial glial cells (RGCs) and neuronal, glial, and microglial markers tested the lineage identity of this subpopulation of radial glial descendants. Adjacent to the ventricular zone, a minor fraction showed overlap with GFAP but not with nestin, Olig2, NG2, or S100. No co‐localization was found with neuronal markers NeuN, calbindin, DCX or with markers for microglial cells (Iba‐1, CD68). Moreover, the SSEA‐4 and YKL‐40 positive cell population in subventricular zone was largely devoid of Tbr2, a marker for intermediate neuronal progenitor cells descending from RGCs. YKL‐40 has recently been found in astrocytes in the neuron‐free fimbria, and both SSEA‐4 and YKL‐40 are present in malignant astroglial brain tumors. We suggest that the population of cells characterized by immunohistochemical combination of antibodies against SSEA‐4 and YKL‐40 and devoid of neuronal and microglial markers represent a yet unexplored astrogenic lineage illustrating the complexity of astroglial development. GLIA 2016;64:90–104 PMID:26295543

  3. Clonally related forebrain interneurons disperse broadly across both, functional areas and structural boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christian; Jaglin, Xavier H.; Cobbs, Lucy V.; Bandler, Rachel C.; Streicher, Carmen; Cepko, Constance L.; Hippenmeyer, Simon; Fishell, Gord

    2015-01-01

    The medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) gives rise to the majority of mouse forebrain interneurons. Here, we examine the lineage relationship among MGE-derived interneurons using a replication-defective retroviral library containing a highly diverse set of DNA barcodes. Recovering the barcodes from the mature progeny of infected progenitor cells enabled us to unambiguously determine their respective lineal relationship. We found that clonal dispersion occurs across large areas of the brain and is not restricted by anatomical divisions. As such, sibling interneurons can populate the cortex, hippocampus striatum and globus pallidus. The majority of interneurons appeared to be generated from asymmetric divisions of MGE progenitor cells, followed by symmetric divisions within the subventricular zone. Altogether, our findings uncover that lineage relationships do not appear to determine interneuron allocation to particular regions. As such, it is likely that clonally-related interneurons have considerable flexibility as to the particular forebrain circuits to which they can contribute. PMID:26299473

  4. The forebrain of actinopterygians revisited.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuys, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain of actinopterygian fishes differs from that of other vertebrates in that it consists of a pair of solid lobes. Lateral ventricles surrounded by nervous tissue are entirely lacking. Comparative anatomical and embryological studies have shown that the unusual configuration of the forebrain in actinopterygians results from an outward bending or eversion of the dorsal portions of its lateral walls. Due to this eversion, the telencephalic roof plate is transformed into a wide, membranous structure which surrounds the dorsal and lateral parts of the solid lobes and is attached to their lateral or ventrolateral aspects. The taeniae, i.e. the lines of attachment of the widened roof plate, represent important landmarks in actinopterygian forebrains. In the present paper, the process of eversion is specified and quantified. It is pointed out that recent suggestions to modify the original eversion concept lack an empirical basis. Eversion is the antithesis of the inward bending or inversion that occurs in the forebrains of most other vertebrates. The forebrain lobes in actinopterygians, like those in other vertebrates, comprise a pallium and a subpallium, both of which include a number of distinct cell masses. The morphological interpretations of these cell masses over the past 130 years are reviewed and evaluated in light of a set of carefully selected criteria for homologous relationships. Special attention is paid to the interpretation of a cell mass known as Dp, situated in the caudolateral portion of the pallium in teleosts (by far the largest clade of living actinopterygians). Based on its position close to the taenia, and given the everted condition of the pallium in teleosts, this cell mass clearly corresponds with the medial pallium in inverted forebrains; however, Dp receives a dense olfactory input, and it shares this salient feature with the lateral pallium, rather than with the medial pallium of inverted forebrains. There is presently no consensus

  5. Forebrain Pain Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker; Galhardo, Vasco; Maione, Sabatino; Mackey, Sean C.

    2009-01-01

    Emotional-affective and cognitive dimensions of pain are less well understood than nociceptive and nocifensive components, but the forebrain is believed to play an important role. Recent evidence suggests subcortical and cortical brain areas outside the traditional pain processing network contribute critically to emotional-affective responses and cognitive deficits related to pain. These brain areas include different nuclei of the amygdala and certain prefrontal cortical areas. Their roles in various aspects of pain will be discussed. Biomarkers of cortical dysfunction are being identified that may evolve into therapeutic targets to modulate pain experience and improve pain-related cognitive impairment. Supporting data from preclinical studies in neuropathic pain models will be presented. Neuroimaging analysis provides evidence for plastic changes in the pain processing brain network. Results of clinical studies in neuropathic pain patients suggest that neuroimaging may help determine mechanisms of altered brain functions in pain as well as monitor the effects of pharmacologic interventions to optimize treatment in individual patients. Recent progress in the analysis of higher brain functions emphasizes the concept of pain as a multidimensional experience and the need for integrative approaches to determine the full spectrum of harmful or protective neurobiological changes in pain. PMID:19162070

  6. Increased expression of Slit2 and its receptors Robo1 and Robo4 in reactive astrocytes of the rat hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Joo-Hee; Pak, Ha-Jin; Riew, Tae-Ryong; Shin, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Mun-Yong

    2016-03-01

    Slit2 is a secreted glycoprotein that was originally identified as a chemorepulsive factor in the developing brain; however, it was recently reported that Slit2 is associated with adult neuronal function including a variety of pathophysiological processes. To elucidate whether Slit2 is implicated in the pathophysiology of ischemic injury, we investigated the temporal changes and cellular localization of Slit2 and its predominant receptors, Robo1 and Robo4, for 28 days after transient forebrain ischemia. Slit2 and its receptors had similar overall expression patterns in the control and ischemic hippocampi. The ligand and receptors were constitutively expressed in hippocampal neurons in control animals; however, in animals with ischemic injury, their upregulation was detected in reactive astrocytes, but not in neurons or activated microglia, in the CA1 region. Astroglial induction of Slit2 and its receptors occurred by day 3 after reperfusion, and appeared to increase progressively until the final time point on day 28. Their temporal expression patterns overlapped with the time period in which reactive astrocytes undergo dynamic structural changes and appear hypertrophic in the ischemic hippocampus. The immunohistochemical data were consistent with the results of the immunoblot analyses, indicating that the expression of Slit2 and Robo increased progressively over the relatively long period of 28 days examined here. Collectively, these results suggest that Slit2/Robo signaling may be involved in regulating the astroglial reaction via autocrine or paracrine mechanisms in post-ischemic processes. Moreover, this may contribute to the dynamic morphological changes that occur in astrocytes in response to ischemic injury.

  7. Synchronized electrical stimulation of the rat medial forebrain bundle and perforant pathway generates an additive BOLD response in the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Karla; Min, Hoon-Ki; Lee, Kendall H; Angenstein, Frank

    2013-08-15

    To study how a synchronized activation of two independent pathways affects the fMRI response in a common targeted brain region, blood oxygen dependent (BOLD) signals were measured during electrical stimulation of the right medial forebrain bundle (MFB), the right perforant pathway (PP) and concurrent stimulation of the two fiber systems. Repetitive electrical stimulations of the MFB triggered significant positive BOLD responses in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), septum, anterior cingulate cortex/medial prefrontal cortex (ACC/mPFC), ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra (VTA/SN), right entorhinal cortex (EC) and colliculus superior, which, in general, declined during later stimulation trains. At the same time, negative BOLD responses were observed in the striatum. Thus, the same stimulus caused region-specific hemodynamic responses. An identical electrical stimulation of the PP generated positive BOLD responses in the right dentate gyrus/hippocampus proper/subiculum (DG/HC), the right entorhinal cortex and the left entorhinal cortex, which remained almost stable during consecutive stimulation trains. Co-stimulation of the two fiber systems resulted in an additive activation pattern, i.e., the BOLD responses were stronger during the stimulation of the two pathways than during the stimulation of only one pathway. However, during the simultaneous stimulation of the two pathways, the development of the BOLD responses to consecutive trains changed. The BOLD responses in regions that were predominantly activated by MFB stimulation (i.e., NAcc, septum and ACC/mPFC) did not decline as fast as during pure MFB stimulation, thus an additive BOLD response was only observed during later trains. In contrast, in the brain regions that were predominantly activated by PP stimulation (i.e., right EC, DG/HC), co-stimulation of the MFB only resulted in an additive effect during early trains but not later trains. Consequently, the development of the BOLD responses during consecutive

  8. Effects of hypocretin (orexin) neuronal loss on sleep and extracellular adenosine levels in the basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Rodriguez, Eric; Liu, Meng; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Shiromani, Priyattam J.

    2009-01-01

    Neurons containing the neuropeptide hypocretin (orexin) are localized only in the lateral hypothalamus from where they innervate multiple regions implicated in arousal, including the basal forebrain. HCRT activation of downstream arousal neurons is likely to stimulate release of endogenous factors. One such factor is adenosine (AD), which in the basal forebrain increases with waking and decreases with sleep, and is hypothesized to regulate the waxing and waning of sleep drive. Does loss of HCRT neurons affect AD levels in the basal forebrain? Is the increased sleep that accompanies HCRT loss a consequence of higher AD levels in the basal forebrain? In the present study, we investigate these questions by lesioning the HCRT neurons (hypocretin-2-saporin) and measuring sleep and extracellular levels of AD in the basal forebrain. In separate groups of rats, the neurotoxin HCRT2-SAP or saline were administered locally to the lateral hypothalamus and 80 days later AD and sleep were assessed. Rats given the neurotoxin had a 94% loss of the HCRT neurons. These rats awake less at night, and had more REM sleep, which is consistent with a HCRT hypofunction. These rats also had more sleep after brief periods of sleep deprivation. However, in the lesioned rats, AD levels did not increase with 6h sleep deprivation, whereas such an increase in AD occurred in rats without lesion of the HCRT neurons. These findings indicate that AD levels do not increase with waking in rats with a HCRT lesion, and that the increased sleep in these rats occurs independently of AD levels in the basal forebrain. PMID:18783368

  9. Forebrain Mechanisms of Nociception and Pain: Analysis through Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Kenneth L.

    1999-07-01

    Pain is a unified experience composed of interacting discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive components, each of which is mediated and modulated through forebrain mechanisms acting at spinal, brainstem, and cerebral levels. The size of the human forebrain in relation to the spinal cord gives anatomical emphasis to forebrain control over nociceptive processing. Human forebrain pathology can cause pain without the activation of nociceptors. Functional imaging of the normal human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) shows synaptically induced increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in several regions specifically during pain. We have examined the variables of gender, type of noxious stimulus, and the origin of nociceptive input as potential determinants of the pattern and intensity of rCBF responses. The structures most consistently activated across genders and during contact heat pain, cold pain, cutaneous laser pain or intramuscular pain were the contralateral insula and anterior cingulate cortex, the bilateral thalamus and premotor cortex, and the cerebellar vermis. These regions are commonly activated in PET studies of pain conducted by other investigators, and the intensity of the brain rCBF response correlates parametrically with perceived pain intensity. To complement the human studies, we developed an animal model for investigating stimulus-induced rCBF responses in the rat. In accord with behavioral measures and the results of human PET, there is a progressive and selective activation of somatosensory and limbic system structures in the brain and brainstem following the subcutaneous injection of formalin. The animal model and human PET studies should be mutually reinforcing and thus facilitate progress in understanding forebrain mechanisms of normal and pathological pain.

  10. Causes and consequences of expanded subventricular zones.

    PubMed

    Charvet, Christine J; Striedter, Georg F

    2011-09-01

    Primates have evolved an expanded isocortex relative to many other mammals. Parrots and songbirds have evolved an expanded telencephalon relative to many other birds. Previous work suggests that the expansion of the telencephalon in parrots and songbirds as well as the isocortex in primates is achieved, at least in part, by selectively delaying neurogenesis, expanding the subventricular zone (SVZ) and delaying maturation. The finding that similar developmental alterations in the spatial and temporal pattern of neurogenesis evolved together in these two distant lineages suggests that a single change in developmental mechanism might account for the expansion of the isocortex or telencephalon. We here review how uniformly lengthening developmental schedules may result in delays of neurogenesis, the expansion of the SVZ and delayed maturation. We propose that delays in neurogenesis may cause ventricular zone (VZ) cells to proliferate faster than the VZ can expand, which may force many proliferating cells to leave the VZ and form an expanded SVZ. Prolonged proliferation in the VZ and SVZ causes delays in neuronal maturation, which in turn may promote learning from conspecifics. Thus, we suggest that a single heterochronic change in developmental timing may orchestrate a variety of changes in the spatial and temporal pattern of proliferation, which has important behavioral consequences in adulthood.

  11. Cell migration in the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Menezes, J R L; Marins, M; Alves, J A J; Froes, M M; Hedin-Pereira, C

    2002-12-01

    New neurons are constantly added to the olfactory bulb of rodents from birth to adulthood. This accretion is not only dependent on sustained neurogenesis, but also on the migration of neuroblasts and immature neurons from the cortical and striatal subventricular zone (SVZ) to the olfactory bulb. Migration along this long tangential pathway, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), is in many ways opposite to the classical radial migration of immature neurons: it is faster, spans a longer distance, does not require radial glial guidance, and is not limited to postmitotic neurons. In recent years many molecules have been found to be expressed specifically in this pathway and to directly affect this migration. Soluble factors with inhibitory, attractive and inductive roles in migration have been described, as well as molecules mediating cell-to-cell and cell-substrate interactions. However, it is still unclear how the various molecules and cells interact to account for the special migratory behavior in the RMS. Here we will propose some candidate mechanisms for roles in initiating and stopping SVZ/RMS migration.

  12. Microinjection of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 into the rat brainstem and basal forebrain: site-dependent effects on REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Monti, Jaime M; Leopoldo, Marcello; Jantos, Héctor; Lagos, Patricia

    2012-08-01

    The effects of SB-269970, a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, on spontaneous sleep were studied in adult rats implanted for chronic sleep recordings. The 5-HT7 receptor ligand was microinjected into the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) during the light period of the 12-h light/12-h dark cycle. For comparative purposes the compound was administered systemically and, in addition, injected directly into the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Microinjection of SB-269970 into the HDB and the DRN induced a significant reduction of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS). Similar effects were observed after systemic administration of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist. On the other hand, local infusion of the compound into the LDT provoked the opposite effect. It is proposed that the deactivation of GABAergic cells located in the HDB, DRN and LDT is responsible for the changes induced by SB-269970 on REM sleep values. It is suggested that the antidepressant effect of the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist could partly depend on the involvement of neuronal systems located in the DRN and the HDB.

  13. A Model of Ischemia-Induced Neuroblast Activation in the Adult Subventricular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Vergni, Davide; Castiglione, Filippo; Briani, Maya; Middei, Silvia; Alberdi, Elena; Reymann, Klaus G.; Natalini, Roberto; Volonté, Cinzia; Matute, Carlos; Cavaliere, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a rat brain organotypic culture model, in which tissue slices contain cortex-subventricular zone-striatum regions, to model neuroblast activity in response to in vitro ischemia. Neuroblast activation has been described in terms of two main parameters, proliferation and migration from the subventricular zone into the injured cortex. We observed distinct phases of neuroblast activation as is known to occur after in vivo ischemia. Thus, immediately after oxygen/glucose deprivation (6–24 hours), neuroblasts reduce their proliferative and migratory activity, whereas, at longer time points after the insult (2 to 5 days), they start to proliferate and migrate into the damaged cortex. Antagonism of ionotropic receptors for extracellular ATP during and after the insult unmasks an early activation of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone, which responded with a rapid and intense migration of neuroblasts into the damaged cortex (within 24 hours). The process is further enhanced by elevating the production of the chemoattractant SDf-1α and may also be boosted by blocking the activation of microglia. This organotypic model which we have developed is an excellent in vitro system to study neurogenesis after ischemia and other neurodegenerative diseases. Its application has revealed a SOS response to oxygen/glucose deprivation, which is inhibited by unfavorable conditions due to the ischemic environment. Finally, experimental quantifications have allowed us to elaborate a mathematical model to describe neuroblast activation and to develop a computer simulation which should have promising applications for the screening of drug candidates for novel therapies of ischemia-related pathologies. PMID:19390597

  14. Amphetamine elevates phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) in the rat forebrain via activating dopamine D1 and D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bing; Fitzgerald, Cole A; Jin, Dao-Zhong; Mao, Li-Min; Wang, John Q

    2016-09-01

    Psychostimulants have an impact on protein synthesis, although underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Eukaryotic initiation factor 2α-subunit (eIF2α) is a key player in initiation of protein translation and is regulated by phosphorylation. While this factor is sensitive to changing synaptic input and is critical for synaptic plasticity, its sensitivity to stimulants is poorly understood. Here we systematically characterized responses of eIF2α to a systemic administration of the stimulant amphetamine (AMPH) in dopamine responsive regions of adult rat brains. Intraperitoneal injection of AMPH at 5mg/kg increased eIF2α phosphorylation at serine 51 in the striatum. This increase was transient. In the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), AMPH induced a relatively delayed phosphorylation of the factor. Pretreatment with a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 blocked the AMPH-stimulated eIF2α phosphorylation in both the striatum and mPFC. Similarly, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride reduced the effect of AMPH in the two regions. Two antagonists alone did not alter basal eIF2α phosphorylation. AMPH and two antagonists did not change the amount of total eIF2α proteins in both regions. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of eIF2α to stimulant exposure. AMPH possesses the ability to stimulate eIF2α phosphorylation in striatal and mPFC neurons in vivo in a D1 and D2 receptor-dependent manner. PMID:27338925

  15. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CELL POPULATION IN THE RAT, INCLUDING NEURONS CONTAINING CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE (ChAT), GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (GAD) OR PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE (PAG) AND COLOCALIZING VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS (VGluTs)

    PubMed Central

    GRITTI, I.; HENNY, P.; GALLONI, F.; MAINVILLE, L.; MARIOTTI, M.; JONES, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in modulating cortical activity and influencing attention, learning and memory. These activities are fulfilled importantly yet not entirely by cholinergic neurons. Noncholinergic neurons also contribute and are comprised by GABAergic neurons and other possibly glutamatergic neurons. The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of cells in the BF of the rat and the proportions of that total represented by cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. For this purpose, cells were counted using unbiased stereological methods within the medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic nucleus, substantia innominata and globus pallidus in sections stained for Nissl substance and/or the neurotransmitter enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In Nissl-stained sections, the total number of neurons in the BF was estimated as ~355,000 and the numbers of ChAT-immuno-positive (+) as ~22,000, GAD+ ~119,000 and PAG+ ~316,000, corresponding to ~5%, ~35% and ~90% of the total. Thus, of the large population of BF neurons, only a small proportion has the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh), one third to synthesize GABA and the vast majority to synthesize glutamate (Glu). Moreover, through the presence of PAG, a proportion of ACh- and GABA-synthesizing neurons also have the capacity to synthesize Glu. In sections dual fluorescent immunostained for vesicular transporters, VGluT3 and not VGluT2 was present in the cell bodies of most PAG+ and ChAT+ and half the GAD+ cells. Given previous results showing that VGluT2 and not VGluT3 was present in BF axon terminals and not colocalized with VAChT or VGAT, we conclude that the BF cell population influences cortical and subcortical regions through neurons which release ACh, GABA or Glu from their terminals but which in part can also synthesize and release Glu from their soma or

  16. Extensive Lesions of Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Neurons Do Not Impair Spatial Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuckovich, Joseph A.; Semel, Mara E.; Baxter, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    A recent study suggests that lesions to all major areas of the cholinergic basal forebrain in the rat (medial septum, horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca, and nucleus basalis magnocellularis) impair a spatial working memory task. However, this experiment used a surgical technique that may have damaged cerebellar Purkinje cells. The…

  17. Learning and the motivation to eat: Forebrain circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Petrovich, Gorica D.

    2011-01-01

    Appetite and eating are not only controlled by energy needs, but also by extrinsic factors that are not directly related to energy balance. Environmental signals that acquire motivational properties through associative learning—learned cues—can override homeostatic signals and stimulate eating in sated states, or inhibit eating in states of hunger. Such influences are important, as environmental factors are believed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to overeating and the rise in obesity in the developed world. Similarly, environmental and social factors contribute to the onset and maintenance of anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders through interactions with the individual genetic background. Nevertheless, how learning enables environmental signals to control feeding, and the underlying brain mechanisms are poorly understood. We developed two rodent models to study how learned cues are integrated with homeostatic signals within functional forebrain networks, and how these networks are modulated by experience. In one model, a cue previously paired with food when an animal was hungry induces eating in sated rats. In the other model, food-deprived rats inhibit feeding when presented with a cue that signals danger, a tone previously paired with footshocks. Here evidence will be reviewed that the forebrain network formed by the amygdala, lateral hypothalamus and medial prefrontal cortex mediates cue-driven feeding, while a parallel amygdalar circuitry mediates suppression of eating by the fear cue. Findings from the animal models may be relevant for understanding aspects of human appetite and eating, and maladaptive mechanisms that could lead to overeating and anorexia. PMID:21549730

  18. Learning and the motivation to eat: forebrain circuitry.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Gorica D

    2011-09-26

    Appetite and eating are not only controlled by energy needs, but also by extrinsic factors that are not directly related to energy balance. Environmental signals that acquire motivational properties through associative learning-learned cues-can override homeostatic signals and stimulate eating in sated states, or inhibit eating in states of hunger. Such influences are important, as environmental factors are believed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to overeating and the rise in obesity in the developed world. Similarly, environmental and social factors contribute to the onset and maintenance of anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders through interactions with the individual genetic background. Nevertheless, how learning enables environmental signals to control feeding, and the underlying brain mechanisms are poorly understood. We developed two rodent models to study how learned cues are integrated with homeostatic signals within functional forebrain networks, and how these networks are modulated by experience. In one model, a cue previously paired with food when an animal was hungry induces eating in sated rats. In the other model, food-deprived rats inhibit feeding when presented with a cue that signals danger, a tone previously paired with footshocks. Here evidence will be reviewed that the forebrain network formed by the amygdala, lateral hypothalamus and medial prefrontal cortex mediates cue-driven feeding, while a parallel amygdalar circuitry mediates suppression of eating by the fear cue. Findings from the animal models may be relevant for understanding aspects of human appetite and eating, and maladaptive mechanisms that could lead to overeating and anorexia. PMID:21549730

  19. Gap junctions are involved in cell migration in the early postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Marins, Mônica; Xavier, Anna L R; Viana, Nathan B; Fortes, Fábio S A; Fróes, Maira M; Menezes, João R L

    2009-09-15

    The massive migration of neuroblasts and young neurons through the anterior extension of the postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ), known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS) is still poorly understood on its molecular basis. In this work, we investigated the involvement of gap junctional communication (GJC) in the robust centrifugal migration from SVZ/RMS explants obtained from early postnatal (P4) rats. Cells were dye-coupled in homocellular and heterocellular pairings and expressed at least two connexins, Cx 43 and 45. Treatment with the uncoupler agent carbenoxolone (CBX, 10-100 microM) reversibly reduced outgrowth from SVZ explants, while its inactive analog, glycyrhizinic acid (GZA), had no effect. Consistent with a direct effect on cell migration, time-lapse video microscopy show that different pharmacological uncouplers cause an abrupt and reversible arrest of cell movement in explants. Our results indicate that GJC is positively involved in the migration of neuroblasts within the SVZ/RMS.

  20. The forebrain of the Pacific hagfish: a cladistic reconstruction of the ancestral craniate forebrain.

    PubMed

    Wicht, H; Northcutt, R G

    1992-01-01

    The forebrain of the Pacific hagfish is described with regard to its morphology, cytoarchitecture, and secondary olfactory projections. The forebrain ventricular system is greatly reduced in adult hagfishes, although vestiges of ventricular structures can still be recognized. In order to clarify topographical relationships within the forebrain, we provide a three-dimensional reconstruction of the ventricular system, including the vestigial portions. Topography and embryology lead us to conclude that the 'primordium hippocampi' of previous authors is a diencephalic structure. For topographical and hodological reasons, we interpret the 'area basalis' of previous authors to be part of the preoptic region, and we identify a part of the so-called 'nucleus olfactorius anterior' as the homologue of the striatum. The laminated pallium is dominated by secondary olfactory projections and shows a high degree of regional cytoarchitectural specialization, as does the entire forebrain. In all, 42 cell groups are identified in the forebrain of hagfishes (compared to only about 25 in lampreys, for example). This surprisingly high degree of cytoarchitectural complexity prompted us to re-examine the phylogenetic history of craniate brains with this complexity in mind. In this paper we use cladistic methodology to reconstruct a morphotype, and we conclude that the forebrains of the earliest craniates may have been more complex than previously believed. This reconstruction includes hypotheses regarding the general morphology, secondary olfactory system, and visual system, as well as the relative sizes of major divisions of the forebrain in the earliest craniates.

  1. Inflammation-induced subventricular zone dysfunction leads to olfactory deficits in a targeted mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tepavčević, Vanja; Lazarini, Françoise; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Kerninon, Christophe; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Garcia-Verdugo, José Manuel; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim; Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) persist in defined brain niches, including the subventricular zone (SVZ), throughout adulthood and generate new neurons destined to support specific neurological functions. Whether brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with changes in adult NSCs and whether this might contribute to the development and/or persistence of neurological deficits remains poorly investigated. We examined SVZ function in mice in which we targeted an MS-like pathology to the forebrain. In these mice, which we refer to herein as targeted EAE (tEAE) mice, there was a reduction in the number of neuroblasts compared with control mice. Altered expression of the transcription factors Olig2 and Dlx2 in the tEAE SVZ niche was associated with amplification of pro-oligodendrogenic transit-amplifying cells and decreased neuroblast generation, which resulted in persistent reduction in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. Altered SVZ neurogenesis led to impaired long-term olfactory memory, mimicking the olfactory dysfunction observed in MS patients. Importantly, we also found that neurogenesis was reduced in the SVZ of MS patients compared with controls. Thus, our findings suggest that neuroinflammation induces functional alteration of adult NSCs that may contribute to olfactory dysfunction in MS patients. PMID:22056384

  2. The subventricular zone continues to generate corpus callosum and rostral migratory stream astroglia in normal adult mice.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jiho; Orosco, Lori; Guo, Fuzheng; Chung, Seung-Hyuk; Bannerman, Peter; Mills Ko, Emily; Zarbalis, Kostas; Deng, Wenbin; Pleasure, David

    2015-03-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the CNS, and have many essential functions, including maintenance of blood-brain barrier integrity, and CNS water, ion, and glutamate homeostasis. Mammalian astrogliogenesis has generally been considered to be completed soon after birth, and to be reactivated in later life only under pathological circumstances. Here, by using genetic fate-mapping, we demonstrate that new corpus callosum astrocytes are continuously generated from nestin(+) subventricular zone (SVZ) neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in normal adult mice. These nestin fate-mapped corpus callosum astrocytes are uniformly postmitotic, express glutamate receptors, and form aquaporin-4(+) perivascular endfeet. The entry of new astrocytes from the SVZ into the corpus callosum appears to be balanced by astroglial apoptosis, because overall numbers of corpus callosum astrocytes remain constant during normal adulthood. Nestin fate-mapped astrocytes also flow anteriorly from the SVZ in association with the rostral migratory stream, but do not penetrate into the deeper layers of the olfactory bulb. Production of new astrocytes from nestin(+) NPCs is absent in the normal adult cortex, striatum, and spinal cord. Our study is the first to demonstrate ongoing SVZ astrogliogenesis in the normal adult mammalian forebrain.

  3. Brain oxygen tension controls the expansion of outer subventricular zone-like basal progenitors in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wagenführ, Lisa; Meyer, Anne K; Braunschweig, Lena; Marrone, Lara; Storch, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex shows a conserved six-layered structure that differs between species in the total number of cortical neurons produced owing to differences in the relative abundance of distinct progenitor populations. Recent studies have identified a new class of proliferative neurogenic cells in the outer subventricular zone (OSVZ) in gyrencephalic species such as primates and ferrets. Lissencephalic brains of mice possess fewer OSVZ-like progenitor cells and these do not constitute a distinct layer. Most in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that oxygen regulates the maintenance, proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells. Here we dissect the effects of fetal brain oxygen tension on neural progenitor cell activity using a novel mouse model that allows oxygen tension to be controlled within the hypoxic microenvironment in the neurogenic niche of the fetal brain in vivo. Indeed, maternal oxygen treatment of 10%, 21% and 75% atmospheric oxygen tension for 48 h translates into robust changes in fetal brain oxygenation. Increased oxygen tension in fetal mouse forebrain in vivo leads to a marked expansion of a distinct proliferative cell population, basal to the SVZ. These cells constitute a novel neurogenic cell layer, similar to the OSVZ, and contribute to corticogenesis by heading for deeper cortical layers as a part of the cortical plate.

  4. Subventricular zone progenitors in time and space: generating neuronal diversity

    PubMed Central

    Sequerra, Eduardo B.

    2014-01-01

    The adult mammalian brain harbors a population of cells around their lateral ventricles capable of giving rise to new neurons throughout life. The so-called subventricular zone (SVZ) is a heterogeneous germinative niche in regard to the neuronal types it generates. SVZ progenitors give rise to different olfactory bulb (OB) interneuron types in accordance to their position along the ventricles. Here, I review data showing the difference between progenitors located along different parts of the SVZ axes and ages. I also discuss possible mechanisms for the origin of this diversity. PMID:25565967

  5. Orexin receptor activity in the basal forebrain alters performance on an olfactory discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Patrick T; Holmes, Ashley; Roberts, Bradley M; Bailey, Aileen M

    2015-01-12

    Cholinergic innervation of the prefrontal cortex is critical for various forms of cognition, although the efferent modulators contributing to acetylcholine (ACh) release are not well understood. The main source of cortical ACh, the basal forebrain, receives projections from lateral and perifornical hypothalamic neurons releasing the peptides orexin (orexin A; OxA, and orexin B; OxB), of which OxA is hypothesized to play a role in various cognitive functions. We sought to assess one such function known to be susceptible to basal forebrain cholinergic manipulation, olfactory discrimination acquisition, and reversal learning, in rats following intra-basal forebrain infusion of OxA or the orexin 1 receptor (OxR1) antagonist SB-334867. OxA administration facilitated, while OxR1 antagonism impaired performance on both the acquisition and reversal portions of the task. These data suggest that orexin acting in the basal forebrain may be important for cortical-dependant executive functions, possibly through the stimulation of cortical ACh release.

  6. Chlordiazepoxide-induced released responding in extinction and punishment-conflict procedures is not altered by neonatal forebrain norepinephrine depletion.

    PubMed

    Bialik, R J; Pappas, B A; Pusztay, W

    1982-02-01

    The effects of chlordiazepoxide (CDZ) in extinction and punishment-conflict tasks were examined in rats after neonatal systemic administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to deplete forebrain norepinephrine (NE). At about 70 days of age the rats were water deprived and trained for three days to drink in a novel apparatus. On the fourth day (test day) drinking was either extinguished by elimination of water from the drinking tube or punished by lick-contingent shock. Just prior to this test session half of the vehicle and half of the 6-OHDA treated rats were given an injection of CDZ (8 mg/kg IP). Both the injection of CDZ and forebrain NE depletion prolonged responding during extinction and reduced the suppressant effects of punishment in male rats, and these effects were of similar magnitude. Furthermore, CDZ was as effective in neonatal 6-OHDA treated male rats as in vehicle treated rats indicating that decreased transmission is ascending NE fibers caused by CDZ is not solely responsible for its behavioral effects in extinction and conflict tasks. Rather, these effects may involve cooperative mediation by both noradrenergic and serotonergic forebrain terminals. Unexpectedly, CDZ's anti-extinction effect was absent in female rats and its anti-conflict effect observed only in NE depleted females.

  7. Chlordiazepoxide-induced released responding in extinction and punishment-conflict procedures is not altered by neonatal forebrain norepinephrine depletion.

    PubMed

    Bialik, R J; Pappas, B A; Pusztay, W

    1982-02-01

    The effects of chlordiazepoxide (CDZ) in extinction and punishment-conflict tasks were examined in rats after neonatal systemic administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to deplete forebrain norepinephrine (NE). At about 70 days of age the rats were water deprived and trained for three days to drink in a novel apparatus. On the fourth day (test day) drinking was either extinguished by elimination of water from the drinking tube or punished by lick-contingent shock. Just prior to this test session half of the vehicle and half of the 6-OHDA treated rats were given an injection of CDZ (8 mg/kg IP). Both the injection of CDZ and forebrain NE depletion prolonged responding during extinction and reduced the suppressant effects of punishment in male rats, and these effects were of similar magnitude. Furthermore, CDZ was as effective in neonatal 6-OHDA treated male rats as in vehicle treated rats indicating that decreased transmission is ascending NE fibers caused by CDZ is not solely responsible for its behavioral effects in extinction and conflict tasks. Rather, these effects may involve cooperative mediation by both noradrenergic and serotonergic forebrain terminals. Unexpectedly, CDZ's anti-extinction effect was absent in female rats and its anti-conflict effect observed only in NE depleted females. PMID:7071081

  8. Transcriptional Networks Controlled by NKX2-1 in the Development of Forebrain GABAergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Magnus; Flandin, Pierre; Silberberg, Shanni; Su-Feher, Linda; Price, James D; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kim, Carol; Visel, Axel; Nord, Alex S; Rubenstein, John L R

    2016-09-21

    The embryonic basal ganglia generates multiple projection neurons and interneuron subtypes from distinct progenitor domains. Combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and chromatin are thought to regulate gene expression. In the medial ganglionic eminence, the NKX2-1 transcription factor controls regional identity and, with LHX6, is necessary to specify pallidal projection neurons and forebrain interneurons. Here, we dissected the molecular functions of NKX2-1 by defining its chromosomal binding, regulation of gene expression, and epigenetic state. NKX2-1 binding at distal regulatory elements led to a repressed epigenetic state and transcriptional repression in the ventricular zone. Conversely, NKX2-1 is required to establish a permissive chromatin state and transcriptional activation in the sub-ventricular and mantle zones. Moreover, combinatorial binding of NKX2-1 and LHX6 promotes transcriptionally permissive chromatin and activates genes expressed in cortical migrating interneurons. Our integrated approach provides a foundation for elucidating transcriptional networks guiding the development of the MGE and its descendants. PMID:27657450

  9. Forebrain noradrenaline concentration following weakly reinforced training.

    PubMed

    Crowe, S F; Ng, K T; Gibbs, M E

    1991-09-01

    Day-old chicks trained on a single-trial discriminated passive avoidance task using a concentrated taste aversant, methyl anthranilate, have been shown to exhibit three stages of memory processing; short-, intermediate-, and long-term memory. If the aversant is diluted to 20% v/v methyl anthranilate in absolute ethanol, only the short-term and some of the intermediate stage are observed. In this study we investigated the whole forebrain levels of noradrenaline in response to differing intensities of the training experience. The results show a profound difference in the level of whole forebrain NA at all training-sacrifice intervals for the trained as compared to the untrained controls, except at 15- and 20-minute posttraining, when a substantial reduction in the level of NA was achieved under all training conditions. Furthermore, subjects which received treatments which resulted in the emergence of behavioural evidence of long-term memory tended to have higher levels of whole-forebrain NA at 30 minutes after initial training. This is the time when we have postulated that triggering of protein synthesis associated with long-term memory formation takes place.

  10. Long-term hydrocephalus alters the cytoarchitecture of the adult subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Campos-Ordoñez, Tania; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Rigamonti, Daniele; García-Verdugo, Jose M; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2014-11-01

    Hydrocephalus can develop secondarily to a disturbance in production, flow and/or absorption of cerebrospinal fluid. Experimental models of hydrocephalus, especially subacute and chronic hydrocephalus, are few and limited, and the effects of hydrocephalus on the subventricular zone are unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of long-term obstructive hydrocephalus on the subventricular zone, which is the neurogenic niche lining the lateral ventricles. We developed a new method to induce hydrocephalus by obstructing the aqueduct of Sylvius in the mouse brain, thus simulating aqueductal stenosis in humans. In 120-day-old rodents (n=18 per group), the degree of ventricular dilatation and cellular composition of the subventricular zone were studied by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. In adult patients (age>18years), the sizes of the subventricular zone, corpus callosum, and internal capsule were analyzed by magnetic resonance images obtained from patients with and without aqueductal stenosis (n=25 per group). Mice with 60-day hydrocephalus had a reduced number of Ki67+ and doublecortin+cells on immunofluorescence, as well as decreased number of neural progenitors and neuroblasts in the subventricular zone on electron microscopy analysis as compared to non-hydrocephalic mice. Remarkably, a number of extracellular matrix structures (fractones) contacting the ventricular lumen and blood vessels were also observed around the subventricular zone in mice with hydrocephalus. In humans, the widths of the subventricular zone, corpus callosum, and internal capsule in patients with aqueductal stenosis were significantly smaller than age and gender-matched patients without aqueductal stenosis. In summary, supratentorial hydrocephalus reduces the proliferation rate of neural progenitors and modifies the cytoarchitecture and extracellular matrix compounds of the subventricular zone. In humans, this similar process reduces the subventricular

  11. Long-term hydrocephalus alters the cytoarchitecture of the adult subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Campos-Ordoñez, Tania; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Rigamonti, Daniele; García-Verdugo, Jose M; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2014-11-01

    Hydrocephalus can develop secondarily to a disturbance in production, flow and/or absorption of cerebrospinal fluid. Experimental models of hydrocephalus, especially subacute and chronic hydrocephalus, are few and limited, and the effects of hydrocephalus on the subventricular zone are unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of long-term obstructive hydrocephalus on the subventricular zone, which is the neurogenic niche lining the lateral ventricles. We developed a new method to induce hydrocephalus by obstructing the aqueduct of Sylvius in the mouse brain, thus simulating aqueductal stenosis in humans. In 120-day-old rodents (n=18 per group), the degree of ventricular dilatation and cellular composition of the subventricular zone were studied by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. In adult patients (age>18years), the sizes of the subventricular zone, corpus callosum, and internal capsule were analyzed by magnetic resonance images obtained from patients with and without aqueductal stenosis (n=25 per group). Mice with 60-day hydrocephalus had a reduced number of Ki67+ and doublecortin+cells on immunofluorescence, as well as decreased number of neural progenitors and neuroblasts in the subventricular zone on electron microscopy analysis as compared to non-hydrocephalic mice. Remarkably, a number of extracellular matrix structures (fractones) contacting the ventricular lumen and blood vessels were also observed around the subventricular zone in mice with hydrocephalus. In humans, the widths of the subventricular zone, corpus callosum, and internal capsule in patients with aqueductal stenosis were significantly smaller than age and gender-matched patients without aqueductal stenosis. In summary, supratentorial hydrocephalus reduces the proliferation rate of neural progenitors and modifies the cytoarchitecture and extracellular matrix compounds of the subventricular zone. In humans, this similar process reduces the subventricular

  12. Long-term hydrocephalus alters the cytoarchitecture of the adult subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Ordoñez, Tania; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Chaichana, Kaisorn L.; Rincon-Torroella, Jordina; Rigamonti, Daniele; García-Verdugo, Jose M.; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Hydrocephalus can develop secondarily to a disturbance in production, flow and/or absorption of cerebrospinal fluid. Experimental models of hydrocephalus, especially subacute and chronic hydrocephalus, are few and limited, and the effects of hydrocephalus on the subventricular zone are unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of long-term obstructive hydrocephalus on the subventricular zone, which is the neurogenic niche lining the lateral ventricles. We developed a new method to induce hydrocephalus by obstructing the aqueduct of Sylvius in the mouse brain, thus simulating aqueductal stenosis in humans. In 120-day-old rodents (n = 18 per group), the degree of ventricular dilatation and cellular composition of the subventricular zone were studied by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. In adult patients (age > 18 years), the sizes of the subventricular zone, corpus callosum, and internal capsule were analyzed by magnetic resonance images obtained from patients with and without aqueductal stenosis (n=25 per group). Mice with 60-day hydrocephalus had a reduced number of Ki67+ and doublecortin+ cells on immunofluorescence, as well as decreased number of neural progenitors and neuroblasts in the subventricular zone on electron microscopy analysis as compared to non-hydrocephalic mice. Remarkably, a number of extracellular matrix structures (fractones) contacting the ventricular lumen and blood vessels were also observed around the subventricular zone in mice with hydrocephalus. In humans, the widths of the subventricular zone, corpus callosum, and internal capsule in patients with aqueductal stenosis were significantly smaller than age and gender-matched patients without aqueductal stenosis. In summary, supratentorial hydrocephalus reduces the proliferation rate of neural progenitors and modifies the cytoarchitecture and extracellular matrix compounds of the subventricular zone. In humans, this similar process reduces the

  13. Widespread expression of BDNF but not NT3 by target areas of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H.S.; Hains, J.M.; Laramee, G.R.; Rosenthal, A.; Winslow, J.W. )

    1990-10-12

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT3) are homologs of the well-known neurotrophic factor nerve growth factor. The three members of this family display distinct patterns of target specificity. To examine the distribution in brain of messenger RNA for these molecules, in situ hybridization was performed. Cells hybridizing intensely to antisense BDNF probe were located throughout the major targets of the rat basal forebrain cholinergic system, that is, the hippocampus, amygdala, and neocortex. Strongly hybridizing cells were also observed in structures associated with the olfactory system. The distribution of NT3 mRNA in forebrain was much more limited. Within the hippocampus, labeled cells were restricted to CA2, the most medial portion of CA1, and the dentate gyrus. In human hippocampus, cells expressing BDNF and mRNA are distributed in a fashion similar to that observed in the rat. These findings point to both basal forebrain cholinergic cells and olfactory pathways as potential central targets for BDNF.

  14. Role of tissue plasminogen activator/plasmin cascade in delayed neuronal death after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nagai, Nobuo; Urano, Tetsumei

    We studied the possible involvement of the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)/plasmin system on both delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus and the associated enhancement of locomotor activity in rats, after transient forebrain ischemia induced by a four-vessel occlusion (FVO). Seven days after FVO, locomotor activity was abnormally increased and, after 10 days, pyramidal cells were degraded in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. FVO increased the t-PA antigen level and its activity in the hippocampus, which peaked at 4 h. Both the enhanced locomotor activity and the degradation of pyramidal cells were significantly suppressed by intracerebroventricular injection of aprotinin, a plasmin inhibitor, at 4 h but not during FVO. These results suggest the importance of the t-PA/plasmin cascade during the early pathological stages of delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus following transient forebrain ischemia.

  15. Age and sex-dependent decreases in ChAT in basal forebrain nuclei.

    PubMed

    Luine, V N; Renner, K J; Heady, S; Jones, K J

    1986-01-01

    Microdissection techniques were utilized to measure the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) (enzyme responsible for synthesis of acetylcholine) in individual basal forebrain nuclei of aged (24 month) and young (4 month) male and female rats. Small but consistent decreases in the activity of ChAT in aged rats were found, and the location of the changes was dependent on the sex of the rat. Aged female rats showed approximately 30% lower ChAT and 40% lower acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the ventral globus pallidus (vGP). Aged males did not show decreased ChAT in the vGP but activity in the medial aspect of the horizontal diagonal band nucleus was 50% lower than in the young males. ChAT activity in four other closely aligned basal forebrain nuclei was not different between the young and aged rats. Analysis of cell number, density and area in the vGP by AChE histochemistry showed no significant differences between aged and young females. In addition, age and sex-dependent changes were measured in pituitary glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. The relationship of the changes to age-dependent decrements in memory, the possible influence of gonadal hormones on aging, and the mechanisms responsible for age-related declines in ChAT activity are discussed.

  16. Epidermal growth factor treatment of the adult brain subventricular zone leads to focal microglia/macrophage accumulation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Olle R; Brederlau, Anke; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-04-01

    One of the major components of the subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenic niche is the specialized vasculature. The SVZ vasculature is thought to be important in regulating progenitor cell proliferation and migration. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a mitogen with a wide range of effects. When stem and progenitor cells in the rat SVZ are treated with EGF, using intracerebroventricular infusion, dysplastic polyps are formed. Upon extended infusion, blood vessels are recruited into the polyps. In the current study we demonstrate how polyps develop through distinct stages leading up to angiogenesis. As polyps progress, microglia/macrophages accumulate in the polyp core concurrent with increasing cell death. Both microglia/macrophage accumulation and cell death peak during angiogenesis and subsequently decline following polyp vascularization. This model of inducible angiogenesis in the SVZ neurogenic niche suggests involvement of microglia/macrophages in acquired angiogenesis and can be used in detail to study angiogenesis in the adult brain.

  17. Forebrain substrates of reward and motivation.

    PubMed

    Wise, Roy A

    2005-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle can reward arbitrary acts or motivate biologically primitive, species-typical behaviors like feeding or copulation. The subsystems involved in these behaviors are only partially characterized, but they appear to transsynaptically activate the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Basal function of the dopamine system is essential for arousal and motor function; phasic activation of this system is rewarding and can potentiate the effectiveness of reward-predictors that guide learned behaviors. This system is phasically activated by most drugs of abuse and such activation contributes to the habit-forming actions of these drugs.

  18. Forebrain substrates of reward and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Roy A.

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle can reward arbitrary acts or motivate biologically primitive, species-typical behaviors like feeding or copulation. The sub-systems involved in these behaviors are only partially characterized, but they appear to trans-synaptically activate the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Basal function of the dopamine system is essential for arousal and motor function; phasic activation of this system is rewarding and can potentiate the effectiveness of reward-predictors that guide learned behaviors. This system is phasically activated by most drugs of abuse and such activation contributes to the habit-forming actions of these drugs. PMID:16254990

  19. Carbon nanotubes impregnated with subventricular zone neural progenitor cells promotes recovery from stroke

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sung Ung; Kim, Jihee; Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Kim, Jong Youl; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J; Lee, Jong Eun

    2012-01-01

    The present in vivo study was conducted to evaluate whether hydrophilic (HL) or hydrophobic (HP) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) impregnated with subventricular zone neural progenitor cells (SVZ NPCs) could repair damaged neural tissue following stroke. For this purpose, stroke damaged rats were transplanted with HL CNT-SVZ NPCs, HP CNT-SVZ NPCs, or SVZ NPCs alone for 1, 3, 5, and 8 weeks. Results showed that the HP CNT-SVZ NPC transplants improved rat behavior and reduced infarct cyst volume and infarct cyst area compared with the experimental control and the HL CNT-SVZ NPC and SVZ NPCs alone groups. The transplantation groups showed an increase in the expression of nestin (cell stemness marker) and proliferation which was evident with the increased number of doublecortin and bromodeoxyuridine double-stained immunopositive cells around the lesion site. But, these effects were more prominent in the HP CNT-SVZ NPC group compared with the other transplantation groups. The HP CNT-SVZ NPC and HL CNT-SVZ NPC transplants increased the number of microtubule-associated protein 2 (marker for neurons) and decreased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (marker for astroglial cells) positive cells within the injury epicenter. The majority of the transplanted HP CNT-SVZ NPCs collectively broadened around the ischemic injured region and the SVZ NPCs differentiated into mature neurons, attained the synapse morphology (TUJ1, synaptophysin), and decreased microglial activation (CD11b/c [OX-42]). For these reasons, this study provided the first evidence that CNTs can improve stem cell differentiation to heal stroke damage and, thus, deserve further attention. PMID:22701320

  20. Carbon nanotubes impregnated with subventricular zone neural progenitor cells promotes recovery from stroke.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Ung; Kim, Jihee; Bokara, Kiran Kumar; Kim, Jong Youl; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J; Lee, Jong Eun

    2012-01-01

    The present in vivo study was conducted to evaluate whether hydrophilic (HL) or hydrophobic (HP) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) impregnated with subventricular zone neural progenitor cells (SVZ NPCs) could repair damaged neural tissue following stroke. For this purpose, stroke damaged rats were transplanted with HL CNT-SVZ NPCs, HP CNT-SVZ NPCs, or SVZ NPCs alone for 1, 3, 5, and 8 weeks. Results showed that the HP CNT-SVZ NPC transplants improved rat behavior and reduced infarct cyst volume and infarct cyst area compared with the experimental control and the HL CNT-SVZ NPC and SVZ NPCs alone groups. The transplantation groups showed an increase in the expression of nestin (cell stemness marker) and proliferation which was evident with the increased number of doublecortin and bromodeoxyuridine double-stained immunopositive cells around the lesion site. But, these effects were more prominent in the HP CNT-SVZ NPC group compared with the other transplantation groups. The HP CNT-SVZ NPC and HL CNT-SVZ NPC transplants increased the number of microtubule-associated protein 2 (marker for neurons) and decreased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (marker for astroglial cells) positive cells within the injury epicenter. The majority of the transplanted HP CNT-SVZ NPCs collectively broadened around the ischemic injured region and the SVZ NPCs differentiated into mature neurons, attained the synapse morphology (TUJ1, synaptophysin), and decreased microglial activation (CD11b/c [OX-42]). For these reasons, this study provided the first evidence that CNTs can improve stem cell differentiation to heal stroke damage and, thus, deserve further attention. PMID:22701320

  1. In vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the infarct and the subventricular zone in experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Xarrié, Elena; Davila, Myriam; Gil-Perotín, Sara; Jurado-Rodríguez, Andrés; Candiota, Ana Paula; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Lope-Piedrafita, Silvia; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Arús, Carles; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) provides metabolic information with higher sensitivity and spectral resolution than in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Therefore, we used both techniques to better characterize the metabolic pattern of the infarct and the neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the ipsilateral subventricular zone (SVZi). Ischemic stroke rats were divided into three groups: G0 (non-stroke controls, n=6), G1 (day 1 after stroke, n=6), and G7 (days 6 to 8 after stroke, n=12). All the rats underwent MRS. Three rats per group were analyzed by HRMAS. The remaining rats were used for immunohistochemical studies. In the infarct, both techniques detected significant metabolic changes. The most relevant change was in mobile lipids (2.80 ppm) in the G7 group (a 5.53- and a 3.95-fold increase by MRS and HRMAS, respectively). In the SVZi, MRS did not detect any significant metabolic change. However, HRMAS detected a 2.70-fold increase in lactate and a 0.68-fold decrease in N-acetylaspartate in the G1 group. None of the metabolites correlated with the 1.37-fold increase in NPCs detected by immunohistochemistry in the G7 group. In conclusion, HRMAS improves the metabolic characterization of the brain in experimental ischemic stroke. However, none of the metabolites qualifies as a surrogate biomarker of NPCs. PMID:25605287

  2. Expression of a novel serine/threonine kinase gene, Ulk4, in neural progenitors during Xenopus laevis forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, L; Schlosser, G; Shen, S

    2015-04-01

    We have analyzed the expression pattern of a novel serine/threonine kinase gene Ulk4 during forebrain development in Xenopus laevis. To this aim, we firstly cloned a Ulk4 cDNA fragment from X.laevis and generated a RNA probe that was used for its detection by in situ hybridization. Throughout development xUlk4 expression was detected along the ventricular (vz) and subventricular zones (svz) of all forebrain regions, with the exception of the vz of the striatum. In the adult, xUlk4 was also mainly located in the vz, with some xUlk4 expressing cells reaching the svz/mantle zone (mz). This xUlk4 expression was especially remarkable in forebrain regions involving the homeostatic control of the brain such as the preoptic region, the hypothalamic territory and some neurosecretory circumventricular organs (CVOs). We further combined in situ hybridization for xUlk4 with immunohistochemistry for the neural progenitor cell marker SOX3, the radial glial marker brain lipid-binding protein (BLBP), neuronal markers MAP2 and doublecortin (DCX) and the specific neuronal marker tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). xUlk4 was co-expressed with the neural stem/progenitor cell marker SOX3 in the vz of all the forebrain regions throughout development and in the adult, and this co-expression was also especially evident in the svz of the hypothalamic region. xUlk4 was also expressed in the radial glia along the whole brain. We have also found minor expression of xUlk4 in some DCX- or MAP2-positive cells but not in TH-positive neurons. These findings suggest that Ulk4 may play roles in neural stem/progenitor cells during neurogenesis both in development and in the adulthood, in migrating cells as well as in cells committed to neuronal fate in Xenopus. Moreover, the results obtained in this study argue for an involvement of Ulk4 in the control of the neuroendocrine homeostatic functions in the brain. PMID:25637795

  3. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in forebrain neurones contributes to osmoregulatory mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dine, Julien; Ducourneau, Vincent R R; Fénelon, Valérie S; Fossat, Pascal; Amadio, Aurélie; Eder, Matthias; Israel, Jean-Marc; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Voisin, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    Vasopressin secretion from the magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) is crucial for body fluid homeostasis. Osmotic regulation of MNC activity involves the concerted modulation of intrinsic mechanosensitive ion channels, taurine release from local astrocytes as well as excitatory inputs derived from osmosensitive forebrain regions. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) are mitogen-activated protein kinases that transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular post-translational and transcriptional responses, leading to changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and synaptic function. Here, we investigated whether ERK activation (i.e. phosphorylation) plays a role in the functioning of forebrain osmoregulatory networks. We found that within 10 min after intraperitoneal injections of hypertonic saline (3 m, 6 m) in rats, many phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones were observed in osmosensitive forebrain regions, including the MNC containing supraoptic nuclei. The intensity of ERK labelling was dose-dependent. Reciprocally, slow intragastric infusions of water that lower osmolality reduced basal ERK phosphorylation. In the supraoptic nucleus, ERK phosphorylation predominated in vasopressin neurones vs. oxytocin neurones and was absent from astrocytes. Western blot experiments confirmed that phosphoERK expression in the supraoptic nucleus was dose dependent. Intracerebroventricular administration of the ERK phosphorylation inhibitor U 0126 before a hyperosmotic challenge reduced the number of both phosphoERK-immunopositive neurones and Fos expressing neurones in osmosensitive forebrain regions. Blockade of ERK phosphorylation also reduced hypertonically induced depolarization and an increase in firing of the supraoptic MNCs recorded in vitro. It finally reduced hypertonically induced vasopressin release in the bloodstream. Altogether, these findings identify ERK phosphorylation as a new element contributing to the osmoregulatory mechanisms of

  4. Pheromone-induced cell proliferation in the murine subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sachiko; Soini, Helena A; Foley, John; Novotny, Milos V; Lai, Cary

    2014-08-01

    Enhancement of adult neurogenesis in female mice was previously demonstrated through exposure to soiled bedding from males, although the identity of relevant chemosignals has remained unknown. The farnesenes and SBT (2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole) are male murine pheromones that dominant males secrete at higher levels. Previous studies have shown that they induce oestrus in female mice. We have recently shown that these pheromones strongly increase cell proliferation in the SVZ (subventricular zone) of adult female mice. In addition, we found that a female murine pheromone, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, facilitates similar changes in males. 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is a female pheromone that is secreted when females are housed in large groups and it was originally found to suppress oestrus in females. We found that it does not have suppressive effect on the cell proliferation in the SVZ of females. Similarly, male murine pheromones, SBT and the farnesenes, do not show a suppressive effect on the cell proliferation in the SVZ of males. Our results demonstrated that pheromonal communication between males and females has strong stimulatory effect on both the reproductive physiology and brain cell proliferation, but intrasex pheromonal exchanges do not reduce progenitor proliferation in these brain regions.

  5. Role of nitric oxide in subventricular zone neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Matarredona, Esperanza R; Murillo-Carretero, Maribel; Moreno-López, Bernardo; Estrada, Carmen

    2005-09-01

    A possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in adult neurogenesis has been suggested based on anatomical findings showing that subventricular zone (SVZ) neuroblasts are located close to NO-producing cells, and on the known antiproliferative actions of NO in many cell types. Experiments have been performed in rodents with systemic and intracerebroventricular administrations of the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME. NOS inhibition leads to significant increases in the number of proliferating cells in the SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB). NO exerts its cytostatic action preferentially on the cell population expressing nestin but not betaIII-tubulin, which may correspond to the type C cells described in the SVZ. The negative effect of NO on SVZ cell proliferation has also been confirmed in SVZ primary cultures. An inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is described as one of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the antiproliferative effect of NO in SVZ cells. Biochemical data supporting this conclusion has been obtained using the neuroblastoma cell line NB69, which endogenously expresses the EGFR. In these cells, the antimitotic action of NO occurs upon inhibition of the EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, probably by a direct S-nitrosylation of the receptor. The latest published reports on NO and neurogenesis indicate that NO physiologically participates in the control of adult neurogenesis by modulating the proliferation and fate of the SVZ progenitor cells. These effects might be partially due to a direct inhibition of the EGFR by S-nitrosylation.

  6. Implications of irradiating the subventricular zone stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Bonsu, Janice M; Redmond, Kristin J; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    Radiation therapy is a standard treatment for brain tumor patients. However, it comes with side effects, such as neurological deficits. While likely multi-factorial, the effect may in part be associated with the impact of radiation on the neurogenic niches. In the adult mammalian brain, the neurogenic niches are localized in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, where the neural stem cells (NSCs) reside. Several reports showed that radiation produces a drastic decrease in the proliferative capacity of these regions, which is related to functional decline. In particular, radiation to the SVZ led to a reduced long-term olfactory memory and a reduced capacity to respond to brain damage in animal models, as well as compromised tumor outcomes in patients. By contrast, other studies in humans suggested that increased radiation dose to the SVZ may be associated with longer progression-free survival in patients with high-grade glioma. In this review, we summarize the cellular and functional effects of irradiating the SVZ niche. In particular, we review the pros and cons of using radiation during brain tumor treatment, discussing the complex relationship between radiation dose to the SVZ and both tumor control and toxicity.

  7. Habituation and extinction of fear recruit overlapping forebrain structures.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Teri M; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P

    2016-02-01

    Establishing the neurocircuitry involved in inhibiting fear is important for understanding and treating anxiety disorders. To date, extinction procedures have been predominately used to examine the inhibition of learned fear, where fear is reduced to a conditioned stimulus (CS) by presenting it in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus (US). However, learned fear can also be reduced by habituation procedures where the US is presented in the absence of the CS. Here we used expression of the activity marker c-Fos in rats to compare the recruitment of several forebrain structures following fear habituation and extinction. Following fear conditioning where a tone CS was paired with a loud noise US, fear was then reduced the following day by either presentation of the CS or US alone (i.e. CS extinction or US habituation, respectively). This extinction and habituation training recruited several common structures, including infralimbic cortex, basolateral amygdala, midline thalamus and medial hypothalamus (orexin neurons). Moreover, this overlap was shared when examining the neural correlates of the expression of habituation and extinction, with common recruitment of infralimbic cortex and midline thalamus. However, there were also important differences. Specifically, acquisition of habituation was associated with greater recruitment of prelimbic cortex whereas expression of habituation was associated with greater recruitment of paraventricular thalamus. There was also less recruitment of central amygdala for habituation compared to extinction in the retention phase. These findings indicate that largely overlapping neurocircuitries underlie habituation and fear extinction and imply common mechanisms for reducing fear across different inhibitory treatments.

  8. Dynamic roles of FGF-2 and Anosmin-1 in the migration of neuronal precursors from the subventricular zone during pre- and postnatal development.

    PubMed

    García-González, Diego; Clemente, Diego; Coelho, Maria; Esteban, Pedro F; Soussi-Yanicostas, Nadia; de Castro, Fernando

    2010-04-01

    FGF-2 and Anosmin-1 are diffusible proteins which act in cell proliferation and/or migration during CNS development. We describe their developmental expression patterns in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain and the neuronal precursors (NPs) that migrate from this neurogenic site towards the olfactory bulb, forming the rostral migratory stream (RMS). The analysis is carried out before (E14), during (E17, P5) and after (P15) the peaks of migration along the RMS and before this acquires its mature conformation. At all these stages, FGF-2 exerts a FGFR1-mediated motogenic effect on NPs and induces the proliferation of SVZ astrocytes (putatively type B cells from triads), and Anosmin-1 works as a typical chemotropic agent for the NPs (mediated by FGFR1 at P5-P15). Altogether, our results are consistent with the notion that FGF-2 increases cell proliferation in the SVZ and would be the motogenic cue which feeds the migration of the newly produced NPs once generated, from early development (E14) and at least until P15, while Anosmin-1 cooperates in this migration attracting the NPs. In this sense, both cues should be considered as two of the first to be chronologically identified as actors in the formation of the RMS.

  9. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Deficits Reduce Glucose Metabolism and Function of Cholinergic and GABAergic Systems in the Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da Un; Oh, Jin Hwan; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jihyeon; Cho, Zang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Reduced brain glucose metabolism and basal forebrain cholinergic neuron degeneration are common features of Alzheimer's disease and have been correlated with memory function. Although regions representing glucose hypometabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease are targets of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, the interaction between cholinergic denervation and glucose hypometabolism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate glucose metabolism changes caused by cholinergic deficits. Materials and Methods We lesioned basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in rats using 192 immunoglobulin G-saporin. After 3 weeks, lesioned animals underwent water maze testing or were analyzed by 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Results During water maze probe testing, performance of the lesioned group decreased with respect to time spent in the target quadrant and platform zone. Cingulate cortex glucose metabolism in the lesioned group decreased, compared with the normal group. Additionally, acetylcholinesterase activity and glutamate decarboxylase 65/67 expression declined in the cingulate cortex. Conclusion Our results reveal that spatial memory impairment in animals with selective basal forebrain cholinergic neuron damage is associated with a functional decline in the GABAergic and cholinergic system associated with cingulate cortex glucose hypometabolism. PMID:26632397

  10. The Rho GTPase Rac1 is required for proliferation and survival of progenitors in the developing forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Dino P.; Srinivasan, Karpagam; Brakebusch, Cord; McConnell, Susan K.

    2010-01-01

    Progenitor cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) and subventricular zone (SVZ) of the developing forebrain give rise to neurons and glial cells, and are characterized by distinct morphologies and proliferative behaviors. The mechanisms that distinguish VZ and SVZ progenitors are not well understood, although the homeodomain transcription factor Cux2 and Cyclin D2, a core component of the cell cycle machinery, are specifically involved in controlling SVZ cell proliferation. Rho GTPases have been implicated in regulating the proliferation, differentiation and migration of many cell types, and one family member, Cdc42, affects the polarity and proliferation of radial glial cells in the VZ. Here we show that another family member, Rac1, is required for the normal proliferation and differentiation of SVZ progenitors and for survival of both VZ and SVZ progenitors. A forebrain-specific loss of Rac1 leads to an SVZ-specific reduction in proliferation, a concomitant increase in cell cycle exit, and premature differentiation. In Rac1 mutants the SVZ and VZ can no longer be delineated, but rather fuse to become a single compact zone of intermingled cells. Cyclin D2 expression, which is normally expressed by both VZ and SVZ progenitors, is reduced in Rac1 mutants, suggesting that the mutant cells differentiate precociously. Rac1-deficient mice can still generate SVZ-derived upper layer neurons, indicating that Rac1 is not required for the acquisition of upper layer neuronal fates, but instead is needed for the normal regulation of proliferation by progenitor cells in the SVZ. PMID:20506362

  11. The bilaterian forebrain: an evolutionary chimaera.

    PubMed

    Tosches, Maria Antonietta; Arendt, Detlev

    2013-12-01

    The insect, annelid and vertebrate forebrains harbour two major centres of output control, a sensory-neurosecretory centre releasing hormones and a primordial locomotor centre that controls the initiation of muscular body movements. In vertebrates, both reside in the hypothalamus. Here, we review recent comparative neurodevelopmental evidence indicating that these centres evolved from separate condensations of neurons on opposite body sides ('apical nervous system' versus 'blastoporal nervous system') and that their developmental specification involved distinct regulatory networks (apical six3 and rx versus mediolateral nk and pax gene-dependent patterning). In bilaterian ancestors, both systems approached each other and became closely intermingled, physically, functionally and developmentally. Our 'chimeric brain hypothesis' sheds new light on the vast success and rapid diversification of bilaterian animals in the Cambrian and revises our understanding of brain architecture.

  12. PDGF-responsive progenitors persist in the subventricular zone across the lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lisamarie; Bain, Jennifer M.; Loh, Ji Meng; Levison, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    The SVZ (subventricular zone) contains neural stem cells and progenitors of various potentialities. Although initially parsed into A, B, and C cells, this germinal zone is comprised of a significantly more diverse population of cells. Here, we characterized a subset of postnatal PRPs (PDGF-AA-responsive precursors) that express functional PDGFα and β receptors from birth to adulthood. When grown in PDGF-AA, dissociated neonatal rat SVZ cells divided to produce non-adherent clusters of progeny. Unlike the self-renewing EGF/FGF-2-responsive precursors that produce neurospheres, these PRPs failed to self-renew after three passages; therefore, we refer to the colonies they produce as spheroids. Upon differentiation these spheroids could produce neurons, type 1 astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. When maintained in medium supplemented with BMP-4 they also produced type 2 astrocytes. Using lineage tracing methods, it became evident that there were multiple types of PRPs, including a subset that could produce neurons, oligodendrocytes, and type 1 and type 2 astrocytes; thus some of these PRPs represent a unique population of precursors that are quatropotential. Spheroids also could be generated from the newborn neocortex and they had the same potentiality as those from the SVZ. By contrast, the adult neocortex produced less than 20% of the numbers of spheroids than the adult SVZ and spheroids from the adult neocortex only differentiated into glial cells. Interestingly, SVZ spheroid producing capacity diminished only slightly from birth to adulthood. Altogether these data demonstrate that there are PRPs that persist in the SVZ that includes a unique population of quatropotential PRPs. PMID:24367913

  13. Purinergic signaling promotes proliferation of adult mouse subventricular zone cells.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Satoshi; Sunabori, Takehiko; Kanki, Hiroaki; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Gachet, Christian; Koizumi, Schuichi; Okano, Hideyuki

    2012-07-01

    In adult mammalian brains, neural stem cells (NSCs) exist in the subventricular zone (SVZ), where persistent neurogenesis continues throughout life. Those NSCs produce neuroblasts that migrate into the olfactory bulb via formation of transit-amplifying cells, which are committed precursor cells of the neuronal lineage. In this SVZ niche, cell-cell communications conducted by diffusible factors as well as physical cell-cell contacts are important for the regulation of the proliferation and fate determination of NSCs. Previous studies have suggested that extracellular purinergic signaling, which is mediated by purine compounds such as ATP, plays important roles in cell-cell communication in the CNS. Purinergic signaling also promotes the proliferation of adult NSCs in vitro. However, the in vivo roles of purinergic signaling in the neurogenic niche still remain unknown. In this study, ATP infusion into the lateral ventricle of the mouse brain resulted in an increase in the numbers of rapidly dividing cells and Mash1-positive transit-amplifying cells (Type C cells) in the SVZ. Mash1-positive cells express the P2Y1 purinergic signaling receptor and infusion of the P2Y1 receptor-specific antagonist MRS2179 decreased the number of rapidly dividing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells and Type C cells. Moreover, a 17% reduction of rapidly dividing BrdU-positive cells and a 19% reduction of Mash1-positive cells were observed in P2Y1 knock-out mice. Together, these results suggest that purinergic signaling promotes the proliferation of rapidly dividing cells and transit-amplifying cells, in the SVZ niche through the P2Y1 receptor. PMID:22764232

  14. Diphenylhydantoin promotes proliferation in the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Contreras, Alma Y.; Gonzalez-Castaneda, Rocio E; Luquin, Sonia; Guzman-Muniz, Jorge; Moy-Lopez, Norma A.; Ramos-Zuniga, Rodrigo; Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement Diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin) is an antiepileptic drug that generates hyperplasia in some tissue by stimulating Epidermal Growth Factor (EGFR) and Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta (PDGFR-β) receptors and by increasing serum levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, FGF2 or FGF-β). Neural stem cells in the adult brain have been isolated from three regions: the Subventricular Zone (SVZ) lining the lateral wall of the lateral ventricles, the Subgranular Zone (SGZ) in the dentate gyrus at the hippocampus and the Subgranular Zone (SZC) lining between the hippocampus and the corpus callosum. Neural stem cells actively respond to bFGF, PDGFR-β or EGF by increasing their proliferation, survival and differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of phenytoin on proliferation and apoptosis in the three neurogenic niches in the adult brain. Approach We orally administrated phenytoin with an oropharyngeal cannula for 30 days: 0 mg kg−1 (controls), 1, 5, 10, 50 and 100 mg kg−1. To label proliferative cells, three injections of 100 mg kg−1 of BrdU was administrated every 12 h. Immunohistochemistry against BrdU or Caspase-3 active were performed to determine the number of proliferative or apoptotic cells. Results Our results showed that phenytoin induces proliferation in the SVZ and the SGZ in a dose-dependent manner. No statistically significant effects on cell proliferation in the SCZ neither in the apoptosis rate at the SVZ, SGZ and SCZ were found. Conclusion These data indicate that phenytoin promotes a dose-dependent proliferation in the SVZ and SGZ of the adult brain. The clinical relevance of these findings remain to be elucidated. PMID:24478822

  15. Patterning of the chick forebrain anlage by the prechordal plate.

    PubMed

    Pera, E M; Kessel, M

    1997-10-01

    We analysed the role of the prechordal plate in forebrain development of chick embryos in vivo. After transplantation to uncommitted ectoderm a prechordal plate induces an ectopic, dorsoventrally patterned, forebrain-like vesicle. Grafting laterally under the anterior neural plate causes ventralization of the lateral side of the forebrain, as indicated by a second expression domain of the homeobox gene NKX2.1. Such a lateral ventralization cannot be induced by the secreted factor Sonic Hedgehog alone, as this is only able to distort the ventral forebrain medially. Removal of the prechordal plate does not reduce the rostrocaudal extent of the anterior neural tube, but leads to significant narrowing and cyclopia. Excision of the head process results in the caudal expansion of the NKX2.1 expression in the ventral part of the anterior neural tube, while PAX6 expression in the dorsal part remains unchanged. We suggest that there are three essential steps in early forebrain patterning, which culminate in the ventralization of the forebrain. First, anterior neuralization occurs at the primitive streak stage, when BMP-4-antagonizing factors emanate from the node and spread in a planar fashion to induce anterior neural ectoderm. Second, the anterior translocation of organizer-derived cells shifts the source of neuralizing factors anteriorly, where the relative concentration of BMP-4-antagonists is thus elevated, and the medial part of the prospective forebrain becomes competent to respond to ventralizing factors. Third, the forebrain anlage is ventralized by signals including Sonic Hedgehog, thereby creating a new identity, the prospective hypothalamus, which splits the eye anlage into two lateral domains.

  16. Forebrain-Cerebellar Interactions During Learning

    PubMed Central

    Weible, Aldis P.; Galvez, Roberto; Disterhoft, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebral cortex and cerebellum are high level neural centers that must interact cooperatively to generate coordinated and efficient goal directed movements, including those necessary for a well-timed conditioned response. In this review we describe the progress made in utilizing the forebrain-dependent trace eyeblink conditioning paradigm to understand the neural substrates mediating cerebro-cerebellar interactions during learning and consolidation of conditioned responses. This review expands upon our previous hypothesis that the interaction occurs at sites that project to the pontine nuclei (Weiss & Disterhoft, 1996), by offering more details on the function of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex during acquisition and the circuitry involved in facilitating pontine input to the cerebellum as a necessary requisite for trace eyeblink conditioning. Our discussion describes the role of the hippocampus, caudal anterior cingulate gyrus, basal ganglia, thalamus, and sensory cortex, including the benefit of utilizing the whisker barrel cortical system. We propose that permanent changes in the sensory cortex, along with input from the caudate and claustrum, and a homologue of the primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, serve to bridge the stimulus free trace interval and allow the cerebellum to generate a well-timed conditioned response. PMID:26617664

  17. Transient forebrain ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration in fascia dentata transplants.

    PubMed

    Tønder, N; Aznar, S; Johansen, F F

    1994-01-01

    Fascia dentata tissue blocks from newborn rats were grafted into one-week-old, ibotenic acid-induced lesions of the fascia dentata, or the normal fascia dentata of adult rats. After at least 2 months survival the recipient rats were subjected to 10 min of forebrain ischemia (4-vessel occlusion), and examined 2 or 4 days later for neuronal degeneration in the host hippocampi and the transplants, by silver staining and immunohistochemistry. Transplants survived well in both normal and lesioned host brains, with easily recognizable subfields and layers and presence of normal types of principal and non-principal neurons. As expected, argyrophilic, degenerating neurons were present in the pyramidal cell layer of CAl and CA3c of the non-grafted contralateral host hippocampus and in the contralateral dentate hilus (CA4). In the hilus the degeneration corresponded to the loss of somatostatin-immunoreactive neurons, while parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons were spared. In the dentate transplants degenerating neurons were observed in the granule cell layer, the hilus and the adjacent CA3 pyramidal cell layer. There was no obvious loss of either somatostatin- or parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The degeneration varied considerably between transplants, from a few to large groups of silver stained neurons, but this difference did not display any obvious relation to grafting into normal or lesioned hosts, the exact location of the grafts or the general organization and distribution of intrinsic or extrinsic host afferents in the grafts. The results demonstrate that both ischemia-susceptible and -resistant types of neurons grafted to normal and lesioned adult rat brains are susceptible to transient forebrain ischemia after transplantation. In spite of an extensive reorganization of transplant nerve connections, the physiologicalbiochemical mechanisms necessary for the induction of ischemic cell death were accordingly present in the transplants.

  18. Effects of lithium and aripiprazole on brain stimulation reward and neuroplasticity markers in the limbic forebrain.

    PubMed

    Mavrikaki, Maria; Schintu, Nicoletta; Kastellakis, Andreas; Nomikos, George G; Svenningsson, Per; Panagis, George

    2014-04-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe pathological condition with impaired reward-related processing. The present study was designed to assess the effects of two commonly used BD medications, the mood stabilizer lithium chloride (LiCl) and the atypical antipsychotic and antimanic agent aripiprazole, in an animal model of reward and motivation and on markers of neuroplasticity in the limbic forebrain in rats. We utilized intracranial self-simulation (ICSS) to assess the effects of acute and chronic administration of LiCl and aripiprazole on brain stimulation reward, and phosphorylation studies to determine their effects on specific cellular neuroplasticity markers, i.e., the phosphorylation of CREB and crucial phosphorylation sites on the GluA1 subunit of AMPA receptors and the NA1 and NA2B subunits of NMDA receptors, in the limbic forebrain. Chronic LiCl induced tolerance to the anhedonic effect of the drug observed after acute administration, while chronic aripiprazole induced a sustained anhedonic effect. These distinct behavioral responses might be related to differences in molecular markers of neuroplasticity. Accordingly, we demonstrated that chronic LiCl, but not aripiprazole, decreased phosphorylation of CREB at the Ser133 site and NA1 at the Ser896 site in the prefrontal cortex and GluA1 at the Ser831 site and NA2B at the Ser1303 site in the ventral striatum. The present study provides evidence for BD medication-evoked changes in reward and motivation processes and in specific markers of neuronal plasticity in the limbic forebrain, promoting the notion that these drugs may blunt dysregulated reward processes in BD by counteracting neuronal plasticity deficits.

  19. Evolution of vertebrate forebrain development: how many different mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Foley, A C; Stern, C D

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 50 years and more, many models have been proposed to explain how the nervous system is initially induced and how it becomes subdivided into gross regions such as forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain and spinal cord. Among these models is the 2-signal model of Nieuwkoop & Nigtevecht (1954), who suggested that an initial signal ('activation') from the organiser both neuralises and specifies the forebrain, while later signals ('transformation') from the same region progressively caudalise portions of this initial territory. An opposing idea emerged from the work of Otto Mangold (1933) and other members of the Spemann laboratory: 2 or more distinct organisers, emitting different signals, were proposed to be responsible for inducing the head, trunk and tail regions. Since then, evidence has accumulated that supports one or the other model, but it has been very difficult to distinguish between them. Recently, a considerable body of work from mouse embryos has been interpreted as favouring the latter model, and as suggesting that a 'head organiser', required for the induction of the forebrain, is spatially separate from the classic organiser (Hensen's node). An extraembryonic tissue, the 'anterior visceral endoderm' (AVE), was proposed to be the source of forebrain-inducing signals. It is difficult to find tissues that are directly equivalent embryologically or functionally to the AVE in other vertebrates, which led some (e.g. Kessel, 1998) to propose that mammals have evolved a new way of patterning the head. We will present evidence from the chick embryo showing that the hypoblast is embryologically and functionally equivalent to the mouse AVE. Like the latter, the hypoblast also plays a role in head development. However, it does not act like a true organiser. It induces pre-neural and pre-forebrain markers, but only transiently. Further development of neural and forebrain phenotypes requires additional signals not provided by the hypoblast. In addition, the

  20. Forebrain pathway for auditory space processing in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Y E; Miller, G L; Knudsen, E I

    1998-02-01

    The forebrain plays an important role in many aspects of sound localization behavior. Yet, the forebrain pathway that processes auditory spatial information is not known for any species. Using standard anatomic labeling techniques, we used a "top-down" approach to trace the flow of auditory spatial information from an output area of the forebrain sound localization pathway (the auditory archistriatum, AAr), back through the forebrain, and into the auditory midbrain. Previous work has demonstrated that AAr units are specialized for auditory space processing. The results presented here show that the AAr receives afferent input from Field L both directly and indirectly via the caudolateral neostriatum. Afferent input to Field L originates mainly in the auditory thalamus, nucleus ovoidalis, which, in turn, receives input from the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. In addition, we confirmed previously reported projections of the AAr to the basal ganglia, the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX), the deep layers of the optic tectum, and various brain stem nuclei. A series of inactivation experiments demonstrated that the sharp tuning of AAr sites for binaural spatial cues depends on Field L input but not on input from the auditory space map in the midbrain ICX: pharmacological inactivation of Field L eliminated completely auditory responses in the AAr, whereas bilateral ablation of the midbrain ICX had no appreciable effect on AAr responses. We conclude, therefore, that the forebrain sound localization pathway can process auditory spatial information independently of the midbrain localization pathway. PMID:9463450

  1. Chick homeobox gene cDlx expression demarcates the forebrain anlage, indicating the onset of forebrain regional specification at gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Borghjid, S; Siddiqui, M A

    2000-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a chick homeobox-containing gene, cDlx, which shows greater than 85% homology to the homeodomain of other vertebrate Distal-less genes. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies reveal that cDlx expression is developmentally regulated and is tissue specific. In particular, the developmental expression pattern is characterized by an early appearance of cDlx transcript in the prospective forebrain region of gastrulating embryos. During neurulation, cDlx is consistently expressed in a spatially restricted domain in the presumptive ventral forebrain region of the neural plate that will give rise to the hypothalamus and the adenohypophysis. Our data support the notion that members of the Dlx gene family are part of a homeobox gene code in forebrain pattern formation and suggest that regional specification of the forebrain occurs at much earlier stages than previously thought. The homeobox gene cDlx may thus play a role in defining forebrain regional identity as early as gastrulation.

  2. Indomethacin treatment reduces microglia activation and increases numbers of neuroblasts in the subventricular zone and ischaemic striatum after focal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rosana S; Cardoso, Marcelo M; Sampaio, Arthur O; Barbosa, Mario Santos; Souza, Celice C; DA Silva, Michelle C; Ferreira, Elane Magno N; Freire, Marco Aurelio M; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues; Gomes-Leal, Walace

    2016-09-01

    Neuroblasts from the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate to striatum following stroke, but most of them die in the ischaemic milieu and this can be related to exacerbated microglial activation. Here, we explored the effects of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory indomethacin on microglial activation, neuronal preservation and neuroblast migration following experimental striatal stroke in adult rats. Animals were submitted to endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced focal striatal ischaemia and were treated with indomethacin or sterile saline (i.p.) for 7 days, being perfused after 8 or 14 days. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess neuronal loss (anti-NeuN), microglial activation (anti-Iba1, ED1) and migrating neuroblasts (anti-DCX) by counting NeuN, ED1 and DCX-positive cells in the ischaemic striatum or SVZ. Indomethacin treatment reduced microglia activation and the number of ED1+ cells in both 8 and 14 days post injury as compared with controls. There was an increase in the number of DCX+ cells in both SVZ and striatum at the same survival times. Moreover, there was a decrease in the number of NeuN+ cells in indomethacin-treated animals as compared with the control group at 8 days but not after 14 days post injury. Our results suggest that indomethacin treatment modulates microglia activation, contributing to increased neuroblast proliferation in the SVZ and migration to the ischaemic striatum following stroke. PMID:27581930

  3. The subventricular zone is the developmental milestone of a 6-layered neocortex: comparisons in metatherian and eutherian mammals.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Amanda F P; Kondo, Shinichi; Abdel-Mannan, Omar; Chodroff, Rebecca A; Sirey, Tamara M; Bluy, Lisa E; Webber, Natalie; DeProto, Jamin; Karlen, Sarah J; Krubitzer, Leah; Stolp, Helen B; Saunders, Norman R; Molnár, Zoltán

    2010-05-01

    The major lineages of mammals (Eutheria, Metatheria, and Monotremata) diverged more than 100 million years ago and have undergone independent changes in the neocortex. We found that adult South American gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) and tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) possess a significantly lower number of cerebral cortical neurons compared with the mouse (Mus musculus). To determine whether the difference is reflected in the development of the cortical germinal zones, the location of progenitor cell divisions was examined in opossum, tammar wallaby, and rat. The basic pattern of the cell divisions was conserved, but the emergence of a distinctive band of dividing cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) occurred relatively later in the opossum (postnatal day [P14]) and the tammar wallaby (P40) than in rodents. The planes of cell divisions in the ventricular zone (VZ) were similar in all species, with comparable mRNA expression patterns of Brn2, Cux2, NeuroD6, Tbr2, and Pax6 in opossum (P12 and P20) and mouse (embryonic day 15 and P0). In conclusion, the marsupial neurodevelopmental program utilizes an organized SVZ, as indicated by the presence of intermediate (or basal) progenitor cell divisions and gene expression patterns, suggesting that the SVZ emerged prior to the Eutherian-Metatherian split.

  4. The proliferative capacity of the subventricular zone is maintained in the parkinsonian brain.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, Simone A; van Strien, Miriam E; Korecka, Joanna A; Dijkstra, Anke A; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Kooijman, Lieneke; Eggers, Ruben; De Filippis, Lidia; Vescovi, Angelo L; Verhaagen, Joost; van de Berg, Wilma D J; Hol, Elly M

    2011-11-01

    There are many indications that neurogenesis is impaired in Parkinson's disease, which might be due to a lack of dopamine in the subventricular zone. An impairment in neurogenesis may have negative consequences for the development of new therapeutic approaches in Parkinson's disease, as neural stem cells are a potential source for endogenous repair. In this study, we examined the subventricular zone of 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and 10 age- and sex-matched controls for proliferation and neural stem cell numbers. We also included five cases with incidental Lewy body disease, which showed Parkinson's disease pathology but no clinical symptoms and thus did not receive dopaminergic treatment. We quantified the neural stem cell number and proliferative capacity in the subventricular zone of these three donor groups. We found subventricular neural stem cells in each donor, with a high variation in number. We did not observe significant differences in neural stem cell number or in proliferation between the groups. Additionally, we were able to culture neural stem cells from post-mortem brain of several patients with Parkinson's disease, confirming the presence of viable neural stem cells in these brains. We have also examined the subventricular zone of a chronic, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model, and again found no effect of dopaminergic denervation on precursor proliferation. Lastly, we investigated the proliferation capacity of two different human neural stem cell lines in response to dopamine. Both cell lines did not respond with a change in proliferation to treatment with dopamine agonists and an antagonist. In summary, the adult neural stem cell pool in the subventricular zone was not clearly affected in the human parkinsonian brain or a Parkinson's disease mouse model. Furthermore, we did not find evidence that dopamine has a direct effect on human neural stem cell proliferation in vitro. Thus, we

  5. Impairment of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons associated with aging and long-term loss of ovarian function.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, R B

    1998-06-01

    Recent studies suggest that women are at greater risk for Alzheimer's disease than men and that estrogen replacement can help to reduce the risk and severity of Alzheimer's-related dementia in postmenopausal women. We have hypothesized that the increased risk for Alzheimer's-related dementia is due, in part, to the loss of ovarian function in postmenopausal women and to the effects that decreased levels of ovarian hormones have on basal forebrain cholinergic function. In the present study, the effects of aging and ovariectomy on cholinergic neurons in the rat basal forebrain were examined to determine (1) whether aging differentially affects cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain of males vs females, and (2) whether long-term loss of ovarian function produces deficits in basal forebrain cholinergic function beyond those associated with aging and sex. In part I of the study, gonadally intact male and female rats were sacrificed at 13, 19, and 25 months of age and the effects of aging on cholinergic neurons in the medial septum (MS) and nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) were compared. In part II of the study, female rats were ovariectomized at 13 months of age and then sacrificed 3 and 6 months later along with gonadally intact, age-matched controls. Adjacent sections through the MS and NBM were processed for either immunocytochemical detection of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and p75NTR-like immunoreactivity or for in situ hybridization detection and quantification of ChAT and trkA mRNA. Results from part I revealed no significant effects of age on the relative size or density of cholinergic neurons in the MS and NBM of gonadally intact animals. Likewise, no significant effects on the relative numbers of cholinergic neurons expressing p75NTR protein were detected. However, a significant decrease in trkA mRNA was detected in the MS of gonadally intact females, but not males, between 13 and 25 months of age. No significant effects of aging on ChAT mRNA were

  6. Persistent Wnt/β-catenin signaling determines dorsalization of the postnatal subventricular zone and neural stem cell specification into oligodendrocytes and glutamatergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Azim, Kasum; Fischer, Bruno; Hurtado-Chong, Anahi; Draganova, Kalina; Cantù, Claudio; Zemke, Martina; Sommer, Lukas; Butt, Arthur; Raineteau, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    In the postnatal and adult central nervous system (CNS), the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain is the main source of neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate olfactory neurons and oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelinating cells of the CNS. Here, we provide evidence of a primary role for canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in regulating NSC fate along neuronal and oligodendroglial lineages in the postnatal SVZ. Our findings demonstrate that glutamatergic neuronal precursors (NPs) and oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) are derived strictly from the dorsal SVZ (dSVZ) microdomain under the control of Wnt/β-catenin, whereas GABAergic NPs are derived mainly from the lateral SVZ (lSVZ) microdomain independent of Wnt/β-catenin. Transcript analysis of microdissected SVZ microdomains revealed that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling was more pronounced in the dSVZ microdomain. This was confirmed using the β-catenin-activated Wnt-reporter mouse and by pharmacological stimulation of Wnt/β-catenin by infusion of the specific glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor, AR-A014418, which profoundly increased the generation of cycling cells. In vivo genetic/pharmacological stimulation or inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin, respectively, increased and decreased the differentiation of dSVZ-NSCs into glutamatergic NPs, and had a converse effect on GABAergic NPs. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin dramatically stimulated the generation of OPs, but its inhibition had no effect, indicating other factors act in concert with Wnt/β-catenin to fine tune oligodendrogliogenesis in the postnatal dSVZ. These results demonstrate a role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling within the dorsal microdomain of the postnatal SVZ, in regulating the genesis of glutamatergic neurons and OLs.

  7. Elevated adult neurogenesis in brain subventricular zone following in vivo manganese exposure: roles of copper and DMT1.

    PubMed

    Fu, Sherleen; O'Neal, Stefanie; Hong, Lan; Jiang, Wendy; Zheng, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The brain subventricular zone (SVZ) is a source of neural precursor cells; these cells travel along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to destination areas in the process of adult neurogenesis. Recent x-ray fluorescence (XRF) studies reveal an extensive accumulation of copper (Cu) in the SVZ. Earlier human and animal studies also suggest an altered Cu homeostasis after manganese (Mn) exposure. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that Mn exposure by acting on the divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) altered Cu levels in SVZ and RMS, thereby affecting adult neurogenesis. Adult rats received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 6 mg Mn/kg as MnCl2 once daily for 4 weeks with concomitant injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for 5 days in the last week. In control rats, Cu levels were significantly higher in the SVZ than other brain regions examined. Mn exposure significantly reduced Cu concentrations in the SVZ (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemical data showed that in vivo Mn exposure significantly increased numbers of BrdU(+) cells, which were accompanied with increased GFAP(+) astrocytic stem cells and DCX(+) neuroblasts in SVZ and RMS. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot confirmed the increased expression of DMT1 in SVZ following in vivo Mn exposure, which contributed to Mn accumulation in the neurogenesis pathway. Taken together, these results indicate a clear disruptive effect of Mn on adult neurogenesis; the effect appears due partly to Mn induction of DMT1 and its interference with cellular Cu regulation in SVZ and RMS. The future research directions based on these observations are also discussed. PMID:25575534

  8. Functional response to SDF1α through over-expression of CXCR4 on adult subventricular zone progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian Shuang; Chopp, Michael; Santra, Manoranjan; Hozeska-Solgot, Ann; Zhang, Rui Lan; Wang, Lei; Teng, Hua; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1α) regulate neuroblast migration towards the ischemic boundary after stroke. Using loss-and gain-function, we investigated the biological effect of CXCR4/SDF1α on neural progenitor cells. Neural progenitor cells, from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult rat, were transfected with rat CXCR4-pLEGFP-C1 and pSIREN-RetroQ-CXCR4-siRNA retroviral vectors. Migration assay analysis showed that inhibition of CXCR4 by siRNA significantly reduced cell migration compared to the empty vector, indicating that CXCR4 mediated neural progenitor cell motility. When neural progenitor cells were cultured in growth medium containing bFGF (20 ng/ml), over-expression of CXCR4 significantly reduced the cell proliferation as measured by the number of bromodeoxyuridine+ (BrdU+) cells (26.4%) compared with the number in the control group (54.0%). Addition of a high concentration of SDF1α (500 ng/ml) into the progenitor cells with over-expression of CXCR4 reversed the cell proliferation back to the control levels (57.6%). Immunostaining analysis showed that neither over-expression nor inhibition of CXCR4 altered the population of neurons and astrocytes, when neural progenitor cells were cultured in differentiation medium. These in vitro results suggest that CXCR4/SDF1α primarily regulates adult neural progenitor cell motility but not differentiation, while over-expression of CXCR4 in the absence of SDF1α decreases neural progenitor cell proliferation. PMID:18598677

  9. Elevated Adult Neurogenesis in Brain Subventricular Zone Following In vivo Manganese Exposure: Roles of Copper and DMT1

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Sherleen; O'Neal, Stefanie; Hong, Lan; Jiang, Wendy; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The brain subventricular zone (SVZ) is a source of neural precursor cells; these cells travel along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) to destination areas in the process of adult neurogenesis. Recent x-ray fluorescence (XRF) studies reveal an extensive accumulation of copper (Cu) in the SVZ. Earlier human and animal studies also suggest an altered Cu homeostasis after manganese (Mn) exposure. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that Mn exposure by acting on the divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) altered Cu levels in SVZ and RMS, thereby affecting adult neurogenesis. Adult rats received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of 6 mg Mn/kg as MnCl2 once daily for 4 weeks with concomitant injections of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for 5 days in the last week. In control rats, Cu levels were significantly higher in the SVZ than other brain regions examined. Mn exposure significantly reduced Cu concentrations in the SVZ (P < 0.01). Immunohistochemical data showed that in vivo Mn exposure significantly increased numbers of BrdU(+) cells, which were accompanied with increased GFAP(+) astrocytic stem cells and DCX(+) neuroblasts in SVZ and RMS. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot confirmed the increased expression of DMT1 in SVZ following in vivo Mn exposure, which contributed to Mn accumulation in the neurogenesis pathway. Taken together, these results indicate a clear disruptive effect of Mn on adult neurogenesis; the effect appears due partly to Mn induction of DMT1 and its interference with cellular Cu regulation in SVZ and RMS. The future research directions based on these observations are also discussed. PMID:25575534

  10. Task-phase-specific dynamics of basal forebrain neuronal ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Tingley, David; Alexander, Andrew S.; Kolbu, Sean; de Sa, Virginia R.; Chiba, Andrea A.; Nitz, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Cortically projecting basal forebrain neurons play a critical role in learning and attention, and their degeneration accompanies age-related impairments in cognition. Despite the impressive anatomical and cell-type complexity of this system, currently available data suggest that basal forebrain neurons lack complexity in their response fields, with activity primarily reflecting only macro-level brain states such as sleep and wake, onset of relevant stimuli and/or reward obtainment. The current study examined the spiking activity of basal forebrain neuron populations across multiple phases of a selective attention task, addressing, in particular, the issue of complexity in ensemble firing patterns across time. Clustering techniques applied to the full population revealed a large number of distinct categories of task-phase-specific activity patterns. Unique population firing-rate vectors defined each task phase and most categories of task-phase-specific firing had counterparts with opposing firing patterns. An analogous set of task-phase-specific firing patterns was also observed in a population of posterior parietal cortex neurons. Thus, consistent with the known anatomical complexity, basal forebrain population dynamics are capable of differentially modulating their cortical targets according to the unique sets of environmental stimuli, motor requirements, and cognitive processes associated with different task phases. PMID:25309352

  11. Laser-scanning photostimulation of optogenetically targeted forebrain circuits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles C; Lam, Ying-Wan; Imaizumi, Kazuo; Sherman, S Murray

    2013-01-01

    The sensory forebrain is composed of intricately connected cell types, of which functional properties have yet to be fully elucidated. Understanding the interactions of these forebrain circuits has been aided recently by the development of optogenetic methods for light-mediated modulation of neuronal activity. Here, we describe a protocol for examining the functional organization of forebrain circuits in vitro using laser-scanning photostimulation of channelrhodopsin, expressed optogenetically via viral-mediated transfection. This approach also exploits the utility of cre-lox recombination in transgenic mice to target expression in specific neuronal cell types. Following transfection, neurons are physiologically recorded in slice preparations using whole-cell patch clamp to measure their evoked responses to laser-scanning photostimulation of channelrhodopsin expressing fibers. This approach enables an assessment of functional topography and synaptic properties. Morphological correlates can be obtained by imaging the neuroanatomical expression of channelrhodopsin expressing fibers using confocal microscopy of the live slice or post-fixed tissue. These methods enable functional investigations of forebrain circuits that expand upon more conventional approaches. PMID:24430760

  12. Neuronal ensemble bursting in the basal forebrain encodes salience irrespective of valence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Chieh; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2008-07-10

    Both reward- and punishment-related stimuli are motivationally salient and attract the attention of animals. However, it remains unclear how motivational salience is processed in the brain. Here, we show that both reward- and punishment-predicting stimuli elicited robust bursting of many noncholinergic basal forebrain (BF) neurons in behaving rats. The same BF neurons also responded with similar bursting to primary reinforcement of both valences. Reinforcement responses were modulated by expectation, with surprising reinforcement eliciting stronger BF bursting. We further demonstrate that BF burst firing predicted successful detection of near-threshold stimuli. Together, our results point to the existence of a salience-encoding system independent of stimulus valence. We propose that the encoding of motivational salience by ensemble bursting of noncholinergic BF neurons may improve behavioral performance by affecting the activity of widespread cortical circuits and therefore represents a novel candidate mechanism for top-down attention.

  13. Neuronal ensemble bursting in the basal forebrain encodes salience irrespective of valence.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Chieh; Nicolelis, Miguel A L

    2008-07-10

    Both reward- and punishment-related stimuli are motivationally salient and attract the attention of animals. However, it remains unclear how motivational salience is processed in the brain. Here, we show that both reward- and punishment-predicting stimuli elicited robust bursting of many noncholinergic basal forebrain (BF) neurons in behaving rats. The same BF neurons also responded with similar bursting to primary reinforcement of both valences. Reinforcement responses were modulated by expectation, with surprising reinforcement eliciting stronger BF bursting. We further demonstrate that BF burst firing predicted successful detection of near-threshold stimuli. Together, our results point to the existence of a salience-encoding system independent of stimulus valence. We propose that the encoding of motivational salience by ensemble bursting of noncholinergic BF neurons may improve behavioral performance by affecting the activity of widespread cortical circuits and therefore represents a novel candidate mechanism for top-down attention. PMID:18614035

  14. Volume of the Human Septal Forebrain Region Is a Predictor of Source Memory Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Tracy; Blackmon, Karen; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Wang, Xiuyuan; DuBois, Jonathan; Carlson, Chad; Barr, William B.; French, Jacqueline; Devinsky, Orrin; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Halgren, Eric; Thesen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Septal nuclei, components of basal forebrain, are strongly and reciprocally connected with hippocampus, and have been shown in animals to play a critical role in memory. In humans, the septal forebrain has received little attention. To examine the role of human septal forebrain in memory, we acquired high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans from 25 healthy subjects and calculated septal forebrain volume using recently developed probabilistic cytoarchitectonic maps. We indexed memory with the California Verbal Learning Test-II. Linear regression showed that bilateral septal forebrain volume was a significant positive predictor of recognition memory accuracy. More specifically, larger septal forebrain volume was associated with the ability to recall item source/context accuracy. Results indicate specific involvement of septal forebrain in human source memory, and highlight the need for additional research into the role of septal nuclei in memory and other impairments associated with human diseases. PMID:22152217

  15. Is forebrain neurogenesis a potential repair mechanism after stroke?

    PubMed

    Inta, Dragos; Gass, Peter

    2015-07-01

    The use of adult subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis as brain repair strategy after stroke represents a hot topic in neurologic research. Recent radiocarbon-14 dating has revealed a lack of poststroke neurogenesis in the adult human neocortex; however, adult neurogenesis has been shown to occur, even under physiologic conditions, in the human striatum. Here, these results are contrasted with experimental poststroke neurogenesis in the murine brain. Both in humans and in rodents, the SVZ generates predominantly calretinin (CR)-expressing GABAergic interneurons, which cannot replace the broad spectrum of neuronal subtypes damaged by stroke. Therefore, SVZ neurogenesis may represent a repair mechanism only after genetic manipulation redirecting its differentiation.

  16. Is forebrain neurogenesis a potential repair mechanism after stroke?

    PubMed Central

    Inta, Dragos; Gass, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The use of adult subventricular zone (SVZ) neurogenesis as brain repair strategy after stroke represents a hot topic in neurologic research. Recent radiocarbon-14 dating has revealed a lack of poststroke neurogenesis in the adult human neocortex; however, adult neurogenesis has been shown to occur, even under physiologic conditions, in the human striatum. Here, these results are contrasted with experimental poststroke neurogenesis in the murine brain. Both in humans and in rodents, the SVZ generates predominantly calretinin (CR)-expressing GABAergic interneurons, which cannot replace the broad spectrum of neuronal subtypes damaged by stroke. Therefore, SVZ neurogenesis may represent a repair mechanism only after genetic manipulation redirecting its differentiation. PMID:25966955

  17. Nicotine administration in the wake-promoting basal forebrain attenuates sleep-promoting effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rishi; Lodhi, Shafi; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2015-10-01

    Nicotine and alcohol co-abuse is highly prevalent, although the underlying causes are unclear. It has been suggested that nicotine enhances pleasurable effects of alcohol while reducing aversive effects. Recently, we reported that nicotine acts via the basal forebrain (BF) to activate nucleus accumbens and increase alcohol consumption. Does nicotine suppress alcohol-induced aversive effects via the BF? We hypothesized that nicotine may act via the BF to suppress sleep-promoting effects of alcohol. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with sleep-recording electrodes and bilateral guides targeted toward the BF. Nicotine (75 pmol/500 nL/side) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF; 500 nL/side) was microinjected into the BF followed by intragastric alcohol (ACSF + EtOH and NiC + EtOH groups; 3 g/kg) or water (NiC + W and ACSF + W groups; 10 mL/kg) administration. On completion, rats were killed and processed to localize injection sites in the BF. The statistical analysis revealed a significant effect of treatment on sleep-wakefulness. While rats exposed to alcohol (ACSF + EtOH) displayed strong sleep promotion, nicotine pre-treatment in the BF (NiC + EtOH) attenuated alcohol-induced sleep and normalized sleep-wakefulness. These results suggest that nicotine acts via the BF to suppress the aversive, sleep-promoting effects of alcohol, further supporting the role of BF in alcohol-nicotine co-use.

  18. Reduced Cerebral Oxygen Content in the DG and SVZ In Situ Promotes Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Brain In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhou, Yanzhao; Zhao, Tong; Wu, Liying; Huang, Xin; Wu, Kuiwu; Xu, Lun; Li, Dahu; Liu, Shuhong; Zhao, Yongqi; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult brain occurs mainly within two neurogenic structures, the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain. It has been reported that mild hypoxia promoted the proliferation of Neural Stem Cells (NSCs)in vitro. Our previous study further demonstrated that an external hypoxic environment stimulated neurogenesis in the adult rat brain in vivo. However, it remains unknown how external hypoxic environments affect the oxygen content in the brain and result in neurogenesis. Here we use an optical fiber luminescent oxygen sensor to detect the oxygen content in the adult rat brain in situ under normoxia and hypoxia. We found that the distribution of oxygen in cerebral regions is spatiotemporally heterogeneous. The Po2 values in the ventricles (45∼50 Torr) and DG (approximately 10 Torr) were much higher than those of other parts of the brain, such as the cortex and thalamus (approximately 2 Torr). Interestingly, our in vivo studies showed that an external hypoxic environment could change the intrinsic oxygen content in brain tissues, notably reducing oxygen levels in both the DG and SVZ, the major sites of adult neurogenesis. Furthermore, the hypoxic environment also increased the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF, two factors that have been reported to regulate neurogenesis, within the DG and SVZ. Thus, we have demonstrated that reducing the oxygen content of the external environment decreased Po2 levels in the DG and SVZ. This reduced oxygen level in the DG and SVZ might be the main mechanism triggering neurogenesis in the adult brain. More importantly, we speculate that varying oxygen levels may be the physiological basis of the regionally restricted neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  19. Origins of serotonin innervation of forebrain structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellar, K. J.; Brown, P. A.; Madrid, J.; Bernstein, M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Mehler, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The tryptophan hydroxylase activity and high-affinity uptake of (3H) serotonin ((3H)5-HT) were measured in five discrete brain regions of rats following lesions of the dorsal or median raphe nuclei. Dorsal raphe lesions reduced enzyme and uptake activity in the striatum only. Median raphe lesions reduced activities in the hippocampus, septal area, frontal cortex, and, to a lesser extent, in the hypothalamus. These data are consistent with the suggestion that the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are the origins of two separate ascending serotonergic systems - one innervating striatal structures and the other mesolimbic structures, predominantly. In addition, the data suggest that measurements of high-affinity uptake of (3H)5-HT may be a more reliable index of innervation than either 5-HT content or tryptophan hydroxylase activity.

  20. Chronic inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis enhances both subventricular zone neurogenesis and olfactory learning in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Romero-Grimaldi, Carmen; Gheusi, Gilles; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Estrada, Carmen

    2006-11-01

    The ability to generate new neurons during the course of adult life is preserved in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the mammalian brain. These two regions constitute specifically regulated neurogenic niches, and provide newborn neurons involved in olfactory and spatial learning, respectively. Nitric oxide (NO) is a negative regulator of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone, whereas its role in the dentate gyrus remains controversial. Using systemic administration of NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors to chronically inhibit NO production, we increased neural precursor proliferation in the subventricular zone as well as neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb, without modifying the number of mitotic cells or the granular cell layer thickness in the dentate gyrus. The same treatment specifically improved olfactory learning performance, whereas spatial learning and memory was unchanged, thus demonstrating that olfactory memory is closely associated with the level of ongoing neurogenesis in the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb. The anatomical specificity of the NOS inhibitor actions was not due to differences in the availability of NO, as demonstrated by immunohistochemical detection of neuronal NOS and S-nitrosylated proteins in both regions. Remarkably, the distinct NO sensitivity might result from a differential expression of epidermal growth factor receptor in precursor cells in both regions, as the proliferative effect of NOS inhibitors in the subventricular zone was restricted to the cells that expressed this receptor.

  1. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P.; Ferrari, Loris L.; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E.; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state. PMID:26524973

  2. Basal forebrain control of wakefulness and cortical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Anaclet, Christelle; Pedersen, Nigel P; Ferrari, Loris L; Venner, Anne; Bass, Caroline E; Arrigoni, Elda; Fuller, Patrick M

    2015-11-03

    Wakefulness, along with fast cortical rhythms and associated cognition, depend on the basal forebrain (BF). BF cholinergic cell loss in dementia and the sedative effect of anti-cholinergic drugs have long implicated these neurons as important for cognition and wakefulness. The BF also contains intermingled inhibitory GABAergic and excitatory glutamatergic cell groups whose exact neurobiological roles are unclear. Here we show that genetically targeted chemogenetic activation of BF cholinergic or glutamatergic neurons in behaving mice produced significant effects on state consolidation and/or the electroencephalogram but had no effect on total wake. Similar activation of BF GABAergic neurons produced sustained wakefulness and high-frequency cortical rhythms, whereas chemogenetic inhibition increased sleep. Our findings reveal a major contribution of BF GABAergic neurons to wakefulness and the fast cortical rhythms associated with cognition. These findings may be clinically applicable to manipulations aimed at increasing forebrain activation in dementia and the minimally conscious state.

  3. Ghrelin stimulates proliferation, migration and differentiation of neural progenitors from the subventricular zone in the adult mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Endan; Kim, Yumi; Kim, Sehee; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Park, Seungjoon

    2014-02-01

    Ghrelin has been shown to regulate neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of ghrelin on cell proliferation and neuroblast formation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory system (RMS) and generation of interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB). We found that ghrelin receptors were expressed in the SVZ-RMS-OB system. Ghrelin knockout (GKO) mice have fewer proliferating neural progenitor cells and neuroblasts in the SVZ, while ghrelin administration attenuated these changes. We also found that not only the number of BrdU-labeled cells but also the fraction of migratory neuroblasts in the RMS was decreased in the GKO mice compared with controls. Treatment of GKO mice with ghrelin restored these numbers to the wild-type control values. Far fewer BrdU/NeuN double-labeled cells were found in the OB of GKO mice than in wild-type mice 4 weeks after labeling, which were increased by ghrelin replacement. GKO mice showed less numbers of BrdU/calbindin, BrdU/calretinin and BrdU/tyrosine hydroxylase double-labeled cells in the periglomerular layer of the OB. However, these numbers were increased to wild-type values after ghrelin administration. Finally, in the GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats, ghrelin increased the number of progenitor cells and neuroblasts in the SVZ, without significant effect on the differentiation in the OB. These findings suggest that ghrelin is involved in the regulation of proliferation of progenitor cells in the SVZ, the number of migratory neuroblasts in the SVZ, and the differentiation of interneurons in the OB. PMID:24295570

  4. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA from cholinergic forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Arpiar; Granger, Adam J; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitter corelease is emerging as a common theme of central neuromodulatory systems. Though corelease of glutamate or GABA with acetylcholine has been reported within the cholinergic system, the full extent is unknown. To explore synaptic signaling of cholinergic forebrain neurons, we activated choline acetyltransferase expressing neurons using channelrhodopsin while recording post-synaptic currents (PSCs) in layer 1 interneurons. Surprisingly, we observed PSCs mediated by GABAA receptors in addition to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Based on PSC latency and pharmacological sensitivity, our results suggest monosynaptic release of both GABA and ACh. Anatomical analysis showed that forebrain cholinergic neurons express the GABA synthetic enzyme Gad2 and the vesicular GABA transporter (Slc32a1). We confirmed the direct release of GABA by knocking out Slc32a1 from cholinergic neurons. Our results identify GABA as an overlooked fast neurotransmitter utilized throughout the forebrain cholinergic system. GABA/ACh corelease may have major implications for modulation of cortical function by cholinergic neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06412.001 PMID:25723967

  5. Adolescent Intermittent Alcohol Exposure: Deficits in Object Recognition Memory and Forebrain Cholinergic Markers.

    PubMed

    Swartzwelder, H Scott; Acheson, Shawn K; Miller, Kelsey M; Sexton, Hannah G; Liu, Wen; Crews, Fulton T; Risher, Mary-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The long-term effects of intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence (AIE) are of intensive interest and investigation. The effects of AIE on learning and memory and the neural functions that drive them are of particular interest as clinical findings suggest enduring deficits in those cognitive domains in humans after ethanol abuse during adolescence. Although studies of such deficits after AIE hold much promise for identifying mechanisms and therapeutic interventions, the findings are sparse and inconclusive. The present results identify a specific deficit in memory function after AIE and establish a possible neural mechanism of that deficit that may be of translational significance. Male rats (starting at PND-30) received exposure to AIE (5g/kg, i.g.) or vehicle and were allowed to mature into adulthood. At PND-71, one group of animals was assessed using the spatial-temporal object recognition (stOR) test to evaluate memory function. A separate group of animals was used to assess the density of cholinergic neurons in forebrain areas Ch1-4 using immunohistochemistry. AIE exposed animals manifested deficits in the temporal component of the stOR task relative to controls, and a significant decrease in the number of ChAT labeled neurons in forebrain areas Ch1-4. These findings add to the growing literature indicating long-lasting neural and behavioral effects of AIE that persist into adulthood and indicate that memory-related deficits after AIE depend upon the tasks employed, and possibly their degree of complexity. Finally, the parallel finding of diminished cholinergic neuron density suggests a possible mechanism underlying the effects of AIE on memory and hippocampal function as well as possible therapeutic or preventive strategies for AIE. PMID:26529506

  6. Adolescent Intermittent Alcohol Exposure: Deficits in Object Recognition Memory and Forebrain Cholinergic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Swartzwelder, H. Scott; Acheson, Shawn K.; Miller, Kelsey M.; Sexton, Hannah G.; Liu, Wen; Crews, Fulton T.; Risher, Mary-Louise

    2015-01-01

    The long-term effects of intermittent ethanol exposure during adolescence (AIE) are of intensive interest and investigation. The effects of AIE on learning and memory and the neural functions that drive them are of particular interest as clinical findings suggest enduring deficits in those cognitive domains in humans after ethanol abuse during adolescence. Although studies of such deficits after AIE hold much promise for identifying mechanisms and therapeutic interventions, the findings are sparse and inconclusive. The present results identify a specific deficit in memory function after AIE and establish a possible neural mechanism of that deficit that may be of translational significance. Male rats (starting at PND-30) received exposure to AIE (5g/kg, i.g.) or vehicle and were allowed to mature into adulthood. At PND-71, one group of animals was assessed using the spatial-temporal object recognition (stOR) test to evaluate memory function. A separate group of animals was used to assess the density of cholinergic neurons in forebrain areas Ch1-4 using immunohistochemistry. AIE exposed animals manifested deficits in the temporal component of the stOR task relative to controls, and a significant decrease in the number of ChAT labeled neurons in forebrain areas Ch1-4. These findings add to the growing literature indicating long-lasting neural and behavioral effects of AIE that persist into adulthood and indicate that memory-related deficits after AIE depend upon the tasks employed, and possibly their degree of complexity. Finally, the parallel finding of diminished cholinergic neuron density suggests a possible mechanism underlying the effects of AIE on memory and hippocampal function as well as possible therapeutic or preventive strategies for AIE. PMID:26529506

  7. Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons induced by unilateral rotenone infusion into the medial forebrain bundle.

    PubMed

    Norazit, Anwar; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Nguyen, Maria Nga; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2010-11-11

    Rotenone, a mitochondrial complex 1 inhibitor, causes oxidative damage via production of reactive oxygen species. We examined the pathophysiology of neuronal and glial cells of the nigrostriatal pathway following unilateral infusion of varying doses of rotenone into the substantia nigra or medial forebrain bundle of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, sacrificed 14 and 60 days after infusion. Immunofluorescence techniques were used to qualitatively and quantitatively assay dopaminergic neurons, their projections, glial cells, synapses, and oxidative stress. Rotenone infusion into the substantia nigra at all concentrations caused extensive damage and tissue necrosis, therefore of limited relevance for producing a Parkinson disease model. Infusion of 0.5μg of rotenone targeting the medial forebrain bundle induced oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons causing ongoing cell stress as defined by an elevation of stress granule and oxidative stress markers. This treatment resulted in the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive cells in the substantia nigra (p≤0.01) and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve fibres and synaptic specialisations in the striatum (p≤0.01). The infusion of 0.5μg of rotenone also caused an increase in astrocytes and microglial cells in the substantia nigra in comparison to control (p≤0.01). We examined the time-dependent reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nerve fibres and cell bodies in the striatum and substantia nigra respectively, with a progressive reduction evident 60days after infusion (p≤0.01, p≤0.05). Dopaminergic axons exposed to low-dose rotenone undergo oxidative stress, with a resultant ongoing loss of dopaminergic neurons, providing an animal model relevant to Parkinson disease.

  8. Effects of protein restriction during gestation and lactation on cell proliferation in the hippocampus and subventricular zone: functional implications. Protein restriction alters hippocampal/SVZ cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Mariana Araya de; Souza, Amanda Santos de; Lobo, Mônica Alves; Sampaio, Omar Vidal Kress; Moraes, Louise; Baldanza, Marcelo Ribeiro; Magri, Tatiana Przybylski Ribeiro; Wernerck de Castro, João Pedro Saar; Tavares do Carmo, Maria das Graças; Soares-Mota, Márcia; Rocha, Monica Santos; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo Felippe

    2013-02-16

    There is no consensus about the effects of protein restriction on neurogenesis and behavior. Here, for the first time, we evaluated the effects of protein restriction during gestation and lactation, on the two major neurogenic regions of the adult brain, the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ), simultaneously. We also assessed different types of behavior relevant to each region. After mating, pregnant Wistar rats were divided into a control group (CG) that received a normal diet (20% protein); and a protein-restriction group (PRG) that received a low-protein diet (8% protein). After birth, the same diets were provided to the mother and pups until weaning, when some rats were analyzed and others received a normal-protein diet until adulthood. Different sets of rats were used for cellular and behavioral studies in juvenile or adult age. Brains were processed for immunohistochemistry anti-BrdU, anti-Ki67, or anti-pHisH3. Juvenile and adult rats from distinct litters also underwent several behavioral tests. Our data show that early protein restriction results in a reduction of hippocampal progenitors and deficits in object recognition during adult life. Moreover, longer periods of immobility in the tail suspension and in the forced swimming tests revealed that PRG rats show a depressive behavior at 21 days of age (P21) and in adulthood. Furthermore, we suggest that despite the reduced number/proliferation of neural stem cells (B and/or E cells) in SVZ there is a compensatory mechanism in which the progenitors (types C and A cells) proliferate in a higher rate, without affecting olfactory ability in adulthood.

  9. CLUSTERING OF LARGE CELL POPULATIONS: METHOD AND APPLICATION TO THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CHOLINERGIC SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Nadasdy, Zoltan; Varsanyi, Peter; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    Functionally related groups of neurons spatially cluster together in the brain. To detect groups of functionally related neurons from 3D histological data, we developed an objective clustering method that provides a description of detected cell clusters that is quantitative and amenable to visual exploration. This method is based on bubble clustering (Gupta and Gosh, 2008). Our implementation consists of three steps: (i) an initial data exploration for scanning the clustering parameter space; (ii) determination of the optimal clustering parameters; (iii) final clustering. We designed this algorithm to flexibly detect clusters without assumptions about the underlying cell distribution within a cluster or the number and sizes of clusters. We implemented the clustering function as an integral part of the neuroanatomical data visualization software Virtual RatBrain (http://www.virtualratbrain.org). We applied this algorithm to the basal forebrain cholinergic system, which consists of a diffuse but inhomogeneous population of neurons (Zaborszky, 1992). With this clustering method, we confirmed the inhomogeneity in this system, defined cell clusters, quantified and localized them, and determined the cell density within clusters. Furthermore, by applying the clustering method to multiple specimens from both rat and monkey, we found that cholinergic clusters display remarkable cross-species preservation of cell density within clusters. This method is efficient not only for clustering cell body distributions but may also be used to study other distributed neuronal structural elements, including synapses, receptors, dendritic spines and molecular markers. PMID:20398701

  10. Oligodendrocyte Lineage and Subventricular Zone Response to Traumatic Axonal Injury in the Corpus Callosum

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Genevieve M.; Mierzwa, Amanda J.; Kijpaisalratana, Naruchorn; Tang, *Haiying; Wang, Yong; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Selwyn, Reed

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury frequently causes traumatic axonal injury (TAI) in white matter tracts. Experimental TAI in the corpus callosum of adult mice was used to examine the effects on oligodendrocyte lineage cells and myelin in conjunction with neuroimaging. The injury targeted the corpus callosum over the subventricular zone, a source of neural stem/progenitor cells. Traumatic axonal injury was produced in the rostral body of the corpus callosum by impact onto the skull at the bregma. During the first week after injury, magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging showed that axial diffusivity decreased in the corpus callosum and that corresponding regions exhibited significant axon damage accompanied by hypertrophic microglia and reactive astrocytes. Oligodendrocyte progenitor proliferation increased in the subventricular zone and corpus callosum. Oligodendrocytes in the corpus callosum shifted toward upregulation of myelin gene transcription. Plp/CreERT:R26IAP reporter mice showed normal reporter labeling of myelin sheaths 0 to 2 days after injury but labeling was increased between 2 and 7 days after injury. Electron microscopy revealed axon degeneration, demyelination, and redundant myelin figures. These findings expand the cell types and responses to white matter injuries that inform diffusion tensor imaging evaluation and identify pivotal white matter changes after TAI that may affect axon vulnerability vs. recovery after brain injury. PMID:24226267

  11. Heparan sulfate deficiency in autistic postmortem brain tissue from the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Brandon L.; Corley, Michael J.; Vasconcellos, Amy; Blanchard, D. Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal cellular growth and organization have been characterized in postmortem tissue from brains of autistic individuals, suggestive of pathology in a critical neurogenic niche, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain lateral ventricles (LV). We examined cellular organization, cell proliferation, and constituents of the extracellular matrix such as N-sulfated heparan sulfate (HS) and laminin (LAM) in postmortem brain tissue from the LV-SVZ of young to elderly individuals with autism (n = 4) and age-matched typically developing (TD) individuals (n = 4) using immunofluorescence techniques. Strong and systematic reductions in HS immunofluorescence were observed in the LV-SVZ of the TD individuals with increasing age. For young through mature, but not elderly, autistic pair members, HS was reduced compared to their matched TDs. Cellular proliferation (Ki67+) was higher in the autistic individual of the youngest age-matched pair. These preliminary data suggesting that HS may be reduced in young to mature autistic individuals are in agreement with previous findings from the BTBR T+tf/J mouse, an animal model of autism; from mice with genetic modifications reducing HS; and with genetic variants in HS-related genes in autism. They suggest that aberrant extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan function localized to the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles may be a biomarker for autism, and potentially involved in the etiology of the disorder. PMID:23318464

  12. The carbocyanine dye DiD labels in vitro and in vivo neural stem cells of the subventricular zone as well as myelinated structures following in vivo injection in the lateral ventricle.

    PubMed

    Carradori, Dario; Barreau, Kristell; Eyer, Joël

    2016-02-01

    Carbocyanines are fluorescent lipophilic cationic dyes used since the early 1980s as neuronal tracers. Several applications of these compounds have been developed thanks to their low cell toxicity, lateral diffusion within the cellular membranes, and good photostability. 1,1'-Dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindodicarbocyanine 4-chlorobenzenesulfonate (DiD) is an interesting component of this family because, in addition to the classic carbocyanine properties, it has a longer wavelength compared with its analogues. That makes DiD an excellent carbocyanine for labeling cells and tissues with significant intrinsic fluorescence. Drug encapsulation, drug delivery, and cellular transplantation are also fields using DiD-based systems where having detailed knowledge about its behavior as a single entity is important. Recently, promising studies concerned neural stem cells from the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle in the brain (their natural niche) and their potential therapeutic use. Here, we show that DiD is able to label these stem cells in vitro and present basilar information concerning its pharmacokinetics, concentrations, and microscope protocols. Moreover, when DiD is injected in vivo in the cerebrospinal fluid present in the lateral ventricle of rat, it also labels stem cells as well as myelinated structures of the caudoputamen. This analysis provides a database to consult when planning experiments concerning DiD and neural stem cells from the subventricular zone.

  13. Estradiol selectively enhances auditory function in avian forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Caras, Melissa L; O'Brien, Matthew; Brenowitz, Eliot A; Rubel, Edwin W

    2012-12-01

    Sex steroids modulate vertebrate sensory processing, but the impact of circulating hormone levels on forebrain function remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that circulating sex steroids modulate single-unit responses in the avian telencephalic auditory nucleus, field L. We mimicked breeding or nonbreeding conditions by manipulating plasma 17β-estradiol levels in wild-caught female Gambel's white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii). Extracellular responses of single neurons to tones and conspecific songs presented over a range of intensities revealed that estradiol selectively enhanced auditory function in cells that exhibited monotonic rate level functions to pure tones. In these cells, estradiol treatment increased spontaneous and maximum evoked firing rates, increased pure tone response strengths and sensitivity, and expanded the range of intensities over which conspecific song stimuli elicited significant responses. Estradiol did not significantly alter the sensitivity or dynamic ranges of cells that exhibited non-monotonic rate level functions. Notably, there was a robust correlation between plasma estradiol concentrations in individual birds and physiological response properties in monotonic, but not non-monotonic neurons. These findings demonstrate that functionally distinct classes of anatomically overlapping forebrain neurons are differentially regulated by sex steroid hormones in a dose-dependent manner.

  14. Dynamic variation in forebrain estradiol levels during song learning.

    PubMed

    Chao, Andrew; Paon, Ashley; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2015-03-01

    Estrogens shape brain circuits during development, and the capacity to synthesize estrogens locally has consequences for both sexual differentiation and the acute modulation of circuits during early learning. A recently optimized method to detect and quantify fluctuations in brain estrogens in vivo provides a direct means to explore how brain estrogen production contributes to both differentiation and neuromodulation during development. Here, we use this method to test the hypothesis that neuroestrogens are sexually differentiated as well as dynamically responsive to song tutoring (via passive video/audio playback) during the period of song learning in juvenile zebra finches. Our results show that baseline neuroestradiol levels in the caudal forebrain do not differ between males and females during an early critical masculinization window. Instead, we observe a prominent difference between males and females in baseline neuroestradiol that emerges during the subadult stage as animals approach sexual maturity. Second, we observe that fluctuating neuroestradiol levels during periods of passive song tutoring exhibit a markedly different profile in juveniles as compared to adults. Specifically, neuroestrogens in the caudal forebrain are elevated following (rather than during) tutor song exposure in both juvenile males and females, suggesting an important role for the early consolidation of tutor song memories. These results further reveal a circadian influence on the fluctuations in local neuroestrogens during sensory/cognitive tasks. Taken together, these findings uncover several unexpected features of brain estrogen synthesis in juvenile animals that may have implications for secondary masculinization as well as the consolidation of recent sensory experiences. PMID:25205304

  15. Distribution of vasopressin in the forebrain of spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Greta J; De Vries, Geert J; Villalba, Constanza; Weldele, Mary L; Place, Ned J; Coscia, Elizabeth M; Glickman, Steve E; Forger, Nancy G

    2006-09-01

    The extreme virilization of the female spotted hyena raises interesting questions with respect to sexual differentiation of the brain and behavior. Females are larger and more aggressive than adult, non-natal males and dominate them in social encounters; their external genitalia also are highly masculinized. In many vertebrates, the arginine vasopressin (VP) innervation of the forebrain, particularly that of the lateral septum, is associated with social behaviors such as aggression and dominance. Here, we used immunohistochemistry to examine the distribution of VP cells and fibers in the forebrains of adult spotted hyenas. We find the expected densely staining VP immunoreactive (VP-ir) neurons in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, as well as an unusually extensive distribution of magnocelluar VP-ir neurons in accessory regions. A small number of VP-ir cell bodies are present in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis; however, there are extensive VP-ir fiber networks in presumed projection areas of these nuclei, for example, the subparaventricular zone and lateral septum, respectively. No significant sex differences were detected in the density of VP-ir fibers in any area examined. In the lateral septum, however, marked variability was observed. Intact females exhibited a dense fiber network, as did two of the four males examined; the two other males had almost no VP-ir septal fibers. This contrasts with findings in many other vertebrate species, in which VP innervation of the lateral septum is consistently greater in males than in females.

  16. Adenosine inhibits glutamatergic input to basal forebrain cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hawryluk, J. M.; Ferrari, L. L.; Keating, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine has been proposed as an endogenous homeostatic sleep factor that accumulates during waking and inhibits wake-active neurons to promote sleep. It has been specifically hypothesized that adenosine decreases wakefulness and promotes sleep recovery by directly inhibiting wake-active neurons of the basal forebrain (BF), particularly BF cholinergic neurons. We previously showed that adenosine directly inhibits BF cholinergic neurons. Here, we investigated 1) how adenosine modulates glutamatergic input to BF cholinergic neurons and 2) how adenosine uptake and adenosine metabolism are involved in regulating extracellular levels of adenosine. Our experiments were conducted using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices. We found that in BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine reduced the amplitude of AMPA-mediated evoked glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature EPSCs through presynaptic A1 receptors. Thus we have demonstrated that in addition to directly inhibiting BF cholinergic neurons, adenosine depresses excitatory inputs to these neurons. It is therefore possible that both direct and indirect inhibition may synergistically contribute to the sleep-promoting effects of adenosine in the BF. We also found that blocking the influx of adenosine through the equilibrative nucleoside transporters or inhibiting adenosine kinase and adenosine deaminase increased endogenous adenosine inhibitory tone, suggesting a possible mechanism through which adenosine extracellular levels in the basal forebrain are regulated. PMID:22357797

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L V; Szele, Francis G

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  18. Stimulation of cell proliferation in the subventricular zone by synthetic murine pheromones.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sachiko; Soini, Helena A; Foley, John; Novotny, Milos V; Lai, Cary

    2013-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in female mice is known to be enhanced by exposure to soiled bedding from males, although the identity of the relevant chemosignals has remained unknown. Here we show that the previously recognized male murine pheromones, the farnesenes and 2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole (SBT), strongly increase cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult female mice, but not younger female mice. In addition, we found that a unique female murine pheromone, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, facilitates similar changes in males. SBT stimulated cell proliferation in the SVZ of only adult females and not in young adult or pre- and post-puberty females. Our study suggests that pheromonal communication between males and females is enhancing reproductive success by controlling the estrous cycle and by promoting cell proliferation in a reciprocal manner.

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V.; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L. V.; Szele, Francis G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  20. A Distinct Population of Microglia Supports Adult Neurogenesis in the Subventricular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro Xavier, Anna L.; Kress, Benjamin T.; Goldman, Steven A.; Lacerda de Menezes, João R.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia are involved in synaptic pruning both in development and in the mature CNS. In this study, we investigated whether microglia might further contribute to circuit plasticity by modulating neuronal recruitment from the neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult mouse striatum. We found that microglia residing in the SVZ and adjacent rostral migratory stream (RMS) comprise a morphologically and antigenically distinct phenotype of immune effectors. Whereas exhibiting characteristics of alternatively activated microglia, the SVZ/RMS microglia were clearly distinguished by their low expression of purinoceptors and lack of ATP-elicitable chemotaxis. Furthermore, the in vivo depletion of these microglia hampered the survival and migration of newly generated neuroblasts through the RMS to the olfactory bulb. SVZ and RMS microglia thus appear to comprise a functionally distinct class that is selectively adapted to the support and direction of neuronal integration into the olfactory circuitry. Therefore, this unique microglial subpopulation may serve as a novel target with which to modulate cellular addition from endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells of the adult brain. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Microglial cells are a specialized population of macrophages in the CNS, playing key roles as immune mediators. As integral components in the CNS, the microglia stand out for using the same mechanisms, phagocytosis and cytochemokine release, to promote homeostasis, synaptic pruning, and neural circuitry sculpture. Here, we addressed microglial functions in the subventricular zone (SVZ), the major postnatal neurogenic niche. Our results depict microglia as a conspicuous component of SVZ and its anterior extension, the rostral migratory stream, a pathway used by neuroblasts during their transit toward olfactory bulb layers. In addition to other unique populations residing in the SVZ niche, microglia display distinct morphofunctional properties that boost neuronal

  1. A diet enriched in polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids, LMN diet, induces neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and hippocampus of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Valente, Tony; Hidalgo, Juan; Bolea, Irene; Ramirez, Bartolomé; Anglés, Neus; Reguant, Jordi; Morelló, José Ramón; Gutiérrez, Cristina; Boada, Mercè; Unzeta, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    At present it is widely accepted that there are at least two neurogenic sites in the adult mammalian brain: the subventricular zone (SVZ) of lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus dentate gyrus. The adult proliferation rate declines with aging and is altered in several neurodegenerative pathologies including Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this work was to study whether a natural diet rich in polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (LMN diet) can modulate neurogenesis in adult mice and give insight into putative mechanisms. Results with BrdU and PCNA demonstrated that the LMN fed mice had more newly generated cells in the SVZ and SGZ, and those with DCX (undifferentiated neurons) and tyrosine hydroxylase, calretinin, and calbindin (differentiated neurons) immunostainings and western blots demonstrated a significant effect on neuronal populations, strongly supporting a positive role of the LMN diet on adult neurogenesis. In primary rat neuron cultures, the LMN cream dramatically protected against damage caused by both hydrogen peroxide and Abeta(1-42), demonstrating a potent antioxidant effect that could play a major role in the normal adult neurogenesis and, moreover, the LMN diet could have a significant effect combating the cognitive function decline during both aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  2. The Effect of Pro-Neurogenic Gene Expression on Adult Subventricular Zone Precursor Cell Recruitment and Fate Determination After Excitotoxic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kathryn S; Connor, Bronwen J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of on-going neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain, neurons are generally not replaced after injury. Using a rodent model of excitotoxic cell loss and retroviral (RV) lineage tracing, we previously demonstrated transient recruitment of precursor cells from the subventricular zone (SVZ) into the lesioned striatum. In the current study we determined that these cells included migratory neuroblasts and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC), with the predominant response from glial cells. We attempted to override this glial response by ectopic expression of the pro-neurogenic genes Pax6 or Dlx2 in the adult rat SVZ following quinolinic acid lesioning. RV-Dlx2 over-expression stimulated repair at a previously non-neurogenic time point by enhancing neuroblast recruitment and the percentage of cells that retained a neuronal fate within the lesioned area, compared to RV-GFP controls. RV-Pax6 expression was unsuccessful at inhibiting glial fate and intriguingly, increased OPC cell numbers with no change in neuronal recruitment. These findings suggest that gene choice is important when attempting to augment endogenous repair as the lesioned environment can overcome pro-neurogenic gene expression. Dlx2 over-expression however was able to partially overcome an anti-neuronal environment and therefore is a promising candidate for further study of striatal regeneration. PMID:27397999

  3. A frontal cortex event-related potential driven by the basal forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, David P; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are widely used in both healthy and neuropsychiatric conditions as physiological indices of cognitive functions. Contrary to the common belief that cognitive ERPs are generated by local activity within the cerebral cortex, here we show that an attention-related ERP in the frontal cortex is correlated with, and likely generated by, subcortical inputs from the basal forebrain (BF). In rats performing an auditory oddball task, both the amplitude and timing of the frontal ERP were coupled with BF neuronal activity in single trials. The local field potentials (LFPs) associated with the frontal ERP, concentrated in deep cortical layers corresponding to the zone of BF input, were similarly coupled with BF activity and consistently triggered by BF electrical stimulation within 5–10 msec. These results highlight the important and previously unrecognized role of long-range subcortical inputs from the BF in the generation of cognitive ERPs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02148.001 PMID:24714497

  4. Intrinsic voltage dynamics govern the diversity of spontaneous firing profiles in basal forebrain noncholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ovsepian, Saak V; Dolly, J Oliver; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2012-07-01

    Spontaneous firing and behavior-related changes in discharge profiles of basal forebrain (BF) neurons are well documented, albeit the mechanisms underlying the variety of activity modes and intermodal transitions remain elusive. With the use of cell-attached recordings, this study identifies a range of spiking patterns in diagonal band Broca (DBB) noncholinergic cells of rats and tentatively categorizes them into low-rate random, tonic, and cluster firing activities. It demonstrates further that the multiplicity of discharge profiles is sustained intrinsically and persists after blockade of glutamate-, glycine/GABA-, and cholinergic synaptic inputs. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors, blockade of voltage-gated Ca(2+)-, and small conductance (SK) Ca(2+)-activated K(+) currents as well as chelating of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration accelerate low-rate random and tonic firing and favor transition of neurons into cluster firing mode. A similar trend towards higher discharge rates with switch of neurons into cluster firing has been revealed by activation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors with the NPY or NPY(1) receptor agonist [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-NPY. Whole cell current-clamp analysis demonstrates that the variety of spiking modes and intermodal transitions could be induced within the same neuronal population by injection of bias depolarizing or hyperpolarizing currents. Taken together, these data demonstrate the intrinsic and highly variable character of regenerative firing in BF noncholinergic cells, subject to powerful modulation by classical neurotransmitters, NPY, and small membrane currents.

  5. Basal Forebrain Atrophy Contributes to Allocentric Navigation Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Kerbler, Georg M; Nedelska, Zuzana; Fripp, Jurgen; Laczó, Jan; Vyhnalek, Martin; Lisý, Jiří; Hamlin, Adam S; Rose, Stephen; Hort, Jakub; Coulson, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain degenerates in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this process is believed to contribute to the cognitive decline observed in AD patients. Impairment in spatial navigation is an early feature of the disease but whether basal forebrain dysfunction in AD is responsible for the impaired navigation skills of AD patients is not known. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between basal forebrain volume and performance in real space as well as computer-based navigation paradigms in an elderly cohort comprising cognitively normal controls, subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and those with AD. We also tested whether basal forebrain volume could predict the participants' ability to perform allocentric- vs. egocentric-based navigation tasks. The basal forebrain volume was calculated from 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and navigation skills were assessed using the human analog of the Morris water maze employing allocentric, egocentric, and mixed allo/egocentric real space as well as computerized tests. When considering the entire sample, we found that basal forebrain volume correlated with spatial accuracy in allocentric (cued) and mixed allo/egocentric navigation tasks but not the egocentric (uncued) task, demonstrating an important role of the basal forebrain in mediating cue-based spatial navigation capacity. Regression analysis revealed that, although hippocampal volume reflected navigation performance across the entire sample, basal forebrain volume contributed to mixed allo/egocentric navigation performance in the AD group, whereas hippocampal volume did not. This suggests that atrophy of the basal forebrain contributes to aspects of navigation impairment in AD that are independent of hippocampal atrophy.

  6. Basal Forebrain Atrophy Contributes to Allocentric Navigation Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Kerbler, Georg M; Nedelska, Zuzana; Fripp, Jurgen; Laczó, Jan; Vyhnalek, Martin; Lisý, Jiří; Hamlin, Adam S; Rose, Stephen; Hort, Jakub; Coulson, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain degenerates in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and this process is believed to contribute to the cognitive decline observed in AD patients. Impairment in spatial navigation is an early feature of the disease but whether basal forebrain dysfunction in AD is responsible for the impaired navigation skills of AD patients is not known. Our objective was to investigate the relationship between basal forebrain volume and performance in real space as well as computer-based navigation paradigms in an elderly cohort comprising cognitively normal controls, subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment and those with AD. We also tested whether basal forebrain volume could predict the participants' ability to perform allocentric- vs. egocentric-based navigation tasks. The basal forebrain volume was calculated from 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and navigation skills were assessed using the human analog of the Morris water maze employing allocentric, egocentric, and mixed allo/egocentric real space as well as computerized tests. When considering the entire sample, we found that basal forebrain volume correlated with spatial accuracy in allocentric (cued) and mixed allo/egocentric navigation tasks but not the egocentric (uncued) task, demonstrating an important role of the basal forebrain in mediating cue-based spatial navigation capacity. Regression analysis revealed that, although hippocampal volume reflected navigation performance across the entire sample, basal forebrain volume contributed to mixed allo/egocentric navigation performance in the AD group, whereas hippocampal volume did not. This suggests that atrophy of the basal forebrain contributes to aspects of navigation impairment in AD that are independent of hippocampal atrophy. PMID:26441643

  7. Intracellular calcium and survival of tadpole forebrain cells in anoxia.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Michael S; Fahlman, Christian S; Bickler, Philip E

    2005-02-01

    The frog brain survives hypoxia with a slow loss of energy charge and ion homeostasis. Because hypoxic death in most neurons is associated with increases in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), we examined the relationship between [Ca2+]i and survival of a mixed population of isolated cells from the forebrain of North American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana tadpoles. Forebrain cells from stage V-XV tadpoles were isolated by enzymatic digestion and loaded with one of three different calcium indicators (Fura-2, Fura 2-FF and BTC) to provide estimates of [Ca2+]i accurate at low and high [Ca2+]i. Propidium iodide (PI) fluorescence was used as an indicator of cell viability. Cells were exposed to anoxia (100% N2) and measurements of [Ca2+]i and cell survival made from 1 h to 18 h. Intracellular [Ca2+] increased significantly after 3-6 h anoxia (P<0.05), regardless of the type of Ca2+ indicator used; however, there were substantial differences in the measurements of [Ca2+]i with the different indicators, reflecting their varying affinities for Ca2+. Resting [Ca2+]i was approximately 50 nmol l(-1) and increased to about 9-30 micromol l(-1) after 4-6 h anoxia. The significant increase in [Ca2+]i during anoxia was not associated with significant increases in cell death, with 85-95% survival over this time period. Cells exposed to anoxia for 18 h, or those made anoxic for 4-6 and reoxygenated for 12 h to 16 h, had survival rates greater than 70%, but survival was significantly less than normoxic controls. These results indicate that large increases in [Ca2+]i are not necessarily associated with hypoxic cell death in vertebrate brain cells. PMID:15695760

  8. The effects of environmental diversity on well fed and previously undernourished rats: neuronal and glial cell measurements in the visual cortex (area 17).

    PubMed Central

    Bhide, P G; Bedi, K S

    1984-01-01

    Black and white hooded Lister rats were undernourished from the sixteenth day of gestation until 25 postnatal days of age. Around 85 days of age, 12 previously undernourished male rats were assigned to an 'enriched environmental condition' and 12 to an 'isolated environmental condition'. Well fed controls were similarly assigned. After 30 days in these environmental conditions all rats were killed by perfusion with 2% buffered glutaraldehyde. Body and forebrain weights and forebrain lengths and widths were determined for each animal. Cortical depths were measured from sections through the left occipital cortical region. Neuronal and glial cell nuclear diameters and numerical densities as well as neuronal perikaryal volumes were determined from sections through the right visual cortex. In both well fed and previously undernourished groups, the environmentally enriched rats had heavier forebrains and greater forebrain lengths compared to isolated rats. There were no significant differences between enriched and isolated rats in forebrain width or cortical depth measurements in either nutritional group. In both the well fed and previously undernourished groups there were no consistently significant differences between enriched and isolated rats in any of the measurements on neurons and glial cells. Two-way analysis of variance tests on combined data from both nutritional groups indicated significant effects of environment on forebrain weight, forebrain length and on cortical depth in one of the three sections studied (section 10). Nutrition had a significant effect on body weight, forebrain weight and forebrain width. The interaction between nutrition and environment was not statistically significant for any of the measurements carried out. PMID:6735907

  9. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging detection of basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kerbler, Georg M; Hamlin, Adam S; Pannek, Kerstin; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Keller, Marianne D; Rose, Stephen E; Coulson, Elizabeth J

    2013-02-01

    Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is an early and key feature of Alzheimer's disease, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) volumetric measurement of the basal forebrain has recently gained attention as a potential diagnostic tool for this condition. The aim of this study was to determine whether loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons underpins changes which can be detected through diffusion MRI using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography in a mouse model. To cause selective basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration, the toxin saporin conjugated to a p75 neurotrophin receptor antibody (mu-p75-SAP) was used. This resulted in ~25% loss of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and significant loss of terminal cholinergic projections in the hippocampus, as determined by histology. To test whether lesion of cholinergic neurons caused basal forebrain, hippocampal, or whole brain atrophy, we performed manual segmentation analysis, which revealed no significant atrophy in lesioned animals compared to controls (Rb-IgG-SAP). However, analysis by DTI of the basal forebrain area revealed a significant increase in fractional anisotropy (FA; +7.7%), mean diffusivity (MD; +6.1%), axial diffusivity (AD; +8.5%) and radial diffusivity (RD; +4.0%) in lesioned mice compared to control animals. These parameters strongly inversely correlated with the number of choline acetyl transferase-positive neurons, with FA showing the greatest association (r(2)=0.72), followed by MD (r(2)=0.64), AD (r(2)=0.64) and RD (r(2)=0.61). Moreover, probabilistic tractography analysis of the septo-hippocampal tracts originating from the basal forebrain revealed an increase in streamline MD (+5.1%) and RD (+4.3%) in lesioned mice. This study illustrates that moderate loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (representing only a minor proportion of all septo-hippocampal axons) can be detected by measuring either DTI parameters of the basal forebrain nuclei or

  10. P2X7 receptor inhibition increases CNTF in the subventricular zone, but not neurogenesis or neuroprotection after stroke in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seong Su; Keasey, Matthew Phillip; Hagg, Theo

    2013-10-01

    Increasing endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) expression with a pharmacological agent might be beneficial after stroke as CNTF both promotes neurogenesis and, separately, is neuroprotective. P2X7 purinergic receptor inhibition is neuroprotective in rats and increases CNTF release in rat CMT1A Schwann cells. We, first, investigated the role of P2X7 in regulating CNTF and neurogenesis in adult mouse subventricular zone (SVZ). CNTF expression was increased by daily intravenous injections of the P2X7 antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG) in naïve C57BL/6 or Balb/c mice over 3 days. Despite the ∼40-60 % increase or decrease in CNTF with BBG or the agonist BzATP, respectively, the number of proliferated BrdU+SVZ nuclei did not change. BBG failed to increase FGF2, which is involved in CNTF-regulated neurogenesis, but induced IL-6, LIF, and EGF, which are known to reduce SVZ proliferation. Injections of IL-6 next to the SVZ induced CNTF and FGF2, but not proliferation, suggesting that IL-6 counteracts their neurogenesis-inducing effects. Following ischemic injury of the striatum by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), a 3-day BBG treatment increased CNTF in the medial penumbra containing the SVZ. BBG also induced CNTF and LIF, which are known to be protective following stroke, in the whole striatum after MCAO, but not GDNF or BDNF. However, BBG treatment did not reduce the lesion area or apoptosis in the penumbra. Even so, this study shows that P2X7 can be targeted with systemic drug treatments to differentially regulate neurotrophic factors in the brain following stroke.

  11. Novel in vivo imaging techniques for trafficking the behavior of subventricular zone neural stem cells (SVZSC) and SVZSC induced functional repair

    SciTech Connect

    Anna-Liisa Brownell

    2003-11-28

    Adult progenitor cells hold promise for therapeutic treatment where there has been a disabling loss of function due to death of cells from trauma, disease or aging. However, it will be essential in clinical application to be able to follow the fate of the transplanted cells over time using in vivo tracking methods. We have developed protocol for labeling of progenitor cells to monitor cell trafficking by high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and super high resolution positron emission tomography (PET). We have transfected rat subventricular zone stem cells (SVZ, progenitor cell line) and another control cell line (PC12, pheochromocytoma cells) utilizing super paramagnetic iron oxide and poly-L-lysine complex for MR imaging or radiolabeling with 18F-fluor deoxy-D- glucose for PET imaging. The labeled cells were transplanted into the rostral migratory stream (RMS) or striatum of normal or 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned Spraque-Dawley rats. Longitudinal MRI studies (up to 40 days) showed that transplantation site has significant impact to the fate of the cells; when SVZ cells were transplanted into the RMS, cells migrated several centimeter into the olfactory bulb; after transplantation into the striatum, the migration was minimal, only 2 mm. PC 12 cells grew a massive tumor after the striatal implantation and significantly smaller tumor after the RMS implantation. PET studies conducted immediately after transplantation verified the transplantation site. MRI studies were able to show the whole path of migration in one image, since part of the cells die during migration and will get detected because of iron content. Endpoint histological studies verified the cell survival and immunohistochemical studies revealed the differentiation of the transplanted cells into astrocytes and neurons.

  12. Neurodevelopment Genes in Lampreys Reveal Trends for Forebrain Evolution in Craniates

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Adèle; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Marrakchi, Emna; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Mazan, Sylvie; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain is the brain region which has undergone the most dramatic changes through vertebrate evolution. Analyses conducted in lampreys are essential to gain insight into the broad ancestral characteristics of the forebrain at the dawn of vertebrates, and to understand the molecular basis for the diversifications that have taken place in cyclostomes and gnathostomes following their splitting. Here, we report the embryonic expression patterns of 43 lamprey genes, coding for transcription factors or signaling molecules known to be involved in cell proliferation, stemcellness, neurogenesis, patterning and regionalization in the developing forebrain. Systematic expression patterns comparisons with model organisms highlight conservations likely to reflect shared features present in the vertebrate ancestors. They also point to changes in signaling systems –pathways which control the growth and patterning of the neuroepithelium-, which may have been crucial in the evolution of forebrain anatomy at the origin of vertebrates. PMID:19399187

  13. Role of adenosine and wake-promoting basal forebrain in insomnia and associated sleep disruptions caused by ethanol dependence.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rishi; Engemann, Samuel; Sahota, Pradeep; Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2010-11-01

    Insomnia is a severe symptom of alcohol withdrawal; however, the underlying neuronal mechanism is yet unknown. We hypothesized that chronic ethanol exposure will impair basal forebrain (BF) adenosinergic mechanism resulting in insomnia-like symptoms. We performed a series of experiments in Sprague-Dawley rats to test our hypothesis. We used Majchrowicz's chronic binge ethanol protocol to induce ethanol dependency. Our first experiment verified the effects of ethanol withdrawal on sleep-wakefulness. Significant increase in wakefulness was observed during ethanol withdrawal. Next, we examined c-Fos expression (marker of neuronal activation) in BF wake-promoting neurons during ethanol withdrawal. There was a significant increase in the number of BF wake-promoting neurons with c-Fos immunoreactivity. Our third experiment examined the effects of ethanol withdrawal on sleep deprivation induced increase in BF adenosine levels. Sleep deprivation did not increase BF adenosine levels in ethanol dependent rats. Our last experiment examined the effects of ethanol withdrawal on equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 and A1 receptor expression in the BF. There was a significant reduction in A1 receptor and equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 expression in the BF of ethanol dependent rats. Based on these results, we suggest that insomnia observed during ethanol withdrawal is caused because of impaired adenosinergic mechanism in the BF.

  14. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor gene deletion attenuates behavioral changes and antidepressant responsiveness during chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-10-01

    Stress is an important risk factor for mood disorders. Stress also stimulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, which have been found to influence mood. To determine the role of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in behavioral responses to chronic stress, the present experiments compared behavioral effects of repeated social defeat in mice with forebrain GR deletion and in floxed GR littermate controls. Repeated defeat produced alterations in forced swim and tail suspension immobility in floxed GR mice that did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion. Defeat-induced changes in immobility in floxed GR mice were prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment, indicating that these behaviors were dysphoria-related. In contrast, although mice with forebrain GR deletion exhibited antidepressant-induced decreases in tail suspension immobility in the absence of stress, this response did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion after defeat. There were no marked differences in plasma corticosterone between genotypes, suggesting that behavioral differences depended on forebrain GR rather than on abnormal glucocorticoid secretion. Defeat-induced gene expression of the neuronal activity marker c-fos in the ventral hippocampus, paraventricular thalamus and lateral septum correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral effects of defeat, whereas c-fos induction in the nucleus accumbens and central and basolateral amygdala correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral responses to antidepressant treatment. The dependence of both negative (dysphoria-related) and positive (antidepressant-induced) behaviors on forebrain GR is consistent with the contradictory effects of glucocorticoids on mood, and implicates these or other forebrain regions in these effects.

  15. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor gene deletion attenuates behavioral changes and antidepressant responsiveness during chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Stress is an important risk factor for mood disorders. Stress also stimulates the secretion of glucocorticoids, which have been found to influence mood. To determine the role of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in behavioral responses to chronic stress, the present experiments compared behavioral effects of repeated social defeat in mice with forebrain GR deletion and in floxed GR littermate controls. Repeated defeat produced alterations in forced swim and tail suspension immobility in floxed GR mice that did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion. Defeat-induced changes in immobility in floxed GR mice were prevented by chronic antidepressant treatment, indicating that these behaviors were dysphoria-related. In contrast, although mice with forebrain GR deletion exhibited antidepressant-induced decreases in tail suspension immobility in the absence of stress, this response did not occur in mice with forebrain GR deletion after defeat. There were no marked differences in plasma corticosterone between genotypes, suggesting that behavioral differences depended on forebrain GR rather than on abnormal glucocorticoid secretion. Defeat-induced gene expression of the neuronal activity marker c-fos in the ventral hippocampus, paraventricular thalamus and lateral septum correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral effects of defeat, whereas c-fos induction in the nucleus accumbens and central and basolateral amygdala correlated with genotype-related differences in behavioral responses to antidepressant treatment. The dependence of both negative (dysphoria-related) and positive (antidepressant-induced) behaviors on forebrain GR is consistent with the contradictory effects of glucocorticoids on mood, and implicates these or other forebrain regions in these effects. PMID:25168761

  16. From pluripotency to forebrain patterning: an in vitro journey astride embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Bertacchi, Michele; Carucci, Nicoletta; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Biagioni, Stefano; Cremisi, Federico

    2014-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used extensively as in vitro models of neural development and disease, with special efforts towards their conversion into forebrain progenitors and neurons. The forebrain is the most complex brain region, giving rise to several fundamental structures, such as the cerebral cortex, the hypothalamus, and the retina. Due to the multiplicity of signaling pathways playing different roles at distinct times of embryonic development, the specification and patterning of forebrain has been difficult to study in vivo. Research performed on ESCs in vitro has provided a large body of evidence to complement work in model organisms, but these studies have often been focused more on cell type production than on cell fate regulation. In this review, we systematically reassess the current literature in the field of forebrain development in mouse and human ESCs with a focus on the molecular mechanisms of early cell fate decisions, taking into consideration the specific culture conditions, exogenous and endogenous molecular cues as described in the original studies. The resulting model of early forebrain induction and patterning provides a useful framework for further studies aimed at reconstructing forebrain development in vitro for basic research or therapy. PMID:24643740

  17. From pluripotency to forebrain patterning: an in vitro journey astride embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Bertacchi, Michele; Carucci, Nicoletta; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Biagioni, Stefano; Cremisi, Federico

    2014-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used extensively as in vitro models of neural development and disease, with special efforts towards their conversion into forebrain progenitors and neurons. The forebrain is the most complex brain region, giving rise to several fundamental structures, such as the cerebral cortex, the hypothalamus, and the retina. Due to the multiplicity of signaling pathways playing different roles at distinct times of embryonic development, the specification and patterning of forebrain has been difficult to study in vivo. Research performed on ESCs in vitro has provided a large body of evidence to complement work in model organisms, but these studies have often been focused more on cell type production than on cell fate regulation. In this review, we systematically reassess the current literature in the field of forebrain development in mouse and human ESCs with a focus on the molecular mechanisms of early cell fate decisions, taking into consideration the specific culture conditions, exogenous and endogenous molecular cues as described in the original studies. The resulting model of early forebrain induction and patterning provides a useful framework for further studies aimed at reconstructing forebrain development in vitro for basic research or therapy.

  18. The Adult Ventricular-Subventricular Zone (V-SVZ) and Olfactory Bulb (OB) Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Daniel A; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-05-02

    A large population of neural stem/precursor cells (NSCs) persists in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) located in the walls of the lateral brain ventricles. V-SVZ NSCs produce large numbers of neuroblasts that migrate a long distance into the olfactory bulb (OB) where they differentiate into local circuit interneurons. Here, we review a broad range of discoveries that have emerged from studies of postnatal V-SVZ neurogenesis: the identification of NSCs as a subpopulation of astroglial cells, the neurogenic lineage, new mechanisms of neuronal migration, and molecular regulators of precursor cell proliferation and migration. It has also become evident that V-SVZ NSCs are regionally heterogeneous, with NSCs located in different regions of the ventricle wall generating distinct OB interneuron subtypes. Insights into the developmental origins and molecular mechanisms that underlie the regional specification of V-SVZ NSCs have also begun to emerge. Other recent studies have revealed new cell-intrinsic molecular mechanisms that enable lifelong neurogenesis in the V-SVZ. Finally, we discuss intriguing differences between the rodent V-SVZ and the corresponding human brain region. The rapidly expanding cellular and molecular knowledge of V-SVZ NSC biology provides key insights into postnatal neural development, the origin of brain tumors, and may inform the development regenerative therapies from cultured and endogenous human neural precursors.

  19. The Molecular Profiles of Neural Stem Cell Niche in the Adult Subventricular Zone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheol; Hu, Jingqiong; Ralls, Sherry; Kitamura, Toshio; Loh, Y. Peng; Yang, Yanqin; Mukouyama, Yoh-suke; Ahn, Sohyun

    2012-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in a unique microenvironment called the neurogenic niche and generate functional new neurons. The neurogenic niche contains several distinct types of cells and interacts with the NSCs in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle. While several molecules produced by the niche cells have been identified to regulate adult neurogenesis, a systematic profiling of autocrine/paracrine signaling molecules in the neurogenic regions involved in maintenance, self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation of NSCs has not been done. We took advantage of the genetic inducible fate mapping system (GIFM) and transgenic mice to isolate the SVZ niche cells including NSCs, transit-amplifying progenitors (TAPs), astrocytes, ependymal cells, and vascular endothelial cells. From the isolated cells and microdissected choroid plexus, we obtained the secretory molecule expression profiling (SMEP) of each cell type using the Signal Sequence Trap method. We identified a total of 151 genes encoding secretory or membrane proteins. In addition, we obtained the potential SMEP of NSCs using cDNA microarray technology. Through the combination of multiple screening approaches, we identified a number of candidate genes with a potential relevance for regulating the NSC behaviors, which provide new insight into the nature of neurogenic niche signals. PMID:23209762

  20. Aging results in copper accumulations in GFAP-positive cells in the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Pushkar, Yulia; Robison, Gregory; Sullivan, Brendan; Zheng, Wei; Fu, Sherleen X.; Kohne, Meghan; Jiang, Wendy; Rohr, Sven; Lai, Barry; Marcus, Matthew A.; Zakharova, Taisiya

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of rodent brains with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy combined with immunohistochemistry allowed us to demonstrate that local Cu concentrations are thousands of times higher in the glia of the subventricular zone than in other cells. Using XRF microscopy with subcellular resolution and intracellular X-ray absorption spectroscopy we determined the copper (I) oxidation state and the sulfur ligand environment. Cu K-edge XANES is consistent with Cu being bound as a multimetallic Cu-S cluster similar to one present in Cu-metallothionein. Analysis of age related changes show that Cu content in astrocytes of the SVZ increases 4 fold from 3 weeks to 9 months while Cu concentration in other brain areas remain essentially constant. This increase in Cu correlates with a decrease in adult neurogenesis assessed using the Ki67 marker (both, however, can be age related effects). We demonstrate that the Cu distribution and age-related concentration changes in the brain are highly cell-specific. PMID:23738916

  1. Patterns and dynamics of subventricular zone neuroblast migration in the ischemic striatum of the adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui L; Chopp, Michael; Gregg, Sara R; Toh, Yier; Roberts, Cindi; LeTourneau, Yvonne; Buller, Benjamin; Jia, Longfei; Davarani, Siamak P Nejad; Zhang, Zheng G

    2009-01-01

    The migratory behavior of neuroblasts after a stroke is poorly understood. Using time-lapse microscopy, we imaged migration of neuroblasts and cerebral vessels in living brain slices of adult doublecortin (DCX, a marker of neuroblasts) enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) transgenic mice that were subjected to 7 days of stroke. Our results show that neuroblasts originating in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mouse brain laterally migrated in chains or individually to reach the ischemic striatum. The chains were initially formed at the border between the SVZ and the striatum by neuroblasts in the SVZ and then extended to the striatum. The average speed of DCX-eGFP-expressing cells within chains was 28.67±1.04 μm/h, which was significantly faster (P < 0.01) than the speed of the cells in the SVZ (17.98±0.57 μm/h). Within the ischemic striatum, individual neuroblasts actively extended or retracted their processes, suggestive of probing the immediate microenvironment. The neuroblasts close to cerebral blood vessels exhibited multiple processes. Our data suggest that neuroblasts actively interact with the microenvironment to reach the ischemic striatum by multiple migratory routes. PMID:19436318

  2. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25256750

  3. Neurotoxic effects of ochratoxin A on the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paradells, Sara; Rocamonde, Brenda; Llinares, Cristina; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Jimenez, Misericordia; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Zipancic, Ivan; Soria, Jose Miguel; Garcia-Esparza, Ma Angeles

    2015-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin that was discovered as a secondary metabolite of the fungal species Aspergillus and Penicillium, is a common contaminant in food and animal feed. This mycotoxin has been described as teratogenic, carcinogenic, genotoxic, immunotoxic and has been proven a potent neurotoxin. Other authors have previously reported the effects of OTA in different structures of the central nervous system as well as in some neurogenic regions. However, the impact of OTA exposure in the subventricular zone (SVZ) has not been assessed yet. To elucidate whether OTA affects neural precursors of the mouse SVZ we investigated, in vitro and in vivo, the effects of OTA exposure on the SVZ and on the neural precursors obtained from this neurogenic niche. In this work, we prove the cumulative effect of OTA exposure on proliferation, differentiation and depletion of neural stem cells cultured from the SVZ. In addition, we corroborated these results in vivo by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. As a result, we found a significant alteration in the proliferation process, which was evidenced by a decrease in the number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive cells and glial cells, as well as, a significant decrease in the number of neuroblasts in the SVZ. To summarize, in this study we demonstrate how OTA could be a threat to the developing and the adult SVZ through its impact in cell viability, proliferation and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner.

  4. Death effector activation in the subventricular zone subsequent to perinatal hypoxia/ischemia.

    PubMed

    Romanko, Michael J; Zhu, Changlian; Bahr, Ben A; Blomgren, Klas; Levison, Steven W

    2007-11-01

    Perinatal hypoxia/ischemia (H/I) is the leading cause of neurological injury resulting from birth complications and pre-maturity. Our studies have demonstrated that this injury depletes the subventricular zone (SVZ) of progenitors. In this study, we sought to reveal which cell death pathways are activated within these progenitors after H/I. We found that calpain activity is detected as early as 4 h of reperfusion and is sustained for 48 h, while caspase 3 activation does not occur until 8 h and peaks at 24 h post-insult. Activated calpains and caspase 3 co-localized within precursors situated in the lateral aspects of the SVZ (which coincides with progenitor cell death), whereas neither enzyme was activated in the medial SVZ (which harbors the neural stem cells that are resilient to this insult). These studies reveal targets for neuroprotective agents to protect precursors from cell death towards the goal of restoring normal brain development after H/I.

  5. Initial stages of radial glia astrocytic transformation in the early postnatal anterior subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Alves, José A J; Barone, Patrick; Engelender, Simone; Fróes, Maira M; Menezes, João R L

    2002-09-01

    In the early postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ), two seemingly unrelated events occur simultaneously: a massive tangential migration of neuroblasts towards the olfactory bulb, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), and the outward movement of radial glia (RG) undergoing astrocytic transformation. Because of the orthogonal arrangement between these two sets of cells, little, if any, relevance has been ascribed for their possible interactions. By depositing DiI at the pial surface we have studied RG transformation within the SVZ/RMS, from birth up to the end of the first postnatal week. While still within the SVZ/RMS, RG morphology changed from simple bipolar to highly complex branched profiles, attaining their highest degree of complexity at the interface of the SVZ with the overlying white matter. At this interface cell bodies of radial glia accumulate and their processes run tangentially, surrounding the SVZ/RMS. Processes of RG surrounding the SVZ/RMS could also be observed by immunostaining for vimentin, GFAP, and nestin. In contrast, in the white matter all DiI-labeled RG presented a simple bipolar profile. These results indicate that the outward radial migration of the transforming RG does not occur uniformly. Instead, the different morphologies and cell densities that RG assume when they cross the SVZ/RMS and overlying white matter imply different migratory behaviors. Finally, our data suggest that RG provide a cellular scaffold to the early postnatal SVZ/RMS, much in the same way as astrocytes in the adult RMS.

  6. Dye coupling and connexin expression by cortical radial glia in the early postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Andressa S; Xavier, Anna L R; Furtado, Carla M; Hedin-Pereira, Cecilia; Fróes, Maira M; Menezes, João R L

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the specific contribution of the cortical radial glia (RG) for gap junctional communication (GJC) within the postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ). To specifically target RG as source of dye-coupling in situ, we have developed a new technique that involves direct cell loading through the processes that reach the pial surface, with a mix of gap junction permeant (Lucifer yellow, LY) and nonpermeant (rhodamine-conjugated dextran 3 KDa, RD) fluorochromes, the latter used as a marker for direct loaded cells. Tissue sections were analyzed for identification of directly loaded (LY+RD+) and coupled cells (LY+RD-) in the SVZ. Directly loaded cells were restricted to the region underlying the pial loading surface area. Coupled cells were distributed in a bistratified manner, along the outer dorsal surface of the SVZ and aligning the ventricle, leaving the SVZ core relatively free. Blocking GJC prior to pial loading greatly reduced dye coupling. Phenotypic analysis indicated that coupling by RG excludes neuroblasts and is mostly restricted to cells of glial lineage. Notwithstanding, no corresponding restriction to specific cell phenotype was found for two connexin isotypes, Cx43 and Cx45, in the postnatal SVZ. The extensive homocellular cell coupling by RG suggests an important role in the regulation of neurogenesis and functional compartmentalization of the postnatal SVZ.

  7. The aged brain: genesis and fate of residual progenitor cells in the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) persist in the adult mammalian brain through life. The subventricular zone (SVZ) is the largest source of stem cells in the nervous system, and continuously generates new neuronal and glial cells involved in brain regeneration. During aging, the germinal potential of the SVZ suffers a widespread decline, but the causes of this turn down are not fully understood. This review provides a compilation of the current knowledge about the age-related changes in the NSC population, as well as the fate of the newly generated cells in the aged brain. It is known that the neurogenic capacity is clearly disrupted during aging, while the production of oligodendroglial cells is not compromised. Interestingly, the human brain seems to primarily preserve the ability to produce new oligodendrocytes instead of neurons, which could be related to the development of neurological disorders. Further studies in this matter are required to improve our understanding and the current strategies for fighting neurological diseases associated with senescence. PMID:26441536

  8. New insights into the role of histamine in subventricular zone-olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Eiriz, Maria F.; Valero, Jorge; Malva, João O.; Bernardino, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) contains neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate new neurons throughout life. Many brain diseases stimulate NSCs proliferation, neuronal differentiation and homing of these newborns cells into damaged regions. However, complete cell replacement has never been fully achieved. Hence, the identification of proneurogenic factors crucial for stem cell-based therapies will have an impact in brain repair. Histamine, a neurotransmitter and immune mediator, has been recently described to modulate proliferation and commitment of NSCs. Histamine levels are increased in the brain parenchyma and at the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) upon inflammation and brain injury, thus being able to modulate neurogenesis. Herein, we add new data showing that in vivo administration of histamine in the lateral ventricles has a potent proneurogenic effect, increasing the production of new neuroblasts in the SVZ that ultimately reach the olfactory bulb (OB). This report emphasizes the multidimensional effects of histamine in the modulation of NSCs dynamics and sheds light into the promising therapeutic role of histamine for brain regenerative medicine. PMID:24982610

  9. Generation of glutamatergic neurons from postnatal and adult subventricular zone with pyramidal-like morphology.

    PubMed

    Sequerra, Eduardo B; Miyakoshi, Leo M; Fróes, Maira M; Menezes, João R L; Hedin-Pereira, Cecilia

    2010-11-01

    The mammalian subventricular zone (SVZ) contains progenitors derived from cerebral cortex radial glia cells, which give rise to glutamatergic pyramidal neurons during embryogenesis. However, during postnatal life, SVZ generates neurons that migrate and differentiate into olfactory bulb γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons. In this work, we tested if SVZ cells are able to produce glutamatergic neurons if confronted with the embryonic cortical ventricular zone environment. Different from typical SVZ chain migration, cells from P9-P11 SVZ explants migrate into embryonic cortical slices individually, many of which radially oriented. An average of 82.5% of green fluorescent protein-positive cells were immunolabeled for neuronal marker class III β-tubulin. Invading cells differentiate into multiple morphologies, including a pyramidal-like morphotype. A subset of these cells are GABAergic; however, about 28% of SVZ-derived cells are immunoreactive for glutamate. Adult SVZ explants also give rise to glutamatergic neurons in these conditions. Taken together, our results indicate that SVZ can be a source of glutamatergic cortical neurons when submitted to proper environmental cues.

  10. Stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors does not influence the discharge of A1 neurons projecting to the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, S M; Harris, M C

    1989-01-01

    Stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors activates putative vasopressin neurons in the supraoptic nucleus, an effect which has been abolished by lesions in the caudal ventrolateral medulla. Stimulation within the A1 catecholamine cell group in the ventrolateral medulla also activates supraoptic neurons and releases vasopressin. Therefore the A1 catecholamine neurons may be the means by which carotid body chemoreceptors influence the supraoptic nucleus and other parts of the forebrain. To test this possibility the influence of carotid body chemoreceptors on the discharge of rostrally-projecting neurons in the A1 region of the caudal ventrolateral medulla has been assessed in rats anaesthetized with a mixture of urethane and sodium pentobarbitone. Tests were performed on 131 neurons, 23 of which were antidromically invaded following electrical stimulation within the supraoptic nucleus, the medial forebrain bundle or the ventral noradrenergic bundle. The positions of all antidromically invaded neurons were marked with dye and in six animals subsequent fluorescence histochemistry showed that the blue spots were in the proximity of one or more catecholamine-containing cell bodies in the ventrolateral medulla. The recorded neurons were therefore presumed to be part of the A1 group of catecholamine-containing neurons. All neurons located were tested for their responses to specific stimulation of ipsilateral carotid body chemoreceptors and also to general baroreflex activation. Not one of the antidromically invaded neurons was affected by chemoreceptor stimulation and only one was activated by baroreflex activation. Of the non-antidromically invaded neurons, seven were activated and 13 were depressed following chemoreceptor stimulation but in many cases the latency to onset was very long.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2511501

  11. Evolution and development of interhemispheric connections in the vertebrate forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Rodrigo; Gobius, Ilan; Richards, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Axonal connections between the left and right sides of the brain are crucial for bilateral integration of lateralized sensory, motor, and associative functions. Throughout vertebrate species, forebrain commissures share a conserved developmental plan, a similar position relative to each other within the brain and similar patterns of connectivity. However, major events in the evolution of the vertebrate brain, such as the expansion of the telencephalon in tetrapods and the origin of the six-layered isocortex in mammals, resulted in the emergence and diversification of new commissural routes. These new interhemispheric connections include the pallial commissure, which appeared in the ancestors of tetrapods and connects the left and right sides of the medial pallium (hippocampus in mammals), and the corpus callosum, which is exclusive to eutherian (placental) mammals and connects both isocortical hemispheres. A comparative analysis of commissural systems in vertebrates reveals that the emergence of new commissural routes may have involved co-option of developmental mechanisms and anatomical substrates of preexistent commissural pathways. One of the embryonic regions of interest for studying these processes is the commissural plate, a portion of the early telencephalic midline that provides molecular specification and a cellular scaffold for the development of commissural axons. Further investigations into these embryonic processes in carefully selected species will provide insights not only into the mechanisms driving commissural evolution, but also regarding more general biological problems such as the role of developmental plasticity in evolutionary change. PMID:25071525

  12. Forebrain neurocircuitry associated with human reflex cardiovascular control

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, J. Kevin; Goswami, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis depends upon adequate integration and responsiveness of sensory information with the autonomic nervous system to affect rapid and effective adjustments in end organ control. Dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system leads to cardiovascular disability with consequences as severe as sudden death. The neural pathways involved in reflexive autonomic control are dependent upon brainstem nuclei but these receive modulatory inputs from higher centers in the midbrain and cortex. Neuroimaging technologies have allowed closer study of the cortical circuitry related to autonomic cardiovascular adjustments to many stressors in awake humans and have exposed many forebrain sites that associate strongly with cardiovascular arousal during stress including the medial prefrontal cortex, insula cortex, anterior cingulate, amygdala and hippocampus. Using a comparative approach, this review will consider the cortical autonomic circuitry in rodents and primates with a major emphasis on more recent neuroimaging studies in awake humans. A challenge with neuroimaging studies is their interpretation in view of multiple sensory, perceptual, emotive and/or reflexive components of autonomic responses. This review will focus on those responses related to non-volitional baroreflex control of blood pressure and also on the coordinated responses to non-fatiguing, non-painful volitional exercise with particular emphasis on the medial prefrontal cortex and the insula cortex. PMID:26388780

  13. Forebrain neurocircuitry associated with human reflex cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, J Kevin; Goswami, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Physiological homeostasis depends upon adequate integration and responsiveness of sensory information with the autonomic nervous system to affect rapid and effective adjustments in end organ control. Dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system leads to cardiovascular disability with consequences as severe as sudden death. The neural pathways involved in reflexive autonomic control are dependent upon brainstem nuclei but these receive modulatory inputs from higher centers in the midbrain and cortex. Neuroimaging technologies have allowed closer study of the cortical circuitry related to autonomic cardiovascular adjustments to many stressors in awake humans and have exposed many forebrain sites that associate strongly with cardiovascular arousal during stress including the medial prefrontal cortex, insula cortex, anterior cingulate, amygdala and hippocampus. Using a comparative approach, this review will consider the cortical autonomic circuitry in rodents and primates with a major emphasis on more recent neuroimaging studies in awake humans. A challenge with neuroimaging studies is their interpretation in view of multiple sensory, perceptual, emotive and/or reflexive components of autonomic responses. This review will focus on those responses related to non-volitional baroreflex control of blood pressure and also on the coordinated responses to non-fatiguing, non-painful volitional exercise with particular emphasis on the medial prefrontal cortex and the insula cortex. PMID:26388780

  14. Basal forebrain circuit for sleep-wake control.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Chung, Shinjae; Zhang, Siyu; Zhong, Peng; Ma, Chenyan; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Weissbourd, Brandon; Sakai, Noriaki; Luo, Liqun; Nishino, Seiji; Dan, Yang

    2015-11-01

    The mammalian basal forebrain (BF) has important roles in controlling sleep and wakefulness, but the underlying neural circuit remains poorly understood. We examined the BF circuit by recording and optogenetically perturbing the activity of four genetically defined cell types across sleep-wake cycles and by comprehensively mapping their synaptic connections. Recordings from channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-tagged neurons revealed that three BF cell types, cholinergic, glutamatergic and parvalbumin-positive (PV+) GABAergic neurons, were more active during wakefulness and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (wake/REM active) than during non-REM (NREM) sleep, and activation of each cell type rapidly induced wakefulness. By contrast, activation of somatostatin-positive (SOM+) GABAergic neurons promoted NREM sleep, although only some of them were NREM active. Synaptically, the wake-promoting neurons were organized hierarchically by glutamatergic→cholinergic→PV+ neuron excitatory connections, and they all received inhibition from SOM+ neurons. Together, these findings reveal the basic organization of the BF circuit for sleep-wake control.

  15. Multiple forebrain systems converge on motor neurons innervating the thyroarytenoid muscle

    PubMed Central

    Van Daele, Douglas J.; Cassell, Martin D.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the central connections of motor neurons innervating the thyroarytenoid laryngeal muscle that is active in swallowing, respiration and vocalization. In both intact and sympathectomized rats, the pseudorabies virus (PRV) was inoculated into the muscle. After initial infection of laryngomotor neurons in the ipsilateral loose division of the nucleus ambiguous (NA) by 3 days post-inoculation., PRV spread to the ipsilateral compact portion of the NA, the central and intermediate divisions of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), the Botzinger complex, and the parvocellular reticular formation by 4 days. Infection was subsequently expanded to include the ipsilateral granular and dysgranular parietal insular cortex, the ipsilateral medial division of the central nucleus of the amygdala, the lateral, paraventricular, ventrolateral and medial preoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus (generally bilaterally), the lateral periaqueductal gray, the A7 and oral and caudal pontine nuclei. At the latest time points sampled post-inoculation (5 days), infected neurons were identified in the ipsilateral agranular insular cortex, the caudal parietal insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the contralateral motor cortex. In the amygdala, infection had spread to the lateral central nucleus and the parvocellular portion of the basolateral nucleus. Hypothalamic infection was largely characterized by an increase in the number of infected cells in earlier infected regions though the posterior, dorsomedial, tuberomammillary and mammillary nuclei contained infected cells. Comparison with previous connectional data suggest PRV followed three interconnected systems originating in the forebrain; a bilateral system including the ventral anterior cingulate cortex, periaqueductal gray and ventral respiratory group; an ipsilateral system involving the parietal insular cortex, central nucleus of the amygdala and parvicellular reticular formation, and a minor

  16. Ropinirole regulates emotionality and neuronal activity markers in the limbic forebrain.

    PubMed

    Mavrikaki, Maria; Schintu, Nicoletta; Nomikos, George G; Panagis, George; Svenningsson, Per

    2014-12-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are movement disorders usually accompanied by emotional and cognitive deficits. Although D3/D2 receptor agonists are effective against motor and non-motor deficits in RLS and PD, the exact behavioral and neurochemical effects of these drugs are not clearly defined. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of acute ropinirole (0, 0.1, 1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), a preferential D3/D2 receptor agonist, on intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), spontaneous motor activity, anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, spatial reference and working memory in rats as well as on certain markers of neuronal activity, i.e. induction of immediate early genes, such as c-fos and arc, and crucial phosphorylations on GluA1 subunit of α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors and NA1, NA2A and NA2B subunits of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Ropinirole decreased ICSS thresholds and induced anxiolytic- and antidepressive-like effects without affecting motor activity or spatial memory. The effects on emotionality were associated with a decrease in p-Ser897-NA1 and an increase in p-Tyr1472-NA2B in the ventral striatum as well as an increased induction of c-fos messenger RNA (mRNA) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and decreased expression of arc mRNA in the striatum and the shell of the nucleus accumbens. Our data indicate that ropinirole significantly affects emotionality at doses (1-10 mg/kg, i.p.) that exert no robust effects on locomotion or cognition. The data reinforce the use of D3/D2 receptor agonists in the treatment of RLS and PD patients characterized by emotional deficits and suggest that altered NMDA-mediated neurotransmission in the limbic forebrain may underlie some of ropinirole's therapeutic actions.

  17. CHOLINERGIC NEURONS OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN MEDIATE BIOCHEMICAL AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS UNDERLYING SLEEP HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Kalinchuk, Anna V.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; McCarley, Robert W.; Basheer, Radhika

    2015-01-01

    The tight coordination of biochemical and electrophysiological mechanisms underlies the homeostatic sleep pressure (HSP) produced by sleep deprivation (SD). We have reported that during SD the levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), extracellular nitric oxide (NO), adenosine [AD]ex, lactate [Lac]ex and pyruvate [Pyr]ex increase in the basal forebrain (BF). However, it is not clear whether all of them contribute to HSP leading to increased electroencephalogram (EEG) delta activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) recovery sleep (RS) following SD. Previously, we showed that NREM delta increase evident during RS depends on the presence of BF cholinergic (ChBF) neurons. Here, we investigated the role of ChBF cells in coordination of biochemical and EEG changes seen during SD and RS in the rat. Increases in low theta power (5–7Hz), but not high theta (7–9Hz), during SD correlated with the increase in NREM delta power during RS, and with the changes in nitrate/nitrite [NOx]ex and [AD]ex. Lesions of ChBF cells using IgG 192-saporin prevented increases in [NOx]ex, [AD]ex and low theta activity, during SD, but did not prevent increases in [Lac]ex and [Pyr]ex. Infusion of NO donor DETA NONOate into the saporin-treated BF failed to increase NREM RS and delta power, suggesting ChBF cells are important for mediating NO homeostatic effects. Finally, SD-induced iNOS was mostly expressed in ChBF cells, and the intensity of iNOS induction correlated with the increase in low theta activity. Together, our data indicate ChBF cells are important in regulating the biochemical and EEG mechanisms that contribute to HSP. PMID:25369989

  18. Direct transcriptional regulation of Six6 is controlled by SoxB1 binding to a remote forebrain enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bumwhee; Rizzoti, Karine; Kwon, David S.; Kim, Seon-Young; Oh, Sangtaek; Epstein, Douglas J.; Son, Youngsook; Yoon, Jaeseung; Baek, Kwanghee; Jeong, Yongsu

    2014-01-01

    Six6, a sine oculis homeobox protein, plays a crucial and conserved role in the development of the forebrain and eye. To understand how the expression of Six6 is regulated during embryogenesis, we screened ~250 kb of genomic DNA encompassing the Six6 locus for cis-regulatory elements capable of directing reporter gene expression to sites of Six6 transcription in transgenic mouse embryos. Here, we describe two novel enhancer elements, that are highly conserved in vertebrate species and whose activities recapitulate Six6 expression in the ventral forebrain and eye, respectively. Cross-species comparisons of the Six6 forebrain enhancer sequences revealed highly conserved binding sites matching the consensus for homeodomain and SoxB1 transcription factors. Deletion of either of the binding sites resulted in loss of the forebrain enhancer activity in the ventral forebrain. Moreover, our studies show that members of the SoxB1 family, including Sox2 and Sox3, are expressed in the overlapping region of the ventral forebrain with Six6 and can bind to the Six6 forebrain enhancer. Loss of function of SoxB1 genes in vivo further emphasizes their role in regulating Six6 forebrain enhancer activity. Thus, our data strongly suggest that SoxB1 transcription factors are direct activators of Six6 expression in the ventral forebrain. PMID:22561201

  19. Sexually dimorphic effects of the Lhx7 null mutation on forebrain cholinergic function.

    PubMed

    Fragkouli, A; Stamatakis, A; Zographos, E; Pachnis, V; Stylianopoulou, F

    2006-01-01

    It has been reported recently that mice lacking both alleles of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx7, display dramatically reduced number of forebrain cholinergic neurons. In the present study, we investigated whether the Lhx7 mutation affects male and female mice differently, given the fact that gender differences are consistently observed in forebrain cholinergic function. Our results show that in adult male as well as female Lhx7 homozygous mutants there is a dramatic loss of choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive forebrain neurons, both projection and interneurons. The reduction of forebrain choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive neurons in Lhx7 homozygous mutants is accompanied by a decrease of acetylcholinesterase histochemical staining in all forebrain cholinergic neuron target areas of both male and female homozygous mutants. Furthermore, there was an increase of M1-, but not M2-, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding site density in the somatosensory cortex and basal ganglia of only the female homozygous mutant mice. Such an increase can be regarded as a mechanism acting to compensate for the dramatically reduced cholinergic input, raising the possibility that the forebrain cholinergic system in female mice may be more plastic and responsive to situations of limited neurotransmitter availability. Finally, our study provides additional data for the sexual dimorphism of the forebrain cholinergic system, as female mice appear to have a lower density of M1-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the striatal areas of the basal ganglia and a higher density of M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, in a number of cortical areas, as well as the striatal areas of the basal ganglia.

  20. RhoE deficiency alters postnatal subventricular zone development and the number of calbindin-expressing neurons in the olfactory bulb of mouse.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Lurbe, Begoña; González-Granero, Susana; Mocholí, Enric; Poch, Enric; García-Manzanares, María; Dierssen, Mara; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio; García-Verdugo, José M; Guasch, Rosa M; Terrado, José

    2015-11-01

    The subventricular zone represents an important reservoir of progenitor cells in the adult brain. Cells from the subventricular zone migrate along the rostral migratory stream and reach the olfactory bulb, where they originate different types of interneurons. In this work, we have analyzed the role of the small GTPase RhoE/Rnd3 in subventricular zone cell development using mice-lacking RhoE expression. Our results show that RhoE null mice display a remarkable postnatal broadening of the subventricular zone and caudal rostral migratory stream. This broadening was caused by an increase in progenitor proliferation, observed in the second postnatal week but not before, and by an altered migration of the cells, which appeared in disorganized cell arrangements that impaired the appropriate contact between cells in the rostral migratory stream. In addition, the thickness of the granule cell layer in the olfactory bulb was reduced, although the density of granule cells did not differ between wild-type and RhoE null mice. Finally, the lack of RhoE expression affected the olfactory glomeruli inducing a severe reduction of calbindin-expressing interneurons in the periglomerular layer. This was already evident in the newborns and even more pronounced 15 days later when RhoE null mice displayed 89% less cells than control mice. Our results indicate that RhoE has pleiotropic functions on subventricular cells because of its role in proliferation and tangential migration, affecting mainly the development of calbindin-expressing cells in the olfactory bulb.

  1. Reduced subventricular zone proliferation and white matter damage in juvenile ferrets with kaolin-induced hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Di Curzio, Domenico L; Buist, Richard J; Del Bigio, Marc R

    2013-10-01

    Hydrocephalus is a neurological condition characterized by altered cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow with enlargement of ventricular cavities in the brain. A reliable model of hydrocephalus in gyrencephalic mammals is necessary to test preclinical hypotheses. Our objective was to characterize the behavioral, structural, and histological changes in juvenile ferrets following induction of hydrocephalus. Fourteen-day old ferrets were given an injection of kaolin (aluminum silicate) into the cisterna magna. Two days later and repeated weekly until 56 days of age, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was used to assess ventricle size. Behavior was examined thrice weekly. Compared to age-matched saline-injected controls, severely hydrocephalic ferrets weighed significantly less, their postures were impaired, and they were hyperactive prior to extreme debilitation. They developed significant ventriculomegaly and displayed white matter destruction. Reactive astroglia and microglia detected by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1 immunostaining were apparent in white matter, cortex, and hippocampus. There was a hydrocephalus-related increase in activated caspase 3 labeling of apoptotic cells (7.0 vs. 15.5%) and a reduction in Ki67 labeling of proliferating cells (23.3 vs. 5.9%) in the subventricular zone (SVZ). Reduced Olig2 immunolabeling suggests a depletion of glial precursors. GFAP content was elevated. Myelin basic protein (MBP) quantitation and myelin biochemical enzyme activity showed early maturational increases. Where white matter was not destroyed, the remaining axons developed myelin similar to the controls. In conclusion, the hydrocephalus-induced periventricular disturbances may involve developmental impairments in cell proliferation and glial precursor cell populations. The ferret should prove useful for testing hypotheses about white matter damage and protection in the immature hydrocephalic brain.

  2. Intrauterine Growth Restriction: Effects on Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation and Angiogenesis in the Foetal Subventricular Zone.

    PubMed

    Tolcos, Mary; Markwick, Rachel; O'Dowd, Rachael; Martin, Veronica; Turnley, Ann; Rees, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to adverse prenatal factors can result in abnormal brain development, contributing to the aetiology of several neurological disorders. Intrauterine insults could occur during neurogenesis and gliogenesis, disrupting these events. Here we investigate the effects of chronic placental insufficiency (CPI) on cell proliferation and the microenvironment in the subventricular zone (SVZ). At 30 days of gestation (DG; term ∼67 DG), CPI was induced in pregnant guinea pigs via unilateral uterine artery ligation to produce growth-restricted (GR) foetuses (n = 7); controls (n = 6) were from the unoperated horn. At 60 DG, foetal brains were stained immunohistochemically to identify proliferating cells (Ki67), immature neurons (polysialylated neuronal cell adhesion molecule), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein), microglia (ionised calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1, Iba-1) and the microvasculature (von Willebrand factor) in the SVZ. There was no overall difference (p > 0.05) in the total number of Ki67-immunoreactive (IR) cells, the percentage of SVZ occupied by blood vessels or the density of Iba-1-IR microglia in control versus GR foetuses. However, regression analysis across both groups revealed that both the number of Ki67-IR cells and the percentage of SVZ occupied by blood vessels in the ventral SVZ were negatively correlated (p < 0.05) with brain weight. Furthermore, in the SVZ (dorsal and ventral) the density of blood vessels positively correlated (p < 0.05) with the number of Ki67-IR cells. Double-labelling immunofluorescence suggested that the majority of proliferating cells were likely to be neural precursor cells. Thus, we have demonstrated an association between angiogenesis and neurogenesis in the foetal neurogenic niche and have identified a window of opportunity for the administration of trophic support to enhance a neuroregenerative response.

  3. Evaluation of High Ipsilateral Subventricular Zone Radiation Therapy Dose in Glioblastoma: A Pooled Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Percy; Eppinga, Wietse; Lagerwaard, Frank; Cloughesy, Timothy; Slotman, Benjamin; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Demarco, John; Selch, Michael T.; Steinberg, Michael; Kang, Jung Julie

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may play a role in the recurrence of glioblastoma. They are believed to originate from neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ). Because of their radioresistance, we hypothesized that high doses of radiation (>59.4 Gy) to the SVZ are necessary to control CSCs and improve progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: 173 patients with glioblastoma pooled from 2 academic centers were treated with resection followed by chemoradiation therapy. The SVZ was segmented on computed tomography to calculate radiation doses delivered to the presumptive CSC niches. The relationships between high SVZ doses and PFS and OS were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. Five covariates were included to estimate their impact on PFS or OS: ipsilateral and contralateral SVZ doses, clinical target volume dose, age, and extent of resection. Results: Median PFS and OS were 10.4 and 19.6 months for the cohort. The mean ipsilateral SVZ, contralateral SVZ, and clinical target volume doses were 49.2, 35.2, and 60.1 Gy, respectively. Twenty-one patients who received high ipsilateral SVZ dose (>59.4 Gy) had significantly longer median PFS (12.6 vs 9.9 months, P=.042) and longer OS (25.8 vs 19.2 months, P=.173). On multivariate analysis, high radiation therapy doses to ipsilateral SVZ remained a statistically significant independent predictor of improved PFS but not of OS. The extent of surgery affected both PFS and OS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: High radiation therapy doses to ipsilateral CSC niches are associated with improved PFS in glioblastoma.

  4. EGF induces the progeny of subventricular zone type B cells to migrate and differentiate into oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Romero-Rodriguez, Ricardo; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    New neurons and oligodendrocytes are continuously produced in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of adult mammalian brains. Under normal conditions, the SVZ primary precursors (type B1 cells) generate type C cells, the majority of which differentiate into neurons, with a small sub-population giving rise to oligodendrocytes. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling induces dramatic proliferation and migration of SVZ progenitors, a process that could have therapeutic applications. However, the fate of cells derived from adult neural stem cells after EGF stimulation remains unknown. Here, we specifically labeled SVZ B1 cells and followed their progeny after a 7-day intraventricular infusion of EGF. Cells derived from SVZ B1 cells invaded the parenchyma around the SVZ into striatum, septum, corpus callosum, and fimbria-fornix. The majority of these B1-derived cells gave rise to cells in the oligodendrocyte lineage including local NG2+ progenitors, pre-myelinating and myelinating oligodendrocytes. SVZ B1 cells also gave rise to a population of highly branched S100β+/GFAP+ cells in the striatum and septum, but no neuronal differentiation was observed. Interestingly, when demyelination was induced in the corpus callosum by a local injection of lysolecithin, increased number of cells derived from SVZ B1 cells and stimulated to migrate and proliferate by EGF infusion, differentiated into oligodendrocytes at the lesion site. This work indicates that EGF infusion can greatly expand the number of progenitors derived from the SVZ primary progenitors, which migrate and differentiate into oligodendroglial cells. This expanded population could be used for the repair of white matter lesions. PMID:19544429

  5. Glioblastoma Recurrence Patterns After Radiation Therapy With Regard to the Subventricular Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Adeberg, Sebastian; König, Laila; Bostel, Tilman; Harrabi, Semi; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: We evaluated the influence of tumor location and tumor spread in primary glioblastoma (GBM), with respect to the subventricular zone (SVZ), on recurrence behavior, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: 607 patients (376 male and 231 female) with a median age of 61.3 years (range, 3.0-87.9 years) and primary GBM treated with radiation therapy (RT) from 2004 to 2012 at a single institution were included in this retrospective study. Preoperative images and follow-up examination results were assessed to evaluate tumor location. Tumors were classified according to the tumor location in relation to the SVZ. Results: The median PFS of the study population was 5.2 months (range, 1-91 months), and the median OS was 13.8 months (range, 1-102 months). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that tumor location in close proximity to the SVZ was associated with a significant decline in PFS and OS (4.8 and 12.3 months, respectively; each P<.001). Furthermore, in cases where tumors were involved with the SVZ, distant cerebral progression (43.8%; P=.005) and multifocal progression (39.8%; P=.008) were more common. Interestingly, opening of the ventricle during the previous surgery showed no impact on PFS and OS. Conclusion: GBM in close proximity to the SVZ was associated with decreased survival and had a higher risk of multifocal or distant progression. Ventricle opening during surgery had no effect on survival rates.

  6. Fractone-heparan sulfates mediate BMP-7 inhibition of cell proliferation in the adult subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Douet, Vanessa; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Mercier, Frederic

    2012-10-24

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) is a heparin-binding growth factor that inhibits cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle, the primary neurogenic niche in the adult brain. However, the physiological mechanisms regulating the activity of BMP-7 in the SVZ are unknown. Here, we report the inhibitory effect of BMP-7 on cell proliferation through the anterior SVZ after intracerebroventricular injection in the adult mouse. To determine whether the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by BMP-7 is dependant on heparin-binding, heparitinase-1 was intracerebroventricularly injected to N-desulfate heparan sulfate proteoglycans before BMP-7 was injected. Heparatinase-1 drastically reduced the inhibitory effect of BMP-7 on cell proliferation in the SVZ. To determine where BMP-7 binds within the niche, we visualized biotinylated-BMP-7 after intracerebroventricular injection, using streptavidin Texas red on frozen brain sections. BMP-7 binding was seen as puncta in the SVZ at the location of fractones, the particulate specialized extracellular matrix of the SVZ, which have been identified primarily by N-sulfated heparan sulfate immunoreactivity (NS-HS+). BMP binding was also seen in NS-HS+ blood vessels of the SVZ. Injection of heparitinase-1 prior to biotinylated BMP-7 resulted in the absence of signal for biotinylated-BMP-7 in the fractones and blood vessels, indicating that the binding is heparan sulfate dependant. These results indicate that BMP-7 requires heparan sulfates to bind and inhibit cell proliferation in the SVZ neurogenic niche. Heparan sulfates concentrated in fractones and SVZ blood vessels emerge as a functional stem cell niche component involved in growth factor activity.

  7. Impact of basal forebrain cholinergic inputs on basolateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Unal, Cagri T; Pare, Denis; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2015-01-14

    In addition to innervating the cerebral cortex, basal forebrain cholinergic (BFc) neurons send a dense projection to the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA). In this study, we investigated the effect of near physiological acetylcholine release on BLA neurons using optogenetic tools and in vitro patch-clamp recordings. Adult transgenic mice expressing cre-recombinase under the choline acetyltransferase promoter were used to selectively transduce BFc neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 and a reporter through the injection of an adeno-associated virus. Light-induced stimulation of BFc axons produced different effects depending on the BLA cell type. In late-firing interneurons, BFc inputs elicited fast nicotinic EPSPs. In contrast, no response could be detected in fast-spiking interneurons. In principal BLA neurons, two different effects were elicited depending on their activity level. When principal BLA neurons were quiescent or made to fire at low rates by depolarizing current injection, light-induced activation of BFc axons elicited muscarinic IPSPs. In contrast, with stronger depolarizing currents, eliciting firing above ∼ 6-8 Hz, these muscarinic IPSPs lost their efficacy because stimulation of BFc inputs prolonged current-evoked afterdepolarizations. All the effects observed in principal neurons were dependent on muscarinic receptors type 1, engaging different intracellular mechanisms in a state-dependent manner. Overall, our results suggest that acetylcholine enhances the signal-to-noise ratio in principal BLA neurons. Moreover, the cholinergic engagement of afterdepolarizations may contribute to the formation of stimulus associations during fear-conditioning tasks where the timing of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli is not optimal for the induction of synaptic plasticity.

  8. Basal forebrain projections to the lateral habenula modulate aggression reward.

    PubMed

    Golden, Sam A; Heshmati, Mitra; Flanigan, Meghan; Christoffel, Daniel J; Guise, Kevin; Pfau, Madeline L; Aleyasin, Hossein; Menard, Caroline; Zhang, Hongxing; Hodes, Georgia E; Bregman, Dana; Khibnik, Lena; Tai, Jonathan; Rebusi, Nicole; Krawitz, Brian; Chaudhury, Dipesh; Walsh, Jessica J; Han, Ming-Hu; Shapiro, Matt L; Russo, Scott J

    2016-06-30

    Maladaptive aggressive behaviour is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders and is thought to result partly from the inappropriate activation of brain reward systems in response to aggressive or violent social stimuli. Nuclei within the ventromedial hypothalamus, extended amygdala and limbic circuits are known to encode initiation of aggression; however, little is known about the neural mechanisms that directly modulate the motivational component of aggressive behaviour. Here we established a mouse model to measure the valence of aggressive inter-male social interaction with a smaller subordinate intruder as reinforcement for the development of conditioned place preference (CPP). Aggressors develop a CPP, whereas non-aggressors develop a conditioned place aversion to the intruder-paired context. Furthermore, we identify a functional GABAergic projection from the basal forebrain (BF) to the lateral habenula (lHb) that bi-directionally controls the valence of aggressive interactions. Circuit-specific silencing of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of aggressors with halorhodopsin (NpHR3.0) increases lHb neuronal firing and abolishes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Activation of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of non-aggressors with channelrhodopsin (ChR2) decreases lHb neuronal firing and promotes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Finally, we show that altering inhibitory transmission at BF-lHb terminals does not control the initiation of aggressive behaviour. These results demonstrate that the BF-lHb circuit has a critical role in regulating the valence of inter-male aggressive behaviour and provide novel mechanistic insight into the neural circuits modulating aggression reward processing. PMID:27357796

  9. Basal forebrain projections to the lateral habenula modulate aggression reward.

    PubMed

    Golden, Sam A; Heshmati, Mitra; Flanigan, Meghan; Christoffel, Daniel J; Guise, Kevin; Pfau, Madeline L; Aleyasin, Hossein; Menard, Caroline; Zhang, Hongxing; Hodes, Georgia E; Bregman, Dana; Khibnik, Lena; Tai, Jonathan; Rebusi, Nicole; Krawitz, Brian; Chaudhury, Dipesh; Walsh, Jessica J; Han, Ming-Hu; Shapiro, Matt L; Russo, Scott J

    2016-06-30

    Maladaptive aggressive behaviour is associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders and is thought to result partly from the inappropriate activation of brain reward systems in response to aggressive or violent social stimuli. Nuclei within the ventromedial hypothalamus, extended amygdala and limbic circuits are known to encode initiation of aggression; however, little is known about the neural mechanisms that directly modulate the motivational component of aggressive behaviour. Here we established a mouse model to measure the valence of aggressive inter-male social interaction with a smaller subordinate intruder as reinforcement for the development of conditioned place preference (CPP). Aggressors develop a CPP, whereas non-aggressors develop a conditioned place aversion to the intruder-paired context. Furthermore, we identify a functional GABAergic projection from the basal forebrain (BF) to the lateral habenula (lHb) that bi-directionally controls the valence of aggressive interactions. Circuit-specific silencing of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of aggressors with halorhodopsin (NpHR3.0) increases lHb neuronal firing and abolishes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Activation of GABAergic BF-lHb terminals of non-aggressors with channelrhodopsin (ChR2) decreases lHb neuronal firing and promotes CPP to the intruder-paired context. Finally, we show that altering inhibitory transmission at BF-lHb terminals does not control the initiation of aggressive behaviour. These results demonstrate that the BF-lHb circuit has a critical role in regulating the valence of inter-male aggressive behaviour and provide novel mechanistic insight into the neural circuits modulating aggression reward processing.

  10. Dissociating basal forebrain and medial temporal amnesic syndromes: insights from classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Myer, Catherine E; Bryant, Deborah; DeLuca, John; Gluck, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    In humans, anterograde amnesia can result from damage to the medial temporal (MT) lobes (including hippocampus), as well as to other brain areas such as basal forebrain. Results from animal classical conditioning studies suggest that there may be qualitative differences in the memory impairment following MT vs. basal forebrain damage. Specifically, delay eyeblink conditioning is spared after MT damage in animals and humans, but impaired in animals with basal forebrain damage. Recently, we have likewise shown delay eyeblink conditioning impairment in humans with amnesia following anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm rupture, which damages the basal forebrain. Another associative learning task, a computer-based concurrent visual discrimination, also appears to be spared in MT amnesia while ACoA amnesics are slower to learn the discriminations. Conversely, animal and computational models suggest that, even though MT amnesics may learn quickly, they may learn qualitatively differently from controls, and these differences may result in impaired transfer when familiar information is presented in novel combinations. Our initial data suggests such a two-phase learning and transfer task may provide a double dissociation between MT amnesics (spared initial learning but impaired transfer) and ACoA amnesics (slow initial learning but spared transfer). Together, these emerging data suggest that there are subtle but dissociable differences in the amnesic syndrome following damage to the MT lobes vs. basal forebrain, and that these differences may be most visible in non-declarative tasks such as eyeblink classical conditioning and simple associative learning.

  11. Brain atrophy in primary progressive aphasia involves the cholinergic basal forebrain and Ayala's nucleus.

    PubMed

    Teipel, Stefan J; Flatz, Wilhelm; Ackl, Nibal; Grothe, Michel; Kilimann, Ingo; Bokde, Arun L W; Grinberg, Lea; Amaro, Edson; Kljajevic, Vanja; Alho, Eduardo; Knels, Christina; Ebert, Anne; Heinsen, Helmut; Danek, Adrian

    2014-03-30

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by left hemispheric frontotemporal cortical atrophy. Evidence from anatomical studies suggests that the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP), a subnucleus of the cholinergic basal forebrain, may be involved in the pathological process of PPA. Therefore, we studied the pattern of cortical and basal forebrain atrophy in 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of PPA and 18 healthy age-matched controls using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We determined the cholinergic basal forebrain nuclei according to Mesulam's nomenclature and the NSP in MRI reference space based on histological sections and the MRI scan of a post-mortem brain in cranio. Using voxel-based analysis, we found left hemispheric cortical atrophy in PPA patients compared with controls, including prefrontal, lateral temporal and medial temporal lobe areas. We detected cholinergic basal forebrain atrophy in left predominant localizations of Ch4p, Ch4am, Ch4al, Ch3 and NSP. For the first time, we have described the pattern of basal forebrain atrophy in PPA and confirmed the involvement of NSP that had been predicted based on theoretical considerations. Our findings may enhance understanding of the role of cholinergic degeneration for the regional specificity of the cortical destruction leading to the syndrome of PPA.

  12. Sox2-mediated differential activation of Six3.2 contributes to forebrain patterning.

    PubMed

    Beccari, Leonardo; Conte, Ivan; Cisneros, Elsa; Bovolenta, Paola

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate forebrain is patterned during gastrulation into telencephalic, retinal, hypothalamic and diencephalic primordia. Specification of each of these domains requires the concerted activity of combinations of transcription factors (TFs). Paradoxically, some of these factors are widely expressed in the forebrain, which raises the question of how they can mediate regional differences. To address this issue, we focused on the homeobox TF Six3.2. With genomic and functional approaches we demonstrate that, in medaka fish, Six3.2 regulates, in a concentration-dependent manner, telencephalic and retinal specification under the direct control of Sox2. Six3.2 and Sox2 have antagonistic functions in hypothalamic development. These activities are, in part, executed by Foxg1 and Rx3, which seem to be differentially and directly regulated by Six3.2 and Sox2. Together, these data delineate the mechanisms by which Six3.2 diversifies its activity in the forebrain and highlight a novel function for Sox2 as one of the main regulators of anterior forebrain development. They also demonstrate that graded levels of the same TF, probably operating in partially independent transcriptional networks, pattern the vertebrate forebrain along the anterior-posterior axis. PMID:22096077

  13. The T-box transcription factor Eomes/Tbr2 regulates neurogenesis in the cortical subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Sebastian J.; Huang, Guo-Jen; Cheung, Amanda F.P.; Era, Takumi; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Bikoff, Elizabeth K.; Molnár, Zoltán; Robertson, Elizabeth J.; Groszer, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The embryonic subventricular zone (SVZ) is a critical site for generating cortical projection neurons; however, molecular mechanisms regulating neurogenesis specifically in the SVZ are largely unknown. The transcription factor Eomes/Tbr2 is transiently expressed in cortical SVZ progenitor cells. Here we demonstrate that conditional inactivation of Tbr2 during early brain development causes microcephaly and severe behavioral deficits. In Tbr2 mutants the number of SVZ progenitor cells is reduced and the differentiation of upper cortical layer neurons is disturbed. Neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus but not the subependymal zone is abolished. These studies establish Tbr2 as a key regulator of neurogenesis in the SVZ. PMID:18794345

  14. Opposing regulation of dopaminergic activity and exploratory motor behavior by forebrain and brainstem cholinergic circuits.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti C; Rossignol, Elsa; Rice, Margaret E; Machold, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine transmission is critical for exploratory motor behaviour. A key regulator is acetylcholine; forebrain acetylcholine regulates striatal dopamine release, whereas brainstem cholinergic inputs regulate the transition of dopamine neurons from tonic to burst firing modes. How these sources of cholinergic activity combine to control dopamine efflux and exploratory motor behaviour is unclear. Here we show that mice lacking total forebrain acetylcholine exhibit enhanced frequency-dependent striatal dopamine release and are hyperactive in a novel environment, whereas mice lacking rostral brainstem acetylcholine are hypoactive. Exploratory motor behaviour is normalized by the removal of both cholinergic sources. Involvement of dopamine in the exploratory motor phenotypes observed in these mutants is indicated by their altered sensitivity to the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist raclopride. These results support a model in which forebrain and brainstem cholinergic systems act in tandem to regulate striatal dopamine signalling for proper control of motor activity.

  15. Organization of the avian basal forebrain: chemical anatomy in the parrot (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Roberts, Todd Freeman; Hall, William Sterling; Brauth, Steven Earle

    2002-12-23

    Hodological, electrophysiological, and ablation studies indicate a role for the basal forebrain in telencephalic vocal control; however, to date the organization of the basal forebrain has not been extensively studied in any nonmammal or nonhuman vocal learning species. To this end the chemical anatomy of the avian basal forebrain was investigated in a vocal learning parrot, the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus). Immunological and histological stains, including choline acetyltransferase, acetylcholinesterase, tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP)-32, the calcium binding proteins calbindin D-28k and parvalbumin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, iron, substance P, methionine enkephalin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphotase diaphorase, and arginine vasotocin were used in the present study. We conclude that the ventral paleostriatum (cf. Kitt and Brauth [1981] Neuroscience 6:1551-1566) and adjacent archistriatal regions can be subdivided into several distinct subareas that are chemically comparable to mammalian basal forebrain structures. The nucleus accumbens is histochemically separable into core and shell regions. The nucleus taeniae (TN) is theorized to be homologous to the medial amygdaloid nucleus. The archistriatum pars ventrolateralis (Avl; comparable to the pigeon archistriatum pars dorsalis) is theorized to be a possible homologue of the central amygdaloid nucleus. The TN and Avl are histochemically continuous with the medial aspects of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the ventromedial striatum, forming an avian analogue of the extended amygdala. The apparent counterpart in budgerigars of the mammalian nucleus basalis of Meynert consists of a field of cholinergic neurons spanning the basal forebrain. The budgerigar septal region is theorized to be homologous as a field to the mammalian septum. Our results are discussed with regard to both the evolution of the basal forebrain and its role in vocal

  16. Placenta-derived hypo-serotonin situations in the developing forebrain cause autism.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder that is characterized by the behavioral traits of impaired social cognition and communication, and repetitive and/or obsessive behavior and interests. Although there are many theories and speculations about the pathogenetic causes of autism, the disruption of the serotonergic system is one of the most consistent and well-replicated findings. Recently, it has been reported that placenta-derived serotonin is the main source in embryonic day (E) 10-15 mouse forebrain, after that period, the serotonergic fibers start to supply serotonin into the forebrain. E 10-15 is the very important developing period, when cortical neurogenesis, migration and initial axon targeting are processed. Since all these events have been considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of autism and they are highly controlled by serotonin signals, the paucity of placenta-derived serotonin should have potential importance when the pathogenesis of autism is considered. I, thus, postulate a hypothesis that placenta-derived hypo-serotonin situations in the developing forebrain cause autism. The hypothesis is as follows. Various factors, such as inflammation, dysfunction of the placenta, together with genetic predispositions cause a decrease of placenta-derived serotonin levels. The decrease of placenta-derived serotonin levels leads to hypo-serotonergic situations in the forebrain of the fetus. The paucity of serotonin in the forebrain leads to mis-wiring in important regions which are responsible for the theory of mind. The paucity of serotonin in the forebrain also causes over-growth of serotonergic fibers. These disturbances result in network deficiency and aberration of the serotonergic system, leading to the autistic phenotypes.

  17. Catecholamine innervation of the forebrain in the bull frog, Rana catesbiana.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, M; Yamamoto, K; Satoh, K; Sakumoto, T; Shimizu, N

    1977-01-01

    The innervation of forebrain catecholamine (CA) were experimentally investigated with use of sensitive fluorescence method of glyoxylic acid formaldehyde in the brain of the bull frog, Rana catesbiana. The CA of the olfactory bulb is supplied by CA neurons situated in olfactory bulb. And CA neurons in the hypothalamus contribute the main source for the forebrain CA except olfactory bulb. The hypothalamic CA neurons also give rise to long descending axons to innervate the brain stem. Judging from their anatomical aspects it seems that the structure homologous to mammalian nigro-neostriatal dopamine or mesolimbic dopamine system is not present in amphibian brain. PMID:303652

  18. Age-dependent increase of brain copper levels and expressions of copper regulatory proteins in the subventricular zone and choroid plexus

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Sherleen; Jiang, Wendy; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Our recent data suggest a high accumulation of copper (Cu) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) along the wall of brain ventricles. Anatomically, SVZ is in direct contact with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is secreted by a neighboring tissue choroid plexus (CP). Changes in Cu regulatory gene expressions in the SVZ and CP as the function of aging may determine Cu levels in the CSF and SVZ. This study was designed to investigate the associations between age, Cu levels, and Cu regulatory genes in SVZ and plexus. The SVZ and CP were dissected from brains of 3-week, 10-week, or 9-month old male rats. Analyses by atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed that the SVZ of adult and old animals contained the highest Cu level compared with other tested brain regions. Significantly positive correlations between age and Cu levels in SVZ and plexus were observed; the SVZ Cu level of old animals was 7.5- and 5.8-fold higher than those of young and adult rats (p < 0.01), respectively. Quantitation by qPCR of the transcriptional expressions of Cu regulatory proteins showed that the SVZ expressed the highest level of Cu storage protein metallothioneins (MTs), while the CP expressed the high level of Cu transporter protein Ctr1. Noticeably, Cu levels in the SVZ were positively associated with type B slow proliferating cell marker Gfap (p < 0.05), but inversely associated with type A proliferating neuroblast marker Dcx (p < 0.05) and type C transit amplifying progenitor marker Nestin (p < 0.01). Dmt1 had significant positive correlations with age and Cu levels in the plexus (p < 0.01). These findings suggest that Cu levels in all tested brain regions are increased as the function of age. The SVZ shows a different expression pattern of Cu-regulatory genes from the CP. The age-related increase of MTs and decrease of Ctr1 may contribute to the high Cu level in this neurogenesis active brain region. PMID:26106293

  19. Vocal control pathways through the anterior forebrain of a parrot (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Durand, S E; Heaton, J T; Amateau, S K; Brauth, S E

    1997-01-13

    A feature of the telencephalic vocal control system in the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) that has been hypothesized to represent a profound difference in organization from the oscine vocal system is its reported lack of an inherent circuit through the anterior forebrain. The present study reports anatomical connections that indicate the existence of an anterior forebrain circuit comparable in important ways to the "recursive" pathway of oscine songbirds. Results from anterograde and retrograde tracing experiments with biocytin and fluorescently labeled dextran amines indicate that the central nucleus of the anterior archistriatum (AAc) is the source of ascending projections upon the oval nuclei of the anterior neostriatum and ventral hyperstriatum (NAo and HVo, respectively). Efferent projections from the latter nuclei terminate in the lateral neostriatum afferent to AAc, thereby forming a short recurrent pathway through the pallium. Previously reported projections from HVo and NAo upon the magnocellular nucleus of the lobus parolfactorius (LPOm), and after LPOm onto the magnocellular nucleus of the dorsal thalamus (DMm; G.F. Striedter [1994] J. Comp. Neurol. 343:35-56), are confirmed. A specific projection from DMm onto NAom is also demonstrated; therefore, a recurrent pathway through the basal forebrain also exists in the budgerigar vocal system that is similar to the anterior forebrain circuit of oscine songbirds. Parallels between these circuits and mammalian basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits are discussed. It is hypothesized that vocal control nuclei of the avian anterior neostriatum may perform a function similar to the primate supplemental motor area.

  20. Conserved Noncoding Sequences Regulate lhx5 Expression in the Zebrafish Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liu; Chen, Fengjiao; Peng, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The LIM homeobox family protein Lhx5 plays important roles in forebrain development in the vertebrates. The lhx5 gene exhibits complex temporal and spatial expression patterns during early development but its transcriptional regulation mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have used transgenesis in zebrafish in order to define regulatory elements that drive lhx5 expression in the forebrain. Through comparative genomic analysis we identified 10 non-coding sequences conserved in five teleost species. We next examined the enhancer activities of these conserved non-coding sequences with Tol2 transposon mediated transgenesis. We found a proximately located enhancer gave rise to robust reporter EGFP expression in the forebrain regions. In addition, we identified an enhancer located at approximately 50 kb upstream of lhx5 coding region that is responsible for reporter gene expression in the hypothalamus. We also identify an enhancer located approximately 40 kb upstream of the lhx5 coding region that is required for expression in the prethalamus (ventral thalamus). Together our results suggest discrete enhancer elements control lhx5 expression in different regions of the forebrain. PMID:26147098

  1. [Method of Calculating the Distance Between the Classes of the Structural Components of the Forebrain Birds].

    PubMed

    Voronov, L N; Konstantinov, V Y

    2016-01-01

    The method of calculating the distance between the classes of the structural components of the brain of birds. Compared interclass distances of glia, neurons and neuroglial complexes in the forebrain hooded crow (Corvus cornix) (a bird with a highly rational activity) and common crossbill (Loxia curvirostra) (birds with a medium level of rational activity). PMID:27263281

  2. Slow age-dependent decline of doublecortin expression and BrdU labeling in the forebrain from lesser hedgehog tenrecs.

    PubMed

    Alpár, Alán; Künzle, Heinz; Gärtner, Ulrich; Popkova, Yulia; Bauer, Ute; Grosche, Jens; Reichenbach, Andreas; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2010-05-12

    In addition to synaptic remodeling, formation of new neurons is increasingly acknowledged as an important cue for plastic changes in the central nervous system. Whereas all vertebrates retain a moderate neuroproliferative capacity, phylogenetically younger mammals become dramatically impaired in this potential during aging. The present study shows that the lesser hedgehog tenrec, an insectivore with a low encephalization index, preserves its neurogenic potential surprisingly well during aging. This was shown by quantitative analysis of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunolabeling in the olfactory bulb, paleo-, archi-, and neocortices from 2- to 7-year-old animals. In addition to these newly born cells, a large number of previously formed immature neurons are present throughout adulthood as shown by doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining in various forebrain regions including archicortex, paleocortex, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. Several ventricle-associated cells in olfactory bulb and hippocampus were double-labeled by BrdU and DCX immunoreactivity. However, most DCX cells in the paleocortex can be considered as persisting immature neurons that obviously do not enter a differentiation program since double fluorescence labeling does not reveal their co-occurrence with numerous neuronal markers, whereas only a small portion coexpresses the pan-neuronal marker HuC/D. Finally, the present study reveals tenrecs as suitable laboratory animals to study age-dependent brain alterations (e.g., of neurogenesis) or slow degenerative processes, particularly due to the at least doubled longevity of tenrecs in comparison to mice and rats.

  3. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal.

  4. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal. PMID:23831917

  5. TASK Channels on Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Modulate Electrocortical Signatures of Arousal by Histamine

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Michael T.; Du, Guizhi; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons are the main source of cortical acetylcholine, and their activation by histamine elicits cortical arousal. TWIK-like acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels modulate neuronal excitability and are expressed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, but the role of TASK channels in the histamine-basal forebrain cholinergic arousal circuit is unknown. We first expressed TASK channel subunits and histamine Type 1 receptors in HEK cells. Application of histamine in vitro inhibited the acid-sensitive K+ current, indicating a functionally coupled signaling mechanism. We then studied the role of TASK channels in modulating electrocortical activity in vivo using freely behaving wild-type (n = 12) and ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice (n = 12), the latter lacking TASK-1/3 channels on cholinergic neurons. TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly altered endogenous electroencephalogram oscillations in multiple frequency bands. We then identified the effect of TASK channel deletion during microperfusion of histamine into the basal forebrain. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly attenuated the histamine-induced increase in 30–50 Hz activity, consistent with TASK channels contributing to histamine action on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. In contrast, during active wakefulness, histamine significantly increased 30–50 Hz activity in ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice but not wild-type mice, showing that the histamine response depended upon the prevailing cortical arousal state. In summary, we identify TASK channel modulation in response to histamine receptor activation in vitro, as well as a role of TASK channels on cholinergic neurons in modulating endogenous oscillations in the electroencephalogram and the electrocortical response to histamine at the basal forebrain in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attentive states and cognitive function are associated with the generation of γ EEG activity

  6. Sensitivity of depression-like behavior to glucocorticoids and antidepressants is independent of forebrain glucocorticoid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Melanie Y.; Hussain, Rifat J.; Zampi, Michael E.; Sheeran, Katherine; Solomon, Matia B.; Herman, James P.; Khan, Anum; Jacobson, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    The location of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) implicated in depression symptoms and antidepressant action remains unclear. Forebrain glucocorticoid receptor deletion on a C57B/6×129×CBA background (FBGRKO-T50) reportedly produces increased depression-like behavior and elevated glucocorticoids. We further hypothesized that forebrain GR deletion would reduce behavioral sensitivity to glucocorticoids and to antidepressants. We have tested this hypothesis in mice with calcium calmodulin kinase IIα-Cre-mediated forebrain GR deletion derived from a new founder on a pure C57BL/6 background (FBGRKO-T29-1). We measured immobility in forced swim or tail suspension tests after manipulating glucocorticoids or after dose response experiments with tricyclic or monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressants. Despite forebrain GR deletion that was at least as rapid and more extensive than reported in the mixed-strain FBGRKO-T50 mice (Boyle et al. 2005), and possibly because of their different founder, our FBGRKO-T29-1 mice did not exhibit increases in depression-like behavior or adrenocortical axis hormones. Nevertheless, FBGRKO-T29-1 mice were at least as sensitive as floxed GR controls to the depressive effects of glucocorticoids and the effects of two different classes of antidepressants. FBGRKO-T29-1 mice also unexpectedly exhibited increased mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) gene expression. Our results reinforce prior evidence that antidepressant action does not require forebrain GR, and suggest a correlation between the absence of depression-like phenotype and combined MR up-regulation and central amygdala GR deficiency. Our findings demonstrate that GR outside the areas targeted in FBGRKO-T29-1 mice are involved in the depressive effects of glucocorticoids, and leave open the possibility that these GR populations also contribute to antidepressant action. PMID:23727405

  7. A dynamic fate map of the forebrain shows how vertebrate eyes form and explains two causes of cyclopia.

    PubMed

    England, Samantha J; Blanchard, Guy B; Mahadevan, L; Adams, Richard J

    2006-12-01

    Mechanisms for shaping and folding sheets of cells during development are poorly understood. An example is the complex reorganisation of the forebrain neural plate during neurulation, which must fold a sheet into a tube while evaginating two eyes from a single contiguous domain within the neural plate. We, for the first time, track these cell rearrangements to show that forebrain morphogenesis differs significantly from prior hypotheses. We postulate a new model for forebrain neurulation and demonstrate how mutations affecting two signalling pathways can generate cyclopic phenotypes by disrupting normal cell movements or introducing new erroneous behaviours.

  8. A restricted period for formation of outer subventricular zone defined by Cdh1 and Trnp1 levels

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martínez, Maria Ángeles; De Juan Romero, Camino; Fernández, Virginia; Cárdenas, Adrián; Götz, Magdalena; Borrell, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    The outer subventricular zone (OSVZ) is a germinal layer playing key roles in the development of the neocortex, with particular relevance in gyrencephalic species such as human and ferret, where it contains abundant basal radial glia cells (bRGCs) that promote cortical expansion. Here we identify a brief period in ferret embryonic development when apical RGCs generate a burst of bRGCs that become founders of the OSVZ. After this period, bRGCs in the OSVZ proliferate and self-renew exclusively locally, thereby forming a self-sustained lineage independent from the other germinal layers. The time window for the brief period of OSVZ bRGC production is delineated by the coincident downregulation of Cdh1 and Trnp1, and their upregulation reduces bRGC production and prevents OSVZ seeding. This mechanism in cortical development may have key relevance in brain evolution and disease. PMID:27264089

  9. A restricted period for formation of outer subventricular zone defined by Cdh1 and Trnp1 levels.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Maria Ángeles; De Juan Romero, Camino; Fernández, Virginia; Cárdenas, Adrián; Götz, Magdalena; Borrell, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    The outer subventricular zone (OSVZ) is a germinal layer playing key roles in the development of the neocortex, with particular relevance in gyrencephalic species such as human and ferret, where it contains abundant basal radial glia cells (bRGCs) that promote cortical expansion. Here we identify a brief period in ferret embryonic development when apical RGCs generate a burst of bRGCs that become founders of the OSVZ. After this period, bRGCs in the OSVZ proliferate and self-renew exclusively locally, thereby forming a self-sustained lineage independent from the other germinal layers. The time window for the brief period of OSVZ bRGC production is delineated by the coincident downregulation of Cdh1 and Trnp1, and their upregulation reduces bRGC production and prevents OSVZ seeding. This mechanism in cortical development may have key relevance in brain evolution and disease. PMID:27264089

  10. A restricted period for formation of outer subventricular zone defined by Cdh1 and Trnp1 levels.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Maria Ángeles; De Juan Romero, Camino; Fernández, Virginia; Cárdenas, Adrián; Götz, Magdalena; Borrell, Víctor

    2016-06-06

    The outer subventricular zone (OSVZ) is a germinal layer playing key roles in the development of the neocortex, with particular relevance in gyrencephalic species such as human and ferret, where it contains abundant basal radial glia cells (bRGCs) that promote cortical expansion. Here we identify a brief period in ferret embryonic development when apical RGCs generate a burst of bRGCs that become founders of the OSVZ. After this period, bRGCs in the OSVZ proliferate and self-renew exclusively locally, thereby forming a self-sustained lineage independent from the other germinal layers. The time window for the brief period of OSVZ bRGC production is delineated by the coincident downregulation of Cdh1 and Trnp1, and their upregulation reduces bRGC production and prevents OSVZ seeding. This mechanism in cortical development may have key relevance in brain evolution and disease.

  11. Neuronal amyloid-β accumulation within cholinergic basal forebrain in ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baker-Nigh, Alaina; Vahedi, Shahrooz; Davis, Elena Goetz; Weintraub, Sandra; Bigio, Eileen H; Klein, William L; Geula, Changiz

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms that contribute to selective vulnerability of the magnocellular basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, are not fully understood. Because age is the primary risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, mechanisms of interest must include age-related alterations in protein expression, cell type-specific markers and pathology. The present study explored the extent and characteristics of intraneuronal amyloid-β accumulation, particularly of the fibrillogenic 42-amino acid isoform, within basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in normal young, normal aged and Alzheimer's disease brains as a potential contributor to the selective vulnerability of these neurons using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Amyloid-β1-42 immunoreactivity was observed in the entire cholinergic neuronal population regardless of age or Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. The magnitude of this accumulation as revealed by optical density measures was significantly greater than that in cortical pyramidal neurons, and magnocellular neurons in the globus pallidus did not demonstrate a similar extent of amyloid immunoreactivity. Immunoblot analysis with a panel of amyloid-β antibodies confirmed accumulation of high concentration of amyloid-β in basal forebrain early in adult life. There was no age- or Alzheimer-related alteration in total amyloid-β content within this region. In contrast, an increase in the large molecular weight soluble oligomer species was observed with a highly oligomer-specific antibody in aged and Alzheimer brains when compared with the young. Similarly, intermediate molecular weight oligomeric species displayed an increase in aged and Alzheimer brains when compared with the young using two amyloid-β42 antibodies. Compared to cortical homogenates, small molecular weight oligomeric species were lower and intermediate species were enriched in basal forebrain in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Regional and age

  12. Forebrain-Specific Loss of BMPRII in Mice Reduces Anxiety and Increases Object Exploration

    PubMed Central

    McBrayer, Zofeyah L.; Dimova, Jiva; Pisansky, Marc T.; Sun, Mu; Beppu, Hideyuki; Gewirtz, Jonathan C.; O’Connor, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of Bone Morphogenic Protein Receptor Type II (BMPRII) in learning, memory, and exploratory behavior in mice, a tissue-specific knockout of BMPRII in the post-natal hippocampus and forebrain was generated. We found that BMPRII mutant mice had normal spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze, but showed significantly reduced swimming speeds with increased floating behavior. Further analysis using the Porsolt Swim Test to investigate behavioral despair did not reveal any differences in immobility between mutants and controls. In the Elevated Plus Maze, BMPRII mutants and Smad4 mutants showed reduced anxiety, while in exploratory tests, BMPRII mutants showed more interest in object exploration. These results suggest that loss of BMPRII in the mouse hippocampus and forebrain does not disrupt spatial learning and memory encoding, but instead impacts exploratory and anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:26444546

  13. Overexpression of the Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase in the Forebrain Leads to Deficits of Behavioral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hong; Saraf, Amit; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) is an activity-dependent, calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase expressed in the nervous system that is implicated in memory formation. We examined the locomotor activity, and impulsive and social behaviors of AC1+ mice, a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing AC1 in the forebrain. Here we report that AC1+ mice exhibit hyperactive behaviors and demonstrate increased impulsivity and reduced sociability. In contrast, AC1 and AC8 double knock-out mice are hypoactive, and exhibit increased sociability and reduced impulsivity. Interestingly, the hyperactivity of AC1+ mice can be corrected by valproate, a mood-stabilizing drug. These data indicate that increased expression of AC1 in the forebrain leads to deficits in behavioral inhibition. PMID:25568126

  14. Overexpression of the type 1 adenylyl cyclase in the forebrain leads to deficits of behavioral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuanmao; Cao, Hong; Saraf, Amit; Zweifel, Larry S; Storm, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) is an activity-dependent, calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase expressed in the nervous system that is implicated in memory formation. We examined the locomotor activity, and impulsive and social behaviors of AC1+ mice, a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing AC1 in the forebrain. Here we report that AC1+ mice exhibit hyperactive behaviors and demonstrate increased impulsivity and reduced sociability. In contrast, AC1 and AC8 double knock-out mice are hypoactive, and exhibit increased sociability and reduced impulsivity. Interestingly, the hyperactivity of AC1+ mice can be corrected by valproate, a mood-stabilizing drug. These data indicate that increased expression of AC1 in the forebrain leads to deficits in behavioral inhibition.

  15. Cholinergic basal forebrain neurons burst with theta during waking and paradoxical sleep.

    PubMed

    Lee, Maan Gee; Hassani, Oum K; Alonso, Angel; Jones, Barbara E

    2005-04-27

    It is known that acetylcholine can stimulate activation and promote plasticity in the cerebral cortex, yet it is not known how the cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, which release acetylcholine in the cortex, discharge in relation to natural cortical activity and sleep-wake states. By recording basal forebrain units in association with electroencephalographic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and labeling individual neurons with Neurobiotin for immunohistochemical identification, we show for the first time that cholinergic neurons discharge in bursts at maximal rates during active waking and paradoxical sleep, when gamma and theta electroencephalographic activity are maximal. They virtually cease firing during slow-wave sleep. Notably, their bursting discharge is synchronized with theta oscillations. Through their maximal firing and rhythmic theta discharge during active waking and paradoxical sleep, the cholinergic neurons can thus modulate the cortex to promote activation along with plasticity during these two states.

  16. A specific form of cognitive rigidity following excitotoxic lesions of the basal forebrain in marmosets.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A C; Robbins, T W; Everitt, B J; Muir, J L

    1992-01-01

    The effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced lesions of the basal forebrain were studied on performance of a series of visual discrimination tests that examined a range of cognitive functions in the marmoset. These included the ability to attend to the various dimensional properties of stimuli and to use just one of these properties in order to solve a discrimination (intra-dimensional shift); to switch attention from one dimension to another (extra-dimensional shift); to learn the reinforcement value of specific exemplars within a dimension (new learning); and to relearn their reinforcement value following reversal of the reward contingencies (serial reversals). Lesions of the basal forebrain did not impair the ability either to attend selectively to the dimensional properties of the stimuli or to switch attention from one dimension to the other. However, the lesion did affect various aspects of associative learning including a transient impairment of new learning and a marked disruption of serial reversal learning. The reversal deficit could be characterised as a tendency to perseverate on the previously correct stimulus and as a failure to to show the formation of a reversal learning set. In addition, the lesion prevented disruption of performance of a well-learned discrimination when novel exemplars from the irrelevant dimension were introduced (probe test). It is suggested that the functional effects of the basal forebrain lesion reflect impaired learning of stimulus-reward associations and behavioural rigidity. The finding, however, that there was no effect of the lesion on attentional set-shifting suggests that any loss of inhibitory control was specific to the level of stimulus-response or stimulus-reward associations, inhibitory control at the level of attentional selection remaining intact. The similarity of the effects of damage to the basal forebrain to those seen following damage to the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala are discussed in the context

  17. Forebrain neuroanatomy of the neonatal and juvenile dolphin (T. truncatus and S. coeruloalba)

    PubMed Central

    Parolisi, Roberta; Peruffo, Antonella; Messina, Silvia; Panin, Mattia; Montelli, Stefano; Giurisato, Maristella; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of dolphin functional neuroanatomy mostly derives from post-mortem studies and non-invasive approaches (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging), due to limitations in experimentation on cetaceans. As a consequence the availability of well-preserved tissues for histology is scarce, and detailed histological analyses are referred mainly to adults. Here we studied the neonatal/juvenile brain in two species of dolphins, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), with special reference to forebrain regions. We analyzed cell density in subcortical nuclei, white/gray matter ratio, and myelination in selected regions at different anterior–posterior levels of the whole dolphin brain at different ages, to better define forebrain neuroanatomy and the developmental stage of the dolphin brain around birth. The analyses were extended to the periventricular germinal layer and the cerebellum, whose delayed genesis of the granule cell layer is a hallmark of postnatal development in the mammalian nervous system. Our results establish an atlas of the young dolphin forebrain and, on the basis of occurrence/absence of delayed neurogenic layers, confirm the stage of advanced brain maturation in these animals with respect to most terrestrial mammals. PMID:26594155

  18. Reconciling different models of forebrain induction and patterning: a dual role for the hypoblast.

    PubMed

    Foley, A C; Skromne, I; Stern, C D

    2000-09-01

    Several models have been proposed for the generation of the rostral nervous system. Among them, Nieuwkoop's activation/transformation hypothesis and Spemann's idea of separate head and trunk/tail organizers have been particularly favoured recently. In the mouse, the finding that the visceral endoderm (VE) is required for forebrain development has been interpreted as support for the latter model. Here we argue that the chick hypoblast is equivalent to the mouse VE, based on fate, expression of molecular markers and characteristic anterior movements around the time of gastrulation. We show that the hypoblast does not fit the criteria for a head organizer because it does not induce neural tissue from naïve epiblast, nor can it change the regional identity of neural tissue. However, the hypoblast does induce transient expression of the early markers Sox3 and Otx2. The spreading of the hypoblast also directs cell movements in the adjacent epiblast, such that the prospective forebrain is kept at a distance from the organizer at the tip of the primitive streak. We propose that this movement is important to protect the forebrain from the caudalizing influence of the organizer. This dual role of the hypoblast is more consistent with the Nieuwkoop model than with the notion of separate organizers, and accommodates the available data from mouse and other vertebrates. PMID:10934028

  19. Activation of Wnt/ß-catenin signaling in ESC promotes rostral forebrain differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Takata, Nozomu; Sakakura, Eriko; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2016-03-01

    Wnt/ß-catenin signaling is crucial for maintenance of pluripotent state of embryonic stem cell (ESC). However, it is unclear how Wnt/ß-catenin signaling affects the differentiation ability of ESC, especially with regard to rostral forebrain cells. Here, using Rax, rostral forebrain marker, and Wnt/ß-catenin reporter lines, we report ratio of Rax(+) and Wnt responding tissue (Wnt(+)) patterns, which were affected by seeding number of ESC in three-dimensional culture system. Surprisingly, we found ß-catenin level and localization are heterogeneous in ESC colony by immunostaining and time-laps imaging of ß-catenin-mEGFP signals. Moreover, activation of Wnt signaling in ESC promoted expression level and nuclear localization of ß-catenin, and mRNA levels of Wnt antagonists, axin2 and dkk1, leading to upregulating Wnt/ß-catenin reporter in ESC state and Rax expression at differentiation culture day 7. Together, our results suggest that activation of Wnt signaling in ESC promotes the differentiation efficacy of rostral forebrain cells. Wnt-priming culture method may provide a useful tool for applications in the areas of basic science and molecular therapeutics for regenerative medicine.

  20. Forebrain neuroanatomy of the neonatal and juvenile dolphin (T. truncatus and S. coeruloalba).

    PubMed

    Parolisi, Roberta; Peruffo, Antonella; Messina, Silvia; Panin, Mattia; Montelli, Stefano; Giurisato, Maristella; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of dolphin functional neuroanatomy mostly derives from post-mortem studies and non-invasive approaches (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging), due to limitations in experimentation on cetaceans. As a consequence the availability of well-preserved tissues for histology is scarce, and detailed histological analyses are referred mainly to adults. Here we studied the neonatal/juvenile brain in two species of dolphins, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), with special reference to forebrain regions. We analyzed cell density in subcortical nuclei, white/gray matter ratio, and myelination in selected regions at different anterior-posterior levels of the whole dolphin brain at different ages, to better define forebrain neuroanatomy and the developmental stage of the dolphin brain around birth. The analyses were extended to the periventricular germinal layer and the cerebellum, whose delayed genesis of the granule cell layer is a hallmark of postnatal development in the mammalian nervous system. Our results establish an atlas of the young dolphin forebrain and, on the basis of occurrence/absence of delayed neurogenic layers, confirm the stage of advanced brain maturation in these animals with respect to most terrestrial mammals. PMID:26594155

  1. Cell death atlas of the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus: effects of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Todd H; Krug, Stefanie; Carr, Audrey V; Murray, Elaine K; Fitzpatrick, Emmett; Bengston, Lynn; McCutcheon, Jill; De Vries, Geert J; Forger, Nancy G

    2013-08-01

    Naturally occurring cell death is essential to the development of the mammalian nervous system. Although the importance of developmental cell death has been appreciated for decades, there is no comprehensive account of cell death across brain areas in the mouse. Moreover, several regional sex differences in cell death have been described for the ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, but it is not known how widespread the phenomenon is. We used immunohistochemical detection of activated caspase-3 to identify dying cells in the brains of male and female mice from postnatal day (P) 1 to P11. Cell death density, total number of dying cells, and regional volume were determined in 16 regions of the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain (the anterior hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus, anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus; the basolateral, central, and medial amygdala; the lateral and principal nuclei of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis; the caudate-putamen; the globus pallidus; the lateral septum; and the islands of Calleja). All regions showed a significant effect of age on cell death. The timing of peak cell death varied between P1 to P7, and the average rate of cell death varied tenfold among regions. Several significant sex differences in cell death and/or regional volume were detected. These data address large gaps in the developmental literature and suggest interesting region-specific differences in the prevalence and timing of cell death in the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain.

  2. Spatiotemporal clustering of cell death in the avian forebrain proliferative zone.

    PubMed

    Charvet, Christine J; Striedter, Georg F

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which programmed cell death is the fate of proliferative, rather than post-mitotic, cells remains controversial, but a preponderance of evidence suggests that at least some cells within the brain's proliferative zone die during mammalian brain development. One major unresolved question is the extent to which cell death in the proliferative zone is spatiotemporally patterned. In order to answer this question we used the terminal dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method to stain apoptotic cells in the forebrain of chicken embryos at relatively early stages of brain development (Hamburger-Hamilton stages 19-32). Our principal finding is that most of the TUNEL-positive cells within the brain's proliferative zone are concentrated into distinct clusters, whose location varies with developmental stage. At stage 19, many TUNEL+ cells are found within the basal synencephalon, just below where the forebrain's first neurons are located. At stages 24-26, numerous TUNEL+ cells are located within the preoptic area and along the optic stalk. After stage 26, TUNEL labeling is prominent in two telencephalic areas: the thin dorsomedial telencephalon and the thickest portions of the telencephalon's lateral walls (i.e. the dorsal ventricular ridge). Collectively, the observed pattern of TUNEL staining suggests that cell death in the proliferative zone plays a substantial role in shaping the forebrain. In addition, cell death in the proliferative zone may be related to cell cycle exit.

  3. Altered cholinergic function in the basal forebrain of girls with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wenk, G L; Hauss-Wegrzyniak, B

    1999-06-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is predominant in females and is associated with cortical atrophy, stereotyped hand movements and severe mental deficiency. Previous studies have demonstrated a significant decline in number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-containing neurons throughout the forebrain of RS girls. The loss of these ChAT-positive cells may be caused by a lack of nerve growth factor (NGF). In the current study, cortical levels of NGF were normal in RS girls as compared to age-and sex-matched controls. The number of neurons within the basal forebrain that express the 75 kDa (p75) low-affinity receptor for NGF was unchanged. In contrast, the number of ChAT-positive neurons was significantly decreased. The results suggest that normal amounts of NGF are available for binding to the p75 receptor and for retrograde transport to forebrain cholinergic cells, however, these neurons do not respond by producing the ChAT protein that is necessary for the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.

  4. Localization and spatiotemporal expression of IDO following transient forebrain ischemia in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Ayako; Hara, Akira; Saito, Kuniaki; Hoshi, Masato; Niwa, Masayuki; Seishima, Mitsuru; Mori, Hideki

    2008-06-27

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the kynurenine pathway that converts L-tryptophan to L-kynurenine. Transient forebrain ischemia initiates a series of cellular events that lead to the delayed neuronal degeneration of several brain regions. The goal of this study was to determine the localization of IDO in gerbil brain, and analyze the spatiotemporal expression of IDO in a transient forebrain ischemic model. Expression of IDO in the normal gerbil brain was observed by using immunohistochemistry. Time-course of the expression of IDO following transient forebrain ischemic gerbils was examined by immunohistochemistry, combined with hematoxylin and eosin staining for morphological analysis, and in situ terminal dUTP-biotin nick end labeling of DNA fragments (TUNEL) method. In normal gerbils, IDO immunostaining was observed in thalamus, hypothalamus and amygdaloid nucleus. IDO expression was negative in the cingulate cortex, hippocampal CA1 region and parietal cortex. Following transient ischemia, we observed a time-dependent increase of IDO expression in CA1, cingulate cortex and hypothalamus. The peak of IDO expression in CA1 and cingulate cortex occurred at 48 h after ischemic insult and diminished by 2 weeks. TUNEL staining was observed only in the CA1 region at 72 and 96 h after transient ischemia. Thus, IDO protein is present in specific regions in gerbil brain, and dynamic changes of IDO expression was observed in some neurons following transient ischemia. PMID:18501338

  5. Forebrain neuropeptide regulation of pair association and behavior in cooperating cleaner fish.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Sónia C; Grutter, Alexandra S; Paula, José R; André, Gonçalo I; Messias, João P; Gozdowska, Magdalena; Kulczykowska, Ewa; Soares, Marta C

    2015-06-01

    Animals establish privileged relationships with specific partners, which are treated differently from other conspecifics, and contribute to behavioral variation. However, there is limited information on the underlying physiological mechanisms involved in the establishment of these privileged ties and their relationship to individual cooperation levels. The Indo-Pacific bluestreak cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus often forages in mixed-sex pairs when cleaning fish clients. Intra-couple conflicts often arise during a joint client inspection, which may alter the overall quality of cleaning service provided. Here we tested two hypotheses: a) whether intra-pair association (i.e. association index), measured with joint interspecific cleaning and intraspecific behavior, is correlated with neuroendocrine mechanisms involving forebrain neuropeptides arginine vasotocin (AVT) and isotocin (IT) and b) whether these neuropeptide level shifts relate to an individual's interspecific service quality. We found that partner support (number of cleaning interactions and tactile stimulation) received by male cleaners increased with association index. When cleaners inspected clients alone, cleaners' cheating decreased with association index for females but not males. AVT levels did not differ according to sex or association level. Forebrain IT levels increased with association index for males, whereas no relationship was found for females. Finally, cleaner cheating varied between sex and forebrain IT levels. Findings indicate that variation in pairs' relationships influences male and female cleaner fish differently and contributes to the variation of brain neuropeptide levels, which is linked to distinct cooperative outcomes. PMID:25802022

  6. Genetically determined cholinergic deficiency in the forebrain of C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Bentivoglio, A R; Altavista, M C; Granata, R; Albanese, A

    1994-02-21

    This study demonstrates that a deficiency of forebrain cholinergic neurons occurs in C57BL/6 (C57) mice, a strain characterized by poor learning capabilities. The brains of 21-day-old and 18-week-old C57 and DBA/2 (DBA) mice were studied by means of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry and of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry. Computer-assisted image analysis was performed on sections through the medial septum, the diagonal band of Broca, the basal nucleus of Meynert and the neostriatum. As compared to the DBA strain, C57 mice had a reduced number of forebrain cholinergic neurons. This feature was present at the age of 21 days and persisted to 18 weeks. Between-strain variations in the density of neurons were more obvious in ChAT-stained material than in AChE-stained sections. These data show that C57 mice can be regarded as a genetic mutant, whose phenotype is characterized by a reduced number of forebrain cholinergic neurons and by cognitive abnormalities. C57 mice represent a valuable model for studying the influence of genetic factors on central nervous system cholinergic mechanisms and the effects of genetically determined cholinergic deficiency on behavior and learning.

  7. Forebrain neuropeptide regulation of pair association and behavior in cooperating cleaner fish.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Sónia C; Grutter, Alexandra S; Paula, José R; André, Gonçalo I; Messias, João P; Gozdowska, Magdalena; Kulczykowska, Ewa; Soares, Marta C

    2015-06-01

    Animals establish privileged relationships with specific partners, which are treated differently from other conspecifics, and contribute to behavioral variation. However, there is limited information on the underlying physiological mechanisms involved in the establishment of these privileged ties and their relationship to individual cooperation levels. The Indo-Pacific bluestreak cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus often forages in mixed-sex pairs when cleaning fish clients. Intra-couple conflicts often arise during a joint client inspection, which may alter the overall quality of cleaning service provided. Here we tested two hypotheses: a) whether intra-pair association (i.e. association index), measured with joint interspecific cleaning and intraspecific behavior, is correlated with neuroendocrine mechanisms involving forebrain neuropeptides arginine vasotocin (AVT) and isotocin (IT) and b) whether these neuropeptide level shifts relate to an individual's interspecific service quality. We found that partner support (number of cleaning interactions and tactile stimulation) received by male cleaners increased with association index. When cleaners inspected clients alone, cleaners' cheating decreased with association index for females but not males. AVT levels did not differ according to sex or association level. Forebrain IT levels increased with association index for males, whereas no relationship was found for females. Finally, cleaner cheating varied between sex and forebrain IT levels. Findings indicate that variation in pairs' relationships influences male and female cleaner fish differently and contributes to the variation of brain neuropeptide levels, which is linked to distinct cooperative outcomes.

  8. Salt Appetite: Interaction of Forebrain Angiotensinergic and Hindbrain Serotonergic Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menani, Jose Vanderlei; Colombari, Debora S. A.; Beltz, Terry G.; Thunhorst, Robert L.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    Methysergide injected into the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) increases the salt appetite of rats depleted of sodium by furosemide (FURO). The present study investigated the effects of angiotensin 2 (ANG 2) receptor blockade in the subfornical organ (SFO) on this increased salt appetite. The intake of 0.3 M NaCl and water was induced by combined administration of the diuretic, FURO, and the angiotensin-convertina, enzyme inhibitor, captopril (CAP). Pretreatment of the SFO with the anciotensin Type 1 (AT,) receptor antagonist, losartan (1 microgram/200 nl), reduced water intake but not 0.3 M NaCl intake induced by subcutaneous FURO+ CAP. Methysergide (4 microgram/200 nl) injected bilaterally into the LPBN increased 0.3 M NaCl intake after FURO + CAP. Losartan injected into the SFO prevented additional 0.3 M NaCl intake caused by methysergide injections into the LPBN. These results indicate that AT, receptors located in the SFO may have a role in mediatina the intake of sodium and water induced by sodium depletion. They also suggest that after treatment with FURO + CAP an LPBN-associated scrotonergic mechanism inhibits increased sodium intake.

  9. Basal forebrain dynamics during a tactile discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Eric; Lou, Jason; Sylvester, Kathryn; McDonough, Annie; Tica, Stefani; Nicolelis, Miguel A

    2014-09-01

    The nucleus basalis (NB) is a cholinergic neuromodulatory structure that projects liberally to the entire cortical mantle and regulates information processing in all cortical layers. Here, we recorded activity from populations of single units in the NB as rats performed a whisker-dependent tactile discrimination task. Over 80% of neurons responded with significant modulation in at least one phase of the task. Such activity started before stimulus onset and continued for seconds after reward delivery. Firing rates monotonically increased with reward magnitude during the task, suggesting that NB neurons are not indicating the absolute deviation from expected reward amounts. Individual neurons also encoded significant amounts of information about stimulus identity. Such robust coding was not present when the same stimuli were delivered to lightly anesthetized animals, suggesting that the NB neurons contain a sensorimotor, rather than purely sensory or motor, representation of the environment. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that neurons in the NB provide a value-laden representation of the sensorimotor state of the animal as it engages in significant behavioral tasks.

  10. Basal forebrain dynamics during a tactile discrimination task

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Eric; Lou, Jason; Sylvester, Kathryn; McDonough, Annie; Tica, Stefani

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus basalis (NB) is a cholinergic neuromodulatory structure that projects liberally to the entire cortical mantle and regulates information processing in all cortical layers. Here, we recorded activity from populations of single units in the NB as rats performed a whisker-dependent tactile discrimination task. Over 80% of neurons responded with significant modulation in at least one phase of the task. Such activity started before stimulus onset and continued for seconds after reward delivery. Firing rates monotonically increased with reward magnitude during the task, suggesting that NB neurons are not indicating the absolute deviation from expected reward amounts. Individual neurons also encoded significant amounts of information about stimulus identity. Such robust coding was not present when the same stimuli were delivered to lightly anesthetized animals, suggesting that the NB neurons contain a sensorimotor, rather than purely sensory or motor, representation of the environment. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that neurons in the NB provide a value-laden representation of the sensorimotor state of the animal as it engages in significant behavioral tasks. PMID:24920019

  11. Neonatal ACTH administration elicits long-term changes in forebrain monoamine innervation. Subsequent disruptions in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and gonadal function.

    PubMed

    Alves, S E; Akbari, H M; Anderson, G M; Azmitia, E C; McEwen, B C; Strand, F L

    1997-04-24

    The findings from this study demonstrated that the manipulation of the HPA system resulting from ACTH administration during neonatal development produces long-term, differential effects, not only on adrenocortical activity, but also on the activity and integrity of the forebrain monoamine systems. Increased concentrations of the monoamines within the forebrain regions studied at days 7 and 15, suggest a hastened maturation of these neural systems in animals neonatally treated with ACTH. The observed neurochemical alterations in these animals at one year are suggestive of an accelerated aging in the monoamine systems. A further consequence of these disturbances during development is an altered functioning of the HPG axis, as demonstrated by a delayed onset of puberty as previously reported, as well as significantly decreased proestrus plasma estradiol. Although deficits in sexual behavior also existed, it seems probable that these behavioral changes are a manifestation of altered neural systems regulating the ability to cope with a novel stimulus or situation, rather than a disruption of the "feminization" of the brain during sexual differentiation. This is in contrast to the male rat which exhibits permanent deficits in male typical sexual behavior following developmental ACTH treatment. The clinical relevance of these findings may be extensive. Perinatal exposure to events or agents that markedly increase ACTH and the corticosteroids may cause significant immediate and long-term changes in central monoamine functioning. These changes may constitute some of the most deleterious effects of stress exposure in infants and children. The alterations may be especially devastating in individuals with predispositions to stress-sensitive disorders such as anxiety, depression, and Tourette's syndrome. Finally, the use of ACTH in the treatment of infantile spasms may need to be reassessed in light of the possible long-term effects of ACTH on central monoamine functioning.

  12. Magnesium chloride alone or in combination with diazepam fails to prevent hippocampal damage following transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Milani, H; Lepri, E R; Giordani, F; Favero-Filho, L A

    1999-10-01

    In the central nervous system, magnesium ion (Mg2+) acts as an endogenous modulator of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-coupled calcium channels, and may play a major role in the pathomechanisms of ischemic brain damage. In the present study, we investigated the effects of magnesium chloride (MgCl2, 2.5, 5.0 or 7.5 mmol/kg), either alone or in combination with diazepam (DZ), on ischemia-induced hippocampal cell death. Male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia for 15 min using the 4-vessel occlusion model. MgCl2 was applied systemically (sc) in single (1x, 2 h post-ischemia) or multiple doses (4x, 1, 2, 24 and 48 h post-ischemia). DZ was always given twice, at 1 and 2 h post-ischemia. Thus, ischemia-subjected rats were assigned to one of the following treatments: vehicle (0.1 ml/kg, N = 34), DZ (10 mg/kg, N = 24), MgCl2 (2.5 mmol/kg, N = 10), MgCl2 (5.0 mmol/kg, N = 17), MgCl2 (7.5 mmol/kg, N = 9) or MgCl2 (5 mmol/kg) + DZ (10 mg/kg, N = 14). Seven days after ischemia the brains were analyzed histologically. Fifteen minutes of ischemia caused massive pyramidal cell loss in the subiculum (90.3%) and CA1 (88.4%) sectors of the hippocampus (P<0.0001, vehicle vs sham). Compared to the vehicle-treated group, all pharmacological treatments failed to attenuate the ischemia-induced death of both subiculum (lesion: 86. 7-93.4%) and CA1 (lesion: 85.5-91.2%) pyramidal cells (P>0.05). Both DZ alone and DZ + MgCl2 reduced rectal temperature significantly (P<0.05). No animal death was observed after drug treatment. These data indicate that exogenous magnesium, when administered systemically post-ischemia even in different multiple dose schedules, alone or with diazepam, is not useful against the histopathological effects of transient global cerebral ischemia in rats.

  13. Functional Connectome Analysis of Dopamine Neuron Glutamatergic Connections in Forebrain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Mingote, Susana; Chuhma, Nao; Kusnoor, Sheila V.; Field, Bianca; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2015-01-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a subpopulation of dopamine neurons express vesicular glutamate transporter 2 and make glutamatergic connections to nucleus accumbens (NAc) and olfactory tubercle (OT) neurons. However, their glutamatergic connections across the forebrain have not been explored systematically. To visualize dopamine neuron forebrain projections and to enable photostimulation of their axons independent of transmitter status, we virally transfected VTA neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 fused to enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (ChR2-EYFP) and used DATIREScre mice to restrict expression to dopamine neurons. ChR2-EYFP-expressing neurons almost invariably stained for tyrosine hydroxylase, identifying them as dopaminergic. Dopamine neuron axons visualized by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence projected most densely to the striatum, moderately to the amygdala and entorhinal cortex (ERC), sparsely to prefrontal and cingulate cortices, and rarely to the hippocampus. Guided by ChR2-EYFP fluorescence, we recorded systematically from putative principal neurons in target areas and determined the incidence and strength of glutamatergic connections by activating all dopamine neuron terminals impinging on recorded neurons with wide-field photostimulation. This revealed strong glutamatergic connections in the NAc, OT, and ERC; moderate strength connections in the central amygdala; and weak connections in the cingulate cortex. No glutamatergic connections were found in the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, basolateral amygdala, or prefrontal cortex. These results indicate that VTA dopamine neurons elicit widespread, but regionally distinct, glutamatergic signals in the forebrain and begin to define the dopamine neuron excitatory functional connectome. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopamine neurons are important for the control of motivated behavior and are involved in the pathophysiology of several major neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent studies have shown that some ventral midbrain

  14. Glycoprotein M6a is present in glutamatergic axons in adult rat forebrain and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ben; Werner, Hauke B; Flügge, Gabriele

    2008-03-01

    Glycoprotein M6a is a neuronally expressed member of the proteolipid protein (PLP) family of tetraspans. In vitro studies suggested a potential role in neurite outgrowth and spine formation and previous investigations have identified M6a as a stress-regulated gene. To investigate whether the distribution of M6a correlates with neuronal structures susceptible to alterations in response to stress, we localized M6a expression in neurons of hippocampal formation, prefrontal cortex and cerebellum using in situ hybridization and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. In situ hybridization confirmed that M6a is expressed in dentate gyrus and cerebellar granule neurons and in hippocampal and cortical pyramidal neurons. Confocal microscopy localized M6a immunoreactivity to distinct sites within axonal membranes, but not in dendrites or neuronal somata. Moreover, M6a colocalized with synaptic markers of glutamatergic, but not GABAergic nerve terminals. M6a expression in the adult brain is particularly strong in unmyelinated axonal fibers, i.e. cerebellar parallel and hippocampal mossy fibers. In contrast, myelinated axons exhibit only minimal M6a immunoreactivity localized exclusively to terminal regions. The present neuroanatomical data demonstrate that M6a is an axonal component of glutamatergic neurons and that it is localized to distinct sites of the axonal plasma membrane of pyramidal and granule cells. PMID:18241840

  15. Stepwise, non-adherent differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to generate basal forebrain cholinergic neurons via hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Lucy A; Byrne, Meg L; Taylor, Hannah; Kerrigan, Talitha L; Bru-Mercier, Gilles; Badger, Jennifer L; Barbuti, Peter A; Jo, Jihoon; Tyler, Sue J; Allen, Shelley J; Kunath, Tilo; Cho, Kwangwook; Caldwell, Maeve A

    2013-11-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (bfCNs) which provide innervation to the hippocampus and cortex, are required for memory and learning, and are primarily affected in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), resulting in related cognitive decline. Therefore generation of a source of bfCNs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is crucial for in vitro disease modeling and development of novel AD therapies. In addition, for the advancement of regenerative approaches there is a requirement for an accurate developmental model to study the neurogenesis and survival of this population. Here we demonstrate the efficient production of bfCNs, using a novel embryoid body (EB) based non-adherent differentiation (NAdD) protocol. We establish a specific basal forebrain neural stem cell (NSC) phenotype via expression of the basal forebrain transcription factors NKX2.1 and LHX8, as well as the general forebrain marker FOXG1. We present evidence that this lineage is achieved via recapitulation of embryonic events, with induction of intrinsic hedgehog signaling, through the use of a 3D non-adherent differentiation system. This is the first example of hPSC-derived basal forebrain-like NSCs, which are scalable via self-renewal in prolonged culture. Furthermore upon terminal differentiation these basal forebrain-like NSCs generate high numbers of cholinergic neurons expressing the specific markers ChAT, VACht and ISL1. These hPSC-derived bfCNs possess characteristics that are crucial in a model to study AD related cholinergic neuronal loss in the basal forebrain. Examples are expression of the therapeutic target p75(NTR), the release of acetylcholine, and demonstration of a mature, and functional electrophysiological profile. In conclusion, this work provides a renewable source of human functional bfCNs applicable for studying AD specifically in the cholinergic system, and also provides a model of the key embryonic events in human bfCN development. PMID:24013066

  16. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

    PubMed

    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day. PMID:27091299

  17. Modulation of learning and memory by the targeted deletion of the circadian clock gene Bmal1 in forebrain circuits.

    PubMed

    Snider, Kaitlin H; Dziema, Heather; Aten, Sydney; Loeser, Jacob; Norona, Frances E; Hoyt, Kari; Obrietan, Karl

    2016-07-15

    A large body of literature has shown that the disruption of circadian clock timing has profound effects on mood, memory and complex thinking. Central to this time keeping process is the master circadian pacemaker located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Of note, within the central nervous system, clock timing is not exclusive to the SCN, but rather, ancillary oscillatory capacity has been detected in a wide range of cell types and brain regions, including forebrain circuits that underlie complex cognitive processes. These observations raise questions about the hierarchical and functional relationship between the SCN and forebrain oscillators, and, relatedly, about the underlying clock-gated synaptic circuitry that modulates cognition. Here, we utilized a clock knockout strategy in which the essential circadian timing gene Bmal1 was selectively deleted from excitatory forebrain neurons, whilst the SCN clock remained intact, to test the role of forebrain clock timing in learning, memory, anxiety, and behavioral despair. With this model system, we observed numerous effects on hippocampus-dependent measures of cognition. Mice lacking forebrain Bmal1 exhibited deficits in both acquisition and recall on the Barnes maze. Notably, loss of forebrain Bmal1 abrogated time-of-day dependent novel object location memory. However, the loss of Bmal1 did not alter performance on the elevated plus maze, open field assay, and tail suspension test, indicating that this phenotype specifically impairs cognition but not affect. Together, these data suggest that forebrain clock timing plays a critical role in shaping the efficiency of learning and memory retrieval over the circadian day.

  18. Subventricular zone-derived neuroblasts use vasculature as a scaffold to migrate radially to the cortex in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Le Magueresse, Corentin; Alfonso, Julieta; Bark, Christine; Eliava, Marina; Khrulev, Sergey; Monyer, Hannah

    2012-10-01

    Neurons continue to be generated in the subventricular zone (SVZ) throughout postnatal development and adulthood in rodents. Whereas in adults, virtually all neuroblasts migrate tangentially to the olfactory bulb via the rostral migratory stream (RMS), in neonates, a substantial fraction migrate radially through the corpus callosum (CC) to the cortex. Mechanisms of radial cortical migration have remained unknown. We investigated this by taking recourse to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labeled neuroblasts in the CC and deep cortical layers of neonatal mice and found that they are frequently located adjacent to vasculature. Using time-lapse 2-photon microscopy in acute brain slices, we demonstrate that EGFP-labeled neuroblasts migrate along blood vessels. Although in close proximity to blood vessels, migrating neuroblasts are separated from endothelial cells by 1-2 layers of astrocytic processes, as revealed by electron microscopal studies of retrovirally labeled postnatally born cells. We propose that 2 factors could contribute to the decline of radial migration to the cortex during postnatal development, namely the establishment of a glial sheath delineating the RMS and a gradual decrease in the density of blood vessels in the CC. Together, our data provide evidence for a new mode of radial cortical migration of SVZ-generated neurons involving vasculature and astrocytes.

  19. Mechanisms of oligodendrocyte regeneration from ventricular-subventricular zone-derived progenitor cells in white matter diseases

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Takakuni; Liang, Anna C.; Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Lo, Eng H.; Arai, Ken

    2013-01-01

    White matter dysfunction is an important part of many CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS) and vascular dementia. Within injured areas, myelin loss and oligodendrocyte death may trigger endogenous attempts at regeneration. However, during disease progression, remyelination failure may eventually occur due to impaired survival/proliferation, migration/recruitment, and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) are the main sources of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs), which can give rise to neurons as well as OPCs. Under normal conditions in the adult brain, the V-SVZ progenitors generate a large number of neurons with a small number of oligodendrocyte lineage cells. However, after demyelination, the fate of V-SVZ-derived progenitor cells shifts from neurons to OPCs, and these newly generated OPCs migrate to the demyelinating lesions to ease white matter damage. In this mini-review, we will summarize the recent studies on extrinsic (e.g., vasculature, extracellular matrix (ECM), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) and intrinsic (e.g., transcription factors, epigenetic modifiers) factors, which mediate oligodendrocyte generation from the V-SVZ progenitor cells. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the fate of V-SVZ progenitor cells may lead to new therapeutic approaches for ameliorating white matter dysfunction and damage in CNS disorders. PMID:24421755

  20. A comparative study of the structural organization of spheres derived from the adult human subventricular zone and glioblastoma biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Vik-Mo, Einar Osland; Sandberg, Cecilie; Joel, Mrinal; Stangeland, Biljana; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Moe, Morten Carstens; Murrell, Wayne; Langmoen, Iver Arne

    2011-04-15

    Sphere forming assays have been useful to enrich for stem like cells in a range of tumors. The robustness of this system contrasts the difficulties in defining a stem cell population based on cell surface markers. We have undertaken a study to describe the cellular and organizational composition of tumorspheres, directly comparing these to neurospheres derived from the adult human subventricular zone (SVZ). Primary cell cultures from brain tumors were found to contain variable fractions of cells positive for tumor stem cell markers (CD133 (2-93%)/SSEA1 (3-15%)/CXCR4 (1-72%)). All cultures produced tumors upon xenografting. Tumorspheres contained a heterogeneous population of cells, but were structurally organized with stem cell markers present at the core of spheres, with markers of more mature glial progenitors and astrocytes at more peripheral location. Ultrastructural studies showed that tumorspheres contained a higher fraction of electron dense cells in the core than the periphery (36% and 19%, respectively). Neurospheres also contained a heterogeneous cell population, but did not have an organization similar to tumorspheres. Although tumorspheres clearly display irregular and neoplastic cells, they establish an organized structure with an outward gradient of differentiation. We suggest that this organization is central in maintaining the tumor stem cell pool.

  1. Anosmin-1 over-expression increases adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and neuroblast migration to the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    García-González, Diego; Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Esteban, Pedro F; Ortega, Felipe; Díaz, David; Sánchez-Vera, Irene; Lebrón-Galán, Rafael; Escobar-Castañondo, Laura; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Weruaga, Eduardo; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Berninger, Benedikt; de Castro, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    New subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neuroblasts that migrate via the rostral migratory stream are continuously added to the olfactory bulb (OB) of the adult rodent brain. Anosmin-1 (A1) is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) to exert its biological effects. When mutated as in Kallmann syndrome patients, A1 is associated with severe OB morphogenesis defects leading to anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Here, we show that A1 over-expression in adult mice strongly increases proliferation in the SVZ, mainly with symmetrical divisions, and produces substantial morphological changes in the normal SVZ architecture, where we also report the presence of FGFR1 in almost all SVZ cells. Interestingly, for the first time we show FGFR1 expression in the basal body of primary cilia in neural progenitor cells. Additionally, we have found that A1 over-expression also enhances neuroblast motility, mainly through FGFR1 activity. Together, these changes lead to a selective increase in several GABAergic interneuron populations in different OB layers. These specific alterations in the OB would be sufficient to disrupt the normal processing of sensory information and consequently alter olfactory memory. In summary, this work shows that FGFR1-mediated A1 activity plays a crucial role in the continuous remodelling of the adult OB. PMID:25300351

  2. Expression of delta- and mu-opioid receptors in the ventricular and subventricular zones of the developing human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Anushree; Khurshid, Nazia; Kumar, Praveen; Iyengar, Soumya

    2008-07-01

    Recent research has documented the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in neural development, including neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation. However, the expression of opioid receptors (ORs) in different cell types of the human ventricular and subventricular zones (VZ and SVZ) has not been studied during early gestation. In the present study, we have used immunohistochemistry and quantified the results to demonstrate that the levels of delta- and mu-OR subtypes were high in the VZ and SVZ between 11 and 16 gestation weeks (GW) and decreased by 20GW. These results have also been confirmed by studying OR mRNA expression in the VZ and SVZ. Both delta- and mu-OR subtypes were expressed by multipotential stem cells, newly differentiated neurons and developing glial cells to different extents. However, migrating neurons expressed negligible levels of both OR subtypes. Our results suggest that the opioid system may affect cellular proliferation and/or differentiation of stem cells into neurons and glia during the first and second trimesters of gestation in humans. Since layers II and III of the cerebral cortex are being formed during the second trimester, their development is most likely affected by the opioid system mediated through delta- and mu-ORs.

  3. Lithium restores neurogenesis in the subventricular zone of the Ts65Dn mouse, a model for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Patrizia; Ciani, Elisabetta; Contestabile, Andrea; Guidi, Sandra; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), a high-incidence genetic pathology, involves brain hypoplasia and mental retardation. Emerging evidence suggests that reduced neurogenesis may be a major determinant of brain underdevelopment in DS. To establish whether it is possible to improve neurogenesis in DS, Ts65Dn mice--the most widely used model for DS--and euploid mice were treated with control or lithium chow for 1 month. During the last 3 days animals received one daily injection of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU)--a marker of proliferating cells--and were sacrificed 24 h after the last injection. Neurogenesis was examined in the subventricular zone (SVZ), a region that retains a neurogenic potential across life. We found that Ts65Dn mice had less (-40%) BrdU+ cells than euploid mice, indicating severe proliferation impairment. Treatment with lithium increased the number of Brdu+ cells in both euploid and Ts65Dn mice. In the latter the number of Brdu+ cells became similar to that of untreated euploid mice. Our study shows that lithium is able to restore cell proliferation in the SVZ of the Ts65Dn mouse and point at treatments with mood stabilizers as a potential tool to improve neurogenesis in patients with DS.

  4. Ontogeny of CX3CR1-EGFP expressing cells unveil microglia as an integral component of the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Anna L; Lima, Flavia R S; Nedergaard, Maiken; Menezes, João R L

    2015-01-01

    The full spectrum of cellular interactions within CNS neurogenic niches is still poorly understood. Only recently has the monocyte counterpart of the nervous system, the microglial cells, been described as an integral cellular component of neurogenic niches. The present study sought to characterize the microglia population in the early postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ), the major site of postnatal neurogenesis, as well as in its anterior extension, the rostral migratory stream (RMS), a pathway for neuroblasts during their transit toward the olfactory bulb (OB) layers. Here we show that microglia within the SVZ/RMS pathway are not revealed by phenotypic markers that characterize microglia in other regions. Analysis of the transgenic mice strain that has one locus of the constitutively expressed fractalkine CX3CR1 receptor replaced by the gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) circumvented the antigenic plasticity of the microglia, thus allowing us to depict microglia within the SVZ/RMS pathway during early development. Notably, microglia within the early SVZ/RMS are not proliferative and display a protracted development, retaining a more immature morphology than their counterparts outside germinal layers. Furthermore, microglia contact and phagocyte radial glia cells (RG) processes, thereby playing a role on the astroglial transformation that putative stem cells within the SVZ niche undergo during the first postnatal days.

  5. Ontogeny of CX3CR1-EGFP expressing cells unveil microglia as an integral component of the postnatal subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Anna L.; Lima, Flavia R. S.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Menezes, João R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The full spectrum of cellular interactions within CNS neurogenic niches is still poorly understood. Only recently has the monocyte counterpart of the nervous system, the microglial cells, been described as an integral cellular component of neurogenic niches. The present study sought to characterize the microglia population in the early postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ), the major site of postnatal neurogenesis, as well as in its anterior extension, the rostral migratory stream (RMS), a pathway for neuroblasts during their transit toward the olfactory bulb (OB) layers. Here we show that microglia within the SVZ/RMS pathway are not revealed by phenotypic markers that characterize microglia in other regions. Analysis of the transgenic mice strain that has one locus of the constitutively expressed fractalkine CX3CR1 receptor replaced by the gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) circumvented the antigenic plasticity of the microglia, thus allowing us to depict microglia within the SVZ/RMS pathway during early development. Notably, microglia within the early SVZ/RMS are not proliferative and display a protracted development, retaining a more immature morphology than their counterparts outside germinal layers. Furthermore, microglia contact and phagocyte radial glia cells (RG) processes, thereby playing a role on the astroglial transformation that putative stem cells within the SVZ niche undergo during the first postnatal days. PMID:25741237

  6. Characterization of neural stem/progenitor cells expressing VEGF and its receptors in the subventricular zone of newborn piglet brain.

    PubMed

    Ara, Jahan; Fekete, Saskia; Zhu, Anli; Frank, Melissa

    2010-09-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cell (NSP) biology and neurogenesis in adult central nervous system (CNS) are important both towards potential future therapeutic applications for CNS repair, and for the fundamental function of the CNS. In the present study, we report the characterization of NSP population from subventricular zone (SVZ) of neonatal piglet brain using in vivo and in vitro systems. We show that the nestin and vimentin-positive neural progenitor cells are present in the SVZ of the lateral ventricles of neonatal piglet brain. In vitro, piglet NSPs proliferated as neurospheres, expressed the typical protein of neural progenitors, nestin and a range of well-established neurodevelopmental markers. Upon dissociation and subculture, piglet NSPs differentiated into neurons and glial cells. Clonal analysis demonstrates that piglet NSPs are multipotent and retain the capacity to generate both glia and neurons. These cells expressed VEGF, VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and Neuropilin-1 and -2 mRNAs. Real time PCR revealed that SVZ NSPs from newborn piglet expressed total VEGF and all VEGF splice variants. These findings show that piglet NSPs may be helpful to more effectively design growth factor based strategies to enhance endogenous precursor cells for cell transplantation studies potentially leading to the application of this strategy in the nervous system disease and injury.

  7. GSK3β regulates oligodendrogenesis in the dorsal microdomain of the subventricular zone via Wnt-β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Azim, Kasum; Rivera, Andrea; Raineteau, Olivier; Butt, Arthur M

    2014-05-01

    Oligodendrocytes, the myelinating cells of the CNS, are derived postnatally from oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) of the subventricular zone (SVZ). However, the mechanisms that regulate their generation from SVZ neural stem cells (NSC) are poorly understood. Here, we have examined the role of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), an effector of multiple converging signaling pathways in postnatal mice. The expression of GSK3β by rt-qPCR was most prominent in the SVZ and in the developing white matter, around the first 1–2 weeks of postnatal life, coinciding with the peak periods of OP differentiation. Intraventricular infusion of the GSK3β inhibitor ARA-014418 in mice aged postnatal day (P) 8–11 significantly increased generation of OPs in the dorsal microdomain of the SVZ, as shown by expression of cell specific markers using rt-qPCR and immunolabelling. Analysis of stage specific markers revealed that the augmentation of OPs occurred via increased specification from earlier SVZ cell types. These effects of GSK3β inhibition on the dorsal SVZ were largely attributable to stimulation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway over other pathways. The results indicate GSK3β is a key endogenous factor for specifically regulating oligodendrogenesis from the dorsal SVZ microdomain under the control of Wnt-signaling.

  8. Regulation of Olig2 during astroglial differentiation in the subventricular zone of a cuprizone-induced demyelination mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chen, L P; Li, Z F; Ping, M; Li, R; Liu, J; Xie, X H; Song, X J; Guo, L

    2012-09-27

    The mammalian subventricular zone (SVZ) is the largest germinative zone of the adult brain. Progenitor cells generated from the SVZ play important roles during the remyelination process. To determine the functional role of Olig2 in regulating astroglial differentiation in the mouse SVZ, we used the cuprizone mouse model to investigate demyelination. We found that cuprizone administration significantly enhanced the expression of Olig2 and increased astroglial differentiation in the SVZ, as compared with control. Moreover, cytoplasmic translocation of Olig2 occurred after demyelination. In vitro studies further revealed that supplementation of culture media with growth factors enhanced the oligodendroglial differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), whereas serum alone promoted astroglial differentiation and cytoplasmic translocation of Olig2. Additionally, the expression levels of bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4 (BMP2 and BMP4) and inhibitor of DNA binding 2 and 4 (Id2 and Id4) were greatly elevated during astroglial differentiation. BMP inhibition by noggin suppressed the astroglial differentiation of OPCs. Our results indicate that Olig2 may serve as a key regulator during the directional differentiation of progenitor cells after demyelination. The BMP signaling pathway may contribute to the cytoplasmic translocation and altered expression of Olig2 during the remyelination process. These findings provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in remyelination.

  9. Altered speeds and trajectories of neurons migrating in the ventricular and subventricular zones of the reeler neocortex.

    PubMed

    Britto, Joanne M; Tait, Karen J; Johnston, Leigh A; Hammond, Vicki E; Kalloniatis, Michael; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2011-05-01

    The Reelin signaling pathway is essential for proper cortical development, but it is unclear to whether Reelin function is primarily important for cortical layering or neuron migration. It has been proposed that Reelin is perhaps required only for somal translocation but not glial-dependent locomotion. This implies that the location of neurons responding to Reelin is restricted to the outer regions of the cortical plate (CP). To determine whether Reelin is required for migration outside of the CP, we used time-lapse imaging to track the behavior of cells undergoing locomotion in the germinal zones. We focused on the migratory activity in the ventricular/subventricular zones where the first transition of bipolar to multipolar migration occurs and where functional Reelin receptors are known to be expressed. Despite Reelin loss, neurons had no difficulty in undergoing radial migration and indeed displayed greater migratory speed. Additionally, compared with the wild-type, reeler neurons displayed altered trajectories with greater deviation from a radial path. These results suggest that Reelin loss has early consequences for migration in the germinal zones that are portrayed as defective radial trajectories and migratory speeds. Together, these abnormalities can give rise to the increased cell dispersion observed in the reeler cortex. PMID:20847150

  10. Dissociation of feeding and hoarding after bilateral destruction of lateral septal nuclei in rats.

    PubMed

    Gogate, M G; Salgar, D C; Brid, S V; Wingkar, K C

    1989-01-01

    The interrelationship between Feeding and Hoarding of food pellets was observed to be disrupted following bilateral destruction of lateral septal nuclei in adult male albino rats. The significance of forebrain areas and neuro-endocrinal connection to hypothalamus is discussed. PMID:2737748

  11. Forebrain neural patterns associated with sex differences in autonomic and cardiovascular function during baroreceptor unloading.

    PubMed

    Kimmerly, D S; Wong, S; Menon, R; Shoemaker, J K

    2007-02-01

    Generally, women demonstrate smaller autonomic and cardiovascular reactions to stress, compared with men. The mechanism of this sex-dependent difference is unknown, although reduced baroreflex sensitivity may be involved. Recently, we identified a cortical network associated with autonomic cardiovascular responses to baroreceptor unloading in men. The current investigation examined whether differences in the neural activity patterns within this network were related to sex-related physiological responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 5, 15, and 35 mmHg). Forebrain activity in healthy men and women (n = 8 each) was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast. Stroke volume (SV), heart rate (HR), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were collected on a separate day. Men had larger decreases in SV than women (P < 0.01) during 35 mmHg LBNP only. At 35 mmHg LBNP, HR increased more in males then females (9 +/- 1 beats/min vs. 4 +/- 1 beats/min, P < 0.05). Compared with women, increases in total MSNA were similar at 15 mmHg LBNP but greater during 35 mmHg LBNP in men [1,067 +/- 123 vs. 658 +/- 103 arbitrary units (au), P < 0.05]. BOLD signal changes (P < 0.005, uncorrected) were identified within discrete forebrain regions associated with these sex-specific HR and MSNA responses. Men had larger increases in BOLD signal within the right insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex than women. Furthermore, men demonstrated greater BOLD signal reductions in the right amygdala, left insula, ventral anterior cingulate, and ventral medial prefrontal cortex vs. women. The greater changes in forebrain activity in men vs. women may have contributed to the elevated HR and sympathetic responses observed in men during 35 mmHg LBNP. PMID:17272671

  12. Forebrain regions associated with postexercise differences in autonomic and cardiovascular function during baroreceptor unloading.

    PubMed

    Kimmerly, D S; Wong, S W; Salzer, D; Menon, R; Shoemaker, J K

    2007-07-01

    The cortical regions representing peripheral autonomic reactions in humans are poorly understood. This study examined whether changes in forebrain activity were associated with the altered physiological responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) following a single bout of dynamic exercise (POST-EX). We hypothesized that, compared with the nonexercised condition (NO-EX), POST-EX would elicit greater reductions in stroke volume (SV) and larger increases in heart rate (HR) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during LBNP (5, 15, and 35 mmHg). Forebrain neural activity (n = 11) was measured using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging. HR, SV, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and MSNA were collected separately. Compared with NO-EX, baseline ABP was reduced, whereas HR and total vascular conductance (TVC) were elevated in POST-EX (P < 0.05). In both conditions, 5 mmHg LBNP did not elicit a change (from baseline) in any physiological parameter. Compared with NO-EX, 35 mmHg LBNP-mediated decreases in SV and TVC produced greater increases in HR and MSNA during POST-EX (P < 0.05). The right posterior insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex demonstrated a larger decrease in BOLD at 5 mmHg LBNP but greater BOLD increase at 15 and 35 mmHg LBNP POST-EX vs. NO-EX (P < 0.005). Conversely, the thalamus and ventral medial prefrontal cortex displayed the opposite BOLD activity pattern (i.e., larger increase at 5 mmHg LBNP but greater decrease at 15 and 35 mmHg LBNP POST-EX vs. NO-EX). Our findings suggest that discrete forebrain regions may be involved with the generation of baroreflex-mediated sympathetic and cardiovascular responses elicited by moderate LBNP. PMID:17351074

  13. Internal field strength measurements in chick forebrains at 50, 147, and 450 MHz.

    PubMed

    Weil, C M; Spiegel, R J; Joines, W T

    1984-01-01

    This report describes some experimental measurements of the internal field levels induced within isolated chick-forebrains irradiated at 50, 147, and 450 MHz, under essentially the same conditions as those used in the in vitro calcium-ion efflux experiments. Ratios of incident power at 50/147 MHz and 147/450 MHz that are needed to establish the same probe output are given and comparisons made with values predicted by different spherical models. Data predicted by the layered-sphere model were found to be in close agreement with measured values for the 50/147-MHz ratio. Agreement for the 147/450-MHz ratio was poorer.

  14. LRP2 is an auxiliary SHH receptor required to condition the forebrain ventral midline for inductive signals.

    PubMed

    Christ, Annabel; Christa, Anna; Kur, Esther; Lioubinski, Oleg; Bachmann, Sebastian; Willnow, Thomas E; Hammes, Annette

    2012-02-14

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is a regulator of forebrain development that acts through its receptor, patched 1. However, little is known about cellular mechanisms at neurulation, whereby SHH from the prechordal plate governs specification of the rostral diencephalon ventral midline (RDVM), a major forebrain organizer. We identified LRP2, a member of the LDL receptor gene family, as a component of the SHH signaling machinery in the RDVM. LRP2 acts as an apical SHH-binding protein that sequesters SHH in its target field and controls internalization and cellular trafficking of SHH/patched 1 complexes. Lack of LRP2 in mice and in cephalic explants results in failure to respond to SHH, despite functional expression of patched 1 and smoothened, whereas overexpression of LRP2 variants in cells increases SHH signaling capacity. Our data identify a critical role for LRP2 in SHH signaling and reveal the molecular mechanism underlying forebrain anomalies in mice and patients with Lrp2 defects.

  15. Defects in subventricular zone pigmented epithelium-derived factor niche signaling in the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garcia, Paola; Díaz-Moreno, María; Gil-Gas, Carmen; Fernández-Gómez, Francisco J; Honrubia-Gómez, Paloma; Álvarez-Simón, Carmen Belén; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cano, Juan Carlos Castillo; Almeida, Francisco; Blanco, Vicente; Jordán, Joaquín; Mira, Helena; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    We studied potential changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAM-P8) aging model. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assays with longtime survival revealed a lower number of label-retaining stem cells in the SAM-P8 SVZ compared with the SAM-Resistant 1 (SAM-R1) control strain. We also found that in SAM-P8 niche signaling is attenuated and the stem cell pool is less responsive to the self-renewal niche factor pigmented epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Protein analysis demonstrated stable amounts of the PEDF ligand in the SAM-P8 SVZ niche; however, SAM-P8 stem cells present a significant expression decrease of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2, a receptor for PEDF (PNPLA2-PEDF) receptor, but not of laminin receptor (LR), a receptor for PEDF (LR-PEDF) receptor. We observed changes in self-renewal related genes (hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes5), Sox2] and report that although these genes are down-regulated in SAM-P8, differentiation genes (Pax6) are up-regulated and neurogenesis is increased. Finally, sheltering mammalian telomere complexes might be also involved given a down-regulation of telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (Terf1) expression was observed in SAM-P8 at young age periods. Differences between these 2 models, SAM-P8 and SAM-R1 controls, have been previously detected at more advanced ages. We now describe alterations in the PEDF signaling pathway and stem cell self-renewal at a very young age, which could be involved in the premature senescence observed in the SAM-P8 model. PMID:25636741

  16. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells

    PubMed Central

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M.; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain. PMID:26528139

  17. Evidence for a subventricular zone neural stem cell phagocytic activity stimulated by the vitamin K-dependent factor protein S.

    PubMed

    Ginisty, Aurélie; Gély-Pernot, Aurore; Abaamrane, Loubna; Morel, Franck; Arnault, Patricia; Coronas, Valérie; Benzakour, Omar

    2015-02-01

    Neural stem cells, whose major reservoir in the adult mammalian brain is the subventricular zone (SVZ), ensure neuropoiesis, a process during which many generated cells die. Removal of dead cells and debris by phagocytes is necessary for tissue homeostasis. Using confocal and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that cultured SVZ cells phagocytose both 1 and 2 µm latex beads and apoptotic cell-derived fragments. We determine by flow cytometry that phagocytic cells represent more than 10% of SVZ cultured cells. Phenotyping of SVZ cells using nestin, GFAP, Sox2, or LeX/SSEA and quantification of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, reveals that cells with neural stem-cell features phagocytose and represent more than 30% of SVZ phagocytic cells. In vivo, nestin-, Sox2-, and ALDH-expressing neural stem-like cells engulfed latex beads or apoptotic cell-derived fragments that were injected into mice lateral brain ventricles. We show also that SVZ cell phagocytic activity is an active process, which depends both on cytoskeleton dynamic and on recognition of phosphatidylserine eat-me signal, and is stimulated by the vitamin K-dependent factor protein S (ProS). ProS neutralizing antibodies inhibit SVZ cell phagocytic activity and exposure of SVZ cells to apoptotic cell-derived fragments induces a transient Mer tyrosine kinase receptor (MerTK) phosphorylation. Conversely, MerTK blocking antibodies impair both basal and ProS-stimulated SVZ cell phagocytic activity. By revealing that neural stem-like cells act within the SVZ neurogenic niche as phagocytes and that the ProS/MerTK path represents an endogenous regulatory mechanism for SVZ cell phagocytic activity, the present report opens-up new perspectives for both stem cell biology and brain physiopathology.

  18. Cellular Composition and Organization of the Subventricular Zone and Rostral Migratory Stream in the Adult and Neonatal Common Marmoset Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Hirota, Yuki; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Soriano-Navarro, Mario; He, Xiaoping; Hayakawa-Yano, Yoshika; Yamada, Masayuki; Hikishima, Keigo; Tabata, Hidenori; Iwanami, Akio; Nakajima, Kazunori; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Toshio; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Okano, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle contains neural stem cells. In rodents, these cells generate neuroblasts that migrate as chains toward the olfactory bulb along the rostral migratory stream (RMS). The neural-stem-cell niche at the ventricular wall is conserved in various animal species, including primates. However, it is unclear how the SVZ and RMS organization in nonhuman primates relates to that of rodents and humans. Here we studied the SVZ and RMS of the adult and neonatal common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a New World primate used widely in neuroscience, by electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical detection of cell-type-specific markers. The marmoset SVZ contained cells similar to type B, C, and A cells of the rodent SVZ in their marker expression and morphology. The adult marmoset SVZ had a three-layer organization, as in the human brain, with ependymal, hypocellular, and astro-cyte-ribbon layers. However, the hypocellular layer was very thin or absent in the adult-anterior and neonatal SVZ. Anti-PSA-NCAM staining of the anterior SVZ in whole-mount ventricular wall preparations of adult marmosets revealed an extensive network of elongated cell aggregates similar to the neuroblast chains in rodents. Time-lapse recordings of marmoset SVZ explants cultured in Matrigel showed the neuroblasts migrating in chains, like rodent type A cells. These results suggest that some features of neurogenesis and neuronal migration in the SVZ are common to marmosets, humans, and rodents. This basic description of the adult and neonatal marmoset SVZ will be useful for future studies on adult neurogenesis in primates. PMID:21246550

  19. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  20. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis. PMID:25852474

  1. PPARβ/δ and PPARγ maintain undifferentiated phenotypes of mouse adult neural precursor cells from the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Carolina; Araya, Claudia; Palma, Verónica; Bronfman, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) is one of the main niches of neural stem cells in the adult mammalian brain. Stem and precursor cells in this region are the source for neurogenesis and oligodendrogesis, mainly in the olfactory bulb and corpus callosum, respectively. The identification of the molecular components regulating the decision of these cells to differentiate or maintain an undifferentiated state is important in order to understand the modulation of neurogenic processes in physiological and pathological conditions. PPARs are a group of transcription factors, activated by lipid ligands, with important functions in cellular differentiation and proliferation in several tissues. In this work, we demonstrate that mouse adult neural precursor cells (NPCs), in situ and in vitro, express PPARβ/δ and PPARγ. Pharmacological activation of both PPARs isoforms induces proliferation and maintenance of the undifferentiated phenotype. Congruently, inhibition of PPARβ/δ and PPARγ results in a decrease of proliferation and loss of the undifferentiated phenotype. Interestingly, PPARγ regulates the level of EGFR in adult NPCs, concurrent with it is function described in embryonic NPCs. Furthermore, we describe for the first time that PPARβ/δ regulates SOX2 level in adult NPCs, probably through a direct transcriptional regulation, as we identified two putative PPAR response elements in the promoter region of Sox2. EGFR and SOX2 are key players in neural stem/precursor cells self-renewal. Finally, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ ligand, increases PPARβ/δ level, suggesting a possible cooperation between these two PPARs in the control of cell fate behavior. Our work contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated to neural cell fate decision and places PPARβ/δ and PPARγ as interesting new targets of modulation of mammalian brain homeostasis.

  2. Neural progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone present hemichannel activity and form functional gap junctions with glial cells.

    PubMed

    Talaverón, Rocío; Fernández, Paola; Escamilla, Rosalba; Pastor, Angel M; Matarredona, Esperanza R; Sáez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    The postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ) lining the walls of the lateral ventricles contains neural progenitor cells (NPCs) that generate new olfactory bulb interneurons. Communication via gap junctions between cells in the SVZ is involved in NPC proliferation and in neuroblast migration towards the olfactory bulb. SVZ NPCs can be expanded in vitro in the form of neurospheres that can be used for transplantation purposes after brain injury. We have previously reported that neurosphere-derived NPCs form heterocellular gap junctions with host glial cells when they are implanted after mechanical injury. To analyze functionality of NPC-glial cell gap junctions we performed dye coupling experiments in co-cultures of SVZ NPCs with astrocytes or microglia. Neurosphere-derived cells expressed mRNA for at least the hemichannel/gap junction channel proteins connexin 26 (Cx26), Cx43, Cx45 and pannexin 1 (Panx1). Dye coupling experiments revealed that gap junctional communication occurred among neurosphere cells (incidence of coupling: 100%). Moreover, hemichannel activity was also detected in neurosphere cells as evaluated in time-lapse measurements of ethidium bromide uptake. Heterocellular coupling between NPCs and glial cells was evidenced in co-cultures of neurospheres with astrocytes (incidence of coupling: 91.0 ± 4.7%) or with microglia (incidence of coupling: 71.9 ± 6.7%). Dye coupling in neurospheres and in co-cultures was inhibited by octanol, a gap junction blocker. Altogether, these results suggest the existence of functional hemichannels and gap junction channels in postnatal SVZ neurospheres. In addition, they demonstrate that SVZ-derived NPCs can establish functional gap junctions with astrocytes or microglia. Therefore, cell-cell communication via gap junctions and hemichannels with host glial cells might subserve a role in the functional integration of NPCs after implantation in the damaged brain.

  3. Defects in subventricular zone pigmented epithelium-derived factor niche signaling in the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garcia, Paola; Díaz-Moreno, María; Gil-Gas, Carmen; Fernández-Gómez, Francisco J; Honrubia-Gómez, Paloma; Álvarez-Simón, Carmen Belén; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Cano, Juan Carlos Castillo; Almeida, Francisco; Blanco, Vicente; Jordán, Joaquín; Mira, Helena; Ramírez-Castillejo, Carmen

    2015-04-01

    We studied potential changes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone-8 (SAM-P8) aging model. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) assays with longtime survival revealed a lower number of label-retaining stem cells in the SAM-P8 SVZ compared with the SAM-Resistant 1 (SAM-R1) control strain. We also found that in SAM-P8 niche signaling is attenuated and the stem cell pool is less responsive to the self-renewal niche factor pigmented epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Protein analysis demonstrated stable amounts of the PEDF ligand in the SAM-P8 SVZ niche; however, SAM-P8 stem cells present a significant expression decrease of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2, a receptor for PEDF (PNPLA2-PEDF) receptor, but not of laminin receptor (LR), a receptor for PEDF (LR-PEDF) receptor. We observed changes in self-renewal related genes (hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1), hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes5), Sox2] and report that although these genes are down-regulated in SAM-P8, differentiation genes (Pax6) are up-regulated and neurogenesis is increased. Finally, sheltering mammalian telomere complexes might be also involved given a down-regulation of telomeric repeat binding factor 1 (Terf1) expression was observed in SAM-P8 at young age periods. Differences between these 2 models, SAM-P8 and SAM-R1 controls, have been previously detected at more advanced ages. We now describe alterations in the PEDF signaling pathway and stem cell self-renewal at a very young age, which could be involved in the premature senescence observed in the SAM-P8 model.

  4. Sleep-waking states develop independently in the isolated forebrain and brain stem following early postnatal midbrain transection in cats.

    PubMed

    Villablanca, J R; de Andrés, I; Olmstead, C E

    2001-01-01

    We report the effects of permanently separating the immature forebrain from the brain stem upon sleeping and waking development. Kittens ranging from postnatal 9 to 27 days of age sustained a mesencephalic transection and were maintained for up to 135 days. Prior to postnatal day 40, the electroencephalogram of the isolated forebrain and behavioral sleep-wakefulness of the decerebrate animal showed the immature patterns of normal young kittens. Thereafter, the isolated forebrain showed alternating sleep-wakefulness electrocortical rhythms similar to the corresponding normal patterns of intact, mature cats. Olfactory stimuli generally changed forebrain sleeping into waking activity, and in cats with the section behind the third nerve nuclei, normal correlates of eye movements-pupillary activity with electrocortical rhythms were present. Behind the transection, decerebrate animals showed wakefulness, and after 20 days of age displayed typical behavioral episodes of rapid eye movements sleep and, during these periods, the pontine recordings showed ponto-geniculo-occipital waves, which are markers for this sleep stage, together with muscle atonia and rapid lateral eye movements. Typically, but with remarkable exceptions suggesting humoral interactions, the sleep-waking patterns of the isolated forebrain were dissociated from those of the decerebrate animal. These results were very similar to our previous findings in midbrain-transected adult cats. However, subtle differences suggested greater functional plasticity in the developing versus the adult isolated forebrain. We conclude that behavioral and electroencephalographic patterns of non-rapid eye movement sleep and of rapid eye movement sleep states mature independently in the forebrain and the brain stem, respectively, after these structures are separated early postnatally. In terms of waking, the findings strengthen our concept that in higher mammals the rostral brain can independently support wakefulness

  5. Beta-catenin-mediated cell-adhesion is vital for embryonic forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Dirk; Hack, Iris; Frotscher, Michael; Taylor, Verdon; Kemler, Rolf

    2005-06-01

    Forming a complex structure such as the mammalian brain requires a complex interplay between cells and different signalling cascades during embryonic development. beta-catenin plays pivotal roles in these processes by mediating cadherin-based cell adhesion and Wnt signalling. We show for the first time that beta-catenin functions predominantly as a mediator of cell adhesion during early development of the mammalian telencephalon. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrates that beta-catenin is localized, together with N-cadherin, to adhesion junctions at the apical lining of the neuroepithelium. The ablation of beta-catenin specifically from the forebrain leads to a disruption of apical adherens junctions and a breakdown of neuroepithelial structures. We show that beta-catenin-deficient neuroepithelial cells delaminate and undergo apoptosis. Newborn beta-catenin mutants lack the entire forebrain and anterior facial structures. Our data also indicate a lack of TCF/LEF-beta-catenin-dependent transcriptional activity in the telencephalon of Wnt reporter embryos. Together with the absence of nuclear beta-catenin, this finding suggests that canonical Wnt signalling is not active during early telencephalic development. In summary, we demonstrate that beta-catenin mediates cell-cell adhesion in the early telencephalon and is vital for maintaining the structural integrity of the neuroepithelium.

  6. Forebrain glutamatergic neurons mediate leptin action on depression-like behaviors and synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming; Lu, Yuan; Garza, Jacob C; Li, Yuqing; Chua, Streamson C; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Bai; Lu, Xin-Yun

    2012-01-01

    The glutamatergic system has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressants. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, has antidepressant-like properties. However, the functional role of leptin receptor (Lepr) signaling in glutamatergic neurons remains to be elucidated. In this study, we generated conditional knockout mice in which the long form of Lepr was ablated selectively in glutamatergic neurons located in the forebrain structures, including the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (Lepr cKO). Lepr cKO mice exhibit normal growth and body weight. Behavioral characterization of Lepr cKO mice reveals depression-like behavioral deficits, including anhedonia, behavioral despair, enhanced learned helplessness and social withdrawal, with no evident signs of anxiety. In addition, loss of Lepr in forebrain glutamatergic neurons facilitates NMDA-induced hippocampal long-term synaptic depression (LTD), whereas conventional LTD or long-term potentiation (LTP) was not affected. The facilitated LTD induction requires activation of the GluN2B subunit as it was completely blocked by a selective GluN2B antagonist. Moreover, Lepr cKO mice are highly sensitive to the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of the GluN2B antagonist but resistant to leptin. These results support important roles for Lepr signaling in glutamatergic neurons in regulating depression-related behaviors and modulating excitatory synaptic strength, suggesting a possible association between synaptic depression and behavioral manifestations of depression.

  7. The Impact of Hippocampal Lesions on Trace Eyeblink Conditioning and Forebrain-Cerebellar Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Craig; Disterhoft, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago Behavioral Neuroscience published a pivotal paper by Moyer, Deyo and Disterhoft (1990) that described the impaired acquisition of trace eyeblink conditioning in rabbits with complete removal of the hippocampus. As part of the Behavioral Neuroscience celebration commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Journal, we reflect upon the impact of that study on understanding the role of the hippocampus, forebrain, and forebrain-cerebellar interactions that mediate acquisition and retention of trace conditioned responses, and of declarative memory more globally. We discuss the expansion of the conditioning paradigm to species other than the rabbit, the heterogeneity of responses among hippocampal neurons during trace conditioning, the responsivity of hippocampal neurons following consolidation of conditioning, the role of awareness in conditioning, how blink conditioning can be used as a translational tool by assaying potential therapeutics for cognitive enhancement, how trace and delay classical conditioning may be used to investigate neurological disorders including Alzheimer's Disease and schizophrenia, and how the two paradigms may be used to understand the relationship between declarative and nondeclarative memory systems. PMID:26214216

  8. Generation and behavioral characterization of beta-catenin forebrain-specific conditional knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Gould, Todd D; O'Donnell, Kelley C; Picchini, Alyssa M; Dow, Eliot R; Chen, Guang; Manji, Husseini K

    2008-05-16

    The canonical Wnt pathway and beta-catenin have been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. We generated forebrain-specific CRE-mediated conditional beta-catenin knock-out mice to begin exploring the behavioral implications of decreased Wnt pathway signaling in the central nervous system. In situ hybridization revealed a progressive knock-out of beta-catenin that began between 2 and 4 weeks of age, and by 12 weeks resulted in considerably decreased beta-catenin expression in regions of the forebrain, including the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. A significant decrease in protein levels of beta-catenin in these brain regions was observed by Western blot. Behavioral characterization of these mice in several tests (including the forced swim test, tail suspension test (TST), learned helplessness, response and sensitization to stimulants, and light/dark box among other tests) revealed relatively circumscribed alterations. In the TST, knock-out mice spent significantly less time struggling (a depression-like phenotype). However, knock-out mice did not differ from their wild-type littermates in the other behavioral tests of mood-related or anxiety-related behaviors. These results suggest that a 60-70% beta-catenin reduction in circumscribed brain regions is only capable of inducing subtle behavioral changes. Alternatively, regulating beta-catenin may modulate drug effects rather than being a model of mood disorder pathophysiology per se.

  9. [REM sleep modulation by non-GABAergic neurons of the hypothalamus and basal forebrain].

    PubMed

    Reinoso Suárez, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The ventral part of the oral pontine reticular nucleus (vRPO) is a demonstrated site of brainstem REM-sleep generation and maintenance. The vRPO has reciprocal connections with structures that control other states of the sleep-wakefulness cycle, many situated in the basal forebrain and the diencephalon. The aim of the present revision is to map, using the results described in previous publications of our group, the local origin of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus non-GABAergic projections to the vRPO, and specially the contribution of the hypothalamic neurons positive to hypocretin/orexin (H/O) peptides. I summarize non-GABAergic projections to the vRPO from the: ipsilateral central amygdaline nucleus and the stria terminalis bed nuclei, bilateral projections, but most abundant in the ipsilateral side, from the median preoptic nucleus, medial and lateral preoptic areas, abundant from the zona incerta and dorsal, lateral, posterior and perifornical hypothalamic areas. Very abundant bilateral projections of H/O neurons to the vRPO are described, expressive of the important modulation exerted by these neurons on the vRPO nucleus. I discuss the functional significance of the above results and the corresponding mechanisms, supported by physiological and ultrastructural results of our group. Based on the connections and action mechanisms of H/O neurons on the vRPO, which produce the decreased activity of neurons in this nucleus and, therefore, inhibition of REM sleep, I reflect briefly on narcolepsy pathophysiology.

  10. Representation of binaural spatial cues in field L of the barn owl forebrain.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Y E; Knudsen, E I

    1998-02-01

    This study examined the representation of spatial information in the barn owl Field L, the first telencephalic processing stage of the classical auditory pathway. Field L units were recorded extracellularly, and their responses to dichotically presented interaural time differences (ITD) and interaural level differences (ILD) were tested. We observed a variety of tuning profiles in Field L. Some sites were not sensitive to ITD or ILD. Other sites, especially those in the high-frequency region, were highly selective for values of ITD and ILD. These sites had multipeaked (commonly called "phase ambiguous") ITD tuning profiles and were tuned for a single value of ILD. The tuning properties of these sites are similar to those seen in the lateral shell of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Although the tuning properties of Field L sites were similar to those observed in the inferior colliculus, the functional organization of this spatial information was fundamentally different. Whereas in the inferior colliculus spatial information is organized into global topographics maps, in Field L spatial information is organized into local clusters, with sites having similar binaural tuning properties grouped together. The representation of binaural cues in Field L suggests that it is involved in auditory space processing but at a lower level of information processing than the auditory archistriatum, a forebrain area that is specialized for processing spatial information, and that the levels of information processing in the forebrain space processing pathway are remarkably similar to those in the well-known midbrain space processing pathway. PMID:9463449

  11. Loss of Lrp2 in zebrafish disrupts pronephric tubular clearance but not forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Kur, Esther; Christa, Anna; Veth, Kerry N; Gajera, Chandresh R; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Zhang, Jingjing; Willer, Jason R; Gregg, Ronald G; Abdelilah-Seyfried, Salim; Bachmann, Sebastian; Link, Brian A; Hammes, Annette; Willnow, Thomas E

    2011-06-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2) is a multifunctional cell surface receptor conserved from nematodes to humans. In mammals, it acts as regulator of sonic hedgehog and bone morphogenetic protein pathways in patterning of the embryonic forebrain and as a clearance receptor in the adult kidney. Little is known about activities of this LRP in other phyla. Here, we extend the functional elucidation of LRP2 to zebrafish as a model organism of receptor (dys)function. We demonstrate that expression of Lrp2 in embryonic and larval fish recapitulates the patterns seen in mammalian brain and kidney. Furthermore, we studied the consequence of receptor deficiencies in lrp2 and in lrp2b, a homologue unique to fish, using ENU mutagenesis or morpholino knockdown. While receptor-deficient zebrafish suffer from overt renal resorption deficiency, their brain development proceeds normally, suggesting evolutionary conservation of receptor functions in pronephric duct clearance but not in patterning of the teleost forebrain.

  12. Shp2 in forebrain neurons regulates synaptic plasticity, locomotion, and memory formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Kusakari, Shinya; Saitow, Fumihito; Ago, Yukio; Shibasaki, Koji; Sato-Hashimoto, Miho; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Kotani, Takenori; Murata, Yoji; Hirai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Toshio; Suzuki, Hidenori; Matozaki, Takashi; Ohnishi, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    Shp2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) regulates neural cell differentiation. It is also expressed in postmitotic neurons, however, and mutations of Shp2 are associated with clinical syndromes characterized by mental retardation. Here we show that conditional-knockout (cKO) mice lacking Shp2 specifically in postmitotic forebrain neurons manifest abnormal behavior, including hyperactivity. Novelty-induced expression of immediate-early genes and activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) were attenuated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Shp2 cKO mice, suggestive of reduced neuronal activity. In contrast, ablation of Shp2 enhanced high-K(+)-induced Erk activation in both cultured cortical neurons and synaptosomes, whereas it inhibited that induced by brain-derived growth factor in cultured neurons. Posttetanic potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation were attenuated and enhanced, respectively, in hippocampal slices from Shp2 cKO mice. The mutant mice also manifested transient impairment of memory formation in the Morris water maze. Our data suggest that Shp2 contributes to regulation of Erk activation and synaptic plasticity in postmitotic forebrain neurons and thereby controls locomotor activity and memory formation.

  13. TGFbeta2 mediates rapid inhibition of calcium influx in identified cholinergic basal forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Williams, Sylvain; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy; Danik, Marc

    2002-02-01

    Transforming growth factors betas (TGFbetas) are known to have important roles in neuronal survival and can be upregulated in disease. However, unlike many other trophic factors, nothing is known about the rapid neurotransmitter-like actions of TGFbeta in the CNS. We explored this by examining the effects of TGFbeta on calcium influx of large enzymatically dissociated basal forebrain neurons. We show that brief application of TGFbeta2, but not TGFbeta1, to fura-2AM-loaded neurons reversibly and acutely (within seconds) inhibited K(+)-evoked calcium influx. Moreover, using single-cell RT-PCR, we confirmed that the large TGFbeta2-responsive neurons presented a cholinergic phenotype. Investigation of the signaling mechanism underlying TGFbeta2 actions using whole-cell recordings of calcium currents revealed that TGFbeta2-mediated responses were insensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analogue GTPgammaS. However, TGFbeta2-mediated calcium current reductions were prevented by intracellular perfusion of a Smad2/3 peptide antagonist. Together, these results suggest that TGFbeta2 can acutely regulate the excitability of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons through an atypical signaling mechanism. PMID:11812008

  14. Conservation of spatial memory function in the pallial forebrain of reptiles and ray-finned fishes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Fernando; López, J Carlos; Vargas, J Pedro; Gómez, Yolanda; Broglio, Cristina; Salas, Cosme

    2002-04-01

    The hippocampus of mammals and birds is critical for spatial memory. Neuroanatomical evidence indicates that the medial cortex (MC) of reptiles and the lateral pallium (LP) of ray-finned fishes could be homologous to the hippocampus of mammals and birds. In this work, we studied the effects of lesions to the MC of turtles and to the LP of goldfish in spatial memory. Lesioned animals were trained in place, and cue maze tasks and crucial probe and transfer tests were performed. In experiment 1, MC-lesioned turtles in the place task failed to locate the goal during trials in which new start positions were used, whereas sham animals navigated directly to the goal independently of start location. In contrast, no deficit was observed in cue learning. In experiment 2, LP lesion produced a dramatic impairment in goldfish trained in the place task, whereas medial and dorsal pallium lesions did not decrease accuracy. In addition, none of these pallial lesions produced deficits in cue learning. These results indicate that lesions to the MC of turtles and to the LP of goldfish, like hippocampal lesions in mammals and birds, selectively impair map-like memory representations of the environmental space. Thus, the forebrain structures of reptiles and teleost fish neuroanatomically equivalent to the mammalian and avian hippocampus also share a central role in spatial cognition. Present results suggest that the presence of a hippocampus-dependent spatial memory system is a primitive feature of the vertebrate forebrain that has been conserved through evolution.

  15. Shp2 in Forebrain Neurons Regulates Synaptic Plasticity, Locomotion, and Memory Formation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kusakari, Shinya; Saitow, Fumihito; Ago, Yukio; Shibasaki, Koji; Sato-Hashimoto, Miho; Matsuzaki, Yasunori; Kotani, Takenori; Murata, Yoji; Hirai, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Toshio; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    Shp2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2) regulates neural cell differentiation. It is also expressed in postmitotic neurons, however, and mutations of Shp2 are associated with clinical syndromes characterized by mental retardation. Here we show that conditional-knockout (cKO) mice lacking Shp2 specifically in postmitotic forebrain neurons manifest abnormal behavior, including hyperactivity. Novelty-induced expression of immediate-early genes and activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (Erk) were attenuated in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of Shp2 cKO mice, suggestive of reduced neuronal activity. In contrast, ablation of Shp2 enhanced high-K+-induced Erk activation in both cultured cortical neurons and synaptosomes, whereas it inhibited that induced by brain-derived growth factor in cultured neurons. Posttetanic potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation were attenuated and enhanced, respectively, in hippocampal slices from Shp2 cKO mice. The mutant mice also manifested transient impairment of memory formation in the Morris water maze. Our data suggest that Shp2 contributes to regulation of Erk activation and synaptic plasticity in postmitotic forebrain neurons and thereby controls locomotor activity and memory formation. PMID:25713104

  16. Timed restricted feeding restores the rhythms of expression of the clock protein, Period2, in the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and central nucleus of the amygdala in adrenalectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Segall, L A; Verwey, M; Amir, S

    2008-11-11

    Feeding schedules that limit food availability to a set time of day are powerful synchronizers of the rhythms of expression of the circadian clock protein Period 2 (PER2) in the limbic forebrain in rats. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that mediate the effect of such timed restricted feeding (TRF) schedules on the expression of PER2. Adrenal glucocorticoids have been implicated in the circadian regulation of clock genes expression in peripheral tissues as well as in the control of the rhythms of expression of PER2 in certain limbic forebrain regions, such as the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTov) and central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA) in rats. To study the possible involvement of glucocorticoids in the regulation of PER2 expression by TRF, we assessed the effect of adrenalectomy on TRF-entrained PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain in rats. Adrenalectomy selectively abolished the rhythms of PER2 in the BNSTov and CEA in normally fed rats, as previously shown, but had no effect on TRF-entrained PER2 rhythms in the same structures. These findings show that the effect of TRF on PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain is independent of adrenal glucocorticoids and demonstrate that the involvement of glucocorticoids in the regulation PER2 rhythms in the limbic forebrain is not only region specific, as previously shown, but also state dependent.

  17. The effects of dorsal bundle injections of 6-hydroxydopamine on avoidance responding in rats.

    PubMed

    Fibiger, H C; Mason, S T

    1978-12-01

    1 The effect of injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the fibres of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle on acquisition, retention and extinction of active avoidance in rats were examined. 2 6-OHDA injections severely depleted noradrenaline in all forebrain areas assayed, with the interesting exception of the septum. No significant effect on dopamine concentrations in various forebrain regions was found. 3 Acquisition and retention of active avoidance was not altered by the lesion. Marked resistance to extinction was seen when the unconditioned stimulus (shock) was removed. 4 A comparison with work by other authors in which both forebrain noradrenaline and dopamine were depleted suggest that the alteration in extinction seen in both studies is a noradrenergic effect, whereas the deficits in acquisition and retention found previously are dopaminergic in origin.

  18. Long-term environmental enrichment leads to regional increases in neurotrophin levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ickes, B R; Pham, T M; Sanders, L A; Albeck, D S; Mohammed, A H; Granholm, A C

    2000-07-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that both morphological and biochemical indices in the brain undergo alterations in response to environmental influences. In previous work we have shown that rats raised in an enriched environmental condition (EC) perform better on a spatial memory task than rats raised in isolated conditions (IC). We have also found that EC rats have a higher density of immunoreactivity than IC rats for both low and high affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in the basal forebrain. In order to determine if these alterations were coupled with altered levels of neurotrophins in other brain regions as well, we measured neurotrophin levels in rats that were raised in EC or IC conditions. Rats were placed in the different environments at 2 months of age and 12 months later brain regions were dissected and analyzed for NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) levels using Promega ELISA kits. We found that NGF and BDNF levels were increased in the cerebral cortex, hippocampal formation, basal forebrain, and hindbrain in EC animals compared to age-matched IC animals. NT-3 was found to be increased in the basal forebrain and cerebral cortex of EC animals as well. These findings demonstrate significant alterations in NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 protein levels in several brain regions as a result of an enriched versus an isolated environment and thus provide a possible biochemical basis for behavioral and morphological alterations that have been found to occur with a shifting environmental stimulus.

  19. Early visual experience shapes the representation of auditory space in the forebrain gaze fields of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Miller, G L; Knudsen, E I

    1999-03-15

    Auditory spatial information is processed in parallel forebrain and midbrain pathways. Sensory experience early in life has been shown to exert a powerful influence on the representation of auditory space in the midbrain space-processing pathway. The goal of this study was to determine whether early experience also shapes the representation of auditory space in the forebrain. Owls were raised wearing prismatic spectacles that shifted the visual field in the horizontal plane. This manipulation altered the relationship between interaural time differences (ITDs), the principal cue used for azimuthal localization, and locations of auditory stimuli in the visual field. Extracellular recordings were used to characterize ITD tuning in the auditory archistriatum (AAr), a subdivision of the forebrain gaze fields, in normal and prism-reared owls. Prism rearing altered the representation of ITD in the AAr. In prism-reared owls, unit tuning for ITD was shifted in the adaptive direction, according to the direction of the optical displacement imposed by the spectacles. Changes in ITD tuning involved the acquisition of unit responses to adaptive ITD values and, to a lesser extent, the elimination of responses to nonadaptive (previously normal) ITD values. Shifts in ITD tuning in the AAr were similar to shifts in ITD tuning observed in the optic tectum of the same owls. This experience-based adjustment of binaural tuning in the AAr helps to maintain mutual registry between the forebrain and midbrain representations of auditory space and may help to ensure consistent behavioral responses to auditory stimuli. PMID:10066282

  20. Dynamic gene and protein expression patterns of the autism-associated Met receptor tyrosine kinase in the developing mouse forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Matthew C.; Bergman, Mica Y.; Campbell, Daniel B.; Eagleson, Kathie L.; Levitt, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The establishment of appropriate neural circuitry depends upon the coordination of multiple developmental events across space and time. These events include proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival - all of which can be mediated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling through the Met receptor tyrosine kinase. We previously found a functional promoter variant of the MET gene to be associated with autism spectrum disorder, suggesting that forebrain circuits governing social and emotional function may be especially vulnerable to developmental disruptions in HGF/Met signaling. However, little is known about the spatiotemporal distribution of Met expression in the forebrain during the development of such circuits. To advance our understanding of the neurodevelopmental influences of Met activation, we employed complementary Western blotting, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to comprehensively map Met transcript and protein expression throughout perinatal and postnatal development of the mouse forebrain. Our studies reveal complex and dynamic spatiotemporal patterns of expression during this period. Spatially, Met transcript is localized primarily to specific populations of projection neurons within the neocortex and in structures of the limbic system, including the amygdala, hippocampus and septum. Met protein appears to be principally located in axon tracts. Temporally, peak expression of transcript and protein occurs during the second postnatal week. This period is characterized by extensive neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, supporting a role for the receptor in these processes. Collectively, these data suggest that Met signaling may be necessary for the appropriate wiring of forebrain circuits with particular relevance to social and emotional dimensions of behavior. PMID:19226509

  1. Differential effects of light and feeding on circadian organization of peripheral clocks in a forebrain Bmal1 mutant

    PubMed Central

    Izumo, Mariko; Pejchal, Martina; Schook, Andrew C; Lange, Ryan P; Walisser, Jacqueline A; Sato, Takashi R; Wang, Xiaozhong; Bradfield, Christopher A; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess the contribution of a central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) to circadian behavior and the organization of peripheral clocks, we generated forebrain/SCN-specific Bmal1 knockout mice by using floxed Bmal1 and pan-neuronal Cre lines. The forebrain knockout mice showed >90% deletion of BMAL1 in the SCN and exhibited an immediate and complete loss of circadian behavior in constant conditions. Circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues persisted but became desynchronized and damped in constant darkness. The loss of synchrony was rescued by light/dark cycles and partially by restricted feeding (only in the liver and kidney but not in the other tissues) in a distinct manner. These results suggest that the forebrain/SCN is essential for internal temporal order of robust circadian programs in peripheral clocks, and that individual peripheral clocks are affected differently by light and feeding in the absence of a functional oscillator in the forebrain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04617.001 PMID:25525750

  2. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) immunoreactivity in non-neuronal cells within the raphe nuclei and subventricular region of the brainstem of the cat.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Pablo; Lagos, Patricia; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H

    2008-05-19

    Neurons that utilize melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) as a neuromodulator are localized within the postero-lateral hypothalamus and zona incerta. These neurons project diffusely throughout the central nervous system and have been implicated in critical physiological processes such as energy homeostasis and sleep. In the present report, we examined the distribution of MCH immunoreactivity in the brainstem of the cat. In addition to MCH+ axons, we found MCH-immunoreactive cells that have not been previously described either in the midbrain raphe nuclei or in the periaqueductal and periventricular areas. These MCH+ cells constituted: 1. ependymal cells that lined the fourth ventricle and aqueduct, 2. ependymal cells with long basal processes that projected deeply into the subventricular (subaqueductal) parenchyma, and, 3. cells in subventricular regions and the midbrain raphe nuclei. The MCH+ cells in the midbrain raphe nuclei were closely related to neuronal processes of serotonergic neurons. Utilizing Neu-N and GFAP immunohistochemistry we determined that the preceding MCH+ cells were neither neurons nor astrocytes. However, we found that vimentin, an intermediate-filament protein that is used as a marker for tanycytes, was specifically co-localized with MCH in these cells. We conclude that MCH is present in tanycytes whose processes innervate the midbrain raphe nuclei and adjacent subependymal regions. Because tanycytes are specialized cells that transport substances from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to neural parenchyma, we suggest that MCH is absorbed from the CSF by tanycytes and subsequently liberate to act upon neurons of brainstem nuclei. PMID:18410908

  3. Optimizing Culture Medium Composition to Improve Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Yields In Vitro from Subventricular Zone-Derived Neural Progenitor Cell Neurospheres

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Paula G.; Pasquini, Juana M.; Silvestroff, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells (NSC/NPC) are gathering tangible recognition for their uses in cell therapy and cell replacement therapies for human disease, as well as a model system to continue research on overall neural developmental processes in vitro. The Subventricular Zone is one of the largest NSC/NPC niches in the developing mammalian Central Nervous System, and persists through to adulthood. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) enriched cultures are usefull tools for in vitro studies as well as for cell replacement therapies for treating demyelination diseases. We used Subventricular Zone-derived NSC/NPC primary cultures from newborn mice and compared the effects of different growth factor combinations on cell proliferation and OPC yield. The Platelet Derived Growth Factor-AA and BB homodimers had a positive and significant impact on OPC generation. Furthermore, heparin addition to the culture media contributed to further increase overall culture yields. The OPC generated by this protocol were able to mature into Myelin Basic Protein-expressing cells and to interact with neurons in an in vitro co-culture system. As a whole, we describe an optimized in vitro method for increasing OPC. PMID:25837625

  4. Hippocampal Sclerosis but Not Normal Aging or Alzheimer Disease Is Associated With TDP-43 Pathology in the Basal Forebrain of Aged Persons.

    PubMed

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Takei, Hidehiro; Van Eldik, Linda J; Schmitt, Frederick A; Jicha, Gregory A; Powell, Suzanne Z; Nelson, Peter T

    2016-05-01

    Transactivating responsive sequence (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43-kDa (TDP-43) pathology has been described in various brain diseases, but the full anatomical distribution and clinical and biological implications of that pathology are incompletely characterized. Here, we describe TDP-43 neuropathology in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, and adjacent nuclei in 98 individuals (mean age, 86 years; median final mini-mental state examination score, 27). On examination blinded to clinical and pathologic diagnoses, we identified TDP-43 pathology that most frequently involved the ventromedial basal forebrain in 19 individuals (19.4%). As expected, many of these brains had comorbid pathologies including those of Alzheimer disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), and/or hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging). The basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology was strongly associated with comorbid HS-Aging (odds ratio = 6.8, p = 0.001), whereas there was no significant association between basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology and either AD or LBD neuropathology. In this sample, there were some cases with apparent preclinical TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain that may indicate that this is an early affected area in HS-Aging. We conclude that TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain is strongly associated with HS-Aging. These results raise questions about a specific pathogenetic relationship between basal forebrain TDP-43 and non-HS-Aging comorbid diseases (AD and LBD). PMID:26971127

  5. Hippocampal Sclerosis but Not Normal Aging or Alzheimer Disease Is Associated With TDP-43 Pathology in the Basal Forebrain of Aged Persons.

    PubMed

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Takei, Hidehiro; Van Eldik, Linda J; Schmitt, Frederick A; Jicha, Gregory A; Powell, Suzanne Z; Nelson, Peter T

    2016-05-01

    Transactivating responsive sequence (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43-kDa (TDP-43) pathology has been described in various brain diseases, but the full anatomical distribution and clinical and biological implications of that pathology are incompletely characterized. Here, we describe TDP-43 neuropathology in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, and adjacent nuclei in 98 individuals (mean age, 86 years; median final mini-mental state examination score, 27). On examination blinded to clinical and pathologic diagnoses, we identified TDP-43 pathology that most frequently involved the ventromedial basal forebrain in 19 individuals (19.4%). As expected, many of these brains had comorbid pathologies including those of Alzheimer disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), and/or hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging). The basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology was strongly associated with comorbid HS-Aging (odds ratio = 6.8, p = 0.001), whereas there was no significant association between basal forebrain TDP-43 pathology and either AD or LBD neuropathology. In this sample, there were some cases with apparent preclinical TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain that may indicate that this is an early affected area in HS-Aging. We conclude that TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain is strongly associated with HS-Aging. These results raise questions about a specific pathogenetic relationship between basal forebrain TDP-43 and non-HS-Aging comorbid diseases (AD and LBD).

  6. Peptidergic influences on proliferation, migration, and placement of neural progenitors in the adult mouse forebrain.

    PubMed

    Stanic, Davor; Paratcha, Gustavo; Ledda, Fernanda; Herzog, Herbert; Kopin, Alan S; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2008-03-01

    Neural progenitor proliferation, differentiation, and migration are continually ongoing processes in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory stream (RMS) of the adult brain. There is evidence that peptidergic systems may be involved in the molecular cascades regulating these neurogenic processes, and we examined a possible influence of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) systems in cell proliferation and neuroblast formation in the SVZ and RMS and generation of interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB). We show that NPY and the Y1 and Y2 receptor (R) proteins are expressed in and surrounding the SVZ and RMS and that Y1R is located on neuroblasts in the anterior RMS. Mice deficient in Y1Rs or Y2Rs have fewer Ki-67-immunoreactive (ir) proliferating precursor cells and doublecortin-ir neuroblasts in the SVZ and RMS than WT mice, and less calbindin-, calretinin-, and tyrosine hydroxylase-ir interneurons in the OB. Mice lacking CCK1Rs have fewer proliferating cells and neuroblasts than normal and a shortage of interneurons in the OB. These findings suggest that both NPY and CCK through their receptors help to regulate the proliferation of precursor cells, the amount of neuroblast cells in the SVZ and RMS, and influence the differentiation of OB interneurons.

  7. Gap junctions/hemichannels modulate interkinetic nuclear migration in the forebrain precursors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiuxin; Hashimoto-Torii, Kazue; Torii, Masaaki; Ding, Chen; Rakic, Pasko

    2010-01-01

    During mitotic division in the telencephalic proliferative ventricular zone (VZ), the nuclei of the neural precursors move basally away from the ventricular surface for DNA synthesis, and apically return to the surface for mitotic division; a process known as interkinetic migration or “to-and-fro” nuclear translocation. The cell, which remains attached to the ventricular surface, either continues cycling, or exits the cycle and migrates to the subventricular zone (SVZ) or the developing cortical plate. While gap junctions/hemichannels are known to modulate DNA synthesis via Ca2+ waves, the role of Ca+ oscillations and the mechanism of nuclear translocation in the VZ precursors are unclear. Here we provide evidence that during apical nuclear migration, VZ precursors display dynamic spontaneous Ca2+ transients, which depend on functional gap junctions/hemichannels via ATP release and Ca2+ mobilizing messenger diffusion. Furthermore, we found that blocking gap junctions/hemichannels or shRNA mediated knockdown of connexin 43 (Cx43) retards the apically directed interkinetic nuclear migration accompanied with changes in the nuclear length/width ratio. In addition, we demonstrated that blocking functional gap junctions/hemichannels induces phosphorylation of small GTPase cdc42 in the VZ precursors. The basal phase of interkinetic migration is much slower and appears to be mediated passively by mechanical forces after cell division. Our findings indicate that functional interference with gap junctions/hemichannels during embryonic development may lead to abnormal corticogenesis and dysfunction of the cerebral cortex in adult organisms. PMID:20335455

  8. Calcium Imaging of Basal Forebrain Activity during Innate and Learned Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Thomas C.; Pinto, Lucas; Brock, Julien R.; Dan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays crucial roles in arousal, attention, and memory, and its impairment is associated with a variety of cognitive deficits. The BF consists of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons. Electrical or optogenetic stimulation of BF cholinergic neurons enhances cortical processing and behavioral performance, but the natural activity of these cells during behavior is only beginning to be characterized. Even less is known about GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Here, we performed microendoscopic calcium imaging of BF neurons as mice engaged in spontaneous behaviors in their home cages (innate) or performed a go/no-go auditory discrimination task (learned). Cholinergic neurons were consistently excited during movement, including running and licking, but GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons exhibited diverse responses. All cell types were activated by overt punishment, either inside or outside of the discrimination task. These findings reveal functional similarities and distinctions between BF cell types during both spontaneous and task-related behaviors. PMID:27242444

  9. Adult mouse basal forebrain harbors two distinct cholinergic populations defined by their electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Cagri T.; Golowasch, Jorge P.; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    We performed whole-cell recordings from basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons in transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the control of the choline acetyltransferase promoter. BF cholinergic neurons can be differentiated into two electrophysiologically identifiable subtypes: early and late firing neurons. Early firing neurons (∼70%) are more excitable, show prominent spike frequency adaptation and are more susceptible to depolarization blockade, a phenomenon characterized by complete silencing of the neuron following initial action potentials. Late firing neurons (∼30%), albeit being less excitable, could maintain a tonic discharge at low frequencies. In voltage clamp analysis, we have shown that early firing neurons have a higher density of low voltage activated (LVA) calcium currents. These two cholinergic cell populations might be involved in distinct functions: the early firing group being more suitable for phasic changes in cortical acetylcholine release associated with attention while the late firing neurons could support general arousal by maintaining tonic acetylcholine levels. PMID:22586380

  10. GRK5 Deficiency Leads to Selective Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neuronal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    He, Minchao; Singh, Prabhakar; Cheng, Shaowu; Zhang, Qiang; Peng, Wei; Ding, XueFeng; Li, Longxuan; Liu, Jun; Premont, Richard T.; Morgan, Dave; Burns, Jeffery M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Suo, William Z.

    2016-01-01

    Why certain diseases primarily affect one specific neuronal subtype rather than another is a puzzle whose solution underlies the development of specific therapies. Selective basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurodegeneration participates in cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the first recapitulation of the selective BFC neuronal loss that is typical of human AD in a mouse model termed GAP. We created GAP mice by crossing Tg2576 mice that over-express the Swedish mutant human β-amyloid precursor protein gene with G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 (GRK5) knockout mice. This doubly defective mouse displayed significant BFC neuronal loss at 18 months of age, which was not observed in either of the singly defective parent strains or in the wild type. Along with other supporting evidence, we propose that GRK5 deficiency selectively renders BFC neurons more vulnerable to degeneration. PMID:27193825

  11. GRK5 Deficiency Leads to Selective Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neuronal Vulnerability.

    PubMed

    He, Minchao; Singh, Prabhakar; Cheng, Shaowu; Zhang, Qiang; Peng, Wei; Ding, XueFeng; Li, Longxuan; Liu, Jun; Premont, Richard T; Morgan, Dave; Burns, Jeffery M; Swerdlow, Russell H; Suo, William Z

    2016-05-19

    Why certain diseases primarily affect one specific neuronal subtype rather than another is a puzzle whose solution underlies the development of specific therapies. Selective basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurodegeneration participates in cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the first recapitulation of the selective BFC neuronal loss that is typical of human AD in a mouse model termed GAP. We created GAP mice by crossing Tg2576 mice that over-express the Swedish mutant human β-amyloid precursor protein gene with G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 (GRK5) knockout mice. This doubly defective mouse displayed significant BFC neuronal loss at 18 months of age, which was not observed in either of the singly defective parent strains or in the wild type. Along with other supporting evidence, we propose that GRK5 deficiency selectively renders BFC neurons more vulnerable to degeneration.

  12. Radial glial cell transformation to astrocytes is bidirectional: regulation by a diffusible factor in embryonic forebrain.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, K E; Hatten, M E

    1995-01-01

    During development of mammalian cerebral cortex, two classes of glial cells are thought to underlie the establishment of cell patterning. In the embryonic period, migration of young neurons is supported by a system of radial glial cells spanning the thickness of the cortical wall. In the neonatal period, neuronal function is assisted by the physiological support of a second class of astroglial cell, the astrocyte. Here, we show that expression of embryonic radial glial identity requires extrinsic soluble signals present in embryonic forebrain. Moreover, astrocytes reexpress features of radial glia in vitro in the presence of the embryonic cortical signals and in vivo after transplantation into embryonic neocortex. These findings suggest that the transformation of radial glia cells into astrocytes is regulated by availability of inducing signals rather than by changes in cell potential. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7892225

  13. Calcium Imaging of Basal Forebrain Activity during Innate and Learned Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Thomas C; Pinto, Lucas; Brock, Julien R; Dan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays crucial roles in arousal, attention, and memory, and its impairment is associated with a variety of cognitive deficits. The BF consists of cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons. Electrical or optogenetic stimulation of BF cholinergic neurons enhances cortical processing and behavioral performance, but the natural activity of these cells during behavior is only beginning to be characterized. Even less is known about GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. Here, we performed microendoscopic calcium imaging of BF neurons as mice engaged in spontaneous behaviors in their home cages (innate) or performed a go/no-go auditory discrimination task (learned). Cholinergic neurons were consistently excited during movement, including running and licking, but GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons exhibited diverse responses. All cell types were activated by overt punishment, either inside or outside of the discrimination task. These findings reveal functional similarities and distinctions between BF cell types during both spontaneous and task-related behaviors. PMID:27242444

  14. Whole-Brain Monosynaptic Afferent Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rongfeng; Jin, Sen; He, Xiaobin; Xu, Fuqiang; Hu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS) robustly modulates many important behaviors, such as arousal, attention, learning and memory, through heavy projections to cortex and hippocampus. However, the presynaptic partners governing BFCS activity still remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized a recently developed rabies virus-based cell-type-specific retrograde tracing system to map the whole-brain afferent inputs of the BFCS. We found that the BFCS receives inputs from multiple cortical areas, such as orbital frontal cortex, motor cortex, and insular cortex, and that the BFCS also receives dense inputs from several subcortical nuclei related to motivation and stress, including lateral septum, central amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus, dorsal raphe, and parabrachial nucleus. Interestingly, we found that the BFCS receives inputs from the olfactory areas and the entorhinal–hippocampal system. These results greatly expand our knowledge about the connectivity of the mouse BFCS and provided important preliminary indications for future exploration of circuit function. PMID:27777554

  15. Distribution of SNAP-25 in transient neuronal circuitries of the developing human forebrain.

    PubMed

    Ulfig, N; Setzer, M; Neudörfer, F; Bohl, J

    2000-04-27

    The distribution of SNAP-25 is demonstrated within prominent transient structures in the developing human forebrain. During early fetal development SNAP-25 is mainly expressed in axons of the intermediate zone and the internal capsule. The fibers appear directed towards the mantle zone of the ganglionic eminence and the perireticular nucleus located within the internal capsule. Cells of these two areas are shown to interact with SNAP-25 immunoreactive structures with the aid of double-labellings. The SNAP-25 immunoreactive fibers may represent corticofugal axons which contact the perireticular nucleus and ganglionic eminence which are regarded as intermediate targets providing a scaffold for growing axons. Anti-SNAP-25, thus, is an appropriate marker of intermediate targets which are involved in brain injuries of preterm infants. PMID:10817603

  16. [Qualitative features of confabulation in a case with basal forebrain amnesia].

    PubMed

    Abe, M; Ohtake, H; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, M; Fujii, T; Yamadori, A

    2001-12-01

    We investigated qualitative features of confabulation in a case with basal forebrain amnesia. A 66-year-old, right-handed woman with a 8th-grade education, was admitted to the Rehabilitation Department of Tohoku University Hospital, Japan, for evaluation and therapy of amnesia. Her previous medical history included hypertension. Nine months before admission, she went to a hospital because of headache and blurred vision. She was diagnosed as suffering from a suprasellar arachnoid cyst and unruptured aneurysm at the anterior communicating artery. Five months later, resection of the cyst and clipping of the aneurysm was performed. After the operation, she became disoriented and amnesic with marked confabulation. On admission to our hospital 3 months later, she was alert and cooperative. Detailed neuropsychological assessment was performed during the next two months. She remained clinically stable throughout her hospitalization. Neurological examination showed no abnormalities. Brain magnetic resonance images revealed lesions in the bilateral orbito-frontal cortices and basal forebrain. Measurement of blood flow with 123I-IMP single photon emission computed tomography showed hypoperfusion in the bilateral frontotemporal regions. We performed systematic investigations to clarify the qualitative features of her confabulations. Her confabulations included many facts she had experienced before, but they were out of context. Each fact was recalled in isolation or associated with erroneous places, persons or times. Her confabulations were never fantastic or momentary in nature, but were consisted with isolated facts. Experimental investigation revealed that she could recognize individual facts (a person, a place, a task and time) in each episode. However, she could not integrate individual facts into an episode. We propose calling this type of confabulation "mosaic confabulation". PMID:11806121

  17. Enhancement of performance for brain stimulation reward after footshock in rats.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, B; Marek, P; Panocka, I

    1984-01-01

    Rats bearing electrodes in the anterior forebrain region (AF), lateral hypothalamus (LH) or dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus were trained to press lever for brain stimulation reward. Ten minutes self- stimulation in all these placements produced a lowering of pain sensitivity as assessed by the hot-plate test. Electric footshock administered on 1 s on/4 s off paradigm for 10 min prior to self-stimulation elevated lever pressing rates in AF rats and in part of LH rats, but not in DR rats. The results are discussed in terms of opiate theory of reinforcement.

  18. Androgens alter corticotropin releasing hormone and arginine vasopressin mRNA within forebrain sites known to regulate activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Viau, V; Soriano, L; Dallman, M F

    2001-05-01

    To reveal direct effects of androgens, independent of glucocorticoids, we studied the effects of gonadectomy (GDX) in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats with or without androgen replacement on corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNA expression within various forebrain sites known to regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. These included the medial parvocellular portion of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (mp PVN), the central and medial nuclei of the amygdala and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BNST). In the mp PVN, ADX stimulated both CRH and AVP mRNA expression. Combined ADX + GDX inhibited only AVP, and testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) restored AVP mRNA. In the central nucleus of the amygdala, ADX decreased CRH mRNA expression, and this response was unaffected by GDX +/- testosterone or DHT replacement. In the medial amygdala, AVP mRNA expression was decreased by ADX, abolished by ADX + GDX, and restored by androgen replacement. ADX had no effect on CRH and AVP mRNA expression in the BNST. GDX + ADX, however, reduced CRH mRNA expression only within the fusiform nuclei of the BNST and reduced the number of AVP-expressing neurones in the posterior BNST. Androgen replacement reversed both responses. In summary, in ADX rats, AVP, but not CRH mRNA expression in the amygdala and mp PVN, is sensitive to GDX +/- androgen replacement. Both CRH- and AVP-expressing neurones in the BNST respond to GDX and androgen replacement, but not to ADX alone. Because androgen receptors are not expressed by hypophysiotropic PVN neurones, we conclude that glucocorticoid-independent, androgenic influences on medial parvocellular AVP mRNA expression are mediated upstream from the PVN, and may involve AVP-related pathways in the medial amygdala, relayed to and through CRH- and AVP-expressing neurones of the BNST.

  19. The subventricular zone in the immature piglet brain: anatomy and exodus of neuroblasts into white matter after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Costine, Beth A; Missios, Symeon; Taylor, Sabrina R; McGuone, Declan; Smith, Colin M; Dodge, Carter P; Harris, Brent T; Duhaime, Ann-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of postnatal neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and robust migration of neuroblasts to the lesion site in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI) is well established in rodent species; however, it is not yet known whether postnatal neurogenesis plays a role in repair after TBI in gyrencephalic species. Here we describe the anatomy of the SVZ in the piglet for the first time and initiate an investigation into the effect of TBI on the SVZ architecture and the number of neuroblasts in the white matter. Among all ages of immaturity examined the SVZ contained a dense mesh network of neurogenic precursor cells (doublecortin+) positioned directly adjacent to the ependymal cells (ventricular SVZ, Vsvz) and neuroblasts organized into chains that were distinct from the Vsvz (abventricular SVZ, Asvz). Though the architecture of the SVZ was similar among ages, the areas of Vsvz and Asvz neuroblast chains declined with age. At postnatal day (PND) 14 the white matter tracts have a tremendous number of individual neuroblasts. In our scaled cortical impact model, lesion size increased with age. Similarly, the response of the SVZ to injury was also age dependent. The younger age groups that sustained the proportionately smallest lesions had the largest SVZ areas, which further increased in response to injury. In piglets that were injured at 4 months of age and had the largest lesions, the SVZ did not increase in response to injury. Similar to humans, swine have abundant gyri and gyral white matter, providing a unique platform to study neuroblasts potentially migrating from the SVZ to the lesioned cortex along these white matter tracts. In piglets injured at PND 7, TBI did not increase the total number of neuroblasts in the white matter compared to uninjured piglets, but redistribution occurred with a greater number of neuroblasts in the white matter of the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injury compared to the contralateral hemisphere. At 7 days after injury

  20. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  1. Synaptic dysfunction, memory deficits and hippocampal atrophy due to ablation of mitochondrial fission in adult forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oettinghaus, B; Schulz, J M; Restelli, L M; Licci, M; Savoia, C; Schmidt, A; Schmitt, K; Grimm, A; Morè, L; Hench, J; Tolnay, M; Eckert, A; D'Adamo, P; Franken, P; Ishihara, N; Mihara, K; Bischofberger, J; Scorrano, L; Frank, S

    2016-01-01

    Well-balanced mitochondrial fission and fusion processes are essential for nervous system development. Loss of function of the main mitochondrial fission mediator, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), is lethal early during embryonic development or around birth, but the role of mitochondrial fission in adult neurons remains unclear. Here we show that inducible Drp1 ablation in neurons of the adult mouse forebrain results in progressive, neuronal subtype-specific alterations of mitochondrial morphology in the hippocampus that are marginally responsive to antioxidant treatment. Furthermore, DRP1 loss affects synaptic transmission and memory function. Although these changes culminate in hippocampal atrophy, they are not sufficient to cause neuronal cell death within 10 weeks of genetic Drp1 ablation. Collectively, our in vivo observations clarify the role of mitochondrial fission in neurons, demonstrating that Drp1 ablation in adult forebrain neurons compromises critical neuronal functions without causing overt neurodegeneration. PMID:25909888

  2. Pregnenolone sulfate and its enantiomer: differential modulation of memory in a spatial discrimination task using forebrain NMDA receptor deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Géraldine H.; Tobin, Christine; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Moricard, Yves; Covey, Douglas F.; Rondi-Reig, Laure; Akwa, Yvette

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of forebrain N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs) in the promnesiant effects of natural (+) pregnenolone sulfate (PREGS) and its synthetic (−) enantiomer ent-PREGS in young adult mice. Using the two-trial arm discrimination task in a Y-maze, PREGS and ent-PREGS administration to control mice increased memory performances. In mice with a knock-out of the NR1 subunit of NMDA-Rs in the forebrain, the promnesiant effect of ent-PREGS was maintained whereas the activity of PREGS was lost. Memory enhancement by PREGS involves the NMDA-R activity in the hippocampal CA1 area and possibly in some locations of the cortical layers, whereas ent-PREGS acts independently of NMDA-R function. PMID:21036556

  3. 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural prolongs survival and inhibits oxidative stress in a mouse model of forebrain ischemia☆

    PubMed Central

    Ya, Bailiu; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Li; Li, Yali; Li, Lin

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we hypothesized that 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural could attenuate ischemic brain damage by reducing oxidative injury. Thus, mice were subjected to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion to establish a model of permanent forebrain ischemia. The mice were intraperitoneally injected with 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural 30 minutes before ischemia or 5 minutes after ischemia. The survival time of mice injected with 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural was longer compared with untreated mice. The mice subjected to ischemia for 30 minutes and reperfusion for 5 minutes were intraperitoneally injected with 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural 5 minutes prior to reperfusion, which increased superoxide dismutase content and reduced malondialdehyde content, similar to the effects of Edaravone, a hydroxyl radical scavenger used for the treatment of stroke. These findings indicate that intraperitoneal injection of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural can prolong the survival of mice with permanent forebrain ischemia. This outcome may be mediated by its antioxidative effects. PMID:25624794

  4. Gsx2 controls region-specific activation of neural stem cells and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    López-Juárez, Alejandro; Howard, Jennifer; Ullom, Kristy; Howard, Lindsey; Grande, Andrew; Pardo, Andrea; Waclaw, Ronald; Sun, Yu-Yo; Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Campbell, Kenneth; Nakafuku, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in widespread regions along the lateral ventricle and generate diverse olfactory bulb (OB) interneuron subtypes in the adult mouse brain. Molecular mechanisms underlying their regional diversity, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the homeodomain transcription factor Gsx2 plays a crucial role in the region-specific control of adult NSCs in both persistent and injury-induced neurogenesis. In the intact brain, Gsx2 is expressed in a regionally restricted subset of NSCs and promotes the activation and lineage progression of stem cells, thereby controlling the production of selective OB neuron subtypes. Moreover, Gsx2 is ectopically induced in damaged brains outside its normal expression domains and is required for injury-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ). These results demonstrate that mobilization of adult NSCs is controlled in a region-specific manner and that distinct mechanisms operate in continuous and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult brain. PMID:23723414

  5. Gsx2 controls region-specific activation of neural stem cells and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    López-Juárez, Alejandro; Howard, Jennifer; Ullom, Kristy; Howard, Lindsey; Grande, Andrew; Pardo, Andrea; Waclaw, Ronald; Sun, Yu-Yo; Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Campbell, Kenneth; Nakafuku, Masato

    2013-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in widespread regions along the lateral ventricle and generate diverse olfactory bulb (OB) interneuron subtypes in the adult mouse brain. Molecular mechanisms underlying their regional diversity, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the homeodomain transcription factor Gsx2 plays a crucial role in the region-specific control of adult NSCs in both persistent and injury-induced neurogenesis. In the intact brain, Gsx2 is expressed in a regionally restricted subset of NSCs and promotes the activation and lineage progression of stem cells, thereby controlling the production of selective OB neuron subtypes. Moreover, Gsx2 is ectopically induced in damaged brains outside its normal expression domains and is required for injury-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ). These results demonstrate that mobilization of adult NSCs is controlled in a region-specific manner and that distinct mechanisms operate in continuous and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult brain.

  6. Engrailed-2 (En2) deletion produces multiple neurodevelopmental defects in monoamine systems, forebrain structures and neurogenesis and behavior.

    PubMed

    Genestine, Matthieu; Lin, Lulu; Durens, Madel; Yan, Yan; Jiang, Yiqin; Prem, Smrithi; Bailoor, Kunal; Kelly, Brian; Sonsalla, Patricia K; Matteson, Paul G; Silverman, Jill; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Millonig, James H; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2015-10-15

    Many genes involved in brain development have been associated with human neurodevelopmental disorders, but underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain undefined. Human genetic and mouse behavioral analyses suggest that ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders, especially autism spectrum disorder. In mouse, En2 exhibits dynamic spatiotemporal expression in embryonic mid-hindbrain regions where monoamine neurons emerge. Considering their importance in neuropsychiatric disorders, we characterized monoamine systems in relation to forebrain neurogenesis in En2-knockout (En2-KO) mice. Transmitter levels of serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine (NE) were dysregulated from Postnatal day 7 (P7) to P21 in En2-KO, though NE exhibited the greatest abnormalities. While NE levels were reduced ∼35% in forebrain, they were increased 40 -: 75% in hindbrain and cerebellum, and these patterns paralleled changes in locus coeruleus (LC) fiber innervation, respectively. Although En2 promoter was active in Embryonic day 14.5 -: 15.5 LC neurons, expression diminished thereafter and gene deletion did not alter brainstem NE neuron numbers. Significantly, in parallel with reduced NE levels, En2-KO forebrain regions exhibited reduced growth, particularly hippocampus, where P21 dentate gyrus granule neurons were decreased 16%, suggesting abnormal neurogenesis. Indeed, hippocampal neurogenic regions showed increased cell death (+77%) and unexpectedly, increased proliferation. Excess proliferation was restricted to early Sox2/Tbr2 progenitors whereas increased apoptosis occurred in differentiating (Dcx) neuroblasts, accompanied by reduced newborn neuron survival. Abnormal neurogenesis may reflect NE deficits because intra-hippocampal injections of β-adrenergic agonists reversed cell death. These studies suggest that disruption of hindbrain patterning genes can alter monoamine system development and thereby produce forebrain defects that are relevant to human

  7. Absence of Prenatal Forebrain Defects in the Dp(16)1Yey/+ Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Goodliffe, Joseph W.; Olmos-Serrano, Jose Luis; Aziz, Nadine M.; Pennings, Jeroen L.A.; Guedj, Faycal; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in humans with Down syndrome (DS) show that alterations in fetal brain development are followed by postnatal deficits in neuronal numbers, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive and motor function. This same progression is replicated in several mouse models of DS. Dp(16)1Yey/+ (hereafter called Dp16) is a recently developed mouse model of DS in which the entire region of mouse chromosome 16 that is homologous to human chromosome 21 has been triplicated. As such, Dp16 mice may more closely reproduce neurodevelopmental changes occurring in humans with DS. Here, we present the first comprehensive cellular and behavioral study of the Dp16 forebrain from embryonic to adult stages. Unexpectedly, our results demonstrate that Dp16 mice do not have prenatal brain defects previously reported in human fetal neocortex and in the developing forebrains of other mouse models, including microcephaly, reduced neurogenesis, and abnormal cell proliferation. Nevertheless, we found impairments in postnatal developmental milestones, fewer inhibitory forebrain neurons, and deficits in motor and cognitive performance in Dp16 mice. Therefore, although this new model does not express prenatal morphological phenotypes associated with DS, abnormalities in the postnatal period appear sufficient to produce significant cognitive deficits in Dp16. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Down syndrome (DS) leads to intellectual disability. Several mouse models have increased our understanding of the neuropathology of DS and are currently being used to test therapeutic strategies. A new mouse model that contains an expanded number of DS-related genes, known as Dp(16)1Yey/+ (Dp16), has been generated recently. We sought to determine whether the extended triplication creates a better phenocopy of DS-related brain pathologies. We measured embryonic development, forebrain maturation, and perinatal/adult behavior and revealed an absence of prenatal phenotypes in Dp16 fetal brain, but specific cellular and behavioral

  8. Absence of Prenatal Forebrain Defects in the Dp(16)1Yey/+ Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goodliffe, Joseph W; Olmos-Serrano, Jose Luis; Aziz, Nadine M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Guedj, Faycal; Bianchi, Diana W; Haydar, Tarik F

    2016-03-01

    Studies in humans with Down syndrome (DS) show that alterations in fetal brain development are followed by postnatal deficits in neuronal numbers, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive and motor function. This same progression is replicated in several mouse models of DS. Dp(16)1Yey/+ (hereafter called Dp16) is a recently developed mouse model of DS in which the entire region of mouse chromosome 16 that is homologous to human chromosome 21 has been triplicated. As such, Dp16 mice may more closely reproduce neurodevelopmental changes occurring in humans with DS. Here, we present the first comprehensive cellular and behavioral study of the Dp16 forebrain from embryonic to adult stages. Unexpectedly, our results demonstrate that Dp16 mice do not have prenatal brain defects previously reported in human fetal neocortex and in the developing forebrains of other mouse models, including microcephaly, reduced neurogenesis, and abnormal cell proliferation. Nevertheless, we found impairments in postnatal developmental milestones, fewer inhibitory forebrain neurons, and deficits in motor and cognitive performance in Dp16 mice. Therefore, although this new model does not express prenatal morphological phenotypes associated with DS, abnormalities in the postnatal period appear sufficient to produce significant cognitive deficits in Dp16. PMID:26961948

  9. Absence of Prenatal Forebrain Defects in the Dp(16)1Yey/+ Mouse Model of Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goodliffe, Joseph W; Olmos-Serrano, Jose Luis; Aziz, Nadine M; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Guedj, Faycal; Bianchi, Diana W; Haydar, Tarik F

    2016-03-01

    Studies in humans with Down syndrome (DS) show that alterations in fetal brain development are followed by postnatal deficits in neuronal numbers, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive and motor function. This same progression is replicated in several mouse models of DS. Dp(16)1Yey/+ (hereafter called Dp16) is a recently developed mouse model of DS in which the entire region of mouse chromosome 16 that is homologous to human chromosome 21 has been triplicated. As such, Dp16 mice may more closely reproduce neurodevelopmental changes occurring in humans with DS. Here, we present the first comprehensive cellular and behavioral study of the Dp16 forebrain from embryonic to adult stages. Unexpectedly, our results demonstrate that Dp16 mice do not have prenatal brain defects previously reported in human fetal neocortex and in the developing forebrains of other mouse models, including microcephaly, reduced neurogenesis, and abnormal cell proliferation. Nevertheless, we found impairments in postnatal developmental milestones, fewer inhibitory forebrain neurons, and deficits in motor and cognitive performance in Dp16 mice. Therefore, although this new model does not express prenatal morphological phenotypes associated with DS, abnormalities in the postnatal period appear sufficient to produce significant cognitive deficits in Dp16.

  10. ESC-Derived Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Ameliorate the Cognitive Symptoms Associated with Alzheimer's Disease in Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Yue, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Man; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Min; Sheng, Nengyin; Feng, Su; Tang, Ke; Yu, Xiang; Shu, Yousheng; Yue, Chunmei; Jing, Naihe

    2015-11-10

    Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) is associated with cognitive impairments of Alzheimer's disease (AD), implying that BFCNs hold potentials in exploring stem cell-based replacement therapy for AD. However, studies on derivation of BFCNs from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are limited, and the application of ESC-derived BFCNs remains to be determined. Here, we report on differentiation approaches for directing both mouse and human ESCs into mature BFCNs. These ESC-derived BFCNs exhibit features similar to those of their in vivo counterparts and acquire appropriate functional properties. After transplantation into the basal forebrain of AD model mice, ESC-derived BFCN progenitors predominantly differentiate into mature cholinergic neurons that functionally integrate into the endogenous basal forebrain cholinergic projection system. The AD mice grafted with mouse or human BFCNs exhibit improvements in learning and memory performances. Our findings suggest a promising perspective of ESC-derived BFCNs in the development of stem cell-based therapies for treatment of AD. PMID:26489896

  11. Forebrain-specific deletion of Cdk5 in pyramidal neurons results in mania-like behavior and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Susan C.; Rudenko, Andrii; Cho, Sukhee; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is associated with synaptic plasticity and cognitive function. Previous reports have demonstrated that Cdk5 is necessary for memory formation, although others have reported Cdk5 conditional knockout mouse models exhibiting enhanced learning and memory. Furthermore, how Cdk5 acts in specific cell populations to affect behavior and cognitive outcomes remains unclear. Here we conduct a behavioral characterization of a forebrain-specific Cdk5 conditional knockout mouse model under the αCaMKII promoter, in which Cdk5 is ablated in excitatory pyramidal neurons of the forebrain. The Cdk5 conditional knockouts exhibit hyperactivitiy in the open field, reduced anxiety, and reduced behavioral despair. Moreover, the Cdk5 conditional knockouts also display impaired spatial learning in the Morris water maze and are severely impaired in contextual fear memory, which correspond to deficits in synaptic transmission. Remarkably, the hyperactivity of the Cdk5 conditional knockouts can be ameliorated by the administration of lithium chloride, an inhibitor of GSK3β signaling. Collectively, our data reveal that Cdk5 ablation from forebrain excitatory neurons results in deleterious effects on emotional and cognitive behavior and highlight a key role for Cdk5 in regulating the GSK3β signaling pathway. PMID:23850563

  12. Neurochemical Organization and Experience-Dependent Activation of Estrogen-Associated Circuits in the Songbird Auditory Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Burrows, Kaiping; Tremere, Liisa A.; Pinaud, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The classic steroid hormone estradiol is rapidly produced by central auditory neurons in the songbird brain and instantaneously modulates auditory coding to enhance the neural and behavioral discrimination of acoustic signals. Although these recent advances highlight novel roles for estradiol in the regulation of central auditory processing, current knowledge on the functional and neurochemical organization of estrogen-associated circuits, as well as the impact of sensory experience in these auditory forebrain networks, remains very limited. Here we show that both estrogen-producing and -sensitive neurons are highly expressed in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM), the zebra finch analog of the mammalian auditory association cortex, but not other auditory forebrain areas. We further demonstrate that auditory experience primarily engages estrogen-producing, and to a lesser extent, estrogen-responsive neurons in NCM, that these neuronal populations moderately overlap, and that acute episodes of sensory experience do not quantitatively affect these circuits. Finally, we show that whereas estrogen-producing cells are neurochemically heterogenous, estrogen-sensitive neurons are primarily glutamatergic. These findings reveal the neurochemical and functional organization of estrogen-associated circuits in the auditory forebrain, demonstrate their activation and stability in response to sensory experience in behaving animals, and highlight estrogenic circuits as fundamental components of central networks supporting sensory processing. PMID:21707790

  13. Rac1 deficiency in the forebrain results in neural progenitor reduction and microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Melendez, Jaime; Campbell, Kenneth; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Zheng, Yi

    2009-01-01

    The Rho family of small GTPases has been implicated in many neurological disorders including mental retardation, but whether they are involved in primary microcephaly (microcephalia vera) is unknown. Here, we examine the role of Rac1 in mammalian neural progenitors and forebrain development by a conditional gene-targeting strategy using the Foxg1-Cre line to delete floxed-Rac1 alleles in the telencephalic ventricular zone (VZ) of mouse embryos. We found that Rac1 deletion in the telencephalic VZ progenitors resulted in reduced sizes of both the striatum and cerebral cortex. Analyses further indicated that this abnormality was caused by accelerated cell-cycle exit and increased apoptosis during early corticogenesis (approximately E14.5), leading to a decrease of the neural progenitor pool in mid-to-late telencephalic development (E16.5 to E18.5). Moreover, the formation of patch-matrix compartments in the striatum was impaired by Rac1-deficiency. Together, these results suggest that Rac1 regulates self-renewal, survival, and differentiation of telencephalic neural progenitors, and that dysfunctions of Rac1 may lead to primary microcephaly. PMID:19007770

  14. The amygdala and basal forebrain as a pathway for motivationally guided attention.

    PubMed

    Peck, Christopher J; Salzman, C Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Visual stimuli associated with rewards attract spatial attention. Neurophysiological mechanisms that mediate this process must register both the motivational significance and location of visual stimuli. Recent neurophysiological evidence indicates that the amygdala encodes information about both of these parameters. Furthermore, the firing rate of amygdala neurons predicts the allocation of spatial attention. One neural pathway through which the amygdala might influence attention involves the intimate and bidirectional connections between the amygdala and basal forebrain (BF), a brain area long implicated in attention. Neurons in the rhesus monkey amygdala and BF were therefore recorded simultaneously while subjects performed a detection task in which the stimulus-reward associations of visual stimuli modulated spatial attention. Neurons in BF were spatially selective for reward-predictive stimuli, much like the amygdala. The onset of reward-predictive signals in each brain area suggested different routes of processing for reward-predictive stimuli appearing in the ipsilateral and contralateral fields. Moreover, neurons in the amygdala, but not BF, tracked trial-to-trial fluctuations in spatial attention. These results suggest that the amygdala and BF could play distinct yet inter-related roles in influencing attention elicited by reward-predictive stimuli. PMID:25297102

  15. Distinct roles of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in spatial and object recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kana; Nishizawa, Kayo; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Sakata, Shogo; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2015-08-06

    Recognition memory requires processing of various types of information such as objects and locations. Impairment in recognition memory is a prominent feature of amnesia and a symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons contain two major groups, one localized in the medial septum (MS)/vertical diagonal band of Broca (vDB), and the other in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM). The roles of these cell groups in recognition memory have been debated, and it remains unclear how they contribute to it. We use a genetic cell targeting technique to selectively eliminate cholinergic cell groups and then test spatial and object recognition memory through different behavioural tasks. Eliminating MS/vDB neurons impairs spatial but not object recognition memory in the reference and working memory tasks, whereas NBM elimination undermines only object recognition memory in the working memory task. These impairments are restored by treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, anti-dementia drugs for AD. Our results highlight that MS/vDB and NBM cholinergic neurons are not only implicated in recognition memory but also have essential roles in different types of recognition memory.

  16. Basal forebrain motivational salience signal enhances cortical processing and decision speed

    PubMed Central

    Raver, Sylvina M.; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) contains major projections to the cerebral cortex, and plays a well-documented role in arousal, attention, decision-making, and in modulating cortical activity. BF neuronal degeneration is an early event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and dementias, and occurs in normal cognitive aging. While the BF is best known for its population of cortically projecting cholinergic neurons, the region is anatomically and neurochemically diverse, and also contains prominent populations of non-cholinergic projection neurons. In recent years, increasing attention has been dedicated to these non-cholinergic BF neurons in order to better understand how non-cholinergic BF circuits control cortical processing and behavioral performance. In this review, we focus on a unique population of putative non-cholinergic BF neurons that encodes the motivational salience of stimuli with a robust ensemble bursting response. We review recent studies that describe the specific physiological and functional characteristics of these BF salience-encoding neurons in behaving animals. These studies support the unifying hypothesis whereby BF salience-encoding neurons act as a gain modulation mechanism of the decision-making process to enhance cortical processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli, and thereby facilitate faster and more precise behavioral responses. This function of BF salience-encoding neurons represents a critical component in determining which incoming stimuli warrant an animal’s attention, and is therefore a fundamental and early requirement of behavioral flexibility. PMID:26528157

  17. The Amygdala and Basal Forebrain as a Pathway for Motivationally Guided Attention

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Visual stimuli associated with rewards attract spatial attention. Neurophysiological mechanisms that mediate this process must register both the motivational significance and location of visual stimuli. Recent neurophysiological evidence indicates that the amygdala encodes information about both of these parameters. Furthermore, the firing rate of amygdala neurons predicts the allocation of spatial attention. One neural pathway through which the amygdala might influence attention involves the intimate and bidirectional connections between the amygdala and basal forebrain (BF), a brain area long implicated in attention. Neurons in the rhesus monkey amygdala and BF were therefore recorded simultaneously while subjects performed a detection task in which the stimulus–reward associations of visual stimuli modulated spatial attention. Neurons in BF were spatially selective for reward-predictive stimuli, much like the amygdala. The onset of reward-predictive signals in each brain area suggested different routes of processing for reward-predictive stimuli appearing in the ipsilateral and contralateral fields. Moreover, neurons in the amygdala, but not BF, tracked trial-to-trial fluctuations in spatial attention. These results suggest that the amygdala and BF could play distinct yet inter-related roles in influencing attention elicited by reward-predictive stimuli. PMID:25297102

  18. Distributed forebrain sites mediate melatonin-induced short-day responses in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Leitner, Claudia; Bartness, Timothy J

    2010-07-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin (MEL) is the key initiator in regulating seasonal photoperiodic responses; however, the central sites that mediate short day (SD) winter-like responses, such as testicular regression and decreases in white adipose tissue (WAT) mass, by Siberian hamsters are not precisely known. WAT is innervated by the sympathetic nervous system, and several forebrain sites that are part of the sympathetic nervous system outflow to WAT coexpress MEL(1a) receptor mRNA [e.g. suprachiasmatic nucleus, subzona incerta (SubZi), dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, nucleus reunions and paraventricular nuclei of the thalamus]. We tested the involvement of these sites in MEL-triggered SD responses. A long duration, SD-like MEL signal was applied site specifically for 5 wk, with sc and third ventricle MEL application serving as positive controls. Whereas SD MEL signals delivered to each of these sites were able to induce testicular regression, all but the paraventricular nuclei of the thalamus also trigger SD-induced decreases in body mass. Third ventricle, sc, suprachiasmatic nucleus, or SubZi MEL application also decreased WAT mass, and only sc and SubZi MEL application decreased food intake. Collectively these data suggest a distributed system of MEL-sensitive brain sites sufficient to mediate these SD responses, the redundancy of which suggests its importance for appropriate seasonal responses critical for overwintering.

  19. Quantitative autoradiography of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors in the forebrain of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta

    SciTech Connect

    Schlegel, J.R.; Kriegstein, A.R.

    1987-11-22

    The distribution of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors was investigated in the turtle forebrain by the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Muscarinic binding sites were labeled with 1 nM /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and benzodiazepine sites were demonstrated with the aid of 1 nM /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (/sup 3/H-FLU). Autoradiograms generated on /sup 3/H-Ultrofilm apposed to tissue slices revealed regionally specific distributions of muscarinic and benzodiazepine binding sites that are comparable with those for mammalian brain. Dense benzodiazepine binding was found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the lateral and dorsal cortices, and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), a structure with no clear mammalian homologue. Muscarinic binding sites were most dense in the striatum, accumbens, DVR, lateral geniculate, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. Cortical binding sites were studied in greater detail by quantitative analysis of autoradiograms generated by using emulsion-coated coverslips. Laminar gradients of binding were observed that were specific for each radioligand; /sup 3/H-QNB sites were most dense in the inner molecular layer in all cortical regions, whereas /sup 3/H-FLU binding was generally most concentrated in the outer molecular layer and was least dense through all layers in the dorsomedial cortex. Because pyramidal cells are arranged in register in turtle cortex, the laminar patterns of receptor binding may reflect different receptor density gradients along pyramidal cell dendrites.

  20. Birds have primate-like numbers of neurons in the forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Olkowicz, Seweryn; Kocourek, Martin; Lučan, Radek K.; Porteš, Michal; Fitch, W. Tecumseh; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Němec, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Some birds achieve primate-like levels of cognition, even though their brains tend to be much smaller in absolute size. This poses a fundamental problem in comparative and computational neuroscience, because small brains are expected to have a lower information-processing capacity. Using the isotropic fractionator to determine numbers of neurons in specific brain regions, here we show that the brains of parrots and songbirds contain on average twice as many neurons as primate brains of the same mass, indicating that avian brains have higher neuron packing densities than mammalian brains. Additionally, corvids and parrots have much higher proportions of brain neurons located in the pallial telencephalon compared with primates or other mammals and birds. Thus, large-brained parrots and corvids have forebrain neuron counts equal to or greater than primates with much larger brains. We suggest that the large numbers of neurons concentrated in high densities in the telencephalon substantially contribute to the neural basis of avian intelligence. PMID:27298365

  1. Basal forebrain motivational salience signal enhances cortical processing and decision speed.

    PubMed

    Raver, Sylvina M; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) contains major projections to the cerebral cortex, and plays a well-documented role in arousal, attention, decision-making, and in modulating cortical activity. BF neuronal degeneration is an early event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementias, and occurs in normal cognitive aging. While the BF is best known for its population of cortically projecting cholinergic neurons, the region is anatomically and neurochemically diverse, and also contains prominent populations of non-cholinergic projection neurons. In recent years, increasing attention has been dedicated to these non-cholinergic BF neurons in order to better understand how non-cholinergic BF circuits control cortical processing and behavioral performance. In this review, we focus on a unique population of putative non-cholinergic BF neurons that encodes the motivational salience of stimuli with a robust ensemble bursting response. We review recent studies that describe the specific physiological and functional characteristics of these BF salience-encoding neurons in behaving animals. These studies support the unifying hypothesis whereby BF salience-encoding neurons act as a gain modulation mechanism of the decision-making process to enhance cortical processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli, and thereby facilitate faster and more precise behavioral responses. This function of BF salience-encoding neurons represents a critical component in determining which incoming stimuli warrant an animal's attention, and is therefore a fundamental and early requirement of behavioral flexibility.

  2. Statistical learning of recurring sound patterns encodes auditory objects in songbird forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kai; Vicario, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Auditory neurophysiology has demonstrated how basic acoustic features are mapped in the brain, but it is still not clear how multiple sound components are integrated over time and recognized as an object. We investigated the role of statistical learning in encoding the sequential features of complex sounds by recording neuronal responses bilaterally in the auditory forebrain of awake songbirds that were passively exposed to long sound streams. These streams contained sequential regularities, and were similar to streams used in human infants to demonstrate statistical learning for speech sounds. For stimulus patterns with contiguous transitions and with nonadjacent elements, single and multiunit responses reflected neuronal discrimination of the familiar patterns from novel patterns. In addition, discrimination of nonadjacent patterns was stronger in the right hemisphere than in the left, and may reflect an effect of top-down modulation that is lateralized. Responses to recurring patterns showed stimulus-specific adaptation, a sparsening of neural activity that may contribute to encoding invariants in the sound stream and that appears to increase coding efficiency for the familiar stimuli across the population of neurons recorded. As auditory information about the world must be received serially over time, recognition of complex auditory objects may depend on this type of mnemonic process to create and differentiate representations of recently heard sounds. PMID:25246563

  3. Cognitive functions of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in monkeys: memory or attention?

    PubMed

    Voytko, M L

    1996-02-01

    The cholinergic hypothesis of memory dysfunction originally proposed that dysfunction of cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS) may be responsible for the memory deficits associated with aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This hypothesis directed focus on the BFCS in experimental animal models of AD. In contrast to numerous studies in rodents, fewer investigations have been conducted in monkeys with BFCS lesions. The medical septal nucleus/nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca (MS/NDBB) and the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) may be involved in different cognitive functions in monkeys. Although few investigations have specifically addressed the issue of cognitive functions of the MS/NDBB in monkeys, there is some indication that these regions may be important for memory. In contrast, lesions of the NBM do not consistently disrupt mnemonic functions in monkeys. Recent electrophysiological and lesion studies of monkeys indicate that the NBM may play a more important role in attention functions, impairments of which are an early and significant feature of patients with AD.

  4. Birds have primate-like numbers of neurons in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Olkowicz, Seweryn; Kocourek, Martin; Lučan, Radek K; Porteš, Michal; Fitch, W Tecumseh; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Němec, Pavel

    2016-06-28

    Some birds achieve primate-like levels of cognition, even though their brains tend to be much smaller in absolute size. This poses a fundamental problem in comparative and computational neuroscience, because small brains are expected to have a lower information-processing capacity. Using the isotropic fractionator to determine numbers of neurons in specific brain regions, here we show that the brains of parrots and songbirds contain on average twice as many neurons as primate brains of the same mass, indicating that avian brains have higher neuron packing densities than mammalian brains. Additionally, corvids and parrots have much higher proportions of brain neurons located in the pallial telencephalon compared with primates or other mammals and birds. Thus, large-brained parrots and corvids have forebrain neuron counts equal to or greater than primates with much larger brains. We suggest that the large numbers of neurons concentrated in high densities in the telencephalon substantially contribute to the neural basis of avian intelligence. PMID:27298365

  5. Visualizing an emotional valence map in the limbic forebrain by TAI-FISH.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Jianbo; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Ting-ting; Chen, Yang; Hu, Hailan

    2014-11-01

    A fundamental problem in neuroscience is how emotional valences are represented in the brain. We know little about how appetitive and aversive systems interact and the extent to which information regarding these two opposite values segregate and converge. Here we used a new method, tyramide-amplified immunohistochemistry-fluorescence in situ hybridization, to simultaneously visualize the neural correlates of two stimuli of contrasting emotional valence across the limbic forebrain at single-cell resolution. We discovered characteristic patterns of interaction, segregated, convergent and intermingled, between the appetitive and aversive neural ensembles in mice. In nucleus accumbens, we identified a mosaic activation pattern by positive and negative emotional cues, and unraveled previously unappreciated functional heterogeneity in the D1- and D2-type medium-spiny neurons, which correspond to the Go and NoGo pathways. These results provide insights into the coding of emotional valence in the brain and act as a proof of principle of a powerful methodology for simultaneous functional mapping of two distinct behaviors.

  6. Selective activation of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons induces immediate sleep-wake transitions.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Shi, Yu-feng; Xi, Wang; Zhou, Rui; Tan, Zhi-bing; Wang, Hao; Li, Xiao-ming; Chen, Zhong; Feng, Guoping; Luo, Minmin; Huang, Zhi-li; Duan, Shumin; Yu, Yan-qin

    2014-03-17

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays a crucial role in cortical activation [1, 2]. However, the exact role of cholinergic BF (ch-BF) neurons in the sleep-wake cycle remains unclear [3, 4]. We demonstrated that photostimulation of ch-BF neurons genetically targeted with channelrhodopsin 2 (ChR2) was sufficient to induce an immediate transition to waking or rapid eye movement (REM) sleep from slow-wave sleep (SWS). Light stimulation was most likely to induce behavioral arousal during SWS, but not during REM sleep, a result in contrast to the previously reported photostimulation of noradrenergic or hypocretin neurons that induces wake transitions from both SWS and REM sleep. Furthermore, the ratio of light-induced transitions from SWS to wakefulness or to REM sleep did not significantly differ from that of natural transitions, suggesting that activation of ch-BF neurons facilitates the transition from SWS but does not change the direction of the transition. Excitation of ch-BF neurons during wakefulness or REM sleep sustained the cortical activation. Stimulation of these neurons for 1 hr induced a delayed increase in the duration of wakefulness in the subsequent inactive period. Our results suggest that activation of ch-BF neurons alone is sufficient to suppress SWS and promote wakefulness and REM sleep.

  7. Male song quality modulates c-Fos expression in the auditory forebrain of the female canary

    PubMed Central

    Monbureau, Marie; Barker, Jennifer M.; Leboucher, Gérard; Balthazart, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    In canaries, specific phrases of male song (sexy songs, SS) that are difficult to produce are especially attractive for females. Females exposed to SS produce more copulation displays and deposit more testosterone into their eggs than females exposed to non-sexy songs (NS). Increased expression of the immediate early genes c-Fos or zenk (a.k.a. egr-1) has been observed in the auditory forebrain of female songbirds hearing attractive songs. C-Fos immunoreactive (Fos-ir) cell numbers were quantified here in the brain of female canaries that had been collected 30 min after they had been exposed for 60 min to the playback of SS or NS or control white noise. Fos-ir cell numbers increased in the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM) and caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) of SS birds as compared to controls. Song playback (pooled SS and NS) also tended to increase average Fos-ir cell numbers in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) but this effect did not reach full statistical significance. At the individual level, Fos expression in CMM was correlated with its expression in NCM and in MBH but also with the frequency of calls that females produced in response to the playbacks. These data thus indicate that male songs of different qualities induce a differential metabolic activation of NCM and CMM. The correlation between activation of auditory regions and of the MBH might reflect the link between auditory stimulation and changes in behavior and reproductive physiology. PMID:25846435

  8. Cell type-specific long-range connections of basal forebrain circuit.

    PubMed

    Do, Johnny Phong; Xu, Min; Lee, Seung-Hee; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Zhang, Siyu; Chung, Shinjae; Yung, Tyler J; Fan, Jiang Lan; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Luo, Liqun; Dan, Yang

    2016-09-19

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays key roles in multiple brain functions, including sleep-wake regulation, attention, and learning/memory, but the long-range connections mediating these functions remain poorly characterized. Here we performed whole-brain mapping of both inputs and outputs of four BF cell types - cholinergic, glutamatergic, and parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) GABAergic neurons - in the mouse brain. Using rabies virus -mediated monosynaptic retrograde tracing to label the inputs and adeno-associated virus to trace axonal projections, we identified numerous brain areas connected to the BF. The inputs to different cell types were qualitatively similar, but the output projections showed marked differences. The connections to glutamatergic and SOM+ neurons were strongly reciprocal, while those to cholinergic and PV+ neurons were more unidirectional. These results reveal the long-range wiring diagram of the BF circuit with highly convergent inputs and divergent outputs and point to both functional commonality and specialization of different BF cell types.

  9. Male song quality modulates c-Fos expression in the auditory forebrain of the female canary.

    PubMed

    Monbureau, Marie; Barker, Jennifer M; Leboucher, Gérard; Balthazart, Jacques

    2015-08-01

    In canaries, specific phrases of male song (sexy songs, SS) that are difficult to produce are especially attractive for females. Females exposed to SS produce more copulation displays and deposit more testosterone into their eggs than females exposed to non-sexy songs (NS). Increased expression of the immediate early genes c-Fos or zenk (a.k.a. egr-1) has been observed in the auditory forebrain of female songbirds hearing attractive songs. C-Fos immunoreactive (Fos-ir) cell numbers were quantified here in the brain of female canaries that had been collected 30min after they had been exposed for 60min to the playback of SS or NS or control white noise. Fos-ir cell numbers increased in the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM) and caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) of SS birds as compared to controls. Song playback (pooled SS and NS) also tended to increase average Fos-ir cell numbers in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) but this effect did not reach full statistical significance. At the individual level, Fos expression in CMM was correlated with its expression in NCM and in MBH but also with the frequency of calls that females produced in response to the playbacks. These data thus indicate that male songs of different qualities induce a differential metabolic activation of NCM and CMM. The correlation between activation of auditory regions and of the MBH might reflect the link between auditory stimulation and changes in behavior and reproductive physiology. PMID:25846435

  10. Establishment of a Long-Term Chick Forebrain Neuronal Culture on a Microelectrode Array Platform

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Serena Y.; Huang, Ting; Wang, Zhonghai; Lin, Yongliang; Kindy, Mark; Xi, Tingfei; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2016-01-01

    The biosensor system formed by culturing primary animal neurons on a microelectrode array (MEA) platform is drawing an increasing research interest for its power as a rapid, sensitive, functional neurotoxicity assessment, as well as for many other electrophysiological related research purposes. In this paper, we established a long-term chick forebrain neuron culture (C-FBN-C) on MEAs with a more than 5 month long lifespan and up to 5 month long stability in morphology and physiological function; characterized the C-FBN-C morphologically, functionally, and developmentally; partially compared its functional features with rodent counterpart; and discussed its pros and cons as a novel biosensor system in comparison to rodent counterpart and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Our results show that C-FBN-C on MEA platform 1) can be used as a biosensor of its own type in a wide spectrum of basic biomedical research; 2) is of value in comparative physiology in cross-species studies; and 3) may have potential to be used as an alternative, cost-effective approach to rodent counterpart within shared common functional domains (such as specific types of ligand-gated ion channel receptors and subtypes expressed in the cortical tissues of both species) in large-scale environmental neurotoxicant screening that would otherwise require millions of animals. PMID:26989485

  11. Interaction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with the glucocorticoid system in stress regulation and cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Saswati; Jeon, Won Kyung; Bizon, Jennifer L.; Han, Jung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A substantial number of studies on basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons (BFCN) have provided compelling evidence for their role in the etiology of stress, cognitive aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and other neurodegenerative diseases. BFCN project to a broad range of cortical sites and limbic structures, including the hippocampus, and are involved in stress and cognition. In particular, the hippocampus, the primary target tissue of the glucocorticoid stress hormones, is associated with cognitive function in tandem with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulation. The present review summarizes glucocorticoid and HPA axis research to date in an effort to establish the manner in which stress affects the release of acetylcholine (ACh), glucocorticoids, and their receptor in the context of cognitive processes. We attempt to provide the molecular interactive link between the glucocorticoids and cholinergic system that contributes to BFCN degeneration in stress-induced acceleration of cognitive decline in aging and AD. We also discuss the importance of animal models in facilitating such studies for pharmacological use, to which could help decipher disease states and propose leads for pharmacological intervention. PMID:25883567

  12. Disruption of auditory spatial working memory by inactivation of the forebrain archistriatum in barn owls.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, E I; Knudsen, P F

    1996-10-01

    Barn owls not only localize auditory stimuli with great accuracy, they also remember the locations of auditory stimuli and can use this remembered spatial information to guide their flight and strike. Although the mechanisms of sound localization have been studied extensively, the neurobiological basis of auditory spatial memory has not. Here we show that the ability of barn owls to orient their gaze towards and fly to the remembered location of auditory targets is lost during pharmacological inactivation of a small region in the forebrain, the anterior archistriatum. In contrast, archistriatal inactivation has no effect on stimulus-guided responses to auditory targets. The memory-dependent deficit is evident only for acoustic events that occur in the hemifield contralateral to the side that is inactivated. The data demonstrate that in the avian archistriatum, as in the mammalian frontal cortex, there exists a region that is essential for the expression of spatial working memory and that, in the barn owl, this region encodes auditory spatial memory. PMID:8837773

  13. Distinct roles of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in spatial and object recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kana; Nishizawa, Kayo; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Sakata, Shogo; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Recognition memory requires processing of various types of information such as objects and locations. Impairment in recognition memory is a prominent feature of amnesia and a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons contain two major groups, one localized in the medial septum (MS)/vertical diagonal band of Broca (vDB), and the other in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM). The roles of these cell groups in recognition memory have been debated, and it remains unclear how they contribute to it. We use a genetic cell targeting technique to selectively eliminate cholinergic cell groups and then test spatial and object recognition memory through different behavioural tasks. Eliminating MS/vDB neurons impairs spatial but not object recognition memory in the reference and working memory tasks, whereas NBM elimination undermines only object recognition memory in the working memory task. These impairments are restored by treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, anti-dementia drugs for AD. Our results highlight that MS/vDB and NBM cholinergic neurons are not only implicated in recognition memory but also have essential roles in different types of recognition memory. PMID:26246157

  14. Computational perspectives on forebrain microcircuits implicated in reinforcement learning, action selection, and cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Daniel; Tan, Can Ozan; John, Yohan J

    2009-01-01

    Abundant new information about signaling pathways in forebrain microcircuits presents many challenges, and opportunities for discovery, to computational neuroscientists who strive to bridge from microcircuits to flexible cognition and action. Accurate treatment of microcircuit pathways is especially critical for creating models that correctly predict the outcomes of candidate neurological therapies. Recent models are trying to specify how cortical circuits that enable planning and voluntary actions interact with adaptive subcortical microcircuits in the basal ganglia. The basal ganglia are strongly implicated in reinforcement learning, and in all behavior and cognition over which the frontal lobes exert flexible control. The persisting role of the basal ganglia shows that ancient vertebrate designs for motivated action selection proved adaptable enough to support many "modern" behavioral innovations, including fluent generation of language and speech. This paper summarizes how recent models have incorporated realistic representations of microcircuit features, and have begun to trace their computational implications. Also summarized are recent empirical discoveries that provide guidance regarding how to formulate the rules for synaptic modification that govern learning in cortico-striatal pathways. Such efforts are contributing to an emerging synthesis based on an interlocking set of computational hypotheses regarding cortical interactions with basal ganglia and thalamic nuclei. These hypotheses specify how specialized microcircuits solve learning and control problems inherent to the brain's parallel design.

  15. Cell type-specific long-range connections of basal forebrain circuit.

    PubMed

    Do, Johnny Phong; Xu, Min; Lee, Seung-Hee; Chang, Wei-Cheng; Zhang, Siyu; Chung, Shinjae; Yung, Tyler J; Fan, Jiang Lan; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Luo, Liqun; Dan, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays key roles in multiple brain functions, including sleep-wake regulation, attention, and learning/memory, but the long-range connections mediating these functions remain poorly characterized. Here we performed whole-brain mapping of both inputs and outputs of four BF cell types - cholinergic, glutamatergic, and parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) GABAergic neurons - in the mouse brain. Using rabies virus -mediated monosynaptic retrograde tracing to label the inputs and adeno-associated virus to trace axonal projections, we identified numerous brain areas connected to the BF. The inputs to different cell types were qualitatively similar, but the output projections showed marked differences. The connections to glutamatergic and SOM+ neurons were strongly reciprocal, while those to cholinergic and PV+ neurons were more unidirectional. These results reveal the long-range wiring diagram of the BF circuit with highly convergent inputs and divergent outputs and point to both functional commonality and specialization of different BF cell types. PMID:27642784

  16. Agonist mediated conformational changes of solubilized calf forebrain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, P; Andre, C; de Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G

    1984-10-01

    Muscarinic receptors in calf forebrain membranes can be identified by the specific binding of the radiolabelled antagonist [3H]dexetimide. These receptors (2.8 pM/mg protein) comprise two non-interconvertible subpopulations with respectively high and low agonist affinity but with the same antagonist affinity. For all the agonists tested the low affinity sites represent 85 +/- 5% of the total receptor population. 0.5% Digitonin solubilized extracts contain 0.8 pM muscarinic receptor/mg protein. In contrast with the membranes, these extracts contain only sites with low agonist affinity. The alkylating reagent N-ethylmaleimide causes an increase of the acetylcholine affinity for the low affinity sites in membranes as well as for the solubilized sites. This effect is time dependent until a maximal 3-fold increase in affinity is attained. The rate of N-ethylmaleimide action is enhanced by the concomitant presence of agonists. In contrast, N-ethylmaleimide does not affect antagonist binding. This suggests that agonists mediate a conformational change of both the membrane bound low affinity muscarinic sites and of the solubilized sites, resulting in their increased susceptibility towards NEM alkylation. PMID:6487351

  17. Silencing of Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Neurons Using Archaerhodopsin Prolongs Slow-Wave Sleep in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu-Feng; Han, Yong; Su, Yun-Ting; Yang, Jun-Hua; Yu, Yan-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays a crucial role in cortical activation. Our previous study showed that activation of cholinergic BF neurons alone is sufficient to suppress slow-wave sleep (SWS) and promote wakefulness and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, the exact role of silencing cholinergic BF neurons in the sleep-wake cycle remains unclear. We inhibitied the cholinergic BF neurons genetically targeted with archaerhodopsin (Arch) with yellow light to clarify the role of cholinergic BF neurons in the sleep-wake cycle. Bilateral inactivation of cholinergic BF neurons genetically targeted with archaerhodopsin prolonged SWS and decreased the probability of awakening from SWS in mice. However, silencing these neurons changed neither the duration of wakefulness or REM sleep, nor the probability of transitions to other sleep-wake episodes from wakefulness or REM sleep. Furthermore, silencing these neurons for 6 h within the inactive or active period increased the duration of SWS at the expense of the duration of wakefulness, as well as increasing the number of prolonged SWS episodes (120-240 s). The lost wakefulness was compensated by a delayed increase of wakefulness, so the total duration of SWS and wakefulness during 24 h was kept stable. Our results indicate that the main effect of these neurons is to terminate SWS, whereas wakefulness or REM sleep may be determined by co-operation of the cholinergic BF neurons with other arousal-sleep control systems.

  18. Regulation of GABA and benzodiazepine receptors following neurotoxin-induced striatal and medial forebrain bundle lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, H.S.I.

    1985-01-01

    GABA, a major inhibitory transmitter, is used by many projection neurons of the striatum. To investigate the role of GABA in striatal function, the GABA receptor complex was studied after lesions of the striatum or the nigrostriatal neurons. Quantitative receptor autoradiography using thaw-mounted tissue slices was developed for the study of GABA and benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. With the technique established, binding to GABA and BDZ receptors after unilateral striatal kainate lesions was examined. Subsequently, changes in GABA and BDZ receptors were studied following the destruction of dopaminergic nigrostriatal cells by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In summary, quantitative receptor autoradiography allowed the detection of GABA and BDZ receptor changes in multiple small areas in each lesioned brain. This technique made it feasible to carry out kinetic saturation, and competition studies using less than 1 mg of tissue. The data suggest that dopamine is functionally inhibitory on striatopallidal neurons but is functionally excitatory on striatoentopeduncular and striatonigral cells which in turn inhibit the thalamus. This quantitative autoradiographic technique can be generalized to study other transmitter receptors and can be combined with 2-deoxyglucose uptake studies.

  19. The Forebrain Song System Mediates Predictive Call Timing in Female and Male Zebra Finches.

    PubMed

    Benichov, Jonathan I; Benezra, Sam E; Vallentin, Daniela; Globerson, Eitan; Long, Michael A; Tchernichovski, Ofer

    2016-02-01

    The dichotomy between vocal learners and non-learners is a fundamental distinction in the study of animal communication. Male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) are vocal learners that acquire a song resembling their tutors', whereas females can only produce innate calls. The acoustic structure of short calls, produced by both males and females, is not learned. However, these calls can be precisely coordinated across individuals. To examine how birds learn to synchronize their calls, we developed a vocal robot that exchanges calls with a partner bird. Because birds answer the robot with stereotyped latencies, we could program it to disrupt each bird's responses by producing calls that are likely to coincide with the bird's. Within minutes, the birds learned to avoid this disruptive masking (jamming) by adjusting the timing of their responses. Notably, females exhibited greater adaptive timing plasticity than males. Further, when challenged with complex rhythms containing jamming elements, birds dynamically adjusted the timing of their calls in anticipation of jamming. Blocking the song system cortical output dramatically reduced the precision of birds' response timing and abolished their ability to avoid jamming. Surprisingly, we observed this effect in both males and females, indicating that the female song system is functional rather than vestigial. We suggest that descending forebrain projections, including the song-production pathway, function as a general-purpose sensorimotor communication system. In the case of calls, it enables plasticity in vocal timing to facilitate social interactions, whereas in the case of songs, plasticity extends to developmental changes in vocal structure. PMID:26774786

  20. Adenosinergic modulation of basal forebrain and preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neuronal activity in the control of behavioral state.

    PubMed

    Strecker, R E; Morairty, S; Thakkar, M M; Porkka-Heiskanen, T; Basheer, R; Dauphin, L J; Rainnie, D G; Portas, C M; Greene, R W; McCarley, R W

    2000-11-01

    This review describes a series of animal experiments that investigate the role of endogenous adenosine (AD) in sleep. We propose that AD is a modulator of the sleepiness associated with prolonged wakefulness. More specifically, we suggest that, during prolonged wakefulness, extracellular AD accumulates selectively in the basal forebrain (BF) and cortex and promotes the transition from wakefulness to slow wave sleep (SWS) by inhibiting cholinergic and non-cholinergic wakefulness-promoting BF neurons at the AD A1 receptor. New in vitro data are also compatible with the hypothesis that, via presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic inhibitory input, AD may disinhibit neurons in the preoptic/anterior hypothalamus (POAH) that have SWS-selective activity and Fos expression. Our in vitro recordings initially showed that endogenous AD suppressed the discharge activity of neurons in the BF cholinergic zone via the AD A1 receptor. Moreover, in identified mesopontine cholinergic neurons, AD was shown to act post-synaptically by hyperpolarizng the membrane via an inwardly rectifying potassium current and inhibition of the hyperpolarization-activated current, I(h). In vivo microdialysis in the cat has shown that AD in the BF cholinergic zone accumulates during prolonged wakefulness, and declines slowly during subsequent sleep, findings confirmed in the rat. Moreover, increasing BF AD concentrations to approximately the level as during sleep deprivation by a nucleoside transport blocker mimicked the effect of sleep deprivation on both the EEG power spectrum and behavioral state distribution: wakefulness was decreased, and there were increases in SWS and REM sleep. As predicted, microdialyis application of the specific A1 receptor antagonist cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT) in the BF produced the opposite effects on behavioral state, increasing wakefulness and decreasing SWS and REM. Combined unit recording and microdialysis studies have shown neurons selectively active in wakefulness

  1. Leptin acts in the forebrain to differentially influence baroreflex control of lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoxin; Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Brooks, Virginia L

    2013-04-01

    Although leptin is known to increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), we tested the hypothesis that leptin also enhances baroreflex control of SNA and heart rate (HR). Using α-chloralose anesthetized male rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP), HR, lumbar SNA (LSNA), splanchnic SNA (SSNA), and renal SNA (RSNA) were recorded before and for 2 hours after lateral cerebroventricular leptin or artificial cerebrospinal fluid administration. Baroreflex function was assessed using a 4-parameter sigmoidal fit of HR and SNA responses to slow ramp (3-5 minutes) changes in MAP, induced by intravenous infusion of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Leptin (3 μg) increased (P<0.05) basal LSNA, SSNA, RSNA, HR, and MAP, and the LSNA, SSNA, RSNA, and HR baroreflex maxima. Leptin also increased gain of baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA, but not of SSNA or HR. The elevations in HR were eliminated by pretreatment with methscopalamine, to block parasympathetic nerve activity; however, after cardiac sympathetic blockade with atenolol, leptin still increased basal HR and MAP and the HR baroreflex maximum and minimum. Leptin (1.5 μg) also increased LSNA and enhanced LSNA baroreflex gain and maximum, but did not alter MAP, HR, or the HR baroreflex. Lateral cerebroventricular artificial cerebrospinal fluid had no effects. Finally, to test whether leptin acts in the brain stem, leptin (3 μg) was infused into the 4th ventricle; however, no significant changes were observed. In conclusion, leptin acts in the forebrain to differentially influence baroreflex control of LSNA, RSNA, SSNA, and HR, with the latter action mediated via suppression of parasympathetic nerve activity. PMID:23424232

  2. Inter-tissue networks between the basal forebrain, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex in a model for depression caused by disturbed sleep.

    PubMed

    Lagus, Markus; Gass, Natalia; Saharinen, Juha; Savelyev, Sergey; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Paunio, Tiina

    2012-09-01

    Disturbances in sleep are encountered in the majority of patients with depressive disorder. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind this relationship, we examined gene expression changes in a rodent model for disturbed sleep and depression. The animals were treated with daily injections of clomipramine to affect their sleep during early infancy. This early interference with sleep is known to induce depression-like behavior in adult animals. After 2 weeks of treatment, the change in gene expression was examined using the Affymetrix Rat 230.2 chip. We studied the gene expression in the basal forebrain, hippocampus, and frontal cortex and combined the results to reveal the otherwise indissectible networks between and around the tissues. The major disrupted pathways between the three brain areas were related to synaptic transmission, regulation of translation, and ubiquitinylation. The involved pathways were within the cellular components of the axons, growth cones, melanosomes, and pigment granules. A network analysis allowing for additional interactors, in the form of chemicals or gene products, revealed a disturbed communicational network between the different brain areas. This disturbed network is centered around serotonin, Mn(II), and Rhoa. The findings elucidate inter-tissue pathways and networks in the brain that are involved in sleep and mood regulation. The findings are of uttermost interest, some are quite predictable and obvious, but some are novel or have only been proposed by rare theoretical speculations (such as the melanosome and Mn(II) involvement). Equally important as the findings are the methods described in this article. In this study, we present two novel simple ways to perform system biological analysis based on gene expression array data. We used two already existing tools in a new way, and by careful planning of the input data, managed to extrapolate intricate hidden inter-tissue networks to build a molecular picture of disease. PMID

  3. Discharge profiles of identified GABAergic in comparison to cholinergic and putative glutamatergic basal forebrain neurons across the sleep-wake cycle.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Oum Kaltoum; Lee, Maan Gee; Henny, Pablo; Jones, Barbara E

    2009-09-23

    Whereas basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons are known to participate in processes of cortical activation during wake (W) and paradoxical sleep (PS or P, also called REM sleep), codistributed GABAergic neurons have been thought to participate in processes of cortical deactivation and slow-wave sleep (SWS or S). To learn the roles the GABAergic neurons might play, in relation to cholinergic and glutamatergic neurons, we juxtacellularly recorded and labeled neurons during natural sleep-wake states in head-fixed rats. Neurobiotin (Nb)-labeled cells were identified immunohistochemically as choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)+, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)+, or ChAT-/GAD-. Of the latter, some were identified as glutamatergic by immunostaining of their terminals with the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT2). In contrast to ChAT+ neurons, which all discharged maximally during W and PS, GAD+ neurons comprised multiple sleep-wake subgroups. Some GABAergic neurons discharged maximally during W and PS, as WP-max active cells (36%), and in positive correlation with gamma electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. Some discharged maximally during SWS, as S-max active cells (28%), and in positive correlation with delta EEG activity. Others increased their discharge progressively during sleep to discharge maximally during PS, as P-max active cells (36%), and in negative association with electromyographic (EMG) activity. ChAT-/GAD- cells comprised WP-max (46%), S-max (17%), P-max (17%), and W-max active cells (14%), whose discharge was positively correlated with EMG activity. GABAergic neurons would thus play similar or reciprocal roles to other cholinergic and glutamatergic BF neurons in regulating cortical activity and muscle tone along with behavior across sleep-wake states.

  4. Forebrain organization representing baroreceptor gating of somatosensory afferents within the cortical autonomic network.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Ruma; Frances, Maria Fernanda; Steinback, Craig Douglas; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2012-07-01

    Somatosensory afferents are represented within the cortical autonomic network (CAN). However, the representation of somatosensory afferents, and the consequent cardiovascular effects, may be modified by levels of baroreceptor input. Thus, we examined the cortical regions involved with processing somatosensory inputs during baroreceptor unloading. Neuroimaging sessions (functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI]) recorded brain activity during 30 mmHg lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) alone and combined with somatosensory stimulation (LBNP+SS) of the forearm (n = 14). Somatosensory processing was also assessed during increased sympathetic outflow via end-expiratory apnea. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), cardiac output (Q), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded during the same protocols in a separate laboratory session. SS alone had no effect on any cardiovascular or MSNA variable at rest. Measures of HR, BP, and Q during LBNP were not different compared with LBNP+SS. The rise in MSNA burst frequency was attenuated during LBNP+SS versus LBNP alone (8 vs. 12 bursts/min, respectively, P < 0.05). SS did not affect the change in MSNA during apnea. Activations within the insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) observed during LBNP were not seen during LBNP+SS. Anterior insula and ACC activations occurring during apnea were not modified by SS. Thus, the absence of insular and dorsal ACC activity during LBNP+SS along with an attenuation of MSNA burst frequency suggest sympathoinhibitory effects of sensory stimulation during decreased baroreceptor input by a mechanism that includes conjoint insula-dorsal ACC regulation. These findings reveal that the level of baroreceptor input influences the forebrain organization of somatosensory afferents. PMID:22514285

  5. Vomeronasal neuroepithelium and forebrain Fos responses to male pheromones in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Halem, H A; Cherry, J A; Baum, M J

    1999-05-01

    Male urinary pheromones modulate behavioral and neuroendocrine function in mice after being detected by sensory neurons in the vomeronasal organ (VNO) neuroepithelium. We used nuclear Fos protein immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) as a marker of changes in neuronal activity to examine the processing of male pheromones throughout the VNO projection pathway to the hypothalamus. Sexually naive male and female Balb/c mice were gonadectomized and treated daily with estradiol benzoate (EB) or oil vehicle for 3 weeks. Subjects were then exposed to soiled bedding from gonadally intact Balb/c males or to clean bedding for 90 min prior to sacrifice and processing of their VNOs and forebrains for Fos-IR. Male pheromones induced similar numbers of Fos-IR cells in the VNO neuroepithelium of oil-treated male and female subjects; however, EB-treated females had significantly more Fos-IR neurons in the VNO than any other group. There was an equivalent neuronal Fos response to male odors in the mitral and granule cells of the anterior and posterior accessory olfactory bulb of males and females, regardless of hormone treatment. In central portions of the VNO projection pathway (i.e., bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, medial preoptic area) neuronal Fos responses to male pheromones were present in female but absent in male subjects, regardless of hormone treatment. In a separate experiment, mating induced neuronal Fos-IR in these brain regions at levels in gonadally intact male subjects which were equal to or greater than those seen in ovariectomized females primed with estrogen and progesterone. This suggests that neurons in the central portions of the male's VNO pathway are capable of expressing Fos. Our results suggest that sexually dimorphic central responses to pheromones exist in mice that may begin in the VNO neuroepithelium.

  6. Glucose metabolism and neurogenesis in the gerbil hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae Young; Lee, Kwon Young; Park, Joon Ha; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-08-01

    Recent evidence exists that glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) plays an important role in the energy metabolism in the brain. Most previous studies have been conducted using focal or hypoxic ischemia models and have focused on changes in GLUT3 expression based on protein and mRNA levels rather than tissue levels. In the present study, we observed change in GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the adult gerbil hippocampus at various time points after 5 minutes of transient forebrain ischemia. In the sham-operated group, GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region was weak, in the pyramidal cells of the CA1 region increased in a time-dependent fashion 24 hours after ischemia, and in the hippocampal CA1 region decreased significantly between 2 and 5 days after ischemia, with high level of GLUT3 immunoreactivity observed in the CA1 region 10 days after ischemia. In a double immunofluorescence study using GLUT3 and glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), we observed strong GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the astrocytes. GLUT3 immunoreactivity increased after ischemia and peaked 7 days in the dentate gyrus after ischemia/reperfusion. In a double immunofluorescence study using GLUT3 and doublecortin (DCX), we observed low level of GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the differentiated neuroblasts of the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus after ischemia. GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the sham-operated group was mainly detected in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that the increase in GLUT3 immunoreactivity may be a compensatory mechanism to modulate glucose level in the hippocampal CA1 region and to promote adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. PMID:27651772

  7. Active recognition enhances the representation of behaviorally relevant information in single auditory forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Sensory systems are dynamic. They must process a wide range of natural signals that facilitate adaptive behaviors in a manner that depends on an organism's constantly changing goals. A full understanding of the sensory physiology that underlies adaptive natural behaviors must therefore account for the activity of sensory systems in light of these behavioral goals. Here we present a novel technique that combines in vivo electrophysiological recording from awake, freely moving songbirds with operant conditioning techniques that allow control over birds' recognition of conspecific song, a widespread natural behavior in songbirds. We show that engaging in a vocal recognition task alters the response properties of neurons in the caudal mesopallium (CM), an avian analog of mammalian auditory cortex, in European starlings. Compared with awake, passive listening, active engagement of subjects in an auditory recognition task results in neurons responding to fewer song stimuli and a decrease in the trial-to-trial variability in their driven firing rates. Mean firing rates also change during active recognition, but not uniformly. Relative to nonengaged listening, active recognition causes increases in the driven firing rates in some neurons, decreases in other neurons, and stimulus-specific changes in other neurons. These changes lead to both an increase in stimulus selectivity and an increase in the information conveyed by the neurons about the animals' behavioral task. This study demonstrates the behavioral dependence of neural responses in the avian auditory forebrain and introduces the starling as a model for real-time monitoring of task-related neural processing of complex auditory objects. PMID:23303858

  8. Role of the forebrain commissures in bihemispheric mnemonic integration in macaques.

    PubMed

    Lewine, J D; Doty, R W; Astur, R S; Provencal, S L

    1994-05-01

    A serial probe recognition task was used to examine the interhemispheric exchange of visual data in macaques. Each block of trials began with the memorization of one to six visual target images. The monkeys then had to determine, in tests that followed immediately, whether probe images were or were not members of the learned target set. Previous work with both humans and macaques has shown that the time required for the evaluation of probes generally increases, while response accuracy decreases, as a function of the number of targets, the "memory load". By testing animals with bisected optic chiasm, it was possible to direct visual information to only one hemisphere at a time, simply by occluding the opposite eye. In this fashion, the quality of intrahemispheric evaluations (in which a monocular probe was a match for a target previously viewed through the same eye) was compared with that of interhemispheric evaluations (in which a probe was a match for a target previously designated through the opposite eye). A key question was whether division of the target list between the hemispheres modified the relationships between reaction time, response accuracy, and memory load. Provided that either the anterior commissure or the splenium of the corpus callosum was intact, interhemispheric processing was only subtly less efficient than intrahemispheric processing. The ability to perform interhemispheric evaluations was selectively and completely disrupted if all forebrain commissural fibers were transected. In this latter split-brain condition, the time required for probe evaluations was, as expected, determined solely by the number of target items memorized by the probed hemisphere. Accuracy, however, was always a function of the total memory load, regardless of the distribution of targets between the hemispheres. This implies, first, that accuracy and latency do not reflect identical mnemonic factors, as frequently held, and second, that in mnemonic processing, the two

  9. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic, and Parvalbumin Neurons in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Franciosi, Serena; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF) region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV) neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made from BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic and PV neurons with the size (>20 μm) and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents) corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min) bath application of adenosine (100 μM) decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic, and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM). Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required

  10. Nitric oxide activates leak K+ currents in the presumed cholinergic neuron of basal forebrain.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youngnam; Dempo, Yoshie; Ohashi, Atsuko; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Sato, Hajime; Koshino, Hisashi; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2007-12-01

    Learning and memory are critically dependent on basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neuron excitability, which is modulated profoundly by leak K(+) channels. Many neuromodulators closing leak K(+) channels have been reported, whereas their endogenous opener remained unknown. We here demonstrate that nitric oxide (NO) can be the endogenous opener of leak K(+) channels in the presumed BFC neurons. Bath application of 1 mM S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), an NO donor, induced a long-lasting hyperpolarization, which was often interrupted by a transient depolarization. Soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitors prevented SNAP from inducing hyperpolarization but allowed SNAP to cause depolarization, whereas bath application of 0.2 mM 8-bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclomonophosphate (8-Br-cGMP) induced a similar long-lasting hyperpolarization alone. These observations indicate that the SNAP-induced hyperpolarization and depolarization are mediated by the cGMP-dependent and -independent processes, respectively. When examined with the ramp command pulse applied at -70 mV under the voltage-clamp condition, 8-Br-cGMP application induced the outward current that reversed at K(+) equilibrium potential (E(K)) and displayed Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz rectification, indicating the involvement of voltage-independent K(+) current. By contrast, SNAP application in the presumed BFC neurons either dialyzed with the GTP-free internal solution or in the presence of 10 muM Rp-8-bromo-beta-phenyl-1,N(2)-ethenoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate sodium salt, a protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor, induced the inward current that reversed at potentials much more negative than E(K) and close to the reversal potential of Na(+)-K(+) pump current. These observations strongly suggest that NO activates leak K(+) channels through cGMP-PKG-dependent pathway to markedly decrease the excitability in BFC neurons, while NO simultaneously causes depolarization by the inhibition of Na(+)-K(+) pump through ATP

  11. Distribution and Intrinsic Membrane Properties of Basal Forebrain GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, James T.; Yang, Chun; Franciosi, Serena; Winston, Stuart; Abarr, Kathleen K.; Rigby, Matthew S.; Yanagawa, Yuchio; McCarley, Robert W.; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) strongly regulates cortical activation, sleep homeostasis, and attention. Many BF neurons involved in these processes are GABAergic, including a subpopulation of projection neurons containing the calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). However, technical difficulties in identification have prevented a precise mapping of the distribution of GABAergic and GABA/PV+ neurons in the mouse or a determination of their intrinsic membrane properties. Here we used mice expressing fluorescent proteins in GABAergic (GAD67-GFP knock-in mice) or PV+ neurons (PV-Tomato mice) to study these neurons. Immunohistochemical staining for GABA in GAD67-GFP mice confirmed that GFP selectively labeled BF GABAergic neurons. GFP+ neurons and fibers were distributed throughout the BF, with the highest density in the magnocellular preoptic area (MCPO). Immunohistochemistry for PV indicated that the majority of PV+ neurons in the BF were large (>20 μm) or medium-sized (15–20 μm) GFP+ neurons. Most medium and large-sized BF GFP+ neurons, including those retrogradely labeled from the neocortex, were fast-firing and spontaneously active in vitro. They exhibited prominent hyperpolarization-activated inward currents and subthreshold “spikelets,” suggestive of electrical coupling. PV+ neurons recorded in PV-Tomato mice had similar properties but had significantly narrower action potentials and a higher maximal firing frequency. Another population of smaller GFP+ neurons had properties similar to striatal projection neurons. The fast firing and electrical coupling of BF GABA/PV+ neurons, together with their projections to cortical interneurons and the thalamic reticular nucleus, suggest a strong and synchronous control of the neocortical fast rhythms typical of wakefulness and REM sleep. PMID:23254904

  12. Atrophy and structural covariance of the cholinergic basal forebrain in primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Teipel, Stefan; Raiser, Theresa; Riedl, Lina; Riederer, Isabelle; Schroeter, Matthias L; Bisenius, Sandrine; Schneider, Anja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Fliessbach, Klaus; Spottke, Annika; Grothe, Michel J; Prudlo, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Straub, Sarah; Otto, Markus; Danek, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by profound destruction of cortical language areas. Anatomical studies suggest an involvement of cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in PPA syndromes, particularly in the area of the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Here we aimed to determine the pattern of atrophy and structural covariance as a proxy of structural connectivity of BF nuclei in PPA variants. We studied 62 prospectively recruited cases with the clinical diagnosis of PPA and 31 healthy older control participants from the cohort study of the German consortium for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We determined cortical and BF atrophy based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Patterns of structural covariance of BF with cortical regions were determined using voxel-based partial least square analysis. We found significant atrophy of total BF and BF subregions in PPA patients compared with controls [F(1, 82) = 20.2, p < .001]. Atrophy was most pronounced in the NSP and the posterior BF, and most severe in the semantic variant and the nonfluent variant of PPA. Structural covariance analysis in healthy controls revealed associations of the BF nuclei, particularly the NSP, with left hemispheric predominant prefrontal, lateral temporal, and parietal cortical areas, including Broca's speech area (p < .001, permutation test). In contrast, the PPA patients showed preserved structural covariance of the BF nuclei mostly with right but not with left hemispheric cortical areas (p < .001, permutation test). Our findings agree with the neuroanatomically proposed involvement of the cholinergic BF, particularly the NSP, in PPA syndromes. We found a shift from a structural covariance of the BF with left hemispheric cortical areas in healthy aging towards right hemispheric cortical areas in PPA, possibly reflecting a consequence of the profound and early destruction of cortical language areas in PPA.

  13. Grey matter atrophy of basal forebrain and hippocampus in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haobo; Trollor, Julian N; Wen, Wei; Zhu, Wanlin; Crawford, John D; Kochan, Nicole A; Slavin, Melissa J; Brodaty, Henry; Reppermund, Simone; Kang, Kristan; Mather, Karen A; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2011-05-01

    The basal forebrain area (BFA) is closely connected to the hippocampus by virtue of cholinergic neuronal projections. Structural neuroimaging studies have shown reduced volumes of both structures in Alzheimer's disease and its prodromal stage mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but generally not in the same investigation. By combining voxel based morphometry and region of interest methods, we measured the grey matter (GM) volumes of the two brain regions with the goal of elucidating their contributions to MCI and its two subtypes (amnestic MCI and non-amnestic MCI) in an elderly epidemiological sample. The results replicated previous findings that the atrophies of both brain regions were associated with an increased likelihood of MCI and its two subtypes. However, in a regression model for the prediction of MCI with GM volumes for both regions used as predictors, only hippocampal atrophy remained significant. Two possible interpretations for this pattern of results were discussed. One is that the observed correlation between BFA atrophy and MCI is spurious and due to the hippocampal atrophy correlated with both. Alternatively, our observation is consistent with the possibility that BFA atrophy has a causal effect on MCI, which is mediated via its influence on hippocampal atrophy. Furthermore, we found that the left hippocampal atrophy had a stronger effect than the right hippocampus and bilateral BFA in the prediction of amnestic MCI occurrence when the four unilateral areas were entered into one regression model. In addition, a slight but statistically significant difference was found in the left hippocampal volume between APOE ε4 allele carriers and non-carriers, consistent with prior studies.

  14. Cortically projecting basal forebrain parvalbumin neurons regulate cortical gamma band oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae; Thankachan, Stephen; McKenna, James T.; McNally, James M.; Yang, Chun; Choi, Jee Hyun; Chen, Lichao; Kocsis, Bernat; Deisseroth, Karl; Strecker, Robert E.; Basheer, Radhika; McCarley, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical gamma band oscillations (GBO, 30–80 Hz, typically ∼40 Hz) are involved in higher cognitive functions such as feature binding, attention, and working memory. GBO abnormalities are a feature of several neuropsychiatric disorders associated with dysfunction of cortical fast-spiking interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV). GBO vary according to the state of arousal, are modulated by attention, and are correlated with conscious awareness. However, the subcortical cell types underlying the state-dependent control of GBO are not well understood. Here we tested the role of one cell type in the wakefulness-promoting basal forebrain (BF) region, cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing PV, whose virally transduced fibers we found apposed cortical PV interneurons involved in generating GBO. Optogenetic stimulation of BF PV neurons in mice preferentially increased cortical GBO power by entraining a cortical oscillator with a resonant frequency of ∼40 Hz, as revealed by analysis of both rhythmic and nonrhythmic BF PV stimulation. Selective saporin lesions of BF cholinergic neurons did not alter the enhancement of cortical GBO power induced by BF PV stimulation. Importantly, bilateral optogenetic inhibition of BF PV neurons decreased the power of the 40-Hz auditory steady-state response, a read-out of the ability of the cortex to generate GBO used in clinical studies. Our results are surprising and novel in indicating that this presumptively inhibitory BF PV input controls cortical GBO, likely by synchronizing the activity of cortical PV interneurons. BF PV neurons may represent a previously unidentified therapeutic target to treat disorders involving abnormal GBO, such as schizophrenia. PMID:25733878

  15. Forebrain networks and the control of feeding by environmental learned cues

    PubMed Central

    Petrovich, Gorica D.

    2013-01-01

    The motivation to eat is driven by a complex sum of physiological and non-physiological influences computed by the brain. Physiological signals that inform the brain about energy and nutrient needs are the primary drivers, but environmental signals unrelated to energy balance also control appetite and eating. The two components could act in concert to support the homeostatic regulation of food intake. Often, however, environmental influences rival physiological control and stimulate eating irrespective of satiety, or inhibit eating irrespective of hunger. If persistent, such maladaptive challenges to the physiological system could lead to dysregulated eating and ultimately to eating disorders. Nevertheless, the brain mechanisms underlying environmental contribution in the control of food intake are poorly understood. This paper provides an overview in recent advances in deciphering the critical brain systems using rodent models for environmental control by learned cues. These models use associative learning to compete with the physiological control, and in one preparation food cues stimulate a meal despite satiety, while in another preparation fear cues stop a meal despite hunger. Thus far, four forebrain regions have been identified as part of the essential cue induced feeding circuitry. These are telencephalic areas critical for associative learning, memory encoding, and decision making, the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and the lateral hypothalamus, which functions to integrate feeding, reward, and motivation. This circuitry also engages two orexigenic peptides, ghrelin and orexin. A parallel amygdalar circuitry supports fear cue cessation of feeding. These findings illuminate the brain mechanisms underlying environmental control of food intake and might be also relevant to aspects of human appetite and maladaptive overeating and undereating. PMID:23562305

  16. The role of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in fear and extinction memory.

    PubMed

    Knox, Dayan

    2016-09-01

    Cholinergic input to the neocortex, dorsal hippocampus (dHipp), and basolateral amygdala (BLA) is critical for neural function and synaptic plasticity in these brain regions. Synaptic plasticity in the neocortex, dHipp, ventral Hipp (vHipp), and BLA has also been implicated in fear and extinction memory. This finding raises the possibility that basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons, the predominant source of acetylcholine in these brain regions, have an important role in mediating fear and extinction memory. While empirical studies support this hypothesis, there are interesting inconsistencies among these studies that raise questions about how best to define the role of BF cholinergic neurons in fear and extinction memory. Nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) cholinergic neurons that project to the BLA are critical for fear memory and contextual fear extinction memory. NBM cholinergic neurons that project to the neocortex are critical for cued and contextual fear conditioned suppression, but are not critical for fear memory in other behavioral paradigms and in the inhibitory avoidance paradigm may even inhibit contextual fear memory formation. Medial septum and diagonal band of Broca cholinergic neurons are critical for contextual fear memory and acquisition of cued fear extinction. Thus, even though the results of previous studies suggest BF cholinergic neurons modulate fear and extinction memory, inconsistent findings among these studies necessitates more research to better define the neural circuits and molecular processes through which BF cholinergic neurons modulate fear and extinction memory. Furthermore, studies determining if BF cholinergic neurons can be manipulated in such a manner so as to treat excessive fear in anxiety disorders are needed.

  17. Morphological characteristics of eosinophilic neuronal death after transient unilateral forebrain ischemia in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanling; Wang, Zongli; Li, Fuying; Sun, Liyuan

    2016-06-01

    Various types of eosinophilic neurons (ENs) are found in the post-ischemic brain. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the temporal and spatial profile of ENs, the expression of TUNEL staining and ultrastructural characteristics in the core and peripheral regions of the cortex post-ischemia. Unilateral forebrain ischemia was induced in Mongolian gerbils by transient common carotid artery occlusions, and the brains from 3 h to 2 weeks post-ischemia were prepared for morphometric, electron microscopy (EM) and TUNEL staining of the ENs. Light microscopy showed that ENs with minimally abnormal nuclei and swollen cell bodies appeared at 3 h in the ischemic core and at 12 h in the periphery. Thereafter, ENs with pyknosis and irregular atrophic cytoplasm peaked at 12 h, pyknosis with scant cytoplasm peaked at 4 days, and TUNEL-positive staining was observed in the ischemic core. In the ischemic periphery, ENs had slightly atrophic cytoplasm and sequentially developed pyknosis, karyorrhexis and karyolysis over 1 week. These cells were also positive for TUNEL. In EM, severe organelle dilation and vacuolization preceded chromatin fragmentation in the ischemic core, while chromatin fragmentation and homogenization were the vital characteristics in the ischemic periphery. There might be two region-dependent pathways for EN changes in the post-ischemic brain: pyknosis with cytoplasmic shrinkage in the core and nuclear disintegration with slightly atrophic cytoplasm in the periphery. These pathways were comparable to necrosis and proceeded from non-classical apoptosis to necrosis, respectively.

  18. The role of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in fear and extinction memory.

    PubMed

    Knox, Dayan

    2016-09-01

    Cholinergic input to the neocortex, dorsal hippocampus (dHipp), and basolateral amygdala (BLA) is critical for neural function and synaptic plasticity in these brain regions. Synaptic plasticity in the neocortex, dHipp, ventral Hipp (vHipp), and BLA has also been implicated in fear and extinction memory. This finding raises the possibility that basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic neurons, the predominant source of acetylcholine in these brain regions, have an important role in mediating fear and extinction memory. While empirical studies support this hypothesis, there are interesting inconsistencies among these studies that raise questions about how best to define the role of BF cholinergic neurons in fear and extinction memory. Nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) cholinergic neurons that project to the BLA are critical for fear memory and contextual fear extinction memory. NBM cholinergic neurons that project to the neocortex are critical for cued and contextual fear conditioned suppression, but are not critical for fear memory in other behavioral paradigms and in the inhibitory avoidance paradigm may even inhibit contextual fear memory formation. Medial septum and diagonal band of Broca cholinergic neurons are critical for contextual fear memory and acquisition of cued fear extinction. Thus, even though the results of previous studies suggest BF cholinergic neurons modulate fear and extinction memory, inconsistent findings among these studies necessitates more research to better define the neural circuits and molecular processes through which BF cholinergic neurons modulate fear and extinction memory. Furthermore, studies determining if BF cholinergic neurons can be manipulated in such a manner so as to treat excessive fear in anxiety disorders are needed. PMID:27264248

  19. Glucose metabolism and neurogenesis in the gerbil hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Dae Young; Lee, Kwon Young; Park, Joon Ha; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence exists that glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) plays an important role in the energy metabolism in the brain. Most previous studies have been conducted using focal or hypoxic ischemia models and have focused on changes in GLUT3 expression based on protein and mRNA levels rather than tissue levels. In the present study, we observed change in GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the adult gerbil hippocampus at various time points after 5 minutes of transient forebrain ischemia. In the sham-operated group, GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region was weak, in the pyramidal cells of the CA1 region increased in a time-dependent fashion 24 hours after ischemia, and in the hippocampal CA1 region decreased significantly between 2 and 5 days after ischemia, with high level of GLUT3 immunoreactivity observed in the CA1 region 10 days after ischemia. In a double immunofluorescence study using GLUT3 and glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), we observed strong GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the astrocytes. GLUT3 immunoreactivity increased after ischemia and peaked 7 days in the dentate gyrus after ischemia/reperfusion. In a double immunofluorescence study using GLUT3 and doublecortin (DCX), we observed low level of GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the differentiated neuroblasts of the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus after ischemia. GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the sham-operated group was mainly detected in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that the increase in GLUT3 immunoreactivity may be a compensatory mechanism to modulate glucose level in the hippocampal CA1 region and to promote adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. PMID:27651772

  20. Distribution of forebrain diffuse axonal injury following inertial closed head injury in miniature swine.

    PubMed

    Ross, D T; Meaney, D F; Sabol, M K; Smith, D H; Gennarelli, T A

    1994-04-01

    Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) is one of the most frequently encountered types of brain damage resulting from closed head injury. This study was designed to verify whether DAI could be produced in miniature swine by rapid acceleration and deceleration of the head in the coronal plane. Hanford miniature swine (16-19 kg) were anesthetized with 3% isoflurane and their heads accelerated rapidly once through a 60-105 degrees arc in the coronal plane, producing only transient post-traumatic unconsciousness without prolonged coma. All animals made a good recovery and were sacrificed between 6 h and 10 days after injury. The response of forebrain projection systems to this injury was studied using neurofilament immunohistochemistry with antisera to nonphosphorylated (SMI-32) and phosphorylated (SMI-31) epitopes common to heavy (200 kDa) and medium (160 kDa) neurofilament proteins. In 9 of 12 animals, lesions characterized by foci of SMI-32 positive axonal retraction balls were present at the white matter/gray matter junction at the crests of gyri in the dorsolateral regions of the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices and along margins of the lateral ventricles. A high density of pyramidal neuron perikarya in layers III and V within cortical gyri associated with subcortical DAI were intensely positive for SMI-31 immunohistochemistry. These results validate the use of miniature swine in studies of axonal injury and demonstrate that axonal injury analogous to that seen in the mildest form of DAI (grade I) can be produced in these animals without producing prolonged coma.

  1. Atrophy and structural covariance of the cholinergic basal forebrain in primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Teipel, Stefan; Raiser, Theresa; Riedl, Lina; Riederer, Isabelle; Schroeter, Matthias L; Bisenius, Sandrine; Schneider, Anja; Kornhuber, Johannes; Fliessbach, Klaus; Spottke, Annika; Grothe, Michel J; Prudlo, Johannes; Kassubek, Jan; Ludolph, Albert; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Straub, Sarah; Otto, Markus; Danek, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is characterized by profound destruction of cortical language areas. Anatomical studies suggest an involvement of cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in PPA syndromes, particularly in the area of the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Here we aimed to determine the pattern of atrophy and structural covariance as a proxy of structural connectivity of BF nuclei in PPA variants. We studied 62 prospectively recruited cases with the clinical diagnosis of PPA and 31 healthy older control participants from the cohort study of the German consortium for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We determined cortical and BF atrophy based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Patterns of structural covariance of BF with cortical regions were determined using voxel-based partial least square analysis. We found significant atrophy of total BF and BF subregions in PPA patients compared with controls [F(1, 82) = 20.2, p < .001]. Atrophy was most pronounced in the NSP and the posterior BF, and most severe in the semantic variant and the nonfluent variant of PPA. Structural covariance analysis in healthy controls revealed associations of the BF nuclei, particularly the NSP, with left hemispheric predominant prefrontal, lateral temporal, and parietal cortical areas, including Broca's speech area (p < .001, permutation test). In contrast, the PPA patients showed preserved structural covariance of the BF nuclei mostly with right but not with left hemispheric cortical areas (p < .001, permutation test). Our findings agree with the neuroanatomically proposed involvement of the cholinergic BF, particularly the NSP, in PPA syndromes. We found a shift from a structural covariance of the BF with left hemispheric cortical areas in healthy aging towards right hemispheric cortical areas in PPA, possibly reflecting a consequence of the profound and early destruction of cortical language areas in PPA. PMID:27509365

  2. Sex-dependent species discrimination in auditory forebrain of naturally hybridizing birds.

    PubMed

    Gee, Jennifer M; Tomaszycki, Michelle L; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Pairs of individuals breed together only if they recognize each other as the same species, but the process of recognizing conspecifics can depend on flexible criteria even when species-specific signals are innate and fixed. This study examines species recognition in naturally hybridizing sister species, California and Gambel's quail (Callipepla californica and Callipepla gambelii), that have vocalizations which are not learned. Specifically, this study tests whether being raised in a vocalizing mixed-species cohort affects neural activity in the adult auditory forebrain in response to heterospecific and conspecific calls. After hatching, quail chicks were raised either with their own kind or with both species. Once reaching reproductive condition, each adult was played a recording that was one of three types: Gambel's quail opposite-sex contact calls; California quail opposite-sex contact calls; or synthetic tones. Brains were collected following playback and assessed for neuronal activity by quantifying expression of the protein of the immediate early gene, ZENK, in two brain regions, the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM). ZENK levels were greater in NCM of males than females, but female NCM cells responded differentially to conspecific compared to heterospecific calls. Namely, females had more immuno-positive NCM cells when they heard conspecific calls rather than heterospecific male calls. Early experience with heterospecific broodmates did not alter neural responses in the NCM or CMM to heterospecific vocalizations. This study suggests that the NCM plays a role in species discrimination but that rearing condition does not alter the response in these non-vocal-learning species. PMID:19996584

  3. Sex-Dependent Species Discrimination in Auditory Forebrain of Naturally Hybridizing Birds

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Jennifer M.; Tomaszycki, Michelle L.; Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Pairs of individuals breed together only if they recognize each other as the same species, but the process of recognizing conspecifics can depend on flexible criteria even when species-specific signals are innate and fixed. This study examines species recognition in naturally hybridizing sister species, California and Gambel's quail (Callipepla californica and Callipepla gambelii), that have vocalizations which are not learned. Specifically, this study tests whether being raised in a vocalizing mixed-species cohort affects neural activity in the adult auditory forebrain in response to heterospecific and conspecific calls. After hatching, quail chicks were raised either with their own kind or with both species. Once reaching reproductive condition, each adult was played a recording that was one of three types: Gambel's quail opposite-sex contact calls; California quail opposite-sex contact calls; or synthetic tones. Brains were collected following playback and assessed for neuronal activity by quantifying expression of the protein of the immediate early gene, ZENK, in two brain regions, the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM). ZENK levels were greater in NCM of males than females, but female NCM cells responded differentially to conspecific compared to heterospecific calls. Namely, females had more immuno-positive NCM cells when they heard conspecific calls rather than heterospecific male calls. Early experience with heterospecific broodmates did not alter neural responses in the NCM or CMM to heterospecific vocalizations. This study suggests that the NCM plays a role in species discrimination but that rearing condition does not alter the response in these non-vocal-learning species. PMID:19996584

  4. Glucose metabolism and neurogenesis in the gerbil hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Dae Young; Lee, Kwon Young; Park, Joon Ha; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence exists that glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) plays an important role in the energy metabolism in the brain. Most previous studies have been conducted using focal or hypoxic ischemia models and have focused on changes in GLUT3 expression based on protein and mRNA levels rather than tissue levels. In the present study, we observed change in GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the adult gerbil hippocampus at various time points after 5 minutes of transient forebrain ischemia. In the sham-operated group, GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region was weak, in the pyramidal cells of the CA1 region increased in a time-dependent fashion 24 hours after ischemia, and in the hippocampal CA1 region decreased significantly between 2 and 5 days after ischemia, with high level of GLUT3 immunoreactivity observed in the CA1 region 10 days after ischemia. In a double immunofluorescence study using GLUT3 and glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), we observed strong GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the astrocytes. GLUT3 immunoreactivity increased after ischemia and peaked 7 days in the dentate gyrus after ischemia/reperfusion. In a double immunofluorescence study using GLUT3 and doublecortin (DCX), we observed low level of GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the differentiated neuroblasts of the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus after ischemia. GLUT3 immunoreactivity in the sham-operated group was mainly detected in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that the increase in GLUT3 immunoreactivity may be a compensatory mechanism to modulate glucose level in the hippocampal CA1 region and to promote adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus.

  5. Genetic evidence that Celsr3 and Celsr2, together with Fzd3, regulate forebrain wiring in a Vangl-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yibo; Huang, Yuhua; Feng, Jia; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Grove, Elizabeth A.; Yang, Yingzi; Tissir, Fadel; Zhou, Libing; Goffinet, Andre M.

    2014-01-01

    Celsr3 and Fzd3, members of “core planar cell polarity” (PCP) genes, were shown previously to control forebrain axon guidance and wiring by acting in axons and/or guidepost cells. Here, we show that Celsr2 acts redundantly with Celsr3, and that their combined mutation mimics that of Fzd3. The phenotypes generated upon inactivation of Fzd3 in different forebrain compartments are similar to those in conditional Celsr2-3 mutants, indicating that Fzd3 and Celsr2-3 act in the same population of cells. Inactivation of Celsr2-3 or Fzd3 in thalamus does not affect forebrain wiring, and joint inactivation in cortex and thalamus adds little to cortical inactivation alone in terms of thalamocortical projections. On the other hand, joint inactivation perturbs strongly the formation of the barrel field, which is unaffected upon single cortical or thalamic inactivation, indicating a role for interactions between thalamic axons and cortical neurons in cortical arealization. Unexpectedly, forebrain wiring is normal in mice defective in Vangl1 and Vangl2, showing that, contrary to epithelial PCP, axon guidance can be Vangl independent in some contexts. Our results suggest that Celsr2-3 and Fzd3 regulate axonal navigation in the forebrain by using mechanisms different from classical epithelial PCP, and require interacting partners other than Vangl1-2 that remain to be identified. PMID:25002511

  6. Effect of ischemic preconditioning on antioxidant status in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Min; Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, In Hye

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a condition of sublethal transient global ischemia and exhibits neuroprotective effects against subsequent lethal ischemic insult. We, in this study, examined the neuroprotective effects of IPC and its effects on immunoreactive changes of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and SOD2, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia. Pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale (SP) in the hippocampal CA1 region of animals died 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC (8.6% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group); however, IPC prevented the pyramidal neurons from subsequent lethal ischemic injury (92.3% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group). SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals were easily detected in pyramidal neurons in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region, while all of these immunoreactivities were rarely detected in the stratum pyramidale at 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC. Meanwhile, their immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals with IPC were similar to (SOD1, SOD2 and CAT) or higher (GPX) than those in the sham-operated animals without IPC. Furthermore, their immunoreactivities in the stratum pyramidale of the ischemia-operated animals with IPC were steadily maintained after lethal ischemia/reperfusion. Results of western blot analysis for SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX were similar to immunohistochemical data. In conclusion, IPC maintained or increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes in the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampal CA1 region after subsequent lethal transient forebrain ischemia and IPC exhibited neuroprotective effects in the hippocampal CA1 region against transient forebrain ischemia. PMID:27630689

  7. Transformation from a pure time delay to a mixed time and phase delay representation in the auditory forebrain pathway.

    PubMed

    Vonderschen, Katrin; Wagner, Hermann

    2012-04-25

    Birds and mammals exploit interaural time differences (ITDs) for sound localization. Subsequent to ITD detection by brainstem neurons, ITD processing continues in parallel midbrain and forebrain pathways. In the barn owl, both ITD detection and processing in the midbrain are specialized to extract ITDs independent of frequency, which amounts to a pure time delay representation. Recent results have elucidated different mechanisms of ITD detection in mammals, which lead to a representation of small ITDs in high-frequency channels and large ITDs in low-frequency channels, resembling a phase delay representation. However, the detection mechanism does not prevent a change in ITD representation at higher processing stages. Here we analyze ITD tuning across frequency channels with pure tone and noise stimuli in neurons of the barn owl's auditory arcopallium, a nucleus at the endpoint of the forebrain pathway. To extend the analysis of ITD representation across frequency bands to a large neural population, we employed Fourier analysis for the spectral decomposition of ITD curves recorded with noise stimuli. This method was validated using physiological as well as model data. We found that low frequencies convey sensitivity to large ITDs, whereas high frequencies convey sensitivity to small ITDs. Moreover, different linear phase frequency regimes in the high-frequency and low-frequency ranges suggested an independent convergence of inputs from these frequency channels. Our results are consistent with ITD being remodeled toward a phase delay representation along the forebrain pathway. This indicates that sensory representations may undergo substantial reorganization, presumably in relation to specific behavioral output. PMID:22539852

  8. Immunization Against Specific Fragments of Neurotrophin p75 Receptor Protects Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons in the Olfactory Bulbectomized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bobkova, Natalia; Vorobyov, Vasily; Medvinskaya, Natalia; Nesterova, Inna; Tatarnikova, Olga; Nekrasov, Pavel; Samokhin, Alexander; Deev, Alexander; Sengpiel, Frank; Koroev, Dmitry; Volpina, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive impairment associated with marked cholinergic neuron loss and amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulation in the brain. The cytotoxicity in AD is mediated, at least in part, by Aβ binding with the extracellular domain of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), localized predominantly in the membranes of acetylcholine-producing neurons in the basal forebrain. Hypothesizing that an open unstructured loop of p75NTR might be the effective site for Aβ binding, we have immunized both olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) and sham-operated (SO) mice (n = 82 and 49, respectively) with synthetic peptides, structurally similar to different parts of the loops, aiming to block them by specific antibodies. OBX-mice have been shown in previous studies, and confirmed in the present one, to be characterized by typical behavioral, morphological, and biochemical AD hallmarks, including cholinergic deficits in forebrain neurons. Immunization of OBX- or SO-mice with KLH conjugated fragments of p75NTR induced high titers of specific serum antibodies for each of nine chosen fragments. However, maximal protective effects on spatial memory, evaluated in a Morris water maze, and on activity of choline acetyltransferase in forebrain neurons, detected by immunoreactivity to specific antibodies, were revealed only for peptides with amino acid residue sequences of 155–164 and 167–176. We conclude that the approach based on immunological blockade of specific p75NTR sites, linked with the cytotoxicity, is a useful and effective tool for study of AD-associated mechanisms and for development of highly selective therapy of cholinergic malfunctioning in AD patients. PMID:27163825

  9. Early auditory experience induces frequency-specific, adaptive plasticity in the forebrain gaze fields of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Miller, G L; Knudsen, E I

    2001-05-01

    Binaural acoustic cues such as interaural time and level differences (ITDs and ILDs) are used by many species to determine the locations of sound sources. The relationship between cue values and locations in space is frequency dependent and varies from individual to individual. In the current study, we tested the capacity of neurons in the forebrain localization pathway of the barn owl to adjust their tuning for binaural cues in a frequency-dependent manner in response to auditory experience. Auditory experience was altered by raising young owls with a passive acoustic filtering device that caused frequency-dependent changes in ITD and ILD. Extracellular recordings were made in normal and device-reared owls to characterize frequency-specific ITD and ILD tuning in the auditory archistriatum (AAr), an output structure of the forebrain localization pathway. In device-reared owls, individual sites in the AAr exhibited highly abnormal, frequency-dependent variations in ITD tuning, and across the population of sampled sites, there were frequency-dependent shifts in the representation of ITD. These changes were in a direction that compensated for the acoustic effects of the device on ITD and therefore tended to restore a normal representation of auditory space. Although ILD tuning was degraded relative to normal at many sites in the AAr of device-reared owls, the representation of frequency-specific ILDs across the population of sampled sites was shifted in the adaptive direction. These results demonstrate that early auditory experience shapes the representation of binaural cues in the forebrain localization pathway in an adaptive, frequency-dependent manner. PMID:11353033

  10. Characterization of a forebrain gaze field in the archistriatum of the barn owl: microstimulation and anatomical connections.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, E I; Cohen, Y E; Masino, T

    1995-07-01

    We present evidence that the archistriatum in the forebrain of the barn owl participates in gaze control, that it can mediate gaze changes independently of the optic tectum (OT), and that it projects in parallel to both the OT and to saccade-generating circuitry in the brainstem tegmentum. These properties are similar to those of the frontal eye fields (FEF) in the prefrontal cortex of primates. The forebrain was surveyed for sites where electrical microstimulation would induce head saccades. Head (and eye) saccades were elicited from the anterior 70% of the archistriatum, a region that we refer to as the archistriatal gaze fields (AGF). At single stimulation sites in the AGF, saccade amplitude tended to vary as a function of stimulation parameters (current strength, pulse frequency, and train duration) and starting head position. In contrast, saccade direction was largely independent of these parameters. Saccade direction did vary over a wide range of primarily contraversive directions with the site of stimulation in the AGF. Using anatomical pathway tracing techniques, we found that the archistriatum projects strongly and in parallel to the deep layers of the OT and to nuclei in the midline brainstem tegmentum. Previous work has shown that electrical microstimulation of either of these brainstem regions evokes saccadic movements of the head and/or eyes (du Lac and Knudsen, 1990; Masino and Knudsen, 1992b). Inactivation of the OT with lidocaine reduced the size but did not eliminate (or change the direction of) the saccades evoked by AGF stimulation. The direct anatomical pathway from the archistriatum to the midline tegmental nuclei can account for saccades that persist following OT inactivation. The similarities between the AGF in barn owls and the FEF in primates suggest that the same general plan of anatomical and functional organization supports the contribution of the forebrain to gaze control in a wide variety of species. PMID:7623141

  11. Effect of ischemic preconditioning on antioxidant status in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Min; Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, In Hye

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a condition of sublethal transient global ischemia and exhibits neuroprotective effects against subsequent lethal ischemic insult. We, in this study, examined the neuroprotective effects of IPC and its effects on immunoreactive changes of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and SOD2, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia. Pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale (SP) in the hippocampal CA1 region of animals died 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC (8.6% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group); however, IPC prevented the pyramidal neurons from subsequent lethal ischemic injury (92.3% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group). SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals were easily detected in pyramidal neurons in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region, while all of these immunoreactivities were rarely detected in the stratum pyramidale at 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC. Meanwhile, their immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals with IPC were similar to (SOD1, SOD2 and CAT) or higher (GPX) than those in the sham-operated animals without IPC. Furthermore, their immunoreactivities in the stratum pyramidale of the ischemia-operated animals with IPC were steadily maintained after lethal ischemia/reperfusion. Results of western blot analysis for SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX were similar to immunohistochemical data. In conclusion, IPC maintained or increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes in the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampal CA1 region after subsequent lethal transient forebrain ischemia and IPC exhibited neuroprotective effects in the hippocampal CA1 region against transient forebrain ischemia. PMID:27630689

  12. Can manipulation of differentiation conditions eliminate proliferative cells from a population of ES cell-derived forebrain cells?

    PubMed

    Precious, Sophie V; Kelly, Claire M; Allen, Nicholas D; Rosser, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    There is preliminary evidence that implantation of primary fetal striatal cells provides functional benefit in patients with Huntington's disease, a neurodegenerative condition resulting in loss of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSN) of the striatum. Scarcity of primary fetal tissue means it is important to identify a renewable source of cells from which to derive donor MSNs. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, which predominantly default to telencephalic-like precursors in chemically defined medium (CDM), offer a potentially inexhaustible supply of cells capable of generating the desired neurons. Using an ES cell line, with the forebrain marker FoxG1 tagged to the LacZ reporter, we assessed effects of known developmental factors on the yield of forebrain-like precursor cells in CDM suspension culture. Addition of FGF2, but not DKK1, increased the proportion of FoxG1-expressing cells at day 8 of neural induction. Oct4 was expressed at day 8, but was undetectable by day 16. Differentiation of day 16 precursors generated GABA-expressing neurons, with few DARPP32 positive MSNs. Transplantation of day 8 precursor cells into quinolinic acid-lesioned striata resulted in generation of teratomas. However, transplantation of day 16 precursors yielded grafts expressing neuronal markers including NeuN, calbindin and parvalbumin, but no DARPP32 6 weeks post-transplantation. Manipulation of fate of ES cells requires optimization of both concentration and timing of addition of factors to culture systems to generate the desired phenotypes. Furthermore, we highlight the value of increasing the precursor phase of ES cell suspension culture when directing differentiation toward forebrain fate, so as to dramatically reduce the risk of teratoma formation. PMID:27606335

  13. Effect of ischemic preconditioning on antioxidant status in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Min; Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Jae-Chul; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Ohk, Taek Geun; Cho, Jun Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, In Hye

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is a condition of sublethal transient global ischemia and exhibits neuroprotective effects against subsequent lethal ischemic insult. We, in this study, examined the neuroprotective effects of IPC and its effects on immunoreactive changes of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1 and SOD2, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the gerbil hippocampal CA1 region after transient forebrain ischemia. Pyramidal neurons of the stratum pyramidale (SP) in the hippocampal CA1 region of animals died 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC (8.6% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group); however, IPC prevented the pyramidal neurons from subsequent lethal ischemic injury (92.3% (ratio of remanent neurons) of the sham-operated group). SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals were easily detected in pyramidal neurons in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region, while all of these immunoreactivities were rarely detected in the stratum pyramidale at 5 days after lethal transient ischemia without IPC. Meanwhile, their immunoreactivities in the sham-operated animals with IPC were similar to (SOD1, SOD2 and CAT) or higher (GPX) than those in the sham-operated animals without IPC. Furthermore, their immunoreactivities in the stratum pyramidale of the ischemia-operated animals with IPC were steadily maintained after lethal ischemia/reperfusion. Results of western blot analysis for SOD1, SOD2, CAT and GPX were similar to immunohistochemical data. In conclusion, IPC maintained or increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes in the stratum pyramidale of the hippocampal CA1 region after subsequent lethal transient forebrain ischemia and IPC exhibited neuroprotective effects in the hippocampal CA1 region against transient forebrain ischemia.

  14. Shifts in the Vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) isoforms result in transcriptome changes correlated with early neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation in mouse forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Jacob T.; Berosik, Matthew A.; Snyder, Stephanie D.; Crawford, Natalie F.; Nour, Shirin I.; Schaubhut, Geoffrey J.; Darland, Diane C.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) fate decisions is critical during the transition from a multicellular mammalian forebrain neuroepithelium to the multi-layered neocortex. Forebrain development requires coordinated vascular investment alongside NSC differentiation. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (Vegf) has proven to be a pleiotrophic gene whose multiple protein isoforms regulate a broad range of effects in neurovascular systems. To test the hypothesis that the Vegf isoforms (120, 164, and 188) are required for normal forebrain development, we analyzed the forebrain transcriptome of mice expressing specific Vegf isoforms, Vegf120, VegfF188, or a combination of Vegf120/188. Transcriptome analysis identified differentially expressed genes in embryonic day (E) 9.5 forebrain, a time point preceding dramatic neuroepithelial expansion and vascular investment in the telencephalon. Meta-analysis identified gene pathways linked to chromosome-level modifications, cell fate regulation, and neurogenesis that were altered in Vegf isoform mice. Based on these gene network shifts, we predicted that NSC populations would be affected in later stages of forebrain development. In the E11.5 telencephalon, we quantified mitotic cells [Phospho-Histone H3 (pHH3)-positive] and intermediate progenitor cells (Tbr2/Eomes-positive), observing quantitative and qualitative shifts in these populations. We observed qualitative shifts in cortical layering at P0, particularly with Ctip2-positive cells in layer V. The results identify a suite of genes and functional gene networks that can be used to further dissect the role of Vegf in regulating NSC differentiation and downstream consequences for NSC fate decisions. PMID:24124161

  15. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors and apoptotic cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB{sub 2} receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB{sub 1} receptors.

  16. Effects of chronic food restriction on mu and kappa opioid binding in rat forebrain: a quantitative autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Wolinsky, T D; Carr, K D; Hiller, J M; Simon, E J

    1994-09-12

    It was previously observed that chronic food restriction lowers the threshold for lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation in a manner that is reversible by mu- and kappa-selective opioid antagonists. The present quantitative autoradiographic study was designed to investigate whether chronic food restriction alters regional mu and kappa opioid binding in brain. [3H]DAGO (mu) and mu/delta blocked [3H]BMZ (kappa) binding were analyzed in 34 brain regions from the medial prefrontal cortex to posterior hypothalamus. Significant reductions in mu binding were observed in caudal portions of the medial and lateral habenula, and the basolateral and basomedial nuclei of the amygdala. kappa binding was similarly reduced in medial habenula. Large increases in kappa binding were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, ventral pallidum, and medial preoptic area. The possible involvement of these changes in the sensitization of reward by food restriction is discussed.

  17. RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Chiara; Caramanica, Pasquale; Burney, Matthew J; Toselli, Camilla; Bithell, Angela; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Stanton, Lawrence W; Biagioni, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Cacci, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    Adult neural stem cell (aNSC) activity is tuned by external stimuli through the recruitment of transcription factors. This study examines the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain and provides the first extensive characterization of REST-mediated control of the cellular and molecular properties. This study shows that REST knockdown affects the capacity of progenitor cells to generate neurospheres, reduces cell proliferation, and triggers cell differentiation despite the presence of growth factors. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses show that REST binding sites are significantly enriched in genes associated with synaptic transmission and nervous system development and function. Seeking candidate regulators of aNSC function, this study identifies a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family, BMP6, the mRNA and protein of which increased after REST knockdown. The results of this study extend previous findings, demonstrating a reciprocal control of REST expression by BMPs. Administration of exogenous BMP6 inhibits aNSC proliferation and induces the expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, highlighting its antimitogenic and prodifferentiative effects. This study suggests that BMP6 produced in a REST-regulated manner together with other signals can contribute to regulation of NSC maintenance and fate. PMID:25691247

  18. Abundant Occurrence of Basal Radial Glia in the Subventricular Zone of Embryonic Neocortex of a Lissencephalic Primate, the Common Marmoset Callithrix jacchus

    PubMed Central

    Kelava, Iva; Reillo, Isabel; Murayama, Ayako Y.; Kalinka, Alex T.; Stenzel, Denise; Tomancak, Pavel; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Lebrand, Cécile; Sasaki, Erika; Schwamborn, Jens C.; Okano, Hideyuki; Borrell, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Subventricular zone (SVZ) progenitors are a hallmark of the developing neocortex. Recent studies described a novel type of SVZ progenitor that retains a basal process at mitosis, sustains expression of radial glial markers, and is capable of self-renewal. These progenitors, referred to here as basal radial glia (bRG), occur at high relative abundance in the SVZ of gyrencephalic primates (human) and nonprimates (ferret) but not lissencephalic rodents (mouse). Here, we analyzed the occurrence of bRG cells in the embryonic neocortex of the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus, a near-lissencephalic primate. bRG cells, expressing Pax6, Sox2 (but not Tbr2), glutamate aspartate transporter, and glial fibrillary acidic protein and retaining a basal process at mitosis, occur at similar relative abundance in the marmoset SVZ as in human and ferret. The proportion of progenitors in M-phase was lower in embryonic marmoset than developing ferret neocortex, raising the possibility of a longer cell cycle. Fitting the gyrification indices of 26 anthropoid species to an evolutionary model suggested that the marmoset evolved from a gyrencephalic ancestor. Our results suggest that a high relative abundance of bRG cells may be necessary, but is not sufficient, for gyrencephaly and that the marmoset's lissencephaly evolved secondarily by changing progenitor parameters other than progenitor type. PMID:22114084

  19. Intraventricular administration of endoneuraminidase-N facilitates ectopic migration of subventricular zone-derived neural progenitor cells into 6-OHDA lesioned striatum of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Zhang, Yong-Xin; Yang, Chun; Hao, Fei; Chen, Sha-Sha; Hao, Qiang; Lu, Tao; Qu, Ting-Yu; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA), a carbohydrate polymer associated with the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), plays an important role in the migration, differentiation and maturation of neuroblasts. Endoneuraminidase-N (Endo-N) can specifically cleave PSA from NCAM. The objective of the present study was to examine: the effect of Endo-N on characteristics of subventricular zone (SVZ)-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vitro; whether intraventricular administration of Endo-N could increase ectopic migration of SVZ-derived NPCs into 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned striatum, and whether migrated NPCs could differentiate into neuronal and glial cells. In in vitro study, Endo-N was found to inhibit the migration of NPCs, and to enhance the differentiation of NPCs. In in vivo study, mice sequentially received injections of 6-OHDA into the right striatum, Endo-N into the right lateral ventricle, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) intraperitoneally. The data showed that intraventricular injections of Endo-N disorganized the normal structure of the rostral migratory stream (RMS), and drastically increased the number of BrdU-immunoreactive (IR) cells in 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum. In addition, a number of BrdU-IR cells were double labeled for doublecortin (DCX), NeuN or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). The results suggest that interruption of neuroblast chain pathway with Endo-N facilitates ectopic migration of SVZ-derived NPCs into the lesioned striatum, and migrated NPCs can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes. PMID:26724216

  20. Inhibition of the histone demethylase Kdm5b promotes neurogenesis and derepresses Reln (reelin) in neural stem cells from the adult subventricular zone of mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiong; Obana, Edwin A; Radomski, Kryslaine L; Sukumar, Gauthaman; Wynder, Christopher; Dalgard, Clifton L; Doughty, Martin L

    2016-02-15

    The role of epigenetic regulators in the control of adult neurogenesis is largely undefined. We show that the histone demethylase enzyme Kdm5b (Jarid1b) negatively regulates neurogenesis from adult subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem cells (NSCs) in culture. shRNA-mediated depletion of Kdm5b in proliferating adult NSCs decreased proliferation rates and reduced neurosphere formation in culture. When transferred to differentiation culture conditions, Kdm5b-depleted adult NSCs migrated from neurospheres with increased velocity. Whole-genome expression screening revealed widespread transcriptional changes with Kdm5b depletion, notably the up-regulation of reelin (Reln), the inhibition of steroid biosynthetic pathway component genes and the activation of genes with intracellular transport functions in cultured adult NSCs. Kdm5b depletion increased extracellular reelin concentration in the culture medium and increased phosphorylation of the downstream reelin signaling target Disabled-1 (Dab1). Sequestration of extracellular reelin with CR-50 reelin-blocking antibodies suppressed the increase in migratory velocity of Kdm5b-depleted adult NSCs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that Kdm5b is present at the proximal promoter of Reln, and H3K4me3 methylation was increased at this locus with Kdm5b depletion in differentiating adult NSCs. Combined the data suggest Kdm5b negatively regulates neurogenesis and represses Reln in neural stem cells from the adult SVZ.

  1. RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Soldati, Chiara; Caramanica, Pasquale; Burney, Matthew J; Toselli, Camilla; Bithell, Angela; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Stanton, Lawrence W; Biagioni, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Cacci, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    Adult neural stem cell (aNSC) activity is tuned by external stimuli through the recruitment of transcription factors. This study examines the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain and provides the first extensive characterization of REST-mediated control of the cellular and molecular properties. This study shows that REST knockdown affects the capacity of progenitor cells to generate neurospheres, reduces cell proliferation, and triggers cell differentiation despite the presence of growth factors. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses show that REST binding sites are significantly enriched in genes associated with synaptic transmission and nervous system development and function. Seeking candidate regulators of aNSC function, this study identifies a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family, BMP6, the mRNA and protein of which increased after REST knockdown. The results of this study extend previous findings, demonstrating a reciprocal control of REST expression by BMPs. Administration of exogenous BMP6 inhibits aNSC proliferation and induces the expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, highlighting its antimitogenic and prodifferentiative effects. This study suggests that BMP6 produced in a REST-regulated manner together with other signals can contribute to regulation of NSC maintenance and fate.

  2. Early Inflammatory Responses Following Cell Grafting in the CNS Trigger Activation of the Subventricular Zone: A Proposed Model of Sequential Cellular Events.

    PubMed

    Praet, Jelle; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Le Blon, Debbie; Hoornaert, Chloé; Goossens, Herman; Hens, Niel; Van der Linden, Annemie; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2015-01-01

    While multiple rodent preclinical studies, and to a lesser extent human clinical trials, claim the feasibility, safety, and potential clinical benefit of cell grafting in the central nervous system (CNS), currently only little convincing knowledge exists regarding the actual fate of the grafted cells and their effect on the surrounding environment (or vice versa). Our preceding studies already indicated that only a minor fraction of the initially grafted cell population survives the grafting process, while the surviving cell population becomes invaded by highly activated microglia/macrophages and surrounded by reactive astrogliosis. In the current study, we further elaborate on early cellular and inflammatory events following syngeneic grafting of eGFP(+) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs) in the CNS of immunocompetent mice. Based on obtained quantitative histological data, we here propose a detailed mathematically derived working model that sequentially comprises hypoxia-induced apoptosis of grafted mEFs, neutrophil invasion, neoangiogenesis, microglia/macrophage recruitment, astrogliosis, and eventually survival of a limited number of grafted mEFs. Simultaneously, we observed that the cellular events following mEF grafting activates the subventricular zone neural stem and progenitor cell compartment. This proposed model therefore further contributes to our understanding of cell graft-induced cellular responses and will eventually allow for successful manipulation of this intervention.

  3. Cell Sorting of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells from the Adult Mouse Subventricular Zone and Live-imaging of their Cell Cycle Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Daynac, Mathieu; Morizur, Lise; Kortulewski, Thierry; Gauthier, Laurent R; Ruat, Martial; Mouthon, Marc-André; Boussin, François D

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles (SVZ) sustain olfactory neurogenesis throughout life in the mammalian brain. They successively generate transit amplifying cells (TACs) and neuroblasts that differentiate into neurons once they integrate the olfactory bulbs. Emerging fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) techniques have allowed the isolation of NSCs as well as their progeny and have started to shed light on gene regulatory networks in adult neurogenic niches. We report here a cell sorting technique that allows to follow and distinguish the cell cycle dynamics of the above-mentioned cell populations from the adult SVZ with a LeX/EGFR/CD24 triple staining. Isolated cells are then plated as adherent cells to explore in details their cell cycle progression by time-lapse video microscopy. To this end, we use transgenic Fluorescence Ubiquitination Cell Cycle Indicator (FUCCI) mice in which cells are red-fluorescent during G1 phase due to a G1 specific red-Cdt1 reporter. This method has recently revealed that proliferating NSCs progressively lengthen their G1 phase during aging, leading to neurogenesis impairment. This method is easily transposable to other systems and could be of great interest for the study of the cell cycle dynamics of brain cells in the context of brain pathologies. PMID:26436641

  4. [Novel calretinin-positive cells with polymorphous spines in the mouse forebrain during early postnatal ontogenesis].

    PubMed

    Revishchin, A V; Okhotin, V E; Pavlova, G V

    2009-01-01

    Using an immunocytochemical method for calretinin (CR) detection, we have earlier described (Morfologiya, 2009 v. 135. No. 3, p. 7-19) the population of previously unknown mono- and bipolar cells with polymorphous spines (PS) covering their cell bodies and processes, in adult mice forebrain structures adjacent to anterior horn of lateral ventricle. CR-positive spiny (CR+PS) cells were negative to GAD67 and were detected in the white matter and in layers V and VI of frontal area of dorsomedial cortex close to the cingulum, in in rostro-dorsal part of the caudate nucleus-putamen complex, anterior olfactory nucleus and in subependymal layer of the dorso-lateral angle of the lateral ventricle. In this work, the distribution of these cells in 7-day-old mice was studied. Comparative topographical analysis of definitive and early CR+PS cells demonstrated that in 7-day-old mice CR+PS cells were absent from the areas of their localization in adult animals - anterior olfactory nucleus, cortical plate and inner portion of neostriatum. Meanwhile, some CR+PS-like cells were detected in 7-day-old mice inside the rostral migratory route, close to neostriatum anterior boundary, along the dorsal border between neostriatum and corpus callosum, subependymal layer of lateral wall of the lateral ventricle, and in the cingulum area. These findings are indicative of the possible postnatal appearance of CR+PS cells. To test this hypothesis, the experiments were conducted in which bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered to the mice on their postnatal days 2-4 with the subsequent study of the brain sections of these animals sacrificed on their postnatal day 20. Double immunolabeling of these sections for CR and BrdU has detected the presence of CR+PS cells that contained postnatally administered BrdU. These results strongly suggest that, at least, some portion of CR+PS cells have their mitosis postnatally. It may be assumed, that CR+PS cells migrate to the sites of their distribution in

  5. New calretinin-positive cells with polymorphous spines in the mouse forebrain during early postnatal ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Revishchin, A V; Okhotin, V E; Pavlova, G V

    2010-10-01

    Immunohistochemical studies of calretinin (CR) in forebrain structures adjacent to the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle in adult mice allowed us to detect a population of previously unknown mono- and bipolar cells whose bodies and processes were coated with polymorphous spines (PS) (Morfologiya, 135, No. 3, 7-19 (2009)). CR-positive spiny (CR(+)PS) cells did not contain GAD67 and were located in the white matter and layers V-VI of the frontal area of the dorsomedial cortex close to the cingulum, the rostrodorsal part of the caudate-putamen, the anterior olfactory nucleus, and the subependyma of the dorsolateral angle of the lateral ventricle. We report here studies of the distribution of these cells in seven-day-old mice. Comparative topographic analysis of definitive and early CR(+)PS cells showed that in seven-day-old mice, CR(+)PS cells were absent from the sites at which they were seen in adults, i.e., the anterior olfactory cortex, the cortical plate, and the inner part of the neostriatum. In addition, small numbers of CR(+)PS-like cells were seen at this age within the dorsal migration pathway, at the anterior margin of the neostriatum, along the dorsal border of the neostriatum with the corpus callosum, in the subependymal layer of the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle, and in the cingulum area. These data demonstrate that CR(+)PS cells may have a postnatal origin. Experiments to verify this hypothesis were performed using postnatal administration of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to mice aged 2-4 days, followed by assessment of brain sections fixed at age 20 days. Double immunolabeling of sections for CR and BrdU demonstrated the presence of CR(+)PS cells containing postnatally supplied BrdU. These data provide evidence that at least some CR(+)PS cells undergo mitosis at postnatal age. In all probability, during the period from 7 to 20 days of postnatal development, CR(+)PS cells migrate to the sites that they occupy in adult animals. PMID:20721693

  6. Improved acquisition of left-right response differentiation in the rat following section of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Noonan, M; Axelrod, S

    1991-12-20

    Split-brained rats learned a left-right response differentiation in a water maze significantly faster than rats with sham surgery. It is unlikely that this superiority resulted from improvement in performance variables since callosotomized rats did not differ significantly from sham operates in speed of acquisition of a brightness discrimination in the same apparatus. Additionally, callosotomy likewise had no effect on the acquisition of a water-maze task requiring consistent unilateral responses. The superiority of the callosotomized animals in forming the left-right response differentiation supports a hypothesis implicating the forebrain commissures in left-right confusion.

  7. The basal forebrain modulates spontaneous activity of principal cells in the main olfactory bulb of anesthetized mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xiping; Yin, Pingbo; Heinbockel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous activity is an important characteristic of the principal cells in the main olfactory bulb (MOB) for encoding odor information, which is modulated by the basal forebrain. Cholinergic activation has been reported to inhibit all major neuron types in the MOB. In this study, the effect of diagonal band (NDB) stimulation on mitral/tufted (M/T) cell spontaneous activity was examined in anesthetized mice. NDB stimulation increased spontaneous activity in 66 MOB neurons which lasted for 2–35 s before returning to the baseline level. The majority of the effected units showed a decrease of interspike intervals (ISI) at a range of 8–25 ms. Fifty-two percent of NDB stimulation responsive units showed intrinsic rhythmical bursting, which was enhanced temporarily by NDB stimulation, whereas the remaining non-rhythmic units were capable of synchronized bursting. The effect was attenuated by scopolamine in 21 of 27 units tested. Only four NDB units were inhibited by NDB stimulation, an inhibition that lasted less than 10 s. The NDB stimulation responsive neurons appeared to be M/T cells. Our findings demonstrate an NDB excitation effect on M/T neurons that mostly requires muscarinic receptor activation, and is likely due to non-selectivity of electrical stimulation. This suggests that cholinergic and a diverse group of non-cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain co-ordinately modulate the dynamics of M/T cell spontaneous activity, which is fundamental for odor representation and attentional perception. PMID:24065892

  8. Deletion of glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) in forebrain neurons facilitates reversal learning: enhanced cognitive adaptability?

    PubMed

    Singer, Philipp; Boison, Detlev; Möhler, Hanns; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2009-10-01

    Local availability of glycine near N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is partly regulated by neuronal glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1), which can therefore modulate NMDAR function because binding to the glycine site of the NMDAR is necessary for channel activation. Disrupting GlyT1 in forebrain neurons has been shown to enhance Pavlovian conditioning and object recognition memory. Here, the authors report that the same genetic manipulation facilitated reversal learning in the water maze test of reference memory, but did not lead to any clear improvement in a working memory version of the water maze test. Facilitation in a nonspatial discrimination reversal task conducted on a T maze was also observed, supporting the conclusion that forebrain neuronal GlyT1 may modulate the flexibility in (new) learning and relevant mnemonic functions. One possibility is that these phenotypes may reflect reduced susceptibility to certain forms of proactive interference. This may be relevant for the suggested clinical application of GlyT1 inhibitors in the treatment of cognitive deficits, including schizophrenia, which is characterized by cognitive inflexibility in addition to the positive symptoms of the disease.

  9. Efficient generation of region-specific forebrain neurons from human pluripotent stem cells under highly defined condition

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fang; Fang, Kai-Heng; Cao, Shi-Ying; Qu, Zhuang-Yin; Li, Qi; Krencik, Robert; Xu, Min; Bhattacharyya, Anita; Su, Yu-Wen; Zhu, Dong-Ya; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have potential to differentiate to unlimited number of neural cells, which provide powerful tools for neural regeneration. To date, most reported protocols were established with an animal feeder system. However, cells derived on this system are inappropriate for the translation to clinical applications because of the introduction of xenogenetic factors. In this study, we provided an optimized paradigm to generate region-specific forebrain neurons from hPSCs under a defined system. We assessed five conditions and found that a vitronectin-coated substrate was the most efficient method to differentiate hPSCs to neurons and astrocytes. More importantly, by applying different doses of purmorphamine, a small-molecule agonist of sonic hedgehog signaling, hPSCs were differentiated to different region-specific forebrain neuron subtypes, including glutamatergic neurons, striatal medium spiny neurons, and GABA interneurons. Our study offers a highly defined system without exogenetic factors to produce human neurons and astrocytes for translational medical studies, including cell therapy and stem cell-based drug discovery. PMID:26670131

  10. Gbx2 Directly Restricts Otx2 Expression to Forebrain and Midbrain, Competing with Class III POU Factors

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Fumitaka; Kurokawa, Daisuke; Takahashi, Maiko

    2012-01-01

    Otx2 plays essential roles in rostral brain development, and its counteraction with Gbx2 has been suggested to determine the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) in vertebrates. We previously identified the FM enhancer that is conserved among vertebrates and drives Otx2 transcription in forebrain/midbrain from the early somite stage. In this study, we found that the POU homeodomain of class III POU factors (Brn1, Brn2, Brn4, and Oct6) associates with noncanonical target sequence TAATTA in the FM enhancer. MicroRNA-mediated knockdown of Brn2 and Oct6 diminished the FM enhancer activity in anterior neural progenitor cells (NPCs) differentiated from P19 cells. The class III POU factors associate with the FM enhancer in forebrain and midbrain but not in hindbrain. We also demonstrated that the Gbx2 homeodomain recognizes the same target TAATTA in the FM enhancer, and Gbx2 associates with the FM enhancer in hindbrain. Gbx2 misexpression in the anterior NPCs repressed the FM enhancer activity and inhibited Brn2 association with the enhancer, whereas Gbx2 knockdown caused ectopic Brn2 association in the posterior NPCs. These results suggest that class III POU factors and Gbx2 share the same target site, TAATTA, in the FM enhancer and that their region-specific binding restricts Otx2 expression at the MHB. PMID:22566684

  11. Defects in GPI biosynthesis perturb Cripto signaling during forebrain development in two new mouse models of holoprosencephaly

    PubMed Central

    McKean, David M.; Niswander, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Summary Holoprosencephaly is the most common forebrain defect in humans. We describe two novel mouse mutants that display a holoprosencephaly-like phenotype. Both mutations disrupt genes in the glycerophosphatidyl inositol (GPI) biosynthesis pathway: gonzo disrupts Pign and beaker disrupts Pgap1. GPI anchors normally target and anchor a diverse group of proteins to lipid raft domains. Mechanistically we show that GPI anchored proteins are mislocalized in GPI biosynthesis mutants. Disruption of the GPI-anchored protein Cripto (mouse) and TDGF1 (human ortholog) have been shown to result in holoprosencephaly, leading to our hypothesis that Cripto is the key GPI anchored protein whose altered function results in an HPE-like phenotype. Cripto is an obligate Nodal co-factor involved in TGFβ signaling, and we show that TGFβ signaling is reduced both in vitro and in vivo. This work demonstrates the importance of the GPI anchor in normal forebrain development and suggests that GPI biosynthesis genes should be screened for association with human holoprosencephaly. PMID:23213481

  12. Defects in GPI biosynthesis perturb Cripto signaling during forebrain development in two new mouse models of holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    McKean, David M; Niswander, Lee

    2012-09-15

    Holoprosencephaly is the most common forebrain defect in humans. We describe two novel mouse mutants that display a holoprosencephaly-like phenotype. Both mutations disrupt genes in the glycerophosphatidyl inositol (GPI) biosynthesis pathway: gonzo disrupts Pign and beaker disrupts Pgap1. GPI anchors normally target and anchor a diverse group of proteins to lipid raft domains. Mechanistically we show that GPI anchored proteins are mislocalized in GPI biosynthesis mutants. Disruption of the GPI-anchored protein Cripto (mouse) and TDGF1 (human ortholog) have been shown to result in holoprosencephaly, leading to our hypothesis that Cripto is the key GPI anchored protein whose altered function results in an HPE-like phenotype. Cripto is an obligate Nodal co-factor involved in TGFβ signaling, and we show that TGFβ signaling is reduced both in vitro and in vivo. This work demonstrates the importance of the GPI anchor in normal forebrain development and suggests that GPI biosynthesis genes should be screened for association with human holoprosencephaly. PMID:23213481

  13. Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Structure Influences the Reconfiguration of White Matter Connections to Support Residual Memory in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Nicola J.; Metzler-Baddeley, Claudia; Khondoker, Mizanur R.; Grothe, Michel J.; Teipel, Stefan; Wright, Paul; Heinsen, Helmut; Jones, Derek K.; Aggleton, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The fornix and hippocampus are critical to recollection in the healthy human brain. Fornix degeneration is a feature of aging and Alzheimer's disease. In the presence of fornix damage in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a recognized prodrome of Alzheimer's disease, recall shows greater dependence on other tracts, notably the parahippocampal cingulum (PHC). The current aims were to determine whether this shift is adaptive and to probe its relationship to cholinergic signaling, which is also compromised in Alzheimer's disease. Twenty-five human participants with MCI and 20 matched healthy volunteers underwent diffusion MRI, behavioral assessment, and volumetric measurement of the basal forebrain. In a regression model for recall, there was a significant group × fornix interaction, indicating that the association between recall and fornix structure was weaker in patients. The opposite trend was present for the left PHC. To further investigate this pattern, two regression models were generated to account for recall performance: one based on fornix microstructure and the other on both fornix and left PHC. The realignment to PHC was positively correlated with free recall but not non-memory measures, implying a reconfiguration that is beneficial to residual memory. There was a positive relationship between realignment to PHC and basal forebrain gray matter volume despite this region demonstrating atrophy at a group level, i.e., the cognitive realignment to left PHC was most apparent when cholinergic areas were relatively spared. Therefore, cholinergic systems appear to enable adaptation to injury even as they degenerate, which has implications for functional restoration. PMID:25589767

  14. The distribution of p75 neurotrophin receptor-immunoreactive cells in the forebrain of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Maclean, C J; Baker, H F; Fine, A; Ridley, R M

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of neurones that could be stained immunohistochemically with antibody to the p75 neurotrophin protein was studied in the forebrain of the common marmoset. The p75-immunoreactive forebrain cells appear to correspond to choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive (i.e., cholinergic) neurones. Two populations of cells could be distinguished on the basis of the intensity of p75 immunostaining. Moderately stained cells correspond to cholinergic interneurones of the caudate and putamen, while intensely stained cells correspond to the cholinergic neurones projecting to the cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus, located in the septum, diagonal band, and basal nucleus of Meynert. The distribution of cells of the diagonal band/basal nucleus complex is more extensive in the marmoset than in other primate species, extending into parts of the postcommissural fornix via the posterior septum, and by small projections dorsal to the anterior commissure and via the thalamic fasciculus from the basal nucleus; the posterior extent of the basal nucleus continues extensively into the lamina between the globus pallidus and the putamen.

  15. Genealogical correspondence of a forebrain cen