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Sample records for rat hippocampus increases

  1. Long-term aerobic exercise increases redox-active iron through nitric oxide in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, De-Sheng

    2014-01-30

    Adult hippocampus is highly vulnerable to iron-induced oxidative stress. Aerobic exercise has been proposed to reduce oxidative stress but the findings in the hippocampus are conflicting. This study aimed to observe the changes of redox-active iron and concomitant regulation of cellular iron homeostasis in the hippocampus by aerobic exercise, and possible regulatory effect of nitric oxide (NO). A randomized controlled study was designed in the rats with swimming exercise treatment (for 3 months) and/or an unselective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) (L-NAME) treatment. The results from the bleomycin-detectable iron assay showed additional redox-active iron in the hippocampus by exercise treatment. The results from nonheme iron content assay, combined with the redox-active iron content, showed increased storage iron content by exercise treatment. NOx (nitrate plus nitrite) assay showed increased NOx content by exercise treatment. The results from the Western blot assay showed decreased ferroportin expression, no changes of TfR1 and DMT1 expressions, increased IRP1 and IRP2 expression, increased expressions of eNOS and nNOS rather than iNOS. In these effects of exercise treatment, the increased redox-active iron content, storage iron content, IRP1 and IRP2 expressions were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment, and decreased ferroportin expression was in part reversed by L-NAME. L-NAME treatment completely inhibited increased NOx and both eNOS and nNOS expression in the hippocampus. Our findings suggest that aerobic exercise could increase the redox-active iron in the hippocampus, indicating an increase in the capacity to generate hydroxyl radicals through the Fenton reactions, and aerobic exercise-induced iron accumulation in the hippocampus might mainly result from the role of the endogenous NO.

  2. Increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by morphine-sensitization in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Mehdi; Farahmandfar, Maryam; Ranjbar, Faezeh Esmaeli; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-07-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine, elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect long-lasting changes in some of the important molecules involved in memory processing such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In the present study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression of α and β isoforms and activity of CaMKII in the hippocampus of male rats. Animals were treated for 3 days with saline or morphine (20mg/kg) and following a washout period of 5 days, a challenge dose of morphine (5mg/kg) were administered. The results indicate that morphine administration in pre-treated animals produces behavioral sensitization, as determined by significant increase in locomotion and oral stereotypy behavior. In addition, repeated morphine treatment increased mRNA expression of both α and β isoforms of CaMKII in the hippocampus. The present study also showed that induction of morphine sensitization significantly increased both Ca2+/calmodulin-independent and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent activities of CaMK II in the rat hippocampus. However, acute administration of morphine (5mg/kg) did not alter either α and β CaMKII mRNA expression or CaMKII activity in the hippocampus. The stimulation effects of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression and activity of CaMKII were completely abolished by administration of naloxone, 30min prior to s.c. injections of morphine (20mg/kg/day×3 days). Our data demonstrated that induction of morphine sensitization could effectively modulate the activity and the mRNA expression of CaMKII in the hippocampus and this effect of morphine was exerted by the activation of opioid receptors.

  3. Repeated stress increases catalytic TrkB mRNA in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nibuya, M; Takahashi, M; Russell, D S; Duman, R S

    1999-05-28

    Northern blot analysis was utilized to distinguish between catalytic and truncated TrkB mRNA on the basis of transcript size. Repeated (10 days), but not acute, immobilization stress significantly increased levels of catalytic TrkB mRNA, but did not influence expression of truncated TrkB transcripts in rat hippocampus. Exposure to another paradigm, a combination of different, unpredictable stressors, also increased levels of catalytic, but not truncated, TrkB mRNA. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that chronic stress up-regulated TrkB mRNA in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granule cells layers of hippocampus. As previously reported, both acute and chronic immobilization stress decreased expression of BDNF mRNA, suggesting that up-regulation of catalytic TrkB mRNA may be a compensatory adaptation to repeated stress.

  4. Increased extracellular concentrations of norepinephrine in cortex and hippocampus following vagus nerve stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Roosevelt, Rodney W; Smith, Douglas C; Clough, Richard W; Jensen, Robert A; Browning, Ronald A

    2006-11-13

    The vagus nerve is an important source of afferent information about visceral states and it provides input to the locus coeruleus (LC), the major source of norepinephrine (NE) in the brain. It has been suggested that the effects of electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve on learning and memory, mood, seizure suppression, and recovery of function following brain damage are mediated, in part, by the release of brain NE. The hypothesis that left vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) at the cervical level results in increased extracellular NE concentrations in the cortex and hippocampus was tested at four stimulus intensities: 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mA. Stimulation at 0.0 and 0.25 mA had no effect on NE concentrations, while the 0.5 mA stimulation increased NE concentrations significantly in the hippocampus (23%), but not the cortex. However, 1.0 mA stimulation significantly increased NE concentrations in both the cortex (39%) and hippocampus (28%) bilaterally. The increases in NE were transient and confined to the stimulation periods. VNS did not alter NE concentrations in either structure during the inter-stimulation baseline periods. No differences were observed between NE levels in the initial baseline and the post-stimulation baselines. These findings support the hypothesis that VNS increases extracellular NE concentrations in both the hippocampus and cortex.

  5. Hydroxysafflor yellow A increases BDNF and NMDARs in the hippocampus in a vascular dementia rat model.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengya; Sun, Qingna; Wang, Yiyi; Cheng, Yan; Zhang, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a drug that exerts angiogenesis regulatory and neuroprotective effects and has become an effective therapy for brain and heart ischemic disorders. There is no definite evidence supporting a therapeutic effect of HSYA in vascular dementia (VaD). We used HSYA in a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia to determine its potential therapeutic effects in VaD. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate spatial cognitive function, and long-term potentiation (LTP) was tested as a marker of synaptic plasticity. The expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and two subunits of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR; GluN2A and GluN2B) in the hippocampus were measured via western blotting. The MWM results showed that the experimental VaD group had longer escape latencies than the sham group, whereas the HSYA group had a decreased escape latency compared with the VaD group (P<0.05). The LTP at CA3-CA1 synapses in the hippocampus was also enhanced in the HSYA compared with the VaD group (P<0.05). The western blotting results revealed lower hippocampal BDNF and GluN2B expression in the VaD group compared with the sham group and significantly higher hippocampal expression in the HSYA group compared with the VaD group. No significant change in GluN2A expression was detected. The results indicate that HSYA may enhance the endogenous expression of BDNF and GluN2B, which are associated with the synaptic plasticity of the hippocampus, and may improve spatial learning and memory abilities in a rat model of VaD.

  6. Early enriched environment induces an increased conversion of proBDNF to BDNF in the adult rat's hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenyu; Duan, Juan; Wang, Xueqin; Zhong, Xiaolin; Hu, Zhaolan; Huang, Fulian; Wang, Hongtao; Zhang, Juan; Li, Fang; Zhang, Jianyi; Luo, Xuegang; Li, Chang-Qi

    2014-05-15

    An enriched environment has been shown to influence brain plasticity and function by involving the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF, which is synthesized as a precursor molecule (proBDNF) that undergoes proteolytic cleavage, plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and contributes to several brain functions such as memory, learning, and behavior. The neurotrophins and proneurotrophins often play opposite roles in the brain, suggesting that proteolytic cleavage of proneurotrophins controls the action of neurotrophins. However, few studies have focused on the expression and cleavage of proBDNF after exposure to an enriched environment. Our study aimed to explore the effects of an early-enriched environment on the conversion of proBDNF to BDNF in the adult rats' hippocampus. We found that there was no difference in the expression of proBDNF in the hippocampus between the SE (standard environment) and EE (enriched environment) rats, but a significantly increased BDNF protein level was found in the EE rats. Thus, a remarkably enhanced ratio of BDNF to proBDNF (BDNF/proBDNF) was observed in the EE rats. In addition, the EE resulted in a remarkably up-regulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the hippocampus, which played a key role in converting proBDNF to BDNF in the extracellular space. Furthermore, the expression of synapse-related proteins (NR1 and NR2A) was analyzed, and the results indicated that EE could significantly increase the expression of NR1 and NR2A in the hippocampus. In addition, the behavioral results showed that EE reduced anxiety-like behavior in the elevated-plus maze test and reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test. Moreover, the EE resulted in an increased preference for sucrose compared to the SE. These results suggested that the EE up-regulated MMP-9 levels within the hippocampus, which might facilitate the conversion of proBDNF to BDNF, thereby contributing to the long lasting alterations of

  7. Prenatal choline supplementation increases NGF levels in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, Noah J; Loy, Rebekah; Williams, Christina L

    2002-08-23

    Female Sprague-Dawley rats received approximately 300 mg/kg per day of choline chloride through their drinking water on days 11 of pregnancy through birth and the level of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of their male offspring was measured at 20 and 90 days of age. Prenatal choline supplementation caused significant increases in hippocampal NGF levels at 20 and 90 days of age, while levels of NGF in the frontal cortex were elevated in choline-supplemented rats at 20 days of age, but not 90 days of age. These results suggest that increases in NGF levels during development or adulthood may be one mechanism underlying improvements in spatial and temporal memory of adult rats exposed to elevated levels of choline chloride perinatally.

  8. Testosterone depletion in adult male rats increases mossy fiber transmission, LTP, and sprouting in area CA3 of hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Skucas, Vanessa A.; Duffy, Aine M.; Harte-Hargrove, Lauren; Magagna-Poveda, Alejandra; Radman, Thomas; Chakraborty, Goutam; Schroeder, Charles E.; MacLusky, Neil J.; Scharfman, H.E.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens have dramatic effects on neuronal structure and function in hippocampus. However, androgen depletion does not always lead to hippocampal impairment. To address this apparent paradox, we evaluated the hippocampus of adult male rats after gonadectomy (Gdx) or sham surgery. Surprisingly, Gdx rats showed increased synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) of the mossy fiber (MF) pathway. Gdx rats also exhibited increased excitability and MF sprouting. We then addressed the possible underlying mechanisms, and found that Gdx induced a long-lasting upregulation of MF brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity. Antagonism of Trk receptors, which bind neurotrophins such as BDNF, reversed the increase in MF transmission, excitability and LTP in Gdx rats, but there were no effects of Trk antagonism in sham controls. To determine which androgens were responsible, the effects of testosterone metabolites dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol were examined. Exposure of slices to 50 nM DHT decreased the effects of Gdx on MF transmission but 50 nM 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol had no effect. Remarkably, there was no effect of DHT in control males. The data suggest that a Trk- and androgen receptor-sensitive form of MF transmission and synaptic plasticity emerges after Gdx. We suggest that androgens may normally be important in area CA3 to prevent hyperexcitability and aberrant axon outgrowth, but limit MF synaptic transmission and some forms of plasticity. The results also suggest a potential explanation for the maintenance of hippocampal-dependent cognitive function after androgen depletion: a reduction in androgens may lead to compensatory upregulation of MF transmission and plasticity. PMID:23392664

  9. Chronic antidepressant administration increases the expression of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nibuya, M; Nestler, E J; Duman, R S

    1996-04-01

    The present study demonstrates that chronic, but not acute, adminstration of several different classes of antidepressants, including serotonin- and norepinephrine-selective reuptake inhibitors, increases the expression of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) mRNA in rat hippocampus. In contrast, chronic administration of several nonantidepressant psychotropic drugs did not influence expression of CREB mRNA, demonstrating the pharmacological specificity of this effect. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrates that antidepressant administration increases expression of CREB mRNA in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal and dentate gyrus granule cell layers of the hippocampus. In addition, levels of CRE immunoreactivity and of CRE binding activity were increased by chronic antidepressant administration, which indicates that expression and function of CREB protein are increased along with its mRNA. Chronic administration of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors rolipram or papaverine also increased expression of CREB mRNA in hippocampus, demonstrating a role for the cAMP cascade. Moreover, coadministration of rolipram with imipramine resulted in a more rapid induction of CREB than with either treatment alone. Increased expression and function of CREB suggest that specific target genes may be regulated by these treatments. We have found that levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and trkB mRNA are also increased by administration of antidepressants or PDE inhibitors. These findings indicate that upregulation of CREB is a common action of chronic antidepressant treatments that may lead to regulation of specific target genes, such as BDNF and trkB, and to the long-term effects of these treatments on brain function.

  10. Morphine sensitization increases the extracellular level of glutamate in CA1 of rat hippocampus via μ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Kadivar, Mehdi; Afrouzi, Hossein; Naghdi, Nasser

    2011-04-25

    Repeated administration of abuse drugs such as morphine elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect plastic changes requiring regulation of glutamatergic system in the brain. In this study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus, a brain region rich in glutamatergic neurons. Sensitization was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of morphine, once daily for 3 days followed by 5 days free of the opioid treatment. The results showed that extracellular glutamate concentration in the CA1 was decreased following administration of morphine in non-sensitized rats. However, morphine-induced behavioral sensitization significantly increased the extracellular glutamate concentration in this area. The enhancement of glutamate in morphine sensitized rats was prevented by administration of naloxone 30 min before each of three daily doses of morphine. These results suggest an adaptation of the glutamatergic neuronal transmission in the hippocampus after morphine sensitization and it is postulated that opioid receptors may play an important role in this effect.

  11. Haptoglobin increases with age in rat hippocampus and modulates Apolipoprotein E mediated cholesterol trafficking in neuroblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Spagnuolo, Maria Stefania; Maresca, Bernardetta; Mollica, Maria Pina; Cavaliere, Gina; Cefaliello, Carolina; Trinchese, Giovanna; Esposito, Maria Grazia; Scudiero, Rosaria; Crispino, Marianna; Abrescia, Paolo; Cigliano, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in cholesterol metabolism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is the major component of brain lipoproteins supporting cholesterol transport. We previously reported that the acute-phase protein Haptoglobin (Hpt) binds ApoE, and influences its function in blood cholesterol homeostasis. Major aim of this study was to investigate whether Hpt influences the mechanisms by which cholesterol is shuttled from astrocytes to neurons. In detail it was studied Hpt effect on ApoE-dependent cholesterol efflux from astrocytes and ApoE-mediated cholesterol incorporation in neurons. We report here that Hpt impairs ApoE-mediated cholesterol uptake in human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y, and limits the toxicity of a massive concentration of cholesterol for these cells, while it does not affect cholesterol efflux from the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma cell line U-87 MG. As aging is the most important non-genetic risk factor for various neurodegenerative disorders, and our results suggest that Hpt modulates ApoE functions, we evaluated the Hpt and ApoE expression profiles in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of adolescent (2 months), adult (5 and 8 months), and middle-aged (16 months) rats. Hpt mRNA level was higher in hippocampus of 8 and 16 month-old than in 2-month old rats (p < 0.05), and Hpt concentration increased with the age from adolescence to middle-age (p < 0.001). ApoE concentration, in hippocampus, was higher (p < 0.001) in 5 month-old rats compared to 2 month but did not further change with aging. No age-related changes of Hpt (protein and mRNA) were found in the cortex. Our results suggest that aging is associated with changes, particularly in the hippocampus, in the Hpt/ApoE ratio. Age-related changes in the concentration of Hpt were also found in human cerebrospinal fluids. The age-related changes might affect neuronal function and survival in brain, and have important implications in brain

  12. Adult onset-hypothyroidism increases response latency and long-term potentiation (LTP) in rat hippocampus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormones (TH) influence central nervous system (CNS) function during both development and in adulthood. The hippocampus is critical for some types of learning and memory and is particularly sensitive to thyroid hormone deficiency. Hypothyroidism in adulthood has been ass...

  13. Chronic neonatal nicotine exposure increases excitation in the young adult rat hippocampus in a sex-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Griffith, William H.; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking during pregnancy exposes the fetus to nicotine, resulting in nicotine-stimulated neurotransmitter release. Recent evidence suggests that the hippocampus develops differently in males and females with delayed maturation in males. We show that chronic nicotine exposure during the first postnatal week has sex-specific long-term effects. Neonatal rat pups were chronically treated with nicotine (6 mg/kg/day) (CNN) from postnatal day 1 to 7 or milk only (Controls), and hippocampal slices were prepared from Control- and CNN-treated young adults. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) or population spikes (PSs) were recorded from the CA1 hippocampus following CA1 s. radiatum stimulation. Input/Output curves constructed from fEPSP data indicated that CNN-males, but not females, had significantly increased excitatory responses compared to Controls (p<0.05, n=10 Con, n=11 CNN). Long-term potentiation (LTP) was not significantly changed by CNN. In the presence of bicuculline, which blocks inhibitory GABAA receptors, an epileptiform burst consisting of a series of PSs was evoked. The amplitude of the first PS was significantly larger in CNN-males and females compared to Controls (males: p<0.01, n=8 Con, n=8 CNN; females: p<0.05, n=9 Con, n=7 CNN). Only CNN-males also had significantly larger second PSs (p<0.05, n=8 con, n=8 CNN). Epileptiform activity evoked by zero Mg2+ incubation did not differ in amplitude or duration of bursts in CNN-males or females compared to Controls. These data indicate that neonatal nicotine exposure has long lasting effects and results in increased excitation within the CA1 hippocampus in adulthood, with males showing increased sensitivity to nicotine's effects. PMID:22119395

  14. Zaprinast impairs spatial memory by increasing PDE5 expression in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Mauro; Pompili, Assunta; Cardarelli, Silvia; Castelli, Valentina; Biagioni, Stefano; Sancesario, Giuseppe; Gasbarri, Antonella

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we report the effect of post-training intraperitoneal administration of zaprinast on rat memory retention in the Morris water maze task that revealed a significant memory impairment at the intermediate dose of 10mg/kg. Zaprinast is capable of inhibiting both striatal and hippocampal PDE activity but to a different extent which is probably due to the different PDE isoforms expressed in these areas. To assess the possible involvement of cyclic nucleotides in rat memory impairment, we compared the effects obtained 30 min after the zaprinast injection with respect to 24h after injection by measuring both cyclic nucleotide levels and PDE activity. As expected, 30 min after the zaprinast administration, we observed an increase of cyclic nucleotides, which returned to a basal level within 24h, with the exception of the hippocampal cGMP which was significantly decreased at the dose of 10mg/kg of zaprinast. This increase in the hippocampal region is the result of a cGMP-specific PDE5 induction, confirmed by sildenafil inhibition, in agreement with literature data that demonstrate transcriptional regulation of PDE5 by cAMP/cGMP intracellular levels. Our results highlight the possible rebound effect of PDE inhibitors.

  15. The rat brain hippocampus proteome.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Michael; Tsangaris, George T; Maris, Antony; Lubec, Gert

    2005-05-05

    The hippocampus is crucial in memory storage and retrieval and plays an important role in stress response. In humans, the CA1 area of hippocampus is one of the first brain areas to display pathology in Alzheimer's disease. A comprehensive analysis of the hippocampus proteome has not been accomplished yet. We applied proteomics technologies to construct a two-dimensional database for rat brain hippocampus proteins. Hippocampus samples from eight months old animals were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The database comprises 148 different gene products, which are in the majority enzymes, structural proteins and heat shock proteins. It also includes 39 neuron specific gene products. The database may be useful in animal model studies of neurological disorders.

  16. Glia activation and cytokine increase in rat hippocampus by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Massimo; Perego, Carlo; Aliprandi, Marisa; Richichi, Cristina; Ravizza, Teresa; Colella, Daniele; Velískŏvá, Jana; Moshé, Solomon L; De Simoni, M Grazia; Vezzani, Annamaria

    2003-12-01

    In adult rats, status epilepticus (SE) induces cytokine production by glia especially when seizures are associated with neuronal injury. This suggests that cytokines may play a role in seizure-induced neuronal damage. As SE-induced injury is age-specific, we used rats of different ages (with distinct susceptibilities to seizure-induced neuronal injury) to elucidate the role of cytokines in this process. Thus, we investigated the activation of microglia and astrocytes, induction of cytokines, and hippocampal neuronal injury 4 and 24 h following kainic acid-induced SE in postnatal day (PN) 9, 15, and 21 rats. At PN9, there was little activation of microglia and astrocytes at any time point studied. Interleukin-1beta (IL), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and IL-6 or the naturally occurring IL-1 receptor antagonist (Ra) mRNA expression did not increase. No evidence of cell injury has been detected. At PN15, immunostaining of microglia and astrocytes was enhanced, but only IL-1beta mRNA expression was increased. These changes were observed 4 h after SE. Scattered injured neurons in CA3 and subiculum, but not in any other region, were present 24 h following SE. At PN21, immunostaining of microglia and astrocytes and the mRNA expression of all cytokines studied was significantly increased already 4 h after SE. At 24 h, many injured neurons were present in CA1 and CA3 regions and in 40% of rats in other forebrain areas. These data show that (i) the pattern of glia activation and cytokine gene transcription induced by SE is age-dependent and (ii) neuronal injury in the hippocampus occurs only when cytokines are induced and their synthesis precedes the appearance of neuronal damage. Thus, cytokine expression in immature brain is associated specifically with cell injury rather than with seizures per se, suggesting that proinflammatory cytokines may contribute to the occurence of SE-induced hippocampal damage.

  17. Early-life environmental intervention may increase the number of neurons, astrocytes, and cellular proliferation in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann-Duarte, Elisa C; Padilha-Hoffmann, Camila B; Martins, Daniel F; Schuh, Artur F S; Fernandes, Marilda C; Santin, Ricardo; Merlo, Suelen; Sanvitto, Gilberto L; Lucion, Aldo B

    2011-11-01

    Neonatal handling reduces the stress response in adulthood due to a feedback mechanism. The present study analyzed the effects of repeated neonatal environmental intervention (daily handling during the first 10 days after birth) on neuron-, astroglial cell density, and cellular proliferation of the hippocampal (CA1, CA2, and CA3) pyramidal cell layers in female rats. Pups were divided into two groups, nonhandled and handled, which were submitted to repeated handling sessions between postnatal days 1 and 10. Histological and immunohistochemical procedures were used to determine changes in neuron density, astroglial cell density, and cellular proliferation. We found an increase in neuron density in each pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, and CA3) in female rats (11 and 90 day old) that were handled during the neonatal period. Furthermore, we found an increase in astroglial cell density in both hemispheres of the brain in the handled group. Finally, we observed an increase in cellular proliferation in both hippocampi (CA1, CA2, and CA3) of the brain in female pups (11 days old) handled during the neonatal period. This study demonstrates that an early-life environmental intervention may induce morphological changes in a structure involved with several functions, including the stress response. The results of the current study suggest that neonatal handling may influence the animals' responses to environmental adversities later in life.

  18. Adolescent exposure to cocaine increases anxiety-like behavior and induces morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Mao, Z; Zhu, C; Li, M; Cao, C; Guan, Y; Yuan, J; Xie, G; Guan, X

    2016-01-28

    Repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence may affect both physical and psychological conditions in the brain, and increase the risk of psychiatric disorders and addiction behaviors in adulthood. Adolescence represents a critical development period for the hippocampus. Moreover, different regions of the hippocampus are involved in different functions. Dorsal hippocampus (dHP) has been implicated in learning and memory, whereas ventral hippocampus (vHP) plays an important role in emotional processing. In this study, the rats that were exposed to cocaine during adolescence (postnatal days, P28-P42) showed higher anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze test in adulthood (P80), but displayed normal spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze test. Furthermore, repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence lead to alterations in morphology of pyramidal neurons, activities of astrocytes, and levels of proteins that involved in synaptic transmission, apoptosis, inflammation and addiction in both dHP and vHP of adult rats. These findings suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence in rats may elicit morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus when the animals reach adulthood. These changes may contribute to the increased susceptibility for psychiatric disorders and addiction seen in adults.

  19. MDMA increases glutamate release and reduces parvalbumin-positive GABAergic cells in the dorsal hippocampus of the rat: role of cyclooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Anneken, John H; Cunningham, Jacobi I; Collins, Stuart A; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2013-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) is a popular drug of abuse with well-documented acute effects on serotonergic, dopaminergic, and cholinergic transmitter systems, as well as evidence of long-term disruption of serotoninergic systems in the rat brain. Recently, it was demonstrated that MDMA evokes a delayed and sustained increase in glutamate release in the hippocampus. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of inflammatory mediators in the MDMA-induced increase in glutamate release, as well as the contribution of inflammatory pathways in the persistent neurochemical toxicity associated with repeated MDMA treatment. Treatment with the non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor ketoprofen and the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide attenuated the increase in extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus evoked by repeated MDMA exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h); no attenuation was observed in rats treated with the COX-1 selective inhibitor piroxicam. Reverse dialysis of a major product of COX activity, prostaglandin E2, also resulted in a significant increase in extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus . Repeated exposure to MDMA diminished the number of parvalbumin-positive GABA interneurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, an effect that was attenuated by ketoprofen treatment. However, COX inhibition with ketoprofen did not prevent the long-term depletion of 5-HT in the hippocampus evoked by MDMA treatment. These data are supportive of the view that cyclooxygenase activity contributes to the mechanism underlying both the increased release of glutamate and decreased number of GABA interneurons in the rat hippocampus produced by repeated MDMA exposure.

  20. Short-term steroid treatment increases δ GABAA receptor subunit expression in rat CA1 hippocampus: Pharmacological and behavioral effects

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Gong, Qi Hua; Yuan, Maoli; Smith, Sheryl S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 48 h administration of 3α-OH-5β-pregnan-20-one (3α,5β-THP) or 17β-estradiol (E2)+progesterone (P) to female rats increased expression of the δ subunit of the GABAA receptor (GABAR) in CA1 hippocampus. Coexpression of α4 and δ subunits was suggested by an increased response of isolated pyramidal cells to the GABA agonist 4,5,6,7- tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), following 48 h steroid treatment, and nearly complete blockade by 300 μM lanthanum (La3+). Because α4βδ GABAR are extrasynaptic, we also recorded pharmacologically isolated GABAergic holding current from CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells in the slice. The La3+-sensitive THIP current, representative of current gated by α4βδ GABAR, was measurable only following 48 h steroid treatment. In contrast, the bicuculline-sensitive current was not altered by steroid treatment, assessed with or without 200 nM gabazine to block synaptic current. However, 48 h steroid treatment resulted in a tonic current insensitive to the benzodiazepine agonists lorazepam (10 μM) and zolpidem (100 nM). These results suggest that 48 h steroid treatment increases expression of α4βδ GABAR which replace the ambient receptor population. Increased anxiolytic effects of THIP were also observed following 48 h steroid treatment. The findings from the present study may be relevant for alterations in mood and benzodiazepine sensitivity reported across the menstrual cycle. PMID:15950994

  1. Neonatal nicotine exposure increases excitatory synaptic transmission and attenuates nicotine-stimulated GABA release in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Damborsky, Joanne C; Griffith, William H; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H

    2015-01-01

    Developmental exposure to nicotine has been linked to long-lasting changes in synaptic transmission which may contribute to behavioral abnormalities seen in offspring of women who smoke during pregnancy. Here, we examined the long-lasting effects of developmental nicotine exposure on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission, and on acute nicotine-induced glutamate and GABA release in the adult hippocampus, a structure important in cognitive and emotional behaviors. We utilized a chronic neonatal nicotine treatment model to administer nicotine (6 mg/kg/day) to rat pups from postnatal day (P) 1-7, a period that falls developmentally into the third human trimester. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we measured excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents in neonatally control- and nicotine-treated young adult males. Neonatal nicotine exposure significantly increased AMPA receptor-mediated spontaneous and evoked excitatory signaling, with no change in glutamate release probability in adults. Conversely, there was no increase in spontaneous GABAergic neurotransmission in nicotine-males. Chronic neonatal nicotine treatment had no effect on acute nicotine-stimulated glutamate release in adults, but acute nicotine-stimulated GABA release was significantly attenuated. Thus, neonatal nicotine exposure results in a persistent net increase in excitation and a concurrent loss of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated regulation of presynaptic GABA but not glutamate release, which would exacerbate excitation following endogenous or exogenous nAChR activation. Our data underscore an important role for nAChRs in hippocampal excitatory synapse development, and suggest selective long-term changes at specific presynaptic nAChRs which together could explain some of the behavioral abnormalities associated with maternal smoking.

  2. 3'-5' cyclic-guanosine monophosphate increase in rat brain hippocampus after gamma-hydroxybutyrate administration. Prevention by valproate and naloxone

    SciTech Connect

    Vayer, P.; Gobaille, S.; Mandel, P.; Maitre, M.

    1987-08-03

    An increase (123%) of cyclic GMP (cGMP) was observed in the hippocampus of the rat killed by microwave irradiation 45 min after administration of 500 mg/kg el-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) IP. This increase is time and dose dependent. No modification in cyclic nucleotide content was observed in striatum and in cerebellum. As the role of GHB has been implicated in neurotransmission, the fact that this compound increases cyclic GMP accumulation in hippocampus in vivo may represent a mechanism by which the actions of GHB are mediated at the cellular level. Valproate (400 mg/kg) or naloxone (10 mg/kg) pretreatment completely abolish the cGMP increase due to GHB. A GABAergic and/or opiate phenomenon may be involved in the mechanism of GHB induced increase of cGMP. 34 references, 4 figures.

  3. Maternal separation increases GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of norepinephrine release in the hippocampus of a rat model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Sterley, Toni-Lee; Howells, Fleur M; Russell, Vivienne A

    2013-02-25

    Experiencing early life stress increases the risk of developing a psychiatric disorder later in life, possibly by altering neural networks, such as the locus-coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE) system. Whether early life stress affects the LC-NE system directly, or whether the effects are via changes in glutamate and GABA modulation of the LC-NE system, is unclear. Early life stress has been shown to alter glutamate and GABA transmission, and in particular, to alter GABA(A) receptor expression. The LC-NE system has been implicated in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), amongst other disorders, and is over-responsive to glutamate stimulation in a validated rat model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). It is plausible that the LC-NE system, or glutamate and GABA modulation thereof, in an individual already genetically predisposed to develop ADHD, or in SHR, may respond in a unique way to early life stress. To investigate this we applied a mild developmental stressor, maternal separation, onto SHR, and onto their control strain, Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), from post-natal day (P)2-14. On P50-52, in early adulthood, we assayed glutamate and potassium stimulated release of radio-actively labelled NE ((3)[H]NE) from hippocampal slices using an in vitro superfusion technique, in the presence or absence of a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, bicuculline. Our results show that maternal separation altered GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of NE release in the hippocampus of the two strains in opposite directions, increasing it in SHR and decreasing it in WKY. Our findings indicate that effects of early life stress are highly dependent on genetic predisposition, since opposite changes in GABA(A) receptor-mediated modulation of NE release were observed in the rat model of ADHD, SHR, and their control strain, WKY.

  4. PBDE-209 exposure damages learning and memory ability in rats potentially through increased autophagy and apoptosis in the hippocampus neuron.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Du, Lili; Tang, Wenting; Kuang, Liyun; Du, Peili; Chen, Jingsi; Chen, Dunjin

    2017-03-01

    This study is to investigate the neurotoxicity of PBDE-209 during pregnancy through autophagy and apoptosis in the fetal hippocampus neuron. The autophagy protein levels of LC3-II and Beclin-1 were significantly higher in hippocampus tissue and neuron, while P62 protein were lower. Apoptosis protein Cleaved Caspase-3 and Cleaved PARP was significantly higher in PBDE dose groups and BCL-2 levels in high PBDE dose groups were significantly lower. During the Morris water maze task, the escape latency times of high PBDE dose groups were significantly longer. PBDE-209-induced autophagy leads to neurons death and inhibition of autophagy reduce PBDE-209-induced apoptotic cell death. These results suggest that exposure of the PBDE-209 during pregnancy increases hippocampal autophagy, decrease neuron viability, and it partly effect apoptosis induced by PBDE-209. All that may contribute to the decline of learning and memory ability in the offspring.

  5. Antidepressant dose of taurine increases mRNA expression of GABAA receptor α2 subunit and BDNF in the hippocampus of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Caletti, Greice; Almeida, Felipe Borges; Agnes, Grasiela; Nin, Maurício Schüler; Barros, Helena Maria Tannhauser; Gomez, Rosane

    2015-04-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder associated with higher risk for depression. Diabetic rats present depressive-like behaviors and taurine, one of the most abundant free amino acids in the brain, reverses this depressive behaviors. Because taurine is a GABAA agonist modulator, we hypothesize that its antidepressant effect results from the interaction on this system by changing α2 GABAA receptor subunit expression, beside changes on BDNF mRNA, and memory in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-diabetic and non-diabetic Wistar rats were daily injected with 100mg/kg of taurine or saline, intraperitoneally, for 30 days. At the end of the experiment, rats were exposed to the novel object recognition memory. Later they were euthanized, the brains were weighed, and the hippocampus was dissected for α2 GABAA subunit and BDNF mRNA expression. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that diabetic rats presented lower α2 GABAA subunit and BDNF mRNA expression than non-diabetic rats and taurine increased both parameters in these sick rats. Taurine also reversed the lower brain weight and improved the short-term memory in diabetic rats. Thus, the taurine antidepressant effect may be explained by interference with the GABA system, in line to its neuroprotective effect showed here by preventing brain weight loss and improving memory in diabetic rats.

  6. The role of 5-HT₁A receptors in fish oil-mediated increased BDNF expression in the rat hippocampus and cortex: a possible antidepressant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vines, Aparecida; Delattre, Ana Marcia; Lima, Marcelo M S; Rodrigues, Laís Soares; Suchecki, Deborah; Machado, Ricardo B; Tufik, Sergio; Pereira, Sofia I R; Zanata, Sílvio M; Ferraz, Anete Curte

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological and dietary studies show that nutritional deficit of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) is directly related to the prevalence and severity of depression. Supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) during critical periods of development (pregnancy and lactation) is essential for cortical maturation, synaptogenesis and myelination, and may also mitigate the risk for cognitive deficits and psychopathologies in young adults. The present study was performed to evaluate the involvement of serotonin (5-HT) receptors, particularly of 5-HT(1A), and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the antidepressant effect of ω-3 PUFA supplementation. In Experiment 1, the antidepressant effects of fish oil were assessed by the modified forced swim test in adult rats. The data indicated a robust antidepressant effect produced by this supplementation and that treatment of the rats with WAY 100135 reversed this effect. In Experiment 2, cortical and hippocampal contents of BDNF, 5-HT, dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), were determined in animals subjected to the same protocol. Increased BDNF expression in the cortex and hippocampus of both age groups was detected. In 90 day-old rats, 5-HT content in the hippocampus was increased, whereas 5-HIAA formation was diminished in the fish oil group. We suggest the occurrence of a reciprocal involvement of 5-HT(1A) receptors activation and the hippocampal BDNF-increased expression mediated by fish oil supplementation. These data corroborate and expand the notion that supplementation with ω-3 PUFA produces antidepressant effects mediated by an increase in serotonergic neurotransmission, particularly in the hippocampus. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Anxiety and Depression'.

  7. Endogenous BDNF protein is increased in adult rat hippocampus after a kainic acid induced excitotoxic insult but exogenous BDNF is not neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Rudge, J S; Mather, P E; Pasnikowski, E M; Cai, N; Corcoran, T; Acheson, A; Anderson, K; Lindsay, R M; Wiegand, S J

    1998-02-01

    Systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainic acid to adult rats results in a well defined pattern of loss of the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Prior to this neuronal loss, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA is substantially increased. We show here that BDNF protein is increased after excitotoxic insult in specific areas of the hippocampus, reaching maximal levels 24 h after the insult. BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus increase in direct relation to the severity of seizure. Up to 7 days after injection of kainic acid, levels of full-length TrkB protein were unchanged, whereas levels of truncated TrkB protein were significantly increased by 12 h. To determine whether elevations in BDNF protein levels are potentially beneficial to hippocampal neurons exposed to an excitotoxic stress, we infused exogenous BDNF prior to and during the period of neuronal death caused by kainic acid. We find that administration of high levels of exogenous BDNF does not affect severity of seizure, but does in fact, exacerbate the injury caused by kainic acid, specifically to CA3 pyramidal neurons. Although there was a trend toward sparing of CA1 pyramidal neurons on the side infused with BDNF, this was not significant. In the same paradigm, infusion of exogenous NT-3 had no effect.

  8. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA Receptor Subunits Increase in the Hippocampus during Memory Consolidation in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Cercato, Magali C; Vázquez, Cecilia A; Kornisiuk, Edgar; Aguirre, Alejandra I; Colettis, Natalia; Snitcofsky, Marina; Jerusalinsky, Diana A; Baez, María V

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that NMDA receptors (NMDAR) are required for learning and memory formation, and for synaptic plasticity induction. We have previously shown that hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A NMDAR subunits significantly increased following habituation of rats to an open field (OF), while GluN2B remained unchanged. Similar results were obtained after CA1-long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in rat hippocampal slices. Other studies have also shown NMDAR up regulation at earlier and later time points after LTP induction or learning acquisition. In this work, we have studied NMDAR subunits levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after OF habituation and after object recognition (OR), to find out whether rising of NMDAR subunits is a general and structure-specific feature during memory formation. In 1, 2 and 3 month old rats there was an increase in hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A, but not in GluN2B levels 70 min after OF habituation. This rise overlaps with early phase of memory consolidation, suggesting a putative relationship between them. The increases fell down to control levels 90 min after training. Similar results were obtained in the hippocampus of adult rats 70 min after OR training, without changes in PFC. Following OF test or OR discrimination phase, NMDAR subunits remained unchanged. Hence, rising of hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A appears to be a general feature after novel "spatial/discrimination" memory acquisition. To start investigating the dynamics and possible mechanisms of these changes, we have studied hippocampal neuron cultures stimulated by KCl to induce plasticity. GluN1 and GluN2A increased both in dendrites and neuronal bodies, reaching a maximum 75 min later and returning to control levels at 90 min. Translation and/or transcription and mobilization differentially contribute to this rise in subunits in bodies and dendrites. Our results showed that the NMDAR subunits increase follows a similar time course both in vitro and in

  9. GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA Receptor Subunits Increase in the Hippocampus during Memory Consolidation in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cercato, Magali C.; Vázquez, Cecilia A.; Kornisiuk, Edgar; Aguirre, Alejandra I.; Colettis, Natalia; Snitcofsky, Marina; Jerusalinsky, Diana A.; Baez, María V.

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that NMDA receptors (NMDAR) are required for learning and memory formation, and for synaptic plasticity induction. We have previously shown that hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A NMDAR subunits significantly increased following habituation of rats to an open field (OF), while GluN2B remained unchanged. Similar results were obtained after CA1-long-term potentiation (LTP) induction in rat hippocampal slices. Other studies have also shown NMDAR up regulation at earlier and later time points after LTP induction or learning acquisition. In this work, we have studied NMDAR subunits levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after OF habituation and after object recognition (OR), to find out whether rising of NMDAR subunits is a general and structure-specific feature during memory formation. In 1, 2 and 3 month old rats there was an increase in hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A, but not in GluN2B levels 70 min after OF habituation. This rise overlaps with early phase of memory consolidation, suggesting a putative relationship between them. The increases fell down to control levels 90 min after training. Similar results were obtained in the hippocampus of adult rats 70 min after OR training, without changes in PFC. Following OF test or OR discrimination phase, NMDAR subunits remained unchanged. Hence, rising of hippocampal GluN1 and GluN2A appears to be a general feature after novel “spatial/discrimination” memory acquisition. To start investigating the dynamics and possible mechanisms of these changes, we have studied hippocampal neuron cultures stimulated by KCl to induce plasticity. GluN1 and GluN2A increased both in dendrites and neuronal bodies, reaching a maximum 75 min later and returning to control levels at 90 min. Translation and/or transcription and mobilization differentially contribute to this rise in subunits in bodies and dendrites. Our results showed that the NMDAR subunits increase follows a similar time course both in vitro and

  10. IUGR increases chromatin-remodeling factor Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter in newborn male rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xingrao; McKnight, Robert A; Gracey Maniar, Lia E; Sun, Ying; Callaway, Christopher W; Majnik, Amber; Lane, Robert H; Cohen, Susan S

    2015-07-15

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for neurodevelopment delay and neuroendocrine reprogramming in both humans and rats. Neuroendocrine reprogramming involves the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene that is epigenetically regulated in the hippocampus. Using a well-characterized rodent model, we have previously shown that IUGR increases GR exon 1.7 mRNA variant and total GR expressions in male rat pup hippocampus. Epigenetic regulation of GR transcription may involve chromatin remodeling of the GR gene. A key chromatin remodeler is Brahma-related gene-1(Brg1), a member of the ATP-dependent SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Brg1 regulates gene expression by affecting nucleosome repositioning and recruiting transcriptional components to target promoters. We hypothesized that IUGR would increase hippocampal Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter, as well as alter nucleosome positioning over GR promoters in newborn male pups. Further, we hypothesized that IUGR would lead to accumulation of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and RNA pol II at GR exon 1.7 promoter. Indeed, we found that IUGR increased Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter. We also found that increased Brg1 binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter was associated with accumulation of Sp1 and RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain pSer-5 (a marker of active transcription). Furthermore, the transcription start site of GR exon 1.7 was located within a nucleosome-depleted region. We speculate that changes in hippocampal Brg1 expression mediate GR expression and subsequently trigger neuroendocrine reprogramming in male IUGR rats.

  11. Increased DNA double-strand break was associated with downregulation of repair and upregulation of apoptotic factors in rat hippocampus after alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Suman, Shubhankar; Kumar, Santosh; N'Gouemo, Prosper; Datta, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Binge drinking is known to cause damage in critical areas of the brain, including the hippocampus, which is important for relational memory and is reported to be sensitive to alcohol toxicity. However, the roles of DNA double-strand break (DSB) and its repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in alcohol-induced hippocampal injury remain to be elucidated. The purpose of this first study was to assess alcohol-induced DNA DSB and the mechanism by which alcohol affects DSB repair pathways in rat hippocampus. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (8-10 weeks old) were put on a 4-day binge ethanol treatment regimen. Control animals were maintained under similar conditions but were given the vehicle without ethanol. All animals were humanely euthanized 24 h after the last dose of ethanol administration and the hippocampi were dissected for immunoblot and immunohistochemistry analysis. Ethanol exposure caused increased 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) staining as well as elevated γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in hippocampal cells. Immunoblot analysis showed decreased Mre11, Rad51, Rad50, and Ku86 as well as increased Bax and p21 in samples from ethanol-treated rats. Additionally, we also observed increased activated caspase3 staining in hippocampal cells 24 h after ethanol withdrawal. Taken together, our data demonstrated that ethanol concurrently induced DNA DSB, downregulated DSB repair pathway proteins, and increased apoptotic factors in hippocampal cells. We believe these findings will provide the impetus for further research on DNA DSB and its repair pathways in relation to alcohol toxicity in brain.

  12. Prenatal valproate treatment produces autistic-like behavior and increases metabotropic glutamate receptor 1A-immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Francisco; Fuentealba, Constanza; Fiedler, Jenny; Aliaga, Esteban

    2016-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social communication and social interaction, and repetitive and stereotypical patterns of behavior. Previously, a common physiopathological pathway, involving the control of synaptic protein synthesis, was proposed as a convergence point in ASD. In particular, a role for local mRNA translation activated by class I metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) was suggested in genetic syndromes with autistic signs and in the prenatal exposition to the valproate model of autism. However, the role of the other members of class I metabotropic glutamate receptors, including mGluR1, has been poorly studied. The present study analyzed the immunoreactivity for mGluR1a in the hippocampus of rats prenatally treated with valproate. Pregnant dams (embryonic day 12.5) were injected with valproate (450 mg/kg) and subsequently, the behavior and mGluR1a were evaluated at postnatal day 30. Experimental rats exhibited social deficit, repetitive conduct and anxious behaviors compared with that of the control animals. Additionally, the present study observed an increased level of mGluR1a-immunoreactivity in the hilus of dentate gyrus and in the CA1 alveus region of the hippocampus. These results suggested an over‑functioning of mGluR1a signaling in the hippocampus, induced in the valproate model of autism, which may serve a role in cognitive and behavioral signs of ASD.

  13. Adolescence fluoxetine increases serotonergic activity in the raphe-hippocampus axis and improves depression-like behaviors in female rats that experienced neonatal maternal separation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang Bae; Kim, Bom-Taeck; Kim, Jin Young; Ryu, Vitaly; Kang, Dong-Won; Lee, Jong-Ho; Jahng, Jeong Won

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted to examine if fluoxetine, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, would reverse adverse behavioral effects of neonatal maternal separation in female rats. Sprague-Dawley pups were separated from dam daily for 3h during postnatal day (PND) 1-14 (maternal separation; MS) or left undisturbed (non-handled; NH). Female NH and MS pups received intraperitoneal injection of fluoxetine (10mg/kg) or vehicle daily from PND 35 until the end of the whole experimental period. Rats were either subjected to behavioral tests during PND 44-54, or sacrificed for neurochemical analyses during PND 43-45. Daily food intake and weight gain of both NH and MS pups were suppressed by fluoxetine, with greater effects in MS pups. MS experience increased immobility and decrease swimming in forced swim test. Swimming was increased, although immobility was not significantly decreased, in MS females by adolescence fluoxetine. However, adolescence fluoxetine increased immobility during forced swim test and decreased time spent in open arms during elevated plus maze test in NH females. Fluoxetine normalized MS-induced decrease of the raphe 5-HT levels and increased 5-HT metabolism in the hippocampus in MS females, and increased the hypothalamic 5-HT both in NH and MS. Fluoxetine decreased the raphe 5-HT and increased the plasma corticosterone in NH females. Results suggest that decreased 5-HTergic activity in the raphe nucleus is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression-like behaviors, and increased 5-HTergic activities in the raphe-hippocampus axis may be a part of anti-depressant efficacy of fluoxetine, in MS females. Also, an extra-hypothalamic 5-HTergic activity may contribute to the increased anorectic efficacy of fluoxetine in MS females. Additionally, decreased 5-HT in the raphe and elevated plasma corticosterone may be related with fluoxetine-induced depression- and/or anxiety-like behaviors in NH females.

  14. Chronic high fat feeding increases anxiety-like behaviour and reduces transcript abundance of glucocorticoid signalling genes in the hippocampus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Sivanathan, Shathveekan; Thavartnam, Kabriya; Arif, Shahneen; Elegino, Trisha; McGowan, Patrick O

    2015-06-01

    The consumption of diets high in saturated fats and obesity have been associated with impaired physical and mental health. Previous studies indicate that chronic high fat diet consumption leads to systemic inflammation in humans and non-human animal models. Studies in non-human animals suggest that altered physiological responses to stress are also a consequence of high fat diet consumption. Glucocorticoid signalling mechanisms may link immune and stress-related pathways in the brain, and were shown to be significantly altered in the brains of female rat offspring of mothers exposed to chronic high fat diet during pregnancy and lactation. For adult females, the consequence of chronic high fat diet consumption on these signalling pathways and their relationship to stress-related behaviour is not known. In this study, we examined the effects of chronic consumption of a high fat diet compared to a low fat control diet among adult female Long Evans rats. We found significant differences in weight gain, caloric intake, anxiety-related behaviours, and glucocorticoid-related gene expression over a 10-week exposure period. As expected, rats in the high fat diet group gained the most weight and consumed the greatest number of calories. Rats in the high fat diet group showed significantly greater levels of anxiety-related behaviour in the Light Dark and Open Field tasks compared to rats in the low fat diet group. Rats consuming high fat diet also exhibited reduced transcript abundance in the hippocampus of stress-related mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor genes, as well as nuclear factor kappa beta gene expression, implicated in inflammatory processes. Together, these data indicate that chronic high fat diet consumption may increase anxiety-like behaviour at least in part via alterations in glucocorticoid signalling mechanisms in limbic brain regions.

  15. IL-1β increases necrotic neuronal cell death in the developing rat hippocampus after status epilepticus by activating type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1RI).

    PubMed

    Medel-Matus, Jesús-Servando; Álvarez-Croda, Dulce-Mariely; Martínez-Quiroz, Joel; Beltrán-Parrazal, Luis; Morgado-Valle, Consuelo; López-Meraz, María-Leonor

    2014-11-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is associated with seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the adult brain. The contribution of IL-1β to neuronal injury induced by status epilepticus (SE) in the immature brain remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of IL-1β administration on hippocampal neuronal cell death associated with SE in the immature brain, and the role of the type I receptor of IL-1β (IL-1RI). SE was induced with lithium-pilocarpine in 14-days-old (P14) rat pups. Six hours after SE onset, pups were i.c.v. injected in the right ventricle with IL-1β (0, 0.3, 3, 30, or 300 ng), 30 ng of IL-1RI antagonist (IL-1Ra) alone, or 30 ng of IL-1Ra plus 3ng of IL-1β. As control groups, pups without seizures were injected with 3 ng of IL-1β or vehicle. Twenty-four hours after SE onset, neuronal cell death in the CA1 field of dorsal hippocampus was assessed by hematoxylin-eosin, Fluoro-Jade B and in vivo propidium iodide (PI) staining; expression of active caspase-3 (aCas-3) was also determined, using immunohistochemistry. The concentration-response curve of IL-1β showed a bell-shape. Only pups injected with 3 ng of IL-1β after SE showed a significant increase in the number of cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and pyknotic nuclei, as well as F-JB positive cells with respect to the vehicle group. This effect was prevented when IL-1β was injected with IL-1Ra. Injection of 3 ng of IL-1β increased the number of PI-positive cells in CA1 area after SE. Injection of 3 ng of IL-1β did not produce hippocampal cell death in rats without seizures. Active caspase-3 expression was not observed after treatments in hippocampus. The activation of the IL-1β/IL-1RI system increases necrotic neuronal cell death caused by SE in rat pups.

  16. Clitoria ternatea root extract enhances acetylcholine content in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rai, K S; Murthy, K D; Karanth, K S; Nalini, K; Rao, M S; Srinivasan, K K

    2002-12-01

    Treatment with 100 mg/kg of Clitoria ternatea aqueous root extract (CTR), for 30 days in neonatal and young adult age groups of rat, significantly increased acetylcholine (ACh) content in their hippocampi as compared to age matched controls. Increase in ACh content in their hippocampus may be the neurochemical basis for their improved learning and memory.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation leads to the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and increases susceptibility to neurodegeneration induced by proteasome inhibition in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuroinflammation and protein accumulation are characteristic hallmarks of both normal aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, the relationship between these factors in neurodegenerative processes is poorly understood. We have previously shown that proteasome inhibition produced higher neurodegeneration in aged than in young rats, suggesting that other additional age-related events could be involved in neurodegeneration. We evaluated the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation as a potential synergic risk factor for hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by proteasome inhibition. Methods Young male Wistar rats were injected with 1 μL of saline or LPS (5 mg/mL) into the hippocampus to evaluate the effect of LPS-induced neuroinflammation on protein homeostasis. The synergic effect of LPS and proteasome inhibition was analyzed in young rats that first received 1 μL of LPS and 24 h later 1 μL (5 mg/mL) of the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Animals were sacrificed at different times post-injection and hippocampi isolated and processed for gene expression analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction; protein expression analysis by western blots; proteasome activity by fluorescence spectroscopy; immunofluorescence analysis by confocal microscopy; and degeneration assay by Fluoro-Jade B staining. Results LPS injection produced the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in hippocampal neurons, increased expression of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UB2L6, decreased proteasome activity and increased immunoproteasome content. However, LPS injection was not sufficient to produce neurodegeneration. The combination of neuroinflammation and proteasome inhibition leads to higher neuronal accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, predominant expression of pro-apoptotic markers and increased neurodegeneration, when compared with LPS or lactacystin (LT) injection alone. Conclusions Our results identify neuroinflammation

  18. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits.

  19. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits. PMID:27419108

  20. Dopamine Transporter Blockade Increases LTP in the CA1 Region of the Rat Hippocampus via Activation of the D3 Dopamine Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swant, Jarod; Wagner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine has been demonstrated to be involved in the modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. As monoamine transporter blockade will increase the actions of endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters, the effect of a dopamine transporter (DAT) antagonist on LTP was assessed using field excitatory postsynaptic…

  1. Grape juice increases the BDNF levels but not alter the S100B levels in hippocampus and frontal cortex from male Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Dani, Caroline; Andreazza, Ana Cristina; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto; Kapizinski, Flávio; Henriques, João A P; Salvador, Mirian

    2017-03-02

    Several studies have shown that a high consumption of vegetables and fruits is consistently associated with a low risk of oxidative stress-induced diseases, which includes some degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer and Parkinson. Therefore, the objective of this study is to verify the effects of conventional and organic grape juice in the modulation of the neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and astrocytic markers protein (S100B) in hippocampus and frontal cortex of Wistar rats. In this study, 24 male Wistar rats were divided into three groups. To the first one, it was given organic purple grape juice; to the second, conventional grape juice, while the last one received only saline. After 30 days, all rats were sacrificed and hippocampus and frontal cortex were dissected. The animals that received organic and conventional grape juice showed, in frontal cortex, an elevated BNDF levels in relation to saline group. However, S100B levels did not change. These results showed that grape juices are able to modulate important marker in brain tissue, and could be an important factor to prevent brain diseases.

  2. Neocortical activation of the hippocampus during sleep in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Mohns, Ethan J; Blumberg, Mark S

    2010-03-03

    We recently reported that the majority of hippocampal neurons in newborn rats increase their activity in association with myoclonic twitches, which are indicative of active sleep. Because spindle bursts in the developing somatosensory neocortex occur in response to sensory feedback from myoclonic twitching, we hypothesized that the state-dependent activity of the newborn hippocampus arises from sensory feedback that sequentially activates the neocortex and then hippocampus, constituting an early form of neocortical-hippocampal communication. Here, in unanesthetized 5- to 6-d-old rats, we test this hypothesis by recording simultaneously from forelimb and barrel regions of somatosensory neocortex and dorsal hippocampus during periods of spontaneous sleep and wakefulness and in response to peripheral stimulation. Myoclonic twitches were consistently followed by neocortical spindle bursts, which were in turn consistently followed by bursts of hippocampal unit activity; moreover, spindle burst power was positively correlated with hippocampal unit activity. In addition, exogenous stimulation consistently evoked this neocortical-to-hippocampal sequence of activation. Finally, parahippocampal lesions that disrupted functional connections between the neocortex and hippocampus effectively disrupted the transmission of both spontaneous and evoked neocortical activity to the hippocampus. These findings suggest that sleep-related motor activity contributes to the development of neocortical and hippocampal circuits and provides a foundation on which coordinated activity between these two forebrain structures develops.

  3. Infusions of 3alpha,5alpha-THP to the VTA enhance exploratory, anti-anxiety, social, and sexual behavior and increase levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP in midbrain, hippocampus, diencephalon, and cortex of female rats.

    PubMed

    Frye, Cheryl A; Rhodes, Madeline E

    2008-02-11

    17beta-Estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) influence the onset and duration of sexual behavior and are also associated with changes in behaviors that may contribute to mating, such as exploration, anxiety, and social behaviors (socio-sexual behaviors). In the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA), the P4 metabolite, 5alpha-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP), modulates lordosis of E2-primed rodents; 3alpha,5alpha-THP can also influence anxiety and social behaviors. To examine if 3alpha,5alpha-THP in the VTA mediates socio-sexual behaviors, we infused 3alpha,5alpha-THP to the VTA of diestrous and proestrous rats. As expected, proestrous, compared to diestrous, rats showed more exploratory (open field), anxiolytic (elevated plus maze), pro-social (partner preference, social interaction), and sexual (paced mating) behavior and had increased E2, P4, dihydroprogesterone (DHP), and 3alpha,5alpha-THP in serum, midbrain, hippocampus, diencephalon, and cortex. Infusions of 3alpha,5alpha-THP to the VTA, but not control sites, such as the substantia nigra (SN) or central grey (CG), of diestrous rats produced behavioral and endocrine effects akin to that of proestrous rats and increased DHP and 3alpha,5alpha-THP levels in midbrain, hippocampus, and diencephalon. Levels of DHP and 3alpha,5alpha-THP, but neither E2 nor P4 concentrations, in midbrain, hippocampus, diencephalon, and/or cortex were positively correlated with socio-sexual behaviors. Thus, 3alpha,5alpha-THP infusions to the VTA, but not SN or CG, can enhance socio-sexual behaviors and increase levels in midbrain, hippocampus, and diencephalon.

  4. Increased CRE-binding activity and tryptophan hydroxylase mRNA expression induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") in the rat frontal cortex but not in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    García-Osta, Ana; Del Río, Joaquín; Frechilla, Diana

    2004-07-26

    A single administration of either 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") or p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) produced a rapid and marked reduction of serotonin (5-HT) content in rat frontal cortex and hippocampus. In the cortex of MDMA-treated rats, 5-HT levels returned to control values 48 h after drug administration. This recovery was correlated with an induction of CRE-binding activity and an enhanced expression of tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA, the rate-limiting enzyme in 5-HT biosynthesis, suggesting that MDMA may up-regulate the TPH gene through a CREB-dependent mechanism. In the cortex of PCA-treated rats, neither a recovery of 5-HT levels nor changes in DNA-binding or TPH mRNA were found at the same time point. In the hippocampus of rats receiving either PCA or MDMA a decrease in TPH mRNA levels was found at all times, along with a reduced CRE-binding at the 8-h time point. The results show region-specific effects of MDMA. In the frontal cortex, the increased TPH expression suggests a compensatory response to MDMA-induced loss of serotonergic function.

  5. 17β-Estradiol, but not estrone, increases the survival and activation of new neurons in the hippocampus in response to spatial memory in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    McClure, Robyn E S; Barha, Cindy K; Galea, Liisa A M

    2013-01-01

    Estrogens fluctuate across the lifespan in women, with circulating 17β-estradiol levels higher pre-menopause than estrone and circulating estrone levels higher postmenopause than 17β-estradiol. Estrone is a common component of hormone replacement therapies, but research shows that 17β-estradiol may have a greater positive impact on cognition. Previous studies show that acute estrone and 17β-estradiol impact hippocampus-dependent learning and cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus in a dose-dependent manner in adult female rats. The current study explores how chronic treatment with estrone and 17β-estradiol differentially influences spatial learning, hippocampal neurogenesis and activation of new neurons in response to spatial memory. Adult female rats received daily injections of vehicle (sesame oil), or a 10 μg dose of either 17β-estradiol or estrone for 20 days. One day following the first hormone injection all rats were injected with the DNA synthesis marker, bromodeoxyuridine. On days 11-15 after BrdU injection rats were trained on a spatial reference version of the Morris water maze, and five days later (day 20 of estrogens treatment) were given a probe trial to assess memory retention. Cell proliferation was assessed by the endogenous cell cycle marker, Ki67, cell survival was assessed by counting the number and density of BrdU-ir cells in the dentate gyrus and cell activation was assessed by the percentage of BrdU-ir cells that were co-labelled with the immediate early gene product zif268. There were no significant differences between groups in acquisition or retention of Morris water maze. However, the 17β-estradiol group had significantly higher, while the estrone group had significantly lower, levels of cell survival (BrdU-ir cells) in the dentate gyrus compared to controls. Furthermore, rats injected with 17β-estradiol showed significantly higher levels of activation of new neurons in response to spatial memory compared to controls. These

  6. Dual role of GABA in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Khalilov, I; Dzhala, V; Ben-Ari, Y; Khazipov, R

    1999-11-01

    The effects of modulators of GABA-A receptors on neuronal network activity were studied in the neonatal (postnatal days 0-5) rat hippocampus in vitro. Under control conditions, the physiological pattern of activity of the neonatal hippocampal network was characterized by spontaneous network-driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). The GABA-A receptor agonist isoguvacine (1-2 microM) and the allosteric modulator diazepam (2 microM) induced biphasic responses: initially the frequency of GDPs increased 3 to 4 fold followed by blockade of GDPs and desynchronization of the network activity. The GABA-A receptor antagonists bicuculline (10 microM) and picrotoxin (100 microM) blocked GDPs and induced glutamate (AMPA and NMDA)-receptor-mediated interictal- and ictal-like activities in the hippocampal slices and the intact hippocampus. These data suggest that at early postnatal ages GABA can exert a dual - both excitatory and inhibitory - action on the network activity.

  7. Changes in acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptors in rat hippocampus under cold stress

    SciTech Connect

    Fatranska, M.; Budai, D.; Gulya, K; Kvetnansky, R.

    1989-01-01

    The aim was to study the mechanism of the previously established decrease in acetylcholine (ACh) concentration in the rat hippocampus under cold stress. Male rats were exposed for 14 days to cold (5/degree/C) or kept (controls) at room temperature (24/degree/C). Acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptor binding were investigated in the hippocampus. Cold exposure resulted in a decrease of ACh concentration in the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, the potassium-evoked release of ACh from hippocampal slices was increased and an increase of maximal binding capacity of (/sup 3/H)(-) quinuclidinyl benzilate in the dorsal hippocampus of cold exposed animals was also observed. Thus the decrease of hippocampal ACh concentration under cold exposure is probably due to its increased release. On balance then, our results demonstrate that cold stress in the rat induces significant activation of the hippocampal cholinergic system.

  8. Effects of a 4 month enriched environment on the hippocampus and the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xuan; Huang, Chun-Xia; Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Li, Chen; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Lin; Xiu, Yun; Yang, Jun-Qing; Tang, Yong

    2012-07-17

    An enriched environment has been shown to enhance learning and memory and to induce morphological changes in the hippocampus. In the present study, 14-month (middle-aged) female and male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into enriched environment (EE) rats and standard environment (SE) rats. EE rats were reared in an enriched environment and SE rats were reared in a standard environment for 4 months. The spatial learning capacity was assessed with Morris water maze. The hippocampus and the myelinated fibers in the rat hippocampus were quantitatively investigated with a transmission electronic microscope technique and stereological methods. The female rats housed in an enriched environment showed improved performance in the Morris water maze. There was no significant difference in the total volume of hippocampus between SE rats and EE rats. The total length and total volume of the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of the female and male EE rats were significantly increased, respectively, when compared to the female and male SE rats. The increase of the total length of the myelinated nerve fibers in the hippocampus was mainly due to the increase of the myelinated fibers with diameters from 0.5 to 0.9 μm. Our results showed that a 4 month enriched environment had significant effects on the spatial learning capacity and the myelinated fibers in the hippocampus of middle-aged rats. The present study might provide an important theoretical basis for searching for an ethological strategy to delay the progress of brain aging in the future.

  9. Weak and nondiscriminative responses to conspecifics in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    von Heimendahl, Moritz; Rao, Rajnish P; Brecht, Michael

    2012-02-08

    Little is known about how hippocampal neurons in rodents respond to and represent conspecifics. To address this question, we let rats interact while quantifying hippocampal neuronal activation patterns with extracellular recordings and immediate-early gene (c-Fos) expression. A total of 319 single putative pyramidal neurons was recorded in dorsal hippocampus. In sessions with multiple stimulus rats, no cell responded differentially to individual rats (N = 267 cells). We did find, however, that the presence of other rats induced a significant enhancement or suppression of firing in a fraction of neurons (n = 22 of 319; 7%). As expected, a large fraction of neurons (n = 170; 53%) had place fields. There was no evidence for place-independent responses to rats. Rather, the modulations were linked to the spatial responses. While neurons did not discriminate between individual rats, they did discriminate between rats and inanimate objects. Surprisingly, neuronal responses were more strongly modulated by objects than by rats, even though subjects spent more time near their conspecifics. Consistent with the low fraction of rat-modulated cells, social encounters did not induce c-Fos expression in the hippocampus, while there was a social interaction-specific expression in the basolateral amygdala. In both interacting and non-interacting rats, the fraction of c-Fos-expressing cells in the hippocampus was very low. Our investigation of social coding in the rat hippocampus, along with other recent work, showed that social responses were rare and lacked individual specificity, altogether speaking against a role of rodent dorsal hippocampus in social memory.

  10. Red wine interferes with oestrogen signalling in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Rosário; Faria, Ana; Mateus, Nuno; Calhau, Conceição; Azevedo, Isabel

    2008-07-01

    Oestrogens have neuroprotective properties, resulting in memory and learning preservation. Red wine (RW) has been linked to neuroprotection, but mechanisms are largely unknown. The aim of this work was to test the effect of RW or 13% ethanol solution consumption on the expression of aromatase and estrogen receptors (ER) in the rat hippocampus. Beverages were supplied to male Wistar rats and after 8 weeks of treatment animals were euthanised, hippocampus was removed, aromatase expression assessed by western blotting and aromatase and ER transcription determined by RT-PCR. The effects of treatments on hippocampal aromatase activity were also determined, as well as the effect of several red wine polyphenols in hippocampal homogenates from untreated animals. Aromatase transcription was increased by ethanol (to 158+/-7%) but only significantly by RW (to 180+/-9%). No difference was found in ERalpha expression among groups, whereas RW significantly decreased ERbeta expression (to 63+/-10%). Resveratrol, quercetin, myricetin and kaempferol had no effect on aromatase activity and catechin (300 microM), epicatechin (200 microM), procyanidin extract (200 mg/L) and fractioned procyanidins (FI and FII; 200 mg/L) significantly decreased aromatase activity. The contribution of procyanidins in wine to the effect observed in aromatase was investigated in animals treated for the same period with these compounds (200 mg/L), although no effect was seen in aromatase activity, mRNA or protein levels, meaning that this group of compounds had little contribution, if any, to the effects observed. Nevertheless, the increase in aromatase expression induced by RW may corroborate the neuroprotective ability attributed to this beverage. Alterations in the relative abundance of ER expression may also play an important role in the protection.

  11. Extracellular acidic sulfur-containing amino acids and gamma-glutamyl peptides in global ischemia: postischemic recovery of neuronal activity is paralleled by a tetrodotoxin-sensitive increase in cysteine sulfinate in the CA1 of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Andiné, P; Orwar, O; Jacobson, I; Sandberg, M; Hagberg, H

    1991-07-01

    An excessive activation of the excitatory amino acid system has been proposed as one possible mediator of the ischemia-induced delayed death of CA1 pyramidal cells in the hippocampus. Using dialytrodes in the CA1 of the rat, we have investigated multiple-unit activity and extracellular changes in acidic sulfur-containing amino acids and gamma-glutamyl peptides during ischemia (20-min, four-vessel occlusion) and during 8 h of reflow. Multiple-unit activity was abolished during ischemia and for the following 1 h, but then recovered, gradually reaching preischemic levels after 8 h of reflow. Extracellular cysteate, cysteine sulfinate, and gamma-glutamyltaurine increased (1.5- to threefold) during ischemia, and extracellular glutathione and gamma-glutamylaspartate plus gamma-glutamylglutamine increased during early reflow (two- to threefold). The recovery of neuronal activity at 4-8 h was paralleled by an increase in extracellular cysteine sulfinate (2.5-fold at 8 h of reflow). Perfusion with 10 microM tetrodotoxin at 8 h of reflow abolished the multiple-unit activity and reduced extracellular cysteine sulfinate. Considering the glutamate-like properties of cysteine sulfinate, the observed postischemic increase may be involved in the development of the delayed neuronal death.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wangxin; Zhang, Quiling; Deng, Wen; Li, Yalu; Xing, Guoqing; Shi, Xinjun; Du, Yifeng

    2014-08-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a traditional Chinese medicine, which has been shown to have both anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, and noticeably decreases both the infarct area and neuronal apoptosis of the ischemic cortex. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects and mechanisms of pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum (by intragastric administration) in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Our results showed that pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum for 3 and 7 days reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampus, diminished the content of malondialdehyde in the hippocampus and serum, decreased the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8 in the hippocampus, and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase in the hippocampus and serum. These results suggest that pretreatment with ganoderma lucidum was protective against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory actions.

  13. Maternal caffeine intake affects acetylcholinesterase in hippocampus of neonate rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Rosane Souza; Richetti, Stefânia Konrad; da Silveira, Vanessa Gass; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Lara, Diogo R; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional factors and signalling molecules from intracellular metabolism modulate a complex set of events during brain development. Neurotransmitter and neuromodulator synthesis and their receptor expressions vary according to different stages of brain development. The dynamics of signalling systems is often accompanied by alterations in enzyme expression and activity. Adenosine is a neuromodulator that controls the release of several neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, which is an important neurotransmitter during brain development. Caffeine is a non-specific antagonist of adenosine receptors and can reach the immature brain. We evaluated the effects of rat maternal caffeine intake (1g/L) on acetylcholine degradation and acetylcholinesterase expression from hippocampus of 7-, 14- and 21-day-old neonates in caffeine-treated and control groups. Caffeine was not able to change the age-dependent increase of acetylcholinesterase activity or the age-dependent decrease of acetylcholinesterase expression. However, caffeine promoted an increase of acetylcholinesterase activity (42%) without modifications on the level of acetylcholinesterase mRNA transcripts in 21-day-old rats. Considering the high score of phosphorylatable residues on acetylcholinesterase, this profile can be associated with a possible regulation by specific phosphorylation sites. These results highlight the ability of maternal caffeine intake to interfere on cholinergic neurotransmission during brain development.

  14. Impairment of synaptic development in the hippocampus of diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yuki; Negishi, Takayuki; Hatakeyama, Akinori; Kawagoe, Yuta; Sawano, Erika; Tashiro, Tomoko

    2016-10-01

    Insulin receptor signaling has been shown to regulate essential aspects of CNS function such as synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. To elucidate its roles during CNS development in vivo, we examined the synaptic and cognitive development of the spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats in the present study. GK rats are non-obese models of type 2 diabetes established by selective inbreeding of Wistar rats based on impaired glucose tolerance. Though they start exhibiting only moderate hyperglycemia without changes in plasma insulin levels from 3 weeks postnatally, behavioral alterations in the open-field as well as significant impairments in memory retention compared with Wistar rats were observed at 10 weeks and were worsened at 20 weeks. Alterations in insulin receptor signaling and signs of insulin resistance were detected in the GK rat hippocampus at 3 weeks, as early as in other insulin-responsive peripheral tissues. Significant reduction of an excitatory postsynaptic scaffold protein, PSD95, was found at 5w and later in the hippocampus of GK rats due to the absence of a two-fold developmental increase of this protein observed in Wistar control rats between 3 and 20w. In the GK rat hippocampus, NR2A which is a NMDA receptor subunit selectively anchored to PSD95 was also reduced. In contrast, both NR2B and its anchoring protein, SAP102, showed similar developmental profiles in Wistar and GK rats with expression peaks at 2 and 3w. The results suggest that early alterations in insulin receptor signaling in the GK rat hippocampus may affect cognitive performance by suppressing synaptic maturation.

  15. Combined Administration of Levetiracetam and Valproic Acid Attenuates Age Related Hyperactivity of CA3 Place Cells, Reduces Place Field Area, and Increases Spatial Information Content in Aged Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Robitsek, RJ; Ratner, MH; Stewart, TM; Eichenbaum, H; Farb, DH

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory deficits associated with age-related mild cognitive impairment have long been attributed to impaired processing within the hippocampus. Hyperactivity within the hippocampal CA3 region that is associated with aging is mediated in part by a loss of inhibitory interneurons and thought to underlie impaired performance in spatial memory tasks, including the abnormal tendency in aged animals to pattern complete spatial representations. Here, we asked whether the spatial firing patterns of simultaneously recorded CA3 and CA1 neurons in young and aged rats could be manipulated pharmacologically to selectively reduce CA3 hyperactivity and thus, according to hypothesis, the associated abnormality in spatial representations. We used chronically implanted high-density tetrodes to record the spatial firing properties of CA3 and CA1 units during animal exploration for food in familiar and novel environments. Aged CA3 place cells have higher firing rates, larger place fields, less spatial information content, and respond less to a change from a familiar to a novel environment than young CA3 cells. We also find that the combination of levetiracetam (LEV) + valproic acid (VPA), previously shown to act as a cognitive enhancer in tests of spatial memory, attenuate CA3 place cell firing rates, reduce place field area, and increase spatial information content in aged but not young adult rats. This is consistent with drug enhancing the specificity of neuronal firing with respect to spatial location. Contrary to expectation, however, LEV + VPA reduces place cell discrimination between novel and familiar environments, i.e., spatial correlations increase, independent of age even though drug enhances performance in cognitive tasks. The results demonstrate that spatial information content, or the number of bits of information encoded per action potential, may be the key correlate for enhancement of spatial memory by LEV + VPA. PMID:25941121

  16. Combined administration of levetiracetam and valproic acid attenuates age-related hyperactivity of CA3 place cells, reduces place field area, and increases spatial information content in aged rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Robitsek, Jonathan; Ratner, Marcia H; Stewart, Tara; Eichenbaum, Howard; Farb, David H

    2015-12-01

    Learning and memory deficits associated with age-related mild cognitive impairment have long been attributed to impaired processing within the hippocampus. Hyperactivity within the hippocampal CA3 region that is associated with aging is mediated in part by a loss of functional inhibitory interneurons and thought to underlie impaired performance in spatial memory tasks, including the abnormal tendency in aged animals to pattern complete spatial representations. Here, we asked whether the spatial firing patterns of simultaneously recorded CA3 and CA1 neurons in young and aged rats could be manipulated pharmacologically to selectively reduce CA3 hyperactivity and thus, according to hypothesis, the associated abnormality in spatial representations. We used chronically implanted high-density tetrodes to record the spatial firing properties of CA3 and CA1 units during animal exploration for food in familiar and novel environments. Aged CA3 place cells have higher firing rates, larger place fields, less spatial information content, and respond less to a change from a familiar to a novel environment than young CA3 cells. We also find that the combination of levetiracetam (LEV) + valproic acid (VPA), previously shown to act as a cognitive enhancer in tests of spatial memory, attenuate CA3 place cell firing rates, reduce place field area, and increase spatial information content in aged but not young adult rats. This is consistent with drug enhancing the specificity of neuronal firing with respect to spatial location. Contrary to expectation, however, LEV + VPA reduces place cell discrimination between novel and familiar environments, i.e., spatial correlations increase, independent of age even though drug enhances performance in cognitive tasks. The results demonstrate that spatial information content, or the number of bits of information encoded per action potential, may be the key correlate for enhancement of spatial memory by LEV + VPA.

  17. Structural layers of ex vivo rat hippocampus at 7T MRI.

    PubMed

    Kamsu, Jeanine Manuella; Constans, Jean-Marc; Lamberton, Franck; Courtheoux, Patrick; Denise, Pierre; Philoxene, Bruno; Coquemont, Maelle; Besnard, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applied to the hippocampus is challenging in studies of the neurophysiology of memory and the physiopathology of numerous diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, ischemia, and depression. The hippocampus is a well-delineated cerebral structure with a multi-layered organization. Imaging of hippocampus layers is limited to a few studies and requires high magnetic field and gradient strength. We performed one conventional MRI sequence on a 7T MRI in order to visualize and to delineate the multi-layered hippocampal structure ex vivo in rat brains. We optimized a volumic three-dimensional T2 Rapid Acquisition Relaxation Enhancement (RARE) sequence and quantified the volume of the hippocampus and one of its thinnest layers, the stratum granulare of the dentate gyrus. Additionally, we tested passive staining by gadolinium with the aim of decreasing the acquisition time and increasing image contrast. Using appropriated settings, six discrete layers were differentiated within the hippocampus in rats. In the hippocampus proper or Ammon's Horn (AH): the stratum oriens, the stratum pyramidale of, the stratum radiatum, and the stratum lacunosum moleculare of the CA1 were differentiated. In the dentate gyrus: the stratum moleculare and the stratum granulare layer were seen distinctly. Passive staining of one brain with gadolinium decreased the acquisition time by four and improved the differentiation between the layers. A conventional sequence optimized on a 7T MRI with a standard receiver surface coil will allow us to study structural layers (signal and volume) of hippocampus in various rat models of neuropathology (anxiety, epilepsia, neurodegeneration).

  18. Inflammation and increased IDO in hippocampus contribute to depression-like behavior induced by estrogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongjun; Sheng, Hui; Tang, Zhiping; Lu, Jianqiang; Ni, Xin

    2015-07-15

    Estrogen deficiency is involved in the development of depression. However, the mechanism underlying estrogen modulates depression-like behavior remains largely unknown. Inflammation and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) have been shown to play pivotal roles in various depression models. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether estrogen deficiency-induced depression-like behavior is associated with inflammation and IDO activation in brain. The results showed that ovariectomy resulted in depression-like behavior in female rats and caused a decrease in 5-HT content and an increase in levels of IDO, IFN-γ, IL-6, toll like receptor (TLR)-4 and phosphorylated NF-κB (p65 subunit) in hippocampus but not in prefrontal cortex (PFC). 17β-Estradiol (E2) treatment ameliorated depression-like behavior and restored above neurochemical alternations in hippocampus in ovariectomized rats. Partial correlation analysis showed that the levels of phosphorylated p65, IFN-γ and IL-6 in hippocampus correlated to serum E2 level. Our study suggests that estrogen inhibits inflammation and activates of IDO and maintains 5-HT level in hippocampus, thereby ameliorating depression-like behavior.

  19. Localization and regulation of GLUTx1 glucose transporter in the hippocampus of streptozotocin diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Lawrence P.; Gorovits, Naira; Hoskin, Elena K.; Alves, Stephen E.; Katz, Ellen B.; Grillo, Claudia A.; Piroli, Gerardo G.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Charron, Maureen J.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the localization of the recently identified glucose transporter GLUTx1 and the regulation of GLUTx1 in the hippocampus of diabetic and control rats. GLUTx1 mRNA and protein exhibit a unique distribution when compared with other glucose transporter isoforms expressed in the rat hippocampus. In particular, GLUTx1 mRNA was detected in hippocampal pyramidal neurons and granule neurons of the dentate gyrus as well as in nonprincipal neurons. With immunohistochemistry, GLUTx1 protein expression is limited to neuronal cell bodies and the most proximal dendrites, unlike GLUT3 expression that is observed throughout the neuropil. Immunoblot analysis of hippocampal membrane fractions revealed that GLUTx1 protein expression is primarily localized to the intracellular compartment and exhibits limited association with the plasma membrane. In streptozotocin diabetic rats compared with vehicle-treated controls, quantitative autoradiography showed increased GLUTx1 mRNA levels in pyramidal neurons and granule neurons; up-regulation of GLUTx1 mRNA also was found in nonprincipal cells, as shown by single-cell emulsion autoradiography. In contrast, diabetic and control rats expressed similar levels of hippocampal GLUTx1 protein. These results indicate that GLUTx1 mRNA and protein have a unique expression pattern in rat hippocampus and suggest that streptozotocin diabetes increases steady-state mRNA levels in the absence of concomitant increases in GLUTx1 protein expression. PMID:11226324

  20. Gonadectomy increases neurogenesis in the male adolescent rhesus macaque hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Allen, K M; Fung, S J; Rothmond, D A; Noble, P L; Weickert, C Shannon

    2014-02-01

    New neurons are continuously produced in the subgranular zone of the adult hippocampus and can modulate hippocampal plasticity across life. Adolescence is characterized by dramatic changes in sex hormone levels, and social and emotional behaviors. It is also an age for increased risk of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, which may involve altered hippocampal neurogenesis. The extent to which testosterone and other testicular hormones modulate hippocampal neurogenesis and adolescent behavioral development is unclear. This study aimed to determine if removal of testicular hormones during adolescence alters neurogenesis in the male rhesus macaque hippocampus. We used stereology to examine levels of cell proliferation, cell survival and neuronal differentiation in late adolescent male rhesus macaques (4.6-yrs old) that had previously been gonadectomized or sham operated prior to puberty (2.4-yrs old). While the absence of adolescent testicular hormones had no effect on cell proliferation, cell survival was increased by 65% and indices of immature neuronal differentiation were increased by 56% in gonadectomized monkeys compared to intact monkeys. We show for the first time that presence of circulating testicular hormones, including testosterone, may decrease neuronal survival in the primate hippocampus during adolescence. Our findings are in contrast to existing studies in adults where testosterone tends to be a pro-survival factor and demonstrate that testicular hormones may reduce hippocampal neurogenesis during the age typical of schizophrenia onset.

  1. The hippocampus in spontaneously hypertensive rats: an animal model of vascular dementia?

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Maurizio; Catalani, Assia; Consoli, Claudia; Marletta, Nunzio; Tomassoni, Daniele; Avola, Roberto

    2002-03-15

    Hypertension is a main risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, including vascular dementia. The present study was designed to evaluate if hypertension-dependent changes of the hippocampus of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) of different ages were related with those occurring in vascular dementia. The hippocampus was chosen as the brain area involved in learning and memory. Systolic pressure was slightly increased in 2-month-old SHR in comparison with age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and augmented progressively with age in SHR. No microanatomical changes were observed in the hippocampus of SHR of 2 months in comparison with age-matched WKY rats. A limited decrease of white matter volume was observed in 4-month-old SHR. In SHR of 6 months, a reduction of grey matter volume both in the CA1 subfield and in the dentate gyrus occurred. Evaluation of phosphorylated 200-kDa neurofilament immunoreactivity revealed a decreased immune reaction area in the CA1 subfield of 6-month-old SHR compared to age-matched WKY rats and no changes in the expression and localization of the dendritic marker microtubule associated protein (MAP)-2. In 6-month-old SHR, an increase of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expression was found by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increase in number (hyperplasia), but not in size of astrocytes. These findings indicate the occurrence of cytoskeletal breakdown and astroglial changes primarily in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus of SHR of 6 months. The occurrence in the hippocampus of SHR of regressive changes and astroglial reaction similar to those occurring in neurodegenerative disorders with cognitive impairment suggests that they represent an animal model of vascular dementia.

  2. Eszopiclone and fluoxetine enhance the survival of newborn neurons in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaowei W; Li, Xiao-Yuan; Banasr, Mounira; Duman, Ronald S

    2009-11-01

    Clinical research has shown that co-administration of eszopiclone, a sedative-hypnotic sleeping agent, and fluoxetine, a serotonin uptake inhibitor, exerts an additive antidepressant action in treating patients with both depression and insomnia. Preclinical studies demonstrate that the behavioural actions of antidepressants are linked to neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus. To test the hypothesis that the additive effects of eszopiclone and fluoxetine could act via such a mechanism, the influence of combined administration of these agents on the proliferation and survival of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labelled newborn cells in the hippocampus of adult rats was determined. Chronic eszopiclone+fluoxetine co-administration significantly increased the survival, but not proliferation, of newborn neurons in dorsal hippocampus by approximately 50%, an effect greater than either drug alone. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that eszopiclone enhances the antidepressant action of fluoxetine, in part via a novel mechanism that increases the survival of newborn neurons.

  3. Berberine ameliorate oxidative stress and astrogliosis in the hippocampus of STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Hamid Kalalian; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad; Khaksari, Mehdi; Norouzi, Pirasteh; Ahooie, Malihea; Mahboobi, Fatemeh

    2014-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus increases the risk of central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as stroke, seizures, dementia, and cognitive impairment. Berberine, a natural isoquinoline alkaloid, is reported to exhibit beneficial effect in various neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Moreover, astrocytes are proving critical for normal CNS function, and alterations in their activity and impaired oxidative stress could contribute to diabetes-related cognitive dysfunction. Metabolic and oxidative insults often cause rapid changes in glial cells. Key indicators of this response are increased synthesis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as an astrocytic marker. Therefore, we examined the effects of berberine on glial reactivity of hippocampus in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats, using GFAP immunohistochemistry. Lipid peroxidation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and nitrite levels were assessed as the parameters of oxidative stress. Eight weeks after diabetes induction, we observed increased numbers of GFAP(+) astrocytes immunostaining associated with increased lipid peroxidation, decreased superoxide dismutase activity, and elevated nitrite levels in the hippocampus of STZ-diabetic rats. In contrast, chronic treatment with berberine (50 and 100 mg/kg p.o. once daily) lowered hyperglycemia, reduced oxidative stress, and prevented the upregulation of GFAP in the brain of diabetic rats. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the treatment with berberine resulted in an obvious reduction of oxidative stress and GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes in the hippocampus of STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  4. The effect of silver nanoparticles on apoptosis and dark neuron production in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-abassi, Farzaneh; Alavi, Hassan; Mohammadipour, Abbas; Motejaded, Fatemeh; Ebrahimzadeh-bideskan, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are used widely in bedding, water purification, tooth paste and toys. These nanoparticles can enter into the body and move into the hippocampus. The aim of this study was to investigate the neurotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in the adult rat hippocampus. Materials and Methods: 12 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two experimental and control groups (6 rats in each group). Animals in the experimental group received Ag-NPs (30 mg/kg) orally (gavage) for 28 consecutive days. Control group in the same period was treated with distilled water via gavage. At the end of experiment, animals were deeply anesthetized, sacrificed, and their brains were collected from each group. Finally the brain sections were stained using toluidine blue and TUNEL. Then to compare the groups, dark neurons (DNs) and apoptotic neurons were counted by morphometric method. Results: Results showed that the numbers of DNs and apoptotic cells in the CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus significantly increased in the Ag-NPs group in comparison to the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Exposure to Ag-NPs can induce dark neuron and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus. PMID:26351553

  5. Changes in labeling of soluble and solubilized hippocampus proteins after a learning experiment in rats.

    PubMed

    Popov, N; Schulzeck, S; Matthies, H

    1976-01-01

    At various intervals after acquisition of a brightness discrimination in rats labeled leucine was intraventricularly applied. Hippocampus tissue was fractionated in soluble and solubilized insoluble protein fractions. Protein content and labeling of several electrophoretically resolved bands showed a biphasic time course: a first increase was observed 20 minutes after training including preferably soluble proteins, whereas a second increase (about eight hours after training) was mainly related to solubilized insoluble proteins.

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Rat Hippocampus under Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Li, Yujuan; Zhang, Yongqian; Liu, Yahui; Deng, Yulin

    It has been found that microgravity may lead to impairments in cognitive functions performed by CNS. However, the exact mechanism of effects of microgravity on the learning and memory function in animal nervous system is not elucidated yet. Brain function is mainly mediated by membrane proteins and their dysfunction causes degeneration of the learning and memory. To induce simulated microgravity, the rat tail suspension model was established. Comparative O (18) labeling quantitative proteomic strategy was applied to detect the differentially expressed proteins in rat brain hippocampus. The proteins in membrane fraction from rat hippocampus were digested by trypsin and then the peptides were separated by off-gel for the first dimension with 24 wells device encompassing the pH range of 3 - 10. An off-gel fraction was subjected into LC-ESI-QTOF in triplicate. Preliminary results showed that nearly 77% of the peptides identified were specific to one fraction. 676 proteins were identified among which 108 proteins were found differentially expressed under simulated microgravity. Using the KOBAS server, many enriched pathways, such as metabolic pathway, synaptic vesicle cycle, endocytosis, calcium signaling pathway, and SNAREs pathway were identified. Furthermore, it has been found that neurotransmitter released by Ca (2+) -triggered synaptic vesicles fusion may play key role in neural function. Rab 3A might inhibit the membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release. The protein alteration of the synaptic vesicle cycle may further explain the effects of microgravity on learning and memory function in rats. Key words: Microgravity; proteomics; synaptic vesicle; O (18) ({}) -labeling

  7. Vortioxetine disinhibits pyramidal cell function and enhances synaptic plasticity in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Elena; Zhang, Hong; Leiser, Steven C; Xiao, Yixin; Lu, Dunguo; Yang, Charles R; Plath, Niels; Sanchez, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Vortioxetine, a novel antidepressant with multimodal action, is a serotonin (5-HT)3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, a 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and a 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor. Vortioxetine has been shown to improve cognitive performance in several preclinical rat models and in patients with major depressive disorder. Here we investigated the mechanistic basis for these effects by studying the effect of vortioxetine on synaptic transmission, long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular correlate of learning and memory, and theta oscillations in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex. Vortioxetine was found to prevent the 5-HT-induced increase in inhibitory post-synaptic potentials recorded from CA1 pyramidal cells, most likely by 5-HT3 receptor antagonism. Vortioxetine also enhanced LTP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Finally, vortioxetine increased fronto-cortical theta power during active wake in whole animal electroencephalographic recordings. In comparison, the selective SERT inhibitor escitalopram showed no effect on any of these measures. Taken together, our results indicate that vortioxetine can increase pyramidal cell output, which leads to enhanced synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Given the central role of the hippocampus in cognition, these findings may provide a cellular correlate to the observed preclinical and clinical cognition-enhancing effects of vortioxetine. PMID:25122043

  8. Vortioxetine disinhibits pyramidal cell function and enhances synaptic plasticity in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dale, Elena; Zhang, Hong; Leiser, Steven C; Xiao, Yixin; Lu, Dunguo; Yang, Charles R; Plath, Niels; Sanchez, Connie

    2014-10-01

    Vortioxetine, a novel antidepressant with multimodal action, is a serotonin (5-HT)3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, a 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and a 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor. Vortioxetine has been shown to improve cognitive performance in several preclinical rat models and in patients with major depressive disorder. Here we investigated the mechanistic basis for these effects by studying the effect of vortioxetine on synaptic transmission, long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular correlate of learning and memory, and theta oscillations in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex. Vortioxetine was found to prevent the 5-HT-induced increase in inhibitory post-synaptic potentials recorded from CA1 pyramidal cells, most likely by 5-HT3 receptor antagonism. Vortioxetine also enhanced LTP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Finally, vortioxetine increased fronto-cortical theta power during active wake in whole animal electroencephalographic recordings. In comparison, the selective SERT inhibitor escitalopram showed no effect on any of these measures. Taken together, our results indicate that vortioxetine can increase pyramidal cell output, which leads to enhanced synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Given the central role of the hippocampus in cognition, these findings may provide a cellular correlate to the observed preclinical and clinical cognition-enhancing effects of vortioxetine.

  9. Upregulation of 5-HT2C receptors in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats: antagonism by Bacopa monnieri.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Amee; Nandhu, M S; Paulose, C S

    2009-10-01

    Emotional disturbances, depressive mood, anxiety, aggressive behavior, and memory impairment are the common psychiatric features associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study was carried out to investigate the role of Bacopa monnieri extract in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epileptic rats through the 5-HT(2C) receptor in relation to depression. Our results showed upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors with a decreased affinity in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats. Also, there was an increase in 5-HT(2C) gene expression and inositol triphosphate content in epileptic hippocampus. Carbamazepine and B. monnieri treatments reversed the alterations in 5-HT(2C) receptor binding, gene expression, and inositol triphosphate content in treated epileptic rats as compared to untreated epileptic rats. The forced swim test confirmed the depressive behavior pattern during epilepsy that was nearly completely reversed by B. monnieri treatment.

  10. Effects of chronic treatment with methylphenidate on oxidative stress and inflammation in hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Shabab, Behnaz

    2016-04-21

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is a central stimulant, prescribed for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The long-term behavioral consequences of MPH treatment are unknown. In this study, the oxidative stress and neuroinflammation induced by various doses of MPH were investigated. Forty adult male rats were divided into 5 groups; and treated with different doses of MPH for 21 days. Twenty four hours after drug treatment, Open Field Test (OFT) was performed in all animals. At the end of the study, blood cortisol level (BCL) was measured and hippocampus was isolated and oxidative stress and inflammation parameters and histological changes were analyzed. Chronic MPH at all doses decreased central square entries, number of rearing, ambulation distance and time spent in central square in OFT. BCL increased in doses 10 and 20mg/kg of MPH. Furthermore, MPH in all doses markedly increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial oxidized glutathione (GSSG) level, Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNF-α) in isolated hippocampus. MPH (10 and 20mg/kg) treated groups had decreased mitochondrial reduced glutathione (GSH) content, and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRx) activities. 10 and 20mg/kg of MPH change cell density and morphology of cells in Dentate Gyrus (DG) and CA1 areas of hippocampus. Chronic treatment with high doses of MPH can cause oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in hippocampus of adult rats.

  11. COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AND MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE DORSAL HIPPOCAMPUS OF VERY OLD FEMALE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Gustavo R.; Andersen, Tomás; Pardo, Joaquín; Zuccolilli, Gustavo O.; Cambiaggi, Vanina L.; Hereñú, Claudia B.; Goya, Rodolfo G.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus, a medial temporal lobe structure necessary for the formation of spatial memory, is particularly affected by both normal and pathologic aging. In previous studies, we observed a significant age-related increase in dopaminergic neuron loss in the hypothalamus and the substantia nigra of female rats, which becomes more conspicuous at extreme ages. Here, we extend our studies by assessing spatial memory 4–6 months old (young), 26 months old (old) and 29–32 months old (senile) Sprague–Dawley female rats as well as the age-related histopathological changes in their dorsal hippocampus. Age changes in spatial memory performance were assessed with a modified version of the Barnes maze test. We employed two probe trials (PT), one and five days after training, respectively, in order to evaluate learning ability as well as short-term and longer-term spatial memory retention. A set of relevant hippocampal cell markers was also quantitated in the animals by means of an unbiased stereological approach. The results revealed that old rats perform better than senile rats in acquisition trials and young rats perform better than both aging groups. However, during short-term PT both aging groups showed a preserved spatial memory while in longer-term PT, spatial memory showed deterioration in both aged groups. Morphological analysis showed a marked decrease (94–97%) in doublecortin neuron number in the dentate gyrus in both aged groups and a reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cell number in the stratum radiatum of aging rats. Astroglial process length and branching complexity decreased in the aged rats. We conclude that while target-seeking activity and learning ability decrease in aged females, spatial memory only declines in the longer-term tests. The reduction in neuroblast number and astroglial arborescence complexity in the dorsal hippocampus are likely to play a role in the cognitive deficits of aging rats. PMID:26141841

  12. The hippocampus and flexible spatial knowledge in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J M; Vaquero, J M

    2000-12-01

    Lesions to the hippocampal system in rats result in a profound impairment of place or locale spatial learning although other learning strategies remain unaltered. The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether the spatial knowledge preserved in the hippocampal animals can be expressed flexibly under conditions different from those of the acquisition period. Rats with neurotoxic lesions to the dorsal hippocampus and sham-operated subjects were trained to reach the goal arm in a four-arm plus-shaped maze using a constant starting arm. During the training a transparent plexiglas barrier divided the maze in two equal halves in such a way that the animals could only travel from the starting arm to the goal arm, not having access to the remaining 50% of the maze. After seven days of training, a transfer test was used in which the starting arms were the two arms from which the animals had not started during the training phase. Results indicated that the lesioned rats made significantly more errors than the control subjects. But the most interesting results revealed that the kind of error made by the lesioned animals was congruent with the turn that they had to make during the acquisition phase in order to access the goal arm (reinforced). These results suggest that when the hippocampus is damaged a preserved highly inflexible egocentric strategy is employed to solve the spatial problem.

  13. Influence of prenatal noise and music on the spatial memory and neurogenesis in the hippocampus of developing rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Taeck-Hyun; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Shin, Min-Chul; Shin, Mal-Soon; Won, Ran; Shin, Hye-Sook; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2006-03-01

    During the prenatal period, the development of individual is influenced by the environmental factors. In the present study, the influence of prenatal noise and music on the spatial memory and neurogenesis in the hippocampus of developing rats was investigated. The exposure to the noise during pregnancy caused growth retardation, decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and impaired spatial learning ability in pups. The exposure to music during pregnancy, on the other hand, caused increased neurogenesis in the hippocampus and enhanced spatial learning ability in pups. The present study has shown the importance of the prenatal environmental conditions for the cognition and brain development.

  14. Effects of Asiatic Acid on Spatial Working Memory and Cell Proliferation in the Adult Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sirichoat, Apiwat; Chaijaroonkhanarak, Wunnee; Prachaney, Parichat; Pannangrong, Wanassanan; Leksomboon, Ratana; Chaichun, Amnart; Wigmore, Peter; Welbat, Jariya Umka

    2015-10-05

    Asiatic acid is a pentacyclic triterpene from Centella asiatica. Previous studies have reported that asiatic acid exhibits antioxidant and neuroprotective activities in cell culture. It also prevents memory deficits in animal models. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between spatial working memory and changes in cell proliferation within the hippocampus after administration of asiatic acid to male Spraque-Dawley rats. Control rats received vehicle (propylene glycol) while treated rats received asiatic acid (30 mg/kg) orally for 14 or 28 days. Spatial memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL) test. In animals administered asiatic acid for both 14 and 28 days, the number of Ki-67 positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus was significantly higher than in control animals. This was associated with a significant increase in their ability to discriminate between novel and familiar object locations in a novel object discrimination task, a hippocampus-dependent spatial memory test. Administration of asiatic acid also significantly increased doublecortin (DCX) and Notch1 protein levels in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that asiatic acid treatment may be a potent cognitive enhancer which improves hippocampal-dependent spatial memory, likely by increasing hippocampal neurogenesis.

  15. Effects of Asiatic Acid on Spatial Working Memory and Cell Proliferation in the Adult Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Sirichoat, Apiwat; Chaijaroonkhanarak, Wunnee; Prachaney, Parichat; Pannangrong, Wanassanan; Leksomboon, Ratana; Chaichun, Amnart; Wigmore, Peter; Umka Welbat, Jariya

    2015-01-01

    Asiatic acid is a pentacyclic triterpene from Centella asiatica. Previous studies have reported that asiatic acid exhibits antioxidant and neuroprotective activities in cell culture. It also prevents memory deficits in animal models. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between spatial working memory and changes in cell proliferation within the hippocampus after administration of asiatic acid to male Spraque-Dawley rats. Control rats received vehicle (propylene glycol) while treated rats received asiatic acid (30 mg/kg) orally for 14 or 28 days. Spatial memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL) test. In animals administered asiatic acid for both 14 and 28 days, the number of Ki-67 positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus was significantly higher than in control animals. This was associated with a significant increase in their ability to discriminate between novel and familiar object locations in a novel object discrimination task, a hippocampus-dependent spatial memory test. Administration of asiatic acid also significantly increased doublecortin (DCX) and Notch1 protein levels in the hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that asiatic acid treatment may be a potent cognitive enhancer which improves hippocampal-dependent spatial memory, likely by increasing hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:26445061

  16. Enriched environment induces higher CNPase positive cells in aged rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yu; Shi, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Hong; Chao, Feng-Lei; Huang, Chun-Xia; Gao, Yuan; Qiu, Xuan; Chen, Lin; Lu, Wei; Tang, Yong

    2013-10-25

    It had been reported that enriched environment was beneficial for the brain cognition and for the neurons and synapses in hippocampus. Previous study reported that the oligodendrocyte density in hippocampus was increased when the rats were reared in the enriched environment from weaning to adulthood. However, biological conclusions based on density were difficult to interpret because the changes in density could be due to an alteration of total quantity and/or an alteration in the reference volume. In the present study, we used unbiased stereological methods to investigate the effect of enriched environment on the total number of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) positive cells in CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus in aged rats. Our results indicated that there was significant difference in the total numbers of CNPase positive cells in both CA1 and DG between enriched environment group and standard environment group. The present study provided the first evidence for the protective effects of enriched environment on the CNPase positive cells in aged hippocampus.

  17. Caffeine consumption attenuates neurochemical modifications in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João M N; Carvalho, Rui A; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Gruetter, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes can affect hippocampal function triggering cognitive impairment through unknown mechanisms. Caffeine consumption prevents hippocampal degeneration and memory dysfunction upon different insults and is also known to affect peripheral glucose metabolism. Thus we now characterized glucose transport and the neurochemical profile in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using in vivo(1)H NMR spectroscopy and tested the effect of caffeine consumption thereupon. We found that hippocampal glucose content and transport were unaltered in diabetic rats, irrespective of caffeine consumption. However diabetic rats displayed alterations in their hippocampal neurochemical profile, which were normalized upon restoration of normoglycaemia, with the exception of myo-inositol that remained increased (36 +/- 5%, p < 0.01 compared to controls) likely reflecting osmolarity deregulation. Compared to controls, caffeine-consuming diabetic rats displayed increased hippocampal levels of myo-inositol (15 +/- 5%, p < 0.05) and taurine (23 +/- 4%, p < 0.01), supporting the ability of caffeine to control osmoregulation. Compared to controls, the hippocampus of diabetic rats displayed a reduced density of synaptic proteins syntaxin, synaptophysin and synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (in average 18 +/- 1%, p < 0.05) as well increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (20 +/- 5%, p < 0.05), suggesting synaptic degeneration and astrogliosis, which were prevented by caffeine consumption. In conclusion, neurochemical alterations in the hippocampus of diabetic rats are not related to defects of glucose transport but likely reflect osmoregulatory adaptations caused by hyperglycemia. Furthermore, caffeine consumption affected this neurochemical adaptation to high glucose levels, which may contribute to its potential neuroprotective effects, namely preventing synaptic degeneration and astrogliosis.

  18. [Pharmacological characterization of alpha 2-adrenoceptor regulated 5-HT release in the rat hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Numazawa, R

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to confirm the functional regulation of alpha 2-adrenoceptor on the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the rat hippocampus in vivo. Under several pharmacological conditions, extracellular levels of 5-HT were estimated by assaying its concentrations in the perfusion fluid through the use of high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Extracellular 5-HT in the hippocampus was reduced by tetrodotoxin, 10 microM co-perfusion and was increased by perfusion with a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, 10 microM. Addition of potassium (K+; 120 mM) to the perfusion fluid evoked an approximately 3-fold increase in 5-HT release, and a calcium free medium completely prevented this K(+)-evoked 5-HT release. Potassium-evoked 5-HT release from the hippocampus of freely moving rats was significantly and concentration-dependently inhibited when alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, UK14,304, 0.1 microM to 10 microM was added to the perfusion solution, while the output of a 5-HT major metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), remained unchanged. This action of UK14,304 was prevented by pretreatment with idazoxan, 5 mg/kg, i. p., an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. In rats that were catecholaminergically denervated with 6-hydroxydopamine, UK14,304, 10 microM also inhibited the potassium-evoked 5-HT release, but had no effect on the 5-HIAA output. The UK14,304-induced inhibition of 5-HT release was prevented by pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX). These findings suggest that 5-HT release is functionally modulated via alpha 2-adrenoceptors located on the serotonergic nerve terminals in the rat hippocampus. They also indicate the possibility that the inhibition of 5-HT release via alpha 2-adrenoceptors is linked to G-proteins which are substrates of PTX.

  19. Proteomic identification of carbonylated proteins in F344 rat hippocampus after 1-bromopropane exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Subramanian, Kaviarasan; Mohideen, Sahabudeen Sheik; Ichihara, Gaku

    2012-08-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and humans. Previous proteomic analysis of rat hippocampus implicated alteration of protein expression in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress plays a role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. To understand this role at the protein level, we exposed male F344 rats to 1-BP at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 week or 4 weeks by inhalation and quantitated changes in hippocampal protein carbonyl using a protein carbonyl assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), immunoblotting, and matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS). Hippocampal reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyl were significantly increased, demonstrating 1-BP-associated induction of oxidative stress and protein damage. MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS identified 10 individual proteins with increased carbonyl modification (p < 0.05; fold-change ≥ 1.5). The identified proteins were involved in diverse biological processes including glycolysis, ATP production, tyrosine catabolism, GTP binding, guanine degradation, and neuronal metabolism of dopamine. Hippocampal triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) activity was significantly reduced and negatively correlated with TPI carbonylation (p < 0.001; r = 0.83). Advanced glycation end-product (AGE) levels were significantly elevated both in the hippocampus and plasma, and hippocampal AGEs correlated negatively with TPI activity (p < 0.001; r = 0.71). In conclusion, 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus seems to involve oxidative damage of cellular proteins, decreased TPI activity, and elevated AGEs. -- Highlights: ► 1-BP increases hippocampal ROS levels and hippocampal and plasma protein carbonyls. ► 1-BP increases TPI carbonylation and decreases TPI activity in the hippocampus. ► 1-BP increases hippocampal and plasma AGE levels.

  20. Antidepressants modulate glycine action in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Khae Hawn; Kang, Ki-Woon; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Hun-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-12-01

    Antidepressants are drugs that relieve symptoms of depressive disorders. Fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran are different types of antidepressants, and they have widely been used for relieving of depression symptoms. In the present study, the effects of fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran on the glycine-induced ion current by nystatin-perforated patch clamp and on the amplitude of field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region by multichannel extracellular recording, MED64, system, were studied. In the present results, fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran reduced glycine-induced ion current in the hippocampal CA1 neurons in nystatin-perforated patch clamp method. These drugs enhanced the amplitude of the field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region in MED64 system. These results suggest that antidepressants may increase neuronal activity by enhancing field potential through inhibition on glycine-induced ion current.

  1. Antidepressants modulate glycine action in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Khae Hawn; Kang, Ki-Woon; Kang, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Hun-Kyung; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants are drugs that relieve symptoms of depressive disorders. Fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran are different types of antidepressants, and they have widely been used for relieving of depression symptoms. In the present study, the effects of fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran on the glycine-induced ion current by nystatin-perforated patch clamp and on the amplitude of field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region by multichannel extracellular recording, MED64, system, were studied. In the present results, fluoxetine, tianeptine, and milnacipran reduced glycine-induced ion current in the hippocampal CA1 neurons in nystatin-perforated patch clamp method. These drugs enhanced the amplitude of the field potential in the hippocampal CA1 region in MED64 system. These results suggest that antidepressants may increase neuronal activity by enhancing field potential through inhibition on glycine-induced ion current. PMID:26730381

  2. Noopept stimulates the expression of NGF and BDNF in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Zaplina, A P; Vahitova, Ju V; Salimgareeva, M H; Jamidanov, R S; Seredenin, S B

    2008-09-01

    We studied the effect of original dipeptide preparation Noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111) with nootropic and neuroprotective properties on the expression of mRNA for neurotropic factors NGF and BDNF in rat hippocampus. Expression of NGF and BDNF mRNA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was studied by Northern blot analysis. Taking into account the fact that pharmacological activity of Noopept is realized after both acute and chronic treatment, we studied the effect of single and long-term treatment (28 days) with this drug. Expression of the studied neurotropic factors in the cerebral cortex was below the control after single administration of Noopept, while chronic administration caused a slight increase in BDNF expression. In the hippocampus, expression of mRNA for both neurotrophins increased after acute administration of Noopept. Chronic treatment with Noopept was not followed by the development of tolerance, but even potentiated the neurotrophic effect. These changes probably play a role in neuronal restoration. We showed that the nootropic drug increases expression of neurotrophic factors in the hippocampus. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that neurotrophin synthesis in the hippocampus determines cognitive function, particularly in consolidation and delayed memory retrieval. Published data show that neurotrophic factor deficiency in the hippocampus is observed not only in advanced Alzheimer's disease, but also at the stage of mild cognitive impairment (pre-disease state). In light of this our findings suggest that Noopept holds much promise to prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Moreover, therapeutic effectiveness of Noopept should be evaluated at the initial stage of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Dopamine depresses cholinergic oscillatory network activity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Torsten; Veh, Rüdiger W; Heinemann, Uwe

    2003-11-01

    The dopaminergic neuronal system is implicated in cognitive processes in a variety of brain regions including the mesolimbic system. We have investigated whether dopamine also affects synchronized network activity in the hippocampus, which has been ascribed to play a pivotal role in memory formation. Gamma frequency (20-80 Hz) oscillations were induced by the cholinergic agonist carbachol. Oscillatory activity was examined in area CA3 of Wistar rat hippocampal slices, employing field potential and intracellular recordings. Application of carbachol initiated synchronized population activity in the gamma band at 40 Hz. Induced gamma activity persisted over hours and required GABAA receptors. Dopamine reversibly decreased the integrated gamma band power of the carbachol rhythm by 62%, while its frequency was not changed. By contrast, individual pyramidal cells recorded during carbachol-induced field gamma activity exhibited theta frequency (5-15 Hz) membrane potential oscillations that were not altered by dopamine. The dopamine effect on the field gamma activity was mimicked by the D1 receptor agonist SKF-383393 and partially antagonized by the D1 antagonist SCH-23390. Conversely, the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole failed to depress the oscillations, and the D2 antagonist sulpiride did not prevent the suppressive dopamine effect. The data indicate that dopamine strongly depresses cholinergic gamma oscillations in area CA3 of rat hippocampus by activation of D1-like dopamine receptors and that this effect is most likely mediated via impairment of interneurons involved in generation and maintenance of the carbachol-induced network rhythm.

  4. Effect of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate, GABA, glutamine and alanine in the rat striatum and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simos S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2007-01-01

    Taurine, a non-protein amino acid, acts as an osmoregulator and inhibitory neuromodulator in the brain. Here we studied the effects of intraperitoneal injections of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate and GABA, and their precursors, glutamine and alanine, in the rat striatum and hippocampus. Injections of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg taurine led to a gradual increase in taurine tissue concentrations in both hippocampus and striatum. Glutamate and GABA also increased in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum. Glutamine increased and alanine decreased markedly in both brain structures. The results corroborate the neuromodulatory role of taurine in the brain. Taurine administration results in an imbalance in inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the glutamatergic (hippocampus) and GABAergic (striatum) brain structures, affecting more markedly the neurotransmitter precursors.

  5. The effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular concentrations of GABA in dorsal hippocampus of male rats.

    PubMed

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Kadivar, Mehdi; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Naghdi, Nasser

    2011-11-01

    Repeated, intermittent exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine results in response enhancements to subsequent drug treatments, a phenomenon referred to as behavioral sensitization. As persistent neuronal sensitization may contribute to the long-lasting consequences of drug abuse, characterizing the neurochemical mechanisms of sensitization is providing insights into addiction. Although it has been shown that GABAergic systems in the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus are involved in morphine sensitization, the alteration of extracellular level of GABA in this area in morphine sensitization has not been investigated. In the present study, using the in vivo microdialysis technique, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular GABA concentration in CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus of freely moving rats. Sensitization was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of morphine, once daily for 3 days followed by 5 days free of the opioid treatment. The results showed that extracellular GABA concentration in CA1 was decreased following acute administration of morphine in non-sensitized rats. However, morphine-induced behavioral sensitization significantly increased the extracellular GABA concentration in this area. The enhancement of GABA in morphine sensitized rats was inhibited by administration of naloxone 30 min before each of three daily doses of morphine. These results suggest an adaptation of the GABAergic neuronal transmission in dorsal hippocampus induced by morphine sensitization and it is implied that opioid receptors may play an important role in this effect.

  6. Effect of Gingko biloba extract on scopolamine-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, M; Nickmahzar, E G; Babakordi, F

    2013-09-01

    Apoptosis, known as programmed cell death, plays a crucial role in normal development and tissue homeostasis. Apoptosis is also involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amnesia refers to the loss of memory and can also be a warning sign of neurodegenerative diseases. The antioxidant properties of Ginkgo biloba extract was known previously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on the rat's hippocampal apoptotic neurons number after Scopolamine based amnesia. Thirty-six adult male Wistar rats were used. Rats were randomly divided into control, sham, protective and treatment groups. The rats in the sham group received only scopolamine hydrobromide (3 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. The rats in the protective and treatment groups received Ginkgo biloba extract (40, 80 mg/kg) for 7 days intraperitoneally before/after scopolamine injection. Then 48 h after the last injection, the brains of rats were withdrawn and fixed with paraformaldehyde, and then, after histological processing, the slices were stained with the TUNEL kit for apoptotic neurons. Data were compared by the ANOVA Post Hoc Tukey test; P < 0.05 was considered significant. Our results showed that Scopolamine (in the sham group) increased significantly the number of apoptotic neurons in all areas of the hippocampus compared with the control. Whereas, Ginkgo biloba extract reduce the neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus before and/or after encounter with scopolamine. We concluded that pretreatment and treatment injection of Ginkgo biloba extract can have a protective effect for neurons and it can limit apoptosis in all area of the hippocampus.

  7. Anorexia Reduces GFAP+ Cell Density in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Labrada-Moncada, Francisco Emmanuel; Varman, Durairaj Ragu; Krüger, Janina; Morales, Teresa; Miledi, Ricardo; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder observed primarily in young women. The neurobiology of the disorder is unknown but recently magnetic resonance imaging showed a volume reduction of the hippocampus in anorexic patients. Dehydration-induced anorexia (DIA) is a murine model that mimics core features of this disorder, including severe weight loss due to voluntary reduction in food intake. The energy supply to the brain is mediated by astrocytes, but whether their density is compromised by anorexia is unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate GFAP+ cell density in the main regions of the hippocampus (CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus) in the DIA model. Our results showed that GFAP+ cell density was significantly reduced (~20%) in all regions of the hippocampus, except in CA1. Interestingly, DIA significantly reduced the GFAP+ cells/nuclei ratio in CA2 (−23%) and dentate gyrus (−48%). The reduction of GFAP+ cell density was in agreement with a lower expression of GFAP protein. Additionally, anorexia increased the expression of the intermediate filaments vimentin and nestin. Accordingly, anorexia increased the number of reactive astrocytes in CA2 and dentate gyrus more than twofold. We conclude that anorexia reduces the hippocampal GFAP+ cell density and increases vimentin and nestin expression. PMID:27579183

  8. Long-term intermittent feeding restores impaired GR signaling in the hippocampus of aged rat.

    PubMed

    Tesic, Vesna; Perovic, Milka; Lazic, Divna; Kojic, Snezana; Smiljanic, Kosara; Ruzdijic, Sabera; Rakic, Ljubisav; Kanazir, Selma

    2015-05-01

    Diminished glucocorticoid signaling is associated with an age-related decline in hippocampal functioning. In this study we demonstrate the effect of intermittent, every other day (EOD) feeding on the glucocorticoid hormone/glucocorticoid receptor (GR) system in the hippocampus of middle-aged (18-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) Wistar rats. In aged ad libitum-fed rats, a decrease in the level of total GR and GR phosphorylated at Ser(232) (pGR) was detected. Conversely, aged rats subjected to EOD feeding, starting from 6 months of age, showed an increase in GR and pGR levels and a higher content of hippocampal corticosterone. Furthermore, prominent nuclear staining of pGR was observed in CA1 pyramidal and DG granule neurons of aged EOD-fed rats. These changes were accompanied by increased Sgk-1 and decreased GFAP transcription, pointing to upregulated transcriptional activity of GR. EOD feeding also induced an increase in the expression of the mineralocorticoid receptor. Our results reveal that intermittent feeding restores impaired GR signaling in the hippocampus of aged animals by inducing rather than by stabilizing GR signaling during aging.

  9. Influence of Chronic Amphetamine Treatment and Acute Withdrawal on Serotonin Synthesis and Clearance Mechanisms in the Rat Ventral Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jeffrey L.; Scholl, Jamie L.; Solanki, Rajeshwari R.; Watt, Michael J.; Lowry, Christopher A.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Forster, Gina L.

    2012-01-01

    Amphetamine withdrawal in both humans and rats is associated with increased anxiety states, which are thought to contribute to drug relapse. Serotonin in the ventral hippocampus mediates affective behaviors, and reduced serotonin levels in this region are observed in rat models of high anxiety, including during withdrawal from chronic amphetamine. This goal of this study was to understand the mechanisms by which reduced ventral hippocampus serotonergic neurotransmission occurs during amphetamine withdrawal. Serotonin synthesis (assessed by accumulation of serotonin precursor as a measure of the capacity of in vivo tryptophan hydroxylase activity), expression of serotonergic transporters, and in vivo serotonergic clearance using in vivo microdialysis, were assessed in the ventral hippocampus in adult male Sprague Dawley rats at 24 hours withdrawal from chronic amphetamine. Overall, results showed that diminished extracellular serotonin at 24 hours withdrawal from chronic amphetamine was not accompanied by a change in capacity for serotonin synthesis (in vivo tryptophan hydroxylase activity), nor serotonin transporter expression or function in the ventral hippocampus, but instead was associated with increased expression and function of organic cation transporters (low affinity, high capacity serotonin transporters). These findings suggest that 24 hours withdrawal from chronic amphetamine reduces the availability of extracellular serotonin in the ventral hippocampus by increasing organic cation transporter-mediated serotonin clearance, which may represent at future pharmacological target for reversing anxiety states during drug withdrawal. PMID:23157166

  10. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the hippocampus of aged rats: influence of choline alphoscerate treatment.

    PubMed

    Amenta, F; Liu, A; Zeng, Y C; Zaccheo, D

    1994-10-01

    The present study was designed to investigate age-dependent changes of muscarcinic M1 and M2 cholinergic receptors in the rat hippocampus using radioreceptor assay and autoradiographic techniques with [3H]pirenzepine and [3H]AF-DX 116 as ligands. The analysis was performed on 2-, 12- and 27-month-old male Wistar rats, considered young, adult and old, respectively. Moreover, the influence of a 6-month treatment with choline alphoscerate on the density and pattern of M1 and M2 cholinergic receptors was assessed. Choline alphoscerate (L-alpha-glyceryl phosphorylcholine) is a precursor in the biosynthesis of several brain phospholipids which increases the availability of acetylcholine in various tissues. Muscarinic M1 cholinergic receptors were significantly decreased with increasing age whereas M2 cholinergic receptors did not show changes. Choline alphoscerate treatment countered, in part, the loss of muscarinic M1 receptor sites in old rats. Light microscope autoradiography revealed a loss of silver grains developed after exposure of sections of hippocampus to [3H]pirenzepine in the stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3 fields in rats of 12 and 27 months in comparison with young animals. Choline alphoscerate restored, in part, the decrease of silver grains noted in old rats. Quantitative analysis of the density of silver grains developed in the cell body of pyramidal neurons of CA1 and CA3 fields processed for the demonstration of muscarinic M1 receptor sites revealed a decrease of these grains in rats of 27 months in comparison with younger cohorts. These findings suggest that the reduction in muscarinic M1 sites noticeable between 2- and 12-month rats is probably dependent on the loss of nerve cells and/or terminals in these hippocampal fields rather than to a reduction of their density per neuron. Treatment with choline alphoscerate increased the expression of muscarinic M1 cholinergic receptors within the cell body of pyramidal neurons of CA1 and CA3 fields compared to

  11. Structural and functional effects of social isolation on the hippocampus of rats with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Khodaie, Babak; Lotfinia, Ahmad Ali; Ahmadi, Milad; Lotfinia, Mahmoud; Jafarian, Maryam; Karimzadeh, Fariba; Coulon, Philippe; Gorji, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Social isolation has significant long-term psychological and physiological consequences. Both social isolation and traumatic brain injury (TBI) alter normal brain function and structure. However, the influence of social isolation on recovery from TBI is unclear. This study aims to evaluate if social isolation exacerbates the anatomical and functional deficits after TBI in young rats. Juvenile male rats were divided into four groups; sham operated control with social contacts, sham control with social isolation, TBI with social contacts, and TBI with social isolation. During four weeks after brain injury in juvenile rats, we evaluated the animal behaviors by T-maze and open-field tests, recorded brain activity with electrocorticograms and assessed structural changes by histological procedures in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, CA1, and CA3 areas. Our findings revealed significant memory impairments and hyperactivity conditions in rats with TBI and social isolation compared to the other groups. Histological assessments showed an increase of the mean number of dark neurons, apoptotic cells, and caspase-3 positive cells in all tested areas of the hippocampus in TBI rats with and without social isolation compared to sham rats. Furthermore, social isolation significantly increased the number of dark cells, apoptotic neurons, and caspase-3 positive cells in the hippocampal CA3 region in rats with TBI. This study indicates the harmful effect of social isolation on anatomical and functional deficits induced by TBI in juvenile rats. Prevention of social isolation may improve the outcome of TBI.

  12. The effect of Chinese Jinzhida recipe on the hippocampus in a rat model of diabetes-associated cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the effects of treatment with Multi component Chinese Medicine Jinzhida (JZD) on behavioral deficits in diabetes-associated cognitive decline (DACD) rats and verify our hypothesis that JZD treatment improves cognitive function by suppressing the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and improving insulin signaling transduction in the rats’ hippocampus. Methods A rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) was established using high fat diet and streptozotocin (30 mg/kg, ip). Insulin sensitivity was evaluated by the oral glucose tolerance test and the insulin tolerance test. After 7 weeks, the T2DM rats were treated with JZD. The step-down test and Morris water maze were used to evaluate behavior in T2DM rats after 5 weeks of treatment with JZD. Levels of phosphorylated proteins involved in the ERS and in insulin signaling transduction pathways were assessed by Western blot for T2DM rats’ hippocampus. Results Compared to healthy control rats, T2DM rats initially showed insulin resistance and had declines in acquisition and retrieval processes in the step-down test and in spatial memory in the Morris water maze after 12 weeks. Performance on both the step-down test and Morris water maze tasks improved after JZD treatment. In T2DM rats, the ERS was activated, and then inhibited the insulin signal transduction pathways through the Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK) mediated. JZD treatment suppressed the ERS, increased insulin signal transduction, and improved insulin resistance in the rats’ hippocampus. Conclusions Treatment with JZD improved cognitive function in the T2DM rat model. The possible mechanism for DACD was related with ERS inducing the insulin signal transduction dysfunction in T2DM rats’ hippocampus. The JZD could reduce ERS and improve insulin signal transduction and insulin resistance in T2DM rats’ hippocampus and as a result improved the cognitive function. PMID:23829668

  13. Alterations of the oxidative status in rat hippocampus and prodepressant effect of chronic testosterone enanthate administration.

    PubMed

    Joksimović, Jovana; Selaković, Dragica; Jakovljević, Vladimir; Mihailović, Vladimir; Katanić, Jelena; Boroja, Tatjana; Rosić, Gvozden

    2017-03-24

    In a last few decades, anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) abuse has become serious health concern especially among adolescents. AASs abuse has been reported to be involved in pathogenesis of various mood disorders, including depression. In order to evaluate the effects of chronic (6 weeks) testosterone enanthate (TE) treatment in supraphysiological dose and exercise on depression-like behavior in rats, 32 male rats were divided into four groups: control (C), testosterone enanthate (T, 20 mg/kg/w, s.c.), exercise (E, swimming for 1 h/day), and combined group-testosterone enanthate plus exercise (T + E). TE produced prodepressant effect in tail suspension test (TST) parameters compared to the control and exercise groups, while exercise induced the opposite effect. Simultaneous TE administration along with exercise attenuated the antidepressant effect of exercise reversing the parameters of TST to the control values. Oxidative stress markers in rat hippocampus were significantly altered following applied protocols. TE administration increased index of lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and decreased superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), while exercise induced the opposite effect, with no change in glutathione (GSH) levels. Our results indicate that TE chronic treatment resulted in clear depressive-like behavior, even abolishing beneficial antidepressant effects of exercise in TST that was accompanied with increased oxidative damage in rat hippocampus. The antidepressant effect of exercise correlated with the improvement of redox status in hippocampal tissue. Behavioral parameters obtained in TST significantly correlated with the levels of oxidative stress markers.

  14. Functional Relationships between the Hippocampus and Dorsomedial Striatum in Learning a Visual Scene-Based Memory Task in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Delcasso, Sébastien; Huh, Namjung; Byeon, Jung Seop; Lee, Jihyun; Jung, Min Whan

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is important for contextual behavior, and the striatum plays key roles in decision making. When studying the functional relationships with the hippocampus, prior studies have focused mostly on the dorsolateral striatum (DLS), emphasizing the antagonistic relationships between the hippocampus and DLS in spatial versus response learning. By contrast, the functional relationships between the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) and hippocampus are relatively unknown. The current study reports that lesions to both the hippocampus and DMS profoundly impaired performance of rats in a visual scene-based memory task in which the animals were required to make a choice response by using visual scenes displayed in the background. Analysis of simultaneous recordings of local field potentials revealed that the gamma oscillatory power was higher in the DMS, but not in CA1, when the rat performed the task using familiar scenes than novel ones. In addition, the CA1-DMS networks increased coherence at γ, but not at θ, rhythm as the rat mastered the task. At the single-unit level, the neuronal populations in CA1 and DMS showed differential firing patterns when responses were made using familiar visual scenes than novel ones. Such learning-dependent firing patterns were observed earlier in the DMS than in CA1 before the rat made choice responses. The present findings suggest that both the hippocampus and DMS process memory representations for visual scenes in parallel with different time courses and that flexible choice action using background visual scenes requires coordinated operations of the hippocampus and DMS at γ frequencies. PMID:25411483

  15. Functional relationships between the hippocampus and dorsomedial striatum in learning a visual scene-based memory task in rats.

    PubMed

    Delcasso, Sébastien; Huh, Namjung; Byeon, Jung Seop; Lee, Jihyun; Jung, Min Whan; Lee, Inah

    2014-11-19

    The hippocampus is important for contextual behavior, and the striatum plays key roles in decision making. When studying the functional relationships with the hippocampus, prior studies have focused mostly on the dorsolateral striatum (DLS), emphasizing the antagonistic relationships between the hippocampus and DLS in spatial versus response learning. By contrast, the functional relationships between the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) and hippocampus are relatively unknown. The current study reports that lesions to both the hippocampus and DMS profoundly impaired performance of rats in a visual scene-based memory task in which the animals were required to make a choice response by using visual scenes displayed in the background. Analysis of simultaneous recordings of local field potentials revealed that the gamma oscillatory power was higher in the DMS, but not in CA1, when the rat performed the task using familiar scenes than novel ones. In addition, the CA1-DMS networks increased coherence at γ, but not at θ, rhythm as the rat mastered the task. At the single-unit level, the neuronal populations in CA1 and DMS showed differential firing patterns when responses were made using familiar visual scenes than novel ones. Such learning-dependent firing patterns were observed earlier in the DMS than in CA1 before the rat made choice responses. The present findings suggest that both the hippocampus and DMS process memory representations for visual scenes in parallel with different time courses and that flexible choice action using background visual scenes requires coordinated operations of the hippocampus and DMS at γ frequencies.

  16. Electrophysiological and neurochemical changes in the rat hippocampus after in vitro and in vivo treatments with cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo effects of cocaine in the noradrenergic pathway in the rat hippocampus were examined. Although the blockade of (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine-uptake by cocaine has been well-characterized in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, investigations characterizing the electrophysiological effects of cocaine in the central nervous system have been limited. The first part of this thesis examines the relationship between the ability of cocaine to potentiate the electrophysiological response to norepinephrine (NE) and the ability of cocaine to block noradrenergic high affinity uptake in rat hippocampal slices. The second part of this thesis examines the effects of the repeated administration of cocaine on noradrenergic pre- and postsynaptic function and receptors of the rat hippocampus. These studies demonstrate that after repeated administration of cocaine (10 mg/kg/day) for 8 and 14 days there is a 50% decrease in NE high affinity uptake in the rat hippocampus. This was accompanied by a 40% increase in a binding site for NE uptake inhibitors at 14 days. In contrast to these effects, there was no effect on ..beta..-adrenergic receptor number or the isoproterenol induced electrophysiological responsiveness in the rat hippocampus. The conclusion of these studies is that the repeated administration of cocaine has a greater effect on presynaptic targets in the noradrenergic system than on postsynaptic neurons.

  17. Chronic administration of resveratrol prevents morphological changes in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Monserrat Hernández-Hernández, Elizabeth; Serrano-García, Carolina; Antonio Vázquez-Roque, Rubén; Díaz, Alfonso; Monroy, Elibeth; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio; Florán, Benjamin; Flores, Gonzalo

    2016-05-01

    Resveratrol may induce its neuroprotective effects by reducing oxidative damage and chronic inflammation apart from improving vascular function and activating longevity genes, it also has the ability to promote the activity of neurotrophic factors. Morphological changes in dendrites of the pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been reported in the brain of aging humans, or in humans with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. These changes are reflected particularly in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine density. Here we evaluated the effect of resveratrol on the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC (Layers 3 and 5), CA1- and CA3-dorsal hippocampus (DH) as well as CA1-ventral hippocampus, dentate gyrus (DG), and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens of aged rats. 18-month-old rats were administered resveratrol (20 mg/kg, orally) daily for 60 days. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure, followed by Sholl analysis on 20-month-old rats. In all resveratrol-treated rats, a significant increase in dendritic length and spine density in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, CA1, and CA3 of DH was observed. Interestingly, the enhancement in dendritic length was close to the soma in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, whereas in neurons of the DH and DG, the increase in dendritic length was further from the soma. Our results suggest that resveratrol induces modifications of dendritic morphology in the PFC, DH, and DG. These changes may explain the therapeutic effect of resveratrol in aging and in Alzheimer's disease.

  18. [Anxiety level during morphine abstinence correlates with the status of nitrergic system in the rat hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Peregud, D I; Vorontsova, O N; Iakovlev, A A; Panchenko, L F; Guliaeva, N V

    2007-04-01

    Opiate addiction is accompanied by long-term structural and functional changes in brain regions persisting during abstinence, this status being an experimental model of the aberrant neuroplasticity. Nitric oxide is known to be involved in mechanisms of psychopathological events during opiate abstinence. In this study, indices of a nitregic system (nitric synthase activity--NOS, nitrites and nitrates concentration--NOx-) were measured in the rat brain region during morphine abstinence. Prior to this, the rats were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze. NOS activity increased in hippocampus 3 days after morphine withdrawal, while NOx--6 days after withdrawal. No changes of the nitrergic system could be revealed in other brain regions under study. Six days (but not 3 days) after morphine withdrawal, rats visited the open arms of the plus maze more frequently and spent more time in these arms as compared with respective controls. The data suggest that nitrergic system changes in the hippocampus may be involved in molecular mechanisms of behavioural alteration during morphine abstinence in rats.

  19. Effect of Sodium Valproate on Cognitive Function and Hippocampus of Rats After Convulsive Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Hong, Siqi; Zhong, Min; Guo, Yi; Chen, Hengsheng; Jiang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the effect and possible mechanism of sodium valproate (VPA) on the cognitive function and the hippocampus of rats after convulsive status epilepticus (CES). Material/Methods A rat model of CES was established and the Morris water maze was used to observe changes in the cognitive function of the rats after the administration of VPA. Acute hippocampal slices were made to detect field excitatory postsynaptic potential. Western blot analysis was used to test for the expression of CaMKII and p-CaMKII. Results (1) CSE caused no spatial reference memory (SFM) or spatial working memory (SWM) damage to 15-day-old (P15) rats, but caused significant SRM and SWM damage to 35-day-old (P35) rats. VPA damaged the SRM and SWM of P15 rats in both the CSE and control groups. However, VPA improved the memory damage caused by CSE in P35 rats. (2) VPA treatment in vivo increased the induced success rate and the sustainable time of long-term potentiation (LTP) in P35 rats, and also inhibited the expression of CaMKII and p-CaMKII in both P15 and P35 rats. Conclusions VPA significantly improved spatial cognitive dysfunction in a CSE model of P35 rats, and damaged the spatial memory of normal P15 and P35 rats. Improvements after administration of VPA were closely related to the increase of induced success rate and the prolongation of the sustainable time of LTP. VPA treatment in vivo, which inhibited expression and phosphorylation of CaMKII, showed no obvious inhibition on LTP, which may be related to the elution effect of VPA. PMID:28033307

  20. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators Regulate Dendritic Spine Plasticity in the Hippocampus of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    González-Burgos, Ignacio; Rivera-Cervantes, Martha C.; Velázquez-Zamora, Dulce A.; Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Some selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as raloxifene and tamoxifen, are neuroprotective and reduce brain inflammation in several experimental models of neurodegeneration. In addition, raloxifene and tamoxifen counteract cognitive deficits caused by gonadal hormone deprivation in male rats. In this study, we have explored whether raloxifene and tamoxifen may regulate the number and geometry of dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons of the rat hippocampus. Young adult male rats were injected with raloxifene (1 mg/kg), tamoxifen (1 mg/kg), or vehicle and killed 24 h after the injection. Animals treated with raloxifene or tamoxifen showed an increased numerical density of dendritic spines in CA1 pyramidal neurons compared to animals treated with vehicle. Raloxifene and tamoxifen had also specific effects in the morphology of spines. These findings suggest that raloxifene and tamoxifen may influence the processing of information by hippocampal pyramidal neurons by affecting the number and shape of dendritic spines. PMID:22164341

  1. Dynamic Change in Cells Expressing IL-1β in Rat Hippocampus after Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Satoru; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Yamano, Tsunekazu; Shintaku, Haruo

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The time course of cytokine dynamics after seizure remains controversial. Here we evaluated the changes in the levels and sites of interleukin (IL)-1β expression over time in the hippocampus after seizure. METHODS Status epilepticus (SE) was induced in adult Wistar rats by means of intraperitoneal injection of kainic acid (KA). Subsequently, the time courses of cellular localization and IL-1β concentration in the hippocampus were evaluated by means of immunohistochemical and quantitative assays. RESULTS On day 1 after SE, CA3 pyramidal cells showed degeneration and increased IL-1β expression. In the chronic phase (>7 days after SE), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)—positive reactive astrocytes—appeared in CA1 and became IL-1β immunoreactive. Their IL-1β immunoreactivity increased in proportion to the progressive hypertrophy of astrocytes that led to gliosis. Quantitative analysis showed that hippocampal IL-1β concentration progressively increased during the acute and chronic phases. CONCLUSION IL-1β affects the hippocampus after SE. In the acute phase, the main cells expressing IL-1β were CA3 pyramidal cells. In the chronic phase, the main cells expressing IL-1β were reactive astrocytes in CA1. PMID:25210490

  2. The Effect of Ascorbic Acid and Garlic Administration on Lead-Induced Neural Damage in Rat Offspring’s Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Akram; Ebrahimzadeh Bideskan, Alireza; Alipour, Fatemeh; Fazel, Alireza; Haghir, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate ascorbic acid and garlic protective effects on lead-induced neurotoxicity during rat hippocampus development. Materials and Methods: 90 pregnant wistar rats were divided randomly into nine groups: 1- Animals received leaded water (L). 2- Rats received leaded water and ascorbic acid (L+AA). 3- Animals received leaded water and garlic juice (L+G). 4-Animals received leaded water, ascorbic acid and garlic juice (L+G+AA). 5- Rats treated with ascorbic acid (AA). 6- Rats treated with garlic juice (G). 7- Rats treated with ascorbic acid and garlic juice (AA+G). 8- Rats treated with tap water plus 0.4 ml/l normal hydrogen chloride (HCl) and 0.5 mg/l Glucose (Sham). 9- Normal group (N). Leaded water (1500 ppm), garlic juice (1 ml/100g/day, gavage) and ascorbic acid (500 mg/kg/day, IP) were used. Finally, blood lead levels (BLL) were measured in both rats and their offspring. The rat offspring brain sections were stained using Toluidine Blue and photographed. Dark neurons (DNs) were counted to compare all groups. Results: BLL significantly increased in L group compared to control and sham groups and decreased in L+G and L+AA groups in comparison to the L group (P<0.05). the number of DNs in the CA1, CA3, and DG of rat offspring hippocampus significantly increased in L group in comparison to control and sham groups (P<0.05) and decreased in L+G and L+AA groups compared to L group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Garlic juice and ascorbic acid administration during pregnancy and lactation may protect lead-induced neural damage in rat offspring hippocampus. PMID:24298384

  3. Impact of sex and hormones on new cells in the developing rat hippocampus: a novel source of sex dimorphism?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Min; Konkle, Anne T. M.; Zup, Susan L.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    The hippocampus is a key brain region regulating complex cognitive and emotional responses, and is implicated in the etiology of depressive and anxiety disorders, many of which exhibit some degree of sex difference. The male rat hippocampus is consistently reported to be slightly but significantly larger than the female. The majority of studies on the development of volumetric sex differences have focused on the effects of estradiol (E2), with relatively few focusing on androgens. We examined the impact of both E2 and androgens on newly born cells in the developing rat hippocampus, and report that neonatal males have significantly more 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine-5′-monophosphate (BrdU)+ cells than females. Both testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone treatment of females significantly increased the number of BrdU+ cells, an effect blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide. However, only T significantly increased the number of neuronal nuclear antigen+ neurons in the female rat hippocampus. Interestingly, E2 treatment also increased BrdU+ cells in females, but had no effect on neuron number. Instead, E2 and T significantly increased the number of newly born glial fibrillary acidic protein or glutamine synthetase+ glial cells in females, indicating that androgens and E2 may act independently to achieve distinct endpoints. Quantification of pyknotic cells at two different developmental time points indicates no sex difference in the number of cells dying, suggesting, but not proving, that gonadal steroids are promoting cell genesis. PMID:18333959

  4. Modulation of BDNF and TrkB expression in rat hippocampus in response to acute neurotoxicity by diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Micheli, M R; Bova, R; Laurenzi, M A; Bazzucchi, M; Grassi Zucconi, G

    2006-12-13

    In this study, we examined the expression profile of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB in adult rat hippocampus following acute administration of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC), a neurotoxic compound which was previously shown to induce microglia activation and cell death. Semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis detected significant variations of BDNF mRNA levels in whole hippocampus homogenates, with a peak at 24h after DDTC injection. Increased BDNF protein expression was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in various hippocampal subfields. The most relevant increase was observed in the hilus of the dentate gyrus where BDNF levels at 120h were found to be almost four times those of basal levels. Full-length TrkB (TrkB.FL) encoding mRNA was also shown to undergo an earlier increase in the hippocampus of DDTC-treated rats. TrkB immunostaining with an antibody binding both full-length and truncated (TrkB.T) isoforms was found to increase at 120h in the hippocampal CA2 and CA3 regions. These results demonstrate that DDTC modulates the expression of BDNF and its receptor in the adult rat hippocampus and suggest a possible involvement of this neurotrophin in the protective response to DDTC-induced neuronal damage.

  5. Ketogenic diet does not change NKCC1 and KCC2 expression in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Lira, Gisela; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta Griselda; Granados-Rojas, Leticia

    2011-09-01

    In control rats, we examined the effects of ketogenic diet on NKCC1 and KCC2 expression levels in hippocampus. Neither the number of NKCC1 immunoreactive cells nor the intensity of labeling of KCC2 was found to modify in hippocampus of the rats after ketogenic diet treatment. These results indicate that ketogenic diet by itself does not modify the expression of these cation chloride cotransporters.

  6. Pharmacological characterization of alpha 2-adrenoceptor regulated serotonin release in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Numazawa, R; Yoshioka, M; Matsumoto, M; Togashi, H; Kemmotsu, O; Saito, H

    1995-06-16

    The purpose of the present study was to confirm the functional regulation by alpha 2-adrenoceptors of the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the rat hippocampus in vivo. Under several pharmacological conditions, extracellular levels of 5-HT were estimated by assaying its concentrations in the perfusate by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Extracellular 5-HT in the hippocampus was reduced by tetrodotoxin (10 microM) co-perfusion, but increased by perfusion of a selective 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (10 microM). Addition of potassium (K+, 120 mM) to the perfusion fluid evoked an approximately 3-fold increase in 5-HT release. When the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK14,304 (0.1-10 microM) was added to the perfusion solution, the K(+)-evoked 5-HT release was significantly inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner. This inhibitory action of UK14,304 was reversed by pretreatment with an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, idazoxan (5 mg/kg, i.p.). In rats which were catecholaminergically denervated with 6-hydroxydopamine, UK14,304 (10 microM) still inhibited the K(+)-evoked 5-HT release. Treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX) did not alter the K(+)-evoked release of 5-HT but abolished the inhibitory effect of UK14,304. These findings suggest that 5-HT release is functionally modulated via alpha 2-adrenoceptors located on the serotonergic nerve terminals in the rat hippocampus and furthermore, the possibility that the inhibitory of alpha 2-adrenoceptors is linked to G-proteins which are substrates of PTX.

  7. Effects of dorsal hippocampus catecholamine depletion on paired-associates learning and place learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Roschlau, Corinna; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2017-04-14

    Growing evidence suggests that the catecholamine (CA) neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline support hippocampus-mediated learning and memory. However, little is known to date about which forms of hippocampus-mediated spatial learning are modulated by CA signaling in the hippocampus. Therefore, in the current study we examined the effects of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced CA depletion in the dorsal hippocampus on two prominent forms of hippocampus-based spatial learning, that is learning of object-location associations (paired-associates learning) as well as learning and choosing actions based on a representation of the context (place learning). Results show that rats with CA depletion of the dorsal hippocampus were able to learn object-location associations in an automated touch screen paired-associates learning (PAL) task. One possibility to explain this negative result is that object-location learning as tested in the touchscreen PAL task seems to require relatively little hippocampal processing. Results further show that in rats with CA depletion of the dorsal hippocampus the use of a response strategy was facilitated in a T-maze spatial learning task. We suspect that impaired hippocampus CA signaling may attenuate hippocampus-based place learning and favor dorsolateral striatum-based response learning.

  8. Morphine and yohimbine regulate midkine gene expression in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ezquerra, Laura; Pérez-García, Carmen; Garrido, Elisa; Díez-Fernández, Carmen; Deuel, Thomas F; Alguacil, Luis F; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2007-02-28

    Pleiotrophin and midkine are two recently discovered growth factors that promote survival and differentiation of catecholaminergic neurons. Chronic opioid stimulation has been reported to induce marked alterations of the locus coeruleus-hippocampus noradrenergic pathway, an effect that is prevented when opioids are coadministered with the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine. The present work tries to examine a possible link between yohimbine reversal of morphine effects and pleiotrophin/midkine activation in the rat hippocampus by studying the levels of expression of pleiotrophin and midkine in response to acute and chronic administration of morphine, yohimbine and combinations of both drugs. Pleiotrophin gene expression was not altered by any treatment; however midkine mRNA levels were increased after chronic treatment with morphine. Chronic administration of yohimbine alone also increased midkine expression levels, whereas yohimbine and morphine administered together exhibited summatory effects on the upregulation of midkine expression levels. The data suggest that midkine could play a role in the prevention of opioid-induced neuroadaptations in hippocampus by yohimbine.

  9. Lithium Treatment Prevents Apoptosis in Neonatal Rat Hippocampus Resulting from Sevoflurane Exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue; da Li, Wen-; Yuan, Bao-Long; Niu, Li-Jun; Yang, Xiao-Yu; Zhou, Zhi-Bin; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Feng, Xia

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to observe the therapeutic effects of lithium on inhalational anesthetic sevoflurane-induced apoptosis in immature brain hippocampus. From postnatal day 5 (P5) to P28, male Sprague-Dawley pups were intraperitoneally injected with lithium chloride or 0.9 % sodium chloride. On P7 after the injection, pups were exposed to 2.3 % sevoflurane or air for 6 h. Brain tissues were harvested 12 h and 3 weeks after exposure. Cleaved caspase-3, nNOS protein, GSK-3β,p-GSK-3β were assessed by Western blot, and histopathological changes were assessed using Nissl stain and TUNEL stain. From P28, we used the eight-arm radial maze test and step-through test to evaluate the influence of sevoflurane exposure on the learning and memory of juvenile rats. The results showed that neonatal sevoflurane exposure induced caspase-3 activation and histopathological changes in hippocampus can be attenuated by lithium chloride. Sevoflurane increased GSK-3β activity while pretreatment of lithium decreased GSK-3β activity. Moreover, sevoflurane showed possibly slight but temporal influence on the spatial learning and the memory of juvenile rats, and chronic use of lithium chloride might have the therapeutic effect. Our current study suggests that lithium attenuates sevoflurane induced neonatal hippocampual damage by GSK-3β pathway and might improve learning and memory deficits in rats after neonatal exposure.

  10. Surface L-type Ca2+ channel expression levels are increased in aged hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Santana, Félix Luis; Oh, Myongsoo Matthew; Antion, Marcia Diana; Lee, Amy; Hell, Johannes Wilhelm; Disterhoft, John Francis

    2014-01-01

    Age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel (LTCC) expression in hippocampal pyramidal neurons has been hypothesized to underlie the increased Ca2+ influx and subsequent reduced intrinsic neuronal excitability of these neurons that lead to age-related cognitive deficits. Here, using specific antibodies against Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits of LTCCs, we systematically re-examined the expression of these proteins in the hippocampus from young (3 to 4 month old) and aged (30 to 32 month old) F344xBN rats. Western blot analysis of the total expression levels revealed significant reductions in both Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 subunits from all three major hippocampal regions of aged rats. Despite the decreases in total expression levels, surface biotinylation experiments revealed significantly higher proportion of expression on the plasma membrane of Cav1.2 in the CA1 and CA3 regions and of Cav1.3 in the CA3 region from aged rats. Furthermore, the surface biotinylation results were supported by immunohistochemical analysis that revealed significant increases in Cav1.2 immunoreactivity in the CA1 and CA3 regions of aged hippocampal pyramidal neurons. In addition, we found a significant increase in the level of phosphorylated Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane in the dentate gyrus of aged rats. Taken together, our present findings strongly suggest that age-related cognitive deficits cannot be attributed to a global change in L-type channel expression nor to the level of phosphorylation of Cav1.2 on the plasma membrane of hippocampal neurons. Rather, increased expression and density of LTCCs on the plasma membrane may underlie the age-related increase in L-type Ca2+ channel activity in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:24033980

  11. (R)-roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, enhances tonic GABA inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A; Tyzio, R; Zilberter, Y; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-10-02

    Pharmacological agents that mediate a persistent GABAergic conductance are of considerable interest for treatment of epilepsy. (R)-roscovitine is a membrane permeable cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, designed to block cell division. It is currently undergoing a phase II clinical trial as an anticancer drug. We show that (R)-roscovitine increases a tonic GABA-mediated current in rat hippocampal neurons. This enhanced tonic current appears independent of synaptic GABA release and requires functional transmembrane GABA transport. The effect of (R)-roscovitine is associated with neither modification of GABAA receptors nor protein kinase activity, but is associated with a significant increase in intracellular GABA concentration in hippocampal GABAergic neurons. (R)-roscovitine-induced tonic inhibition significantly suppresses spontaneous spiking activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells. Therefore, (R)-roscovitine is a potent modulator of neuronal activity in rat hippocampus and may provide a tool for preventing paroxysmal activity.

  12. Profiling Proteins in the Hypothalamus and Hippocampus of a Rat Model of Premenstrual Syndrome Irritability.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Mingqi; Sun, Peng; Wang, Yang; Wei, Sheng; Wei, Xia; Song, Chunhong; Wang, Fushun; Wu, Jibiao

    2017-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to several physical and mental symptoms (such as irritability) commonly encountered in clinical gynaecology. The incidence of PMS has been increasing, attracting greater attention from medical fields. However, PMS pathogenesis remains unclear. This study employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) for proteomic map analysis of the hypothalamus and hippocampus of rat models of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) irritability. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS) was used to identify proteins possibly related with PMS irritability. Baixiangdan, a traditional Chinese medicine effective against PMS irritability, was used in the rat model to study putative target proteins of this medicine. The hypothalamus and hippocampus of each group modelling PMS displayed the following features: decreased expression of Ulip2, tubulin beta chain 15, α actin, and interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein; increased expression of kappa-B motif-binding phosphoprotein; decreased expression of hydrolase at the end of ubiquitin carboxy, albumin, and aldolase protein; and increased expression of M2 pyruvate kinase, panthenol-cytochrome C reductase core protein I, and calcium-binding protein. Contrasting with previous studies, the current study identified new proteins related to PMS irritability. Our findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of PMS irritability and could provide a reference point for further studies.

  13. Profiling Proteins in the Hypothalamus and Hippocampus of a Rat Model of Premenstrual Syndrome Irritability

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sheng; Wei, Xia; Wu, Jibiao

    2017-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) refers to several physical and mental symptoms (such as irritability) commonly encountered in clinical gynaecology. The incidence of PMS has been increasing, attracting greater attention from medical fields. However, PMS pathogenesis remains unclear. This study employed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) for proteomic map analysis of the hypothalamus and hippocampus of rat models of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) irritability. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF-MS) was used to identify proteins possibly related with PMS irritability. Baixiangdan, a traditional Chinese medicine effective against PMS irritability, was used in the rat model to study putative target proteins of this medicine. The hypothalamus and hippocampus of each group modelling PMS displayed the following features: decreased expression of Ulip2, tubulin beta chain 15, α actin, and interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein; increased expression of kappa-B motif-binding phosphoprotein; decreased expression of hydrolase at the end of ubiquitin carboxy, albumin, and aldolase protein; and increased expression of M2 pyruvate kinase, panthenol-cytochrome C reductase core protein I, and calcium-binding protein. Contrasting with previous studies, the current study identified new proteins related to PMS irritability. Our findings contribute to understanding the pathogenesis of PMS irritability and could provide a reference point for further studies. PMID:28255462

  14. Capsaicin reduces Alzheimer-associated tau changes in the hippocampus of type 2 diabetes rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weijie; Liu, Juanhong; Ma, Delin; Yuan, Gang; Lu, Yan; Yang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a high-risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to impaired insulin signaling pathway in brain. Capsaicin is a specific transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist which was proved to ameliorate insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated whether dietary capsaicin could reduce the risk of AD in T2D. T2D rats were fed with capsaicin-containing high fat (HF) diet for 10 consecutive days (T2D+CAP). Pair-fed T2D rats (T2D+PF) fed with the HF-diet of average dose of T2D+CAP group were included to control for the effects of reduced food intake and body weight. Capsaicin-containing standard chow was also introduced to non-diabetic rats (NC+CAP). Blood glucose and insulin were monitored. The phosphorylation level of tau at individual sites, the activities of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were analyzed by Western blots. The results revealed that the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at sites Ser199, Ser202 and Ser396 in hippocampus of T2D+CAP group were decreased significantly, but these phospho-sites in T2D+PF group didn't show such improvements compared with T2D group. There were almost no changes in non-diabetic rats on capsaicin diet (NC+CAP) compared with the non-diabetic rats with normal chow (NC). Increased activity of PI3K/AKT and decreased activity of GSK-3β were detected in hippocampus of T2D+CAP group compared with T2D group, and these changes did not show in T2D+PF group either. These results demonstrated that dietary capsaicin appears to prevent the hyperphosphorylation of AD-associated tau protein by increasing the activity of PI3K/AKT and inhibiting GSK-3β in hippocampus of T2D rats, which supported that dietary capsaicin might have a potential use for the prevention of AD in T2D.

  15. Capsaicin reduces Alzheimer-associated tau changes in the hippocampus of type 2 diabetes rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weijie; Liu, Juanhong; Ma, Delin; Yuan, Gang; Lu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a high-risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) due to impaired insulin signaling pathway in brain. Capsaicin is a specific transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist which was proved to ameliorate insulin resistance. In this study, we investigated whether dietary capsaicin could reduce the risk of AD in T2D. T2D rats were fed with capsaicin-containing high fat (HF) diet for 10 consecutive days (T2D+CAP). Pair-fed T2D rats (T2D+PF) fed with the HF-diet of average dose of T2D+CAP group were included to control for the effects of reduced food intake and body weight. Capsaicin-containing standard chow was also introduced to non-diabetic rats (NC+CAP). Blood glucose and insulin were monitored. The phosphorylation level of tau at individual sites, the activities of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were analyzed by Western blots. The results revealed that the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at sites Ser199, Ser202 and Ser396 in hippocampus of T2D+CAP group were decreased significantly, but these phospho-sites in T2D+PF group didn’t show such improvements compared with T2D group. There were almost no changes in non-diabetic rats on capsaicin diet (NC+CAP) compared with the non-diabetic rats with normal chow (NC). Increased activity of PI3K/AKT and decreased activity of GSK-3β were detected in hippocampus of T2D+CAP group compared with T2D group, and these changes did not show in T2D+PF group either. These results demonstrated that dietary capsaicin appears to prevent the hyperphosphorylation of AD-associated tau protein by increasing the activity of PI3K/AKT and inhibiting GSK-3β in hippocampus of T2D rats, which supported that dietary capsaicin might have a potential use for the prevention of AD in T2D. PMID:28225806

  16. Effects of static magnetic field and cadmium on oxidative stress and DNA damage in rat cortex brain and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Amara, Salem; Douki, Thierry; Garrel, Catherine; Favier, Alain; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2011-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of co-exposure to static magnetic field (SMF) and cadmium (Cd) on the antioxidant enzymes activity and DNA integrity in rat brain. Sub-chronic exposure to CdCl (CdCl(2), 40 mg/L, per os) for 30 days resulted in a significant reduction in antioxidant enzyme activity such as the glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Total GSH were decreased in the frontal cortex of the Cd-exposed group. Cd exposure induced an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Moreover, the same exposure increased 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2-desoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) level in rat brain. Interestingly, the combined effect of SMF (128 mT, 1 hour/day for 30 consecutive days) and CdCl (40 mg/L, per os) decreased the SOD activity and glutathione level in frontal cortex as compared with the Cd group. Moreover, the association between SMF and Cd increased MDA concentration in frontal cortex as compared with Cd-exposed rats. DNA analysis revealed that SMF exposure failed to alter 8-oxodGuo concentration in Cd-exposed rats. Our data showed that Cd exposure altered the antioxidant enzymes activity and induced oxidative DNA lesions in rat brain. The combined effect of SMF and Cd increased oxidative damage in rat brain as compared with Cd-exposed rats.

  17. The longitudinal study of rat hippocampus influenced by stress: early adverse experience enhances hippocampal vulnerability and working memory deficit in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fengkui; Li, Lei; Shi, Mei; Li, Zhenzi; Zhou, Jinghua; Chen, Li

    2013-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that early adverse experience is related to learning disabilities in adults, but the neurobiological mechanisms have not yet been identified. We used longitudinal animal experiments to test the hypothesis that early life stress enhances hippocampal vulnerability and working memory deficit in adult rats. The expression of Synaptophysin (SYN) and apoptosis (Apo) in hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions were examined to evaluate the effects of environmental factors on the hippocampus. The working memory errors via radial 8-arm maze were studied to evaluate the long-term effect of early stress on rats' spatial learning ability. Our results indicated that chronic restraint stress in early life and forced cold water swimming stress in adulthood reduced SYN expression and increased Apo levels in rat hippocampus, but the hippocampal damage tended to recover when rats returned to a non-stress environment. In addition, when the rats were exposed to forced cold water swimming stress during adulthood, SYN expression (CA3 and DG regions) and Apo levels (CA3 region) in rat hippocampus showed statistical difference between early restraint stress group and non-early restraint stress group (rats exposed to stress in adulthood only). One month after the two groups of rats returned to non-stress environment, this difference of SYN expression (CA3 and DG regions) and working memory deficit between the two groups was still statistically significant. Our study findings suggested that early adverse experience enhances hippocampal vulnerability and working memory deficit in adult rats, and reduces structural plasticity of hippocampus.

  18. The Effects of L-arginine on the Hippocampus of Male Rat Fetuses under Maternal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Reza; Enant, Elham; Delaviz, Hamdollah; Rad, Parastou; Roozbehi, Amrollah; Jafari Barmak, Mehrzad; Azizi, Arsalan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prenatal stress has deleterious effects on the development of the brain and is associated with behavioral and psychosocial problems in childhood and adulthood. This study aimed to determine the protective effect of L-arginine on fetal brain under maternal stress. Methods: Twenty pregnant Wistar rats (weighting 200–230 g) were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=5 for each group). The first nonstress and stress groups received 2 mL of normal saline and the other nonstress and stress two groups received L-arginine (200 mg/kg, IP) from their 5th to 20th days of pregnancy. The pregnant rats were killed on 20th day and the brain fetuses removed and prefrontal cortical thickness, total neurons in the prefrontal cortex and in the areas of CA1, CA2, and CA3 of the hippocampus were measured and counted. Nitrite levels in the brain were measured as an indicator for nitric oxide (NO) level. Results: There was a significant decrease of mean number of pyramidal cells in the CA1 in prenatal stress group compared to nonstress and nonstress plus arginine groups. The NO level in brain tissue increased significantly in the stress plus arginine (3.8±0.4 nmol/mg) and in nonstress rats (2.9±0.3 nmol/mg) compared to the stress group (1.8±0.1 nmol/mg). Prefrontal cortical thickness decreased significantly in stress rats (1.2±0.09 mm) compared to the nonstress plus arginine (1.7±0.15 mm) and nonstress (1.6±0.13 mm) groups. Discussion: Results indicated that prenatal stress could lead to neurodegeneration of hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of rat fetuses. L-arginine as a precursor of NO synthesis had neuroprotective effect during prenatal stress and could be used an effective treatment for stress. PMID:27303594

  19. The expression of contextual fear conditioning involves activation of a NMDA receptor-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in the dorsal hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Fabri, Denise R S; Hott, Sara C; Reis, Daniel G; Biojone, Caroline; Corrêa, Fernando M A; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2014-10-01

    The dorsal portion of the hippocampus is a limbic structure that is involved in fear conditioning modulation in rats. Moreover, evidence shows that the local dorsal hippocampus glutamatergic system, nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP modulate behavioral responses during aversive situations. Therefore, the present study investigated the involvement of dorsal hippocampus NMDA receptors and the NO/cGMP pathway in contextual fear conditioning expression. Male Wistar rats were submitted to an aversive contextual conditioning session and 48 h later they were re-exposed to the aversive context in which freezing, cardiovascular responses (increase of both arterial pressure and heart rate) and decrease of tail temperature were recorded. The intra-dorsal hippocampus administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP7, prior to the re-exposure to the aversive context, attenuated fear-conditioned responses. The re-exposure to the context evoked an increase in NO concentration in the dorsal hippocampus of conditioned animals. Similar to AP7 administration, we observed a reduction of contextual fear conditioning after dorsal hippocampus administration of either the neuronal NO synthase inhibitor N-propyl-L-arginine, the NO scavenger c-PTIO or the guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ. Therefore, the present findings suggest the possible existence of a dorsal hippocampus NMDA/NO/cGMP pathway modulating the expression of contextual fear conditioning in rats.

  20. Quantitative analysis of iron concentration and expression of ferroportin 1 in the cortex and hippocampus of rats induced by cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Li, Yan-wei; Zhao, Jin-ying; Liu, Yue-Ze; Holscher, Christian

    2009-11-01

    Iron overload induced by brain ischemia has been shown to be involved in neurodegenerative disease. Little is known about the relationship between brain ischemia and ferroportin 1 (FP1). The aims of this study are: (i) to determine whether iron accumulation in the brain is induced by cerebral hypoperfusion; and (ii) to test whether expression of FP1 is influenced by cerebral ischemia. The common carotid arteries (CCA) of rats were ligated bilaterally to induce cerebral ischemia, and the iron concentration of the cortex and hippocampus was measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Iron was stained by Perl's method. The expression of FP1 mRNA and protein was shown by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical methods. The iron concentration in the cortex and hippocampus of ischemic rats had increased on day 7 (CCA7) and significantly on day 28 (CCA28) compared to control rats. More iron granules had been deposited in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus in rats with bilaterally ligated CCA on CCA7 and CCA28. In ischemic rats, FP1 expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was decreased by CCA7 and this was more marked by CCA28 compared to control rats. We therefore concluded that iron deposition in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats is induced by cerebral ischemia. Iron deposition may be attributed to the decrease in FP1 expression, and this inhibition of FP1 expression could be a major contributor to the formation of iron deposits in cerebral ischemia.

  1. Effect of exercise on synaptophysin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase levels in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of a rat model of developmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Hescham, Sarah; Grace, Laurian; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Bugarith, Kishor; Russell, Vivienne A

    2010-01-01

    Stress affects the brain differently depending on the timing, duration and intensity of the stressor. Separation from the dam for 3 hours per day is a potent stressor for rat pups which causes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, evidenced by increased plasma levels of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and glucocorticoids. Behaviourally, animals display anxiety-like behaviour while structurally, changes occur in neuronal dendrites and spines in the hippocampus and prefrontal regions involved in emotion and behaviour control. The aim of the present study was to determine whether maternal separation alters expression of synaptic markers, synaptophysin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, CaMKII, in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. A second aim was to determine whether voluntary exercise had a beneficial effect on the expression of these proteins in rat brain. Maternal separation occurred from postnatal day 2 (P2) to P14 for 3 hours per day. Exercised rats were housed in cages with attached running wheels from P29 to P49. At P65, the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were removed for protein quantification. Maternal separation did not have any effect while exercise increased synaptophysin and CaMKII in the ventral hippocampus but not in the dorsal hippocampus or prefrontal cortex. Since the ventral hippocampus is associated with anxiety-related behaviour, these findings are consistent with the fact that voluntary exercise increases anxiety-like behaviour and improves learning and memory. PMID:19821017

  2. The effects of nano-silver and garlic administration during pregnancy on neuron apoptosis in rat offspring hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ataei, Maryam Lale; Ebrahimzadeh-bideskan, Ali Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of nano-silver and garlic administration during pregnancy on neuron apoptosis in rat offspring hippocampus. Materials and Methods: Fifty pregnant wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: 1- nano-silver (N.S) group; 30 mg/kg of N.S treated via gavage. 2- Control (C) group, administrated with distilled water via gavage. 3- N.S and garlic (N.S+G) group; N.S (30 mg/kg) and garlic juice (1 ml/100 g) treated via gavage simultaneously. 4- Garlic group (G); garlic juice (1 ml/100 g) administrated via gavage, 5- normal (N) without any intervention. All the interventions were done during pregnancy (21 days). Finally, the brains of rat offspring were removed to use for nano-silver level measurement and TUNEL staining. The mean of TUNEL positive cell numbers per unit area (NA) in different regions of hippocampus were compared in all animal groups. Results: The results revealed a significant increase of hippocampus nano-silver level in N.S and N.S+G groups comparing to N group (P<0.05) and a significant decrease in nano-silver level in N.S+G group comparing to N.S group (P<0.01). The number of TUNEL positive cells in the CA1, CA3, and DG fields of rat offspring hippocampus increased in N.S and N.S+G groups comparing to other ones, and also reduced significantly in N.S+G group comparing to N.S group (¥ P< 0.01). Conclusion: Our results showed that co-administration of nano-silver and garlic during pregnancy may lead to reduce nano-silver induced apoptotic cells in their offspring hippocampus. PMID:25140202

  3. Exposure to 2.45 GHz electromagnetic fields elicits an HSP-related stress response in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Sen; He, Gen-Lin; Hao, Yu-Tong; Xiao, Yang; Chen, Chun-Hai; Zhang, Guang-Bin; Yu, Zheng-Ping

    2012-07-01

    The issue of possible neurobiological effects of the electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure is highly controversial. To determine whether electromagnetic field exposure could act as an environmental stimulus capable of producing stress responses, we employed the hippocampus, a sensitive target of electromagnetic radiation, to assess the changes in its stress-related gene and protein expression after EMF exposure. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with body restrained were exposed to a 2.45 GHz EMF at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 6 W/kg or sham conditions. cDNA microarray was performed to examine the changes of gene expression involved in the biological effects of electromagnetic radiation. Of 2048 candidate genes, 23 upregulated and 18 downregulated genes were identified. Of these differential expression genes, two heat shock proteins (HSP), HSP27 and HSP70, are notable because expression levels of both proteins are increased in the rat hippocampus. Result from immunocytochemistry revealed that EMF caused intensive staining for HSP27 and HSP70 in the hippocampus, especially in the pyramidal neurons of cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) and granular cells of dentate gyrus (DG). The gene and protein expression profiles of HSP27 and HSP70 were further confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Our data provide direct evidence that exposure to electromagnetic fields elicits a stress response in the rat hippocampus.

  4. Baicalin influences the dendritic morphology of newborn neurons in the hippocampus of chronically stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xinghua; Xu, Junmei; Zou, Dingquan; Yang, Lin; Wang, Yaping

    2013-02-25

    Chronic stress models, established in adult Sprague-Dawley rats through a 14-day subcutaneous injection of 40 mg/kg corticosterone, once per day, were given a daily oral feeding of 50 mg/kg baicalin. The study was an attempt to observe the effect of baicalin on neurogenesis in chronically stressed rats. Results showed that subcutaneous injection of corticosterone significantly decreased the total number of doublecortin-positive neurons in the hippocampus. The reduced cell number caused by corticosterone was mainly due to the decrease of class II doublecortin-positive neurons, but the class I doublecortin-positive neurons were unaffected. Baicalin treatment increased the number of both class I and class II doublecortin-positive neurons. In addition, doublecortin-positive neurons showed less complexity in dendritic morphology after corticosterone injection, and this change was totally reversed by baicalin treatment. These findings suggest that baicalin exhibits a beneficial effect on adult neurogenesis.

  5. Developmental expression of parvalbumin mRNA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

    PubMed

    de Lecea, L; del Río, J A; Soriano, E

    1995-08-01

    Parvalbumin (PARV) belongs to the family of calcium-binding proteins bearing the EF hand domain. Immunocytochemical studies in the cerebral cortex have demonstrated that neurons containing PARV include two types of GABAergic interneurons, namely, basket and axo-axonic chandelier cells. The present study examines the onset and pattern of PARV mRNA expression during the development of rat neocortex and hippocampus by means of 'in situ' hybridization with an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to rat PARV cDNA. In animals aged P0-P6 no signal was detected above background in neocortex or hippocampus. At P8, a few cortical cells displayed a number of silver grains just above background levels. By P10 PARV mRNA-expressing cells in the neocortex were detected almost exclusively in layer V of somatosensory, frontal and cingulate cortices. At P12 PARV mRNA was mainly detected in layers IV, V and VIa. By P14 there was a marked overall increase in the entire neocortex, including layer II-III, both in the number of cells and in their intensity of labelling. Further maturation in the pattern of PARV mRNA concentration was observed between P16 and P21. In the hippocampus low hybridization was observed at P10-P12. In subsequent stages both the number of positive cells and the intensity of labelling increased steadily. No clear-cut radial gradients for the expression of PARV mRNA were observed in the hippocampal region. Our results show that the developmental radial gradient followed by PARV mRNA expression in the neocortex does not follow an 'inside-out' gradient, consistent with previous immunocytochemical findings. Taken together, these data indicate that the developmental sequence followed by the PARV protein directly reflects mRNA abundance and suggest that PARV mRNA expression correlates with the functional maturation of cortical interneurons.

  6. Prenatal and lactational lead exposure enhanced oxidative stress and altered apoptosis status in offspring rats' hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaobo; Jin, Cuihong; Yang, Jinghua; Liu, Qiufang; Wu, Shengwen; Li, Dandan; Guan, Yangyang; Cai, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and apoptosis facilitation in the developing central nervous system (CNS) have been inferred as two mechanisms related to lead's neurotoxicity, and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) can promote oxidative stress and apoptosis facilitation. Few studies systematically investigated the potential relationship among oxidative stress, ROS generation, and apoptosis facilitation after lead exposure in earlier life as a whole. To better understand the adverse effect on the developing central nervous system (CNS) after lead exposure during pregnancy and lactation, the indexes of oxidative stress, apoptosis status, and Bax and Bcl-2 expression of offspring rats' hippocampus were determined. Pregnant rats were randomly divided into four groups and given free access to drinking water which contained 0 %, 0.05 %, 0.1 %, and 0.2 % Pb(AC)(2) respectively from gestation day 0 to postnatal day 21 (PND21). Results showed that ROS and malondialdehyde level of either PND7 or PND21 pups' hippocampus were significantly raised; reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity were obviously decreased following the increase of blood and brain lead level. Similar to apoptotic indexes, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased after 0.1 % and 0.2 % Pb(AC)(2) exposure, especially for the pups on PND7. Comparing with cortex, the hippocampus seemed much more sensitive to damage induced by lead. We concluded that the disruption of pro-oxidant and antioxidant balance and apoptosis facilitation could be associated with the mechanisms of neurotoxicity after lead exposure in earlier life.

  7. Rats use hippocampus to recognize positions of objects located in an inaccessible space.

    PubMed

    Levcik, D; Nekovarova, T; Stuchlik, A; Klement, D

    2013-02-01

    Rat hippocampus plays a crucial role in many spatial tasks, including recognition of position of objects, which can be approached and explored. Whether hippocampus is also necessary for recognizing positions of objects located in an inaccessible part of the environment remains unclear. To address this question, we conditioned rats to press a lever when an object displayed on a distant computer screen was in a particular position ("reward position") and not to press the lever when the object was in other positions ("nonreward positions"). After the rats had reached an asymptotic performance, the role of the dorsal hippocampus was assessed by blocking its activity with muscimol. The rats without functional dorsal hippocampus did not discriminate the reward position from the nonreward positions. Then the same rats were trained to discriminate light and dark conditions. The hippocampal inactivation did not disrupt the ability to discriminate these two conditions. It indicated that the inactivation itself had no major effect on the operant behavior and its control by visual stimuli. We conclude that rats use dorsal hippocampus for recognizing positions of objects located in an inaccessible part of the environment.

  8. Effects of vitamin A deficiency and opioids on parvalbumin + interneurons in the hippocampus of the HIV-1 transgenic rat.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ming; Bryant, Joseph; Sultana, Shireen; Jones, Odell; Royal, Walter

    2012-07-01

    Opioid use in HIV infection has been associated with an increased frequency of neurological disease and cognitive impairment and vitamin A deficiency has been linked to progressive HIV disease in drug users. In this report the potential effects of these factors, alone and in combination, on gamma amino butyric acid (GABA)-expression interneurons in hippocampus in the HIV-1 transgenic rat (TG) model were studied. TG and wild-type (WT) F344 Fisher rats deficient in vitamin A from birth were implanted either with a 37.5 mg morphine tablet or with a matching placebo and total numbers of neurons and of parvalbumin+ neurons were quantitated and parvalbumin expression was quantitated in the CA1 hippocampal region of the rats. These studies showed that total neuronal numbers were decreased in the TG versus WT Fisher rats and that this decrease was enhanced by the vitamin A deficient diet and by treatment with morphine. In contrast, there was no significant change noted in numbers of parvalbumin+ neurons. However, levels of parvalbumin expression were decreased for vitamin A deficient and morphine-treated WT rats as compared to WT rats on the normal diet and placebo-treated WT rats. For TG rats, parvalbumin expression was higher for vitamin A deficient TG rats treated with either placebo or morphine than for WT vitamin A deficient rats treated with placebo, and placebo treated vitamin A deficient TG rats showed higher expression than morphine treated vitamin A deficient rats. Expression was also higher for vitamin A deficient morphine-treated rats than for the corresponding WT rat groups and for vitamin A deficient TG rats treated with placebo. For the remaining groups, parvalbumin was similar for the TG and WT rats. These findings suggest that in hippocampus vitamin A deficiency and morphine can increase parvalbumin expression, perhaps as a manifestation of a stress response. Parvalbumin-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons regulate the primary neuronal output from

  9. The MRI contrast agent gadoteridol enhances distribution of rAAV1 in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hullinger, R; Ugalde, J; Purón-Sierra, L; Osting, S; Burger, C

    2013-12-01

    Contrast agents are commonly used in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to monitor the distribution of molecules in the brain. Recent experiments conducted in our laboratory have shown that co-infusion of recombinant Adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (rAAV5) and the MRI contrast agent gadoteridol (Gd) enhances vector transduction in the rat striatum. The goal of this study was to determine whether gadoteridol may also be used as a tool to enhance transduction efficiency of rAAV1 and rAAV5 within the rat hippocampus. We show that Gd/rAAV1-GFP but not Gd/rAAV5-GFP co-infusion results in significantly higher distribution of the transgene both in the injected hemisphere as well as in the contralateral side and adjacent areas of cortex along the injection track. We also show that Gd/rAAV1-GFP co-infusion has no deleterious effect on hippocampal function as assessed by two tests of spatial memory formation. This work indicates that Gd can be exploited as a method to increase transduction efficiency of AAV1 in the hippocampus for animal studies.

  10. Induction of autophagy in rat hippocampus and cultured neurons by iron.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Hua, Y; Song, S; Liu, W; Keep, R F; Xi, G

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy occurs in the brain after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Iron is an important factor causing neuronal death and brain atrophy after ICH. In this study, we examined whether iron can induce autophagy in the hippocampus and in cultured neurons. For in vivo studies, rats received an infusion of either saline or ferrous iron into the right hippocampus and were killed 1, 3, or 7 days later for Western blot analysis of microtubule-associated protein light chain-3 (LC3). For in vitro studies, primary cultured cortex neurons from rat embryos were exposed to ferrous iron. Cells were used for Western blot analysis of LC3 and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining 24h later. Intrahippocampal injection of ferrous iron resulted in an increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Exposure of primary cultured neurons to ferrous iron also induced an enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. MDC labeling showed an accumulation of MDC in cultured neurons exposed to ferrous iron. These results indicate that autophagy is induced by iron in neurons and that iron-induced autophagy may contribute to brain injury after ICH.

  11. Cranial irradiation modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and corticosteroid receptor expression in the hippocampus of juvenile rat.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Natasa; Djordjevic, Ana; Drakulic, Dunja; Stanojevic, Ivana; Secerov, Bojana; Horvat, Anica

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, essential for normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, exert their action on the hippocampus through two types of corticosteroid receptors: the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Recent studies report that exposure of juvenile rats to cranial irradiation adversely affects HPA axis stability leading to its activation along with radiation- induced inflammation. This study was aimed to examine the acute effects of radiation on HPA axis activity and hippocampal corticosteroid receptor expression in 18-day-old rats. Since immobilization was part of irradiation procedure, both irradiated and sham-irradiated animals were exposed to this unavoidable stress. Our results demonstrate that the irradiated rats exhibited different pattern of corticosteroid receptor expression and hormone levels compared to respective controls. These differences included upregulation of GR protein in the hippocampus with a concomitant elevation of GR mRNA and an increase in circulating level of corticosterone. In addition, the expression of MR, both at the level of protein and gene expression, was not altered. Taken together, this study demonstrates that cranial irradiation in juvenile rats leads to enhanced HPA axis activity and increased relative GR/MR ratio in hippocampus. The present paper intends to show that neuroendocrine response of normal brain tissue to localized irradiation comprise both activation of HPA axis and altered corticosteroid receptor balance, probably as consequence of innate immune activation.

  12. Chronaxie Measurements in Patterned Neuronal Cultures from Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Assaf; Moses, Elisha; Neef, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Excitation of neurons by an externally induced electric field is a long standing question that has recently attracted attention due to its relevance in novel clinical intervention systems for the brain. Here we use patterned quasi one-dimensional neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, exploiting the alignment of axons along the linear patterned culture to separate the contribution of dendrites to the excitation of the neuron from that of axons. Network disconnection by channel blockers, along with rotation of the electric field direction, allows the derivation of strength-duration (SD) curves that characterize the statistical ensemble of a population of cells. SD curves with the electric field aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the axons yield the chronaxie and rheobase of axons and dendrites respectively, and these differ considerably. Dendritic chronaxie is measured to be about 1 ms, while that of axons is on the order of 0.1 ms. Axons are thus more excitable at short time scales, but at longer time scales dendrites are more easily excited. We complement these studies with experiments on fully connected cultures. An explanation for the chronaxie of dendrites is found in the numerical simulations of passive, realistically structured dendritic trees under external stimulation. The much shorter chronaxie of axons is not captured in the passive model and may be related to active processes. The lower rheobase of dendrites at longer durations can improve brain stimulation protocols, since in the brain dendrites are less specifically oriented than axonal bundles, and the requirement for precise directional stimulation may be circumvented by using longer duration fields. PMID:26186201

  13. Morphine Withdrawal Modifies Prion Protein Expression in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Vincenzo; Martellucci, Stefano; Santilli, Francesca; Manganelli, Valeria; Garofalo, Tina; Candelise, Niccolò; Caruso, Alessandra; Sorice, Maurizio; Scaccianoce, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus is a vulnerable brain structure susceptible to damage during aging and chronic stress. Repeated exposure to opioids may alter the brain so that it functions normally when the drugs are present, thus, a prolonged withdrawal might lead to homeostatic changes headed for the restoration of the physiological state. Abuse of morphine may lead to Reacting Oxygen Species-induced neurodegeneration and apoptosis. It has been proposed that during morphine withdrawal, stress responses might be responsible, at least in part, for long-term changes of hippocampal plasticity. Since prion protein is involved in both, Reacting Oxygen Species mediated stress responses and synaptic plasticity, in this work we investigate the effect of opiate withdrawal in rats after morphine treatment. We hypothesize that stressful stimuli induced by opiate withdrawal, and the subsequent long-term homeostatic changes in hippocampal plasticity, might modulate the Prion protein expression. Our results indicate that abstinence from the opiate induced a time-dependent and region-specific modification in Prion protein content, indeed during morphine withdrawal a selective unbalance of hippocampal Prion Protein is observable. Moreover, Prion protein overexpression in hippocampal tissue seems to generate a dimeric structure of Prion protein and α-cleavage at the hydrophobic domain. Stress factors or toxic insults can induce cytosolic dimerization of Prion Protein through the hydrophobic domain, which in turn, it stimulates the α-cleavage and the production of neuroprotective Prion protein fragments. We speculate that this might be the mechanism by which stressful stimuli induced by opiate withdrawal and the subsequent long-term homeostatic changes in hippocampal plasticity, modulate the expression and the dynamics of Prion protein. PMID:28081197

  14. Early induction of secretoneurin expression following kainic acid administration at convulsant doses in the rat and gerbil hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Marti, E; Blasi, J; Ferrer, I

    2002-01-01

    The expression of secretogranin-II and its major proteolytic product secretoneurin (SN) is under the control of neuronal excitation, as demonstrated by treating rats with the excitotoxic kainic acid (KA). Differences in the structure and function of the hippocampus in rats and gerbils have been described; these suggest possible differential reactive responses to KA. In the present study, the SN immunostaining pattern in relation with cell damage is analyzed from 6 h to 4 days following KA administration in rats and gerbils. Dramatic differences in the expression of SN were found in the hippocampal complex following KA administration in gerbils and rats. A robust increase in SN immunoreactivity was detected in the pyramidal cell layer of the rat hippocampus, especially in the CA1 area. In the gerbil, however, a strong increase in SN immunostaining was detected in interneurons of the hippocampal formation, as shown by double-labeling immunohistochemistry to SN and the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin. In addition, no damage (in the hippocampal formation) or moderate damage (in the entorhinal cortex) was observed in the gerbil, in contrast to the rat. The administration of KA and the GABA-B receptor inhibitors (CGP56999A or CGP36742) to the gerbil resulted in a strong rise in SN immunoreactitivty in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus, as in the rat. However, no increased cell damage was observed under these conditions. The present data provide evidence of a species-differential reactive response to KA that might be based, in part, on distinct inhibitory intrahippocampal circuitry.

  15. Anti-inflammatory Function of Phyllostachys Edulis Extract in the Hippocampus of HIV-1 Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiaosha; Panee, Jun

    2016-01-01

    HIV induces neuroinflammation. We evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of an extract from bamboo Phyllostachys edulis in the hippocampus of HIV-1 transgenic (TG) rats. Five (5) one-month-old TG rats and 5 Fisher 344 (F344) rats were fed a control diet, another 5 TG rats were fed the control diet supplemented with bamboo extract (BEX, 11 grams dry mass per 4057 Kcal). After 9 months of dietary treatment, the gene and protein expression of interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1), and the protein expression p65 and c-Jun were analyzed in the hippocampus. Compared to the F344 rats, the TG rats fed control diet showed significantly higher protein expression of GFAP and c-Jun, and mRNA and protein levels of IL-1β. BEX supplement to the TG rats significantly lowered protein expressions of GFAP, p65, and c-Jun, and showed a trend to decrease the protein expression of IL-1β. Compared to the TG rats, TG+BEX rats also downregulated the mRNA levels of IL-1β and TNFα. In summary, neuroinflammation mediated by the NFκB and AP-1 pathways in the hippocampus of the TG rats was effectively abolished by dietary supplement of BEX. PMID:27398410

  16. Cognition Enhancing and Neuromodulatory Propensity of Bacopa monniera Extract Against Scopolamine Induced Cognitive Impairments in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T; Khanum, Farhath

    2016-05-01

    Cognition-enhancing activity of Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was evaluated against scopolamine-induced amnesic rats by novel object recognition test (NOR), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Scopolamine (2 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used to induce amnesia in rats. Piracetam (200 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used as positive control. BME at three different dosages (i.e., 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body wt.) improved the impairment induced by scopolamine by increasing the discrimination index of NOR and by decreasing the transfer latency of EPM and escape latency of MWM tests. Our results further elucidate that BME administration has normalized the neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, glutamate, 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, norepinephrine) levels that were altered by scopolamine administration in hippocampus of rat brain. BME administration also ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating AChE and up-regulating BDNF, muscarinic M1 receptor and CREB expression in brain hippocampus confirms the potent neuroprotective role and these results are in corroboration with the earlier in vitro studies. BME administration showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant and lipid peroxidation. These results indicate that, cognition-enhancing and neuromodulatory propensity of BME is through modulating the expression of AChE, BDNF, MUS-1, CREB and also by altering the levels of neurotransmitters in hippocampus of rat brain.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of Withania coagulans root extract on CA1 hippocampus following cerebral ischemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarbishegi, Maryam; Heidari, Zahra; Mahmoudzadeh- Sagheb, Hamidreza; Valizadeh, Moharram; Doostkami, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oxygen free radicals may be implicated in the pathogenesis of ischemia reperfusion damage. The beneficial effects of antioxidant nutrients, as well as complex plant extracts, on cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injuries are well known. This study was conducted to determine the effects of the hydro-alcoholic root extract of Withania coagulans on CA1 hippocampus oxidative damages following global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion in rat. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided in five groups: control, sham operated, Ischemia/ Reperfiusion (IR), and Withania Coagulans Extract (WCE) 500 and 1000mg/kg + I/R groups. Ischemia was induced by ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries for 30 min after 30 days of WCE administration. Three days after, the animals were sacrificed, their brains were fixed for histological analysis (NISSL and TUNEL staining) and some samples were prepared for measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in hippocampus. Results: WCE showed neuroprotective activity by significant decrease in MDA level and increase in the SOD, CAT and GPx activity in pretreated groups as compared to I/R groups (p<0.001). The number of intact neurons was increased while the number of TUNEL positive neurons in CA1 hippocampal region in pretreated groups were decreased as compared to I/R group (p<0.001). Conclusion: WCE showed potent neuroprotective activity against oxidative stress-induced injuries caused by global cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion in rats probably by radical scavenging and antioxidant activities. PMID:27516980

  18. Effect of zinc supplementation on neuronal precursor proliferation in the rat hippocampus after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Cope, Elise C; Morris, Deborah R; Gower-Winter, Shannon D; Brownstein, Naomi C; Levenson, Cathy W

    2016-05-01

    There is great deal of debate about the possible role of adult-born hippocampal cells in the prevention of depression and related mood disorders. We first showed that zinc supplementation prevents the development of the depression-like behavior anhedonia associated with an animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). This work then examined the effect of zinc supplementation on the proliferation of new cells in the hippocampus that have the potential to participate in neurogenesis. Rats were fed a zinc adequate (ZA, 30ppm) or zinc supplemented (ZS, 180ppm) diet for 4wk followed by TBI using controlled cortical impact. Stereological counts of EdU-positive cells showed that TBI doubled the density of proliferating cells 24h post-injury (p<0.05), and supplemental zinc significantly increased this by an additional 2-fold (p<0.0001). While the survival of these proliferating cells decreased at the same rate in ZA and in ZS rats after injury, the total density of newly born cells was approximately 60% higher in supplemented rats 1wk after TBI. Furthermore, chronic zinc supplementation resulted in significant increases in the density of new doublecortin-positive neurons one week post-TBI that were maintained for 4wk after injury (p<0.01). While the effect of zinc supplementation on neuronal precursor cells in the hippocampus was robust, use of targeted irradiation to eliminate these cells after zinc supplementation and TBI revealed that these cells are not the sole mechanism through which zinc acts to prevent depression associated with brain injury, and suggest that other zinc dependent mechanisms are needed for the anti-depressant effect of zinc in this model of TBI.

  19. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment reduces mercury-induced neurotoxicity in the developing rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Lin, Lulu; Sokolowski, Katie; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Buckley, Brian; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is an environmental toxicant that can disrupt brain development. However, while progress has been made in defining its neurotoxic effects, we know far less about available therapies that can effectively protect brain in exposed individuals. We previously developed an animal model in which we defined the sequence of events underlying neurotoxicity: Methylmercury (MeHg) injection in postnatal rat acutely induced inhibition of mitosis and stimulated apoptosis in the hippocampus, that later resulted in intermediate term deficits in structure size and cell number. NAC is the N-acetyl derivative of L-cysteine used clinically for treatment of drug intoxication. Here, based on its known efficacy in promoting MeHg urinary excretion, we evaluated NAC for protective effects in the developing brain. In immature neurons and precursors MeHg (3µM) induced a >50% decrease in DNA synthesis at 24hr, an effect that was completely blocked by NAC co-incubation. In vivo, injection of MeHg (5µg/gbw) into 7 day-old rats induced a 22% decrease in DNA synthesis in whole hippocampus and a 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3 immunoreactive cells at 24hr, and reduced total cell numbers by 13% at 3 weeks. Treatment of MeHg exposed rats with repeated injections of NAC abolished MeHg toxicity. NAC prevented the reduction in DNA synthesis and the marked increase in caspase-3 immunoreactivity. Moreover, the intermediate term decrease in hippocampal cell number provoked by MeHg was fully blocked by NAC. Altogether, these results suggest that MeHg toxicity in the perinatal brain can be ameliorated by using NAC, opening potential avenues for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22420031

  20. Variations of ATP and its metabolites in the hippocampus of rats subjected to pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Doná, Flávia; Conceição, Isaltino Marcelo; Ulrich, Henning; Ribeiro, Eliane Beraldi; Freitas, Thalma Ariani; Nencioni, Ana Leonor Abrahao; da Silva Fernandes, Maria José

    2016-06-01

    Although purinergic receptor activity has lately been associated with epilepsy, little is known about the exact role of purines in epileptogenesis. We have used a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy induced by pilocarpine to study the dynamics of purine metabolism in the hippocampus during different times of status epilepticus (SE) and the chronic phase. Concentrations of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP), and adenosine in normal and epileptic rat hippocampus were determined by microdialysis in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Extracellular ATP concentrations did not vary along 4 h of SE onset. However, AMP concentration was elevated during the second hour, whereas ADP and adenosine concentrations augmented during the third and fourth hour following SE. During chronic phase, extracellular ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine concentrations decreased, although these levels again increased significantly during spontaneous seizures. These results suggest that the increased turnover of ATP during the acute period is a compensatory mechanism able to reduce the excitatory role of ATP. Increased adenosine levels following 4 h of SE may contribute to block seizures. On the other hand, the reduction of purine levels in the hippocampus of chronic epileptic rats may result from metabolic changes and be part of the mechanisms involved in the onset of spontaneous seizures. This work provides further insights into purinergic signaling during establishment and chronic phase of epilepsy.

  1. The representation of space and the hippocampus in rats, robots and humans.

    PubMed

    Burgess, N; Donnett, J G; O'Keefe, J

    1998-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that the hippocampus represents locations within an allocentric representation of space. The environmental inputs that underlie the rat's representation of its own location within an environment (in the firing of place cells) are the distances to walls, and different walls are identified by their allocentric direction from the rat. We propose that the locations of goals in an environment is stored downstream of the place cells, in the subiculum. In addition to firing rate coding, place cells may use phase coding relative to the theta rhythm of the EEG. In some circumstances path integration may be used, in addition to environmental information, as an input to the hippocampal system. A detailed computational model of the hippocampus successfully guides the navigation of a mobile robot. The model's behaviour is compared to electrophysiological and behavioural data in rats, and implications for the role of the hippocampus in primates are explored.

  2. Basic properties of somatosensory-evoked responses in the dorsal hippocampus of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bellistri, Elisa; Aguilar, Juan; Brotons-Mas, Jorge R; Foffani, Guglielmo; de la Prida, Liset Menendez

    2013-01-01

    The hippocampus is a pivotal structure for episodic memory function. This ability relies on the possibility of integrating different features of sensory stimuli with the spatio-temporal context in which they occur. While recent studies now suggest that somatosensory information is already processed by the hippocampus, the basic mechanisms still remain unexplored. Here, we used electrical stimulation of the paws, the whisker pad or the medial lemniscus to probe the somatosensory pathway to the hippocampus in the anaesthetized rat, and multisite electrodes, in combination with tetrode and intracellular recordings, to look at the properties of somatosensory hippocampal responses. We found that peripheral and lemniscal stimulation elicited small local field potential responses in the dorsal hippocampus about 35–40 ms post-stimulus. Current source density analysis established the local nature of these responses, revealing associated synaptic sinks that were consistently confined to the molecular layer (ML) of the dentate gyrus (DG), with less regular activation of the CA1 stratum lacunosum moleculare (SLM). A delayed (40–45 ms), potentially active, current source that outlasted the SLM sink was present in about 50% cases around the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Somatosensory stimulation resulted in multi-unit firing increases in the majority of DG responses (79%), whereas multi-unit firing suppression was observed in the majority of CA1 responses (62%). Tetrode and intracellular recordings of individual cells confirmed different firing modulation in the DG and the CA1 region, and verified the active nature of both the early ML sink and delayed somatic CA1 source. Hippocampal responses to somatosensory stimuli were dependent on fluctuations in the strength and composition of synaptic inputs due to changes of the ongoing local (hippocampal) and distant (cortical) state. We conclude that somatosensory signals reach the hippocampus mainly from layer II entorhinal cortex to

  3. Fucose incorporation into rat hippocampus structures after acquisition of a brightness discrimination. A histoautoradiographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pohle, W; Rüthrich, H L; Popov, N; Matthies, H

    1979-01-01

    Using a brigthness discrimination model in rats, the labeling of discrete hippocampus formation structures was studied after intraventricular application of [3H]-fucose. This substance was injected 5 min before training as well as 5 min, 3, 7 and 23 h after training, the pulse period lasting 120 min in all cases. A significantly training-related enhanced labeling of CA1, CA3 and CA4 cell bodies and fibres revealed that a biphasic time course occurring when radioactive fucose was applied 5 min before training and 7 h after training, whereas the increased labeling of area dentata structures was evidenced only after application of radioactive fucose 5 min before and after training. In all structures under investigation the training-related increase in labeling was more pronounced in the fibre layers than in the pyramidal and granular cell bodies.

  4. Ethanol Affects Network Activity in Cultured Rat Hippocampus: Mediation by Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Korkotian, Eduard; Bombela, Tatyana; Odegova, Tatiana; Zubov, Petr; Segal, Menahem

    2013-01-01

    The effects of ethanol on neuronal network activity were studied in dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus. Exposure to low (0.25–0.5%) ethanol concentrations caused an increase in synchronized network spikes, and a decrease in the duration of individual spikes. Ethanol also caused an increase in rate of miniature spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Higher concentrations of ethanol eliminated network spikes. These effects were reversible upon wash. The effects of the high, but not the low ethanol were blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline. The enhancing action of low ethanol was blocked by apamin, an SK potassium channel antagonist, and mimicked by 1-EBIO, an SK channel opener. It is proposed that in cultured hippocampal networks low concentration of ethanol is associated with SK channel activity, rather than the GABAergic receptor. PMID:24260098

  5. Poppy seed oil protection of the hippocampus after cerebral ischemia and re-perfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Cevik-Demirkan, A; Oztaşan, N; Oguzhan, E O; Cil, N; Coskun, S

    2012-11-01

    The brain is highly sensitive to hypoxia; this is true particularly of parts that are crucial for cognitive function. The effects of hypoxia are especially dramatic in the hippocampus. We evaluated the potential protective effects of poppy seed oil on the number of hippocampus cells and the serum antioxidant/oxidant status after cerebral ischemia and re-perfusion (CIR). Eighteen rats were divided into three equal groups. Group 1 served as the control group without CIR. Group 2 received poppy seed oil daily by oral gavage at a dose of 0.4 ml/kg, while group 3 was given 0.4 ml/kg saline solution by oral gavage per day; these treatments were continued for one month. Groups 2 and 3 were subjected to CIR induced by clamps on two points of both of the carotid arteries for 45 min followed by 45 min re-perfusion. There were significant decreases in the number of hippocampus cells between groups 1 and 2, and between groups 1 and 3. The mean cell number in group 2 was not significantly different from that of group 3. The serum nitric oxide levels in CIR groups were elevated significantly compared to controls, and were significantly higher in group 2 than in group 3. The glutathione levels were increased significantly in the poppy seed oil treated group compared to the saline CIR groups. The malondialdehyde levels were markedly increased in group 3 compared to both groups 1 and 2. Our study suggests that poppy seed oil can improve antioxidant defense capacity after CIR, although this treatment did not alter significantly the frequency of cell death.

  6. Dynamic expression of the polysialyltransferase in adult rat hippocampus performing an olfactory associative task.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Christine; Migliorati, Martine; Gilbert, Valérie; Brezun, Jean-Michel; Chaillan, Franck A; Truchet, Bruno; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Guiraudie-Capraz, Gaëlle; Roman, François S

    2014-08-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is associated with polysialic acid (PSA), and its function is highly dependent on the extent of polysialylation through the activity of two polysialyltransferases, sialyltransferase-X (STX) and polysialyltransferase (PST). PSA-NCAM plays an important role in synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. The involvement of STX and PST during mnesic processes was assessed in the adult rat hippocampus. We investigated whether different levels in learning and memory using an olfactory associative task influenced STX and PST gene expression in the hippocampus using semiquantitative transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Then, NCAM polysialylation and cell proliferation were quantified in the dentate gyrus of a "Learning and Memory" group using immunohistochemistry. We found that only the expression level of PST mRNA increased with learning performance and returned to an initial level when learned associations were consolidated in long-term memory, while STX mRNA levels remained unchanged. This phenomenon was accompanied by an increase in PSA on NCAM but not by cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus. Our results suggest a different involvement for STX and PST in neural plasticity: while STX is probably involved in the proliferation of neural progenitor cells, PST could play a key role in synaptic plasticity of mature neural networks. The expression of the STX and PST genes could, therefore, be useful markers of neurobiological plasticity in the brain, allowing to follow chronological events in limbic and cortical structures related first to learning and memory processes (for PST) and, second, to adult neurogenesis processes (for STX).

  7. Proteomic changes in rat hippocampus and adrenals following short-term sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Poirrier, Jean-Etienne; Guillonneau, François; Renaut, Jenny; Sergeant, Kjell; Luxen, Andre; Maquet, Pierre; Leprince, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Background To identify the biochemical changes induced by sleep deprivation at a proteomic level, we compared the hippocampal proteome of rats either after 4 hours of sleep or sleep deprivation obtained by gentle handling. Because sleep deprivation might induce some stress, we also analyzed proteomic changes in rat adrenals in the same conditions. After sleep deprivation, proteins from both tissues were extracted and subjected to 2D-DIGE analysis followed by protein identification through mass spectrometry and database search. Results In the hippocampus, 87 spots showed significant variation between sleep and sleep deprivation, with more proteins showing higher abundance in the latter case. Of these, 16 proteins were present in sufficient amount for a sequencing attempt and among the 12 identified proteins, inferred affected cellular functions include cell metabolism, energy pathways, transport and vesicle trafficking, cytoskeleton and protein processing. Although we did not observe classical, macroscopic effect of stress in sleep-deprived rats, 47 protein spots showed significant variation in adrenal tissue between sleep and sleep deprivation, with more proteins showing higher abundance following sleep. Of these, 16 proteins were also present in sufficient amount for a sequencing attempt and among the 13 identified proteins, the most relevant cellular function that was affected was cell metabolism. Conclusion At a proteomic level, short term sleep deprivation is characterized by a higher expression of some proteins in the hippocampus and a lower abundance of other proteins in the adrenals (compared to normal sleep control). Altogether, this could indicate a general activation of a number of cellular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of wakefulness and in increased energy expenditure during sleep deprivation. These findings are relevant to suggested functions of sleep like energy repletion and the restoration of molecular stocks or a more global homeostasis of

  8. Noninvasive Focused Ultrasound Stimulation Can Modulate Phase-Amplitude Coupling between Neuronal Oscillations in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yi; Yan, Jiaqing; Ma, Zhitao; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive focused ultrasound stimulation (FUS) can be used to modulate neural activity with high spatial resolution. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) between neuronal oscillations is tightly associated with cognitive processes, including learning, attention, and memory. In this study, we investigated the effect of FUS on PAC between neuronal oscillations and established the relationship between the PAC index and ultrasonic intensity. The rat hippocampus was stimulated using focused ultrasound at different spatial-average pulse-average ultrasonic intensities (3.9, 9.6, and 19.2 W/cm2). The local field potentials (LFPs) in the rat hippocampus were recorded before and after FUS. Then, we analyzed PAC between neuronal oscillations using a PAC calculation algorithm. Our results showed that FUS significantly modulated PAC between the theta (4–8 Hz) and gamma (30–80 Hz) bands and between the alpha (9–13 Hz) and ripple (81–200 Hz) bands in the rat hippocampus, and PAC increased with incremental increases in ultrasonic intensity. PMID:27499733

  9. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviates short-term memory impairment by enhancing cell proliferation and suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Hoon; Sung, Yun-Hee; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Bo-Kyun

    2014-08-01

    During pregnancy, diabetes mellitus exerts detrimental effects on the development of the fetus, especially the central nervous system. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of postnatal treadmill exercise on short-term memory in relation with cell proliferation and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic maternal rats. Adult female rats were mated with male rats for 24 h. Two weeks after mating, the pregnant female rats were divided into two groups: control group and STZ injection group. The pregnant rats in the STZ injection group were administered 40 mg/kg of STZ intraperitoneally. After birth, the rat pups were divided into the following four groups: control group, control with postnatal exercise group, maternal STZ-injection group, and maternal STZ-injection with postnatal exercise group. The rat pups in the postnatal exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day, 5 times per week for 2 weeks beginning 4 weeks after birth. The rat pups born to diabetic rats were shown to have short-term memory impairment with suppressed cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviated short-term memory impairment by increased cell proliferation and suppressed apoptosis in the rat pups born to diabetic rats. These findings indicate that postnatal treadmill exercise may be used as a valuable strategy to ameliorate neurodevelopmental problems in children born to diabetics.

  10. Acetylcholine release in the hippocampus during the operant conditioned reflex and the footshock stimulus in rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu; Mao, Jianjun; Shangguan, Dihua; Zhao, Rui; Liu, Guoquan

    2004-10-14

    The activity of the septo-hippocampal cholinergic pathway was investigated by measuring changes in the extracellular acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the hippocampus, by means of microdialysis, during the operant conditioned reflex and the repeated footshock stimulus. Microdialysis samplings were conducted in a Skinner box where lights were delivered as conditioned stimuli (CS) paired with footshocks as unconditioned stimuli (US). Two groups of rats were used. Extracellular ACh and choline (Ch) in samples collected at 6min intervals were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The elevation of hippocampus ACh was observed in the two experimental groups. The increase in ACh during aversive stimulus (footshock) was significantly larger and was probably related to the number of footshocks. There might be moderate increase in the hippocampal ACh release during the retrieval of information. The concentration of choline showed no significant fluctuation in the two groups during the whole process. This experiment explored in more detail hippocampal cholinergic activity in relation to the two different procedures.

  11. Acute and chronic effects of nicotine on serotonin uptake in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Awtry, Tammy L; Werling, Linda L

    2003-12-01

    We sought to investigate the effect of nicotine exposure (chronic and acute) on serotonin transporter (SERT) activity in two regions of the brain important for behavioral effects of nicotine. We first looked at the effects of chronic nicotine exposure (0.7 mg/kg nicotine, twice a day for 10 days) on [(3)H]5-HT uptake in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of rats. A significant increase in [(3)H]5-HT uptake was observed in synaptosomes prepared from both regions. To rule out the possibility that the increases were due to the last injection given, in a separate set of experiments a single injection of nicotine was administered the evening before sacrifice. No change in uptake occurred in either region, suggesting that the increases in uptake caused by nicotine was an effect of chronic exposure and not to an acute treatment. SERT binding studies, using prefrontocortical or hippocampal membrane preparations, revealed that chronic nicotine exposure significantly increased B(max) which correlated to an increase in SERT density. Lastly, we looked at the short-term effect of nicotine on [(3)H]5-HT uptake. Rats received a single nicotine injection 15-75 min before sacrifice. PFC synaptosomes displayed a time-dependent increase in uptake, whereas hippocampal synaptosomes showed an increase at only one time point.

  12. Increased dentate neurogenesis after grafting of glial restricted progenitors or neural stem cells in the aging hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shuai, Bing; Cai, Jingli; Coksaygan, Turhan; Rao, Mahendra S; Shetty, Ashok K

    2007-08-01

    Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) declines severely by middle age, potentially because of age-related changes in the DG microenvironment. We hypothesize that providing fresh glial restricted progenitors (GRPs) or neural stem cells (NSCs) to the aging hippocampus via grafting enriches the DG microenvironment and thereby stimulates the production of new granule cells from endogenous NSCs. The GRPs isolated from the spinal cords of embryonic day 13.5 transgenic F344 rats expressing human alkaline phosphatase gene and NSCs isolated from embryonic day 9 caudal neural tubes of Sox-2:EGFP transgenic mice were expanded in vitro and grafted into the hippocampi of middle-aged (12 months old) F344 rats. Both types of grafts survived well, and grafted NSCs in addition migrated to all layers of the hippocampus. Phenotypic characterization revealed that both GRPs and NSCs differentiated predominantly into astrocytes and oligodendrocytic progenitors. Neuronal differentiation of graft-derived cells was mostly absent except in the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ), where some of the migrated NSCs but not GRPs differentiated into neurons. Analyses of the numbers of newly born neurons in the DG using 5'-bromodeoxyuridine and/or doublecortin assays, however, demonstrated considerably increased dentate neurogenesis in animals receiving grafts of GRPs or NSCs in comparison with both naïve controls and animals receiving sham-grafting surgery. Thus, both GRPs and NSCs survive well, differentiate predominantly into glia, and stimulate the endogenous NSCs in the SGZ to produce more new dentate granule cells following grafting into the aging hippocampus. Grafting of GRPs or NSCs therefore provides an attractive approach for improving neurogenesis in the aging hippocampus. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

  13. Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cognitive impairment and hippocampus senescence in a rat model of D-galactose-induced aging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiahong; Mu, Xinyi; Zeng, Jin; Xu, Chunyan; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Mengsi; Li, Chengpeng; Chen, Jie; Li, Tinyu; Wang, Yaping

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis continues throughout the lifetime in the hippocampus, while the rate declines with brain aging. It has been hypothesized that reduced neurogenesis may contribute to age-related cognitive impairment. Ginsenoside Rg1 is an active ingredient of Panax ginseng in traditional Chinese medicine, which exerts anti-oxidative and anti-aging effects. This study explores the neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on the hippocampus of the D-gal (D-galactose) induced aging rat model. Sub-acute aging was induced in male SD rats by subcutaneous injection of D-gal (120 mg/kg·d) for 42 days, and the rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally) or normal saline for 28 days after 14 days of D-gal injection. In another group, normal male SD rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 alone (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally) for 28 days. It showed that administration of ginsenoside Rg1 significantly attenuated all the D-gal-induced changes in the hippocampus, including cognitive capacity, senescence-related markers and hippocampal neurogenesis, compared with the D-gal-treated rats. Further investigation showed that ginsenoside Rg1 protected NSCs/NPCs (neural stem cells/progenitor cells) shown by increased level of SOX-2 expression; reduced astrocytes activation shown by decrease level of Aeg-1 expression; increased the hippocampal cell proliferation; enhanced the activity of the antioxidant enzymes GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase) and SOD (Superoxide Dismutase); decreased the levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, which are the proinflammatory cytokines; increased the telomere lengths and telomerase activity; and down-regulated the mRNA expression of cellular senescence associated genes p53, p21Cip1/Waf1 and p19Arf in the hippocampus of aged rats. Our data provides evidence that ginsenoside Rg1 can improve cognitive ability, protect NSCs/NPCs and promote neurogenesis by enhancing the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacity in the hippocampus.

  14. Ginsenoside Rg1 Prevents Cognitive Impairment and Hippocampus Senescence in a Rat Model of D-Galactose-Induced Aging

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin; Xu, Chunyan; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Mengsi; Li, Chengpeng; Chen, Jie; Li, Tinyu; Wang, Yaping

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis continues throughout the lifetime in the hippocampus, while the rate declines with brain aging. It has been hypothesized that reduced neurogenesis may contribute to age-related cognitive impairment. Ginsenoside Rg1 is an active ingredient of Panax ginseng in traditional Chinese medicine, which exerts anti-oxidative and anti-aging effects. This study explores the neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on the hippocampus of the D-gal (D-galactose) induced aging rat model. Sub-acute aging was induced in male SD rats by subcutaneous injection of D-gal (120 mg/kg·d) for 42 days, and the rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally) or normal saline for 28 days after 14 days of D-gal injection. In another group, normal male SD rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 alone (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally) for 28 days. It showed that administration of ginsenoside Rg1 significantly attenuated all the D-gal-induced changes in the hippocampus, including cognitive capacity, senescence-related markers and hippocampal neurogenesis, compared with the D-gal-treated rats. Further investigation showed that ginsenoside Rg1 protected NSCs/NPCs (neural stem cells/progenitor cells) shown by increased level of SOX-2 expression; reduced astrocytes activation shown by decrease level of Aeg-1 expression; increased the hippocampal cell proliferation; enhanced the activity of the antioxidant enzymes GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase) and SOD (Superoxide Dismutase); decreased the levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, which are the proinflammatory cytokines; increased the telomere lengths and telomerase activity; and down-regulated the mRNA expression of cellular senescence associated genes p53, p21Cip1/Waf1 and p19Arf in the hippocampus of aged rats. Our data provides evidence that ginsenoside Rg1 can improve cognitive ability, protect NSCs/NPCs and promote neurogenesis by enhancing the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacity in the hippocampus. PMID

  15. Modulation of ( sup 3 H)-glutamate binding by serotonin in the rat hippocampus: An autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Mennini, T.; Miari, A. )

    1991-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) added in vitro increased ({sup 3}H)-glutamate specific binding in the rat hippocampus, reaching statistical significance in layers rich in N-Methyl-D-Aspartate sensitive glutamate receptors. This effect was explained by a significant increase in the apparent affinity of ({sup 3}H)-glutamate when 5-HT is added in vitro. Two days after lesion of serotonergic afferents to the hippocampus with 5,7- Dihydroxytryptamine ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding was significantly decreased in the CA3 region and stratum lacunosum moleculare of the hippocampus, this reduction being reversed by in vitro addition of 10 {mu}M 5-HT. The decrease observed is due to a significant reduction of quisqualate-insensitive (radiatum CA3) and kainate receptors (strata oriens, radiatum, pyramidal of CA3). Five days after lesion ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding increased significantly in the CA3 region of the hippocampus but was not different from sham animals in the other hippocampal layers. Two weeks after lesion ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding to quisqualate-insensitive receptors was increased in all the hippocampal layers, while kainate and quisqualate-sensitive receptors were not affected. These data are consistent with the possibility that 5-HT is a direct positive modulator of glutamate receptor subtypes.

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in Down's syndrome hippocampus during development: increased expression in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Iyer, A M; van Scheppingen, J; Milenkovic, I; Anink, J J; Lim, D; Genazzani, A A; Adle-Biassette, H; Kovacs, G G; Aronica, E

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is highly expressed throughout the forebrain and hippocampus. Several lines of evidence support the role of this receptor in brain development and developmental disorders, as well as in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, the expression pattern of mGluR5 was investigated by immunocytochemistry in the developing hippocampus from patients with Down's syndrome (DS) and in adults with DS and AD. mGluR5 was expressed in developing human hippocampus from the earliest stages tested (9 gestational weeks), with strong expression in the ventricular/subventricular zones. We observed a consistent similar temporal and spatial neuronal pattern of expression in DS hippocampus. However, in DS we detected increased prenatal mGluR5 expression in white matter astrocytes, which persisted postnatally. In addition, in adult DS patients with widespread ADassociated neurodegeneration (DS-AD) increased mGluR5 expression was detected in astrocytes around amyloid plaque. In vitro data confirm the existence of a modulatory crosstalk between amyloid-β and mGluR5 in human astrocytes. These findings demonstrate a developmental regulation of mGluR5 in human hippocampus and suggest a role for this receptor in astrocytes during early development in DS hippocampus, as well as a potential contribution to the pathogenesis of ADassociated pathology.

  17. Coherence between Rat Sensorimotor System and Hippocampus Is Enhanced during Tactile Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yangfang; Stella, Federico; Diamond, Mathew E.

    2016-01-01

    Rhythms with time scales of multiple cycles per second permeate the mammalian brain, yet neuroscientists are not certain of their functional roles. One leading idea is that coherent oscillation between two brain regions facilitates the exchange of information between them. In rats, the hippocampus and the vibrissal sensorimotor system both are characterized by rhythmic oscillation in the theta range, 5–12 Hz. Previous work has been divided as to whether the two rhythms are independent or coherent. To resolve this question, we acquired three measures from rats—whisker motion, hippocampal local field potential (LFP), and barrel cortex unit firing—during a whisker-mediated texture discrimination task and during control conditions (not engaged in a whisker-mediated memory task). Compared to control conditions, the theta band of hippocampal LFP showed a marked increase in power as the rats approached and then palpated the texture. Phase synchronization between whisking and hippocampal LFP increased by almost 50% during approach and texture palpation. In addition, a greater proportion of barrel cortex neurons showed firing that was phase-locked to hippocampal theta while rats were engaged in the discrimination task. Consistent with a behavioral consequence of phase synchronization, the rats identified the texture more rapidly and with lower error likelihood on trials in which there was an increase in theta-whisking coherence at the moment of texture palpation. These results suggest that coherence between the whisking rhythm, barrel cortex firing, and hippocampal LFP is augmented selectively during epochs in which the rat collects sensory information and that such coherence enhances the efficiency of integration of stimulus information into memory and decision-making centers. PMID:26890254

  18. Maternal caffeine exposure alters neuromotor development and hippocampus acetylcholinesterase activity in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ana Claudia; Souza, Andressa; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; De Oliveira, Carla; Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bonan, Carla D; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci L S

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal caffeine intake on the neuromotor development of rat offspring and on acetylcholine degradation and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression in the hippocampus of 14-day-old infant rats. Rat dams were treated with caffeine (0.3g/L) throughout gestation and lactation until the pups were 14 days old. The pups were divided into three groups: (1) control, (2) caffeine, and (3) washout caffeine. The washout group received a caffeine solution until the seventh postnatal day (P7). Righting reflex (RR) and negative geotaxis (NG) were assessed to evaluate postural parameters as an index of neuromotor reflexes. An open-field (OF) test was conducted to assess locomotor and exploratory activities as well as anxiety-like behaviors. Caffeine treatment increased both RR and NG latency times. In the OF test, the caffeine group had fewer outer crossings and reduced locomotion compared to control, while the washout group showed increased inner crossings in relation to the other groups and fewer rearings only in comparison to the control group. We found decreased AChE activity in the caffeine group compared to the other groups, with no alteration in AChE transcriptional regulation. Chronic maternal exposure to caffeine promotes important alterations in neuromotor development. These results highlight the ability of maternal caffeine intake to interfere with cholinergic neurotransmission during brain development.

  19. Exposure to PM2.5 causes genetic changes in fetal rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ming-Wei; Yang, Chin-Hua; Lin, Po-Ting; Yang, Yu-Hsiu; Chuang, Yu-Chen; Chung, Meng-Chi; Tseng, Chia-Yi

    2016-08-19

    PM2.5 travels along the respiratory tract and enters systemic blood circulation. Studies have shown that PM2.5 increases the incidence of various diseases not only in adults but also in newborn infants. It causes chronic inflammation in pregnant women and retards fetal development. In this study, pregnant rats were exposed to PM2.5 for extended periods of time and it was found that PM2.5 exposure increased immune cells in mother rats. In addition, cytokines and free radicals rapidly accumulated in the amniotic fluid and indirectly affected the fetuses. The authors collected cerebral cortex and hippocampus samples at E18 and analyzed changes of miRNA levels. Expression levels of cortical miR-6315, miR-3588, and miR-466b-5p were upregulated, and positively correlated with the genes Pkn2 (astrocyte migration), Gorab (neuritogenesis), and Mobp (allergic encephalomyelitis). In contrast, PM2.5 decreased expression of miR-338-5p and let-7e-5p, both related to mental development. Further, PM2.5 exposure increased miR-3560 and let-7b-5p in the hippocampus, two proteins that regulate genes Oxct1 and Lin28b that control ketogenesis and glycosylation, and neural cell differentiation, respectively. miR-99b-5p, miR-92b-5p, and miR-99a-5p were decreased, leading to reduced expression of Kbtbd8 and Adam11 which reduced cell mitosis, migration, and differentiation, and inhibited learning abilities and motor coordination of the fetus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2016.

  20. Aberrant NMDA-dependent LTD after perinatal ethanol exposure in young adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kervern, Myriam; Silvestre de Ferron, Benoît; Alaux-Cantin, Stéphanie; Fedorenko, Olena; Antol, Johann; Naassila, Mickael; Pierrefiche, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    Irreversible cognitive deficits induced by ethanol exposure during fetal life have been ascribed to a lower NMDA-dependent synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. Whether NMDA-dependent long-term depression (LTD) may also play a critical role in those deficits remains unknown. Here, we show that in vitro LTD induced with paired-pulse low frequency stimulation is enhanced in CA1 hippocampus field of young adult rats exposed to ethanol during brain development. Furthermore, single pulse low frequency stimulation, ineffective at this age (LFS600), induced LTD after ethanol exposure accompanied with a stronger response than controls during LFS600, thus revealing an aberrant form of activity-dependent plasticity at this age. Blocking NMDA receptor or GluN2B containing NMDA receptor prevented both the stronger response during LFS600 and LTD whereas Zinc, an antagonist of GluN2A containing NMDA receptor, was ineffective on both responses. In addition, LFS600-induced LTD was revealed in controls only with a reduced-Mg(2+) medium. In whole dissected hippocampus CA1 field, perinatal ethanol exposure increased GluN2B subunit expression in the synaptic compartment whereas GluN2A was unaltered. Using pharmacological tools, we suggest that LFS600 LTD was of synaptic origin. Altogether, we describe a new mechanism by which ethanol exposure during fetal life induces a long-term alteration of synaptic plasticity involving NMDA receptors, leading to an aberrant LTD. We suggest this effect of ethanol may reflect a delayed maturation of the synapse and that aberrant LTD may also participates to long-lasting cognitive deficits in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

  1. The cation-chloride cotransporter NKCC1 promotes sharp waves in the neonatal rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Sipilä, Sampsa T; Schuchmann, Sebastian; Voipio, Juha; Yamada, Junko; Kaila, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Earlier studies indicate a crucial role for the interconnected network of intrinsically bursting CA3 pyramidal neurons in the generation of in vivo hippocampal sharp waves (SPWs) and their proposed neonatal in vitro counterparts, the giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). While mechanisms involving ligand- and voltage-gated channels have received lots of attention in the generation of CA3 network events in the immature hippocampus, the contribution of ion-transport mechanisms has not been extensively studied. Here, we show that bumetanide, a selective inhibitor of neuronal Cl− uptake mediated by the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), completely and reversibly blocks SPWs in the neonate (postnatal days 7–9) rat hippocampus in vivo, an action also seen on GDPs in slices (postnatal days 1–8). These findings strengthen the view that GDPs and early SPWs are homologous events. Gramicidin-perforated patch recordings indicated that NKCC1 accounts for a large (∼10 mV) depolarizing driving force for the GABAA current in the immature CA3 pyramids. Consistent with a reduction in the depolarization mediated by endogenous GABAA-receptor activation, bumetanide inhibited the spontaneous bursts of individual neonatal CA3 pyramids, but it slightly increased the interneuronal activity as seen in the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic currents. An inhibitory effect of bumetanide was seen on the in vitro population events in the absence of synaptic GABAA receptor-mediated transmission, provided that a tonic GABAA receptor-mediated current was present. Our work indicates that NKCC1 expressed in CA3 pyramidal neurons promotes network activity in the developing hippocampus. PMID:16644806

  2. Epileptiform activity triggers long-term plasticity of GABAB receptor signalling in the developing rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Tosetti, P; Ferrand, N; Brun, I Colin-Le; Gaïarsa, JL

    2005-01-01

    GABAB receptor (GABABR)-mediated presynaptic inhibition regulates neurotransmitter release from synaptic terminals. In the neonatal hippocampus, GABABR activation reduces GABA release and terminates spontaneous network discharges called giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). Blocking GABABRs transforms GDPs into longer epileptiform discharges. Thus, GABABR-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABA release (GABA auto-inhibition) controls both spontaneous network activity and excitability in the developing hippocampus. Here we show that extensive release of endogenous GABA during epileptiform activity impairs GABA auto-inhibition, but not GABABR-mediated inhibition of glutamate release, leading to hyperexcitability of the neonatal hippocampal network. Paired-pulse depression of GABA release (PPD) and heterosynaptic depression of glutamate release were used to monitor the efficacy of presynaptic GABABR-mediated inhibition in slices. PPD, but not heterosynaptic depression, was dramatically reduced after potassium (K+)-induced ictal-like discharges (ILDs), suggesting a selective impairment of GABABR-dependent presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic terminals. Impairing GABA auto-inhibition induced a 44% increase in GDP width and the appearance of pathological network discharges. Preventing GABA-induced activation of GABABRs during ILDs avoided PPD loss and most modifications of the network activity. In contrast, a partial block of GABABRs induced network discharges strikingly similar to those observed after K+-driven ILDs. Finally, neither loss of GABA auto-inhibition nor network hyperexcitability could be observed following synchronous release of endogenous GABA in physiological conditions (during GDPs at 1 Hz). Thus, epileptiform activity was instrumental to impair GABABR-dependent presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic terminals. In conclusion, our results indicate that endogenous GABA released during epileptiform activity can reduce GABA auto-inhibition and trigger

  3. NMDA receptor subunit and CaMKII changes in rat hippocampus by congenital HCMV infection: a mechanism for learning and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Wu, De; Yang, Li; Bu, Xiaosong; Tang, Jiulai; Fan, Xiaocheng

    2017-03-22

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of congenital human cytomegalovirus infection on the expression levels of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NRs) and Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the hippocampal neurons of neonatal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Pregnant SD rats were divided into an experimental group and a control group (n=10 in each group). Spatial learning and memory of the offspring of SD rats were evaluated using the Morris water-maze test. Pathological studies of hippocampus sections were carried out. The concentration of [Ca] was measured using a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer method. The expression levels of NRs were detected by an immunohistochemical study. Western blot was performed to detect the expression level of CaMKII. In the Morris water-maze test, the rats in the experimental group showed significantly increased escape latency and distance traveled than the control group. Damaged and structural disorders of the dentate granule in the hippocampus were found in the experimental rats. Immunohistochemistry results showed that the expression levels of NR subunits in the hippocampus of the experimental group were significantly decreased. The concentration of [Ca] in the experimental group was significantly increased. In contrast, the level of CaMKII in the experimental group was significantly decreased. The expressions of the NR subunit and CaMKII were decreased in rat hippocampus by human cytomegalovirus congenital infection, which may be associated with the mechanism underlying the impairment of learning and memory function.

  4. Correlation between oxytocin neuronal sensitivity and oxytocin receptor binding: An electrophysiological and autoradiographical study comparing rat and guinea pig hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Raggenbass, M.; Tribollet, E.; Dubois-Dauphin, M.; Dreifuss, J.J. )

    1989-01-01

    In transverse hippocampal slices from rat and guinea pig brains, the authors obtained unitary extracellular recordings from nonpyramidal neurones located in or near the stratum pyramidale in the CA1 field and in the transition region between the CA1 and the subiculum. In rats, these neurones responded to oxytocin at 50-1,000 nM by a reversible increase in firing rate. The oxytocin-induced excitation was suppressed by a synthetic structural analogue that acts as a potent, selective antioxytocic on peripheral receptors. Nonpyramidal neurones were also excited by carbachol at 0.5-10 {mu}M. The effect of this compound was postsynaptic and was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. In guinea pigs, by contrast, nonpyramidal neurones were unaffected by oxytocin, although they were excited by carbachol. Light microscopic autoradiography, carried out using a radioiodinated selective antioxytocic as a ligand, revealed labeling in the subiculum and in the CA1 area of the hippocampus of rats, whereas no oxytocin-binding sites were detected in the hippocampus of guinea pigs. The results indicate (i) that a hippocampal action of oxytocin is species-dependent and (ii) that a positive correlation exists between neuronal responsiveness to oxytocin and the presence in the hippocampus of high-affinity binding sites for this peptide.

  5. Behavior‐dependent activity patterns of GABAergic long‐range projecting neurons in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Micklem, Ben; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Swiejkowski, Daniel A.; Valenti, Ornella; Viney, Tim J.; Kotzadimitriou, Dimitrios; Klausberger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Long‐range glutamatergic and GABAergic projections participate in temporal coordination of neuronal activity in distributed cortical areas. In the hippocampus, GABAergic neurons project to the medial septum and retrohippocampal areas. Many GABAergic projection cells express somatostatin (SOM+) and, together with locally terminating SOM+ bistratified and O‐LM cells, contribute to dendritic inhibition of pyramidal cells. We tested the hypothesis that diversity in SOM+ cells reflects temporal specialization during behavior using extracellular single cell recording and juxtacellular neurobiotin‐labeling in freely moving rats. We have demonstrated that rare GABAergic projection neurons discharge rhythmically and are remarkably diverse. During sharp wave‐ripples, most projection cells, including a novel SOM+ GABAergic back‐projecting cell, increased their activity similar to bistratified cells, but unlike O‐LM cells. During movement, most projection cells discharged along the descending slope of theta cycles, but some fired at the trough jointly with bistratified and O‐LM cells. The specialization of hippocampal SOM+ projection neurons complements the action of local interneurons in differentially phasing inputs from the CA3 area to CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites during sleep and wakefulness. Our observations suggest that GABAergic projection cells mediate the behavior‐ and network state‐dependent binding of neuronal assemblies amongst functionally‐related brain regions by transmitting local rhythmic entrainment of neurons in CA1 to neuronal populations in other areas. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27997999

  6. Thrombin modulates persistent sodium current in CA1 pyramidal neurons of young and adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lunko, O O; Isaev, D S; Krishtal, O O; Isaeva, E V

    2015-01-01

    Serine protease thrombin, a key factor of blood coagulation, participates in many neuronal processes important for normal brain functioning and during pathological conditions involving abnormal neuronal synchronization, neurodegeneration and inflammation. Our previous study on CA3 pyramidal neurons showed that application ofthrombin through the activation of specific protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) produces a significant hyperpolarizing shift of the activation of the TTX-sensitive persistent voltage-gated Na+ current (I(Nap)) thereby affecting membrane potential and seizure threshold at the network level. It was shown that PAR1 is also expressed in CA1 area of hippocampus and can be implicated in neuronal damage in this area after status epilepticus. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of thrombin on I(NaP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons from adult and young rats. Using whole cell patch-clamp technique we demonstrate that thrombin application results in the hyperpolarization shift of I(NaP) activation as well as increase in the I(NaP) amplitude in both age groups. We have found that I(NaP) in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal CA 1 region is more vulnerable to the thrombin action than I(NaP) in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal CA3 region. We have also found that the immature hippocampus is more sensitive to thrombin action which emphasizes the contribution of thrombin-dependent pathway to the regulation of neuronal activity in immature brain.

  7. Bisphenol-A rapidly enhanced passive avoidance memory and phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits in hippocampus of young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Xiaohong Li Tao; Luo Qingqing; Hong Xing; Xie Lingdan; Tian Dong

    2011-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, is found to influence development of brain and behaviors in rodents. The previous study indicated that perinatal exposure to BPA impaired learning-memory and inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits expressions in hippocampus during the postnatal development in rats; and in cultured hippocampal neurons, BPA rapidly promotes dynamic changes in dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit NR2B. In the present study, we examined the rapid effect of BPA on passive avoidance memory and NMDAR in the developing hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at the age of postnatal day 18. The results showed that BPA or estradiol benzoate (EB) rapidly extended the latency to step down from the platform 1 h after footshock and increased the phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, and mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in hippocampus within 1 h. While 24 h after BPA or EB treatment, the improved memory and the increased phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, ERK disappeared. Furthermore, pre-treatment with an estrogen receptors (ERs) antagonist, ICI182,780, or an ERK-activating kinase inhibitor, U0126, significantly attenuated EB- or BPA-induced phosphorylations of NR1, NR2B, and ERK within 1 h. These data suggest that BPA rapidly enhanced short-term passive avoidance memory in the developing rats. A non-genomic effect via ERs may mediate the modulation of the phosphorylation of NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B through ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: > BPA rapidly extended the latency to step down from platform 1 h after footshock. > BPA rapidly increased pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK in hippocampus within 1 h. > ERs antagonist or MEK inhibitor attenuated BPA-induced pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK.

  8. Ginsenoside Rg1 Decreases Aβ1–42 Level by Upregulating PPARγ and IDE Expression in the Hippocampus of a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Quan, QianKun; Wang, Jue; Li, Xi; Wang, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The present study was designed to examine the effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) in the hippocampus of rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) to determine how ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) decreases Aβ levels in AD. Experimental Approach Experimental AD was induced in rats by a bilateral injection of 10 µg soluble beta-amyloid peptide 1–42 (Aβ1–42) into the CA1 region of the hippocampus, and the rats were treated with Rg1 (10 mg·kg−1, intraperitoneally) for 28 days. The Morris water maze was used to test spatial learning and memory performance. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to analyze the hippocampal histopathological damage. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and real-time PCR were used to detect Aβ1–42, PPARγ, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) expression in the hippocampus. Key Results Injection of soluble Aβ1–42 into the hippocampus led to significant dysfunction of learning and memory, hippocampal histopathological abnormalities and increased Aβ1–42 levels in the hippocampus. Rg1 treatment significantly improved learning and memory function, attenuated hippocampal histopathological abnormalities, reduced Aβ1–42 levels and increased PPARγ and IDE expression in the hippocampus; these effects of Rg1 could be effectively inhibited by GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist. Conclusions and Implications Given that PPARγ can upregulate IDE expression and IDE can degrade Aβ1–42, these results indicate that Rg1 can increase IDE expression in the hippocampus by upregulating PPARγ, leading to decreased Aβ levels, attenuated hippocampal histopathological abnormalities and improved learning and memory in a rat model of AD. PMID:23520555

  9. Effects of treadmill exercise on cyclooxygenase-2 in the hippocampus in type 2 diabetic rats: correlation with the neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Koo; Yi, Sun Shin; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Park, Ok Kyu; Yan, Bingchun; Kim, Il Yong; Kim, Yo Na; Song, Wook; Moon, Seung Myung; Won, Moo-Ho; Seong, Je Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Sung

    2010-06-23

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) is a rate-limiting enzyme in synthesis of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. In this study, we observed the effects of a physical exercise on COX-2 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus using immunohistochemistry in rats. In addition, we examined effects of administration of a COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, on neuroblast differentiation. At 6weeks of age, Zucker lean control (ZLC) and Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats were put on a treadmill with or without running for 1h/session/day for 5weeks. The running speed was gradually increased from 16 to 22m/min with 2m/min per 2weeks. In the ZLC and ZDF rats, COX-2 immunoreaction was detected in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and in the stratum pyramidale of the CA2/3 region; COX-2 immunoreaction in the CA1 region was hardly detected. In the exercised-ZLC and ZDF rats, COX-2 immunoreactivity was significantly increased compared to that in the ZLC and ZDF rats, showing that COX-2 immunoreactivity in the exercised-ZDF rats was slightly low than that in the exercised-ZDF rats. In addition, weak COX-2 immunoreactivity was shown in the CA1 region by exercise. On the other hand, the repeated oral administration of celecoxib to 4-week-old ZDF rats significantly decreased the neuroblasts in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that COX-2 may be associated with the increase of synaptic plasticity or contacts in the hippocampus.

  10. STRESS-INDUCED CHANGES IN EXTRACELLULAR DOPAMINE AND SEROTONIN IN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX AND DORSAL HIPPOCAMPUS OF PRENATALLY MALNOURISHED RATS

    PubMed Central

    Mokler, David J.; Torres, Olga I.; Galler, Janina R.; Morgane, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition continues to be a significant problem in the world today. Exposure to prenatal protein malnutrition increases the risk of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders in adulthood including depression, schizophrenia and attentional deficit disorder. In the present experiment we have examined the effects of stress on extracellular serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of rats exposed in utero to protein malnutrition. The medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus were chosen as two limbic forebrain regions involved in learning and memory, attention and the stress response. Extracellular 5-HT and dopamine were determined in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats using dual probe in vivo microdialysis. Basal extracellular 5-HT did not differ between malnourished and well-nourished controls in either the medial prefrontal cortex or the dorsal hippocampus. Basal extracellular dopamine was significantly decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex of malnourished animals. Restraint stress (20 m) produced a significant rise in extracellular dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex of well-nourished rats but did not alter release in malnourished rats. In malnourished rats, stress produced an increase in 5-HT in the hippocampus, whereas stress produced a decrease in 5-HT in the hippocampus of well-nourished rats. These data demonstrate that prenatal protein malnutrition alters dopaminergic neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as altering the dopaminergic and serotonergic response to stress. These changes may provide part of the bases for alterations in malnourished animals’ response to stress. PMID:17368432

  11. Intracerebroventricular kainic acid administration to neonatal rats alters interneuron development in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongxin; Csernansky, Cynthia A; Chu, Yunxiang; Csernansky, John G

    2003-10-10

    The effects of neonatal exposure to excitotoxins on the development of interneurons have not been well characterized, but may be relevant to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, the excitotoxin, kainic acid (KA) was administered to rats at postnatal day 7 (P7) by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion. At P14, P25, P40 and P60, Nissl staining and immunohistochemical studies with the interneuron markers, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-67), calbindin-D28k (CB) and parvalbumin (PV) were performed in the hippocampus. In control animals, the total number of interneurons, as well as the number of interneurons stained with GAD-67, CB and PV, was nearly constant from P14 through P60. In KA-treated rats, Nissl staining, GAD-67 staining, and CB staining revealed a progressive decline in the overall number of interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields from P14 to P60. In contrast, PV staining in KA-treated rats showed initial decreases in the number of interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields at P14 followed by increases that approached control levels by P60. These results suggest that, in general, early exposure to the excitotoxin KA decreases the number of hippocampal interneurons, but has a more variable effect on the specific population of interneurons labeled by PV. The functional impact of these changes may be relevant to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.

  12. Sulfite leads to neuron loss in the hippocampus of both normal and SOX-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Kocamaz, Erdogan; Adiguzel, Esat; Er, Buket; Gundogdu, Gulşah; Kucukatay, Vural

    2012-08-01

    Sulfites are compounds commonly used as preservatives in foods, beverages and pharmaceuticals. Sulfite is also endogenously generated during the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids and drugs. It has been shown that sulfite is a highly toxic molecule. Many studies have examined the effects of sulfite toxicity, but the effect of ingested sulfite on the number of neurons in the hippocampus has not yet been reported. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ingested sulfite on pyramidal neurons by counting cells in CA1 and CA3-2 subdivisions of the rat hippocampus. For this purpose, rats were assigned to one of four groups (6 rats per group): control (C), sulfite (S), deficient (D) and deficient+sulfite (DS). Sulfite oxidase deficiency was established by feeding rats a low molybdenum diet and adding 200ppm tungsten (W) to their drinking water. Sulfite (70mg/kg) was also administered to the animals via their drinking water. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were sacrificed by exsanguination under anesthesia, and their brains and livers quickly removed. The livers were used for a SOX activity assay, and the brains were used for neuronal counts in a known fraction of the CA1 and CA3-2 subdivisions of the left hippocampus using the optical fractionator method, which is a stereological method. The results showed that sulfite treatment caused a significant decrease in the total number of pyramidal neurons in three subdivisions of the hippocampus (CA1 and CA3-2) in the S, D and DS groups compared with the control group. It is concluded that exogenous administration of sulfite causes loss of pyramidal neurons in CA1 and CA3-2 subdivisions in both normal and SOX deficient rat hippocampus. This finding provides supporting evidence that sulfite is a neurotoxic molecule.

  13. Effect of soy milk on circulating 17- β estradiol, number of neurons in cerebral cortex and hippocampus and determination of their ratio in neonatal ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Marzban Abbasabadi, Behrokh; Tadjalli, Mina

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of soy milk on serum 17- β estradiol level and number of neurons in cerebral cortex and hippocampus as well as determination of the ratio of neurons in cortical and hippocampal regions in neonatal ovariectomized rats. Thirty female rats (one day old) were divided into six groups of five. At day 7, ovariectomy surgery was performed in four groups and two other groups were assumed as sham and control groups. Three groups of ovareictomaized rats were fed with soy milk at the doses of 0.75, 1.50 and 3.00 mL kg-1 per day since they were 14. At day 60, the blood samples were collected to measure the17- β estradiol concentration, and then the brain of rats were prepared for histological studies. The serum 17- β estradiol level significantly increased in ovariectomized rats fed with soy milk compared to ovariectomized rats with no soy milk supplementation. In addition, the results showed that soy milk significantly increased the number of neurons in CA1, CA2 and dentate gyrus regions of hippocampus and granular layer of cerebral cortex in ovariectomized rats, whereas there was no significant change in number of neurons in CA3 zone of hippocampus and molecular, pyramidal and multiform layers of cerebral cortex in ovariectomized rats fed with soy milk. The ratio of cerebral cortex neurons to hippocampal neurons had no significant changes among the experimental groups. PMID:28144428

  14. Reduction in Aβ-induced cell death in the hippocampus of 17β-estradiol-treated female rats is associated with an increase in IGF-I signaling and somatostatinergic tone.

    PubMed

    Perianes-Cachero, Aránzazu; Canelles, Sandra; Aguado-Llera, David; Frago, Laura M; Toledo-Lobo, María Val; Carrera, Iván; Cacabelos, Ramón; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Arilla-Ferreiro, Eduardo; Barrios, Vicente

    2015-12-01

    Several studies indicate that 17β-estradiol (E2) protects against amyloid β-peptide (Aβ)-induced cell death and activates factors associated with learning and memory, a function involving the hippocampal somatostatinergic system. As alterations in somatostatin have been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease, we examined whether E2 prevents changes in the hippocampal somatostatinergic system induced by Aβ25-35 and cell death, as well as the possible involvement of leptin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I signaling. We also measured the levels of Aβ proteases neprilysin and insulin-degrading-enzyme. Co-administration of E2 with Aβ25-35 reduced both its levels and cell death, in addition to preventing the Aβ-induced depletion of some somatostatinergic parameters. Activation of leptin and IGF-I pathways increased after E2 co-administration, and this correlated with changes in the somatostatinergic system. Changes in some components of this system were inversely related with Aβ levels and cell death. Moreover, neprilysin levels were increased only in Aβ plus E2-treated rats and E2 prevented the Aβ-induced insulin-degrading-enzyme reduction. Our results suggest that the E2-induced reduction in cell death is related to lower Aβ levels, probably because of IGF-I and somatostatin modulation of Aβ proteases. We asked how 17β-estradiol (E2) protects against β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced cell death. E2 co-administration prevents Aβ-produced depletion of hippocampal somatostatin (SRIF) by an IGF-I-mediated mechanism, being related this protective effect with an increase in Aβ proteases. Our results suggest that the E2-induced reduction in cell death is related to lower Aβ levels, probably because of SRIF modulation of Aβ proteases. CREB, cAMP response element-binding protein; IGF-I, insulin-like growth factor-I; STAT3, signal transducer and activator of transcription-3.

  15. Hippocampus, Perirhinal Cortex, and Complex Visual Discriminations in Rats and Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, Jena B.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Velu, Priya D.; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Structures in the medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex, are known to be essential for the formation of long-term memory. Recent animal and human studies have investigated whether perirhinal cortex might also be important for visual perception. In our study, using a simultaneous oddity discrimination task, rats with…

  16. Blunted inflammation mediated by NF-κB activation in hippocampus alleviates chronic normobaric hypoxia-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Junming; Fan, Xiaofang; Li, Yang; Guo, Jinbin; Xia, Dongmei; Ding, Lu; Zheng, Qingqing; Wang, Wei; Xue, Feng; Chen, Ran; Liu, Shouting; Hu, Lianggang; Gong, Yongsheng

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate whether inflammation mediated by NF-κB activation is involved in the induction of anxiety-like behavior in chronic normobaric hypoxia (CNH) exposed rats and to investigate the underlying mechanism. To this end, rats were exposed in a normobaric hypoxic chamber with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) of ∼ 10%, 23 h/d, continues for 2 weeks. Anxiety-like behavior was tested by elevated plus maze and open field, inflammatory response, nucleus translocation of NF-κB, and signaling pathway in hippocampus were examined. CNH induced a significant increase of anxiety- like behavior and inflammation responses, which were ameliorated by NF-κB inhibitor, PDTC pretreatment, suggesting that the anxiogenic effect induced by inflammation is through NF-κB activation. CNH treatment significantly increased nucleus translocation of p65 and p105 in hippocampus, which was suppressed by PDTC pretreatment. In addition, CNH treatment significantly increased Iba-1, iNOS, COX-2, and p-PKA in hippocampus, which were blocked by PDTC pretreatment, suggesting CNH may activate microglia cells in hippocampus through NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, our results illustrate a mechanism that, activation of NF-κB in hippocampus may trigger the proinflammatory response of microglia cells, and iNOS-PKA pathway may involve in anxiogenic effect in CNH exposed rats.

  17. Long-term potentiation of GABAergic synaptic transmission in neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caillard, O; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaiarsa, J L

    1999-07-01

    1. The plasticity of GABAergic synapses was investigated in neonatal rat hippocampal slices obtained between postnatal days 3 and 6 using intracellular recording techniques. Ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists were present throughout the experiments to isolate GABAA receptor-mediated postsynaptic potentials (GABAA PSPs) or currents (GABAA PSCs). 2. Repetitive depolarizing pulses (20 pulses, 0.5 s duration, at 0.1 Hz, each pulse generating 4-6 action potentials) induced a long-term potentiation in the slope and amplitude of the evoked GABAA PSPs and GABAA PSCs. 3. Long-term potentiation was prevented by intracellular injection of the calcium chelator BAPTA (50 mM), or when the voltage-dependent calcium channels blockers Ni2+ (50 microM) and nimodipine (10 microM) were bath applied. 4. Repetitive depolarizing pulses induced a persistent (over 1 h) increase in the frequency of spontaneous GABAA PSCs. 5. Repetitive depolarizing pulses induced a long-lasting increase in the frequency of miniature GABAA PSCs, without altering their amplitude or decay-time constant. 6. It is concluded that the postsynaptic activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels leads to a long-term potentiation of GABAergic synaptic transmission in neonatal rat hippocampus. This form of plasticity is expressed as an increase in the probability of GABA release or in the number of functional synapses, rather than as an upregulation of postsynaptic GABAA receptor numbers or conductance at functional synapses.

  18. Changes in aminoacidergic and monoaminergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus and amygdala of rats after ayahuasca ingestion

    PubMed Central

    de Castro-Neto, Eduardo Ferreira; da Cunha, Rafael Henrique; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier; Yonamine, Mauricio; Gouveia, Telma Luciana Furtado; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Amado, Débora; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria da Graça

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate changes in neurotransmission induced by a psychoactive beverage ayahuasca in the hippocampus and amygdala of naive rats. METHODS: The level of monoamines, their main metabolites and amino acid neurotransmitters concentrations were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Four groups of rats were employed: saline-treated and rats receiving 250, 500 and 800 mg/kg of ayahuasca infusion (gavage). Animals were killed 40 min after drug ingestion and the structures stored at -80 °C until HPLC assay. The data from all groups were compared using Analysis of variance and Scheffé as post test and P < 0.05 was accepted as significant. RESULTS: The results showed decreased concentrations of glycine (GLY) (0.13 ± 0.03 vs 0.29 ± 0.07, P < 0.001) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) (1.07 ± 0.14 vs 1.73 ± 0.25, P < 0.001) in the amygdala of rats that received 500 of ayahuasca. Animals that ingested 800 mg/kg of ayahuasca also showed a reduction of GLY level (0.11 ± 0.01 vs 0.29 ± 0.07, P < 0.001) and GABA (0.98 ± 0.06 vs 1.73 ± 0.25, P < 0.001). In the hippocampus, increased GABA levels were found in rats that received all ayahuasca doses: 250 mg/kg (1.29 ± 0.19 vs 0.84 ± 0.21, P < 0.05); 500 mg/kg (2.23 ± 038 vs 084 ± 0.21, P < 0.05) and 800 mg/kg (1.98 ± 0.92 vs 0.84 ± 0.21, P < 0.05). In addition, an increased utilization rate of all monoamines was found in the amygdala after ayahuasca administration in doses: 250 mg/kg (noradrenaline: 0.16 ± 0.02 vs 0.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.01; dopamine: 0.39 ± 0.012 vs 2.39 ± 0.84, P < 0.001; serotonin: 1.02 ± 0.22 vs 4.04 ± 0.91, P < 0.001), 500 mg/kg (noradrenaline: 0.08 ± 0.02 vs 0.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.001; dopamine: 0.33 ± 0.19 vs 2.39 ± 0.84, P < 0.001; serotonin: 0.59 ± 0.08 vs 4.04 ± 0.91, P < 0.001) and 800 mg/kg (noradrenaline: 0.16 ± 0.04 vs 0.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.001; dopamine: 0.84 ± 0.65 vs 2.39 ± 0.84, P < 0.05; serotonin: 0.36 ± 0.02 vs 4.04 ± 0.91, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION

  19. Treatment with dexamethasone and vitamin D3 attenuates neuroinflammatory age-related changes in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michelle; Piazza, Alessia; Nolan, Yvonne; Lynch, Marina A

    2007-10-01

    Among the changes which occur in the brain with age is an increase in hippocampal concentration of proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and an increase in IL-1beta-induced signaling. Here we demonstrate that the increase in IL-1beta concentration is accompanied by an increase in expression of IL-1 type I receptor (IL-1RI) and an age-related increase in microglial activation, as shown by increased expression of the cell surface marker, major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) and increased MHCII staining. The evidence indicates that these age-related changes were abrogated in hippocampus of aged rats treated with dexamethasone and vitamin D3. Similarly, the age-related increases in activation of the stress-activated protein kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), as well as caspase-3 and PARP were all attenuated in hippocampal tissue prepared from rats that received dexamethasone and vitamin D3. The data indicate that dexamethasone and vitamin D3 ameliorated the age-related increase in IFNgamma and suggest that IFNgamma may be the trigger leading to microglial activation, since it increases MHCII mRNA and IL-1beta release from cultured glia. In parallel with its ability to decrease microglial activation in vivo, we report that treatment of cultured glia with dexamethasone and vitamin D3 blocked the lipopolysaccharide increased MHCII mRNA and IL-1beta concentration, while the IL-1beta-induced increases in activation of JNK and caspase 3 in cultured neurons were also reversed by treatment with dexamethasone and vitamin D3. The data suggest that the antiinflammatory effect of dexamethasone and vitamin D3 derives from their ability to downreguate microglial activation.

  20. Expression of trkB mRNA is altered in rat hippocampus after experimental brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Hicks, R R; Zhang, L; Dhillon, H S; Prasad, M R; Seroogy, K B

    1998-08-31

    Recent investigations have shown that expression of mRNAs for the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) is differentially altered in the hippocampus following traumatic brain injury. In the present study, modulation of neurotrophin receptor expression was examined in the hippocampus in a rat model of traumatic brain injury using in situ hybridization. Messenger RNA for trkB, the high-affinity receptor for BDNF and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4), was increased between 3 and 6 h bilaterally in the dentate gyrus following a lateral fluid-percussion brain injury of moderate severity (2.0-2.1 atm). No time-dependent alterations were observed for trkB mRNA in hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3. Levels of mRNA for trkC, the high-affinity receptor for NT-3, did not change in any region of the hippocampus. These data demonstrate that lateral fluid-percussion injury modulates expression of trkB mRNA in the hippocampus and support a role for BDNF/trkB signalling mechanisms in secondary events associated with traumatic brain injury.

  1. Effect of long-lasting serotonin depletion on environmental enrichment-induced neurogenesis in adult rat hippocampus and spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Ueda, S; Sakakibara, S; Yoshimoto, K

    2005-01-01

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation produces new neurons throughout adulthood in mammalian species. Several experimental statuses and factors regulating to neurogenesis have been identified in the adult dentate gyrus. For example, exposure to an enriched environment enhances neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and improves hippocampus-dependent spatial learning. Furthermore, serotonin is known to influence adult neurogenesis, and learning and memory. However, the effects of long-lasting depletion of serotonin over the developing period on neurogenesis have not been investigated. Thus, we examined the influence of long-lasting serotonin depletion on environmental enrichment-induced neurogenesis and spatial memory performance. As reported previously, environmental enrichment significantly increased new neurons in the dentate gyrus. However, there was no improvement of the spatial learning test in adult rats in standard and in environmental enrichment housings. Intracisternal administration of the serotonergic neurotoxin, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, on postnatal day 3 apparently reduced serotonin content in the adult hippocampus without regeneration. This experimental depletion of serotonin in the hippocampus of rats housed in an enriched environment had no effect on spatial memory performance, but produced significant decreases in the number of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled new cells in the dentate gyrus. These findings indicate that newly generated cells stimulated by environmental enrichment are not critical for improvements in hippocampus-dependent learning. Furthermore, numbers of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine-injected rats did not differ between 1 day and 4 weeks after bromodeoxyuridine injection. These data suggest that survival of newly generated dentate gyrus cells remains relatively constant under long-lasting serotonin depletion.

  2. Expression Pattern of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Rat Hippocampus following Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Jiang, Rong; He, Qin; Zhang, Yunmei; Zhang, Yanli; Li, Yong; Zhuang, Ruichun; Luo, Ying; Li, Yu; Wan, Jinyuan; Tang, Yong; Yu, Huarong; Jiang, Qingsong; Yang, Junqing

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the pattern of time-dependent expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, β, and γ) after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) damage in the rat hippocampus. Male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were subjected to global cerebral I/R. The rat hippocampi were isolated to detect the expression of PPARs mRNA and protein levels at 30 min–30 d after I/R by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The expression levels of PPARs mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus significantly increased and peaked at 24 h for PPARα and γ (at 48 h for PPARβ) after I/R, then gradually decreased, and finally approached control levels on d 30. The present results suggest that global cerebral I/R can cause obvious increases of hippocampal PPARs mRNA and protein expression within 15 d after I/R. These findings may help to guide the experimental and clinical therapeutic use of PPARs agonists against brain injury. PMID:23304113

  3. Increased phase synchronization of spontaneous calcium oscillations in epileptic human versus normal rat astrocyte cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázsi, Gábor; Cornell-Bell, Ann H.; Moss, Frank

    2003-06-01

    Stochastic synchronization analysis is applied to intracellular calcium oscillations in astrocyte cultures prepared from epileptic human temporal lobe. The same methods are applied to astrocyte cultures prepared from normal rat hippocampus. Our results indicate that phase-repulsive coupling in epileptic human astrocyte cultures is stronger, leading to an increased synchronization in epileptic human compared to normal rat astrocyte cultures.

  4. Increased expression of the TIAR protein in the hippocampus of Alzheimer patients.

    PubMed

    Oleana, V H; Salehi, A; Swaab, D F

    1998-05-11

    T-cell restricted intracellular antigen related protein (TIAR) is an RNA-binding protein that is supposed to be involved in the process of stress-induced apoptosis. TIAR triggers DNA fragmentation in permeabilized thymocytes and its expression diminishes in the cell nucleus and rises simultaneously in the cytoplasm during Fas-induced cell death. Using a monoclonal antibody against TIAR, we stained different areas of the hippocampus from seven controls and 14 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was a clear expression of TIAR in the hippocampus of non-demented controls. Surprisingly, a significant increase was found in the expression of TIAR in the hippocampal area in AD. The increased expression of TIAR in AD may be related to the process of neurodegeneration in the hippocampus.

  5. Effect of agomelatine on adult hippocampus apoptosis and neurogenesis using the stress model of rats.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Atakan; Yucel, Nermin; Ozkanlar, Seckin; Polat, Elif; Kara, Adem; Ozcan, Halil; Gulec, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    Agomelatine (AG) is an agonist of melatonin receptors and an antagonist of the 5-HT2C-receptor subtype. The chronobiotic properties of AG are of significant interest due to the disorganization of internal rhythms, which might play a role in the pathophysiology of depression. The present study was designed to assess the effects of the antidepressant-like activity of AG, a new antidepressant drug, on adult neurogenesis and apoptosis using stress-exposed rat brains. Over the period of 1 week, the rats were exposed to light stress twice a day for 1h. After a period of 1 week, the rats were given AG treatment at a dose of either 10mg/kg or 40mg/kg for 15 days. The animals were then scarified, and the obtained tissue sections were stained with immuno-histochemical anti-BrdU, Caspase-3, and Bcl-2 antibodies. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations were measured biochemically using a BDNF Elisa kit. Biochemical BDNF analysis revealed a high concentration of BDNF in the serum of the stress-exposed group, but the concentrations of BDNF were much lower those of the AG-treated groups. Immuno-histochemical analysis revealed that AG treatment decreased the BrdU-positive and Bcl-2-positive cell densities and increased the Caspase-3-positive cell density in the hippocampus of stress-induced rats as compared to those of the stress group. The results of the study demonstrated that AG treatment ameliorated the hippocampal apoptotic cells and increased hippocampal neurogenesis. These results also strengthen the possible relationship between depression and adult neurogenesis, which must be studied further.

  6. Chronic noise exposure causes persistence of tau hyperphosphorylation and formation of NFT tau in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bo; Zhu, Lixing; She, Xiaojun; Wu, Mingquan; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Tianhui; Zhang, Na; Xu, Chuanxiang; Chen, Xuewei; An, Gaihong; Liu, Hongtao

    2012-12-01

    The non-auditory effects of noise exposure on the central nervous system have been established both epidemiologically and experimentally. Chronic noise exposure (CNE) has been associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathological changes. However, experimental evidence for these associations remains limited. The aim of the current study was to explore the effects of CNE [100 dB sound pressure level (SPL) white noise, 4 h/d×14 d] on tau phosphorylation in the rat hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: a noise-exposed group and a control group. The levels of radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA)-soluble and RIPA-insoluble phosphorylated tau at Ser202, Ser396, Ser404, and Ser422 in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex were measured at different time points (days 0, 3, 7, and 14) after the end of the last noise exposure. Exposure to white noise for 14 consecutive days significantly increased the levels of tau phosphorylation at Ser202, Ser396, Ser404, and Ser422, the sites typically phosphorylated in AD brains, in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Tau hyperphosphorylation persisted for 7 to 14 d after the cessation of noise exposure. These alterations were also concomitant with the generation of pathological neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) tau 3, 7 and 14 d after the end of the stimulus. Furthermore, lasting increases in proteins involved in hyperphosphorylation, namely glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), were found to occur in close correspondence with increase in tau hyperphosphorylation. The results of this study show that CNE leads to long-lasting increases in non-NFT hyperphosphorylated tau and delayed formation of misfolded NFT tau in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Our results also provide evidence for the involvement of GSK3β and PP2A in these processes.

  7. Mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by glyphosate-based herbicide in immature rat hippocampus: involvement of glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Daiane; de Liz Oliveira Cavalli, Vera Lúcia; Heinz Rieg, Carla Elise; Domingues, Juliana Tonietto; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Tasca, Carla Inês; Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina; Zamoner, Ariane

    2014-06-05

    Previous studies demonstrate that glyphosate exposure is associated with oxidative damage and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the mechanism of glyphosate-induced neurotoxic effects needs to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Roundup(®) (a glyphosate-based herbicide) leads to neurotoxicity in hippocampus of immature rats following acute (30min) and chronic (pregnancy and lactation) pesticide exposure. Maternal exposure to pesticide was undertaken by treating dams orally with 1% Roundup(®) (0.38% glyphosate) during pregnancy and lactation (till 15-day-old). Hippocampal slices from 15 day old rats were acutely exposed to Roundup(®) (0.00005-0.1%) during 30min and experiments were carried out to determine whether glyphosate affects (45)Ca(2+) influx and cell viability. Moreover, we investigated the pesticide effects on oxidative stress parameters, (14)C-α-methyl-amino-isobutyric acid ((14)C-MeAIB) accumulation, as well as glutamate uptake, release and metabolism. Results showed that acute exposure to Roundup(®) (30min) increases (45)Ca(2+) influx by activating NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, leading to oxidative stress and neural cell death. The mechanisms underlying Roundup(®)-induced neurotoxicity also involve the activation of CaMKII and ERK. Moreover, acute exposure to Roundup(®) increased (3)H-glutamate released into the synaptic cleft, decreased GSH content and increased the lipoperoxidation, characterizing excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. We also observed that both acute and chronic exposure to Roundup(®) decreased (3)H-glutamate uptake and metabolism, while induced (45)Ca(2+) uptake and (14)C-MeAIB accumulation in immature rat hippocampus. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Roundup(®) might lead to excessive extracellular glutamate levels and consequently to glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat hippocampus.

  8. Angiotensin IV possibly acts through PKMzeta in the hippocampus to regulate cognitive memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Chow, Lok-Hi; Tao, Pao-Luh; Chen, Yuan-Hao; Lin, Yu-Hui; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung

    2015-10-01

    Ang IV is an endogenous peptide generated from the degradation of angiotensin II. Ang IV was found to enhance learning and memory in CNS. PKMzeta was identified to be a fragment of PKCzeta (protein kinase Czeta). Its continuous activation was demonstrated to be correlated with the formation of memory in the hippocampus. Therefore, we investigated whether PKMzeta participates in the effects of Ang IV on memory. We first examined the effect of Ang IV on non-spatial memory/cognition in modified object recognition test in rats. Our data showed that Ang IV could increase the exploration time on novel object. The co-administration of ZIP (PKMzeta inhibitor) with Ang IV significantly blocked the effect by Ang IV. The effects of Ang IV on hippocampal LTP at the CA1 region were also evaluated. Ang IV significantly increased the amplitude and slope of the EPSPs, which was consistent with other reports. Surprisingly, instead of potentiating LTP, Ang IV caused a failed maintenance of LTP. Moreover, there was no quantitative change in PKMzeta induced by Ang IV and/or ZIP after behavioral experiments. Taken together, our data re-confirmed the finding of the positive effect of Ang IV to enhance memory/cognition. The increased strength of EPSPs with Ang IV could also have certain functional relevance. Since the behavioral results suggested the involvement of PKMzeta, we hypothesized that the enhancement of memory/cognition by Ang IV may rely on an increase in PKMzeta activity. Overall, the present study provided important advances in our understanding of the action of Ang IV in the hippocampus.

  9. Taurine counteracts the suppressive effect of lipopolysaccharide on neurogenesis in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaofeng; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Hu, Jianmin; Nishihara, Masugi

    2013-01-01

    Neurogenesis has been generally accepted to happen in the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricular and subgranular zone (SGZ) in the hippocampus of adult mammalian brain. Recent studies have reported that inflammatory stimuli, such as injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), impair neurogenesis in the SGZ. Taurine, a sulfur-containing β-amino acid, is a major free intracellular amino acid in many tissues of mammals and having various supplementary effects on the mammalian body functions including the brain. Recently, it has been also reported that taurine levels in the brain significantly increase under stressful conditions. The present study was aimed to evaluate the possible beneficial effects of taurine on the neurogenesis in the SGZ under the condition of acute inflammatory stimuli by LPS. Adult male rats were intraperitoneally injected with taurine once a day for 39 days. Twenty-four hours before the animals were sacrificed on the last day of taurine treatment, LPS was injected simultaneously with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Immunohistochemistry for BrdU, Ki67, and Iba-1 in the brain was performed, and serum levels of TNF-α and IL-1β 2 h after LPS injection were determined. The results showed that LPS significantly decreased the number of immunoreactive cells for both BrdU and Ki67 in the SGZ, while increased that for Iba-1, all of which were restored by taurine administration. Meanwhile, the serum concentrations of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased, which were significantly attenuated by taurine administration. These results suggest that taurine effectively maintains neurogenesis in the SGZ under the acute infectious condition by attenuating the increase of microgliosis in the hippocampus as well as proinflammatory cytokines in the peripheral circulation.

  10. Role of NMDA receptors in noise-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Jia, Hengchuan; She, Xiaojun; Cui, Bo; Zhang, Na; Chen, Xuewei; Xu, Chuanxiang; An, Gaihong; Ma, Qiang

    2014-05-15

    Chronic noise exposure has been associated with abnormalities in glutamate (Glu)-NMDAR signaling and tau hyperphosphorylation. However, further studies are necessary to clarify potential causal relationships. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of NMDA receptors in noise-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups in the present study: control with isotonic saline instillation (n=10); noise exposure (100 dB SPL white noise, 4h/d × 14d) and treated with saline (n=10); and noise exposure and treated with MK-801 (0.5mg/kg, intraperitoneally; n=10). The levels of tau phosphorylated at Ser202 and Ser396, and proteins involved in hyperphosphorylation, namely glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), were measured in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) after the last noise exposure. We showed that phosphorylated tau levels were enhanced in noise-exposed-rat hippocampus and PFC. MK-801 decreased the hyperphosphorylation of tau at Ser202 and Ser396 sites in the hippocampus and PFC. Furthermore, MK-801 reversed noise-induced GSK3β overexpression but had no significant effect on PP2A levels. This suggests that MK-801 protects against chronic-noise-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus and PFC. These findings demonstrate that Glu-NMDAR signaling may be involved in triggering aberrant tau hyperphosphorylation in the hippocampus and PFC after chronic noise exposure.

  11. Gene Expression Profile of the Hippocampus of Rats Subjected to Chronic Immobilization Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Jia-Xu; Yue, Guang-Xin; Liu, Yue-Yun; Zhao, Xin; Guo, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Qun; Jiang, You-Ming; Bai, Ming-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study systematically investigated the effect of chronic stress on the hippocampus and its damage mechanism at the whole genome level. Methods The rat whole genome expression chips (Illumina) were used to detect gene expression differences in the hippocampus of rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress (daily immobilization stress for 3 h, for 7 or 21 days). The hippocampus gene expression profile was studied through gene ontology and signal pathway analyses using bioinformatics. A differentially expressed transcription regulation network was also established. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to verify the microarray results and determine expression of the Gabra1, Fadd, Crhr2, and Cdk6 genes in the hippocampal tissues. Results Compared to the control group, 602 differentially expressed genes were detected in the hippocampus of rats subjected to stress for 7 days, while 566 differentially expressed genes were expressed in the animals experiencing stress for 21 days. The stress significantly inhibited the primary immune system functions of the hippocampus in animals subjected to stress for both 7 and 21 days. Immobilization activated the extracellular matrix receptor interaction pathway after 7 day exposure to stress and the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathway. The enhanced collagen synthesis capacity of the hippocampal tissue was the core molecular event of the stress regulation network in the 7-day group, while the inhibition of hippocampal cell growth was the core molecular event in the 21-day group. For the Gabra1, Fadd, Crhr2, and Cdk6 genes, RT-PCR results were nearly in line with gene chip assay results. Conclusion During the 7-day and 21-day stress processes, the combined action of polygenic, multilevel, and multi-signal pathways leads to the disorder of the immunologic functions of the hippocampus, hippocampal apoptosis, and proliferation disequilibrium. PMID:23544040

  12. Age-dependent changes in the functional expression of two nicotinic receptor subtypes in CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Pereira, Edna F R; Albuquerque, Edson X

    2007-10-15

    Protein density measurements and mRNA analysis have provided valuable information on age-dependent changes in the distribution of different nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtypes in various areas of the rat brain, including the hippocampus. However, very little is known regarding the functional expression of nAChRs in individual neuron types at various ages. Likewise, there is paucity of information regarding the functional and pharmacological profile of nAChRs in the mature rat hippocampus. To address these issues, we used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to record nicotinic responses from CA1 stratum radiatum (SR) interneurons in hippocampal slices from rat pups (5-19 days old) and adult rats (2-5 months old). As previously observed in the hippocampus of rat pups, CA1 SR interneurons in the hippocampus of adult rats responded to choline (10mM, 12s) with whole-cell currents that decayed to the baseline within the agonist pulse, were sensitive to inhibition by methyllycaconitine (10nM) or alpha-bungarotoxin (50 nM), and were, therefore, mediated by alpha7*(1)[1] nAChRs. Likewise, as previously observed in the hippocampus of young rats, in the adult rat hippocampus excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded from SR interneurons in response to a pulse of ACh (0.1 mM, 12s) applied in the presence of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. ACh-triggered EPSCs were inhibited by mecamylamine (1 microM) or choline (1 mM) and were, therefore, likely to have resulted from activation of alpha3beta4beta2* nAChR. The magnitude of alpha7* nAChR-mediated responses increased with the age of the animals. In contrast, the magnitude of alpha3beta4beta2* nAChR-mediated responses was highest at the second postnatal week. The distinct age dependency of functional expression of alpha7* and alpha3beta4beta2* nAChRs strongly suggests that the excitability of CA1 SR interneurons is differentially regulated by the nicotinic cholinergic system in the hippocampus of rat pups

  13. Effect of treatment with choline alphoscerate on hippocampus microanatomy and glial reaction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Avola, Roberto; Mignini, Fiorenzo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Amenta, Francesco

    2006-11-20

    The influence of long term treatment with choline alphoscerate on microanatomy of hippocampus and glial reaction was assessed in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) used as an animal model of cerebrovascular disease. Choline alphoscerate is a cholinergic precursor, which has shown to be effective in countering cognitive symptoms in forms of dementia disorders of degenerative, vascular or combined origin. Male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) aged 6 months and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated for 8 weeks with an oral daily dose of 100 mg/kg of choline alphoscerate, 285 mg/kg of phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) or vehicle. On the hippocampus of different animal groups, nerve cell number and GFAP-immunoreactive astrocytes were assessed by neuroanatomical, immunochemical and immunohistochemical techniques associated with quantitative analysis. Treatment with choline alphoscerate countered nerve cell loss and glial reaction primarily in the CA1 subfields and in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of SHR. Phosphatidylcholine did not affect hypertension-dependent changes in hippocampal microanatomy. Both compounds did not affect blood pressure values in SHR. These data suggest that choline alphoscerate may play a role in the countering hippocampal changes induced by cerebrovascular involvement. The observation that treatment with choline alphoscerate attenuates the extent of glial reaction in the hippocampus of SHR suggests also that the compound may afford neuroprotection in this animal model of vascular brain damage.

  14. PEGylated Carbon Nanotubes Impair Retrieval of Contextual Fear Memory and Alter Oxidative Stress Parameters in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dal Bosco, Lidiane; Weber, Gisele E. B.; Parfitt, Gustavo M.; Paese, Karina; Gonçalves, Carla O. F.; Serodre, Tiago M.; Furtado, Clascídia A.; Santos, Adelina P.; Monserrat, José M.; Barros, Daniela M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are promising materials for biomedical applications, especially in the field of neuroscience; therefore, it is essential to evaluate the neurotoxicity of these nanomaterials. The present work assessed the effects of single-walled CNT functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG) on the consolidation and retrieval of contextual fear memory in rats and on oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus. SWCNT-PEG were dispersed in water at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.1 mg/mL and infused into the rat hippocampus. The infusion was completed immediately after training and 30 min before testing of a contextual fear conditioning task, resulting in exposure times of 24 h and 30 min, respectively. The results showed that a short exposure to SWCNT-PEG impaired fear memory retrieval and caused lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. This response was transient and overcome by the mobilization of antioxidant defenses at 24 h. These effects occurred at low and intermediate but not high concentration of SWCNT-PEG, suggesting that the observed biological response may be related to the concentration-dependent increase in particle size in SWCNT-PEG dispersions. PMID:25738149

  15. iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis of hippocampus in spatial memory deficiency rats induced by simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingmei; Chen, Hailong; Lv, Ke; Ji, Guohua; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Yanli; Li, Yinghui; Qu, Lina

    2017-03-22

    It has been demonstrated that simulated microgravity (SM) may lead to cognitive dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In present study, tail-suspension (30°) rat was employed to explore the effects of 28 days of SM on hippocampus-dependent learning and memory capability and the underlying mechanisms. We found that 28-day tail-suspension rats displayed decline of learning and memory ability in Morris water maze (MWM) test. Using iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis, a total of 4774 proteins were quantified in hippocampus. Of these identified proteins, 147 proteins were differentially expressed between tail-suspension and control group. Further analysis showed these differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) involved in different molecular function categories, and participated in many biological processes. Based on the results of PANTHER pathway analysis and further western blot verification, we observed the expression of glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1) and glutamate receptor 4 (GluR4) which involved in metabotropic glutamate receptor group III pathway and ionotropic glutamate receptor pathway were significantly induced by SM. Moreover, an increased concentration of glutamic acid (Glu) was also found in hippocampus while the concentrations of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), dopamine (DA), γ-amino acid butyric acid (GABA) and epinephrine (E) were decreased. Our finding confirms that 28-day SM exposure can cause degrading of the spatial learning and memory capability and the possible mechanisms might be related with glutamate excitotoxicity and imbalances in specific neurotransmitters.

  16. DNA methylation in the developing hippocampus and amygdala of anxiety-prone versus risk-taking rats.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rebecca K; Howard, Jasmine L; Simpson, Danielle N; Akil, Huda; Clinton, Sarah M

    2012-01-01

    All organisms exhibit a wide range of emotional behaviors and interact with the environment in different ways. Some individuals may be more quiet and shy whereas others are more outgoing and adventurous. These temperamental and personality differences can predispose individuals to certain psychopathologies which may be influenced by genetic vulnerability and/or early life experiences. Rodent models can be used to recapitulate emotional reactivity differences, and these models can, in turn, be used to examine potential neurobiological underpinnings of these traits. The present study utilizes two strains of rats that were selectively bred for differences in novelty seeking. High Novelty-Responding (bHR) rats are very active in response to novelty, exhibit exaggerated risk-taking, aggression, impulsivity, and show increased behavioral response to cocaine. Low Novelty-Responding (bLR) rats show increased anxiety, depressive behavior and vulnerability to chronic stress. One way in which the bHR versus bLR behavioral phenotypes may differ is through epigenetic modification of DNA. DNA can be modified through processes such as acetylation or methylation to either enhance or subdue gene expression. This study examines putative differences in methylation levels in the hippocampus and amygdala of developing bHR-bLR rats. Previous research observed widespread gene expression differences in the bLR developing hippocampus, and the current study aims to begin to examine potential epigenetic factors that may contribute to those gene differences. The amygdala was chosen because it is involved in emotional processes, in part through its connections with the hippocampus. Therefore, the present study used in situ hybridization to assess the expression of DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) mRNA in the hippocampus, amygdala and several other brain areas of bHR and bLR pups at three developmental time points: postnatal days (P) 7, 14, and 21. We focused on the first 3 postnatal weeks, in

  17. MDMA decreases glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility: Role for glutamate.

    PubMed

    Huff, Courtney L; Morano, Rachel L; Herman, James P; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) is a unique psychostimulant that continues to be a popular drug of abuse. It has been well documented that MDMA reduces markers of 5-HT axon terminals in rodents, as well as humans. A loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hippocampus following MDMA treatment has only been documented recently. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MDMA reduces glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-IR, another biochemical marker of GABA neurons, in the hippocampus and that this reduction in GAD67-IR neurons and an accompanying increase in seizure susceptibility involve glutamate receptor activation. Repeated exposure to MDMA (3×10mg/kg, ip) resulted in a reduction of 37-58% of GAD67-IR cells in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA1, and CA3 regions, as well as an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures, both of which persisted for at least 30days following MDMA treatment. Administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 or the glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1) inducer ceftriaxone prevented both the MDMA-induced loss of GAD67-IR neurons and the increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced seizures. The MDMA-induced increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate in the hippocampus was significantly diminished in rats treated with ceftriaxone, thereby implicating a glutamatergic mechanism in the neuroprotective effects of ceftriaxone. In summary, the present findings support a role for increased extracellular glutamate and NMDA receptor activation in the MDMA-induced loss of hippocampal GAD67-IR neurons and the subsequent increased susceptibility to evoked seizures.

  18. Antidepressant effects of crocin and its effects on transcript and protein levels of CREB, BDNF, and VGF in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antidepressants have been shown to affect levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and VGF (non-acronymic) whose transcriptions are dependent on cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in long term treatment. The aim of this study was to verify the subacute antidepressant effects of crocin, an active constituent of saffron (Crocus sativus L.), and its effects on CREB, BDNF, and VGF proteins, transcript levels and amount of active, phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) protein in rat hippocampus. Methods Crocin (12.5, 25, and 50 mg/kg), imipramine (10 mg/kg; positive control) and saline (1 mL/kg; neutral control) were administered intraperitoneally (IP) to male Wistar rats for 21 days. The antidepressant effects were studied using the forced swimming test (FST) on day 21 after injection. Protein expression and transcript levels of genes in the rat hippocampus were evaluated using western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), respectively. Results Crocin significantly reduced the immobility time in the FST. Western blot analysis showed that 25 and 50 mg/kg of crocin increased the levels of CREB and BDNF significantly and dose dependently. All doses of crocin increased the VGF levels in a dose-dependent manner. Levels of p-CREB increased significantly by 50 mg/kg dose of crocin. Only 12.5 mg/kg crocin could significantly increase the transcript levels of BDNF. No changes in CREB and VGF transcript levels were observed in all groups. Conclusions These results suggest that crocin has antidepressant-like action by increasing CREB, BDNF and VGF levels in hippocampus. PMID:24401376

  19. [Electrical activities of bursting-firing neurons in epileptic network reestablishment of rat hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Ting; Qin, Xing-Kui; Yin, Shi-Jin; Han, Dan

    2003-12-25

    The purpose of our present work was to study the discharge of bursting-firing neurons (BFNs) in ipsilateral or contralateral hippocampus (HPC), and its relations to the reestablishment of local epileptic networks. The experiments were performed on 140 Sprague Dawley male rats (150-250 g). Acute tetanization (60 Hz, 2 s, 0.4 -0.6 mA) of the right posterior dorsal hippocampus (ATPDH) was administered to establish rat epilepsy model. The single unit discharges and the depth electrographs were simultaneously recorded from ipsilateral or contralateral HPC. In other experimental rats, acute tetanization of the right anterior dorsal HPC (ATADH) was used. Extracellular unit discharges in the CA1 region were simultaneously recorded from bilateral anterior dorsal hippocampi. Analysis of hippocampal BFN firing patterns before or after administration of the tetanization was focused on according to their location in the HPC epileptic networks in vivo. Single unit discharges of 138 hippocampal neurons were recorded from ipsilateral and/or contralateral anterior dorsal HPC. Of the 138 neurons recorded, 19 were BFNs. 13 BFNs were tetanus-evoked and the remaining 6 were spontaneous ones. The evoked reactions of the single hippocampal neuron induced by the tetanization mainly included: (1) the firing patterns of the BFNs in ipsilateral anterior dorsal HPC were obviously modulated by the ATPDH from tonic firing into rhythmic bursting. The bursting interspike intervals (BISI) decreased. (2) There were mild modulations of the firing patterns of the BFNs in contralateral anterior dorsal HPC following post-inhibition of the firing rate of single neuron induced by the ATPDH. The interspike intervals (ISI) increased obviously. (3) Post-facilitation of rhythmic bursting-firing of the BFNs in contralateral anterior dorsal HPC was induced by ATADH; both the ISI and the IBI increased. (4) Synchronous or asynchronous rhythmic bursting-firing of the BFNs and the network epileptiform events

  20. The mast cell stabilizer sodium cromoglycate reduces histamine release and status epilepticus-induced neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Santana-Gómez, César Emmanuel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-05-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate changes in the histamine release, mast cell number and neuronal damage in hippocampus induced by status epilepticus. We also evaluated if sodium cromoglycate, a stabilizer of mast cells with a possible stabilizing effect on the membrane of neurons, was able to prevent the release of histamine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate during the status epilepticus. During microdialysis experiments, rats were treated with saline (SS-SE) or sodium cromoglycate (CG-SE) and 30 min later received the administration of pilocarpine to induce status epilepticus. Twenty-four hours after the status epilepticus, the brains were used to determine the neuronal damage and the number of mast cells in hippocampus. During the status epilepticus, SS-SE group showed an enhanced release of histamine (138.5%, p = 0.005), GABA (331 ± 91%, p ≤ 0.001) and glutamate (467%, p ≤ 0.001), even after diazepam administration. One day after the status epilepticus, SS-SE group demonstrated increased number of mast cells in Stratum pyramidale of CA1 (88%, p < 0.001) and neuronal damage in dentate gyrus, CA1 and CA3. In contrast to SS-SE group, rats from the CG-SE group showed increased latency to the establishment of the status epilepticus (p = 0.048), absence of wet-dog shakes, reduced histamine (but not GABA and glutamate) release, lower number of mast cells (p = 0.008) and reduced neuronal damage in hippocampus. Our data revealed that histamine, possibly from mast cells, is released in hippocampus during the status epilepticus. This effect may be involved in the subsequent neuronal damage and is diminished with sodium cromoglycate pretreatment.

  1. A ketogenic diet modifies glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid and agmatine levels in the hippocampus of rats: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Naima; Betancourt, Luis; Hernández, Luis; Rada, Pedro

    2017-03-06

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is acknowledged as an unconventional option in the treatment of epilepsy. Several lines of investigation point to a possible role of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as main contributors in this protective effect. Other biomolecules could also be involved in the beneficial consequence of the KD, for example, the diamine agmatine has been suggested to block imidazole and glutamate NMDA receptor and serves as an endogenous anticonvulsant in different animal models of epilepsy. In the present report, we have used microdialysis coupled to capillary electrophoresis to monitor microdialysate levels of GABA, glutamate and agmatine in the hippocampus of rats submitted to a KD for 15days compared to rats on a normal rat chow diet. A significant increase in GABA and agmatine levels while no change in glutamate levels was observed. These results support the notion that the KD modifies different transmitters favoring inhibitory over excitatory neurotransmitters.

  2. Sleep enhances memory consolidation in the hippocampus-dependent object-place recognition task in rats.

    PubMed

    Binder, Sonja; Baier, Paul Christian; Mölle, Matthias; Inostroza, Marion; Born, Jan; Marshall, Lisa

    2012-02-01

    The positive impact of sleep on memory consolidation has been shown for human subjects in numerous studies, but there is still sparse knowledge on this topic in rats, one of the most prominent model species in neuroscience research. Here, we examined the role of sleep in the object-place recognition task, a task closely comparable to tasks typically applied for testing human declarative memory: It is a one-trial task, hippocampus-dependent, not stressful and can be repeated within the same animal. A test session consisted of the Sample trial, followed by a 2-h retention interval and a Test trial, the latter examining the memory the rat had for the places of two objects presented at the Sample trial. In Experiment 1, each rat was tested twice, with the retention interval taking place either in the morning or evening, i.e., in the inactive or active phase, respectively. Rats showed significantly (p<0.01) better memory for object place after the Morning session. To control for confounding circadian factors, in Experiment 2 rats were tested four times, i.e., in the morning or in the evening while sleep was or was not deprived. Sleep during the retention interval was recorded polysomnographically. Rats only showed significant memory for the target object place in the Test trial after the Morning retention interval in the absence of sleep deprivation, and recognition performance in this condition was significantly superior to that in the three other conditions (p<0.05). EEG recordings during spontaneous morning sleep revealed increased slow oscillation (0.85-2.0 Hz) and upper delta (2.0-4.0 Hz), but reduced spindle band (10.5-13.5 Hz) activity, as compared to evening sleep. However, spindle band power was increased in the Morning retention interval in comparison to a Morning Baseline period (p<0.05). We conclude that consolidation of object-place memory depends on sleep, and presumably requires NonREM sleep rich in both slow wave and spindle activity.

  3. Acamprosate blocks the increase in dopamine extracellular levels in nucleus accumbens evoked by chemical stimulation of the ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cano-Cebrián, M J; Zornoza-Sabina, T; Guerri, C; Polache, A; Granero, L

    2003-10-01

    Recently, we have shown that acamprosate is able to modulate extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and may act as an antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Neurochemical studies show that chemical stimulation (using NMDA) of the ventral subiculum (vSub) of the hippocampus produces robust and sustained increases in extracellular DA levels in the NAc, an effect mediated through ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors. The present study examines whether acamprosate locally infused in the NAc of rats could block or attenuate the increase in NAc extracellular DA elicited by chemical stimulation (with 5 mM NMDA) of the ventral subiculum of the hippocampus. The stimulation of the vSub during perfusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid in NAc induced a significant and persistent increase in NAc DA levels. Reverse dialysis of 0.05 mM acamprosate in NAc blocked the increase in DA evoked by the chemical stimulation of the vSub. These data support the possibility that the antagonism at the NMDA receptors in NAc can explain, at least in part, the mechanism of action of this drug.

  4. Pharmacological characterisation of the histamine H3 receptor in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Alves-Rodrigues, A; Timmerman, H; Willems, E; Lemstra, S; Zuiderveld, O P; Leurs, R

    1998-03-30

    The purpose of this report was to pharmacologically characterise the histamine H3 in the rat hippocampus using radioligand binding studies with the H3 receptor antagonist [125I]iodophenpropit and the H3 receptor mediated inhibition of [3H]noradrenaline release. A dissociation constant of 0.33 nM and a maximal number of binding sites of 125 fmol/mg protein were found for [125I]iodophenpropit. Competition studies showed stereoselectivity for the (R) and (S) enantiomers of alpha-methylhistamine and 10 microM of GTPgammaS shifted the curve of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine rightwards. Up to 1 microM, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine displaced only 30% whereas the tested H3-antagonists displaced 50-60% of the total [125I]iodophenpropit bound. This indicates the presence of an additional non-H3 receptor binding site(s) for [125I]iodophenpropit in the rat hippocampus. This secondary site shows low affinity for H3 agonists, but high affinity for the tested H3 antagonists. Electrically evoked [3H]acetylcholine release was shown in slices of rat hippocampus. No H3 receptor modulation of [3H]acetylcholine release from hippocampal slices was detectable. However, H3 receptor activation inhibited 42% of the electrically-evoked [3H]noradrenaline release in rat hippocampal slices. The inhibition of [3H]noradrenaline release was effectively antagonized by the H3 antagonists thioperamide and burimamide. We describe the pharmacological identification of the histamine H3 receptor in the rat hippocampus and its similarities and differences from the cortical H3 receptor. These studies enable us to investigate changes in density and functionality of the hippocampal H3 receptor under (patho)physiological conditions.

  5. Functional emergence of the hippocampus in context fear learning in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Raineki, Charlis; Holman, Parker J; Debiec, Jacek; Bugg, Melissa; Beasley, Allyson; Sullivan, Regina M

    2010-09-01

    The hippocampus is a part of the limbic system and is important for the formation of associative memories, such as acquiring information about the context (e.g., the place where an experience occurred) during emotional learning (e.g., fear conditioning). Here, we assess whether the hippocampus is responsible for pups' newly emerging context learning. In all experiments, postnatal day (PN) 21 and PN24 rat pups received 10 pairings of odor-0.5 mA shock or control unpaired odor-shock, odor only, or shock only. Some pups were used for context, cue or odor avoidance tests, while the remaining pups were used for c-Fos immunohistochemistry to assess hippocampal activity during acquisition. Our results show that cue and odor avoidance learning were similar at both ages, while contextual fear learning and learning-associated hippocampal (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus) activity (c-Fos) only occurred in PN24 paired pups. To assess a causal relationship between the hippocampus and context conditioning, we infused muscimol into the hippocampus, which blocked acquisition of context fear learning in the PN24 pups. Muscimol or vehicle infusions did not affect cue learning or aversion to the odor at PN21 or PN24. The results suggest that the newly emerging contextual learning exhibited by PN24 pups is supported by the hippocampus.

  6. Changes in the regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine release by alpha2-adrenoceptors in the rat hippocampus after long-term desipramine treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, M; Matsumoto, M; Numazawa, R; Togashi, H; Smith, C B; Saito, H

    1995-12-29

    In vivo microdialysis was used to measure the effects of long-term treatment of rats with desipramine upon the regulation by alpha2-adrenoceptors of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) release from the serotonergic neurons in the hippocampus. Rats were injected with saline or desipramine, 10 mg/kg, i.p., every 12 h for 14 days. When added to the perfusion solution, brimonidine, an alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist, significantly inhibited the K+-evoked release of 5-HT in the hippocampi of saline-treated, control rats. This action of brimonidine was prevented by pretreating the rats with idazoxan, an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Long-term desipramine treatment significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of brimonidine upon the K+-evoked 5-HT release. With long-term administration of desipramine, noradrenaline content in the hippocampi was significantly decreased as compared with that of the control rats, whereas the basal noradrenaline concentration in the dialysate was significantly increased. On the other hand, both the 5-HT content of the hippocampus and the basal 5-HT concentration in the dialysate were significantly increased. The present study suggests that long-term administration of desipramine causes a functional subsensitivity of the presynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors that regulate serotonergic neuronal function in the rat hippocampus. It also supports the concept that changes in the sensitivity of alpha2-adrenoceptors that regulate neurotransmitter release play an important role in the mechanism of antidepressant drug action.

  7. The effects of 30 mT electromagnetic fields on hippocampus cells of rats

    PubMed Central

    Teimori, Farzaneh; Khaki, Amir A.; Rajabzadeh, Asghar; Roshangar, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the use of electromagnetic waves in the treatment of some acute and chronic diseases, application of these waves in everyday life has created several problems for humans, especially the nerve system. In this study, the effects of 30mT electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on the hippocampus is investigated. Methods: Twenty-four 5-month Wistar rats weighing 150–200 g were divided into two groups. The experimental group rats were under the influence of an EMF at an intensity of 3 mT for approximately 4 hours a day (from 8 AM to 12 PM) during 10 weeks. After the hippocampus was removed, thin slides were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) to study the ultrastructural tissue. Cell death detection POD kits were used to determine the apoptosis rate. Results: The results of the TEM showed that, in the hippocampus of the experimental group, in comparison to the control group, there was a substantial shift; even intracellular organelles such as the mitochondria were morphologically abnormal and uncertain. The number of apoptotic cells in the exposed group compared to the control group showed significant changes. Conclusions: Similar to numerous studies that have reported the effects of EMFs on nerves system, it was also confirmed in this lecture. Hence, the hippocampus which is important in regulating emotions, behavior, motivation, and memory functions, may be impaired by the negative impacts of EMFs. PMID:27453795

  8. Astrocyte fatty acid binding protein-7 is a marker for neurogenic niches in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Young, John K; Heinbockel, Thomas; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2013-12-01

    Recent research has determined that newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of the macaque are frequently adjacent to astrocytes immunoreactive for fatty acid binding protein-7 (FABP7). To investigate if a similar relationship between FABP7-positive (FABP7+) astrocytes and proliferating cells exists in the rodent brain, sections of brains from juvenile rats were stained by immunohistochemistry to demonstrate newborn cells (antibody to Ki67 protein) and FABP7+ astrocytes. In rat brains, FABP7+ astrocytes were particularly abundant in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and were frequently close to dividing cells immunoreactive for Ki67 protein. FABP7+ astrocytes were also present in the olfactory bulbs, arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, and in the dorsal medulla subjacent to the area postrema, sites where more modest numbers of newborn neurons can also be found. These data suggest that regional accumulations of FABP7+ astrocytes may represent reservoirs of cells having the potential for neurogenesis. Because FABP7+ astrocytes are particularly abundant in the hippocampus, and since the gene for FABP7 has been linked to Alzheimer's disease, age-related changes in FABP7+ astrocytes (mitochondrial degeneration) may be relevant to age-associated disorders of the hippocampus.

  9. Localization of glucocorticoid receptor messenger ribonucleic acid in hippocampus of rat brain using in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Matocha, M.F.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1988-08-01

    An in situ hybridization procedure was applied to quantify glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNAs in the hippocampus of rat brain. Hybridization was carried out using a radiolabeled antisense probe complementary to the rat liver GR gene. The specificity of the method was validated by showing: 1) a high cellular grain density in sections hybridized with an antisense but not a sense probe; 2) agreement between the experimental and theoretical temperature at which 50% of the hybrids melted, and 3) a high signal distribution of GR mRNA in the hippocampus, a region of brain known to preferentially concentrate steroid hormones. Within the hippocampus, however, subregional differences in hybridization densities were observed. Quantitative autoradiography indicated that the average neuronal silver grain number was highest in the pyramidal cell layers of CA2 and CA4 and lowest in those of CA1 and CA3. Also, there was a significant difference in the average grain number between all of the cell fields except for that between CA2 and CA4. These results show that contiguous but neuroanatomically distinct cell fields of the hippocampus express different levels of GR transcripts, and indicate that differential regulation of GR expression occurs in subpopulations of hippocampal neurons.

  10. Enhanced dendritic spine number of neurons of the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in old rats after chronic donepezil administration

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara-Gonzalez, Faviola; Juarez, Ismael; Solis, Oscar; Martinez-Tellez, Isaura; Camacho-Abrego, Israel; Masliah, Eliezer; Mena, Raul; Flores, Gonzalo

    2010-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease brains morphological changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been observed. These changes are particularly reflected in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine number. Donepezil is a potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We have studied the effect of oral administration of this drug on the morphology of neuronal cells from the brain of aged rats. We examined dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal or ventral hippocampus and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Donepezil (1 mg/Kg, vo) was administrated every day for 60 days to rats aged 10 and 18 months. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by Sholl analysis at 12 and 20 months ages, respectively. In all Donepezil treated-rats a significant increment of the dendritic spines number in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal hippocampus was observed. However, pyramidal neurons of the ventral hippocampus and medium spiny cells of the NAcc only showed an increase in the number of their spines in 12 months old-rats. Our results suggest that Donepezil prevents the alterations of the neuronal dendrite morphology caused by aging. PMID:20336627

  11. Disturbance of endogenous hydrogen sulfide generation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in hippocampus are involved in homocysteine-induced defect in learning and memory of rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Hong; Tang, Ji-Ping; Zhang, Ping; Li, Xiang; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wei, Hai-Jun; Yang, Xue-Feng; Zou, Wei; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2014-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as an endogenous neuromodulator and neuroprotectant. It has been shown that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathological mechanisms of the learning and memory dysfunctions and that H2S exerts its neuroprotective role via suppressing ER stress. In the present work, we explored the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of Hcy on the formation of learning and memory, the generation of endogenous H2S, and the expression of ER stress in the hippocampus of rats. We found that intracerebroventricular injection of Hcy in rats leads to learning and memory dysfunctions in the Morris water maze and novel of object recognition test and decreases in the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous H2S generation, and the generation of endogenous H2S in the hippocampus of rats. We also showed that exposure of Hcy could up-regulate the expressions of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CHOP, and cleaved caspase-12, which are the major mark proteins of ER stress, in the hippocampus of rats. Taken together, these results suggest that the disturbance of hippocampal endogenous H2S generation and the increase in ER stress in the hippocampus are related to Hcy-induced defect in learning and memory.

  12. Sensitization to the conditioned rewarding effects of morphine modulates gene expression in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Marie-Claire, Cynthia; Courtin, Cindie; Robert, Amelie; Gidrol, Xavier; Roques, Bernard P; Noble, Florence

    2007-02-01

    Opiates addiction is characterized by its long-term persistence. In order to study the enduring changes in long-term memory in hippocampus, a pivotal region for this process, we used suppression subtractive hybridization to compare hippocampal gene expression in morphine and saline-treated rats. Animals were subjected to an extended place preference paradigm consisting of four conditioning phases. Sensitization to the reinforcing effects of the drug occurred after three conditioning phases. After 25 days of treatment rats were euthanized and the complementary DNA (cDNA) from the hippocampus of morphine-dependent and saline-treated animals were then screened for differentially expressed cDNAs. The selected 177 clones were then subjected to a microarray procedure and 20 clones were found differentially regulated. The pattern of regulated genes suggests impairments in neurotransmitter release and the activation of neuroprotective pathways.

  13. Acute antiapoptotic effects of hydrocortisone in the hippocampus of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Menshanov, P N; Bannova, A V; Bulygina, V V; Dygalo, N N

    2013-01-01

    Natural glucocorticoid hydrocortisone was suggested as a potent substitution for dexamethasone in the treatment of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in neonates. The aim of this study was to investigate whether hydrocortisone is able to affect the expression of apoptotic genes and the intensity of naturally occurring cell death in the developing rat hippocampus. Hormone treatment decreased procaspase-3 and active caspase-3 levels as well as DNA fragmentation intensity in the hippocampal formation of one-week-old rats in 6 h after injection. These changes were accompanied by an upregulation of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-XL, while expression of proapoptotic protein Bax remained unchanged. The action of hydrocortisone was glucocorticoid receptor-independent, as the selective glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone did not affect either apoptotic protein levels or DNA fragmentation intensity in the hippocampal region. The data are the first evidences for in vivo antiapoptotic effects of hydrocortisone in the developing hippocampus.

  14. Developmental changes in GABAergic actions and seizure susceptibility in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Khazipov, Roustem; Khalilov, Ilgam; Tyzio, Roman; Morozova, Elena; Ben-Ari, Yezekiel; Holmes, Gregory L

    2004-02-01

    The immature brain is prone to seizures but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We explored the hypothesis that increased seizure susceptibility during early development is due to the excitatory action of GABA. Using noninvasive extracellular field potential and cell-attached recordings in CA3 of Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal slices, we compared the developmental alterations in three parameters: excitatory actions of GABA, presence of the immature pattern of giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) and severity of epileptiform activity generated by high potassium. The GABA(A) receptor agonist isoguvacine increased firing of CA3 pyramidal cells in neonatal slices while inhibiting activity in adults. A switch in the GABA(A) signalling from excitation to inhibition occurred at postnatal day (P) 13.5 +/- 0.4. Field GDPs were present in the form of spontaneous population bursts until P12.7 +/- 0.3. High potassium (8.5 mm) induced seizure-like events (SLEs) in 35% of slices at P7-16 (peak at P11.3 +/- 0.4), but only interictal activity before and after that age. The GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline reduced the frequency or completely blocked SLEs and induced interictal clonic-like activity accompanied by a reduction in the frequency but an increase in the amplitude of the population spikes. In slices with interictal activity, bicuculline typically caused a large amplitude interictal clonic-like activity at all ages; in slices from P5-16 rats it was often preceded by one SLE at the beginning of bicuculline application. These results suggest that, in the immature hippocampus, GABA exerts dual (both excitatory and inhibitory) actions and that the excitatory component in the action of GABA may contribute to increased excitability during early development.

  15. Mifepristone repairs region-dependent alteration of synapsin I in hippocampus in rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Min; Han, Hui; Wang, Qu-Nan; Hou, Hai-Long; Tong, Hui; Yan, Xue-Bo; Zhou, Jiang-Ning

    2007-12-01

    Clinical investigations present much evidence that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist mifepristone leads to a rapid amelioration of depression. The molecular mechanisms of mifepristone involved in the treatment of depression are not fully understood. Depression is associated with hippocampal plasticity, for which increased excitatory amino acid (EAA) release in CA3 induced by chronic stress is responsible, and glucocorticoids have a permissive role and act synergistically with EAAs in producing neuronal damage. Moreover, glucocorticoids increase synapsin I, which has a key role in the release of neurotransmitter, including EAAs. Hereby, we hypothesize that major depression involves synapsin I alteration and that mifepristone blocks this alteration. In the present study, we observed both the expression of hippocampal synapsin I and depression-associated behavior in a rat model of depression induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). The result showed that a region-dependent synapsin I alteration occurs in the rat hippocampus after 21 days of CUMS, that is, it increases in dentate gyrus (DG)/CA3 and decreases in the CA1 region. Correlation analysis indicated that the decrease of synapsin I in CA1 is highly correlated with the increase in the DG/CA3 subfield. Simultaneously, the region-dependent alteration of synapsin I is correlated with depression-associated behaviors. Both the alteration of synapsin I and the depression-associated behavior were rapidly restored after treatment with mifepristone for 1 week. The result suggests that the molecular mechanism underlying the treatment of depression with mifepristone is associated with the rapid repair of the synaptic alteration.

  16. Dynamic release of amino acid transmitters induced by valproate in PTZ-kindled epileptic rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xu-Ying; Lu, Xiang; Zhong, Ming-Kang; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2004-03-01

    In the present communication, the dynamic release of amino acid (AA) transmitters induced by valproate (VPA) in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindled freely moving rats hippocampus has been determined. The results showed that glutamate and aspartate release were significantly increased during the seizure/interical periods, and markedly decreased after the application of 200mg/kg valproate. In contrast, gamma-aminobutyric acid and taurine release were markedly decreased during interical period, and significantly increased during the seizure period. Glycine release was similar to the case of glutamate and aspartate release. The increase of either gamma-aminobutyric acid/taurine or glycine releases during the seizure period could be inhibited by the application of valproate likewise. The results indicate that: (a) the imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters is really involved in epilepsy; (b) the modulation of valproate on the major amino acid neurotransmitters certainly plays one of important roles on antiepilepsy efficacy; (c) the pentylenetetrazol-kindled epileptogenesis model is a fit one for approaching the mechanisms of valproate modulating amino acid neurotransmitters.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of Bacopa monniera whole-plant extract against aluminum-induced hippocampus damage in rats: evidence from electron microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Nannepaga, John Sushma; Korivi, Mallikarjuna; Tirumanyam, Madhavi; Bommavaram, Mahitha; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2014-10-31

    Impaired antioxidant system and structural changes in hippocampus are considered as key instigators of neurodegenerative diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the antioxidant and tissue protective properties of Bacopa monniera whole-plant extract (BME) against aluminum (Al)- induced oxidative stress and hippocampus damage in rats. Male Wistar rats were evenly divided into four groups, nine in each and labeled as control, Al treated (10 mg/kg), BME administered (40 mg/kg) and combination of both Al plus BME (Al+BME) treated groups. After one month of treatment by oral administration, antioxidant status was determined, and structural changes in the hippocampus were evaluated by electron microscopy. Al-induced increased oxidative damage in the hippocampus was revealed by elevated thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). This increased lipid peroxidation was associated with significantly decreased antioxidant enzyme activities, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). However, aluminum intoxicated rats treated with BME for 30 days showed significantly restored antioxidant enzyme activities along with decreased TBARS (P < 0.01). Further evidences from electron micrographs clearly indicated that Al-induced vacuolation, lipofuscin deposition and pyramidal cell degeneration in the hippocampus was attenuated with co-administration of the whole-plant extract. Our results demonstrate that structural derangement in hippocampus by aluminum is directly proportionate with increased lipid peroxidation. Nevertheless, B. monniera treatment potentiates the antioxidant status and suppressed the tissue damage induced by Al-intoxication. These findings suggest that B. monniera whole-plant extracts can be considered as a possible remedy to counteract aluminum-associated neurological disorders.

  18. Growth hormone prevents neuronal loss in the aged rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Azcoitia, Iñigo; Perez-Martin, Margarita; Salazar, Veronica; Castillo, Carmen; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2005-05-01

    Decline of growth hormone (GH) with aging is associated to memory and cognitive alterations. In this study, the number of neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus has been assessed in male and female Wistar rats at 3, 6, 12, 14, 18, 22 and 24 months of age, using the optical fractionator method. Male rats had more neurons than females at all the ages studied. Significant neuronal loss was observed in both sexes between 22 and 24 months of age. In a second experiment, 22 month-old male and female rats were treated for 10 weeks with 2 mg/kg/day of GH or saline. At 24 months of age, animals treated with GH had more neurons in the hilus than animals treated with saline. These findings indicate that GH is neuroprotective in old animals and that its administration may ameliorate neuronal alterations associated to aging.

  19. Differential induction of c-Jun and Fos-like proteins in rat hippocampus and dorsal striatum after training in two water maze tasks.

    PubMed

    Teather, Lisa A; Packard, Mark G; Smith, Diane E; Ellis-Behnke, Rutledge G; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2005-09-01

    Research examining the neuroanatomical bases of memory in mammals suggests that the hippocampus and dorsal striatum are parts of independent memory systems that mediate "cognitive" and stimulus-response "habit" memory, respectively. At the molecular level, increasing evidence indicates a role for immediate early gene (IEG) expression in memory formation. The present experiment examined whether acquisition of cognitive and habit memory result in differential patterns of IEG protein product expression in these two brain structures. Adult male Long-Evans rats were trained in either a hippocampal-dependent spatial water maze task, or a dorsal striatal-dependent cued water maze task. Ninety minutes after task acquisition, brains were removed and processed for immunocytochemical procedures, and the number of cells expressing Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-like-IR) and c-Jun-IR in sections from the dorsal hippocampus and the dorsal striatum were counted. In the dorsal hippocampus of rats trained in the spatial task, there were significantly more c-Jun-IR pyramidal cells in the CA1 and CA3 regions, relative to rats that had acquired the cued task, yoked controls (free-swim), or naïve (home cage) rats. Relative to rats receiving cued task training and control conditions, increases in Fos-like IR were also observed in the CA1 region of rats trained in the spatial task. In rats that had acquired the cued task, patches of c-Jun-IR were observed in the posteroventral striatum; no such patches were evident in rats trained in the spatial task, yoked-control rats, or naïve rats. The results demonstrate that IEG protein product expression is up-regulated in a task-dependent and brain structure-specific manner shortly after acquisition of cognitive and habit memory tasks.

  20. Effect of hindlimb unloading on stereological parameters of the motor cortex and hippocampus in male rats.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Mohammad Saied; Mirzaii-Dizgah, Iraj; Vasaghi-Gharamaleki, Behnoosh; Zamiri, Mohammad Javad

    2016-11-09

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) can cause motion and cognition dysfunction, although its cellular and molecular mechanisms are not well understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the stereological parameters of the brain areas involved in motion (motor cortex) and spatial learning - memory (hippocampus) under an HU condition. Sixteen adult male rats, kept under a 12 : 12 h light-dark cycle, were divided into two groups of freely moving (n=8) and HU (n=8) rats. The volume of motor cortex and hippocampus, the numerical cell density of neurons in layers I, II-III, V, and VI of the motor cortex, the entire motor cortex as well as the primary motor cortex, and the numerical density of the CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus subregions of the hippocampus were estimated. No significant differences were observed in the evaluated parameters. Our results thus indicated that motor cortical and hippocampal atrophy and cell loss may not necessarily be involved in the motion and spatial learning memory impairment in the rat.

  1. Proteomic changes in female rat hippocampus following exposure to a terrified sound stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Hu, Lili; Song, Tusheng; Liu, Yong; Wu, Qiuhua; Zhao, Lingyu; Liu, Liying; Zhao, Xiaoge; Zhang, Dianzeng; Huang, Chen

    2014-06-01

    Stress plays a profound role in the onset of affective disorders, including an elevation in risk factors for depression and anxiety. Women are twice as vulnerable to stress as men because of greater sensitivity to a substance produced during times of anxiety. To better define the abnormal proteins implicated in cognitive deficits and other stress-induced dysfunction, female rats were exposed to terrified sound stress, and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were utilized to determine the differential protein expression in the hippocampus in sound-stressed female rats compared with controls. Quantitative differences were found in 44 protein spots which were differentially expressed between the stressed and control groups (fold change of >2; p < 0.01). Eighteen protein spots were downregulated, and 26 protein spots were upregulated in the stressed group. The seven most differentially expressed proteins were identified and validated as follows: dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (DRP-2), creatine kinase B type, dynamin-1 protein, alpha-internexin, glial fibrillary acidic protein beta, gamma-enolase, and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A. Changes in protein levels were detected in the hippocampus of female rats subjected to terrified sound stress. The findings herein may open new opportunities for further investigations on the modulation induced in the hippocampus by stress at the molecular level, especially with respect to females stress.

  2. Vortioxetine promotes early changes in dendritic morphology compared to fluoxetine in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fenghua; du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Waller, Jessica A; Sanchez, Connie; Nyengaard, Jens R; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical studies reveal that the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine enhances long-term potentiation and dendritic branching compared to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). In the present study, we investigated vortioxetine׳s effects on spines and dendritic morphology in rat hippocampus at two time points compared to the SSRI, fluoxetine. Rats were dosed for 1 and 4 weeks with vortioxetine and fluoxetine at doses relevant for antidepressant activity. Dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons (i.e., dendritic length, dendritic branch, spine number and density, and Sholl analysis) was examined in Golgi-stained sections from hippocampal CA1. After 1 week of treatment, vortioxetine significantly increased spine number (apical and basal dendrites), spine density (only basal), dendritic length (only apical), and dendritic branch number (apical and basal), whereas fluoxetine had no effect. After 4 weeks of treatment, vortioxetine significantly increased all measures of dendritic spine morphology as did fluoxetine except for spine density of basal dendrites. The number of intersections in the apical and basal dendrites was also significantly increased for both treatments after 4 weeks compared to control. In addition, 4 weeks of vortioxetine treatment, but not fluoxetine, promoted a decrease in spine neck length. In conclusion, 1-week vortioxetine treatment induced changes in spine number and density and dendritic morphology, whereas an equivalent dose of fluoxetine had no effects. Decreased spine neck length following 4-week vortioxetine treatment suggests a transition to mature spine morphology. This implies that vortioxetine׳s effects on spine and dendritic morphology are mediated by mechanisms that go beyond serotonin reuptake inhibition.

  3. Alterations of p75 neurotrophin receptor and Myelin transcription factor 1 in the hippocampus of perinatal phencyclidine treated rats.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jessica L; Newell, Kelly A; Matosin, Natalie; Huang, Xu-Feng; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2015-12-03

    Postnatal administration of phencyclidine (PCP) in rodents causes major disturbances to neurological processes resulting in severe modifications to normal behavioral traits into adulthood. It is routinely used to model psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, producing many of the dysfunctional processes in the brain that are present in this devastating disorder, including elevated levels of apoptosis during neurodevelopment and disruptions to myelin and plasticity processes. Lingo-1 (or Leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin domain-containing protein) is responsible for negatively regulating neurite outgrowth and the myelination of axons. Recent findings using a postmortem human brain cohort showed that Lingo-1 signaling partners in the Nogo receptor (NgR)/p75/TNF receptor orphan Y (TROY) signaling complex, and downstream signaling partners With No Lysine (K) (WNK1) and Myelin transcription factor 1 (Myt1), play a significant part in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here we have examined the implication of Lingo-1 and its signaling partners in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia using PCP to determine if these pathways are altered in the hippocampus throughout different stages of neurodevelopment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously with PCP (10mg/kg) or saline solution on postnatal days (PN) 7, 9, and 11. Rats (n=6/group) were sacrificed at PN12, 5weeks, or 14weeks. Relative expression levels of Lingo-1 signaling proteins were examined in the hippocampus of the treated rats. p75 and Myt1 were decreased (0.001≤p≤0.011) in the PCP treated rats at PN12. There were no significant changes in any of the tested proteins at 5weeks (p>0.05). At 14weeks, p75, TROY, and Myt1 were increased in the PCP treated rats (0.014≤p≤0.022). This is the first report of an alteration in Lingo-1 signaling proteins in the rat hippocampus, both directly after PCP treatment in early development and in adulthood. Based on our results, we propose that

  4. Differential effects of benzodiazepines on phospholipid methylation in hippocampus and cerebellum of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Tacconi, M.T.; Salmona, M.

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the occupancy of BDZ binding sites and phospholipid methylation in brain, the authors examined phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity in synaptosomes of rat hippocampi and cerebella in the presence of BDZ ligands with different modes of action. We found that Ro 5-4864, a specific ligand for peripheral type receptors, increased PL methylation in hippocampal and cerebellar synaptosomes. This effect was directly related to receptor occupancy, since the specific antagonist PK11195 inhibited the rise in PEMT activity induced by Ro 5-4864. Clonazepam, on the other hand, tended to reduce PL production in cerebellum and hippocampus except for hiccocampal (/sup 3/H)-phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine which was elevated by 40 to 70% at doses ranging from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M. When equimolar concentrations of the antagonist Ro 15-1788 were given in association the clonazepam-induced phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine increase was reduced by 70%. These data support the involvement of structural and functional membrane alterations in the action of BDZ. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Effects of essential oil from Chamaecyparis obtusa on cytokine genes in the hippocampus of maternal separation rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae Jeong; Kim, Su Kang; Kang, Won Sub; Woo, Jong-Min; Kim, Jong Woo

    2014-02-01

    We investigated the effects of an essential oil from Chamaecyparis obtusa (EOCO) on early life stress, using maternal separation (MS) rats and a microarray method to analyze the changes in gene expressions caused by EOCO in the hippocampus of MS rats. Rats in the MS groups were separated from their respective mothers from postnatal day (pnd) 14 to 28. Rats in the EOCO-treated groups were exposed to EOCO for 1 or 2 h by inhalation from pnd 21 to 28. The EOCO-treated MS rats showed decreased anxiety-related behaviors compared with the untreated MS rats in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test. In the microarray analysis, we found that EOCO downregulated the expressions of cytokine genes such as Ccl2, Il6, Cxcl10, Ccl19, and Il1rl in the hippocampus of MS rats, and also confirmed that using reverse transcriptase - PCR. In particular, the expressions of Ccl2 and Il6 were predominantly decreased by EOCO in the hippocampus of MS rats. Interestingly, protein expression was also reduced by EOCO in MS rats. These results indicate that EOCO decreases MS-induced anxiety-related behaviors, and modulates cytokines, particularly Ccl2 and Il6, in the hippocampus of MS rats.

  6. Biopersistence of PEGylated Carbon Nanotubes Promotes a Delayed Antioxidant Response after Infusion into the Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dal Bosco, Lidiane; Weber, Gisele E; Parfitt, Gustavo M; Cordeiro, Arthur P; Sahoo, Sangram K; Fantini, Cristiano; Klosterhoff, Marta C; Romano, Luis Alberto; Furtado, Clascídia A; Santos, Adelina P; Monserrat, José M; Barros, Daniela M

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are promising nanomaterials for the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. However, the ability of these nanomaterials to cross cell membranes and interact with neural cells brings the need for the assessment of their potential adverse effects on the nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the biopersistence of single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG) directly infused into the rat hippocampus. Contextual fear conditioning, Y-maze and open field tasks were performed to evaluate the effects of SWCNT-PEG on memory and locomotor activity. The effects of SWCNT-PEG on oxidative stress and morphology of the hippocampus were assessed 1 and 7 days after infusion of the dispersions at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.1 mg/mL. Raman analysis of the hippocampal homogenates indicates the biopersistence of SWCNT-PEG in the hippocampus 7 days post-injection. The infusion of the dispersions had no effect on the acquisition or persistence of the contextual fear memory; likewise, the spatial recognition memory and locomotor activity were not affected by SWCNT-PEG. Histological examination revealed no remarkable morphological alterations after nanomaterial exposure. One day after the infusion, SWCNT-PEG dispersions at 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL were able to decrease total antioxidant capacity without modifying the levels of reactive oxygen species or lipid hydroperoxides in the hippocampus. Moreover, SWCNT-PEG dispersions at all concentrations induced antioxidant defenses and reduced reactive oxygen species production in the hippocampus at 7 days post-injection. In this work, we found a time-dependent change in antioxidant defenses after the exposure to SWCNT-PEG. We hypothesized that the persistence of the nanomaterial in the tissue can induce an antioxidant response that might have provided resistance to an initial insult. Such antioxidant delayed response may constitute an adaptive response to the biopersistence of SWCNT-PEG in the

  7. Regional Convection-Enhanced Delivery of Gadolinium-labeled Albumin in the Rat Hippocampus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Astary, Garrett W.; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Carney, Paul R.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa

    2010-01-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) has emerged as a promising method of targeted drug-delivery for treating central nervous system (CNS) disorders, but the influence of brain structure on infusate distribution is unclear. We have utilized this approach to study extracellular transport and distribution of a contrast agent in the hippocampus, a complex structure susceptible to CNS disorders. The magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent diethylene triamene penta-acetic acid chelated gadolinium-labeled albumin (Gd-albumin), tagged with Evans blue dye, was directly infused into the dorsal and ventral hippocampus of seven male Sprague-Dawley rats. The final distribution profile of the contrast agent, a product of CED and limited diffusion, was observed in vivo using high-resolution T1-weighted MR imaging at 11.1 Tesla. Dense cell layers, such as the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and the pyramidal cell layer of CA1, appeared to be barriers to transport of the tracer. Three-dimensional distribution shape and volume (Vd) differences, between the dorsal and ventral hippocampus infusions, were determined from the MR images using a semi-automatic segmentation routine (Dorsal Vd = 23.4 ± 1.8 μl, Ventral Vd = 36.4 ± 5.1 μl). Finer structural detail of the hippocampus was obtained using a combination of histological analysis and fluorescence imaging. This study demonstrates that CED has the potential to target all regions of the hippocampus and that tracer distribution is influenced by infusion site, underlying structure and circuitry, and extent of backflow. Therefore, CED, combined with high-resolution MR imaging, may be a useful strategy for delivering therapeutics for the treatment of CNS disorders affecting the hippocampus. PMID:20067808

  8. Deficits in parvalbumin and calbindin immunoreactive cells in the hippocampus of isolation reared rats.

    PubMed

    Harte, M K; Powell, S B; Swerdlow, N R; Geyer, M A; Reynolds, G P

    2007-07-01

    Post-mortem studies have provided evidence for abnormalities of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in schizophrenia. The calcium-binding proteins (CBPs), parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR) can be used as markers for specific subpopulations of GABAergic neurons in the brain. Isolation rearing of rats is a non-pharmacological, non-lesion manipulation that leads to deficits in prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex (PPI) and other behavioural and neurochemical alterations reminiscent of schizophrenia. Female rats were reared in social housing (groups of three) or singly for 11 weeks post weaning and PPI was measured. Brains were removed and hippocampal CBP- containing neurons determined following immunocytochemical staining. Compared to socially housed rats, isolated rats exhibited PPI deficits and reductions in PV and CB-immunoreactive cells in the hippocampus, with no significant change in CR. These findings demonstrate selective abnormalities of sub-populations of GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus of isolation reared rats, which resemble the neuronal deficits seen in this region in schizophrenia.

  9. Downregulation of caveolin-1 contributes to the synaptic plasticity deficit in the hippocampus of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Liang, Zhanhua; Liu, Jing; Zou, Wei; Li, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yachen; An, Lijia

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity, but the relationship between its pression and cognitive function during aging remains controversial. To explore the relationship be-tween synaptic plasticity in the aging process and changes in learning and memory, we examined caveolin-1 expression in the hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum of rats at different ages. We also examined the relationship between the expression of caveolin-1 and synaptophysin, a marker of synaptic plasticity. Hippocampal caveolin-1 and synaptophysin expression in aged (22–24 month old) rats was significantly lower than that in young (1 month old) and adult (4 months old) rats. pression levels of both proteins were significantly greater in the cortex of aged rats than in that of young or adult rats, and levels were similar between the three age groups in the cerebellum. Linear regression analysis revealed that hippocampal expression of synaptophysin was associated with memory and learning abilities. Moreover, synaptophysin expression correlated positively with caveolin-1 expression in the hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum. These results confirm that caveolin-1 has a regulatory effect on synaptic plasticity, and suggest that the downregulation of hippocampal caveolin-1 expression causes a decrease in synaptic plasticity during physiological aging. PMID:25206583

  10. Glucocorticoids and the expression of mRNAs for neurotrophins, their receptors and GAP-43 in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chao, H M; McEwen, B S

    1994-10-01

    The genes encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are all expressed in the adult rat hippocampus. The colocalization of the these factors with the receptors to which they bind, namely trkB, trkC and the bFGF receptor, respectively, suggests that in the hippocampus they may exert their putative protective and trophic effects through an autocrine mechanism. The morphology and survival of hippocampal neurons are also affected by glucocorticoids, which can act as transcriptional activators of gene expression. In this study we have used in situ hybridization to investigate the adrenal steroid regulation of the mRNAs encoding the neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, and bFGF, their respective receptors, and the growth-associated protein GAP-43. After 7 days of adrenalectomy (ADX), there was an increase in the level of GAP-43 mRNA expression in the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cell layers of the hippocampus, that was prevented by corticosterone replacement to the ADX animals. In the CA2 subregion, adrenalectomy resulted in a decrease in bFGF mRNA expression, that was reversed by steroid treatment. There was evidence for glucocorticoid modulation of the BDNF and NT-3 mRNAs in pyramidal cell layers and in the dentate gyrus, but not of the mRNAs encoding the trkB, trk C or bFGF receptors.

  11. The spiking component of oscillatory extracellular potentials in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Schomburg, Erik W.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Buzsáki, György; Koch, Christof

    2012-01-01

    When monitoring neural activity using intracranial electrical recordings, researchers typically consider the signals to have two primary components: fast action potentials (AP) from neurons near the electrode, and the slower local field potential (LFP), thought to be dominated by postsynaptic currents integrated over a larger volume of tissue. In general, a decrease in signal power with increasing frequency is observed for most brain rhythms. 100–200 Hz oscillations in the rat hippocampus, including ‘fast gamma’ or ‘epsilon’ oscillations and sharp wave-ripples (SPW-R), are one exception, showing an increase in power with frequency within this band. We have employed detailed biophysical modeling to investigate the composition of extracellular potentials during fast oscillations in rat CA1. We find that postsynaptic currents exhibit a decreasing ability to generate large amplitude oscillatory signals at high frequencies, whereas phase-modulated spiking shows the opposite trend. Our estimates indicate that APs and postsynaptic currents contribute similar proportions of the power contained in 140–200 Hz ripples, and the two combined generate a signal that closely resembles in vivo SPW-Rs. Much of the AP-generated signal originates from neurons further than 100 μm from the recording site, consistent with ripples appearing similarly strong regardless of whether or not they contain recognizable APs. Additionally, substantial power can be generated in the 90–150 Hz epsilon band by the APs from rhythmically firing pyramidal neurons. Thus, high frequency LFPs may generally contain signatures of local cell assembly activation. PMID:22915121

  12. Gene Expression Profile of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IIα in Rat's Hippocampus during Morphine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Amiri, Shahin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) which is highly expressed in the hippocampus is known to play a pivotal role in reward-related memories and morphine dependence. Methods In the present study, repeated morphine injections once daily for 7 days was done to induce morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats, after which gene expression profile of α-isoform of CaMKII (CaMKIIα) in the hippocampus was evaluated upon discontinuation of morphine injection over 21 days of morphine withdrawal. Control groups received saline for 7 consecutive days. For gene expression study, rats’ brains were removed and the hippocampus was dissected in separate groups on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 since discontinuation of of morphine injection. A semi-quantitative RT-PCR method was used to evaluate the gene expression profile. Results Tolerance to morphine was verified by a significant decrease in morphine analgesia in a hotplate test on day 8 (one day after the final repeated morphine injections). Results showed that gene expression of CaMKIIα at mRNA level on day 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 of morphine withdrawal was significantly altered as compared to the saline control group. Post hoc Tukey's test revealed a significantly enhanced CaMKIIα gene expression on day 14. Discussion It can be concluded that CaMKIIα gene expression during repeated injections of morphine is increased and this increase continues up to 14 days of withdrawal then settles at a new set point. Therefore, the strong morphine reward-related memory in morphine abstinent animals may, at least partly be attributed to, the up-regulation of CaMKIIα in the hippocampus over 14 days of morphine withdrawal. PMID:25337341

  13. Cholinergic and GABAergic receptor functional deficit in the hippocampus of insulin-induced hypoglycemic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Sherin, A; Anu, J; Peeyush, K T; Smijin, S; Anitha, M; Roshni, B T; Paulose, C S

    2012-01-27

    Neurotransmitter receptor functional regulation plays an important role in controlling the excitability and responsiveness of hippocampal neurons. Deregulation of its function is associated with seizure generation, motor deficits, and memory impairment. In the present study we investigated the changes in hippocampal cholinergic and GABA receptor binding and gene expression in insulin-induced hypoglycemic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Expression of cholinergic enzymes; acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) upregulated and downregulated, respectively, in diabetic group, which was further exacerbated by hypoglycemia. Total muscarinic receptor, muscarinic M1, and GABA maximal binding (B(max)) significantly decreased in hypoglycemic and diabetic rats. In hypoglycemic group, the B(max) showed further decline compared with diabetes. Muscarinic M3 receptor B(max) and gene expression upregulated in hypoglycemic and diabetic group. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) expression significantly downregulated in hypoglycemic and diabetic rats. Gene expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), GABAAα1, and GABAB in hypoglycemic and diabetic rats downregulated, with more significant decrease in hypoglycemic group. Present findings show altered cholinergic, muscarinic, nicotinic receptor expression and thereby function. Decreased GABA receptor expression is associated with decline in GABAergic neurotransmission. Thus cholinergic receptor dysfunction and decreased GABAergic neuroprotective inhibitory function in the hippocampus of hypoglycemic and diabetic rats account for the increased vulnerability of hippocampus predisposing to neuronal damage, which is suggested to contribute to cognitive impairment and memory deficit reported in hypoglycemia and diabetes. Also, recurrent hypoglycemia in diabetes exacerbates the hippocampal dysfunction induced by diabetes, which has clinical significance in diabetes therapy.

  14. The effects of doxepin on stress-induced learning, memory impairments, and TNF-α level in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Azadbakht, Ali Ahmad; Radahmadi, Maryam; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooye; Reisi, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Stress has a profound impact on the nervous system and causes cognitive problems that are partly related to the inflammatory effects. Besides influencing the content of neurotransmitters, antidepressants such as doxepin are likely to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of doxepin on passive avoidance learning and the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the rat hippocampus following repeated restraint stress. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. Chronic stress was induced by keeping animals within an adjustable restraint chamber for 6 h every day for 21 successive days. In stress-doxepin group, stressed rats were given 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg of doxepin intraperitoneally (i.p) for 21 days and before placing them in restraint chamber. Healthy animals who served as control group and stressed rats received normal saline i.p. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency and step-through latency were determined using passive avoidance learning test. TNF-α levels were measured in hippocampus by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) at the end of experiment. Induced stress considerably decreased the step through latencies in the rats (P<0.05) but doxepin administration prevented these changes. Stress-doxepin groups did not reveal any differences compared to control group at any given doses. TNF-α level was increased significantly (P<0.05) in stress group. Only the low dose of doxepin (1 mg/kg) decreased TNF-α level. The present findings indicated that learning and memory are impaired in stressful conditions and doxepin prevented memory deficit. It seems that inflammation may involve in induced stress memory deficits, and that doxepin is helpful in alleviating the neural complications due to stress. PMID:26752995

  15. The effects of doxepin on stress-induced learning, memory impairments, and TNF-α level in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Azadbakht, Ali Ahmad; Radahmadi, Maryam; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooye; Reisi, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Stress has a profound impact on the nervous system and causes cognitive problems that are partly related to the inflammatory effects. Besides influencing the content of neurotransmitters, antidepressants such as doxepin are likely to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of doxepin on passive avoidance learning and the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the rat hippocampus following repeated restraint stress. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. Chronic stress was induced by keeping animals within an adjustable restraint chamber for 6 h every day for 21 successive days. In stress-doxepin group, stressed rats were given 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg of doxepin intraperitoneally (i.p) for 21 days and before placing them in restraint chamber. Healthy animals who served as control group and stressed rats received normal saline i.p. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency and step-through latency were determined using passive avoidance learning test. TNF-α levels were measured in hippocampus by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) at the end of experiment. Induced stress considerably decreased the step through latencies in the rats (P<0.05) but doxepin administration prevented these changes. Stress-doxepin groups did not reveal any differences compared to control group at any given doses. TNF-α level was increased significantly (P<0.05) in stress group. Only the low dose of doxepin (1 mg/kg) decreased TNF-α level. The present findings indicated that learning and memory are impaired in stressful conditions and doxepin prevented memory deficit. It seems that inflammation may involve in induced stress memory deficits, and that doxepin is helpful in alleviating the neural complications due to stress.

  16. Acute ethanol administration affects memory reactivation: a look at the neuronal density and apoptosis in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Alijan-pour, J; Abrari, K; Bluki, T Lashkar; Ghorbanian, M T; Goudarzi, I; Salmani, M Elahdadi; Mirshekar, M

    2012-08-01

    This study is an attempt to examine whether administration of ethanol after memory reactivation will modulate expression of memory in rats or not. We further examined whether this administration alters the number of tunnel positive cells in hippocampus. Adult male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning system using two 1s , 0.6 mA shock with an interval of 180 s. 24 h later the rats were returned to the chamber for reactivation, and then they were injected with ethanol (0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg) or saline, ip. Again, one, seven and fourteen days after reactivation, the rats were returned to the context for 5 min. The freezing time (absence of all movements except respiration) was scored in seconds. In the second experiment, after test 1, the animals were anesthetized and a transcardial perfuse with phosphate buffer and paraformaldehyde 4% was conducted. After post-fixation of brains 5-μm sections were stained with cresyl violet. Finally, paraffin-embedded sections of 10 μm were cut out throughout the tissue and each sample was processed with TUNEL. The number of apoptotic cells in a 130 μm-long segment of the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 fields and dentate gyrus was counted. The data demonstrate that ethanol exposure impairs post retrieval processes. Rats receiving ethanol (1.5 mg/kg) showed lower freezing levels during the first test. Moreover, ethanol decreases the density of CA1, CA3 and DG cells and increases the density of apoptotic cells in all regions of hippocampus. Therefore, ethanol exposure impairs reconsolidation of contextual fear conditioning probably via decreasing the density of CA1, CA3 and DG cells.

  17. Parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons are increased in the dorsal hippocampus of the dystrophic mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Del Tongo, Claudia; Carretta, Donatella; Fulgenzi, Gianluca; Catini, Claudio; Minciacchi, Diego

    2009-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by variable alterations of the dystrophin gene and by muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We postulated an association between cognitive impairment and architectural changes of the hippocampal GABAergic system. We investigated a major subpopulation of GABAergic neurons, the parvalbumin-immunopositive (PV-I) cells, in the dorsal hippocampus of the mdx mouse, an acknowledged model of DMD. PV-I neurons were quantified and their distribution was compared in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus in wild-type and mdx mice. The cell morphology and topography of PV-I neurons were maintained. Conversely, the number of PV-I neurons was significantly increased in the mdx mouse. The percent increase of PV-I neurons was from 45% for CA2, up to 125% for the dentate gyrus. In addition, the increased parvalbumin content in the mdx hippocampus was confirmed by Western blot. A change in the hippocampus processing abilities is the expected functional counterpart of the modification displayed by PV-I GABAergic neurons. Altered hippocampal functionality can be responsible for part of the cognitive impairment in DMD.

  18. Overactivation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors through entorhinal-hippocampal connection initiates accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in rat hippocampus after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng-Shi; Liu, An-Chun; Chen, Juan; Pan, Zhi-Yong; Wan, Qi; Li, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Ze-Fen

    2015-08-01

    Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) induces secondary damages in the hippocampus that is remote from primary ischemic regions. Tau hyperphosphorylation is an important risk for neurodegenerative diseases. Increased tau phosphorylation has been identified in ischemic cortex, but little is known regarding the changes in the hippocampus. We showed that unilateral transient MCAO induced accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and concurrent dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β at Ser 9 in the ipsilateral hippocampus. These MCAO-induced changes were not reproduced when glutamatergic inputs from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampus were transected; however, the changes were mimicked by intrahippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) administration. Inhibition of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunit NR2B, but not NR2A activity in the hippocampus attenuated the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau and spatial cognitive impairment in MCAO rats. Together, our data suggest that overactivation of NR2B-containing NMDARs through entorhinal-hippocampal connection plays an important role in the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampus following MCAO. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β is an important protein kinase involved in NMDARs-mediated tau hyperphosphorylation. This study indicates that early inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs may represent a potential strategy to prevent or delay the occurrence of post-stroke dementia. Middle cerebral artery occlusion induces secondary damage in the hippocampus that is remote from primary ischemic regions. We propose that excessive activation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors through entorhinal-hippocampal connection initiated the accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in the hippocampus, which subsequently induced cognitive deficit. This study provides new insights into the prospects of NR2B inhibition in stoke therapy.

  19. Recurrent seizures and brain pathology after inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the hippocampus in rats.

    PubMed

    Eid, Tore; Ghosh, Arko; Wang, Yue; Beckström, Henning; Zaveri, Hitten P; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Lai, James C K; Malthankar-Phatak, Gauri H; de Lanerolle, Nihal C

    2008-08-01

    An excess of extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus has been linked to the generation of recurrent seizures and brain pathology in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, the mechanism which results in glutamate excess in MTLE remains unknown. We recently reported that the glutamate-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase is deficient in the hippocampus in patients with MTLE, and we postulated that this deficiency is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. To further explore the role of glutamine synthetase in MTLE we created a novel animal model of hippocampal glutamine synthetase deficiency by continuous (approximately 28 days) microinfusion of methionine sulfoximine (MSO: 0.625 to 2.5 microg/h) unilaterally into the hippocampus in rats. This treatment led to a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase activity by 82-97% versus saline. The majority (>95%) of the MSO-treated animals exhibited recurrent seizures that continued for several weeks. Some of the MSO-treated animals exhibited neuropathological features that were similar to mesial temporal sclerosis, such as hippocampal atrophy and patterned loss of hippocampal neurons. However, many MSO-treated animals displayed only minimal injury to the hippocampus, with no clear evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis. These findings support the hypothesis that a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase causes recurrent seizures, even in the absence of classical mesial temporal sclerosis, and that restoration of glutamine synthetase may represent a novel approach to therapeutic intervention in this disease.

  20. Propofol Mitigates Learning and Memory Impairment After Electroconvulsive Shock in Depressed Rats by Inhibiting Autophagy in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Hao, Xue-chao; Luo, Jie; Lv, Feng; Wei, Ke; Min, Su

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study explored the effects of propofol on hippocampal autophagy and synaptophysin in depression-model rats undergoing electroconvulsive shock (ECS). Material/Methods The rat depression model was established by exposing Sprague-Dawley rats to stress for 28 consecutive days. Forty rats were assigned randomly into the depression group (group D; no treatment), the ECS group (group E), the propofol group (group P), and the propofol + ECS group (group PE). Open field tests and sucrose preference tests were applied to evaluate the depression behavior; and Morris water maze tests were used to assess the learning and memory function of the rats. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/I; and ELISA was applied to assess the expression of synaptophysin. Results Rats in group E and group PE scored higher in the open field and sucrose preference tests compared with those in group D. Furthermore, rats in group E also had a longer escape latency, a shorter space exploration time, and increased expression of Beclin-1, LC3-II/I, and synaptophysin. Compared with group E, rats in group PE possessed a shorter escape latency, a longer space exploration time, reduced expression of Beclin-1, LC3-II/I, and synaptophysin. Conclusions Propofol could inhibit excessive ECS-induced autophagy and synaptophysin overexpression in the hippocampus, thus protecting the learning and memory functions in depressed rats after ECS. The inhibitory effects of propofol on the overexpression of synaptophysin may result from its inhibitory effects on the excessive induction of autophagy. PMID:27203836

  1. Sustained HSP25 Expression Induces Clasmatodendrosis via ER Stress in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Hyun, Hye-Won; Min, Su-Ji; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2017-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 (murine/rodent 25 kDa, human 27 kDa) is one of the major astroglial HSP families, which has a potent anti-apoptotic factor contributing to a higher resistance of astrocytes to the stressful condition. However, impaired removals of HSP25 decrease astroglial viability. In the present study, we investigated whether HSP25 is involved in astroglial apoptosis or clasmatodendrosis (autophagic astroglial death) in the rat hippocampus induced by status epilepticus (SE). Following SE, HSP25 expression was transiently increased in astrocytes within the dentate gyrus (DG), while it was sustained in CA1 astrocytes until 4 weeks after SE. HSP25 knockdown exacerbated SE-induced apoptotic astroglial degeneration, but mitigated clasmatodendrosis accompanied by abrogation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress without changed seizure susceptibility or severity. These findings suggest that sustained HSP25 induction itself may result in clasmatodendrosis via prolonged ER stress. To the best of our knowledge, the present study demonstrates for the first time the double-edge properties of HSP25 in astroglial death induced by SE. PMID:28275338

  2. Stress and vitamin D: altered vitamin D metabolism in both the hippocampus and myocardium of chronic unpredictable mild stress exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei; Zhang, Wen-Yuan; Li, Huan-De; Cai, Hua-Lin; Liu, Yi-Ping; Chen, Lin-Yao

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to stressful life events is associated with the onset of major depression and increases the risk of cardiac morbidity and mortality. While recent evidence has indicated the existence of an interrelationship between local vitamin D (VD) metabolism and many aspects of human physiology including brain and heart function, much is still unknown concerning the biological link between VD signaling and stress-induced depressive behavior and cardiac dysfunction. In the present study, we observed the VD intracrine system in the hippocampus and myocardium of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) exposed rats. After 4 weeks of CUMS procedure, rats were induced to a depressive-like state and the cytochromes P450 enzymes involved in VD activating and catabolizing (CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 respectively) and VD receptor (VDR) were assessed by real time RT-PCR and western blot in the hippocampus, myocardium and kidney. In the hippocampus of depressed rats, CYP27B1, CYP24A1 and VDR expression were significantly increased and the local status of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) was higher compared with controls. Furthermore, hippocampal mRNA levels of VD target genes (calbindin-d28k, neurotrophin-3) and RXRα (heterodimeric partner of VDR) were upregulated in response to chronic stress. Similar to the hippocampus, CUMS also induced CYP27B1/CYP24A1/VDR expression in the myocardium. However, renal metabolism of VD and serum1,25(OH)2D status were unchanged. Meanwhile, sertraline treatment could partly normalize the stress-induced alterations of VD metabolism. In conclusion, this study firstly showed a co-elevated expression of CYP27B1/CYP24A1/VDR in both the hippocampus and myocardium of CUMS rats, which suggests VD signaling may be involved in the compensatory mechanism that protect from stress-induced deteriorating effects on the brain and heart.

  3. Forced Treadmill Exercise Prevents Spatial Memory Deficits in Aged Rats Probably Through the Activation of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Vanzella, Cláudia; Sanches, Eduardo Farias; Odorcyk, Felipe Kawa; Nicola, Fabrício; Kolling, Janaína; Longoni, Aline; Dos Santos, Tiago Marcon; Wyse, Angela Terezinha de Souza; Netto, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-02-16

    Regular physical activity has shown to improve the quality of life and to prevent age-related memory deficits. Memory processing requires proper regulation of several enzymes such as sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+), K(+)-ATPase) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), which have a pivotal role in neuronal transmission. The present study investigated the effects of a treadmill running protocol in young (3 months), mature (6 months) and aged (22 months) Wistar rats, on: (a) cognitive function, as assessed in the Water maze spatial tasks; (b) Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and AChE activities in the hippocampus following cognitive training alone or treadmill running combined with cognitive training. Animals of all ages were assigned to naïve (with no behavioral or exercise training), sedentary (non-exercised, with cognitive training) and exercised (20 min of daily running sessions, 3 times per week for 4 weeks and with cognitive training) groups. Cognition was assessed by reference and working memory tasks run in the Morris Water maze; 24 h after last session of behavioral testing, hippocampi were collected for biochemical analysis. Results demonstrated that: (a) a moderate treadmill running exercise prevented spatial learning and memory deficits in aged rats; (b) training in the Water maze increased both Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and AChE activities in the hippocampus of mature and aged rats; (c) aged exercised rats displayed an even further increase of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in the hippocampus, (d) enzyme activity correlated with memory performance in aged rats. It is suggested that exercise prevents spatial memory deficits in aged rats probably through the activation of Na(+), K(+)-ATPase in the hippocampus.

  4. Neurotoxic lesions of the dorsal hippocampus and Pavlovian fear conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Maren, S; Aharonov, G; Fanselow, M S

    1997-11-01

    Electrolytic lesions of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) produce deficits in both the acquisition and expression of conditional fear to contextual stimuli in rats. To assess whether damage to DH neurons is responsible for these deficits, we performed three experiments to examine the effects of neurotoxic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) lesions of the DH on the acquisition and expression of fear conditioning. Fear conditioning consisted of the delivery of signaled or unsignaled footshocks in a novel conditioning chamber and freezing served as the measure of conditional fear. In Experiment 1, posttraining DH lesions produced severe retrograde deficits in context fear when made either 1 or 28, but not 100, days following training. Pretraining DH lesions made 1 week before training did not affect contextual fear conditioning. Tone fear was impaired by DH lesions at all training-to-lesion intervals. In Experiment 2, posttraining (1 day), but not pretraining (1 week), DH lesions produced substantial deficits in context fear using an unsignaled shock procedure. In Experiment 3, pretraining electrolytic DH lesions produced modest deficits in context fear using the same signaled and unsignaled shock procedures used in Experiments 1 and 2, respectively. Electrolytic, but not neurotoxic, lesions also increased pre-shock locomotor activity. Collectively, this pattern of results reveals that neurons in the DH are not required for the acquisition of context fear, but have a critical and time-limited role in the expression of context fear. The normal acquisition and expression of context fear in rats with neurotoxic DH lesions made before training may be mediated by conditioning to unimodal cues in the context, a process that may rely less on the hippocampal memory system.

  5. Altered expression of GABAA receptors (α4, γ2 subunit), potassium chloride cotransporter 2 and astrogliosis in tremor rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaoyuan; Ma, Ping; Cao, Danfeng; Sun, Chunyan; Ji, Zhong; Min, Dongyu; Sun, Hongli; Xie, Ni; Cai, Jiqun; Cao, Yonggang

    2011-11-25

    Impaired GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R), potassium chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2) and astrocytes are of particular importance to GABAergic transmission and thus involved in the development of increased seizure susceptibility. The tremor rat (TRM: tm/tm), a genetic mutant discovered in a Kyoto-Wistar colony, can manifest both absence-like seizures and tonic convulsions without any external stimuli. So far, there are no reports that can elucidate the effects of GABA(A)R (α4, γ2 subunit), KCC2 and astrocytes on TRMs. The present study was undertaken to detect the expressions of GABA(A)R α4, GABA(A)R γ2 and KCC2 in TRMs hippocampus at mRNA and protein levels. In this work, mRNA and protein expressions of GABA(A)R α4 were significantly elevated while GABA(A)R γ2 and KCC2 were both evidently decreased in TRMs hippocampus by real-time RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. Furthermore, a dramatic elevation of KCC2 protein level was found after cerebroventricular injection with K252a to TRMs than that in the DMSO-treated TRMs. Besides, our present study also demonstrated that GFAP (a major component of astrocyte) immunoreactivity was much more intense in TRMs hippocampal CA1, CA3 and DG regions than that in control group with immnohistochemistry and confocal microscopic analyses. The protein expression of GFAP was also markedly elevated in TRMs hippocampus, suggesting that astrogliosis appeared in the TRM model. These data demonstrate that altered expressions of GABA(A)R (α4, γ2) and KCC2 and astrogliosis observed in TRMs hippocampus may provide us good therapeutic targets for the treatment of genetic epilepsy.

  6. Lovastatin decreases the synthesis of inflammatory mediators during epileptogenesis in the hippocampus of rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, T L F; Scorza, F A; Iha, H A; Frangiotti, M I B; Perosa, S R; Cavalheiro, E A; Silva, J A; Feliciano, R S; de Almeida, A C; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, M G

    2014-07-01

    Statins may act on inflammatory responses, decreasing oxidative stress and also reducing brain inflammation in several brain disorders. Epileptogenesis is a process in which a healthy brain becomes abnormal and predisposed to generating spontaneous seizures. We previously reported that lovastatin could prevent neuroinflammation in pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). In this context, this study investigated the long-lasting effects of lovastatin on mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6) and the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the hippocampus during epileptogenesis by immunohistochemistry and real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) during the latent and chronic phases in the epilepsy model induced by pilocarpine in rats. For these purposes, four groups of rats were employed: saline (CONTROL), lovastatin (LOVA), pilocarpine (PILO), and pilocarpine plus lovastatin (PILO+LOVA). After pilocarpine injection (350mg/kg, i.p.), the rats were treated with 20mg/kg of lovastatin via an esophagic probe 2h after SE onset. All surviving rats were continuously treated during 15days, twice/day. The pilocarpine plus lovastatin group showed a significant decrease in the levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 during the latent phase and a decreased expression of IL-1β and TNF-α in the chronic phase when compared with the PILO group. Moreover, lovastatin treatment also induced an increased expression of the antiinflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in the PILO+LOVA group when compared with the PILO group in the chronic phase. Thus, our data suggest that lovastin may reduce excitotoxicity during epileptogenesis induced by pilocarpine by increasing the synthesis of IL-10 and decreasing proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus.

  7. Dopamine receptor dysregulation in hippocampus of aged rats underlies chronic pulsatile L-Dopa treatment induced cognitive and emotional alterations.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Vito S; Luquín, Sonia; Jáuregui-Huerta, Fernando; Corona-Morales, Aleph A; Medina, Mauricio P; Ruíz-Velasco, Silvia; Zhang, Limei

    2014-07-01

    L-Dopa is the major symptomatic therapy for Parkinson's disease, which commonly occurs in elderly patients. However, the effects of chronic use on mood and cognition in old subjects remain elusive. In order to compare the effects of a chronic pulsatile L-Dopa treatment on emotional and cognitive functions in young (3 months) and old (18 months) intact rats, an L-Dopa/carbidopa treatment was administered every 12 h over 4 weeks. Rats were assessed for behavioural despair (repeated forced swimming test, RFST), anhedonia (sucrose preference test, SPT) and spatial learning (Morris water maze, MWM) in the late phase of treatment (T). Neuronal expression of Fos in the hippocampus at the early and late phases of T, as well as after MWM was studied. The density and ratio of dopamine D5r, D3r and D2r receptors were also evaluated in the hippocampus using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Young rats showed similar patterns during behavioural tests, whereas aged treated rats showed increased immobility counts in RFST, diminished sucrose liquid intake in SPT, and spatial learning impairment during MWM. Fos expression was significantly blunted in the aged treated group after MWM. The density of D5r, D3r and D2r was increased in both aged groups. The treatment reduced the ratio of D5r/D3r and D5r/D2r in both groups. Moreover, aged treated subjects had significant lower values of D5r/D3r and higher values of D5r/D2r when compared with young treated subjects. These results indicate that chronic L-Dopa treatment in itself could trigger emotional and cognitive dysfunctions in elderly subjects through dopamine receptor dysregulation.

  8. Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor expression and affinity in the rat hippocampus following bilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jean Ha; Zheng, Yiwen; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2011-01-10

    Numerous studies have shown that bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD) results in spatial memory deficits and hippocampal dysfunction in rats and humans. Since cannabinoid CB(1) receptors are well known to regulate synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, we investigated whether BVD resulted in changes in CB(1) receptor expression and affinity in the rat hippocampus at 1, 3 and 7 days post-surgery, using a combination of Western blotting and radioligand binding. Using Western blotting, we found that CB(1) receptor expression was significantly lower in BVD animals compared to sham controls only in the CA3 area across the 3 time points (P=0.03). CB(1) receptor expression decreased significantly over time for both the BVD and sham animals (P=0.000). The radioligand binding assays showed no significant change in the IC(50) of the CB(1) receptor for the cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist, WIN55,212-2. These results suggest that the CB(1) receptor down-regulates in the CA3 region of the hippocampus following BVD, but with no changes in the affinity of the CB(1) receptor for WIN55,212-2.

  9. Sleep deprivation reduces proliferation of cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in rats

    PubMed Central

    guzmán-marín, Ruben; Suntsova, Natalia; Stewart, Darya R; Gong, Hui; Szymusiak, Ronald; McGinty, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the adult hippocampus gives rise to progenitor cells, which have the potential to differentiate into neurons. To date it is not known whether sleep or sleep loss has any effect on proliferation of cells in the DG. Male rats were implanted for polysomnographic recording, and divided into treadmill sleep-deprived (SD), treadmill control (TC) and cage control (CC) groups. SD and TC rats were kept for 96 h on a treadmill that moved either for 3 s on/12 s off (SD group) or for 15 min on/60 min off (TC group) to equate total movement but permit sustained rest periods in TC animals. To label proliferating cells the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected after the first 48 h of the experimental procedure in all groups (50 mg kg−1, i.p.). The percentage of time awake per day was 93.2 % in the SD group vs. 59.6 % in the TC group and 49.9 % in the CC group (P < 0.001). Stereological analysis showed that the number of BrdU-positive cells in the DG of the dorsal hippocampus was reduced by 54 % in the SD group in comparison with the TC and by 68 % in comparison with the CC group. These results suggest that sleep deprivation reduces proliferation of cells in the DG of the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:12679377

  10. The similarity of astrocytes number in dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield of rats hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Mehrdad; Sadeghi, Y; Hosseini, A; Naghdi, N

    2007-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is a part of hippocampal formation that it contains granule cells, which project to the pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. Astrocytes play a more active role in neuronal activity, including regulating ion flux currents, energy production, neurotransmitter release and synaptogenesis. Astrocytes are the only cells in the brain that contain the energy molecule glycogen. The close relationship between dentate gyrus and CA3 area can cause the similarity of the number of astrocytes in these areas. In this study 5 male albino wistar rats were used. Rats were housed in large plastic cage in animal house and were maintained under standard conditions, after histological processing, The 7 microm slides of the brains were stained with PTAH staining for showing the astrocytes. This staining is specialized for astrocytes. We showed that the number of astrocytes in different (ant., mid., post) parts of dentate gyrus and CA3 of hippocampus is the same. For example, the anterior parts of two area have the most number of astrocytes and the middle parts of two area have the least number of astrocytes. We concluded that dentate gyrus and CA3 area of hippocampus have the same group of astrocytes.

  11. Effects of subchronic aluminum exposure on spatial memory, ultrastructure and L-LTP of hippocampus in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifeng; Jin, Cuihong; Liu, Qiufang; Lu, Xiaobo; Wu, Shengwen; Yang, Jinghua; Du, Yanqiu; Zheng, Linlin; Cai, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations have indicated that aluminum (Al), as an important environmental neurotoxicant, could cause damage to the cognitive function which was closely related with neurodegenerative diseases. Long-term potentiation (LTP) is one form of synaptic plasticity in association with cognitive function. Previous studies have demonstrated that Al impaired early phase long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in vivo and in vitro. However, Al-induced damage to late phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) has poorly been studied. The present study was designed to observe the effects of subchronic Al exposure on the spatial memory, hippocampus ultrastructure and L-LTP in rats. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned to four groups. Neonatal rats were exposed to Al by parental lactation from parturition to weaning for 3 weeks and then fed with the distilled water containing 0, 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.6% aluminum chloride (AlCl3) respectively from weaning to postnatal 3 months. The levels of Al in blood and hippocampus were quantitated by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Morris water maze test was performed to study spatial memory. The induction and maintenance of L-LTP in area of Schaffer collateral- CA1 synapse was recorded by extracellular microelectrode recording technology in hippocampus of experimental rats. Hippocampus was collected for transmission electron microscopy observation. The results showed that the Al concentrations in blood and hippocampus of Al-exposed rats were higher than those of the control rats. Al could impair spatial memory ability of rats. Neuronal and synaptic ultrastructure from Al-exposed rats presented pathological changes; the incidence of L-LTP has a decrease trend while population spike (PS) amplitude was much smaller significantly stimulated by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) in Al-exposed rats. Our findings showed that Al exposure caused spatial memory damage, under which the neuronal and synaptic ultrastructure changes maybe were their

  12. Rapid regulation of sialidase activity in response to neural activity and sialic acid removal during memory processing in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Minami, Akira; Meguro, Yuko; Ishibashi, Sayaka; Ishii, Ami; Shiratori, Mako; Sai, Saki; Horii, Yuuki; Shimizu, Hirotaka; Fukumoto, Hokuto; Shimba, Sumika; Taguchi, Risa; Takahashi, Tadanobu; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi

    2017-04-07

    Sialidase cleaves sialic acids on the extracellular cell surface as well as inside the cell and is necessary for normal long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber-CA3 pyramidal cell synapses and for hippocampus-dependent spatial memory. Here, we investigated in detail the role of sialidase in memory processing. Sialidase activity measured with 4-methylumbelliferyl-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4MU-Neu5Ac) or 5-bromo-4-chloroindol-3-yl-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid (X-Neu5Ac) and Fast Red Violet LB was increased by high-K(+)-induced membrane depolarization. Sialidase activity was also increased by chemical LTP induction with forskolin and activation of BDNF signaling, non-NMDA receptors, or NMDA receptors. The increase in sialidase activity with neural excitation appears to be caused not by secreted sialidase or by an increase in sialidase expression but by a change in the subcellular localization of sialidase. Astrocytes as well as neurons are also involved in the neural activity-dependent increase in sialidase activity. Sialidase activity visualized with a benzothiazolylphenol-based sialic acid derivative (BTP3-Neu5Ac), a highly sensitive histochemical imaging probe for sialidase activity, at the CA3 stratum lucidum of rat acute hippocampal slices was immediately increased in response to LTP-inducible high-frequency stimulation on a time scale of seconds. To obtain direct evidence for sialic acid removal on the extracellular cell surface during neural excitation, the extracellular free sialic acid level in the hippocampus was monitored using in vivo microdialysis. The free sialic acid level was increased by high-K(+)-induced membrane depolarization. Desialylation also occurred during hippocampus-dependent memory formation in a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm. Our results show that neural activity-dependent desialylation by sialidase may be involved in hippocampal memory processing.

  13. Exercise induces age-dependent changes on epigenetic parameters in rat hippocampus: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Lovatel, Gisele Agustini; Moysés, Felipe; Bertoldi, Karine; Spindler, Christiano; Cechinel, Laura Reck; Muotri, Alysson Renato; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2013-02-01

    Regular exercise improves learning and memory, including during aging process. Interestingly, the imbalance of epigenetic mechanisms has been linked to age-related cognitive deficits. However, studies about epigenetic alterations after exercise during the aging process are rare. In this preliminary study we investigated the effect of aging and exercise on DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1 and DNMT3b) and H3-K9 methylation levels in hippocampus from 3 and 20-months aged Wistar rats. The animals were submitted to two exercise protocols: single session or chronic treadmill protocol. DNMT1 and H3-K9 methylation levels were decreased in hippocampus from aged rats. The single exercise session decreased both DNMT3b and DNMT1 levels in young adult rats, without any effect in the aged group. Both exercise protocols reduced H3-K9 methylation levels in young adult rats, while the single session reversed the changes on H3-K9 methylation levels induced by aging. Together, these results suggest that an imbalance on DNMTs and H3-K9 methylation levels might be linked to the brain aging process and that the outcome to exercise seems to vary through lifespan.

  14. Alteration of conditioned emotional response and conditioned taste aversion after neonatal ventral hippocampus lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Angst, Marie-Josée; Macedo, Carlos Eduardo; Guiberteau, Thierry; Sandner, Guy

    2007-04-27

    Sprague-Dawley rats were submitted to bilateral ventral hippocampus lesions 7 days after birth according to the Lipska and Weinberger's procedure for modeling schizophrenia. The aim of the present work was to better characterize their learning capacity. A double latent inhibition study was conducted using respectively conditioned taste aversion and conditioned emotional response. In the background of this evaluation, locomotion under apomorphine and startle reactions, inhibited or not by prepulses, was also evaluated. Our experimental methods were the same as those used in previous studies from the laboratory which were found to be sensitive to pharmacological manipulations and shown by others to be unaffected by lesions of the ventral hippocampus carried out in adult rats. In contrast, neonatally lesioned rats, once adults (over 60 days old), were hyper-responsive to noise--i.e., the startle response to a 105 db(A) noise pulse was enhanced--and hyperactive under apomorphine (0.7 mg/kg). The prepulse inhibition properties of the startle remained unchanged. Lesioned rats showed a deficit but not a suppression of conditioning, similar in both tests, but latent inhibition was preserved. Such observations complement the already known memory deficit produced in this neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia.

  15. Adult neurogenesis and its anatomical context in the hippocampus of three mole-rat species

    PubMed Central

    Amrein, Irmgard; Becker, Anton S.; Engler, Stefanie; Huang, Shih-hui; Müller, Julian; Slomianka, Lutz; Oosthuizen, Maria K.

    2014-01-01

    African mole-rats (family Bathyergidae) are small to medium sized, long-lived, and strictly subterranean rodents that became valuable animal models as a result of their longevity and diversity in social organization. The formation and integration of new hippocampal neurons in adult mammals (adult hippocampal neurogenesis, AHN) correlates negatively with age and positively with habitat complexity. Here we present quantitative data on AHN in wild-derived mole-rats of 1 year and older, and briefly describe its anatomical context including markers of neuronal function (calbindin and parvalbumin). Solitary Cape mole-rats (Georychus capensis), social highveld mole-rats (Cryptomys hottentotus pretoriae), and eusocial naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber) were assessed. Compared to other rodents, the hippocampal formation in mole-rats is small, but shows a distinct cytoarchitecture in the dentate gyrus and CA1. Distributions of the calcium-binding proteins differ from those seen in rodents; e.g., calbindin in CA3 of naked mole-rats distributes similar to the pattern seen in early primate development, and calbindin staining extends into the stratum lacunosum-moleculare of Cape mole-rats. Proliferating cells and young neurons are found in low numbers in the hippocampus of all three mole-rat species. Resident granule cell numbers are low as well. Proliferating cells expressed as a percentage of resident granule cells are in the range of other rodents, while the percentage of young neurons is lower than that observed in surface dwelling rodents. Between mole-rat species, we observed no difference in the percentage of proliferating cells. The percentages of young neurons are high in social highveld and naked mole-rats, and low in solitary Cape mole-rats. The findings support that proliferation is regulated independently of average life expectancy and habitat. Instead, neuronal differentiation reflects species-specific demands, which appear lower in subterranean rodents. PMID

  16. Hippocampus and Retrograde Amnesia in the Rat Model: A Modest Proposal for the Situation of Systems Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Robert J.; Sparks, Fraser T.; Lehmann, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    The properties of retrograde amnesia after damage to the hippocampus have been explicated with some success using a rat model of human medial temporal lobe amnesia. We review the results of this experimental work with rats focusing on several areas of consensus in this growing literature. We evaluate the theoretically significant hypothesis that…

  17. ERK activation in the amygdala and hippocampus induced by fear conditioning in ethanol withdrawn rats: modulation by MK-801.

    PubMed

    Bertotto, María Eugenia; Maldonado, Noelia Martina; Bignante, Elena Anahi; Gorosito, Silvana Vanesa; Cambiasso, María Julia; Molina, Víctor Alejandro; Martijena, Irene Delia

    2011-12-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, which can be activated by NMDA receptor stimulation, is involved in fear conditioning and drug addiction. We have previously shown that withdrawal from chronic ethanol administration facilitated the formation of contextual fear memory. In order to explore the neural substrates and the potential mechanism involved in this effect, we examined: 1) the ERK1/2 activation in the central (CeA) and basolateral (BLA) nuclei of the amygdala and in the dorsal hippocampus (dHip), 2) the effect of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 on fear conditioning and ERK activation and 3) the effect of the infusion of U0126, a MEK inhibitor, into the BLA on fear memory formation in ethanol withdrawn rats. Rats made dependent via an ethanol-containing liquid diet were subjected to contextual fear conditioning on day 3 of ethanol withdrawal. High basal levels of p-ERK were found in CeA and dHip from ethanol withdrawn rats. ERK activation was significantly increased both in control (60min) and ethanol withdrawn rats (30 and 60min) in BLA after fear conditioning. Pre-training administration of MK-801, at a dose that had no effect on control rats, prevented the increase in ERK phosphorylation in BLA and attenuated the freezing response 24h later in ethanol withdrawn rats. Furthermore, the infusion of U0126 into the BLA, but not the CeA, before fear conditioning disrupted fear memory formation. These results suggest that the increased fear memory can be linked to changes in ERK phosphorylation, probably due to NMDA receptor activation in BLA in ethanol withdrawn rats.

  18. Endogenous neurotrophins are required for the induction of GABAergic long-term potentiation in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gubellini, Paolo; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gaïarsa, Jean-Luc

    2005-06-15

    In the developing rat hippocampus, GABAergic synapses undergo a Ca2+-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP(GABA-A)); this form of synaptic plasticity is induced in CA3 pyramidal neurons by delivering repetitive depolarizing pulses (DPs) to the recorded neuron, and it is expressed as a long-lasting increase in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous GABA(A) receptor-mediated postsynaptic currents. In the present study, we examined the role of endogenous tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB) receptor ligands and associated protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in the induction of LTP(GABA-A). The application of Lavendustin A, a broad spectrum PTK inhibitor, blocked the induction of LTP(GABA-A), whereas Lavendustin B, its inactive form, had no effect. Moreover, k-252a and k-252b, two alkaloids that inhibit the kinase activity of the Trk receptor family, also prevented the induction of LTP(GABA-A). On hippocampal slices incubated with the soluble form of TrkB receptor IgG (TrkB-IgG), which prevents the activation of TrkB receptors by endogenous ligands, DPs failed to induce LTP(GABA-A), whereas the incubation with TrkA-IgG or TrkC-IgG had no such effect. Altogether, these data indicate that endogenous TrkB ligands and associated PTK activity are necessary for the induction of GABAergic LTP in the developing rat hippocampus.

  19. Effects of the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor reboxetine on norepinephrine and serotonin transmission in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Szabo, S T; Blier, P

    2001-12-01

    Given that norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) neurons are implicated in the mechanisms of action of antidepressant drugs and both project to the hippocampus, the impact of acute and long-term administration of the selective NE inhibitor reboxetine was assessed on CA(3) pyramidal neuron firing in this postsynaptic structure. Cumulative injections of reboxetine (1-4 mg/kg, i.v.) dose-dependently increased the recovery time of the firing of these neurons following iontophoretic applications of NE, but not 5-HT. In rats treated with reboxetine for 2.5 mg/kg/day for 21 days, a robust increase in the recovery time following NE applications was observed, and a small but significant prolongation occurred following 5-HT applications. In controls and reboxetine-treated rats, 1 and 5 Hz stimulations of the afferent 5-HT bundle to the hippocampus, which allows determination of terminal 5-HT(1B) autoreceptor sensitivity, produced similar frequency-dependent decreases in pyramidal neuron firing in both groups. However, after low and high doses of clonidine (10 and 400 microg/kg, i.v.), which assesses alpha(2)-adrenergic auto- and heteroreceptor sensitivity, respectively, only the effect of the high dose of clonidine was attenuated. Interestingly, administration of the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY 100,635 induced a 140% increase in basal pyramidal neuron firing in reboxetine as compared to saline-treated rats. This increase in tonic activation of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors might be attributable in part to a desensitization of alpha(2)-adrenergic heteroreceptors, presumably resulting from sustained NE reuptake inhibition. These results indicate that even a selective NE reuptake inhibitor can modulate 5-HT transmission.

  20. Theta synchronization between the hippocampus and the nucleus incertus in urethane-anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Cervera-Ferri, Ana; Guerrero-Martínez, Juan; Bataller-Mompeán, Manuel; Taberner-Cortes, Alida; Martínez-Ricós, Joana; Ruiz-Torner, Amparo; Teruel-Martí, Vicent

    2011-06-01

    Oscillatory coupling between distributed areas can constitute a mechanism for neuronal integration. Theta oscillations provide temporal windows for hippocampal processing and only appear during certain active states of animals. Since previous studies have demonstrated that nucleus incertus (NI) contributes to the generation of hippocampal theta activity, in this paper, we evaluated the oscillatory coupling between both structures. We compared hippocampal and NI field potentials that were simultaneously recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrical and cholinergic stimulations of the reticularis pontis oralis nucleus have been used as hippocampal theta generation models. The spectral analyses reveal that electrical stimulation induced an increase in theta oscillations in both channels, whose frequencies depended on the intensity of stimulation. The intensity range used simultaneously increased the normalized spectral energy in the fast theta band (6-12 Hz) in HPC and NI. Frequencies within the theta range were found to be very similar in both channels. In order to validate coupling, spectral coherence was inspected. The data reveal that coherence in the high theta band also increased while stimuli were applied. Cholinergic activation progressively increased the main frequency in both structures to reach an asymptotic period with stable peak frequency in the low theta range (3-6 Hz), which could be first observed in NI and lasted about 1,500 s. Coherence in this band reached values close to 1. Taken together, these results support an electrophysiological and functional coupling between the hippocampus and the reticular formation, suggesting NI to be part of a distributed network working at theta frequencies.

  1. Non-granule PSA-NCAM immunoreactive neurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Juan; Blasco-Ibáñez, José M; McEwen, Bruce S

    2002-03-15

    The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) continues to be expressed in the adult hippocampus, mainly in a subset of neurons located in the innermost portion of the granule cell layer. PSA-NCAM immunoreactive neurons have also been described outside this layer in humans, where they are severely reduced in schizophrenic brains. Given this important clinical implication, we were interested in finding whether similar neurons existed in the adult rat hippocampus and to characterize their distribution, morphology and phenotype. PSA-NCAM immunocytochemistry reveals labeled neurons in the subiculum, fimbria, alveus, hilus, and stratum oriens, lucidum and radiatum of CA3 and CA1. They are mainly distributed in the ventral hippocampus, and have polygonal or fusiform somata with multipolar or bipolar morphology. These neurons show long straight dendrites, which reach several strata and even enter the fimbria and the alveus. These dendrites are often varicose, appear devoid of excrescences and apparently do not show spines. Most of these neurons display GABA immunoreactivity and further analysis has shown that a subpopulation expresses calretinin, but not somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, parvalbumin, calbindin or NADPH diaphorase. Our study demonstrates that there is an important subpopulation of PSA-NCAM immunoreactive neurons, many of which can be considered interneurons, outside the rat granule cell layer, probably homologous to those described in the human hippocampus. The presence of the polysialylated form of NCAM in these neurons could indicate that they are undergoing continuous remodeling during adulthood and may have an important role in hippocampal structural plasticity.

  2. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning.

    PubMed

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine's effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance task. A step-through type passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. To identify the complex pattern of protein expression induced by morphine, we compared rat hippocampal proteome either in morphine-induced amnesia or in state-dependent learning by two-dimensional gel electerophoresis and combined mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS). Post-training administration of morphine decreased step-through latency. Pre-test administration of morphine induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine influence. In the hippocampus, a total of 18 proteins were identified whose MASCOT (Modular Approach to Software Construction Operation and Test) scores were inside 95% confidence level. Of these, five hippocampal proteins altered in morphine-induced amnesia and ten proteins were found to change in the hippocampus of animals that had received post-training and pre-test morphine. These proteins show known functions in cytoskeletal architecture, cell metabolism, neurotransmitter secretion and neuroprotection. The findings indicate that the effect of morphine on memory formation in passive avoidance learning has a morphological correlate on the hippocampal proteome level. In addition, our proteomicscreensuggests that morphine induces memory impairment and state-dependent learning through modulating neuronal plasticity.

  3. Acute restraint stress induces specific changes in nitric oxide production and inflammatory markers in the rat hippocampus and striatum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Spiers, Jereme G; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic mild stress has been shown to cause hippocampal neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) overexpression and the resultant nitric oxide (NO) production has been implicated in the etiology of depression. However, the extent of nitrosative changes including NOS enzymatic activity and the overall output of NO production in regions of the brain like the hippocampus and striatum following acute stress has not been characterized. In this study, outbred male Wistar rats aged 6-7 weeks were randomly allocated into 0 (control), 60, 120, or 240 min stress groups and neural regions were cryodissected for measurement of constitutive and inducible NOS enzymatic activity, nitrosative status, and relative gene expression of neuronal and inducible NOS. Hippocampal constitutive NOS activity increased initially but was superseded by the inducible isoform as stress duration was prolonged. Interestingly, hippocampal neuronal NOS and interleukin-1β mRNA expression was downregulated, while the inducible NOS isoform was upregulated in conjunction with other inflammatory markers. This pro-inflammatory phenotype within the hippocampus was further confirmed with an increase in the glucocorticoid-antagonizing macrophage migration inhibitory factor, Mif, and the glial surveillance marker, Ciita. This indicates that despite high levels of glucocorticoids, acute stress sensitizes a neuroinflammatory response within the hippocampus involving both pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible NOS while concurrently modulating the immunophenotype of glia. Furthermore, there was a delayed increase in striatal inducible NOS expression while no change was found in other pro-inflammatory mediators. This suggests that short term stress induces a generalized increase in inducible NOS signaling that coincides with regionally specific increased markers of adaptive immunity and inflammation within the brain.

  4. Age-related changes in susceptibility of rat brain slice cultures including hippocampus to encephalomyocarditis virus

    PubMed Central

    Su, Weiping; Ueno-Yamanouchi, Aito; Uetsuka, Koji; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Doi, Kunio

    1999-01-01

    Replication of the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC-D) and its cytopathic effects were studied in the brain slice cultures including hippocampus (hippocampal slice) obtained from postnatal 1-, 4-, 7-, 14-, 28-and 56-day-old Fischer 344 rats. At 0, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after infection, virus titres of the slices and culture media were assayed. Viral replication was observed in cultures from 1-to 28-day-old rats, and the highest titre was recorded in the slice and culture medium from the youngest rat. The peak of virus titre decreased with age and no distinct viral replication was observed in the cultures from 56-day-old rats. Light microscopy revealed that degenerative and necrotic changes appeared in the infected hippocampal slices from 1- to 28-day-old rats, and the changes became less prominent with age. In situ hybridization and indirect immunofluorescence staining showed that positive signals of viral RNA and antigen were prominent in younger rats and decreased with age. These results suggest that an age-related decrease in the susceptibility of rat brain to EMC-D is less related to the maturation of the immune system but possibly to that of the neurone. PMID:10632784

  5. Decreased Neuronal Bursting and Phase Synchrony in the Hippocampus of Streptozotocin Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kangning; Li, Guoliang

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is one of the complications of diabetes. Cognitive dysfunction is the main consequence. Previous findings from neuroanatomical and in vitro electrophysiological studies showed that the structure and function of the hippocampus is impaired in diabetes, which may underlie the cognitive dysfunction induced by diabetes. However the study of electrophysiological abnormality of hippocampal neurons in intact networks is sparse. In the current study, we recorded the spontaneous firing of neurons in hippocampal CA1 area in anesthetized streptozotozin (STZ)-diabetic and age-matched control rats. Profound reduction in burst activity was found in diabetic rats. Compared to control rats, the intra-burst inter-spike intervals were prolonged significantly in diabetic rats, while the burst ratio and the mean number of spikes within a burst decreased significantly. Treatment with APP 17-mer peptide retarded the effects of diabetes on these parameters. In addition, the average PLV of diabetic rats was lower than that of control rats. These findings provide in vivo electrophysiological evidence for the impairment of hippocampal function in STZ-diabetic rats, and may have some implications in the mechanisms associated with cognitive deficits in diabetes. PMID:25093193

  6. Methylphenidate Decreases ATP Levels and Impairs Glutamate Uptake and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in Juvenile Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Felipe; Pierozan, Paula; Rodrigues, André F; Biasibetti, Helena; Grings, Mateus; Zanotto, Bruna; Coelho, Daniella M; Vargas, Carmen R; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Wyse, Angela T S

    2016-11-14

    The study of the long-term neurological consequences of early exposure with methylphenidate (MPH) is very important since this psychostimulant has been widely misused by children and adolescents who do not meet full diagnostic criteria for ADHD. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of early chronic exposure with MPH on amino acids profile, glutamatergic and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase homeostasis, as well as redox and energy status in the hippocampus of juvenile rats. Wistar male rats received intraperitoneal injections of MPH (2.0 mg/kg) or saline solution (controls), once a day, from the 15th to the 45th day of age. Results showed that MPH altered amino acid profile in the hippocampus, decreasing glutamine levels. Glutamate uptake and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity were decreased after chronic MPH exposure in the hippocampus of rats. No changes were observed in the immunocontents of glutamate transporters (GLAST and GLT-1), and catalytic subunits of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (α1, α2, and α3), as well as redox status. Moreover, MPH provoked a decrease in ATP levels in the hippocampus of chronically exposed rats, while citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase, respiratory chain complexes activities (II, II-III, and IV), as well as mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial membrane potential were not altered. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic MPH exposure at early age impairs glutamate uptake and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity probably by decreasing in ATP levels observed in rat hippocampus.

  7. Learning impairment caused by a toxin produced by Pfiesteria piscicida infused into the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Blackwelder, W Paul; Glasgow, Howard B; Burkholder, JoAnn M; Moeller, Peter D R; Ramsdell, John S

    2003-01-01

    Pfiesteria piscicida, an estuarine dinoflagellate, which has been shown to kill fish, has also been associated with neurocognitive deficits in humans. With a rat model, we have demonstrated the cause-and-effect relationship between Pfiesteria exposure and learning impairment. In several studies, we have replicated the finding in Sprague-Dawley rats that exposure to fixed acute doses of Pfiesteria cells or filtrates caused radial-arm maze learning impairment. Recently, this finding of Pfiesteria-induced learning impairment in rats has been independently replicated in another laboratory as well. We have demonstrated significant Pfiesteria-induced learning impairment in both the win-shift and repeated-acquisition tasks in the radial-arm maze and in reversal learning in a visual operant signal detection task. These learning impairments have been seen as long as 10 weeks after a single acute exposure to Pfiesteria. In the current study, we used a hydrophilic toxin isolated from clonal P. piscicida cultures (PfTx) and tested its effect when applied locally to the ventral hippocampus on repeated acquisition of rats in the radial-arm maze. Toxin exposure impaired choice accuracy in the radial-arm maze repeated acquisition procedure. The PfTx-induced impairment was seen at the beginning of the session and the early learning deficit was persistent across 6 weeks of testing after a single administration of the toxin. Eventually, with enough practice, in each session, the PfTx-exposed rats did learn that session's problem as did control rats. This model has demonstrated the cause-and-effect relationship between exposure to a hydrophilic toxin produced by P. piscicida and learning impairment, and specifically that the ventral hippocampus was critically involved.

  8. Reversion of BDNF, Akt and CREB in Hippocampus of Chronic Unpredictable Stress Induced Rats: Effects of Phytochemical, Bacopa Monnieri

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Somoday; Kumar, Sourav; Saha, Goutam Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aims of the present study were to explore the behavioural effects and to understand the possible mode of action of Bacopa monnieri extract (BME) on chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) induced depressive model and the biochemical alterations such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Akt, cyclic-AMP response element binding (CREB) protein level in the hippocampus of rats. Methods We examined the effects of chronic administration of BME on CUS exposed rats for 28 days. Behavioural changes were assessed by sucrose consumption and open field test to assess the effect of BME on CUS-induced depression. The mechanisms underlying antidepressant like action of BME was further evaluated by measuring levels of BDNF, Akt, and CREB in the hippocampus of rat brain and compared with the standard tricyclic antidepressant drug imipramine (20 mg/kg body weight). Results Exposure to CUS for 28 days produced depression-like behavior in rats, as indicated by significant decreases in sucrose consumption, locomotor activity including decreased BDNF, Akt and CREB levels in the hippocampus. Daily administration of BME at a dose of (80 mg/kg body weight) significantly reverses the behavioral alteration and restored the normal level of BDNF, total and phospho-Akt, total and phospho CREB in the hippocampus of CUS induced rats as compared to vehicle treated control rats. Conclusion These findings suggest that BME ameliorates CUS induced behavioural depression in rats and that can be used as a potent therapeutic agent in treating depressive like behavior. PMID:28096878

  9. Electroacupuncture Reduces the Effects of Acute Noxious Stimulation on the Electrical Activity of Pain-Related Neurons in the Hippocampus of Control and Neuropathic Pain Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Ying; Chen, Renbo; Feng, Xiu-Mei; Yan, Yaxia; Lippe, Irmgard Th.

    2016-01-01

    To study the effects of acupuncture analgesia on the hippocampus, we observed the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitor on pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal area CA1 of sham or chronic constrictive injury (CCI) rats. The animals were randomly divided into a control, a CCI, and a U0126 (MEK1/2 inhibitor) group. In all experiments, we briefly (10-second duration) stimulated the sciatic nerve electrically and recorded the firing rates of PENs and PINs. The results showed that in both sham and CCI rats brief sciatic nerve stimulation significantly increased the electrical activity of PENs and markedly decreased the electrical activity of PINs. These effects were significantly greater in CCI rats compared to sham rats. EA treatment reduced the effects of the noxious stimulus on PENs and PINs in both sham and CCI rats. The effects of EA treatment could be inhibited by U0126 in sham-operated rats. The results suggest that EA reduces effects of acute sciatic nerve stimulation on PENs and PINs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of both sham and CCI rats and that the ERK (extracellular regulated kinase) signaling pathway is involved in the modulation of EA analgesia. PMID:27833763

  10. Distinct time courses of secondary brain damage in the hippocampus following brain concussion and contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuko; Horiuchi, Yutaka; Kamata, Hiroshi; Yukawa, Masayoshi; Kuwabara, Masato; Tsubokawa, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Secondary brain damage (SBD) is caused by apoptosis after traumatic brain injury that is classified into concussion and contusion. Brain concussion is temporary unconsciousness or confusion caused by a blow on the head without pathological changes, and contusion is a brain injury with hemorrhage and broad extravasations. In this study, we investigated the time-dependent changes of apoptosis in hippocampus after brain concussion and contusion using rat models. We generated the concussion by dropping a plumb on the dura from a height of 3.5 cm and the contusion by cauterizing the cerebral cortex. SBD was evaluated in the hippocampus by histopathological analyses and measuring caspase-3 activity that induces apoptotic neuronal cell death. The frequency of abnormal neuronal cells with vacuolation or nuclear condensation, or those with DNA fragmentation was remarkably increased at 1 hr after concussion (about 30% for each abnormality) from the pre-injury level (0%) and reached the highest level (about 50% for each) by 48 hrs, whereas the frequency of abnormal neuronal cells was increased at 1 hr after contusion (about 10%) and reached the highest level (about 40%) by 48 hrs. In parallel, caspase-3 activity was increased sevenfold in the hippocampus at 1 hr after concussion and returned to the pre-injury level by 48 hrs, whereas after contusion, caspase-3 activity was continuously increased to the highest level at 48 hrs (fivefold). Thus, anti-apoptotic-cell-death treatment to prevent SBD must be performed by 1 hr after concussion and at latest by 48 hrs after contusion.

  11. Retrograde amnesia for spatial information: a dissociation between intra and extramaze cues following hippocampus lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J M

    1998-10-01

    Several recent studies have shown a flat retrograde amnesia for spatial information following lesions to the hippocampus in rats and mice. However, the results of the present investigation demonstrate that in rats that presurgically learned a spatial reference memory task based on extramaze cues, a temporally graded retrograde amnesia is evident following lesions to the hippocampus (1, 16, 32 or 64 days after learning) if two conditions are met. First, that a wide range of retention intervals is used, and second, that independent groups of rats are tested, not a single group that learns different spatial discrimination tasks at different times (expt 1). The results of expt 2 show that the hippocampus does not serve as a consolidating mechanism when the spatial task learned presurgically is based on intramaze cues. Taken together, these results indicate that the hippocampus is critical for the storage and/or retrieval of spatial reference information that was learned up to 1 month before hippocampus damage; however, in the absence of the hippocampus, efficient retention can still occur provided that the spatial knowledge was learned in a simple associative manner.

  12. Tiliacora triandra, an Anti-Intoxication Plant, Improves Memory Impairment, Neurodegeneration, Cholinergic Function, and Oxidative Stress in Hippocampus of Ethanol Dependence Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phunchago, Nattaporn; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in brain dysfunctions induced by alcohol. Since less therapeutic agent against cognitive deficit and brain damage induced by chronic alcohol consumption is less available, we aimed to assess the effect of Tiliacora triandra extract, a plant possessing antioxidant activity, on memory impairment, neuron density, cholinergic function, and oxidative stress in hippocampus of alcoholic rats. Male Wistar rats were induced ethanol dependence condition by semivoluntary intake of alcohol for 15 weeks. Alcoholic rats were orally given T. triandra at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg·kg−1BW for 14 days. Memory assessment was performed every 7 days while neuron density, activities of AChE, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px and, MDA level in hippocampus were assessed at the end of study. Interestingly, the extract mitigated the increased escape latency, AChE and MDA level. The extract also mitigated the decreased retention time, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities, and neurons density in hippocampus induced by alcohol. These data suggested that the extract improved memory deficit in alcoholic rats partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AChE. Therefore, T. triandra is the potential reagent for treating brain dysfunction induced by alcohol. However, further researches are necessary to understand the detail mechanism and possible active ingredient. PMID:26180599

  13. Fibrinogen α-chain-derived peptide is upregulated in hippocampus of rats exposed to acute morphine injection and spontaneous alternation testing.

    PubMed

    Maki, Agatha E; Morris, Kenneth A; Catherman, Kasia; Chen, Xian; Hatcher, Nathan G; Gold, Paul E; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2014-06-01

    Fibrinogen is a secreted glycoprotein that is synthesized in the liver, although recent in situ hybridization data support its expression in the brain. It is involved in blood clotting and is released in the brain upon injury. Here, we report changes in the extracellular levels of fibrinogen α-chain-derived peptides in the brain after injections of saline and morphine. More specifically, in order to assess hippocampus-related working memory, an approach pairing in vivo microdialysis with mass spectrometry was used to characterize extracellular peptide release from the hippocampus of rats in response to saline or morphine injection coupled with a spontaneous alternation task. Two fibrinopeptide A-related peptides derived from the fibrinogen α-chain-fibrinopeptide A (ADTGTTSEFIEAGGDIR) and a fibrinopeptide A-derived peptide (DTGTTSEFIEAGGDIR)-were shown to be consistently elevated in the hippocampal microdialysate. Fibrinopeptide A was significantly upregulated in rats exposed to morphine and spontaneous alternation testing compared with rats exposed to saline and spontaneous alternation testing (P < 0.001), morphine alone (P < 0.01), or saline alone (P < 0.01), respectively. The increase in fibrinopeptide A in rats subjected to morphine and a memory task suggests that a complex interaction between fibrinogen and morphine takes place in the hippocampus.

  14. Dopamine-galanin receptor heteromers modulate cholinergic neurotransmission in the rat ventral hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Estefanía; Vaz, Sandra H.; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Ferrada, Carla; Quiroz, César; Barodia, Sandeep; Kabbani, Nadine; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine and galanin modulate cholinergic transmission in the hippocampus, but little is known about the mechanisms involved and their possible interactions. By using resonance energy transfer techniques in transfected mammalian cells we demonstrated the existence of heteromers between the dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 and D5) and galanin Gal1, but not Gal2 receptors. Within the D1-Gal1 and D5-Gal1 receptor heteromers, dopamine receptor activation potentiated and dopamine receptor blockade counteracted MAPK activation induced by stimulation of Gal1 receptors, while Gal1 receptor activation or blockade did not modify D1-like receptor-mediated MAPK activation. Ability of a D1-like receptor antagonist to block galanin-induced MAPK activation (cross-antagonism) was used as a “biochemical fingerprint” of D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers, allowing their identification in the rat ventral hippocampus. The functional role of D1-like-Gal receptor heteromers was demonstrated in synaptosomes from rat ventral hippocampus, where galanin facilitated acetylcholine release, but only with co-stimulation of D1-like receptors. Electrophysiological experiments in rat ventral hippocampal slices showed that these receptor interactions modulate hippocampal synaptic transmission. Thus, a D1-like receptor agonist, that was ineffective when administered alone, turned an inhibitory effect of galanin into an excitatory effect, an interaction that required cholinergic neurotransmission. Altogether, our results strongly suggest that D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers act as processors that integrate signals of two different neurotransmitters, dopamine and acetylcholine, to modulate hippocampal cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:21593325

  15. Treadmill exercise induces age-related changes in aversive memory, neuroinflammatory and epigenetic processes in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lovatel, Gisele Agustini; Elsner, Viviane Rostirola; Bertoldi, Karine; Vanzella, Cláudia; Moysés, Felipe Dos Santos; Vizuete, Adriana; Spindler, Christiano; Cechinel, Laura Reck; Netto, Carlos Alexandre; Muotri, Alysson Renato; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2013-03-01

    It has been described that exercise can modulate both inflammatory response and epigenetic modifications, although the effect of exercise on these parameters during the normal brain aging process yet remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of aging and treadmill exercise on inflammatory and epigenetic parameters specifically pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines levels, activation of NF-kB and histone H4 acetylation levels in hippocampus from Wistar rats. Additionally, we evaluated aversive memory through inhibitory avoidance task. Rats of 3 and 20 months of age were assigned to non-exercised (sedentary) and exercised (running daily for 20 min for 2 weeks) groups. The effect of daily forced exercise in the treadmill was assessed. The levels of inflammatory and epigenetic parameters were determined 1h, 18 h, 3 days or 7 days after the last training session of exercise. It was observed an age-related decline on aversive memory, as well as aged rats showed increased hippocampal levels of inflammatory markers, such as TNFα, IL1-β and NF-kB and decreased IL-4 levels, an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Moreover, lower levels of global histone H4 acetylation were also observed in hippocampi from aged rats. Interestingly, there was a significant correlation between the biochemical markers and the inhibitory avoidance test performance. The forced exercise protocol ameliorated aging-related memory decline, decreased pro-inflammatory markers and increased histone H4 acetylation levels in hippocampi 20-months-old rats, while increased acutely IL-4 levels in hippocampi from young adult rats. Together, these results suggest that an imbalance of inflammatory markers might be involved to the aging-related aversive memory impairment. Additionally, our exercise protocol may reverse aging-related memory decline through improving cytokine profile.

  16. Neuroprotective effects of various doses of topiramate against methylphenidate induced oxidative stress and inflammation in rat isolated hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Motevalian, Manijeh; Shabab, Behnaz

    2016-03-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) abuse causes neurodegeneration. The neuroprotective effects of topiramate (TPM) have been reported but its putative mechanism remains unclear. The current study evaluates the role of various doses of TPM on protection of rat hippocampal cells from MPH-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in vivo. Seventy adult male rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 received normal saline (0.7 mL/rat) and group 2 was injected with MPH (10 mg/kg) for 21 days. Groups 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 concurrently were treated by MPH (10 mg/kg) and TPM (10, 30, 50, 70 and 100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), respectively for 21 days. After drug administration, the open field test (OFT) was used to investigate motor activity. Oxidative, antioxidant and inflammatory factors were measured in isolated hippocampus. Also, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level was measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. Cresyl violet staining of Dentate Gyrus (DG) and CA1 cell layers of the hippocampus were also performed. MPH significantly disturbs motor activity in OFT and TPM (70 and 100 mg/kg) decreased this disturbance. Also MPH significantly increased lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial reduced state of glutathione (GSH) level, interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and BDNF level in isolated hippocampal cells. Also superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activity significantly decreased. Various doses of TPM attenuated these effects and significantly decreased MPH-induced oxidative damage, inflammation and hippocampal cell loss and increased BDNF level. This study suggests that TPM has the potential to be used as a neuroprotective agent against oxidative stress and neuroinflammation induced by frequent use of MPH.

  17. Age-dependent increase in the expression of antioxidant-like protein-1 in the gerbil hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-A; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Jong-Dai; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Choong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant-like protein-1 (AOP-1) reduces the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the age-related change in AOP-1 expression in the hippocampus among young, adult and aged gerbils was compared using western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that the protein expression of AOP-1 was gradually and significantly increased in the hippocampus during the normal aging process. In addition, the age-dependent increase in AOP-1 immunoreactivity was also observed in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus proper; however, in the dentate gyrus, AOP-1 immunoreactivity was not altered during the normal aging process. These results indicated that the expression of AOP-1 is significantly increased in the hippocampus proper, but not in the dentate gyrus, during the normal aging process. PMID:27511601

  18. Early expression of GABA(A) receptor delta subunit in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Didelon, F; Mladinic', M; Cherubini, E; Bradbury, A

    2000-12-01

    The cDNA library screening strategy was used to identify the genes encoding for GABA(A) receptor subunits in the rat hippocampus during development. With this technique, genes encoding eleven GABA(A) receptor subunits were identified. The alpha5 subunit was by far the most highly expressed, followed by the gamma2, alpha2 and alpha4 subunits respectively. The expression of the beta2, alpha1, gamma1, beta1 and beta3 subunits was moderate, although that of the alpha3 and delta subunits was weak. In situ hybridization experiments, using digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes, confirmed that the delta subunit was expressed in the neonatal as well as in the adult hippocampus, and is likely to form functional receptors in association with other subunits of the GABA(A) receptor. When the more sensitive RT-PCR approach was used, the gamma3 subunit was also detected, suggesting that this subunit is present in the hippocampus during development but at low levels of expression. The insertion of the delta subunit into functional GABA(A) receptors may enhance the efficacy of GABA in the immediate postnatal period when this amino acid is still exerting a depolarizing and excitatory action.

  19. Behavioral deficit and decreased GABA receptor functional regulation in the hippocampus of epileptic rats: effect of Bacopa monnieri.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jobin; Gangadharan, Gireesh; Kuruvilla, Korah P; Paulose, C S

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, alterations of the General GABA and GABA(A) receptors in the hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epileptic rats and the therapeutic application of Bacopa monnieri and its active component Bacoside-A were investigated. Bacopa monnieri (Linn.) is a herbaceous plant belonging to the family Scrophulariaceae. Hippocampus is the major region of the brain belonging to the limbic system and plays an important role in epileptogenesis, memory and learning. Scatchard analysis of [³H]GABA and [³H]bicuculline in the hippocampus of the epileptic rat showed significant decrease in B(max) (P < 0.001) compared to control. Real Time PCR amplification of GABA(A) receptor sub-units such as GABA(Aά₁), GABA(Aά₅) GABA(Aδ), and GAD were down regulated (P < 0.001) in the hippocampus of the epileptic rats compared to control. GABA(Aγ) subunit was up regulated. Epileptic rats have deficit in the radial arm and Y maze performance. Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A treatment reverses all these changes near to control. Our results suggest that decreased GABA receptors in the hippocampus have an important role in epilepsy associated behavioral deficit, Bacopa monnieri and Bacoside-A have clinical significance in the management of epilepsy.

  20. Activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptors enhances glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus of prenatally restraint stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Jérôme; Gatta, Eleonora; Reynaert, Marie-Line; Marrocco, Jordan; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Soichot, Marion; Deruyter, Lucie; Camp, Gilles Van; Bouwalerh, Hammou; Fagioli, Francesca; Pittaluga, Anna; Allorge, Delphine; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Maccari, Stefania

    2015-12-01

    Oxytocin receptors are known to modulate synaptic transmission and network activity in the hippocampus, but their precise function has been only partially elucidated. Here, we have found that activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptor with the potent agonist, carbetocin, enhanced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus with no effect on GABA release. This evidence paved the way for examining the effect of carbetocin treatment in "prenatally restraint stressed" (PRS) rats, i.e., the offspring of dams exposed to repeated episodes of restraint stress during pregnancy. Adult PRS rats exhibit an anxious/depressive-like phenotype associated with an abnormal glucocorticoid feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and, remarkably, with a reduced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus. Chronic systemic treatment with carbetocin (1mg/kg, i.p., once a day for 2-3 weeks) in PRS rats corrected the defect in glutamate release, anxiety- and depressive-like behavior, and abnormalities in social behavior, in the HPA response to stress, and in the expression of stress-related genes in the hippocampus and amygdala. Of note, carbetocin treatment had no effect on these behavioral and neuroendocrine parameters in prenatally unstressed (control) rats, with the exception of a reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor gene in the amygdala. These findings disclose a novel function of oxytocin receptors in the hippocampus, and encourage the use of oxytocin receptor agonists in the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders in adult life.

  1. Correlations between cognitive impairment and brain‑derived neurotrophic factor expression in the hippocampus of post-stroke depression rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Wu, Li-Na; Song, Jing-Gui; Li, Wen-Qiang

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and cognitive impairment in post‑stroke depression (PSD) rats and to explore the mechanism(s) involved in the process of cognitive impairment. A rat model of focal cerebral ischemia was established by occluding the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Rats were subjected to isolation-housing combined with chronic unexpected mild stress (CUMS) to establish a PSD rat model. The learning and memory abilities of the PSD rat model were evaluated by passive avoidance tests. Real‑time PCR and immunohistochemical methods were used to detect changes in BDNF mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus. Passive avoidance defects were revealed in the PSD and depression groups. Passive avoidance defects were more evident in the PSD group compared with the depression group and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). BDNF expression in the hippocampus was significantly lower in the PSD and depression groups compared with that in the normal control group (P<0.01). No significant difference in BDNF expression was identified between the normal control and stroke groups (P>0.05) or between the PSD and the depression groups (P>0.05). The decrease in BDNF expression in the hippocampus of PSD rats may aggravate cognitive impairment, however, the degree of cognitive impairment cannot be reflected by the expression levels of BDNF in the hippocampus.

  2. Neonatal handling enduringly decreases anxiety and stress responses and reduces hippocampus and amygdala volume in a genetic model of differential anxiety: Behavioral-volumetric associations in the Roman rat strains.

    PubMed

    Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Oliveras, Ignasi; Piludu, Maria Antonietta; Gerbolés, Cristina; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Lope-Piedrafita, Silvia; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Torrubia, Rafael; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The hippocampus and amygdala have been proposed as key neural structures related to anxiety. A more active hippocampus/amygdala system has been related to greater anxious responses in situations involving conflict/novelty. The Roman Low- (RLA) and High-avoidance (RHA) rat lines/strains constitute a genetic model of differential anxiety. Relative to RHA rats, RLA rats exhibit enhanced anxiety/fearfulness, augmented hippocampal/amygdala c-Fos expression following exposure to novelty/conflict, increased hippocampal neuronal density and higher endocrine responses to stress. Neonatal handling (NH) is an environmental treatment with long-lasting anxiety/stress-reducing effects in rodents. Since hippocampus and amygdala volume are supposed to be related to anxiety/fear, we hypothesized a greater volume of both areas in RLA than in RHA rats, as well as that NH treatment would reduce anxiety and the volume of both structures, in particular in the RLA strain. Adult untreated and NH-treated RHA and RLA rats were tested for anxiety, sensorimotor gating (PPI), stress-induced corticosterone and prolactin responses, two-way active avoidance acquisition and in vivo 7 T 1H-Magnetic resonance image. As expected, untreated RLA rats showed higher anxiety and post-stress hormone responses, as well as greater hippocampus and amygdala volumes than untreated RHA rats. NH decreased anxiety/stress responses, especially in RLA rats, and significantly reduced hippocampus and amygdala volumes in this strain. Dorsal striatum volume was not different between the strains nor it was affected by NH. Finally, there were positive associations (as shown by correlations, factor analysis and multiple regression) between anxiety and PPI and hippocampus/amygdala volumes.

  3. Chronic stress shifts the GABA reversal potential in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Georgina; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures is stress. However, the underlying mechanisms whereby stress triggers seizures are not yet fully understood. Here we demonstrate a potential mechanism underlying changes in neuronal excitability in the hippocampus following chronic stress, involving a shift in the reversal potential for GABA (EGABA) associated with a dephosphorylation of the potassium chloride co-transporter, KCC2. Mice subjected to chronic restraint stress (30 mins/day for 14 consecutive days) exhibit an increase in serum corticosterone levels which is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures induced with kainic acid (20 mg/kg). Following chronic stress, but not acute stress, we observe a dephosphorylation of KCC2 residue S940, which regulates KCC2 cell surface expression and function, in the hippocampus. To determine the impact of alterations in KCC2 expression following chronic stress, we performed gramicidin perforated patch recordings to measure changes in EGABA and neuronal excitability of principal hippocampal neurons. We observe a depolarizing shift in EGABA in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons after chronic stress. In addition, there is an increase in the intrinsic excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, evident by a shift in the input-output curve which could be reversed with the NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide. These data uncover a potential mechanism involving chronic stress-induced plasticity in chloride homeostasis which may contribute to stress-induced seizure susceptibility. PMID:25524838

  4. Estrogen regulates the development of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Solum, Derek T; Handa, Robert J

    2002-04-01

    During development, estrogen has a variety of effects on morphological and electrophysiological properties of hippocampal neurons. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) also plays an important role in the survival and differentiation of neurons during development. We examined the effects of gonadectomy with and without estrogen replacement on the mRNA and protein of BDNF and its receptor, trkB, during early postnatal development of the rat hippocampus. We used immunocytochemistry to demonstrate that estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and BDNF were localized to the same cells within the developing hippocampus. BDNF and ERalpha were colocalized in pyramidal cells of the CA3 subregion and to a lesser extent in CA1. To determine whether BDNF mRNA was regulated by estrogen during development, we gonadectomized male rat pups at postnatal day 0 (P0) and examined mRNA and protein levels from P0 to P25 using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. After gonadectomy, BDNF mRNA levels are significantly reduced on P7, but after treatment of gonadectomized animals with estradiol benzoate on P0, levels at all ages were similar to those in intact animals. BDNF mRNA changes after gonadectomy are accompanied by an increase in the levels of BDNF protein, which were reduced by estrogen treatment at P0. We also examined the effect of postnatal estrogen treatment on trkB. There were no significant changes in trkB mRNA or protein in gonadectomized or estrogen-replaced animals. These results suggest that a direct interaction may exist between ERalpha and BDNF to alter hippocampal physiology during development in the rat.

  5. Developmental expression of Kir4.1 in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of rat somatosensory cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Moroni, Ramona Frida; Inverardi, Francesca; Regondi, Maria Cristina; Pennacchio, Paolo; Frassoni, Carolina

    2015-12-01

    Kir4.1 is the principal K(+) channel expressed in glial cells. It has been shown that it plays a fundamental role in K(+)-spatial buffering, an astrocyte-specific process where excess extracellular concentration of K(+) ions, generated by synaptic activity, is spatially redistributed to distant sites via astrocytic syncytia. Experimental and clinical evidence suggested that abnormality of Kir4.1 function in the brain is involved in different neurological diseases such as epilepsy, dysmyelination, and Huntington's disease. Although it has been shown that Kir4.1 is expressed predominantly in astrocytes in certain areas of the rat brain and its transcript is present in the rat forebrain as early as embryonic day E14, no information is available concerning the temporal sequence of Kir4.1 protein appearance during embryonic and post-natal development. Aim of this work was to study the expression pattern of Kir4.1 channel in rat somatosensory cortex and hippocampus during development and to examine its cellular localization with the glial and oligodendroglial markers S100-β, GFAP, and Olig-2. Kir4.1 protein was detected since E20 and a gradual increase of Kir4.1 expression occurred between early postnatal period and adulthood. We showed a gradual shift in Kir4.1 subcellular localization from the soma of astrocytes to distal glial processes. Double immunofluorescence experiments confirmed the cellular localization of Kir4.1 in glial cells. Our data provide the first overview of Kir4.1 developmental expression both in the cortex and hippocampus and support the glial role of Kir4.1 in K(+) spatial buffering.

  6. Estradiol and GPER Activation Differentially Affect Cell Proliferation but Not GPER Expression in the Hippocampus of Adult Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Lieblich, Stephanie E.; Chow, Carmen; Galea, Liisa A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the female rodent but it is not known whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), a membrane receptor, is involved in this process, nor whether there are regional differences in estradiol’s effects on cell proliferation. Thus, we investigated whether estradiol exerts its effects on cell proliferation in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus through GPER, using the GPER agonist, G1, and antagonist, G15. Ovariectomized adult female rats received a single injection of either: 17β-estradiol (10 μg), G1 (0.1, 5, 10 μg), G15 (40 μg), G15 and estradiol, or vehicle (oil, DMSO, or oil+DMSO). After 30 min, animals received an injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and were perfused 24 h later. Acute treatment with estradiol increased, while the GPER agonist G1 (5 μg) decreased, the number of BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus relative to controls. The GPER antagonist, G15 increased the number of BrdU+ cells relative to control in the dorsal region and decreased the number of BrdU+ cells in the ventral region. However, G15 treatment in conjunction with estradiol partially eliminated the estradiol-induced increase in cell proliferation in the dorsal dentate gyrus. Furthermore, G1 decreased the expression of GPER in the dentate gyrus but not the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In summary, we found that activation of GPER decreased cell proliferation and GPER expression in the dentate gyrus of young female rats, presenting a potential and novel estrogen-independent role for this receptor in the adult hippocampus. PMID:26075609

  7. Estradiol and GPER Activation Differentially Affect Cell Proliferation but Not GPER Expression in the Hippocampus of Adult Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Lieblich, Stephanie E; Chow, Carmen; Galea, Liisa A M

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the female rodent but it is not known whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), a membrane receptor, is involved in this process, nor whether there are regional differences in estradiol's effects on cell proliferation. Thus, we investigated whether estradiol exerts its effects on cell proliferation in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus through GPER, using the GPER agonist, G1, and antagonist, G15. Ovariectomized adult female rats received a single injection of either: 17β-estradiol (10 μg), G1 (0.1, 5, 10 μg), G15 (40 μg), G15 and estradiol, or vehicle (oil, DMSO, or oil+DMSO). After 30 min, animals received an injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and were perfused 24 h later. Acute treatment with estradiol increased, while the GPER agonist G1 (5 μg) decreased, the number of BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus relative to controls. The GPER antagonist, G15 increased the number of BrdU+ cells relative to control in the dorsal region and decreased the number of BrdU+ cells in the ventral region. However, G15 treatment in conjunction with estradiol partially eliminated the estradiol-induced increase in cell proliferation in the dorsal dentate gyrus. Furthermore, G1 decreased the expression of GPER in the dentate gyrus but not the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In summary, we found that activation of GPER decreased cell proliferation and GPER expression in the dentate gyrus of young female rats, presenting a potential and novel estrogen-independent role for this receptor in the adult hippocampus.

  8. Early-life infection leads to altered BDNF and IL-1beta mRNA expression in rat hippocampus following learning in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bilbo, Staci D; Barrientos, Ruth M; Eads, Andrea S; Northcutt, Alexis; Watkins, Linda R; Rudy, Jerry W; Maier, Steven F

    2008-05-01

    Neonatal bacterial infection in rats leads to profound hippocampal-dependent memory impairments following a peripheral immune challenge in adulthood. Here, we determined whether neonatal infection plus an immune challenge in adult rats is associated with impaired induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) within the hippocampus (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus) following fear conditioning. BDNF is well characterized for its critical role in learning and memory. Rats injected on postnatal day 4 with PBS (vehicle) or Escherichia coli received as adults either no conditioning or a single 2min trial of fear conditioning. Half of the rats in the conditioned group then received a peripheral injection of 25mug/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and all were sacrificed 1 or 4h later. Basal (unconditioned) BDNF mRNA did not differ between groups. However, following conditioning, neonatal infection with E. coli led to decreased BDNF mRNA induction in all regions compared to PBS-treated rats. This decrease in E. coli-treated rats was accompanied by a large increase in IL-1beta mRNA in CA1. Taken together, these data indicate that early infection strongly influences the induction of IL-1beta and BDNF within distinct regions of the hippocampus, which likely contribute to observed memory impairments in adulthood.

  9. Differential gene expression in the rat hippocampus during learning of an operant conditioning task.

    PubMed

    Rapanelli, M; Frick, L R; Zanutto, B S

    2009-11-10

    Changes in transcription levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding (CREB), Synapsin I, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKII), activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc), c-jun and c-fos have been associated to several learning paradigms in different brain areas. In this study, we measured mRNA expression in the hippocampus by real time (RT)-PCR mRNA levels of BDNF, CREB, Synapsin I, CamKII, Arc, c-jun and c-fos, during learning and operant conditioning task. Experimental groups were as follows: control (C, the animals never left the bioterium), when the animals reached 50-65% of the expected response (Incompletely Trained, IT), when animals reached 100% of the expected response with a latency time lower than 5 s (Trained, Tr), Box Control of Incompletely Trained (BCIT), animals spent the same time as the IT in the operant conditioning box and Box Control of Trained (BCTr) animals spent the same time as the Tr in the operant conditioning box. All rats were killed at the same time by cervical dislocation 15 min after training and hippocampi were removed and processed. We found increments of mRNA levels of most genes (BDNF, CREB, Synapsin I, Arc, c-jun and c-fos) in IT and Tr groups compared to their box controls, but increments in Tr were smaller compared with IT. These results describe a differential gene expression in the rat hippocampus when the animals are learning and when animals have already learned. Taking together the results presented herein with the known functions of these genes, we propose a link between changes in gene expression in the hippocampus and different degrees of cellular activation and plasticity during learning of an operant conditioning task.

  10. Neurochemical phenotype of cytoglobin-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    HUNDAHL, CHRISTIAN ANSGAR; FAHRENKRUG, JAN; HANNIBAL, JENS

    2014-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb), a novel oxygen-binding protein, is expressed in the majority of tissues and has been proposed to function in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism in the vasculature and to have cytoprotective properties. However, the overall functions of Cygb remain elusive. Cygb is also expressed in a subpopulation of brain neurons. Recently, it has been shown that stress upregulates Cygb expression in the brain and the majority of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive neurons, an enzyme that produces NO, co-express Cygb. However, there are more neurons expressing Cygb than nNOS, thus a large number of Cygb neurons remain uncharacterized by the neurochemical content. The aim of the present study was to provide an additional and more detailed neurochemical phenotype of Cygb-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus. The rat hippocampus was chosen due to the abundance of Cygb, as well as this limbic structure being an important target in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Using triple immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that nearly all the parvalbumin- and heme oxygenase 1-positive neurons co-express Cygb and to a large extent, these neuron populations are distinct from the population of Cygb neurons co-expressing nNOS. Furthermore, it was shown that the majority of neurons expressing somastostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide also co-express Cygb and nNOS. Detailed information regarding the neurochemical phenotype of Cygb neurons in the hippocampus can be a valuable tool in determining the function of Cygb in the brain. PMID:25054000

  11. Subchronic phencyclidine treatment in adult mice increases GABAergic transmission and LTP threshold in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshihiro; Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Fernandes, Herman B; Remmers, Christine L; Xu, Jian; Meltzer, Herbert Y; Contractor, Anis

    2016-01-01

    Repeated administration of non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists such as phencyclidine (PCP) to rodents causes long-lasting deficits in cognition and memory, and has effects on behaviors that have been suggested to be models of the cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS). Despite this being a widely studied animal model, little is known about the long lasting changes in synapses and circuits that underlie the altered behaviors. Here we examined synaptic transmission ex-vivo in the hippocampus of mice after a subchronic PCP (scPCP) administration regime. We found that after at least one week of drug free washout period when mice have impaired cognitive function, the threshold for long-term potentiation (LTP) of CA1 excitatory synapses was elevated. This elevated LTP threshold was directly related to increased inhibitory input to CA1 pyramidal cells through increased activity of GABAergic neurons. These results suggest repeated PCP administration causes a long-lasting metaplastic change in the inhibitory circuits in the hippocampus that results in impaired LTP, and could contribute to the deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory in PCP-treated mice. Changes in GABA signaling have been described in patients with schizophrenia, therefore our results support using scPCP as a model of CIAS. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'.

  12. Chronic activation of CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the hippocampus increases excitatory synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jimok; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The roles of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in regulating neuronal activity have been extensively characterized. Although early studies show that CB1 receptors are present in the nervous system and CB2 cannabinoid receptors are in the immune system, recent evidence indicates that CB2 receptors are also expressed in the brain. Activation or blockade of CB2 receptors in vivo induces neuropsychiatric effects, but the cellular mechanisms of CB2 receptor function are unclear. The aim of this study is to determine how activation of CB2 receptors present in the hippocampus regulates synaptic function. Here, we show that when organotypic cultures of rodent hippocampal slices were treated with a CB2 receptor agonist (JWH133 or GP1a) for 7–10 days, quantal glutamate release became more frequent and spine density was increased via extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Chronic intraperitoneal injection of JWH133 into mice also increased excitatory synaptic transmission. These effects were blocked by a CB2 receptor antagonist (SR144528) or absent from hippocampal slices of CB2 receptor knock-out mice. This study reveals a novel cellular function of CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the hippocampus and provides insights into how cannabinoid receptor subtypes diversify the roles of cannabinoids in the brain. PMID:25504573

  13. Subchronic phencyclidine treatment in adult mice increases GABAergic transmission and LTP threshold in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Toshihiro; Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Fernandes, Herman B.; Remmers, Christine; Xu, Jian; Meltzer, Herbert; Contractor, Anis

    2015-01-01

    Repeated administration of non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists such as phencyclidine (PCP) to rodents causes long-lasting deficits in cognition and memory, and has effects on behaviors that have been suggested to be models of the cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS). Despite this being a widely studied animal model, little is known about the long lasting changes in synapses and circuits that underlie the altered behaviors. Here we examined synaptic transmission ex-vivo in the hippocampus of mice after a subchronic PCP (scPCP) administration regime. We found that after at least one week of drug free washout period when mice have impaired cognitive function, the threshold for long term potentiation (LTP) of CA1 excitatory synapses was elevated. This elevated LTP threshold was directly related to increased inhibitory input to CA1 pyramidal cells through increased activity of GABAergic neurons. These results suggest repeated PCP administration causes a long-lasting metaplastic change in the inhibitory circuits in the hippocampus that results in impaired LTP, and could contribute to the deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory in PCP-treated mice. Changes in GABA signaling have been described in patients with schizophrenia, therefore our results support using scPCP as a model of CIAS. PMID:25937215

  14. Differential Effects of Resveratrol on the Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Transcripts and Protein in the Hippocampus of Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Shojaei, Shahla; Panjehshahin, Mohammad Reza; Shafiee, Sayed Mohammad; Khoshdel, Zahra; Borji, Mohammad; Ghasempour, Ghasem; Owji, Ali Akbar

    2017-01-01

    Background: The induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus has shown to play a role in the beneficial effects of resveratrol (RSV) on the learning and memory. The BDNF gene has a complicated structure with eight 5’ noncoding exons (I-IXa), each of which can splice to a common coding exon (IX) to form a functional transcript. Estrogens increase levels of BDNF transcripts in the hippocampus of rats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the phytoestrogen, RSV, on the splicing pattern of BDNF transcripts and on the pro-BDNF protein in the hippocampi of mother rats and their embryos. Methods: RSV (60 or 120 mg/kg BW/day) was administered orally to pregnant rats from days 1 to 20 of gestation. Hippocampi of adults and embryos were dissected 24 h after the last administration of RSV. Extracts from hippocampi were subject to quantitative (q) RT-PCR and Western blotting to assess splicing pattern of the BDNF transcripts and levels of pro-BDNF protein, respectively. Results: RSV (120 mg/kg BW/day) caused a statistically significant increase in the expression levels of BDNF exons III, IV and IX, but not the exon I in the hippocampi of adult rats (P≤0.05). Levels of pro-BDNF protein remained unchanged in the hippocampal tissues from both adult and embryonic rats treated by RSV (60 or 120 mg/kg BW/day). Conclusion: Our results showed that RSV differentially activates promoters of the BDNF gene in the hippocampus of pregnant rats, but fails to affect the pro-BDNF level neither in adult nor in the embryonic hippocampal tissues. PMID:28293048

  15. Effects of preweaning environmental enrichment on hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Qiu; Zhong, Le; Yan, Chong-Huai; Tian, Ying; Shen, Xiao-Ming

    2017-02-15

    Previous studies have shown that environmental enrichment (EE) improves learning and memory in adult animals. However, the effects of preweaning EE (preEE) on hippocampus-dependent learning and memory as well as its possible mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we report that preEE enhanced the exploratory activity in rats immediately after weaning, and the EE group showed greater performance in a passive avoidance task than the control group (p<0.05), but not in the locomotion activity. Electrophysiology analysis showed that rats exposed to preEE exhibited larger field excitatory postsynaptic potentials after long-term potentiation induction than those in the control group (p<0.05). The protein levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases as well as activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein were significantly upregulated in the preEE group compared to the control group (p<0.05). Our results indicate that preEE can enhance hippocampus-dependent learning and memory function as postweaning EE does, and the upregulated activation of the ERK signal transduction pathway may be the underlying molecular mechanism.

  16. Cerebral antioxidant enzyme increase associated with learning deficit in type 2 diabetes rats.

    PubMed

    Suge, Rie; Shimazu, Tomokazu; Hasegawa, Hajime; Inoue, Ikuo; Hayashibe, Hidemasa; Nagasaka, Hironori; Araki, Nobuo; Katayama, Shigehiro; Nomura, Masahiko; Watanabe, Shu-Ichi

    2012-10-24

    In this study, we examined alterations in the enzymatic antioxidant defenses associated with learning deficits induced by type 2 diabetes, and studied the effects of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist pioglitazone on these learning deficits. Learning ability was assessed by visual discrimination tasks in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, as a model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes. Levels of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx), Cu(2+)-Zn(2+) superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and manganese SOD were measured in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Half the rats received oral pioglitazone (20mg/kg/day) from the early stage of diabetes (22 weeks old) to 27 weeks old. OLETF rats showed learning deficits compared with control, Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats. GPx levels in the cortex and hippocampus were increased in OLETF rats compared with LETO rats, with an inverse correlation between GPx in the hippocampus and learning score. CuZn-SOD levels were also increased in the hippocampus in OLETF rats. Pioglitazone reduced blood glucose and increased serum adiponectin levels, but had no effect on learning tasks or antioxidant enzymes, except for CuZn-SOD. These results suggest that an oxidative imbalance reflected by increased brain antioxidant enzymes plays an important role in the development of learning deficits in type 2 diabetes. Early pioglitazone administration partly ameliorated diabetic symptoms, but was unable to completely recover cerebral oxidative imbalance and functions. These results suggest that diabetes-induced brain impairment, which results in learning deficits, may have occurred before the appearance of the symptoms of overt diabetes.

  17. Hippocampus and Pavlovian fear conditioning in rats: muscimol infusions into the ventral, but not dorsal, hippocampus impair the acquisition of conditional freezing to an auditory conditional stimulus.

    PubMed

    Maren, Stephen; Holt, William G

    2004-02-01

    The authors compared the effects of pharmacological inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) or ventral hippocampus (VH) on Pavlovian fear conditioning in rats. Freezing behavior served as the measure of fear. Pretraining infusions of muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist, into the VH disrupted auditory, but not contextual, fear conditioning; DH infusions did not affect fear conditioning. Pretesting inactivation of the VH or DH did not affect the expression of conditional freezing. Pretraining electrolytic lesions of the VH reproduced the effects of muscimol infusions, whereas posttraining VH lesions disrupted both auditory and contextual freezing. Hence, neurons in the VH are importantly involved in the acquisition of auditory fear conditioning and the expression of auditory and contextual fear under some conditions.

  18. Neuronal mechanisms of the anoxia-induced network oscillations in the rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dzhala, V; Khalilov, I; Ben-Ari, Y; Khazipov, R

    2001-10-15

    1. A spindle of fast network oscillations precedes the ischaemia-induced rapid depolarisation in the rat hippocampus in vivo. However, this oscillatory pattern could not be reproduced in slices and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have found that anoxia-induced network oscillations (ANOs, 20-40 Hz, lasting for 1-2 min) can be reproduced in the intact hippocampi of postnatal day P7-10 rats in vitro, and we have examined the underlying mechanisms using whole-cell and extracellular field potential recordings in a CA3 pyramidal layer. 2. ANOs were generated at the beginning of the anoxic depolarisation, when pyramidal cells depolarised to subthreshold values. Maximal power of the ANOs was attained when pyramidal cells depolarised to -56 mV; depolarisation above -47 mV resulted in a depolarisation block of pyramidal cells and a waning of ANOs. 3. A multiple unit activity in extracellular field recordings was phase locked to the negative and ascending phases of ANOs. Pyramidal cells recorded in current-clamp mode generated action potentials with an average probability of about 0.05 per cycle. The AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs and the GABA receptor-mediated IPSCs in CA3 pyramidal cells were also phase locked with ANOs. 4. ANOs were prevented by tetrodotoxin and glutamate receptor antagonists CNQX and APV, and were slowed down by the allosteric GABA(A) receptor modulator diazepam. In the presence of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, ANOs were transformed to epileptiform discharges. 5. In the presence of the A1 adenosine receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), the anoxia induced an epileptiform activity and no ANOs were observed. 6. In normoxic conditions, a rise of extracellular potassium to 10 mM induced an epileptiform activity. Increasing extracellular potassium in conjunction with a bath application of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine induced oscillations similar to ANOs. 7. Multisite

  19. Neuronal mechanisms of the anoxia-induced network oscillations in the rat hippocampus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dzhala, Volodymyr; Khalilov, Ilgam; Ben-Ari, Yehezkiel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2001-01-01

    A spindle of fast network oscillations precedes the ischaemia-induced rapid depolarisation in the rat hippocampus in vivo. However, this oscillatory pattern could not be reproduced in slices and the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have found that anoxia-induced network oscillations (ANOs, 20–40 Hz, lasting for 1–2 min) can be reproduced in the intact hippocampi of postnatal day P7–10 rats in vitro, and we have examined the underlying mechanisms using whole-cell and extracellular field potential recordings in a CA3 pyramidal layer.ANOs were generated at the beginning of the anoxic depolarisation, when pyramidal cells depolarised to subthreshold values. Maximal power of the ANOs was attained when pyramidal cells depolarised to −56 mV; depolarisation above −47 mV resulted in a depolarisation block of pyramidal cells and a waning of ANOs.A multiple unit activity in extracellular field recordings was phase locked to the negative and ascending phases of ANOs. Pyramidal cells recorded in current-clamp mode generated action potentials with an average probability of about 0.05 per cycle. The AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs and the GABA receptor-mediated IPSCs in CA3 pyramidal cells were also phase locked with ANOs.ANOs were prevented by tetrodotoxin and glutamate receptor antagonists CNQX and APV, and were slowed down by the allosteric GABAA receptor modulator diazepam. In the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline, ANOs were transformed to epileptiform discharges.In the presence of the A1 adenosine receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), the anoxia induced an epileptiform activity and no ANOs were observed.In normoxic conditions, a rise of extracellular potassium to 10 mm induced an epileptiform activity. Increasing extracellular potassium in conjunction with a bath application of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist cyclopentyladenosine induced oscillations similar to ANOs.Multisite recordings along the septo

  20. Antidepressant Effect of Crocus sativus Aqueous Extract and its Effect on CREB, BDNF, and VGF Transcript and Protein Levels in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, T; Abnous, K; Vahdati, F; Mehri, S; Razavi, B M; Hosseinzadeh, H

    2015-07-01

    Crocus sativus L., commonly known as saffron, is a perennial stemless herb in Iridaceae family. It has been used in traditional medicine as well as in modern pharmacological studies for variety of conditions including depression. Recent studies have suggested brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), VGF Neuropeptide, Cyclic-AMP Response Element Binding Protein (CREB) and phospho-CREB (p-CREB) may play roles in depression. In this research the molecular mechanism of antidepressant effect of aqueous extract of saffron and its effect on the levels of BDNF, VGF, CREB and p-CREB in rat hippocampus, were investigated. The aqueous extract of saffron (40, 80 and 160 mg/kg/day) and imipramine 10 mg/kg/day were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 21 days to rats. The FST (forced swimming test) was performed on the days 1(st) and 21(st). The protein expression and transcript levels of BDNF, VGF CREB and phospho-CREB in rat hippocampus, were evaluated using western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results of FST showed that saffron reduced the immobility time. The protein levels of BDNF, CREB and p-CREB were significantly increased in saffron treated rats. VGF protein expression was also increased, but not significantly. The transcript levels of BDNF significantly increased. No significant changes in CREB and VGF transcript levels were observed. It was concluded that aqueous extract of saffron has antidepressant effects and the mechanism of its antidepressant effect may be due to increasing the levels of BDNF, VGF, CREB and P-CREB in rat hippocampus.

  1. Effects of amyloid-β peptides on the serotoninergic 5-HT1A receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Verdurand, Mathieu; Bérod, Anne; Le Bars, Didier; Zimmer, Luc

    2011-01-01

    A recent [(18)F]MPPF-positron emission tomography study has highlighted an overexpression of 5-HT(1A) receptors in the hippocampus of patients with mild cognitive impairment compared to a decrease in those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) [Truchot, L., Costes, S.N., Zimmer, L., Laurent, B., Le Bars, D., Thomas-Antérion, C., Croisile, B., Mercier, B., Hermier, M., Vighetto, A., Krolak-Salmon, P., 2007. Up-regulation of hippocampal serotonin metabolism in mild cognitive impairment. Neurology 69 (10), 1012-1017]. We used in vivo and in vitro neuroimaging to evaluate the longitudinal effects of injecting amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides (1-40) into the dorsal hippocampus of rats. In vivo microPET imaging showed no significant change in [(18)F]MPPF binding in the dorsal hippocampus over time, perhaps due to spatial resolution. However, in vitro autoradiography with [(18)F]MPPF (which is antagonist) displayed a transient increase in 5-HT(1A) receptor density 7 days after Aβ injection, whereas [(18)F]F15599 (a radiolabelled 5-HT(1A) agonist) binding was unchanged suggesting that the overexpressed 5-HT(1A) receptors were in a non-functional state. Complementary histology revealed a loss of glutamatergic neurons and an intense astroglial reaction at the injection site. Although a neurogenesis process cannot be excluded, we propose that Aβ injection leads to a transient astroglial overexpression of 5-HT(1A) receptors in compensation for the local neuronal loss. Exploration of the functional consequences of these serotoninergic modifications during the neurodegenerative process may have an impact on therapeutics targeting 5-HT(1A) receptors in AD.

  2. Zuogui Jiangtang Jieyu Formulation Prevents Hyperglycaemia and Depressive-Like Behaviour in Rats by Reducing the Glucocorticoid Level in Plasma and Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, YuHong; Yang, Hui; Li, Wei; Meng, Pan; Han, YuanShan; Zhang, Xiuli; Cao, DeLiang; Tan, Yuansheng

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine whether Zuogui Jiangtang Jieyu prescription (ZGJTJY) has hypoglycemic and antidepressant effects which are mediated by corticosterone through adjustment of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) and glucocorticoid (GR) levels. Materials and Methods. The diabetes-related depression rats were randomly divided into four groups: the model group, metformin (1.8 mg/kg) combined with fluoxetine (10.8 mg/kg) group, and ZGJTJY high and low dose groups. Four weeks after modeling, blood glucose, behavior, and cognitive function of depression were detected. The expressions of 11β-HSD1 and GR in hippocampus were measured by western blotting and immunohistochemical experiments. Results. We found that (1) the treatment with ZGJTJY (10.26 g/kg) increases the motor activities and improves cognition ability. (2) ZGJTJY (10.26 g/kg) significantly relieves the disorder in blood and the relative indexes. (3) ZGJTJY (10.26 g/kg) can reduce hippocampal corticosterone expression levels and further improve hippocampus pathological changes. (4) ZGJTJY increased the expression of GR accompanied with decreasing 11β-HSD1 in hippocampus. Conclusions. ZGJTJY inhibits the expression of 11β-HSD1 and increases GR in hippocampus and subsequently modulates blood glucose levels, and therefore it is potential property that ZGJTJY could be of benefit for the treatment of behavior and cognitive function of diabetes-related depression. PMID:26273311

  3. Prenatal Stress Induces Long-Term Effects in Cell Turnover in the Hippocampus-Hypothalamus-Pituitary Axis in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Baquedano, Eva; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Diz-Chaves, Yolanda; Lagunas, Natalia; Calmarza-Font, Isabel; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.; Frago, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Subchronic gestational stress leads to permanent modifications in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of offspring probably due to the increase in circulating glucocorticoids known to affect prenatal programming. The aim of this study was to investigate whether cell turnover is affected in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary axis by subchronic prenatal stress and the intracellular mechanisms involved. Restraint stress was performed in pregnant rats during the last week of gestation (45 minutes; 3 times/day). Only male offspring were used for this study and were sacrificed at 6 months of age. In prenatally stressed adults a decrease in markers of cell death and proliferation was observed in the hippocampus, hypothalamus and pituitary. This was associated with an increase in insulin-like growth factor-I mRNA levels, phosphorylation of CREB and calpastatin levels and inhibition of calpain -2 and caspase -8 activation. Levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 were increased and levels of the pro-apoptotic factor p53 were reduced. In conclusion, prenatal restraint stress induces a long-term decrease in cell turnover in the hippocampus-hypothalamus-pituitary axis that might be at least partly mediated by an autocrine-paracrine IGF-I effect. These changes could condition the response of this axis to future physiological and pathophysiological situations. PMID:22096592

  4. The combined effects of developmental lead and ethanol exposure on hippocampus dependent spatial learning and memory in rats: Role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Elham; Goudarzi, Iran; Abrari, Kataneh; Lashkarbolouki, Taghi

    2016-10-01

    Either developmental lead or ethanol exposure can impair learning and memory via induction of oxidative stress, which results in neuronal damage. we examined the effect of combined exposure with lead and ethanol on spatial learning and memory in offspring and oxidative stress in hippocampus. Rats were exposed to lead (0.2% in drinking water) or ethanol (4 g/kg) either individually or in combination in 5th day gestation through weaning. On postnatal days (PD) 30, rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. On day 37, a probe test was done. Also, oxidative stress markers in the hippocampus were also evaluated. Results demonstrated that lead + ethanol co-exposed rats exhibited higher escape latency during training trials and reduced time spent in target quadrant, higher escape location latency and average proximity in probe trial test. There was significant decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities and increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in hippocampus of animals co-exposed to lead and ethanol compared with their individual exposures. We suggest that maternal consumption of ethanol during lead exposure has pronounced detrimental effects on memory, which may be mediated by oxidative stress.

  5. Mechanisms of induction and expression of long-term depression at GABAergic synapses in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Caillard, O; Ben-Ari, Y; Gaïarsa, J L

    1999-09-01

    Synaptic plasticity at excitatory glutamatergic synapses is believed to be instrumental in the maturation of neuronal networks. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we have studied the mechanisms of induction and expression of long-term depression at excitatory GABAergic synapses in the neonatal rat hippocampus (LTD(GABA-A)). We report that the induction of LTD(GABA-A) requires a GABA(A) receptor-mediated membrane depolarization, which is necessary to remove the Mg(2+) block from postsynaptic NMDA receptors. LTD(GABA-A) is associated with an increase in the coefficient of variation of evoked GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic currents and a decrease in the frequency, but not amplitude, of Sr(2+)-induced asynchronous GABA(A) quantal events. We conclude that LTD(GABA-A) induction requires the activation of both GABA(A) and NMDA postsynaptic receptors and that its expression is likely presynaptic.

  6. Spontaneous synaptic activity is required for the formation of functional GABAergic synapses in the developing rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Colin-Le Brun, Isabelle; Ferrand, Nadine; Caillard, Olivier; Tosetti, Patrizia; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gaïarsa, Jean-Luc

    2004-08-15

    Here we examine the role of the spontaneous synaptic activity generated by the developing rat hippocampus in the formation of functional gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synapses. Intact hippocampal formations (IHFs) were dissected at birth and incubated for 1 day in control or tetrodotoxin (TTX)-supplemented medium at 25 degrees C. After the incubation, miniature GABA(A)-mediated postsynaptic currents (mGABA(A)-PSCs) were recorded in whole-cell voltage-clamped CA3 pyramidal neurones from IHF-derived slices. After 1 day in vitro in control medium, the frequency of mGABA(A)-PSCs was similar to that recorded in acute slices obtained 1 day after birth, but significantly higher than the frequency recorded from acute slices just after birth. These results suggest that the factors required in vivo for the formation of functional GABAergic synapses are preserved in the IHFs in vitro. The frequency increase was prevented when IHFs were incubated for 1 day with TTX. TTX treatment affected neither the morphology of CA3 pyramidal neurones nor cell viability. The TTX effects were reproduced when IHFs were incubated in the presence of glutamatergic or GABAergic ionotropic receptor antagonists or in high divalent cationic medium. The present results indicate that the spontaneous synaptic activity generated by the developing hippocampus is a key player in the formation of functional GABAergic synapses, possibly via network events requiring both glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors.

  7. Spontaneous synaptic activity is required for the formation of functional GABAergic synapses in the developing rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Colin-Le Brun, Isabelle; Ferrand, Nadine; Caillard, Olivier; Tosetti, Patrizia; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gaïarsa, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    Here we examine the role of the spontaneous synaptic activity generated by the developing rat hippocampus in the formation of functional γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synapses. Intact hippocampal formations (IHFs) were dissected at birth and incubated for 1 day in control or tetrodotoxin (TTX)-supplemented medium at 25°C. After the incubation, miniature GABAA-mediated postsynaptic currents (mGABAA-PSCs) were recorded in whole-cell voltage-clamped CA3 pyramidal neurones from IHF-derived slices. After 1 day in vitro in control medium, the frequency of mGABAA-PSCs was similar to that recorded in acute slices obtained 1 day after birth, but significantly higher than the frequency recorded from acute slices just after birth. These results suggest that the factors required in vivo for the formation of functional GABAergic synapses are preserved in the IHFs in vitro. The frequency increase was prevented when IHFs were incubated for 1 day with TTX. TTX treatment affected neither the morphology of CA3 pyramidal neurones nor cell viability. The TTX effects were reproduced when IHFs were incubated in the presence of glutamatergic or GABAergic ionotropic receptor antagonists or in high divalent cationic medium. The present results indicate that the spontaneous synaptic activity generated by the developing hippocampus is a key player in the formation of functional GABAergic synapses, possibly via network events requiring both glutamatergic and GABAergic receptors. PMID:15218067

  8. Hippocampal Synaptic Expansion Induced by Spatial Experience in Rats Correlates with Improved Information Processing in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Carasatorre, Mariana; Ochoa-Alvarez, Adrian; Velázquez-Campos, Giovanna; Lozano-Flores, Carlos; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía Y.; Ramírez-Amaya, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Spatial water maze (WM) overtraining induces hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) expansion, and it has been suggested that spatial pattern separation depends on the MF pathway. We hypothesized that WM experience inducing MF expansion in rats would improve spatial pattern separation in the hippocampal network. We first tested this by using the the delayed non-matching to place task (DNMP), in animals that had been previously trained on the water maze (WM) and found that these animals, as well as animals treated as swim controls (SC), performed better than home cage control animals the DNMP task. The “catFISH” imaging method provided neurophysiological evidence that hippocampal pattern separation improved in animals treated as SC, and this improvement was even clearer in animals that experienced the WM training. Moreover, these behavioral treatments also enhance network reliability and improve partial pattern separation in CA1 and pattern completion in CA3. By measuring the area occupied by synaptophysin staining in both the stratum oriens and the stratun lucidum of the distal CA3, we found evidence of structural synaptic plasticity that likely includes MF expansion. Finally, the measures of hippocampal network coding obtained with catFISH correlate significantly with the increased density of synaptophysin staining, strongly suggesting that structural synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus induced by the WM and SC experience is related to the improvement of spatial information processing in the hippocampus. PMID:26244549

  9. Differential Local Connectivity and Neuroinflammation Profiles in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus in the Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism.

    PubMed

    Codagnone, Martín Gabriel; Podestá, María Fernanda; Uccelli, Nonthué Alejandra; Reinés, Analía

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of developmental disabilities characterized by impaired social interaction, communication deficit and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. Neuroinflammation and synaptic alterations in several brain areas have been suggested to contribute to the physiopathology of ASD. Although the limbic system plays an important role in the functions found impaired in ASD, reports on these areas are scarce and results controversial. In the present study we searched in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus of rats exposed to the valproic acid (VPA) model of ASD for early structural and molecular changes, coincident in time with the behavioral alterations. After confirming delayed growth and maturation in VPA rats, we were able to detect decreased exploratory activity and social interaction at an early time point (postnatal day 35). In mPFC, although typical cortical column organization was preserved in VPA animals, we found that interneuronal space was wider than in controls. Hippocampal CA3 (cornu ammonis 3) pyramidal layer and the granular layer of the dentate gyrus both showed a disorganized spatial arrangement in VPA animals. Neuronal alterations were accompanied with increased tomato lectin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunostainings both in the mPFC and hippocampus. In the latter region, the increased GFAP immunoreactivity was CA3 specific. At the synaptic level, while mPFC from VPA animals showed increased synaptophysin (SYN) immunostaining, a SYN deficit was found in all hippocampal subfields. Additionally, both the mPFC and the hippocampus of VPA rats showed increased neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) immunostaining together with decreased levels of its polysialylated form (PSA-NCAM). Interestingly, these changes were more robust in the CA3 hippocampal subfield. Our results indicate that exploratory and social deficits correlate with region-dependent neuronal disorganization and reactive

  10. Opposite effects of acute ethanol exposure on GAP-43 and BDNF expression in the hippocampus versus the cerebellum of juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Kulkarny, V V; Wiest, N E; Marquez, C P; Nixon, S C; Valenzuela, C F; Perrone-Bizzozero, N I

    2011-08-01

    The adolescent brain is particularly vulnerable to the effects of alcohol, with intoxications at this developmental age often producing long-lasting effects. The present study addresses the effects of a single acute ethanol exposure on growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression in neurons in the cerebellum and hippocampus of adolescent rats. Male postnatal day 23 (P23) Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to ethanol vapors for 2h and after a recovery period of 2h, the cerebellum and hippocampus were harvested and samples were taken for blood alcohol concentration (BAC) determinations. We found that this exposure resulted in a mean BAC of 174 mg/dL, which resembles levels in human adolescents after binge drinking. Analyses of total RNA and protein by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and western blotting, respectively, revealed that this single ethanol exposure significantly decreased the levels of GAP-43 mRNA and protein in the cerebellum but increased the levels of mRNA and protein in the hippocampus. BDNF mRNA and protein levels were also increased in the hippocampus but not in the cerebellum of these animals. In situ hybridizations revealed that GAP-43 and BDNF mRNA levels were primarily increased by alcohol exposure in hippocampal dentate granule cells and CA3 neurons. Overall, the reported alterations in the expression of the plasticity-associated genes GAP-43 and BDNF in juvenile rats are consistent with the known deleterious effects of binge drinking on motor coordination and cognitive function.

  11. Projection neurons in the cortex and hippocampus: differential effects of chronic khat and ethanol exposure in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Alele, Paul E; Matovu, Daniel; Imanirampa, Lawrence; Ajayi, Abayomi M; Kasule, Gyaviira T

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that many individuals who chew khat recreationally also drink ethanol to offset the stimulating effect of khat. The objective of this study was to describe the separate and interactive effects of chronic ethanol and khat exposure on key projection neurons in the cortex and hippocampus of young adult male rats. Methods Young adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six treatment groups: 2 g/kg khat, 4 g/kg khat, 4 g/kg ethanol, combined khat and ethanol (4 g/kg each), a normal saline control, and an untreated group. Treatments were administered orally for 28 continuous days; brains were then harvested, sectioned, and routine hematoxylin–eosin staining was done. Following photomicrography, ImageJ® software captured data regarding neuron number and size. Results No differences occurred in counts of both granular and pyramidal projection neurons in the motor cortex and all four subfields of the hippocampal formation. Khat dose-dependently increased pyramidal neuron size in the motor cortex and the CA3 region, but had different effects on granular neuron size in the dentate gyrus and the motor cortex. Mean pyramidal neuron size for the ethanol-only treatment was larger than that for the 2 g/kg khat group, and the saline control group, in CA3 and in the motor cortex. Concomitant khat and ethanol increased granular neuron size in the motor cortex, compared to the 2 g/kg khat group, the 4 g/kg khat group, and the 4 g/kg ethanol group. In the CA3 region, the 4 g/kg ethanol group showed a larger mean pyramidal neuron size than the combined khat and ethanol group. Conclusion These results suggest that concomitant khat and ethanol exposure changes granular and pyramidal projection neuron sizes differentially in the motor cortex and hippocampus, compared to the effects of chronic exposure to these two drugs separately. PMID:27785113

  12. Effects of Ethanol on the Expression Level of Various BDNF mRNA Isoforms and Their Encoded Protein in the Hippocampus of Adult and Embryonic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shojaei, Shahla; Ghavami, Saeid; Panjehshahin, Mohammad Reza; Owji, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to compare the effects of oral ethanol (Eth) alone or combined with the phytoestrogen resveratrol (Rsv) on the expression of various brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) transcripts and the encoded protein pro-BDNF in the hippocampus of pregnant and embryonic rats. A low (0.25 g/kg body weight (BW)/day) dose of Eth produced an increase in the expression of BDNF exons I, III and IV and a decrease in that of the exon IX in embryos, but failed to affect BDNF transcript and pro-BDNF protein expression in adults. However, co-administration of Eth 0.25 g/kg·BW/day and Rsv led to increased expression of BDNF exons I, III and IV and to a small but significant increase in the level of pro-BDNF protein in maternal rats. A high (2.5 g/kg·BW/day) dose of Eth increased the expression of BDNF exons III and IV in embryos, but it decreased the expression of exon IX containing BDNF mRNAs in the maternal rats. While the high dose of Eth alone reduced the level of pro-BDNF in adults, it failed to change the levels of pro-BDNF in embryos. Eth differentially affects the expression pattern of BDNF transcripts and levels of pro-BDNF in the hippocampus of both adult and embryonic rats. PMID:26703578

  13. Regulation of GABA release by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the neonatal rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Laura; Sher, Emanuele; Cherubini, Enrico

    2001-01-01

    The whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique was used to study the modulation of giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in CA3 hippocampal neurons in slices from postnatal day (P) 2–6 rats.Bath application of nicotine increased GDP frequency in a concentration-dependent manner. For example, nicotine (0.5–1 μm) enhanced GDP frequency from 0.05 ± 0.04 to 0.17 ± 0.04 Hz. This effect was prevented by the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist dihydro-β-erythtroidine (DHβE, 50 μm) and partially antagonized by methyllycaconitine (MLA, 50 nm) a competitive antagonist of α7 nAChRs. GDP frequency was also enhanced by AR-17779 (100 μm), a selective agonist of α7 nAChRs.The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 μm) and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist DNQX (20 μm) blocked GDPs and prevented the effects of nicotine on GDPs. In the presence of DNQX, nicotine increased GABA-mediated synaptic noise, indicating that this drug may have a direct effect on GABAergic interneurons.Bath application of edrophonium (20 μm), a cholinesterase inhibitor, in the presence of atropine (1 μm), increased GDP frequency, indicating that nAChRs can be activated by ACh released from the septo-hippocampal fibres. This effect was prevented by DHβE (50 μm).In the majority of neurons tested, MLA (50 nm) and DHβE (50 μm) reduced the frequency of GDPs with different efficacy: a reduction of 98 ± 11 and 61 ± 29 % was observed with DHβE and MLA, respectively. In a subset of cells (40 % in the case of MLA and 17 % in the case of DHβE) these drugs induced a twofold increase in GDP frequency.It is suggested that, during development, nAChRs modulate the release of GABA, assessed as GDPs, through distinct nAChRs. The rise of intracellular calcium via nAChRs would further strengthen GABA-mediated oscillatory activity. This can be crucial for consolidation of synaptic contacts and for the fine-tuning of the

  14. Chronic developmental lead exposure reduces neurogenesis in adult rat hippocampus but does not impair spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, M E; Kelly, M E; Samsam, T E; Goodman, J H

    2005-08-01

    The dentate granule cell (DG) layer of the hippocampal formation has the distinctive property of ongoing neurogenesis that continues throughout adult life. Although the function of these newly generated neurons and the mechanisms that control their birth are unknown, age, activity, diet and psychosocial stress have all been demonstrated to regulate this type of neurogenesis. Little information on the impact of environmental insults on this process has appeared to date. Developmental lead (Pb) exposure has been well documented to impair cognitive function in children and animals and reduce activity-dependent synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of rodents. Therefore, we examined the effects of this classic environmental neurotoxicant on hippocampal-dependent learning and adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Pregnant rats were exposed to a low level of Pb-acetate (0.2%) via the drinking water from late gestation (GD 16) until weaning on postnatal day 21 (PN 21). At weaning, half of the Pb-exposed animals were weaned to control drinking water and the remainder were maintained on Pb water until termination of the study. Animals were paired- housed and on PN 75 were administered a series of injections of a thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a marker of DNA synthesis that labels proliferating cells and their progeny. At 12-h intervals for 12 days, rats received an ip injection of BrdU (50 mg/kg). Subjects were sacrificed and perfused 24 h and 28 days after the last injection. Spatial learning was assessed in an independent group of animals beginning on PN 110 using a Morris water maze. No Pb-induced impairments were evident in water maze learning. Immunohistochemistry for the detection of BrdU-labeled cells was performed on 40-microm coronal sections throughout the hippocampus. Continuous exposure to Pb (Life) reduced the total number of BrdU-positive cells at 28 days without affecting the total number of labeled cells evident 24 h after the last injection

  15. Protective effects of bupivacaine against kainic acid-induced seizure and neuronal cell death in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Wu, Chia Chan; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-01-01

    The excessive release of glutamate is a critical element in the neuropathology of epilepsy, and bupivacaine, a local anesthetic agent, has been shown to inhibit the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals. This study investigated whether bupivacaine produces antiseizure and antiexcitotoxic effects using a kainic acid (KA) rat model, an animal model used for temporal lobe epilepsy, and excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments. The results showed that administering bupivacaine (0.4 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to rats 30 min before intraperitoneal injection of KA (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and reduced the seizure score. In addition, bupivacaine attenuated KA-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the inhibition of microglial activation and production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, bupivacaine shortened the latency of escaping onto the platform in the Morris water maze learning performance test. Collectively, these data suggest that bupivacaine has therapeutic potential for treating epilepsy.

  16. Rewarded associative and instrumental conditioning after neonatal ventral hippocampus lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Carlos Eduardo; Sandner, Guy; Angst, Marie-Josée; Guiberteau, Thierry

    2008-06-18

    Sprague Dawley rats were submitted to bilateral ventral hippocampus lesions 7 days after birth. This corresponds to the Lipska and Weinberger's procedure for modeling schizophrenia. The aim of the present work was to test the learning capacity of such rats with an associative Pavlovian and an instrumental learning paradigm, both methods using reward outcome (food, sucrose or polycose). The associative paradigm comprised also a second learning test with reversed learning contingencies. The instrumental conditioning comprised an extinction test under outcome devaluation conditions. Neonatally lesioned rats, once adults (over 60 days of age), showed a conditioning deficit in the associative paradigm but not in the instrumental one. Lesioned rats remained able to adapt as readily as controls to the reversed learning contingency and were as sensitive as controls to the devaluation of outcome. Such observations indicate that the active access (instrumental learning) to a reward could have compensated for the deficit observed under the "passive" stimulus-reward associative learning condition. This feature is compared to the memory management impairments observed in clinical patients.

  17. Acute intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid provokes long-lasting misregulation of the cytoskeleton in the striatum, cerebral cortex and hippocampus of young rats.

    PubMed

    Pierozan, Paula; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina; Ferreira, Fernanda; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2014-08-19

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a neuroactive metabolite of the kinurenine pathway, considered to be involved in aging and some neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington׳s disease. In the present work we have studied the long-lasting effect of acute intrastriatal injection of QUIN (150 nmol/0.5 µL) in 30 day-old rats on the phosphorylating system associated with the astrocytic and neuronal intermediate filament (IF) proteins: glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM and NFH) respectively, until 21 days after injection. The acute administration of QUIN altered the homeostasis of IF phosphorylation in a selective manner, progressing from striatum to cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Twenty four hours after QUIN injection, the IFs were hyperphosphorylated in the striatum. This effect progressed to cerebral cortex causing hypophosphorylation at day 14 and appeared in the hippocampus as hyperphosphorylation at day 21 after QUIN infusion. PKA and PKCaMII have been activated in striatum and hippocampus, since Ser55 and Ser57 in NFL head domain were hyperphosphorylated. However, MAPKs (Erk1/2, JNK and p38MAPK) were hyperphosphorylated/activated only in the hippocampus, suggesting different signaling mechanisms in these two brain structures during the first weeks after QUIN infusion. Also, protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and 2B (PP2B)-mediated hypophosphorylation of the IF proteins in the cerebral cortex 14 after QUIN injection reinforce the selective signaling mechanisms in different brain structures. Increased GFAP immunocontent in the striatum and cerebral cortex 24h and 14 days after QUIN injection respectively, suggests reactive astrocytes in these brain regions. We propose that disruption of cytoskeletal homeostasis in neural cells takes part of the long-lasting molecular mechanisms of QUIN toxicity in adolescent rats, showing selective and progressive misregulation of the signaling mechanisms targeting the IF proteins in the

  18. [Effect of semax on the temporary dynamics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor gene expression in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex].

    PubMed

    Agapova, T Iu; Agniullin, Ia V; Silachev, D N; Shadrina, M I; Slominskiĭ, P A; Shram, S I; Limborskaia, S A; Miasoedov, N F

    2008-01-01

    Semax is a synthetic peptide, which consists of the N-terminal adrenocorticotropic hormone fragment (4-7) (ACTH4-7) and C-terminal Pro-Gly-Pro peptide. Semax promotes neuron survival in hypoxia, increases selective attention and memory storage. It was shown that this synthetic peptide exerted a number of gene expressions, especially brain derived neurotrophic factor gene (Bdnf) and nerve growth factor gene (Ngf). Temporary dynamics of Bdnf and Ngf ex- pression in rat hippocampus and frontal cortex under Semax action (50 mg/kg, single intranasal administration) was studied in this work. It was shown that the studied gene expression levels changed significantly both in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex tissues 20 minutes after the peptide preparation application. The expression levels decreased in the hippocampus and increased in the frontal cortex. Forty minutes after Semax administration both gene expression levels returned to the level typical of control tissues. After that they increased significantly by 90 minutes after experiment start. Bdnf and Ngf expression levels decreased up to the control levels by 8 hours after medicine applying maximum gene expression levels were attained. Thus, Semax administration results in rapid, long-term, and specific activation of Bdnf and Ngf expression changes in different rat brain departments.

  19. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase alpha subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  20. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  1. Higher density of serotonin-1A receptors in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of alcohol-preferring P rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G. ); Lumeng, L.; Li, Ting-Kai )

    1990-01-01

    Saturable ({sup 3}H)-80HDPAT binding to 5HT-1A receptors in membranes prepared from hippocampus and frontal cerebral cortex of alcohol-preferring (P) rats and of alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats has been compared. The B{sub max} values or densities of recognition sites for 5HT-1A receptors in both brain areas of the P rats are 38 and 44 percent lower in the P rats than in the NP rats. The corresponding K{sub D} values are 38 and 44 percent lower in the P rats than in the NP rats, indicating higher affinities of the recognition sites for the 5HT-1A receptors in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of the P rats. These findings indicate either an enrichment of 5HT-1A receptor density during selective breeding for alcohol preference or an upregulation of 5HT-1A receptors of 5HT found in these brain areas of P rats as compared with the NP rats.

  2. Adult-onset focal expression of mutated human tau in the hippocampus impairs spatial working memory of rats.

    PubMed

    Mustroph, Martina L; King, Michael A; Klein, Ronald L; Ramirez, Julio J

    2012-07-15

    Tauopathy in the hippocampus is one of the earliest cardinal features of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a condition characterized by progressive memory impairments. In fact, density of tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the hippocampus strongly correlates with severity of cognitive impairments in AD. In the present study, we employed a somatic cell gene transfer technique to create a rodent model of tauopathy by injecting a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector with a mutated human tau gene (P301L) into the hippocampus of adult rats. The P301L mutation is causal for frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 (FTDP-17), but it has been used for studying memory effects characteristic of AD in transgenic mice. To ascertain if P301L-induced mnemonic deficits are persistent, animals were tested for 6 months. It was hypothesized that adult-onset, spatially restricted tau expression in the hippocampus would produce progressive spatial working memory deficits on a learned alternation task. Rats injected with the tau vector exhibited persistent impairments on the hippocampal-dependent task beginning at about 6 weeks post-transduction compared to rats injected with a green fluorescent protein vector. Histological analysis of brains for expression of human tau revealed hyperphosphorylated human tau and NFTs in the hippocampus in experimental animals only. Thus, adult-onset, vector-induced tauopathy spatially restricted to the hippocampus progressively impaired spatial working memory in rats. We conclude that the model faithfully reproduces histological and behavioral findings characteristic of dementing tauopathies. The rapid onset of sustained memory impairment establishes a preclinical model particularly suited to the development of potential tauopathy therapeutics.

  3. Alterations in BDNF and synapsin I within the occipital cortex and hippocampus after mild traumatic brain injury in the developing rat: reflections of injury-induced neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Griesbach, Grace Sophia; Hovda, David Allen; Molteni, Raffaella; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2002-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its signal transduction receptor trkB, and its downstream effector, synapsin I, were measured in the hippocampus and occipital cortex of young animals after fluid-percussion brain injury (FPI). Isofluorane anaesthetized postnatal day 19 rats were subjected to a mild lateral FPI or sham injury. Rats were sacrificed at 24 h, 7 days, or 14 days after injury in order to determine mRNA expression. Additional animals were sacrificed at 7 and 14 days after injury for protein analysis. Only FPI animals exhibited hemispheric differences in BDNF levels. These animals exhibited a contralateral increase, ranging from 40% to 75%, in BDNF mRNA within both the hippocampus and occipital cortex at 24 h and 7 days after injury. The increase in message within the occipital cortex was accompanied by an increase in BDNF protein at 7 and 14 days after injury. However, hippocampal BDNF protein increased in both hemispheres at postinjury day 7 and was restricted to the ipsilateral hippocampus at postinjury day 14. At postinjury day 7, both trkB and synapsin I mRNA expression increased ipsilaterally and decreased contralaterally in the occipital cortex. In addition, synapsin I phosphorylation was increased by 20% in the ipsilateral cortex and by 30% in the hippocampus on this day. These results indicate that the developing brain responds to a mild injury by modifying factors related to synaptic plasticity and suggest that regions remote from the site of injury express neurotrophic signals potentially needed for compensatory responses.

  4. Regional and sex-related differences in modulating effects of female sex steroids on ecto-5'-nucleotidase expression in the rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Nataša; Guševac, Ivana; Drakulić, Dunja; Stanojlović, Miloš; Zlatković, Jelena; Sévigny, Jean; Horvat, Anica; Nedeljković, Nadežda; Grković, Ivana

    2016-09-01

    Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN), a membrane rate-limiting enzyme of the purine catabolic pathway, catalyzes the conversion of AMP to adenosine involved in the regulation of many brain physiological and pathological processes. Since gender fundamentally determines hormonal milieu in the body and brain, it is reasonable to assume that sex differences in the activity of various signaling systems, including adenosine, may be generated by gonadal steroids. Thus, we examined expression of eN as a component of adenosine signaling system in the basal state in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of male and female rats at gene, protein and functional level, as well as in the state of gonadal hormone deprivation, induced by ovariectomy (OVX), whereas impact of steroid hormones was explored after repeated administration of 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol and progesterone for seven consecutive days. Results showed regional and sex-related differences in basal eN activity level, with the highest AMP hydrolysis observed in the hippocampus of male rats. Furthermore, ovarian steroids do not contribute to basal gene eN expression or the activity in cortical and hippocampal region of female rats. However, protein eN expression was increased in OVX rats in both investigated region. Investigated exogenous steroids had no influence on eN expression in male brain, while in OVX females alterations in eN activity were induced. The observed effects in female rats were different between examined regions e.g. in cortex, applied treatments predominantly decreased whereas in hippocampus increased eN activity. Based on the presented results, eN exerts regional and sex-related response in basal state as well as after treatment with female gonadal hormones, however the exact mechanisms of sex steroids actions on eN remain unclear and should be fully explored.

  5. Chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood in female rats induces emotional and memory deficits associated with morphological and molecular alterations in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana Ca; Pereira, Maria Cs; Santana, Luana N da Silva; Fernandes, Rafael M; Teixeira, Francisco B; Oliveira, Gedeão B; Fernandes, Luanna Mp; Fontes-Júnior, Enéas A; Prediger, Rui D; Crespo-López, Maria E; Gomes-Leal, Walace; Lima, Rafael R; Maia, Cristiane do Socorro Ferraz

    2015-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that heavy ethanol exposure in early life may produce long-lasting neurobehavioral consequences, since brain structural maturation continues until adolescence. It is well established that females are more susceptible to alcohol-induced neurotoxicity and that ethanol consumption is increasing among women, especially during adolescence. In the present study, we investigated whether chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood in female rats may induce hippocampal histological damage and neurobehavioral impairments. Female rats were treated with distilled water or ethanol (6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) by gavage from the 35(th)-90(th) day of life. Ethanol-exposed animals displayed reduced exploration of the central area and increased number of fecal boluses in the open field test indicative of anxiogenic responses. Moreover, chronic high ethanol exposure during adolescence induced marked impairments on short-term memory of female rats addressed on social recognition and step-down inhibitory avoidance tasks. These neurobehavioral deficits induced by ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood were accompanied by the reduction of hippocampal formation volume as well as the loss of neurons, astrocytes and microglia cells in the hippocampus. These results indicate that chronic high ethanol exposure during adolescence through early adulthood in female rats induces long-lasting emotional and memory deficits associated with morphological and molecular alterations in the hippocampus.

  6. Status Epilepticus Impairs Synaptic Plasticity in Rat Hippocampus and Is Followed by Changes in Expression of NMDA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Postnikova, T Y; Zubareva, O E; Kovalenko, A A; Kim, K K; Magazanik, L G; Zaitsev, A V

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive deficits and memory loss are frequent in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Persistent changes in synaptic efficacy are considered as a cellular substrate underlying memory processes. Electrophysiological studies have shown that the properties of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity in the cortex and hippocampus may undergo substantial changes after seizures. However, the neural mechanisms responsible for these changes are not clear. In this study, we investigated the properties of short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampal slices 24 h after pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus. We found that the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in CA1 pyramidal cells is reduced compared to the control, while short-term facilitation is increased. The experimental results do not support the hypothesis that status epilepticus leads to background potentiation of hippocampal synapses and further LTP induction becomes weaker due to occlusion, as the dependence of synaptic responses on the strength of input stimulation was not different in the control and experimental animals. The decrease in LTP can be caused by impairment of molecular mechanisms of neuronal plasticity, including those associated with NMDA receptors and/or changes in their subunit composition. Real-time PCR demonstrated significant increases in the expression of GluN1 and GluN2A subunits 3 h after PTZ-induced status epilepticus. The overexpression of obligate GluN1 subunit suggests an increase in the total number of NMDA receptors in the hippocampus. A 3-fold increase in the expression of the GluN2B subunit observed 24 h after PTZ-induced status epilepticus might be indicative of an increase in the proportion of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors. Increased expression of the GluN2B subunit may be a cause for reducing the magnitude of LTP at hippocampal synapses after status epilepticus.

  7. Changes in gene expression in the rat hippocampus following exposure to 56 fe particles and protection by berry diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles), such as 56Fe, enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation and disrupts behavior, including spatial learning and memory. In the present study, we examined whether gene expression in the hippocampus, an area of the b...

  8. Effects of developmental exposure to a Commercial PBDE mixture (DE-71) on protein networks in the rat Cerebellum and Hippocampus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title (20 words): Effects of developmental exposure to a Commercial PBDE mixture (DE-71) on protein networks in the rat Cerebellum and Hippocampus. Introduction (120 words): Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE5) possess neurotoxic effects similar to those of PCBs. The cellular a...

  9. Proteolysis of calcineurin is increased in human hippocampus during mild cognitive impairment and is stimulated by oligomeric Abeta

    PubMed Central

    Abdul, Hafiz Mohmmad; Baig, Irfan; LeVine, Harry; Guttmann, Rodney P; Norris, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Recent reports demonstrate that the activation and interaction of the protease calpain (CP) and the protein phosphatase calcineurin (CN) are elevated in the late stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the extent to which CPs and CN interact during earlier stages of disease progression remains unknown. Here, we investigated CP and CN protein levels in cytosolic, nuclear, and membrane fractions prepared from human postmortem hippocampal tissue from aged non-demented subjects, and subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The results revealed a parallel increase in CP I and the 48 kDa CN-Aα (ΔCN-Aα48) proteolytic fragment in cytosolic fractions during MCI. In primary rat hippocampal cultures, CP-dependent proteolysis and activation of CN was stimulated by application of oligomeric Aβ(1-42) peptides. Deleterious effects of Aβ on neuronal morphology were reduced by blockade of either CP or CN. NMDA-type glutamate receptors, which help regulate cognition and neuronal viability, and are modulated by CPs and CN, were also investigated in human hippocampus. Relative to controls, MCI subjects showed significantly greater proteolytic levels of the NR2B subunit. Within subjects, the extent of NR2B proteolysis was strongly correlated with the generation of ΔCN-Aα48 in the cytosol. A similar proteolytic pattern for NR2B was also observed in primary rat hippocampal cultures treated with oligomeric Aβ and prevented by inhibition of CP or CN. Together, the results demonstrate that the activation and interaction of CPs and CN are increased early in cognitive decline associated with AD and may help drive other pathologic processes during disease progression. PMID:20969723

  10. Activation of glycine receptors modulates spontaneous epileptiform activity in the immature rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongqing; Okabe, Akihito; Sun, Haiyan; Sharopov, Salim; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L; Kolbaev, Sergei N; Fukuda, Atsuo; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kilb, Werner

    2014-01-01

    While the expression of glycine receptors in the immature hippocampus has been shown, no information about the role of glycine receptors in controlling the excitability in the immature CNS is available. Therefore, we examined the effect of glycinergic agonists and antagonists in the CA3 region of an intact corticohippocampal preparation of the immature (postnatal days 4–7) rat using field potential recordings. Bath application of 100 μm taurine or 10 μm glycine enhanced the occurrence of recurrent epileptiform activity induced by 20 μm 4-aminopyridine in low Mg2+ solution. This proconvulsive effect was prevented by 3 μm strychnine or after incubation with the loop diuretic bumetanide (10 μm), suggesting that it required glycine receptors and an active NKCC1-dependent Cl− accumulation. Application of higher doses of taurine (≥1 mm) or glycine (100 μm) attenuated recurrent epileptiform discharges. The anticonvulsive effect of taurine was also observed in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine and was attenuated by strychnine, suggesting that it was partially mediated by glycine receptors. Bath application of the glycinergic antagonist strychnine (0.3 μm) induced epileptiform discharges. We conclude from these results that in the immature hippocampus, activation of glycine receptors can mediate both pro- and anticonvulsive effects, but that a persistent activation of glycine receptors is required to suppress epileptiform activity. In summary, our study elucidated the important role of glycine receptors in the control of neuronal excitability in the immature hippocampus. PMID:24665103

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury Dysregulates MicroRNAs to Modulate Cell Signaling in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zilong; Chen, Xiaorui; Zhao, Lili; Qu, Guoqiang; Li, Qingjie

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause for cognitive and communication problems, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Epigenetic modifications, such as microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation, may underlie altered gene expression in the brain, especially hippocampus that plays a major role in spatial learning and memory and is vulnerable to TBI. To advance our understanding of miRNA in pathophysiological processes of TBI, we carried out a time-course microarray analysis of microRNA expression profile in rat ipsilateral hippocampus and examined histological changes, apoptosis and synapse ultrastructure of hippocampus post moderate TBI. We found that 10 out of 156 reliably detected miRNAs were significantly and consistently altered from one hour to seven days after injury. Bioinformatic and gene ontology analyses revealed 107 putative target genes, as well as several biological processes that might be initiated by those dysregulated miRNAs. Among those differentially expressed microRNAs, miR-144, miR-153 and miR-340-5p were confirmed to be elevated at all five time points after TBI by quantitative RT-PCR. Western blots showed three of the predicated target proteins, calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) and alpha-synuclein (SNCA), were concurrently down- regulated, suggesting that miR-144, miR-153 and miR-340-5p may play important roles collaboratively in the pathogenesis of TBI-induced cognitive and memory impairments. These microRNAs might serve as potential targets for progress assessment and intervention against TBI to mitigate secondary damage to the brain. PMID:25089700

  12. Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Parsons, Loren; Pope, Carey

    2013-11-01

    Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 6–7 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (89–90%) and CPF (78–83%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (88–91%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (35–50%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. • Functional signs were only noted with parathion. • Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. • 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were

  13. Nicotine versus 6-hydroxy-l-nicotine against chlorisondamine induced memory impairment and oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hritcu, Lucian; Ionita, Radu; Motei, Diana Elena; Babii, Cornelia; Stefan, Marius; Mihasan, Marius

    2017-02-01

    6-Hydroxy-l-nicotine (6HLN), a nicotine derivative from nicotine degradation by Arthrobacter nicotinovorans pAO1 strain was found to improve behavioral deficits and to reverse oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus. Rats were given CHL (10mg/kg, i.p.) were used as an Alzheimer's disease-like model. The nicotine (0.3mg/kg) and 6HLN (0.3mg/kg) were administered alone or in combination in the CHL-treated rats. Memory-related behaviors were evaluated using Y-maze and radial arm-maze tests. The antioxidant enzymes activity and the levels of the biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured in the hippocampus. Statistical analyses were performed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test. F values for which p<0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. CHL-caused memory deficits and oxidative stress enhancing were observed. Both nicotine and 6HLN administration attenuated the cognitive deficits and recovered the antioxidant capacity in the rat hippocampus of the CHL rat model. Our results suggest that 6HLN versus nicotine confers anti-amnesic properties in the CHL-induced a rat model of memory impairment via reversing cholinergic function and decreasing brain oxidative stress, suggesting the use of this compound as an alternative agent in AD treatment.

  14. Social isolation-induced increase in NMDA receptors in the hippocampus exacerbates emotional dysregulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hua; Hsiao, Ya-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yu, Yang-Jung; Gean, Po-Wu

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that early life adverse events have long-term effects on the susceptibility to subsequent stress exposure in adolescence, but the precise mechanism is unclear. In the present study, mice on postnatal day 21-28 were randomly assigned to either a group or isolated cages for 8 weeks. The socially isolated (SI) mice exhibited a higher level of spontaneous locomotor activity, a longer duration of immobility in the forced swimming test (FST), significantly less prepulse inhibition (PPI) and an increase in aggressive (but not attack) behavior. However, acute stress markedly exacerbated the attack counts of the SI mice but did not affect the group housing (GH) mice. SI mice exhibited higher synaptosomal NR2A and NR2B levels in the hippocampus as compared to the GH mice. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of CA1 neurons in hippocampal slices showed that the SI mice exhibited a higher input-output relationship of NMDAR-EPSCs as compared to the GH mice. Application of the NR2B -specific antagonist ifenprodil produced a greater attenuating effect on NMDAR-EPSCs in slices from the SI mice. NMDAR EPSCs recorded from the SI mice had a slower deactivation kinetic. MK-801, CPP and ifenprodil, the NMDA antagonists, reversed acute stress-induced exaggeration of aggressive and depressive behaviors. Furthermore, acute stress-induced exacerbation of attack behavior in the SI mice was abolished after the knockdown of NR2B expression. These results suggest that social isolation-induced increased expression of NMDA receptors in the hippocampus involves stress exacerbation of aggressive behaviors. Amelioration of aggressive behaviors by NMDA antagonists may open a new avenue for the treatment of psychopathologies that involve outbursts of emotional aggression in neglected children.

  15. Short-term high-fat-and-fructose feeding produces insulin signaling alterations accompanied by neurite and synaptic reduction and astroglial activation in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Ochoa, Erika; Hernández-Ortega, Karina; Ferrera, Patricia; Morimoto, Sumiko; Arias, Clorinda

    2014-01-01

    Chronic consumption of high-fat-and-fructose diets (HFFD) is associated with the development of insulin resistance (InsRes) and obesity. Systemic insulin resistance resulting from long-term HFFD feeding has detrimental consequences on cognitive performance, neurogenesis, and long-term potentiation establishment, accompanied by neuronal alterations in the hippocampus. However, diet-induced hippocampal InsRes has not been reported. Therefore, we investigated whether short-term HFFD feeding produced hippocampal insulin signaling alterations associated with neuronal changes in the hippocampus. Rats were fed with a control diet or an HFFD consisting of 10% lard supplemented chow and 20% high-fructose syrup in the drinking water. Our results show that 7 days of HFFD feeding induce obesity and InsRes, associated with the following alterations in the hippocampus: (1) a decreased insulin signaling; (2) a decreased hippocampal weight; (3) a reduction in dendritic arborization in CA1 and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) levels; (4) a decreased dendritic spine number in CA1 and synaptophysin content, along with an increase in tau phosphorylation; and finally, (5) an increase in reactive astrocyte associated with microglial changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report addressing hippocampal insulin signaling, as well as morphologic, structural, and functional modifications due to short-term HFFD feeding in the rat. PMID:24667917

  16. Detection of novelty, but not memory of spatial habituation, is associated with an increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein levels in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Winograd, Milena; Viola, Haydée

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence showing that the formation of associative memories is associated with an increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) levels. We recently reported increased pCREB levels in the rat hippocampus after an exploration to a novel environment. In the present work, we studied whether this increment in CREB activation is associated with the formation of memory of habituation to a novel environment or with the detection of novelty. Rats were submitted to consecutive open field sessions at 3-h intervals. Measurement of the hippocampal pCREB level, carried out 1 h after each training session, showed that (1) it did not increase when rats explored a familiar environment; (2) it did not increase after a reexposure that improves the memory of habituation; (3) it increased after a brief novel exploration unable to form memory of habituation; and (4) it increased in amnesic rats for spatial habituation. Taken as a whole, our results suggest that the elevated pCREB level after a single open field exploration is not associated with the memory formation of habituation. It is indeed associated with the detection of a novel environment.

  17. Suppression of synaptic plasticity by fullerenol in rat hippocampus in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin-Xing; Zha, Ying-Ying; Yang, Bo; Chen, Lin; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Fullerenol, a water-soluble fullerene derivative, has attracted much attention due to its bioactive properties, including the antioxidative properties and free radical scavenging ability. Due to its superior nature, fullerenol represents a promising diagnostic, therapeutic, and protective agent. Therefore, elucidation of the possible side effects of fullerenol is important in determining its potential role. In the present study, we investigated the acute effects of 5 μM fullerenol on synaptic plasticity in hippocampal brain slices of rats. Incubation with fullerenol for 20 minutes significantly decreased the peak of paired-pulse facilitation and long-term potentiation, indicating that fullerenol suppresses the short- and long-term synaptic plasticity of region I of hippocampus. We found that fullerenol depressed the activity and the expression of nitric oxide (NO) synthase in hippocampus. In view of the important role of NO in synaptic plasticity, the inhibition of fullerenol on NO synthase may contribute to the suppression of synaptic plasticity. These findings may facilitate the evaluation of the side effects of fullerenol. PMID:27729790

  18. Effect of Prolonged Simulated Microgravity on Metabolic Proteins in Rat Hippocampus: Steps toward Safe Space Travel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Javed, Iqbal; Liu, Yahui; Lu, Song; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yongqian; Qing, Hong; Deng, Yulin

    2016-01-04

    Mitochondria are not only the main source of energy in cells but also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which result in oxidative stress when in space. This oxidative stress is responsible for energy imbalances and cellular damage. In this study, a rat tail suspension model was used in individual experiments for 7 and 21 days to explore the effect of simulated microgravity (SM) on metabolic proteins in the hippocampus, a vital brain region involved in learning, memory, and navigation. A comparative (18)O-labeled quantitative proteomic strategy was used to observe the differential expression of metabolic proteins. Forty-two and sixty-seven mitochondrial metabolic proteins were differentially expressed after 21 and 7 days of SM, respectively. Mitochondrial Complex I, III, and IV, isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase were down-regulated. Moreover, DJ-1 and peroxiredoxin 6, which defend against oxidative damage, were up-regulated in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis of proteins DJ-1 and COX 5A confirmed the mass spectrometry results. Despite these changes in mitochondrial protein expression, no obvious cell apoptosis was observed after 21 days of SM. The results of this study indicate that the oxidative stress induced by SM has profound effects on metabolic proteins.

  19. The reduction of volume and fiber bundle connections in the hippocampus of EGR3 transgenic schizophrenia rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ensen; Song, Tianbin; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Jie; Wang, Liwen; Zhao, Qichao; Guo, Runcai; Li, Miao; Ma, Guolin; Lu, Guangming; Li, Kefeng

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective There is a growing consensus that schizophrenia is ultimately caused by abnormal communication between spatially disparate brain structures. White matter fasciculi represent the primary infrastructure for long distance communication in the brain. In this study, we aimed to investigate the white matter connection in schizophrenia susceptible brain regions of early growth response factor 3 (EGR3) expressing rats. Methods A rat model of schizophrenia was created by the transfection of the EGR3 gene into rat hippocampus. All animals were placed in a fixation system using a commercial rat-dedicated coil. Schizophrenia susceptible brain regions were scanned using in vivo diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. The volume, quantity, average length of fiber bundles, fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficient, the relative heterosexual fraction, and volume ratio were collected in the whole brain and schizophrenia related brain areas (the hippocampus, thalamus, and prefrontal lobe). MedINRIA software was used for data processing of diffusion tensor and fiber bundles tracking. The fibronectin in relevant brain regions was also analyzed. Results There was a significant decrease in the volume of the fiber beam through the left hippocampus dentate in the schizophrenia model group in comparison to the control group and the risperidone treatment group (P<0.05). A significant reduction in the volume and number of the fiber bundles was also observed in left prefrontal–left hippocampus, left hippocampus–left thalamus, left prefrontal–left hippocampus–left thalamus areas in the model group (all P<0.05). Conclusion The volume of hippocampus and the number of fiber bundles were reduced in EGR3 transgenic schizophrenia rats, and are the most sensitive indicators in schizophrenia. The diffusion tensor imaging technique plays an important role in the evaluation of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26170675

  20. Dexmedetomidine ameliorates intracerebral hemorrhage-induced memory impairment by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Lakkyong; Choi, In-Young; Kim, Sung-Eun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jin, Jun-Jang; Chung, Jun-Young; Yi, Jae-Woo

    2013-05-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a severe type of stroke causing neurological dysfunction with a high mortality rate. Dexmedetomidine is an agonist for α2‑adrenoreceptors with sedative, anxiolytic, analgesic and anesthetic effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dexmedetomidine on short‑term and spatial learning memory, as well as its effects on apoptosis following the induction of ICH in rats. A rat model of IHC was created by an injection of collagenase into the hippocampus using a stereotaxic instrument. Dexmedetomidine was administered intraperitoneally daily for 14 consecutive days, commencing 1 day after the induction of ICH. The step‑down avoidance test for short‑term memory and the radial 8‑arm maze test for spatial learning memory were conducted. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay, immunohistochemistry for caspase‑3, and western blot analysis for Bcl‑2, Bax, Bid and caspase-3 expression were performed for the detection of apoptosis in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis for the brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) was also performed for the detection of cell survival in the hippocampus. The induction of ICH deteriorated short‑term and spatial learning memory, increased apoptosis and suppressed BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus. Treatment with dexmedetomidine ameliorated the ICH‑induced impairment of short‑term and spatial learning memory by suppressing apoptosis and enhancing BDNF and TrkB expression. In the normal rats, dexmedetomidine exerted no significant effects on memory function and apoptosis. The present results suggest the possibility that dexmedetomidine may be used as a therapeutic agent for the conservation of memory function in stroke patients.

  1. Effects of streptozotocin-induced type 1 maternal diabetes on PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in the hippocampus of rat neonates.

    PubMed

    Hami, Javad; Kerachian, Mohammad-Amin; Karimi, Razieh; Haghir, Hossein; Sadr-Nabavi, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes in pregnancy impairs hippocampus development in offspring, leading to behavioral problems and learning deficits. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in the regulation of neuronal proliferation, survival and death. The present study was designed to examine the effects of maternal diabetes on PKB/Akt expression and phosphorylation in the developing rat hippocampus. Wistar female rats were maintained diabetic from a week before pregnancy through parturition and male offspring was killed at first postnatal day (P1). The hippocampal expression and phosphorylation level of PKB/Akt, one of the key molecules in PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analysis. We found a significant bilateral downregulation of AKT1 gene expression in the hippocampus of pups born to diabetic mothers (p < 0.05). Interestingly, our results revealed a marked upregulation of Akt1 gene in insulin-treated group compared with other groups (p < 0.05). The western blot analysis also showed the reduction of phosphorylation level of all AKT isoforms in both diabetic and insulin-treated groups compared with control (p < 0.05). Moreover, the results showed a significant increase in phosphorylation level of AKT in insulin-treated group compared with the diabetic group. These results represent that diabetes during pregnancy strongly influences the regulation of PKB/AKT in the developing rat hippocampus. Furthermore, although the control of glycemia by insulin administration is not sufficient to prevent the alterations in PKB/Akt expression, it modulates the phosphorylation process, thus ultimately resulting in a situation comparable to that found in the normal condition.

  2. Increasing Acetylcholine Levels in the Hippocampus or Entorhinal Cortex Reverses the Impairing Effects of Septal GABA Receptor Activation on Spontaneous Alternation

    PubMed Central

    Degroot, Aldemar; Parent, Marise B.

    2000-01-01

    Intra-septal infusions of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist muscimol impair learning and memory in a variety of tasks. This experiment determined whether hippocampal or entorhinal infusions of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine would reverse such impairing effects on spontaneous alternation performance, a measure of spatial working memory. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given intra-septal infusions of vehicle or muscimol (1 nmole/0.5 μL) combined with unilateral intra-hippocampal or intra-entorhinal infusions of vehicle or physostigmine (10 μg/μL for the hippocampus; 7.5 μg/μL or 1.875 μg/0.25 μL for the entorhinal cortex). Fifteen minutes later, spontaneous alternation performance was assessed. The results indicated that intra-septal infusions of muscimol significantly decreased percentage-of-alternation scores, whereas intra-hippocampal or intra-entorhinal infusions of physostigmine had no effect. More importantly, intra-hippocampal or intra-entorhinal infusions of physostigmine, at doses that did not influence performance when administered alone, completely reversed the impairing effects of the muscimol infusions. These findings indicate that increasing cholinergic levels in the hippocampus or entorhinal cortex is sufficient to reverse the impairing effects of septal GABA receptor activation and support the hypothesis that the impairing effects of septal GABAergic activity involve cholinergic processes in the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex. PMID:11040261

  3. Identification of a conserved gene signature associated with an exacerbated inflammatory environment in the hippocampus of aging rats.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Joaquín; Abba, Martin C; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Francelle, Laetitia; Morel, Gustavo R; Outeiro, Tiago F; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2017-04-01

    There have been a few descriptive studies in aged rodents about transcriptome changes in the hippocampus, most of them in males. Here, we assessed the age changes in spatial memory performance and hippocampal morphology in female rats and compared those changes with changes in the hippocampal transcriptome. Old rats displayed significant deficits in spatial memory. In both age groups, hole exploration frequency showed a clear peak at hole 0 (escape hole), but the amplitude of the peak was significantly higher in the young than in the old animals. In the hippocampus, there was a dramatic reduction in neurogenesis, whereas reactive microglial infiltrates revealed an inflammatory hippocampal state in the senile rats. Hippocampal RNA-sequencing showed that 210 genes are differentially expressed in the senile rats, most of them being downregulated. Our RNA-Seq data showed that various genes involved in the immune response, including TYROBP, CD11b, C3, CD18, CD4, and CD74, are overexpressed in the hippocampus of aged female rats. Enrichment analysis showed that the pathways overrepresented in the senile rats matched those of an exacerbated inflammatory environment, reinforcing our morphologic findings. After correlating our results with public data of human and mouse hippocampal gene expression, we found an 11-gene signature of overexpressed genes related to inflammatory processes that was conserved across species. We conclude that age-related hippocampal deficits in female rats share commonalities between human and rodents. Interestingly, the 11-gene signature that we identified may represent a cluster of immune and regulatory genes that are deregulated in the hippocampus and possibly other brain regions during aging as well as in some neurodegenerative diseases and low-grade brain tumors. Our study further supports neuroinflammation as a promising target to treat cognitive dysfunction in old individuals and some brain tumors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mathematical model of the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, A. C. G.; Fernandes de Lima, V. M.; Infantosi, A. F. C.

    1998-09-01

    A mathematical transcription of the intrinsic circuit of the CA1 region of the rat dorsal hippocampus was made and the model parameters adjusted according to experimental data from intracellular recordings and single channel kinetics. This model was able to simulate well the profile of the field potentials recorded extracellularly and the well known phenomenon of the paired-pulse depression. The results suggest that the depression of the second pulse, often interpreted in the literature as resulting from inhibition, can also be due to `shunting' effects on the CA1 pyramids' membrane. The rhythmic oscillations of the field potential (EEG) was obtained as an emergent property of the network dynamics. The frequency of the field oscillation followed the main synaptic input in the region (Schaffer collaterals).

  5. Carbamazepine suppresses synchronized afterdischarging in disinhibited immature rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, K L; Swann, J W

    1987-01-06

    Bath application of therapeutic concentrations of the anticonvulsant carbamazepine suppressed penicillin-induced synchronized afterdischarging in immature rat CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells. Afterdischarging was completely abolished in all preparations at a concentration of 30 microM (IC50 = 8.5 +/- 1.4 microM; mean +/- S.E.M.). The duration of the preceding epileptiform burst was not altered at this concentration and was diminished by only 24.4 +/- 1.2% at a supratherapeutic concentration of 100 microM. These results suggest that a carbamazepine-sensitive neurophysiological mechanism distinct from those responsible for epileptiform burst generation plays a key role in the generation of afterdischarges in developing hippocampus.

  6. Protective effects of C-phycocyanin against kainic acid-induced neuronal damage in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Rimbau, V; Camins, A; Romay, C; González, R; Pallàs, M

    1999-12-03

    The neuroprotective role of C-phycocyanin was examined in kainate-injured brains of rats. The effect of three different treatments with C-phycocyanin was studied. The incidence of neurobehavioral changes was significantly lower in animals receiving C-phycocyanin. These animals also gained significantly more weight than the animals only receiving kainic acid, whereas their weight gain did not differed significantly from controls. Equivalent results were found when the neuronal damage in the hippocampus was evaluated through changes in peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (microglial marker) and heat shock protein 27 kD expression (astroglial marker). Our results are consistent with the oxygen radical scavenging properties of C-phycocyanin described elsewhere. Our findings and the virtual lack of toxicity of C-phycocyanin suggest this drug could be used to treat oxidative stress-induced neuronal injury in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

  7. Effect of lead sulfide nanoparticles exposure on calcium homeostasis in rat hippocampus neurons.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanhua; Liu, Huajie; Li, Qingzhao; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Wenli; Chen, Yinping; Wang, Dong; Cai, Yuan

    2013-09-01

    PbS nanoparticles (NPs) is an important nanomaterial for biomedical imaging in living tissues. However, concerning the high toxicity, especially neurotoxicity, of Pb element, it is crucial that the toxicity assessment of "naked" PbS NPs should be adequately studied. In the current study, we systematically explored the neurotoxicity of PbS NPs in rats by measuring the body weight and brain coefficient changes, testing memory behaviors in Y-electric maze, and studying the neuronal ultrastructure and pathology in hippocampus. Furthermore, in order to study the toxic mechanism, we performed Pb and Ca content measurements in various organs, and investigated Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and L-type calcium channel subunit expression. Our results confirmed that PbS NPs showed high neurotoxicity, while a possible mechanism was suggested to be due to the PbS NPs-induced calcium homeostasis disorder which was caused by the abnormal calcium transportation.

  8. Apigenin, a natural flavonoid, inhibits glutamate release in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia Ying; Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Chia Chuan; Wang, Ying Chou; Chou, Shang Shing Peter; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-09-05

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect and mechanism of apigenin, a natural flavonoid, on glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), apigenin inhibited glutamate release and the elevation of the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration evoked by 4-aminopyridine, whereas it had no effect on 4-aminopyridine-mediated depolarization and Na(+) influx. The apigenin-mediated inhibition of evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca(2+) ions and blocking Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel activity. Furthermore, we determined that gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors are present in the hippocampal nerve terminals because they are colocalized with the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. However, the effect of apigenin on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was unaffected by the GABAA receptor antagonists SR95531 and bicuculline. Furthermore, in slice preparations, whole-cell patch-clamp experiments showed that apigenin reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. On the basis of these results, we suggested that apigenin exerts its presynaptic inhibition probably by reducing Ca(2+) entry mediated by the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, thereby inhibiting glutamate release from the rat hippocampal nerve terminals.

  9. Photoaffinity labeling of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ransom, R W; Asarch, K B; Shih, J C

    1986-10-01

    1-[2-(4-Azidophenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine (p-azido-PAPP) inhibits [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine [( 3H]5-HT) binding to 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B sites in rat brain with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of 0.9 nM and 230 nM, respectively. [3H]p-Azido-PAPP was synthesized and its reversible and irreversible binding properties to the hippocampal 5-HT1A site characterized. [3H]p-Azido-PAPP labeled a single class of sites in rat hippocampal membranes with a KD of 1 nM and a maximal binding density of 370 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of [3H]p-azido-PAPP binding was consistent with the radioligand's selective interaction with the 5-HT1A receptor. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membranes preincubated with [3H]p-azido-PAPP and irradiated showed a major band of incorporation of radioactivity at approximately 55,000 daltons. This incorporation could be blocked when membranes were incubated with 1 microM of several agents that have high affinity for 5-HT1A sites [5-HT, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetraline, TVX Q 7821, spiperone, buspirone, d-lysergic acid diethylamide, metergoline]. The results indicate that on photolysis [3H]p-azido-PAPP irreversibly labels a polypeptide that is, or is a subunit of, the 5-HT1A receptor in rat hippocampus.

  10. Sound sensitivity of neurons in rat hippocampus during performance of a sound-guided task.

    PubMed

    Itskov, Pavel M; Vinnik, Ekaterina; Honey, Christian; Schnupp, Jan; Diamond, Mathew E

    2012-04-01

    To investigate how hippocampal neurons encode sound stimuli, and the conjunction of sound stimuli with the animal's position in space, we recorded from neurons in the CA1 region of hippocampus in rats while they performed a sound discrimination task. Four different sounds were used, two associated with water reward on the right side of the animal and the other two with water reward on the left side. This allowed us to separate neuronal activity related to sound identity from activity related to response direction. To test the effect of spatial context on sound coding, we trained rats to carry out the task on two identical testing platforms at different locations in the same room. Twenty-one percent of the recorded neurons exhibited sensitivity to sound identity, as quantified by the difference in firing rate for the two sounds associated with the same response direction. Sensitivity to sound identity was often observed on only one of the two testing platforms, indicating an effect of spatial context on sensory responses. Forty-three percent of the neurons were sensitive to response direction, and the probability that any one neuron was sensitive to response direction was statistically independent from its sensitivity to sound identity. There was no significant coding for sound identity when the rats heard the same sounds outside the behavioral task. These results suggest that CA1 neurons encode sound stimuli, but only when those sounds are associated with actions.

  11. Hippocampus, perirhinal cortex, and complex visual discriminations in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Hales, Jena B.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Velu, Priya D.

    2015-01-01

    Structures in the medial temporal lobe, including the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex, are known to be essential for the formation of long-term memory. Recent animal and human studies have investigated whether perirhinal cortex might also be important for visual perception. In our study, using a simultaneous oddity discrimination task, rats with perirhinal lesions were impaired and did not exhibit the normal preference for exploring the odd object. Notably, rats with hippocampal lesions exhibited the same impairment. Thus, the deficit is unlikely to illuminate functions attributed specifically to perirhinal cortex. Both lesion groups were able to acquire visual discriminations involving the same objects used in the oddity task. Patients with hippocampal damage or larger medial temporal lobe lesions were intact in a similar oddity task that allowed participants to explore objects quickly using eye movements. We suggest that humans were able to rely on an intact working memory capacity to perform this task, whereas rats (who moved slowly among the objects) needed to rely on long-term memory. PMID:25593294

  12. Proteomic analysis of rat cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum after exposure to morphine.

    PubMed

    Bierczynska-Krzysik, Anna; Pradeep John, Julius Paul; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta; Dylag, Tomasz; Cabatic, Maureen; Lubec, Gert

    2006-10-01

    Although a series of proteins in the brain have been shown to be qualitatively or quantitatively dysregulated following morphine administration, a systematic proteomic study has not been carried out so far. We therefore aimed to show the effect of morphine on protein levels in the rat brain. For this purpose rats were given a morphine base in subcutaneously placed pellets and subsequently the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum were taken for proteomic studies after three days. Extracted proteins were run on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, scanned and quantified by specific software. Proteins with significantly different levels were analysed by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF). Twenty-six proteins were found to be differentially expressed and were unambiguously identified. Dysregulated proteins were from several protein pathways and cascades including signaling, metabolic, protein handling, antioxidant and miscellaneous classes. These findings represent an initial approach to the generation of a 'morphinome' and may form the basis for further protein chemical studies as a valuable analytical tool. Moreover, the study reveals morphine-regulated proteins in different brain areas and indicates the pathways involved following morphine administration in the rat, the main species for pharmacological studies in the field.

  13. Knockdown of Nurr1 in the rat hippocampus: implications to spatial discrimination learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Colón-Cesario, Wanda I; Martínez-Montemayor, Michelle M; Morales, Sohaira; Félix, Jahaira; Cruz, Juan; Adorno, Monique; Pereira, Lixmar; Colón, Nydia; Maldonado-Vlaar, Carmen S; Peña de Ortiz, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Nurr1 expression is up-regulated in the brain following associative learning experiences, but its relevance to cognitive processes remains unclear. In these studies, rats initially received bilateral hippocampal infusions of control or antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) 1 h prior to training in a holeboard spatial discrimination task. Such pre-training infusions of nurr1 antisense ODNs caused a moderate effect in learning the task and also impaired LTM tested 7 d later. In a second experiment, ODN infusions were given immediately after the animals had received two sessions of training, during which all animals showed normal learning. Although antisense treated rats were significantly impaired during the post-infusion stages of acquisition of the task, no group differences were observed during the LTM test given 7 d later. These animals were subjected 3 d later to reversal training in the same maze in the absence of any additional treatments. Remarkably, rats previously treated with antisense ODNs displayed perseveration: The animals were fixated with the previously learned pattern of baited holes, causing them to be significantly impaired in the extinction of acquired spatial preferences and future learning. We postulate that Nurr1 function in the hippocampus is important for normal cognitive processes.

  14. Circadian variations in expression of the trkB receptor in adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dolci, Claudia; Montaruli, Angela; Roveda, Eliana; Barajon, Isabella; Vizzotto, Laura; Grassi Zucconi, Gigliola; Carandente, Franca

    2003-12-19

    The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the central nervous system (CNS) and the expression of its high-affinity trkB receptor on neuron surfaces are known to depend on neuron activity. The expression of BDNF (mRNA and protein) and trkB mRNA shows circadian oscillations in rat hippocampal homogenates. We investigated circadian variations in trkB expression in specific areas of the adult rat hippocampal formation by immunohistochemistry. In sets of two experiments performed in the spring, 39 2-month-old male Wistar rats were accustomed to a 12-h light-12-h dark cycle for 2 weeks. Three animals were then sacrificed every 4 h. Forty-micrometer-thick coronal sections of hippocampal formation were obtained and processed for trkB immunohistochemistry. Cell staining intensity was assessed by image analysis of different hippocampal areas on five sections per animal. Circadian rhythmicity was evaluated by the cosinor method. Statistically significant circadian variations in trkB expression were found in dentate gyrus, entorhinal cortex, and the CA3 and hilar regions of the hippocampus, with highest expression during the first half of the dark (activity) period. These findings suggest a relationship between trkB expression and the physiological neuronal activation of wakefulness. TrkB receptor expression in the hippocampal regions studied was continuous and changes were gradual over the 24-h cycle, suggesting that more complex regulatory mechanisms also intervened.

  15. Activity of the anterior cingulate cortex and ventral hippocampus underlie increases in contextual fear generalization.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Patrick K; Gilman, T Lee; Winiecki, Patrick; Riccio, David C; Jasnow, Aaron M

    2015-10-01

    Memories for context become less specific with time resulting in animals generalizing fear from training contexts to novel contexts. Though much attention has been given to the neural structures that underlie the long-term consolidation of a context fear memory, very little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the increase in fear generalization that occurs as the memory ages. Here, we examine the neural pattern of activation underlying the expression of a generalized context fear memory in male C57BL/6J mice. Animals were context fear conditioned and tested for fear in either the training context or a novel context at recent and remote time points. Animals were sacrificed and fluorescent in situ hybridization was performed to assay neural activation. Our results demonstrate activity of the prelimbic, infralimbic, and anterior cingulate (ACC) cortices as well as the ventral hippocampus (vHPC) underlie expression of a generalized fear memory. To verify the involvement of the ACC and vHPC in the expression of a generalized fear memory, animals were context fear conditioned and infused with 4% lidocaine into the ACC, dHPC, or vHPC prior to retrieval to temporarily inactivate these structures. The results demonstrate that activity of the ACC and vHPC is required for the expression of a generalized fear memory, as inactivation of these regions returned the memory to a contextually precise form. Current theories of time-dependent generalization of contextual memories do not predict involvement of the vHPC. Our data suggest a novel role of this region in generalized memory, which should be incorporated into current theories of time-dependent memory generalization. We also show that the dorsal hippocampus plays a prolonged role in contextually precise memories. Our findings suggest a possible interaction between the ACC and vHPC controls the expression of fear generalization.

  16. Effects of Short-Term Exposure to Lithium on Antiapoptotic Bcl-xL Protein Expression in Cortex and Hippocampus of Rats after Acute Stress.

    PubMed

    Dygalo, N N; Bannova, A V; Sukhareva, E V; Shishkina, G T; Ayriyants, K A; Kalinina, T S

    2017-03-01

    The antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL is involved in development of neurobiological resilience to stress; hence, the possibility of use of psychotropic drugs to increase its expression in brain in response to stress is of considerable interest. Lithium is a neurotropic drug widely used in psychiatry. In work, we studied effects of lithium administration (for 2 or 7 days) on the expression of Bcl-xL mRNA and protein in the hippocampi and cortices of rats subjected to stress that induced depression-like behavior in the animals. In contrast to the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), whose expression decreased in the hippocampus in response to acute stress, stress increased the level of Bcl-xL mRNA in the hippocampus, but decreased it in the frontal cortex. Treatment of stressed animals with lithium for 2 or 7 days increased Bcl-xL protein levels 1.5-fold in the hippocampus, but it decreased them in the cortex. Therefore, Bcl-xL expression in the brain can be modulated by both stress and psychotropic drugs, and the effects of these factors are brain region-specific: both stress exposure and lithium administration activated Bcl-xL expression in the hippocampus and suppressed it in the frontal cortex. The activation of Bcl-xL expression in the hippocampus by lithium, demonstrated for the first time in this study, suggests an important role of this protein in the therapeutic effects of lithium in the treatment of stress-induced psychoemotional disorders.

  17. Anti-oxidative effects produced by environmental enrichment in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Mármol, Frederic; Rodríguez, Clara A; Sánchez, Juan; Chamizo, Victoria D

    2015-07-10

    Both physical and intellectual activity may reduce the incidence of neurodegenerative disorders. There is evidence that environmental enrichment (EE) can induce profound behavioral, neurochemical and neuroanatomical changes, thus producing lasting improvements in memory and learning tasks. In this study we evaluated the anti-oxidative effects produced by EE in the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex of male and female rats. The animals had been reared in either EE or control conditions. The parameters studied were: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein oxidation, total radical antioxidant parameter, catalase, superoxide dismutase and superoxide anion activity. The results showed that our EE protocol reduced markers of oxidative stress in the hippocampus and in the cerebral cortex. Overall, the measures taken in the two cerebral regions revealed that EE rats showed higher values for antioxidant measures and lower values for oxidative stress parameters than control animals. More importantly, a consistent sex difference was found, indicating that in female rats the hippocampus and cerebral cortex are plastic brain regions receptive to external stimulation such as EE. Although EE males have higher levels for antioxidant capacity, catalase and SOD, it is likely that females do not need to activate all the antioxidant defenses since they have a greater capacity to assimilate external stimuli. This is suggested by the similarity of protein oxidation and TBARS levels in hippocampus in both sexes, and the even lower levels of protein oxidation and superoxide anion activity in the cerebral cortex in EE females.

  18. Neurodegeneration and inflammation in hippocampus in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced in rats by one--time administration of encephalitogenic T cells.

    PubMed

    Kurkowska-Jastrzębska, I; Swiątkiewicz, M; Zaremba, M; Cudna, A; Piechal, A; Pyrzanowska, J; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, E; Członkowska, A

    2013-09-17

    Cognitive dysfunction is relatively frequent in multiple sclerosis (MS) and it happens from the early stages of the disease. There is increasing evidence that the grey matter may be involved in autoimmune inflammation during relapses of MS. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if a single transfer of encephalitogenic T cells, mimicking a relapse of MS, may cause hippocampal damage and memory disturbances in rats. Lewis rats were injected with anti-MBP CD4+ T cells, that induced one-phase autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) with full recovery from motor impairments at 10-15 days. The spatial learning and memory were tested by the Morris water maze test in control and EAE animals, 30 and 90 days post-induction (dpi). The neural injury and inflammation was investigated in the hippocampus by immunohistochemistry and quantitative analyses. There was a marked decrease in the number of CA1 and CA4 pyramidal neurons 5 dpi. The loss of neurons then aggravated till the 90 dpi. An increase in microglial and astroglial activation and in pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA expression in the hippocampus, were present 30 and 90 dpi. Nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA levels were also significantly elevated. The water maze test, however, did not reveal memory deficits. The present data indicate that a single transfer of autoimmune T cells results in preserved inflammation and probable on-going neuronal injury in the hippocampus, long after recovery from motor disturbances. These findings suggest that any relapse of the MS may start the neurodegenerative process in the hippocampus, which is not necessarily connected with memory deficits.

  19. Electroconvulsive stimulation, but not chronic restraint stress, causes structural alterations in adult rat hippocampus--a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Mikkel V; Wörtwein, Gitta; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2015-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying depression are not fully understood. Only a few previous studies have used validated stereological methods to test how stress and animal paradigms of depression affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis and whether antidepressant therapy can counteract possible changes in an animal model. Thus, in this study we applied methods that are state of the art in regard to stereological cell counting methods. Using a validated rat model of depression in combination with a clinically relevant schedule of electroconvulsive stimulation, we estimated the total number of newly formed neurons in the hippocampal subgranular zone. Also estimated were the total number of neurons and the volume of the granule cell layer in adult rats subjected to chronic restraint stress and electroconvulsive stimulation either alone or in combination. We found that chronic restraint stress induces depression-like behavior, without significantly changing neurogenesis, the total number of neurons or the volume of the hippocampus. Further, electroconvulsive stimulation prevents stress-induced depression-like behavior and increases neurogenesis. The total number of neurons and the granule cell layer volume was not affected by electroconvulsive stimulation.

  20. A high calorie diet causes memory loss, metabolic syndrome and oxidative stress into hippocampus and temporal cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Samuel; Aguilar-Alonso, Patrícia; Flores Hernandez, Jose Angel; Brambila, Eduardo; Guevara, Jorge; Flores, Gonzalo; Lopez-Lopez, Gustavo; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Morales-Medina, Julio Cesar; Toxqui, Veronica; Venegas, Berenice; Diaz, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    A high calorie intake can induce the appearance of the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is a serious public health problem because it affects glucose levels and triglycerides in the blood. Recently, it has been suggested that MS can cause complications in the brain, since chronic hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are risk factors for triggering neuronal death by inducing a state of oxidative stress and inflammatory response that affect cognitive processes. This process, however, is not clear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the consumption of a high-calorie diet (HCD) on both neurodegeneration and spatial memory impairment in rats. Our results demonstrated that HCD (90 day consumption) induces an alteration of the main energy metabolism markers, indicating the development of MS in rats. Moreover, an impairment of spatial memory was observed. Subsequently, the brains of these animals showed activation of an inflammatory response (increase in reactive astrocytes and interleukin1-β as well as tumor necrosis factor-α) and oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation), causing a reduction in the number of neurons in the temporal cortex and hippocampus. Altogether, these results suggest that a HCD promotes the development of MS and contributes to the development of a neurodegenerative process and cognitive failure. In this regard, it is important to understand the relationship between MS and neuronal damage in order to prevent the onset of neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Glucose Injections into the Dorsal Hippocampus or Dorsolateral Striatum of Rats Prior to T-Maze Training: Modulation of Learning Rates and Strategy Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Stutz, Sonja J.; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The present experiments examined the effects of injecting glucose into the dorsal hippocampus or dorsolateral striatum on learning rates and on strategy selection in rats trained on a T-maze that can be solved by using either a hippocampus-sensitive place or striatum-sensitive response strategy. Percentage strategy selection on a probe trial…

  2. Insulin Reduces Cerebral Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in the Hippocampus of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Collino, Massimo; Aragno, Manuela; Castiglia, Sara; Tomasinelli, Chiara; Thiemermann, Christoph; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe; Fantozzi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—There is evidence that insulin reduces brain injury evoked by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of insulin remain unknown. Insulin is a well-known inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). Here, we investigate the role of GSK-3β inhibition on I/R-induced cerebral injury in a rat model of insulinopenic diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes were subjected to 30-min occlusion of common carotid arteries followed by 1 or 24 h of reperfusion. Insulin (2–12 IU/kg i.v.) or the selective GSK-3β inhibitor TDZD-8 (0.2–3 mg/kg i.v.) was administered during reperfusion. RESULTS—Insulin or TDZD-8 dramatically reduced infarct volume and levels of S100B protein, a marker of cerebral injury. Both drugs induced phosphorylation of the Ser9 residue, thereby inactivating GSK-3β in the rat hippocampus. Insulin, but not TDZD-8, lowered blood glucose. The hippocampi of the drug-treated animals displayed reduced oxidative stress at 1 h of reperfusion as shown by the decreased generation of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. I/R-induced activation of nuclear factor-κB was attenuated by both drug treatments. At 24 h of reperfusion, TDZD-8 and insulin significantly reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α; neutrophil infiltration, measured as myeloperoxidase activity and intercellular-adhesion-molecule-1 expression; and cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible-NO-synthase expression. CONCLUSIONS—Acute administration of insulin or TDZD-8 reduced cerebral I/R injury in diabetic rats. We propose that the inhibitory effect on the activity of GSK-3β contributes to the protective effect of insulin independently of any effects on blood glucose. PMID:18840784

  3. Lactuside B decreases aquaporin-4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression in the hippocampus and striatum following cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, PING-FA; ZHAN, HE-QIN; LI, SHENG-YING; LIU, RUI-LI; YAN, FU-LIN; CUI, TAI-ZHEN; YANG, YU-PING; LI, PENG; WANG, XIN-YAO

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of lactuside B (LB) on aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and caspase-3 mRNA expression in the hippocampus and the striatum following cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Cerebral I/R injury was established in Sprague-Dawley rats by occluding the middle cerebral artery for 2 h and then inducing reperfusion. Rats in the I/R + LB groups were treated with various doses of LB following reperfusion. Neurological deficit scores and brain water content were obtained to determine the pharmacodynamics of LB. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the expression levels of AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA in the hippocampus and the striatum. The results of the present study indicate that LB decreased the neurological deficit scores and the brain water content. In the hippocampus, AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression levels were significantly downregulated in the I/R + LB groups at 24 and 72 h following drug administration, compared with those in the I/R group (P<0.05). In the striatum, LB was also shown to significantly reduce AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression levels at 24 and 72 h following drug administration, compared with those in the I/R group (P<0.05). The effects became stronger as the LB dose was increased. The most significant reductions in AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression were noted in the I/R + LB 25 mg/kg and I/R + LB 50 mg/kg groups at 72 h following drug administration. The results of the present study show that LB is capable of significantly downregulating AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression in the hippocampus and striatum following cerebral I/R injury in rats. The mechanism by which LB improved ischaemic brain injury may be associated with changes in AQP4 and caspase-3 mRNA expression in the hippocampus and the striatum. PMID:24520266

  4. Pernicious effects of long-term, continuous 900-MHz electromagnetic field throughout adolescence on hippocampus morphology, biochemistry and pyramidal neuron numbers in 60-day-old Sprague Dawley male rats.

    PubMed

    Kerimoğlu, Gökçen; Hancı, Hatice; Baş, Orhan; Aslan, Ali; Erol, Hüseyin Serkan; Turgut, Alpgiray; Kaya, Haydar; Çankaya, Soner; Sönmez, Osman Fikret; Odacı, Ersan

    2016-11-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) begins developing in the intrauterine period, a process that continues until adulthood. Contact with chemical substances, drugs or environmental agents such as electromagnetic field (EMF) during adolescence therefore has the potential to disturb the development of the morphological architecture of components of the CNS (such as the hippocampus). The hippocampus is essential to such diverse functions as memory acquisition and integration and spatial maneuvering. EMF can result in severe damage to both the morphology of the hippocampus and its principal functions during adolescence. Although children and adolescents undergo greater exposure to EMF than adults, the information currently available regarding the effects of exposure to EMF during this period is as yet insufficient. This study investigated the 60-day-old male rat hippocampus following exposure to 900 megahertz (MHz) EMF throughout the adolescent period using stereological, histopathological and biochemical analysis techniques. Eighteen male Sprague Dawley rats aged 21days were assigned into control, sham and EMF groups on a random basis. No procedure was performed on the control group rats. The EMF group (EMFGr) was exposed to a 900-MHz EMF for 1h daily from beginning to end of adolescence. The sham group rats were held in the EMF cage but were not exposed to EMF. All rats were sacrificed at 60days of age. Their brains were extracted and halved. The left hemispheres were set aside for biochemical analyses and the right hemispheres were subjected to stereological and histopathological evaluation. Histopathological examination revealed increased numbers of pyknotic neurons with black or dark blue cytoplasm on EMFGr slides stained with cresyl violet. Stereological analyses revealed fewer pyramidal neurons in EMFGr than in the other two groups. Biochemical analyses showed an increase in malondialdehyde and glutathione levels, but a decrease in catalase levels in EMFGr. Our

  5. The Effect of Chronic Ozone Exposure on the Activation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Apoptosis in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Erika; Nava-Ruiz, Concepcion; Escamilla-Chimal, Elsa; Borgonio-Perez, Gabino; Rivas-Arancibia, Selva

    2016-01-01

    The chronic exposure to low doses of ozone, like in environmental pollution, leads to a state of oxidative stress, which has been proposed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). It induces an increase of calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which produces ER stress. On the other hand, different studies show that, in diseases such as Alzheimer’s, there exist disturbances in protein folding where ER plays an important role. The objective of this study was to evaluate the state of chronic oxidative stress on ER stress and its relationship with apoptotic death in the hippocampus of rats exposed to low doses of ozone. We used 108 male Wistar rats randomly divided into five groups. The groups received one of the following treatments: (1) Control (air); (2) Ozone (O3) 7 days; (3) O3 15 days; (4) O3 30 days; (5) O3 60 days; and (6) O3 90 days. Two hours after each treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the hippocampus was extracted. Afterwards, the tissue was processed for western blot and immunohistochemistry using the following antibodies: ATF6, 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and caspase 12. It was also subjected to terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and electronic microscopy. Our results show an increase in ATF6, GRP78 and caspase 12 as well as ER ultrastructural alterations and an increase of TUNEL positive cells after 60 and 90 days of exposure to ozone. With the obtained results, we can conclude that oxidative stress induced by chronic exposure to low doses of ozone leads to ER stress. ER stress activates ATF6 inducing the increase of GRP78 in the cytoplasm, which leads to the increase in the nuclear translocation of ATF6. Finally, the translocation creates a vicious cycle that, together with the activation of the cascade for apoptotic cell death, contributes to the maintenance of ER stress. These events potentially contribute in the neurodegeneration processes

  6. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Gd-albumin Delivery to the Rat Hippocampus In Vivo by Convection-Enhanced Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hwan; Astary, Garrett W.; Nobrega, Tatiana L.; Kantorovich, Svetlana; Carney, Paul R.; Mareci, Thomas H.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa

    2013-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) shows promise in treating neurological diseases due to its ability to circumvent the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and deliver therapeutics directly to the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS). Such a drug delivery method may be useful in treating CNS disorders involving the hippocampus such temporal lobe epilepsy and gliomas; however, the influence of anatomical structures on infusate distribution is not fully understood. As a surrogate for therapeutic agents, we used gadolinium-labeled-albumin (Gd-albumin) tagged with Evans blue dye to observe the time dependence of CED infusate distributions into the rat dorsal and ventral hippocampus in vivo with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). For finer anatomical detail, final distribution volumes (Vd) of the infusate were observed with high-resolution T1-weighted MR imaging and light microscopy of fixed brain sections. Dynamic images demonstrated that Gd-albumin preferentially distributed within the hippocampus along neuroanatomical structures with less fluid resistance and less penetration was observed in dense cell layers. Furthermore, significant leakage into adjacent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces such as the hippocampal fissure, velum interpositum and midbrain cistern occurred toward the end of infusion. Vd increased linearly with infusion volume (Vi) at a mean Vd/Vi ratio of 5.51 ± 0.55 for the dorsal hippocampus infusion and 5.30 ± 0.83 for the ventral hippocampus infusion. This study demonstrated the significant effects of tissue structure and CSF space boundaries on infusate distribution during CED. PMID:22687936

  7. Increased anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus activation in Complex PTSD during encoding of negative words

    PubMed Central

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Draijer, Nel; de Ruiter, Michiel B.; Elzinga, Bernet M.; Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; van Balkom, Anton J.; Smit, Johannes H.; Veltman, Dick J.

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with impaired memory performance coupled with functional changes in brain areas involved in declarative memory and emotion regulation. It is not yet clear how symptom severity and comorbidity affect neurocognitive functioning in PTSD. We performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study with an emotional declarative memory task in 28 Complex PTSD patients with comorbid depressive and personality disorders, and 21 healthy non-trauma-exposed controls. In Complex PTSD patients—compared to controls—encoding of later remembered negative words vs baseline was associated with increased blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in the left ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsal ACC extending to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) together with a trend for increased left hippocampus activation. Patients tended to commit more False Alarms to negative words compared to controls, which was associated with enhanced left ventrolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (vlPFC/OFC) responses. Severity of child abuse was positively correlated with left ventral ACC activity and severity of depression with (para) hippocampal and ventral ACC activity. Presented results demonstrate functional abnormalities in Complex PTSD in the frontolimbic brain circuit also implicated in fear conditioning models, but generally in the opposite direction, which may be explained by severity of the trauma and severity of comorbid depression in Complex PTSD. PMID:22156722

  8. Electrographic seizures are significantly reduced by in vivo inhibition of neuronal uptake of extracellular glutamine in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rats were given unilateral kainate injection into hippocampal CA3 region, and the effect of chronic electrographic seizures on extracellular glutamine (GLNECF) was examined in those with low and steady levels of extracellular glutamate (GLUECF). GLNECF, collected by microdialysis in awake rats for 5 h, decreased to 62 ± 4.4% of the initial concentration (n = 6). This change correlated with the frequency and magnitude of seizure activity, and occurred in the ipsilateral but not in contralateral hippocampus, nor in kainate-injected rats that did not undergo seizure (n = 6). Hippocampal intracellular GLN did not differ between the Seizure and No-Seizure Groups. These results suggested an intriguing possibility that seizure-induced decrease of GLNECF reflects not decreased GLN efflux into the extracellular fluid, but increased uptake into neurons. To examine this possibility, neuronal uptake of GLNECF was inhibited in vivo by intrahippocampal perfusion of 2-(methylamino)isobutyrate, a competitive and reversible inhibitor of the sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter (SNAT) subtypes 1 and 2, as demonstrated by 1.8 ± 0.17 fold elevation of GLNECF (n = 7). The frequency of electrographic seizures during uptake inhibition was reduced to 35 ± 7% (n = 7) of the frequency in pre-perfusion period, and returned to 88 ± 9% in the post-perfusion period. These novel in vivo results strongly suggest that, in this well-established animal model of temporal-lobe epilepsy, the observed seizure-induced decrease of GLNECF reflects its increased uptake into neurons to sustain enhanced glutamatergic epileptiform activity, thereby demonstrating a possible new target for anti-seizure therapies. PMID:24070846

  9. Xanthohumol-induced presynaptic reduction of glutamate release in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Ying Chou; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether xanthohumol, a hop-derived prenylated flavonoid present in beer, affects glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In the rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), xanthohumol inhibited the release of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked glutamate and the elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, whereas it had no effect on 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The inhibitory effect of xanthohumol on the evoked glutamate release was prevented by removing extracellular Ca(2+), using the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-CgTX MVIIC, the calmodulin antagonists W7 and calmidazolium, and the protein kinase A inhibitor H89; however, no such effect was observed when the G-protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide was used. In addition, immunocytochemical data demonstrated that GABAA receptors are present in the hippocampal synaptosomes and that the xanthohumol effect on evoked glutamate release was antagonized by the GABAA receptor antagonist SR95531. Furthermore, in slice preparations, xanthohumol reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude. We conclude that xanthohumol acts at GABAA receptors present in the hippocampal nerve terminals to decrease the Ca(2+) influx through N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, which subsequently suppresses the Ca(2+)-calmodulin/PKA cascade to decrease the evoked glutamate release.

  10. Prenatal ethanol exposure reduces the effects of excitatory amino acids in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Ritchie, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion during pregnancy can lead to the Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS), a disorder marked by learning disabilities. A rat model of FAS was used by introducing pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to a liquid diet containing 35% ethanol-derived calories (E), while a second group was pair-fed an isocaloric liquid diet without ethanol (P). A third group of pregnant dams received ad libitum lab chow (C). At parturition, pups from the E and P groups were cross fostered by C mothers and all groups received lab chow. During adulthood, male offspring were sacrificed and hippocampal and prefrontal cortical slices were prelabeled with (3H)inositol. Phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis was determined by measuring the accumulation of (3H)inositol phosphates in the presence of LiCl in response to activation of various excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors. In hippocampal slices, ibotenate- and quisqualate-induced PI hydrolysis was reduced in E compared to P and C animals. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on carbachol-induced PI hydrolysis, evident in P and C animals, was completely abolished in the hippocampus of E animals. In contrast, in the prefrontal cerebral cortex, this inhibitory effect of NMDA prevailed even in the E animals. The evidence suggests that prenatal ethanol exposure alters the activity of EAA receptors in the hippocampal generation of 2nd messengers.

  11. Effect of Methamphetamine Exposure on Expression of Calcium Binding Proteins in Rat Frontal Cortex and Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Veerasakul, Siriluk; Thanoi, Samur; Reynolds, Gavin P; Nudmamud-Thanoi, Sutisa

    2016-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant drug with potent effects on the central nervous system that can cause psychotic symptoms similar to those of schizophrenia. Specific alterations in GABAergic neuronal markers have been reported in schizophrenia and animal models of psychotic illness. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are changes in subpopulations of GABAergic neurons, defined by the presence of calcium binding proteins (CBPs), in animal models of METH abuse. Rats received acute (Binge) doses of 4 × 6 mg/kg, a chronic escalating dose regime (0.1-4 mg/kg over 14 days) or a combination of the two and were compared with a vehicle-administered control group. Brains were taken and sections of frontal cortex (Cg1) and hippocampus (dentate gyrus and CA1-3 regions) underwent immunostaining for three CBPs [parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB), and calretinin (CR)]. Significant decreases in PV-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in each METH group and all regions were observed. Smaller METH-induced deficits in CB-IR cells were observed, reaching significance primarily following chronic METH regimes, while CR-IR was significantly reduced only in frontal cortex following chronic administration. These results suggest that METH regimes in rats can induce selective deficits in GABAergic neuronal subtypes similar to those seen in schizophrenia and may underlie the psychosis and/or cognitive impairment that can occur in METH abuse and dependence.

  12. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Rosa damascena hydro-alcoholic extract on rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Homayoun, Mansour; Seghatoleslam, Masoumeh; Pourzaki, Mojtaba; Shafieian, Reihaneh; Hosseini, Mahmoud; Ebrahimzadeh Bideskan, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Previously, analgesic, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant effects have been suggested for Rosa damascena (R. damascena). In the present study, possible anti-seizure and neuro-protective effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has been investigated after inducing seizures in rats by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Materials and Methods: The rats were divided to five groups: (1) Control: received saline, (2) PTZ: 100 mg/kg, i.p., (3) PTZ- Extract 50 mg/kg (PTZ-Ext 50), (4) PTZ- Extract 100 mg/kg (PTZ-Ext 100), and (5) PTZ- Extract 200 mg/kg (PTZ-Ext 200) groups which were treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg respectively of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena for one week before PTZ injection. The animals were examined for electrocorticography (ECoG) recording and finally, the brains were removed for histological study. Results: The hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the frequency and amplitude of epileptiform burst discharges induced by PTZ injection. Moreover, all three doses of the extract significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the hippocampus in the mentioned animal model. Conclusion: The present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects. More investigations are needed to be done in order to better understand the responsible compound(s) as well as the possible mechanism(s). PMID:26101759

  13. Effects of calcium-sensing receptors on apoptosis in rat hippocampus during hypoxia/re-oxygenation through the ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Li; Wang, Shilei; Li, Shuhong; Li, Yu; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the effects of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) on apoptosis in rat hippocampus during hypoxia/re-oxygenation (H/R). Methods: After post-culturing of isolated rat hippocampus, the cultures were subjected to H/R, meanwhile gadolinium chloride (GdCl3, agonist of CaSR) and NPS 2390 (antagonists of CaSR) was added to reperfusion solution. The number of hippocampal neuron, cell proliferation assay and apoptosis rate was determined by inverted microscope, 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometer (FCM). Besides, caspase-3, Bax, cytochrome C (Cyt-c), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2, pERK1/2, P38 and pP38 were analyzed by western blotting. Results: The hippocampal neuron number and cell viability were significantly decreased after H/R treatment, and were further significantly reduced when co-treatment with CaSR agonist GdCl3. But the effects of GdCl3 were attenuated by NPS-2390. Whereas, apoptosis rate, the expression level of caspase-3, Bax and Cyt-c were all significantly increased under H/R condition, and was further significantly increased by GdCl3, but were reversed by NPS-2390 (P < 0.05). Moreover, there were no significant differences in expression of ERK1/2, P38 and pP38 among different groups. However, the expression of pERK1/2 was significantly increased after H/R treatment, but was significantly reduced by NPS 2390 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results suggest that CaSR might play significant roles in the induction of hippocampus apoptosis in rat during H/R through phosphorylation of ERK1/2. PMID:26550201

  14. Effects of calcium-sensing receptors on apoptosis in rat hippocampus during hypoxia/reoxygenation through the ERK1/2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Li; Wang, Shilei; Li, Shuhong; Li, Yu; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the effects of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSR) on apoptosis in rat hippocampus during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). Methods: After rat hippocampus was isolated, the cultures were subjected to H/R, and meanwhile gadolinium chloride (GdCl3, agonist of CaSR) and NPS 2390 (antagonists of CaSR) were added to reperfusion solution. The number of hippocampal neuron, cell viability and apoptosis rate were determined by inverted microscope, 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometer (FCM), respectively. Besides, caspase-3, Bax, cytochrome C (Cyt-c), extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2, pERK1/2, P38 and pP38 were analyzed by Western blotting. Results: The hippocampal neuron number and cell viability were significantly decreased during H/R, and were further significantly reduced when co-treatment with CaSR agonist GdCl3. But the effects of GdCl3 were attenuated by NPS-2390. Whereas, apoptosis rate, the expression level of caspase-3, Bax and Cyt-c were all significantly increased under H/R condition, and was further significantly increased by GdCl3, but were reversed by NPS-2390 (P < 0.05). Moreover, there were no significant differences in expression of ERK1/2, P38 and pP38 among different groups. However, the expression of pERK1/2 was significantly increased during H/R, but was significantly reduced by NPS 2390 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results suggest that CaSR might play significant roles in the induction of hippocampus apoptosis in rat during H/R through phosphorylation of ERK1/2. PMID:26617793

  15. Involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurogenesis in oestradiol neuroprotection of the hippocampus of hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pietranera, L; Lima, A; Roig, P; De Nicola, A F

    2010-10-01

    The hippocampus of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and deoxycorticosterone (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats shows decreased cell proliferation and astrogliosis as well as a reduced number of hilar cells. These defects are corrected after administration of 17β-oestradiol (E(2) ) for 2 weeks. The present work investigated whether E(2) treatment of SHR and of hypertensive DOCA-salt male rats modulated the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin involved in hippocampal neurogenesis. The neurogenic response to E(2) was simultaneously determined by counting the number of doublecortin-immunopositive immature neurones in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. Both hypertensive models showed decreased expression of BDNF mRNA in the granular zone of the dentate gyrus, without changes in CA1 or CA3 pyramidal cell layers, decreased BDNF protein levels in whole hippocampal tissue, low density of doublecortin (DCX)-positive immature neurones in the subgranule zone and decreased length of DCX+ neurites in the dentate gyrus. After s.c. implantation of a single E(2) pellet for 2 weeks, BDNF mRNA in the dentate gyrus, BDNF protein in whole hippocampus, DCX immunopositive cells and the length of DCX+ neurites were significantly raised in both SHR and DOCA-salt-treated rats. These results indicate that: (i) low BDNF expression and deficient neurogenesis distinguished the hippocampus of SHR and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats and (ii) E(2) was able to normalise these biologically important functions in the hippocampus of hypertensive animals.

  16. Comparison of the temporary dynamics of NGF and BDNF gene expression in rat hippocampus, frontal cortex, and retina under Semax action.

    PubMed

    Shadrina, Maria; Kolomin, Timur; Agapova, Tamara; Agniullin, Yan; Shram, Stanislav; Slominsky, Petr; Lymborska, Svetlana; Myasoedov, Nikolay

    2010-05-01

    Neurotrophins are a family of structurally related proteins that regulate the survival, differentiation, and maintenance of function of different neuron populations. Some peptides are able to affect the production and activity of neurotrophins. One of these synthetic peptides is heptapeptide Semax, an analog of the N-terminal adrenocorticotropic hormone fragment 4-10. It is known that Semax has effects on learning and memory formation and exerts some neuroprotective effects in rodents and humans. Male Wistar rats were treated for 20 min, 40 min, 90 min, 3 h, 8 h, and 24 h with Semax. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression in rat brain and retina was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. It was revealed that after Semax administration the multidirectional activation of the expression of the genes under investigation in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and retina was observed. The expression of both neurotrophin genes was decreased in rat hippocampus and retina 20 min after Semax administration and was increased in the frontal cortex. The expression levels of NGF remained practically constant in the retina at the initial stage, whereas the expression levels of BDNF were significantly increased 90 min after Semax administration.

  17. Galanin inhibits acetylcholine release in the ventral hippocampus of the rat: histochemical, autoradiographic, in vivo, and in vitro studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fisone, G.; Wu, C.F.; Consolo, S.; Nordstroem, O.; Brynne, N.; Bartfai, T.; Melander, T.; Hoekfelt, T.

    1987-10-01

    A high density of galanin binding sites was found by using /sup 125/I-labeled galanin, iodinated by chloramine-T, followed by autoradiography in the ventral, but not in the dorsal, hippocampus of the rat. Lesions of the fimbria and of the septum caused disappearance of a major population of these binding sites, suggesting that a large proportion of them is localized on cholinergic nerve terminals of septal afferents. As a functional correlate to these putative galanin receptor sites, it was shown, both in vivo and in vitro, that galanin, in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibited the evoked release of acetylcholine in the ventral, but not in the dorsal, hippocampus. Intracerebroventricularly applied galanin fully inhibited the scopolamine stimulated release of acetylcholine in the ventral, but not in the dorsal, hippocampus, as measured by the microdialysis technique. In vitro, galanin inhibited the 25 mM K/sup +/-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from slices of the ventral hippocampus, with an IC/sub 50/ value of approx. = 50 nM. These results are discussed with respect to the colocalization of galanin- and choline acetyltransferase-like immunoreactivity in septal somata projecting to the hippocampus.

  18. Gestational and early postnatal hypothyroidism alters VGluT1 and VGAT bouton distribution in the neocortex and hippocampus, and behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Daniela; Alvarado, Mayvi; Navarrete, Francisco; Giner, Manuel; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Manzanares, Jorge; Berbel, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are fundamental for the expression of genes involved in the development of the CNS and their deficiency is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological diseases including mental retardation, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorders. We examined in rat whether developmental and early postnatal hypothyroidism affects the distribution of vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGluT1; glutamatergic) and vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter (VGAT; GABAergic) immunoreactive (ir) boutons in the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex, and the behavior of the pups. Hypothyroidism was induced by adding 0.02% methimazole (MMI) and 1% KClO4 to the drinking water starting at embryonic day 10 (E10; developmental hypothyroidism) and E21 (early postnatal hypothyroidism) until day of sacrifice at postnatal day 50. Behavior was studied using the acoustic prepulse inhibition (somatosensory attention) and the elevated plus-maze (anxiety-like assessment) tests. The distribution, density and size of VGluT1-ir and VGAT-ir boutons in the hippocampus and somatosensory cortex was abnormal in MMI pups and these changes correlate with behavioral changes, as prepulse inhibition of the startle response amplitude was reduced, and the percentage of time spent in open arms increased. In conclusion, both developmental and early postnatal hypothyroidism significantly decreases the ratio of GABAergic to glutamatergic boutons in dentate gyrus leading to an abnormal flow of information to the hippocampus and infragranular layers of the somatosensory cortex, and alter behavior in rats. Our data show cytoarchitectonic alterations in the basic excitatory hippocampal loop, and in local inhibitory circuits of the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus that might contribute to the delayed neurocognitive outcome observed in thyroid hormone deficient children born in iodine deficient areas, or suffering from congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:25741243

  19. Daily patterns of clock and cognition-related factors are modified in the hippocampus of vitamin A-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Golini, Rebeca S; Delgado, Silvia M; Navigatore Fonzo, Lorena S; Ponce, Ivana T; Lacoste, María G; Anzulovich, Ana C

    2012-08-01

    The circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled cognition-related genes in the hippocampus would be essential to achieve an optimal daily cognitive performance. There is some evidence that retinoid nuclear receptors (RARs and RXRs) can regulate circadian gene expression in different tissues. In this study, Holtzman male rats from control and vitamin A-deficient groups were sacrificed throughout a 24-h period and hippocampus samples were isolated every 4 or 5 h. RARα and RXRβ expression level was quantified and daily expression patterns of clock BMAL1, PER1, RORα, and REVERB genes, RORα and REVERB proteins, as well as temporal expression of cognition-related RC3 and BDNF genes were determined in the hippocampus of the two groups of rats. Our results show significant daily variations of BMAL1, PER1, RORα, and REVERB genes, RORα and REVERB proteins and, consequently, daily oscillating expression of RC3 and BDNF genes in the rat hippocampus. Vitamin A deficiency reduced RXRβ mRNA level as well as the amplitude of PER1, REVERB gene, and REVERB protein rhythms, and phase-shifted the daily peaks of BMAL1 and RORα mRNA, RORα protein, and RC3 and BDNF mRNA levels. Thus, nutritional factors, such as vitamin A and its derivatives the retinoids, might modulate daily patterns of BDNF and RC3 expression in the hippocampus, and they could be essential to maintain an optimal daily performance at molecular level in this learning-and-memory-related brain area.

  20. The KCl cotransporter, KCC2, is highly expressed in the vicinity of excitatory synapses in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, A I; Sík, A; Payne, J A; Kaila, K; Freund, T F

    2001-06-01

    Immunocytochemical visualization of the neuron-specific K+/Cl- cotransporter, KCC2, at the cellular and subcellular level revealed an area- and layer-specific diffuse labelling, and a discrete staining outlining the somata and dendrites of some interneurons in all areas of the rat hippocampus. KCC2 was highly expressed in parvalbumin-containing interneurons, as well as in subsets of calbindin, calretinin and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1a-immunoreactive interneurons. During the first 2 postnatal weeks, an increase of KCC2 staining was observed in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, correlating temporally with the arrival of entorhinal cortical inputs. Subcellular localization demonstrated KCC2 in the plasma membranes. Immunoreactivity in principal cells was responsible for the diffuse staining found in the neuropil. In these cells, KCC2 was detected primarily in dendritic spine heads, at the origin of spines and, at a much lower level on the somata and dendritic shafts. KCC2 expression was considerably higher in the somata and dendrites of interneurons, most notably of parvalbumin-containing cells, as well as in the thorny excrescences of CA3 pyramidal cells and in the spines of spiny hilar and stratum lucidum interneurons. The data indicate that KCC2 is highly expressed in the vicinity of excitatory inputs in the hippocampus, perhaps in close association with extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. A high level of excitation is known to lead to a simultaneous net influx of Na+ and Cl-, as evidenced by dendritic swelling. KCC2 located in the same microenvironment may provide a Cl- extrusion mechanism to deal with both ion and water homeostasis in addition to its role in setting the driving force of Cl- currents involved in fast postsynaptic inhibition.

  1. Glycyrrhizin ameliorates oxidative stress and inflammation in hippocampus and olfactory bulb in lithium/pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in rats.

    PubMed

    González-Reyes, Susana; Santillán-Cigales, Juan Jair; Jiménez-Osorio, Angélica Saraí; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2016-10-01

    Glycyrrhizin (GL) is a triterpene present in the roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza glabra that has anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and neuroprotective effects. Recently, it was demonstrated that GL produced neuroprotective effects on the postischemic brain as well as on the kainic acid injury model in rats. In addition to this, GL also prevented excitotoxic effects on primary cultures. The aims of the present study were to evaluate GL scavenging properties and to investigate GL's effect on oxidative stress and inflammation in the lithium/pilocarpine-induced seizure model in two cerebral regions, hippocampus and olfactory bulb, at acute time intervals (3 or 24h) after status epilepticus (SE). Fluorometric methods showed that GL scavenged three reactive oxygen species: hydrogen peroxide, peroxyl radicals and superoxide anions. In contrast, GL was unable to scavenge peroxynitrite, hydroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen and 2,2-diphenil-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals suggesting that GL is a weak scavenger. Additionally, administration of GL (50mg/kg, i.p.) 30min before pilocarpine administration significantly suppressed oxidative stress. Moreover, malondialdehyde levels were diminished and glutathione levels were maintained at control values in both cerebral regions at 3 and 24 after SE. At 24h after SE, glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase activity increased in the hippocampus, while both glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase activity were unchanged in the olfactory bulb at that time. In addition, GL suppressed the induction of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in both cerebral regions evaluated. These results suggest that GL confers protection against pilocarpine damage via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  2. Caffeine-induced activated glucocorticoid metabolism in the hippocampus causes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis inhibition in fetal rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Zhang, Benjian; Liang, Gai; Ping, Jie; Kou, Hao; Li, Xiaojun; Xiong, Jie; Hu, Dongcai; Chen, Liaobin; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations have shown that fetuses with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) are susceptible to adult metabolic syndrome. Clinical investigations and experiments have demonstrated that caffeine is a definite inducer of IUGR, as children who ingest caffeine-containing food or drinks are highly susceptible to adult obesity and hypertension. Our goals for this study were to investigate the effect of prenatal caffeine ingestion on the functional development of the fetal hippocampus and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and to clarify an intrauterine HPA axis-associated neuroendocrine alteration induced by caffeine. Pregnant Wistar rats were intragastrically administered 20, 60, and 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from gestational days 11-20. The results show that prenatal caffeine ingestion significantly decreased the expression of fetal hypothalamus corticotrophin-releasing hormone. The fetal adrenal cortex changed into slight and the expression of fetal adrenal steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR) and cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), as well as the level of fetal adrenal endogenous corticosterone (CORT), were all significantly decreased after caffeine treatment. Moreover, caffeine ingestion significantly increased the levels of maternal and fetal blood CORT and decreased the expression of placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (11β-HSD-2). Additionally, both in vivo and in vitro studies show that caffeine can downregulate the expression of fetal hippocampal 11β-HSD-2, promote the expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and enhance DNA methylation within the hippocampal 11β-HSD-2 promoter. These results suggest that prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits the development of the fetal HPA axis, which may be associated with the fetal overexposure to maternal glucocorticoid and activated glucocorticoid metabolism in the fetal hippocampus. These results will be beneficial in

  3. K+ depolarization evokes ATP, adenosine and glutamate release from glia in rat hippocampus: a microelectrode biosensor study

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, A; Andó, RD; Túri, G; Rózsa, B; Sperlágh, B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE This study was undertaken to characterize the ATP, adenosine and glutamate outflow evoked by depolarization with high K+ concentrations, in slices of rat hippocampus. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We utilized the microelectrode biosensor technique and extracellular electrophysiological recording for the real-time monitoring of the efflux of ATP, adenosine and glutamate. KEY RESULTS ATP, adenosine and glutamate sensors exhibited transient and reversible current during depolarization with 25 mM K+, with distinct kinetics. The ecto-ATPase inhibitor ARL67156 enhanced the extracellular level of ATP and inhibited the prolonged adenosine efflux, suggesting that generation of adenosine may derive from the extracellular breakdown of ATP. Stimulation-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux was inhibited by tetrodotoxin, while exposure to Ca2+-free medium abolished ATP and adenosine efflux from hippocampal slices. Extracellular elevation of ATP and adenosine were decreased in the presence of NMDA receptor antagonists, D-AP-5 and ifenprodil, whereas non-NMDA receptor blockade by CNQX inhibited glutamate but not ATP and adenosine efflux. The gliotoxin fluoroacetate and P2X7 receptor antagonists inhibited the K+-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux, while carbenoxolone in low concentration and probenecid decreased only the adenosine efflux. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrated activity-dependent gliotransmitter release in the hippocampus in response to ongoing neuronal activity. ATP and glutamate were released by P2X7 receptor activation into extracellular space. Although the increased extracellular levels of adenosine did derive from released ATP, adenosine might also be released directly via pannexin hemichannels. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Sershen, pp. 1000–1002 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02072.x PMID:22394324

  4. Postnatal changes in somatic gamma-aminobutyric acid signalling in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tyzio, Roman; Minlebaev, Marat; Rheims, Sylvain; Ivanov, Anton; Jorquera, Isabelle; Holmes, Gregory L; Zilberter, Yuri; Ben-Ari, Yehezkiel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2008-05-01

    During postnatal development of the rat hippocampus, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) switches its action on CA3 pyramidal cells from excitatory to inhibitory. To characterize the underlying changes in the GABA reversal potential, we used somatic cell-attached recordings of GABA(A) and N-methyl-D-aspartate channels to monitor the GABA driving force and resting membrane potential, respectively. We found that the GABA driving force is strongly depolarizing during the first postnatal week. The strength of this depolarization rapidly declines with age, although GABA remains slightly depolarizing, by a few millivolts, even in adult neurons. Reduction in the depolarizing GABA driving force was due to a progressive negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA currents. Similar postnatal changes in GABA signalling were also observed using the superfused hippocampus preparation in vivo, and in the hippocampal interneurons in vitro. We also found that in adult pyramidal cells, somatic GABA reversal potential is maintained at a slightly depolarizing level by bicarbonate conductance, chloride-extrusion and chloride-loading systems. Thus, the postnatal excitatory-to-inhibitory switch in somatic GABA signalling is associated with a negative shift of the GABA reversal potential but without a hyperpolarizing switch in the polarity of GABA responses. These results also suggest that in adult CA3 pyramidal cells, somatic GABAergic inhibition takes place essentially through shunting rather than hyperpolarization. Apparent hyperpolarizing GABA responses previously reported in the soma of CA3 pyramidal cells are probably due to cell depolarization during intracellular or whole-cell recordings.

  5. Kainic acid activates transient expression of tenascin-C in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nakic, M; Mitrovic, N; Sperk, G; Schachner, M

    1996-05-15

    Kainic acid-induced limbic seizures enhance expression of tenascin-C (TN) in the hippocampus of adult rats. TN mRNA was detectable by in situ hybridization in many granule cells in the dentate gyrus 4.5 hr after kainic acid injection but not in saline-injected animals (controls) or in animals killed 2 or 24 hr after injection. Thirty days after kainic acid injection, TN mRNA was detectable only in pyramidal cells of CA3 and CA1. At the protein level, TN was detectable by immunocytochemistry in control animals in the strata oriens and lacunosum moleculare of CA1, in the molecular layer, and within a narrow area at the inner surface of the granule cell layer in the dentate gyrus. Twenty-four hours after kainic acid injection, TN immunoreactivity was enhanced in these areas and throughout the granule cell layer. Thirty days after kainic acid injection, TN immunoreactivity was downregulated in these areas, while it was prominent in the stratum oriens and in clusters of immunoreactivity in the stratum lucidum of CA3. Western blot analysis of the hippocampus showed a peak of TN expression 24 hr after kainic acid injection. These observations show that TN expression is upregulated in predominantly neuronal cells already by 4.5 hr after kainic acid injection, coincident with activation of granule cells and sprouting of axon terminals, whereas the remaining TN expression 30 days after injection relates to pyramidal cells in CA1 and CA3, coincident with an astroglial response, as marked by a strong expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein.

  6. Chronic ketamine produces altered distribution of parvalbumin-positive cells in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Murtishaw, Andrew S; Bolton, Monica M; Heaney, Chelcie F; Langhardt, Michael; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2013-08-29

    The underlying mechanisms of schizophrenia pathogenesis are not well understood. Increasing evidence supports the glutamatergic hypothesis that posits a hypofunction of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on specific gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurons may be responsible for the disorder. Alterations in the GABAergic system have been observed in schizophrenia, most notably a change in the expression of parvalbumin (PV) in the cortex and hippocampus. Several reports also suggest abnormal neuronal migration may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. The current study examined the positioning and distribution of PV-positive cells in the hippocampus following chronic treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. A robust increase was found in the number of PV-positive interneurons located outside the stratum oriens (SO), the layer where most of these cells are normally localized, as well as an overall numerical increase in CA3 PV cells. These results suggest ketamine leads to an abnormal distribution of PV-positive cells, which may be indicative of aberrant migratory activity and possibly related to the Morris water maze deficits observed. These findings may also be relevant to alterations observed in schizophrenia populations.

  7. Dietary fatty acid enrichment increases egg size and quality of yellow seahorse Hippocampus kuda.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, M; Masdeu, M; Hale, P; Sibbons, C M; Holt, W V

    2014-02-01

    Seahorses populations in the wild have been declining and to restore them a better knowledge of seahorse reproduction is required. This study examines the effect of dietary quality on seahorse fecundity and egg quality. Two different diets were tested with Hippocampus kuda females: frozen mysis (control) and frozen mysis enriched with a liposome spray containing essential fatty acids. Diets were given to females (two groups of five) over a seven week period. After this period, males (fed the control diet) and females were paired and the eggs dropped by the females were collected. Fatty acid profile were analysed and eggs were counted and measured. Results showed that females fed on enriched mysis had larger eggs and that these had a higher content of total polyunsaturated fatty acids. The size of the egg was especially affected in the first spawn, where egg size for females fed the enriched diet was significantly higher than the egg size from control females. This effect was reduced in the following spawning where no significant differences were found. Egg size is an important quality descriptor as seahorse juveniles originating from smaller eggs and/or eggs of poor quality will have less chances of overcoming adverse conditions in the wild and consequently have lower survival and growth rates. This study shows that enriching frozen mysis with polyunsaturated fatty acids increases egg size and egg quality of H. kuda.

  8. Tianeptine increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the rat amygdala.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Lawrence P; Hendry, Robert M; Reznikov, Leah R; Piroli, Gerardo G; Wood, Gwendolyn E; McEwen, Bruce S; Grillo, Claudia A

    2007-06-22

    Chronic restraint stress affects hippocampal and amygdalar synaptic plasticity as determined by electrophysiological, morphological and behavioral measures, changes that are inhibited by some but not all antidepressants. The efficacy of some classes of antidepressants is proposed to involve increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), leading to increased expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Conversely, some studies suggest that acute and chronic stress downregulate BDNF expression and activity. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to examine total and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), as well as BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus and amygdala of rats subjected to chronic restraint stress in the presence and absence of the antidepressant tianeptine. In the hippocampus, chronic restraint stress increased pCREB levels without affecting BDNF mRNA or protein expression. Tianeptine administration had no effect upon these measures in the hippocampus. In the amygdala, BDNF mRNA expression was not modulated in chronic restraint stress rats given saline in spite of increased pCREB levels. Conversely, BDNF mRNA levels were increased in the amygdala of chronic restraint stress/tianeptine rats in the absence of changes in pCREB levels when compared to non-stressed controls. Amygdalar BDNF protein increased while pCREB levels decreased in tianeptine-treated rats irrespective of stress conditions. Collectively, these results demonstrate that tianeptine concomitantly decreases pCREB while increasing BDNF expression in the rat amygdala, increases in neurotrophic factor expression that may participate in the enhancement of amygdalar synaptic plasticity mediated by tianeptine.

  9. Repeated morphine treatment alters polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule, glutamate decarboxylase-67 expression and cell proliferation in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Laëtitia; Alonso, Gérard; Normand, Elisabeth; Manzoni, Olivier J

    2005-01-01

    Altered synaptic transmission and plasticity in brain areas involved in reward and learning are thought to underlie the long-lasting effects of addictive drugs. In support of this idea, opiates reduce neurogenesis [A.J. Eisch et al. (2000) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA, 97, 7579-7584] and enhance long-term potentiation in adult rodent hippocampus [J.M. Harrison et al. (2002) Journal of Neurophysiology, 87, 2464-2470], a key structure of learning and memory processes. Here we studied how repeated morphine treatment and withdrawal affect cell proliferation and neuronal phenotypes in the dentate gyrus-CA3 region of the adult rat hippocampus. Our data showed a strong reduction of cellular proliferation in morphine-dependent animals (54% of control) that was followed by a rebound increase after 1 week withdrawal and a return to normal after 2 weeks withdrawal. Morphine dependence was also associated with a drastic reduction in the expression levels of the polysialylated form of neural cell adhesion molecule (68% of control), an adhesion molecule expressed by newly generated neurons and involved in cell migration and structural plasticity. Polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule levels quickly returned to normal following withdrawal. In morphine-dependent rats, we found a significant increase of glutamate decarboxylase-67 mRNA transcription (170% of control) in dentate gyrus granular cells which was followed by a marked rebound decrease after 1 week withdrawal and a return to normal after 4 weeks withdrawal. Together, the results show, for the first time, that, in addition to reducing cell proliferation and neurogenesis, chronic exposure to morphine dramatically alters neuronal phenotypes in the dentate gyrus-CA3 region of the adult rat hippocampus.

  10. A single intracerebroventricular Aβ25-35 infusion leads to prolonged alterations in arginine metabolism in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Bergin, D H; Jing, Y; Zhang, H; Liu, P

    2015-07-09

    While amyloid beta (Aβ) plays a central role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), recent evidence suggests the involvement of arginine metabolism in AD pathogenesis. Earlier research has shown that a single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of pre-aggregated Aβ25-35 (the neurotoxic domain of the full-length Aβ) altered arginine metabolism in the rat hippocampus (particularly the CA2/3 and dentate gyrus (DG) sub-regions) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) at the time point of 8 days post-infusion. The present study measured the levels of L-arginine and its nine downstream metabolites (L-citrulline, L-ornithine, agmatine, putrescine, spermidine, spermine, glutamate, GABA and glutamine) in the hippocampus and PFC at the time points of 42 and 97 days following a single bilateral i.c.v. infusion of Aβ25-35 (30 nmol/rat) or Aβ35-25 (reverse peptide; 30 nmol/rat). At the 42-day time point, Aβ25-35 resulted in decreased levels of glutamate, glutamine and spermine in the CA2/3 sub-region of the hippocampus. At the 97-day time point, however, there were decreased L-ornithine, GABA and putrescine levels, but increased glutamate/GABA ratio, in the PFC and increased spermine levels in the DG sub-region. Cluster analyses showed that L-arginine and its three main metabolites L-citrulline, L-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which changed as a function of Aβ25-35 at the 42-day and 97-day time points, particularly in the CA2/3 and PFC regions respectively. This study, for the first time, demonstrates that a single i.c.v. infusion of pre-aggregated Aβ25-35 leads to prolonged alterations in arginine metabolism in a region-specific and time-dependent manner, which further supports the involvement of arginine metabolism in AD pathogenesis.

  11. Chronic MDMA induces neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adolescent and young adult rats: Down-regulation of apoptotic markers.

    PubMed

    García-Cabrerizo, Rubén; García-Fuster, M Julia

    2015-07-01

    While hippocampus is a brain region particularly susceptible to the effects of MDMA, the cellular and molecular changes induced by MDMA are still to be fully elucidated, being the dosage regimen, the species and the developmental stage under study great variables. This study compared the effects of one and four days of MDMA administration following a binge paradigm (3×5 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h) on inducing hippocampal neurochemical changes in adolescent (PND 37) and young adult (PND 58) rats. The results showed that chronic MDMA caused hippocampal protein deficits in adolescent and young adult rats at different levels: (1) impaired serotonergic (5-HT2A and 5-HT2C post-synaptic receptors) and GABAergic (GAD2 enzyme) signaling, and (2) decreased structural cytoskeletal neurofilament proteins (NF-H, NF-M and NF-L). Interestingly, these effects were not accompanied by an increase in apoptotic markers. In fact, chronic MDMA inhibited proteins of the apoptotic pathway (i.e., pro-apoptotic FADD, Bax and cytochrome c) leading to an inhibition of cell death markers (i.e., p-JNK1/2, cleavage of PARP-1) and suggesting regulatory mechanisms in response to the neurochemical changes caused by the drug. The data, together with the observed lack of GFAP activation, support the view that chronic MDMA effects, regardless of the rat developmental age, extends beyond neurotransmitter systems to impair other hippocampal structural cell markers. Interestingly, inhibitory changes in proteins from the apoptotic pathway might be taking place to overcome the protein deficits caused by MDMA.

  12. Kindled seizure in the prefrontal cortex activated behavioral hyperactivity and increase in accumbens gamma oscillations through the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingyi; Leung, L Stan

    2010-01-05

    In previous studies, we reported that a single afterdischarge (AD) or repeated ADs (kindling) in the hippocampus resulted in schizophrenia-like behaviors such as hyperactivity and loss of sensorimotor gating. Given that medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction is also found in models of schizophrenia, we hypothesized that a single AD in the PFC induces postictal hyperactivity, and PFC kindling results in loss in prepulse inhibition (PPI). An AD was induced by stimulating the PFC with a 5s stimulus train of 60 Hz frequency and 600-800 microA intensity. An initial AD evoked in the PFC was not accompanied by clear postictal behavioral change. After partial kindling (11+/-2 ADs) of the PFC, the PFC-AD propagated into the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens (NAC) and postictal hyperactivity lasted > 5 min. The postictal hyperactivity was accompanied by increased gamma EEG oscillations in both PFC and NAC. A single AD in hippocampal CA1 also induced > 5 min of postictal hyperactivity and increased gamma oscillations in the NAC and the PFC, with a transient increase in hippocampus-NAC gamma coherence occurring 2-3 min after a hippocampal AD. Electrolytic lesion or inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus abolished the behavioral hyperactivity and the NAC/PFC gamma wave increase induced by a PFC-AD. Kindling of the PFC (21 ADs) but not of the lateral frontal cortex resulted in a deficit of PPI to the acoustic startle response tested 3 days after the last AD. In summary, gamma waves in the NAC were found to accompany postictal hyperactivity induced by an AD in the PFC. Postictal gamma and hyperactivity required an intact hippocampus, perhaps through the hippocampal-NAC pathway. PFC kindling, similar to hippocampal CA1 kindling, resulted in a prolonged deficit in PPI.

  13. Indomethacin can downregulate the levels of inflammatory mediators in the hippocampus of rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Michele Juliane; Perosa, Sandra Regina; Argañaraz, Gustavo Adolfo; Silva, José Antônio; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; da Graça Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Refractory status epilepticus is one of the most life-threatening neurological emergencies and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. Additionally, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs during this period is very controversial. Thus, this study has been designed to analyze the effect of a low dose of indomethacin (a COX inhibitor) on the expression of inflammatory molecules. METHOD: The hippocampus of rats submitted to pilocarpine-induced long-lasting status epilepticus was analyzed to determine the expression of inflammatory molecules with RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Compared with controls, reduced levels of the kinin B2 receptors IL1β and TNFα were found in the hippocampus of rats submitted to long-lasting status epilepticus and treated with indomethacin. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that low doses of indomethacin could be employed to minimize inflammation during long-lasting status epilepticus. PMID:25318094

  14. Chronic immobilization in the malpar1 knockout mice increases oxidative stress in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, María; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Pedraza, Carmen; Blanco, Eduardo; Hurtado-Guerrero, Isaac; Barbancho, Miguel Angel; Chun, Jerold; Rodríguez-de-Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín Núñez, Luis Javier

    2012-10-01

    The lysophosphatidic acid LPA₁ receptor has recently been involved in the adaptation of the hippocampus to chronic stress. The absence of LPA₁ receptor aggravates the chronic stress-induced impairment of both hippocampal neurogenesis and apoptosis that were accompanied with hippocampus-dependent memory deficits. Apoptotic death and neurogenesis in the hippocampus are regulated by oxidative stress. In the present work, we studied the involvement of LPA₁ receptor signaling pathway in the regulation of the hippocampal redox after chronic stress. To this end, we used malpar1 knockout (KO) and wild-type mice assigned to either chronic stress (21 days of restraint, 3 h/day) or control conditions. Lipid peroxidation, the activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), as well as mitochondrial function stimulation, monitored through the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), were studied in the hippocampus. Our results showed that chronic immobilization stress enhanced lipid peroxidation as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes studied (CAT, SOD, and GPX). This effect was only observed in absence of LPA₁ receptor. Furthermore, only malpar1 KO mice submitted to chronic stress exhibited a severe downregulation of the COX activity, suggesting the presence of mitochondrial damage. Altogether, these results suggest that malpar1 KO mice display enhanced oxidative stress in the hippocampus after chronic stress. This may be involved in the hippocampal abnormalities observed in this genotype after chronic immobilization, including memory, neurogenesis, and apoptosis.

  15. Neurotoxic kynurenine metabolism is increased in the dorsal hippocampus and drives distinct depressive behaviors during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Parrott, J M; Redus, L; Santana-Coelho, D; Morales, J; Gao, X; O'Connor, J C

    2016-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has an important role in mediating the behavioral effects of inflammation, which has implications in understanding neuropsychiatric comorbidity and for the development of novel therapies. Inhibition of the rate-limiting enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), prevents the development of many of these inflammation-induced preclinical behaviors. However, dysregulation in the balance of downstream metabolism, where neuroactive kynurenines are generated, is hypothesized to be a functionally important pathogenic feature of inflammation-induced depression. Here we utilized two novel transgenic mouse strains to directly test the hypothesis that neurotoxic kynurenine metabolism causes depressive-like behavior following peripheral immune activation. Wild-type (WT) or kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO)-deficient (KMO−/−) mice were administered either lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.5 mg kg−1) or saline intraperitoneally. Depressive-like behavior was measured across multiple domains 24 h after immune challenge. LPS precipitated a robust depressive-like phenotype, but KMO−/− mice were specifically protected from LPS-induced immobility in the tail suspension test (TST) and reduced spontaneous alternations in the Y-maze. Direct administration of 3-hydroxykynurenine, the metabolic product of KMO, caused a dose-dependent increase in depressive-like behaviors. Mice with targeted deletion of 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid dioxygenase (HAAO), the enzyme that generates quinolinic acid, were similarly challenged with LPS. Similar to KMO−/− mice, LPS failed to increase immobility during the TST. Whereas kynurenine metabolism was generally increased in behaviorally salient brain regions, a distinct shift toward KMO-dependent kynurenine metabolism occurred in the dorsal hippocampus in response to LPS. Together, these results demonstrate that KMO is a pivotal mediator of hippocampal-dependent depressive-like behaviors induced by

  16. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Different Types of Chocolate, Milk, Semisweet, Dark, and Soy, in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus, and Cerebellum of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Medeiros, Niara; Koslowsky Marder, Roberta; Farias Wohlenberg, Mariane; Funchal, Cláudia; Dani, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Chocolate is a product consumed worldwide and it stands out for presenting an important amount of phenolic compounds. In this study, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of male Wistar rats when consuming different types of chocolate, including milk, semisweet, dark, and soy, was evaluated. The total polyphenols concentration and antioxidant activity in vitro by the method of DPPH radical-scavenging test were evaluated in chocolate samples. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein oxidation (carbonyl), sulfhydryl groups, and activity of SOD enzyme in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated or not with hydrogen peroxide and/or chocolate were also evaluated. The dark chocolate demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity, followed by semisweet, soy, and milk chocolates. The addition of chocolate in the diet of the rats reduced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation caused by hydrogen peroxide. In the sulfhydryl assay, we observed that the levels of nonenzymatic defenses only increased with the chocolate treatments The SOD enzyme activity was modulated in the tissues treated with the chocolates. We observed in the samples of chocolate a significant polyphenol content and an important antioxidant activity; however, additional studies with different chocolates and other tissues are necessary to further such findings. PMID:26649198

  17. Total Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Activity of Different Types of Chocolate, Milk, Semisweet, Dark, and Soy, in Cerebral Cortex, Hippocampus, and Cerebellum of Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva Medeiros, Niara; Koslowsky Marder, Roberta; Farias Wohlenberg, Mariane; Funchal, Cláudia; Dani, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Chocolate is a product consumed worldwide and it stands out for presenting an important amount of phenolic compounds. In this study, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of male Wistar rats when consuming different types of chocolate, including milk, semisweet, dark, and soy, was evaluated. The total polyphenols concentration and antioxidant activity in vitro by the method of DPPH radical-scavenging test were evaluated in chocolate samples. Lipid peroxidation (TBARS), protein oxidation (carbonyl), sulfhydryl groups, and activity of SOD enzyme in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of rats treated or not with hydrogen peroxide and/or chocolate were also evaluated. The dark chocolate demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity, followed by semisweet, soy, and milk chocolates. The addition of chocolate in the diet of the rats reduced lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation caused by hydrogen peroxide. In the sulfhydryl assay, we observed that the levels of nonenzymatic defenses only increased with the chocolate treatments The SOD enzyme activity was modulated in the tissues treated with the chocolates. We observed in the samples of chocolate a significant polyphenol content and an important antioxidant activity; however, additional studies with different chocolates and other tissues are necessary to further such findings.

  18. Eating habits modulate short term memory and epigenetical regulation of brain derived neurotrophic factor in hippocampus of low-and high running capacity rats

    PubMed Central

    Torma, Ferenc; Bori, Zoltan; Koltai, Erika; Felszeghy, Klara; Vacz, Gabriella; Koch, Lauren; Britton, Steven; Boldogh, Istvan; Radak, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Exercise capacity and dietary restriction (DR) are linked to improved quality of life, including enhanced brain function and neuro-protection. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the key proteins involved in the beneficial effects of exercise on brain. Low capacity runner (LCR) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were subjected to DR in order to investigate the regulation of BDNF. HCR-DR rats out-performed other groups in a passive avoidance test. BDNF content increased significantly in the hippocampus of HCR-DR groups compared to control groups (p<0.05). The acetylation of H3 increased significantly only in the LCR-DR group. However, Chip-assay revealed that the specific binding between acetylated histone H3 and BNDF promoter was increased in both LCR-DR and HCR-DR groups. In spite of these increases in binding, at the transcriptional level only, the LCR-DR group showed an increase in BDNF mRNA content. Additionally, DR also induced the activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), while the content of SIRT1 was not altered. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) was elevated in HCR-DR groups. But, based on the levels of nuclear respiratory factor-1 and cytocrome c oxidase, it appears that DR did not cause mitochondrial biogenesis. The data suggest that DR-mediated induction of BDNF levels includes chromatin remodeling. Moreover, DR does not induce mitochondrial biogenesis in the hippocampus of LCR/HCR rats. DR results in different responses to a passive avoidance test, and BDNF regulation in LCR and HCR rats. PMID:25043449

  19. Eating habits modulate short term memory and epigenetical regulation of brain derived neurotrophic factor in hippocampus of low- and high running capacity rats.

    PubMed

    Torma, Ferenc; Bori, Zoltan; Koltai, Erika; Felszeghy, Klara; Vacz, Gabriella; Koch, Lauren; Britton, Steven; Boldogh, Istvan; Radak, Zsolt

    2014-08-01

    Exercise capacity and dietary restriction (DR) are linked to improved quality of life, including enhanced brain function and neuro-protection. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the key proteins involved in the beneficial effects of exercise on brain. Low capacity runner (LCR) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were subjected to DR in order to investigate the regulation of BDNF. HCR-DR rats out-performed other groups in a passive avoidance test. BDNF content increased significantly in the hippocampus of HCR-DR groups compared to control groups (p<0.05). The acetylation of H3 increased significantly only in the LCR-DR group. However, chip-assay revealed that the specific binding between acetylated histone H3 and BNDF promoter was increased in both LCR-DR and HCR-DR groups. In spite of these increases in binding, at the transcriptional level only, the LCR-DR group showed an increase in BDNF mRNA content. Additionally, DR also induced the activity of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), while the content of SIRT1 was not altered. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) was elevated in HCR-DR groups. But, based on the levels of nuclear respiratory factor-1 and cytocrome c oxidase, it appears that DR did not cause mitochondrial biogenesis. The data suggest that DR-mediated induction of BDNF levels includes chromatin remodeling. Moreover, DR does not induce mitochondrial biogenesis in the hippocampus of LCR/HCR rats. DR results in different responses to a passive avoidance test, and BDNF regulation in LCR and HCR rats.

  20. Hippocampus and Retrograde Amnesia in the Rat Model: A Modest Proposal for the Situation of Systems Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Robert J.; Sparks, Fraser; Lehmann, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    The properties of retrograde amnesia after damage to the hippocampus have been explicated with some success using a rat model of human medial temporal lobe amnesia. We review the results of this experimental work with rats focusing on several areas of consensus in this growing literature. We evaluate the theoretically significant hypothesis that hippocampal retrograde amnesia normally exhibits a temporal gradient, affecting recent, but sparing remote memories. Surprisingly, the evidence does not provide much support for the idea that there is a lengthy process of systems consolidation following a learning episode. Instead, recent and remote memories tend to be equally affected. The extent of damage to the hippocampus is a significant factor in this work since it is likely that spared hippocampal tissue can support at least partial memory retrieval. With extensive hippocampal damage gradients are flat or, in the case of memory tasks with flavour/odour retrieval cues, the retrograde amnesia covers a period of about 1 – 3 days. There is consistent evidence that at the time of learning the hippocampus interferes with or overshadows memory acquisition by other systems. This contributes to the breadth and severity of retrograde amnesia relative to anterograde amnesia in the rat. The fact that multiple, distributed learning episodes can overcome this overshadowing is consistent with a parallel dual-store theory or a Distributed Reinstatement Theory in which each learning episode triggers a short period of memory replay that provides a brief hippocampal-dependent systems consolidation. PMID:20430043

  1. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in rat hippocampus after treatment with antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ou; Chlan-Fourney, Jennifer; Bowen, Rudy; Keegan, David; Li, Xin-Min

    2003-01-01

    Typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs, though both effective, act on different neurotransmitter receptors and are dissimilar in some clinical effects and side effects. The typical antipsychotic drug haloperidol has been shown to cause a decrease in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which plays an important role in neuronal cell survival, differentiation, and neuronal connectivity. However, it is still unknown whether atypical antipsychotic drugs similarly regulate BDNF expression. We examined the effects of chronic (28 days) administration of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs on BDNF mRNA expression in the rat hippocampus using in situ hybridization. Quantitative analysis revealed that the typical antipsychotic drug haloperidol (1 mg/kg) down-regulated BDNF mRNA expression in both CA1 (P < 0.05) and dentate gyrus (P < 0.01) regions compared with vehicle control. In contrast, the atypical antipsychotic agents clozapine (10 mg/kg) and olanzapine (2.7 mg/kg) up-regulated BDNF mRNA expression in CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus regions of the rat hippocampus compared with their respective controls (P < 0.01). These findings demonstrate that the typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs differentially regulate BDNF mRNA expression in rat hippocampus.

  2. Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats causes a selective reduction in the expression of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Panaccione, Isabella; Iacovelli, Luisa; di Nuzzo, Luigi; Nardecchia, Francesca; Mauro, Gianluca; Janiri, Delfina; De Blasi, Antonio; Sani, Gabriele; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Orlando, Rosamaria

    2017-03-01

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats is considered as an experimental animal model of mania endowed with face, construct, and pharmacological validity. We induced paradoxical sleep deprivation by placing rats onto a small platform surrounded by water. This procedure caused the animal to fall in the water at the onset of REM phase of sleep. Control rats were either placed onto a larger platform (which allowed them to sleep) or maintained in their home cage. Sleep deprived rats showed a substantial reduction in type-2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex or corpus striatum, as compared to both groups of control rats. No changes in the expression of mGlu3 receptor mRNA levels or mGlu1α and mGlu5 receptor protein levels were found with exception of an increase in mGlu1α receptor levels in the striatum of SD rats. Moving from these findings we treated SD and control rats with the selective mGlu2 receptor enhancer, BINA (30mg/kg, i.p.). SD rats were also treated with sodium valproate (300mg/kg, i.p.) as an active comparator. Both BINA and sodium valproate were effective in reversing the manic-like phenotype evaluated in an open field arena in SD rats. BINA treatment had no effect on motor activity in control rats, suggesting that our findings were not biased by a non-specific motor-lowering activity of BINA. These findings suggest that changes in the expression of mGlu2 receptors may be associated with the enhanced motor activity observed with mania.

  3. Beta-alanine and taurine as endogenous agonists at glycine receptors in rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro; Gähwiler, Beat H; Gerber, Urs

    2002-02-15

    Electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of glycine receptors were characterized in hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. In the presence of ionotropic glutamate and GABA(B) receptor antagonists, pressure-application of glycine onto CA3 pyramidal cells induced a current associated with increased chloride conductance, which was inhibited by strychnine. Similar chloride currents could also be induced with beta-alanine or taurine. Whole-cell glycine responses were significantly greater in CA3 pyramidal cells than in CA1 pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells, while responses to GABA were similar among these three cell types. Although these results demonstrate the presence of functional glycine receptors in the hippocampus, no evidence for their activation during synaptic stimulation was found. Gabazine, a selective GABA(A) receptor antagonist, totally blocked evoked IPSCs in CA3 pyramidal cells. Glycine receptor activation is not dependent on transporter-controlled levels of extracellular glycine, as no chloride current was observed in response to sarcosine, an inhibitor of glycine transporters. In contrast, application of guanidinoethanesulfonic acid, an uptake inhibitor of beta-alanine and taurine, induced strychnine-sensitive chloride current in the presence of gabazine. These data indicate that modulation of transporters for the endogenous amino acids, beta-alanine and taurine, can regulate tonic activation of glycine receptors, which may function in maintenance of inhibitory tone in the hippocampus.

  4. Activity-based anorexia during adolescence disrupts normal development of the CA1 pyramidal cells in the ventral hippocampus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tara G; Ríos, Mariel B; Chan, Thomas E; Cassataro, Daniela S; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Aoki, Chiye

    2014-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric illness characterized by restricted eating and irrational fears of gaining weight. There is no accepted pharmacological treatment for AN, and AN has the highest mortality rate among psychiatric illnesses. Anorexia nervosa most commonly affects females during adolescence, suggesting an effect of sex and hormones on vulnerability to the disease. Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a rodent model of AN that shares symptoms with AN, including over-exercise, elevation of stress hormones, and genetic links to anxiety traits. We previously reported that ABA in adolescent female rats results in increased apical dendritic branching in CA1 pyramidal cells of the ventral hippocampus at postnatal day 44 (P44). To examine the long-term effects of adolescent ABA (P44) in female rats, we compared the apical branching in the ventral hippocampal CA1 after recovery from ABA (P51) and after a relapse of ABA (P55) with age-matched controls. To examine the age-dependence of the hippocampal plasticity, we examined the effect of ABA during adulthood (P67). We found that while ABA at P44 resulted in increased branching of ventral hippocampal pyramidal cells, relapse of ABA at P55 resulted in decreased branching. ABA induced during adulthood did not have an effect on dendritic branching, suggesting an age-dependence of the vulnerability to structural plasticity. Cells from control animals were found to exhibit a dramatic increase in branching, more than doubling from P44 to P51, followed by pruning from P51 to P55. The proportion of mature spines on dendrites from the P44-ABA animals is similar to that on dendrites from P55-CON animals. These results suggest that the experience of ABA may cause precocious anatomical development of the ventral hippocampus. Importantly, we found that adolescence is a period of continued development of the hippocampus, and increased vulnerability to mental disorders during adolescence may be due to insults during this

  5. Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency During Development Compromises Activity-Dependent Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus of Adult Male Rats

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    behavioral measures of learning and memory in adult offspring of rats treated with thyroid hormone synthesis inhibitor, propylthiouracil.Electrophysiological measures of 'memory' in form of plasticity model known as long term potentiation (LTP)Molecular changes induced by LTPThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Gilbert , M., K. Sanchez-Huerta, and C. Wood. Mild Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency During Development Compromises Activity-Dependent Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus of Adult Make Rats. ENDOCRINOLOGY. Endocrine Society, 157(2): 774-87, (2016).

  6. Effects of Ferulic Acid on Oxidative Stress, Heat Shock Protein 70, Connexin 43 and Monoamines in Hippocampus of Pentylenetetrazole-Kindled Rats.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Abdelaziz M; Abbas, Khalid M; Abulseoud, Osama A; Elhussainy, Elhussainy Mohamed Abouelez

    2017-02-03

    The present study investigated the effects of ferulic acid on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, oxidative stress markers (malondialdhyde (MDA), catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH)), connexin (Cx) 43, heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 and monoamines (serotonin (5HT) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in a rat model of PTZ-induced kindling. Sixty Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 5 equal groups, a) normal group, b) FA group: normal rats received FA at a dose of 40 mg/kg daily, c) PTZ group: rats received PTZ at a dose of 50 mg/kg i.p. on alternate day for 15 days, d) FA before group, as PTZ group and rats received FA and e) FA after group, rats received FA from 6th dose of PTZ. PTZ caused significant increase in MDA, Cx43 and Hsp70 with significant decrease in GSH, 5HT and NE levels and CAT activity in hippocampus (p<0.05).Pre- and post-treatment with FA caused significant improvement in behavioral parameters, MDA, CAT, GSH, 5HT,NE, Cx43 expression and Hsp70 expression in hippocampal region (p<0.05). We concluded that FA has a neuroprotective effects in PTZ induced epilepsy which might be due to attenuation of oxidative stress and Cx43 expression, upregulation of neuroprotective HSP70 and neurotransmitters (5HT and NE) levels.

  7. Increase in Trx2/Prx3 redox system immunoreactivity in the spinal cord and hippocampus of aged dogs.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Choi, Jung Hoon; Song, Ju Min; Lee, Choong Hyun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Jin Sang; Shin, Hyung-Cheul; Won, Moo-Ho

    2011-11-01

    We previously reported that no distinct neuronal loss occurred in the aged dog spinal cord, although oxidative stress was increased in the aged dog spinal cord. Thioredoxin 2 (Trx2)/peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) redox system is a major route for removing H(2)O(2) in the central nervous system. In the present study, we compared the distribution and immunoreactivity of thioredoxin reductase 2 (TrxR2), Trx2 and Prx3 and their protein levels in the spinal cord and hippocampus between the adult (2-3 years) and aged (10-12 years) dogs. The number of TrxR2-immunoreactive neurons was slightly increased; however, its immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the aged spinal cord compared to that in the adult spinal cord. On the other hand, the number and immunoreactivity of both Trx2- and Prx3-immunoreactive neurons were significantly increased in the spinal cord of the aged dog. Similarly, in the hippocampus of the aged dog, TrxR2, Trx2 and Prx3 immunoreactivity and protein levels were markedly increased compared to those in the adult dog. These results indicate that the increases of TrxR2, Trx2 and Prx3 immunoreactivity and their protein levels in the aged spinal cord and hippocampus may contribute to reducing neuronal damage against oxidative stresses during normal aging.

  8. Metabolic changes in rat prefrontal cortex and hippocampus induced by chronic morphine treatment studied ex vivo by high resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hongchang; Xiang, Yun; Sun, Ninglei; Zhu, Hang; Wang, Yaqiang; Liu, Maili; Ma, Yuanye; Lei, Hao

    2007-01-01

    Ex vivo(1)H NMR spectroscopy was used to measure changes in the concentrations of cerebral metabolites in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus of rats subjected to repeated morphine treatment known to cause tolerance/dependence. The results show that repeated morphine exposure induces significant changes in the concentrations of a number of cerebral metabolites, and such changes are region specific. After 10 days of repeated morphine treatment, the concentration of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) increased significantly in the PFC (20+/-11%), but decreased in the hippocampus (-31+/-12%), compared to control. In contrast, the glutamate (Glu) concentrations in both the PFC (-15+/-8%) and hippocampus (-13+/-4%) decreased significantly. Significant changes were also observed in the concentrations of hippocampal glutamine (Gln), myo-inositol, taurine, and N-acetyl aspartate. These morphine-induced changes were reversed during a subsequent 5-day withdrawal period. It is suggested that the observed concentration changes for Glu, Gln and GABA are most likely the result of a shift in the steady-state equilibrium of the Gln-Glu-GABA metabolic cycle. Changes in the metabolism of this neurotransmitter system might be part of the adaptive measures taken by the central nervous system in response to repeated morphine exposure and subsequent withdrawal.

  9. Activation of matrix metalloproteinase in dorsal hippocampus drives improvement in spatial working memory after intra-VTA nicotine infusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hui; Zheng, Guo-qing; Wang, Xiaona; Sun, Yanyun; Liu, Yushan; Weaver, John Michael; Shen, Xianzhi; Liu, Wenlan; Jin, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    The hippocampus receives dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra. These inputs appear to provide a modulatory signal that influences hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Enhancements in working memory performance have been previously reported following acute smoking/nicotine exposure. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of nicotine on spatial working memory (SWM) and the mechanisms involved. Delayed alternation T-maze task was used to assess SWM. In situ and gel gelatin zymography were used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in SWM. Systemic or local (intra-VTA) administration of nicotine significantly improves SWM, which was accompanied by increased MMP-9 activity in dorsal hippocampus (dHPC). Intra-dHPC administration of MMP inhibitor FN-439 abolished the memory enhancement induced by intra-VTA nicotine infusion. FN-439 had no effect on locomotor behavior. Our data suggest that intra-VTA nicotine infusion activates MMP-9 in dHPC to improve SWM in rats.

  10. Chronic corticosterone decreases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein in the hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex, of the rat.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jacob P R; Mørk, Arne

    2006-09-19

    This study examined the effects of chronic corticosterone (32 mg/kg/day, s.c., 21 days) on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. Because evidence suggests that BDNF is an important determinant of the function of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system, we also quantified tissue levels of 5-HT and its major metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), to investigate if changes in BDNF mRNA and protein paralleled changes in the 5-HT system. Corticosterone modestly decreased BDNF protein (-16.6%) in whole hippocampus and BDNF mRNA (-19%) in the CA3 area. In contrast, BDNF mRNA and protein in the frontal cortex were unchanged. In both the frontal cortex and hippocampus, tissue levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA were increased and decreased, respectively. Combined, these data suggests that the effects of corticosterone on the BDNF system are not linked to the effects on the 5-HT systems. However, our findings do suggest that chronic corticosterone impairs hippocampal BDNF function, a finding with potential relevance for the hippocampal atrophy reported in major depression. Additionally, as inferred from the alterations in tissue levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA, chronic corticosterone may influence the function of the 5-HT system.

  11. Calorie restriction improves cognitive decline via up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor: tropomyosin-related kinase B in hippocampus ofobesity-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Takuya; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Nagayama, Tomomi; Isegawa, Kengo; Katsuki, Masato; Takesue, Ko; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    In metabolic syndrome (MetS), previous studies have suggested that cognitive decline is worsened. Among the factors associated with cognition, decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus causes cognitive decline. We previously reported that exercise training with calorie restriction yielded protection against cognitive decline via BDNF in the hippocampus of hypertensive rats. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not calorie restriction results in protection against cognitive decline via BDNF and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in the hippocampus of MetS model rats. We divided dietary-induced obesity-prone and hypertensive rats (OP), as metabolic syndrome model rats, into three groups, fed with a high fat diet (HF), treated with calorie restriction (CR) plus vehicle, and treated with CR and ANA-12 (a TrkB antagonist) (CR+A). After treatment for 28 days, body weight, insulin, fasting blood glucose, adiponectin, systolic blood pressure, and oxidative stress in the hippocampus were significantly lower, and BDNF expression in the hippocampus was significantly higher in CR and CR+A than in HF. Cognitive performance determined by the Morris water maze test was significantly higher in CR than in HF, whereas the benefit was attenuated in CR+A. In conclusion, calorie restriction protects against cognitive decline via up-regulation of BDNF/TrkB through an antioxidant effect in the hippocampus of dietary-induced obesity rats.

  12. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) produces edema due to BBB disruption induced by MMP-9 activation in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hernández, Mercedes; Fernández-Valle, María Encarnación; Rubio-Araiz, Ana; Vidal, Rebeca; Gutiérrez-López, María Dolores; O'Shea, Esther; Colado, María Isabel

    2017-03-16

    The recreational drug of abuse, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) disrupts blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in rats through an early P2X7 receptor-mediated event which induces MMP-9 activity. Increased BBB permeability often causes plasma proteins and water to access cerebral tissue leading to vasogenic edema formation. The current study was performed to examine the effect of a single neurotoxic dose of MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.) on in vivo edema development associated with changes in the expression of the perivascular astrocytic water channel, AQP4, as well as in the expression of the tight-junction (TJ) protein, claudin-5 and Evans Blue dye extravasation in the hippocampus of adult male Dark Agouti rats. We also evaluated the ability of the MMP-9 inhibitor, SB-3CT (25 mg/kg, i.p.), to prevent these changes in order to validate the involvement of MMP-9 activation in MDMA-induced BBB disruption. The results show that MDMA produces edema of short duration temporally associated with changes in AQP4 expression and a reduction in claudin-5 expression, changes which are prevented by SB-3CT. In addition, MDMA induces a short-term increase in both tPA activity and expression, a serine-protease which is involved in BBB disruption and upregulation of MMP-9 expression. In conclusion, this study provides evidence enough to conclude that MDMA induces edema of short duration due to BBB disruption mediated by MMP-9 activation.

  13. Interactions between hippocampus and medial septum during sharp waves and theta oscillation in the behaving rat.

    PubMed

    Dragoi, G; Carpi, D; Recce, M; Csicsvari, J; Buzsáki, G

    1999-07-15

    The medial septal region and the hippocampus are connected reciprocally via GABAergic neurons, but the physiological role of this loop is still not well understood. In an attempt to reveal the physiological effects of the hippocamposeptal GABAergic projection, we cross-correlated hippocampal sharp wave (SPW) ripples or theta activity and extracellular units recorded in the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MSDB) in freely moving rats. The majority of single MSDB cells (60%) were significantly suppressed during SPWs. Most cells inhibited during SPW (80%) fired rhythmically and phase-locked to the negative peak of the CA1 pyramidal layer theta waves. Because both SPW and the negative peak of local theta waves correspond to the maximum discharge probability of CA1 pyramidal cells and interneuron classes, the findings indicate that the activity of medial septal neurons can be negatively (during SPW) or positively (during theta waves) correlated with the activity of hippocampal interneurons. We hypothesize that the functional coupling between medial septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons varies in a state-dependent manner.

  14. Distribution and posttranslational modification of synaptic ERα in the adult female rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tabatadze, Nino; Smejkalova, Tereza; Woolley, Catherine S

    2013-02-01

    Acute 17β-estradiol (E2) signaling in the brain is mediated by extranuclear estrogen receptors. Here we used biochemical methods to investigate the distribution, posttranslational modification, and E2 regulation of estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in synaptosomal fractions isolated by differential centrifugation from the adult female rat hippocampus. We find that ERα is concentrated presynaptically and is highly enriched with synaptic vesicles. Immunoisolation of vesicles using vesicle subtype-specific markers showed that ERα is associated with both glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid-containing neurotransmitter vesicles as well as with some large dense core vesicles. Experiments using broad spectrum and residue-specific phosphatases indicated that a portion of ERα in synaptosomal fractions is phosphorylated at serine/threonine residues leading to a mobility shift in SDS-PAGE and creating a double band on Western blots. The phosphorylated form of ERα runs in the upper of the two bands and is particularly concentrated with synaptic vesicles. Finally, we used E2 with or without the acyl protein thioesterase 1 inhibitor, Palmostatin B, to show that 20 min of E2 treatment of hippocampal slices depletes ERα from the synaptosomal membrane by depalmitoylation. We found no evidence that E2 regulates phosphorylation of synaptosomal ERα on this time scale. These studies begin to fill the gap between detailed molecular characterization of extranuclear ERα in previous in vitro studies and acute E2 modulation of hippocampal synapses in the adult brain.

  15. Manipulating epileptiform bursting in the rat hippocampus using chaos control and adaptive techniques.

    PubMed

    Slutzky, Marc W; Cvitanovic, Predrag; Mogul, David J

    2003-05-01

    Epilepsy is a relatively common disease, afflicting 1%-2% of the population, yet many epileptic patients are not sufficiently helped by current pharmacological therapies. Recent reports have suggested that chaos control techniques may be useful for electrically manipulating epileptiform bursting behavior in vitro and could possibly lead to an alternative method for preventing seizures. We implemented chaos control of spontaneous bursting in the rat hippocampal slice using robust control techniques: stable manifold placement (SMP) and an adaptive tracking (AT) algorithm designed to overcome nonstationarity. We examined the effect of several factors, including control radius size and synaptic plasticity, on control efficacy. AT improved control efficacy over basic SMP control, but relatively frequent stimulation was still necessary and very tight control was only achieved for brief stretches. A novel technique was developed for validating period-1 orbit detection in noisy systems by forcing the system directly onto the period-1 orbit. This forcing analysis suggested that period-1 orbits were indeed present but that control would be difficult because of high noise levels and nonstationarity. Noise might actually be lower in vivo, where regulatory inputs to the hippocampus are still intact. Thus, it may still be feasible to use chaos control algorithms for preventing epileptic seizures.

  16. A new pH-sensitive rectifying potassium channel in mitochondria from the embryonic rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kajma, Anna; Szewczyk, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Patch-clamp single-channel studies on mitochondria isolated from embryonic rat hippocampus revealed the presence of two different potassium ion channels: a large-conductance (288±4pS) calcium-activated potassium channel and second potassium channel with outwardly rectifying activity under symmetric conditions (150/150mM KCl). At positive voltages, this channel displayed a conductance of 67.84pS and a strong voltage dependence at holding potentials from -80mV to +80mV. The open probability was higher at positive than at negative voltages. Patch-clamp studies at the mitoplast-attached mode showed that the channel was not sensitive to activators and inhibitors of mitochondrial potassium channels but was regulated by pH. Moreover, we demonstrated that the channel activity was not affected by the application of lidocaine, an inhibitor of two-pore domain potassium channels, or by tertiapin, an inhibitor of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. In summary, based on the single-channel recordings, we characterised for the first time mitochondrial pH-sensitive ion channel that is selective for cations, permeable to potassium ions, displays voltage sensitivity and does not correspond to any previously described potassium ion channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012).

  17. Effect of Paullinia cupana Mart. Commercial Extract During the Aging of Middle Age Wistar Rats: Differential Effects on the Hippocampus and Striatum.

    PubMed

    Mingori, Moara Rodrigues; Heimfarth, Luana; Ferreira, Charles Francisco; Gomes, Henrique Mautone; Moresco, Karla Suzana; Delgado, Jeferson; Roncato, Sabrina; Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2017-03-27

    During aging, there is a marked decline in the antioxidant capacity of brain tissue, leading to a gradual loss of the antioxidant/oxidant balance, which causes oxidative damage. The effects of Paullinia cupana Mart. extract, which is described as being rich in caffeine and many polyphenol compounds, on the central nervous system have not been extensively investigated. The aim of this study was to therefore investigate the effect of a commercial guarana extract (CGE) on cognitive function, oxidative stress, and brain homeostasis proteins related to cognitive injury and senescence in middle age, male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly assigned to a group according to their treatment (saline, CGE, or caffeine). Solutions were administered daily by oral gavage for 6 months. Open field and novel object recognition tasks were performed before and after treatment. Biochemical analyses were carried out on the hippocampus and striatum. Our open field data showed an increase in exploratory activity and a decrease in anxiety-like behavior with caffeine but not with the CGE treatment. In the CGE-treated group, catalase activity decreased in the hippocampus and increased in the striatum. Analyses of the hippocampus and striatum indicate that CGE and/or caffeine altered some of the analyzed parameters in a tissue-specific manner. Our data suggest that CGE intake does not improve cognitive development, but modifies the oxidative stress machinery and neurodegenerative-signaling pathway, inhibiting pro-survival pathway molecules in the hippocampus and striatum. This may contribute to the development of unfavorable microenvironments in the brain and neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Mitochondria-associated microRNAs in rat hippocampus following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wang-Xia; Visavadiya, Nishant P.; Pandya, Jignesh D.; Nelson, Peter T.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Springer, Joe E.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability. However, the molecular events contributing to the pathogenesis are not well understood. Mitochondria serve as the powerhouse of cells, respond to cellular demands and stressors, and play an essential role in cell signaling, differentiation, and survival. There is clear evidence of compromised mitochondrial function following TBI, however, the underlying mechanisms and consequences are not clear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally, and function as important mediators of neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegeneration. Several miRNAs show altered expression following TBI, however, the relevance of mitochondria in these pathways is unknown. Here, we present evidence supporting the association of miRNA with hippocampal mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondria-associated miRNA expression following a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury in rats. Specifically, we found that the miRNA processing proteins Argonaute (AGO) and Dicer are present in mitochondria fractions from uninjured rat hippocampus, and immunoprecipitation of AGO associated miRNA from mitochondria suggests the presence of functional RNA-induced silencing complexes. Interestingly, RT-qPCR miRNA array studies revealed that a subset of miRNA is enriched in mitochondria relative to cytoplasm. At 12 hour following CCI, several miRNAs are significantly altered in hippocampal mitochondria and cytoplasm. In addition, levels of miR-155 and miR-223, both of which play a role in inflammatory processes, are significantly elevated in both cytoplasm and mitochondria. We propose that mitochondria-associated miRNAs may play an important role in regulating the response to TBI. PMID:25562527

  19. Mitochondria-associated microRNAs in rat hippocampus following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wang-Xia; Visavadiya, Nishant P; Pandya, Jignesh D; Nelson, Peter T; Sullivan, Patrick G; Springer, Joe E

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability. However, the molecular events contributing to the pathogenesis are not well understood. Mitochondria serve as the powerhouse of cells, respond to cellular demands and stressors, and play an essential role in cell signaling, differentiation, and survival. There is clear evidence of compromised mitochondrial function following TBI; however, the underlying mechanisms and consequences are not clear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally, and function as important mediators of neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, and neurodegeneration. Several miRNAs show altered expression following TBI; however, the relevance of mitochondria in these pathways is unknown. Here, we present evidence supporting the association of miRNA with hippocampal mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondria-associated miRNA expression following a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury in rats. Specifically, we found that the miRNA processing proteins Argonaute (AGO) and Dicer are present in mitochondria fractions from uninjured rat hippocampus, and immunoprecipitation of AGO associated miRNA from mitochondria suggests the presence of functional RNA-induced silencing complexes. Interestingly, RT-qPCR miRNA array studies revealed that a subset of miRNA is enriched in mitochondria relative to cytoplasm. At 12h following CCI, several miRNAs are significantly altered in hippocampal mitochondria and cytoplasm. In addition, levels of miR-155 and miR-223, both of which play a role in inflammatory processes, are significantly elevated in both cytoplasm and mitochondria. We propose that mitochondria-associated miRNAs may play an important role in regulating the response to TBI.

  20. CXCR-7 receptor promotes SDF-1α-induced migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulan; Fu, Wei; Zhang, Shichun; He, Xiaomei; Liu, Zhi'an; Gao, Diansuai; Xu, Tiejun

    2014-08-05

    The stromal cell-derived factor 1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (SDF-1/CXCR-4) axis plays an important role during stem cell recruitment. SDF-1 can also bind the more recently described CXCR-7 receptor, but effects of SDF-1/CXCR-7 signaling on stem cell migrating to ischemic brain injury area are little known. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CXCR-7 on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) migration toward SDF-1α in the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat hippocampus. We cultured BMSCs from rats and characterized them using flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and immunofluorescence to detect SDF-1α, CXCR-4, and CXCR-7 expression in third passage BMSCs (P3-BMSCs). We also prepared the model of transient cerebral I/R by four-vessel occlusion (4-VO), and BMSCs were transplanted into I/R rat brain via lateral ventricle (LV) injection (20μl, 1×10(6)/ml). After that, we examined the effect of BMSCs migration in the cerebral I/R rat hippocampus through Transwell chamber assay. Our results show that SDF-1α, CXCR-4, and CXCR-7 were expressed in P3-BMSCs. Moreover, SDF-1α expression was increased in I/R hippocampus. At 48h after transplant, green fluorescent BrdU-BMSCs were observed in transplant groups, but no green fluorescent BrdU-BMSCs were seen in medium group. Among BMSCs transplant groups, the number of BrdU-BMSCs positive cell was the highest in BMSC group. Treatment with AMD3100 and/or CXCR-7 neutralizing antibody decreased the number of BMSC migration. Collectively, these findings indicate that CXCR-4 and -7 receptors were co-expressed in BMSCs and synergistically promoted BMSC migration. The effect of CXCR-7 was stronger than that of CXCR-4. Moreover, BMSCs that migrated to hippocampus promoted the autocrine and paracrine signaling of SDF-1α.

  1. Sex and ovarian steroids modulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels in rat hippocampus under stressful and non-stressful conditions.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Tamara B; Perrot-Sinal, Tara S

    2006-01-01

    Abnormal levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are associated with major depression, a disorder with a higher incidence in women than men. Stress affects BDNF levels in various brain regions and thus, a heightened stress response in females could contribute to the development of depression. As well, ovarian hormones directly affect brain levels of BDNF mRNA and protein. Two experiments were performed to investigate the effects of stress and sex and gonadal hormones on BDNF protein levels in CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) subregions of the hippocampus. In the first experiment, male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to one hour of restraint stress or control handling prior to sacrifice. In the second experiment, fifty-one female rats were ovariectomized and separated into stress and control conditions, as described for the first experiment. Stressed and handled groups received a single injection of estrogen (E; 53h prior to stress), estrogen and progesterone (EP; E given at 53h and P given 5h prior to stress), or vehicle (OVX). In both experiments BDNF protein was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent enzyme assay (ELISA) in micropunches of hippocampus. Gonadally intact females had significantly higher levels of BDNF in CA3, but significantly lower levels in DG, relative to males. In CA3, stress significantly decreased BDNF in both males and females. In DG of ovariectomized female rats, the effects of stress were significantly different following EP vs. vehicle treatment. Thus, stress increased BDNF levels in EP-treated rats but decreased BDNF levels in vehicle-treated rats. Reduced trophic support in DG in the presence of estrogen and progesterone could jeopardize neurogenesis and under certain conditions could be a contributing factor to the hippocampal atrophy associated with stress-induced affective disorders. These results emphasize the need to consider sex, gonadal steroids, and hippocampal subregion when examining the

  2. Choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus is associated with learning strategy preference in adult male rats.