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Sample records for rat incisor fluorotic

  1. Organic and inorganic content of fluorotic rat incisors measured by FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, Isabel Maria; Saiani, Regina Aparecida; Chan, K. L. Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Gerlach, Raquel Fernanda; Bachmann, Luciano

    2010-09-01

    Details on how fluoride interferes in enamel mineralization are still controversial. Therefore, this study aimed at analyzing the organic contents of fluorosis-affected teeth using Fourier Transformation Infrared spectroscopy. To this end, 10 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one received 45 ppm fluoride in distilled water for 60 days; the other received distilled water only. Then, the lower incisors were removed and prepared for analysis by two FTIR techniques namely, transmission and micro-ATR. For the first technique, the enamel was powdered, whereas in the second case one fluorotic incisor was cut longitudinally for micro-ATR. Using transmission and powdered samples, FTIR showed a higher C-H content in the fluorotic enamel compared with control enamel ( p < 0.05, n = 4 in the flurotic, and n = 5 in the control group). Results from the micro-ATR-FTIR spectroscopic analysis on one longitudinally cut incisor carried out at six points reveal a higher C-H bond content at the surface of the enamel, with values decreasing toward the dentine-enamel junction, and reaching the lowest values at the subsuperficial enamel. These results agree with the morphological data, which indicate that in the rat incisor the fluorotic lesion is superficial, rather than subsuperficial, as in the case of human enamel. The results also suggest that the increased C-H bond content may extend toward the more basal enamel (intraosseous), indicating that fluorotic enamel may intrinsically contain more protein. Finally, particularly when coupled to ATR, FTIR is a suitable tool to study the rat incisor enamel, which is a largely used model of normal and abnormal amelogenesis. Further studies along this line may definitely answer some questions regarding protein content in fluorotic enamel as well as their origin.

  2. Organic and inorganic content of fluorotic rat incisors measured by FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Porto, Isabel Maria; Saiani, Regina Aparecida; Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G; Gerlach, Raquel Fernanda; Bachmann, Luciano

    2010-09-15

    Details on how fluoride interferes in enamel mineralization are still controversial. Therefore, this study aimed at analyzing the organic contents of fluorosis-affected teeth using Fourier Transformation Infrared spectroscopy. To this end, 10 male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: one received 45 ppm fluoride in distilled water for 60 days; the other received distilled water only. Then, the lower incisors were removed and prepared for analysis by two FTIR techniques namely, transmission and micro-ATR. For the first technique, the enamel was powdered, whereas in the second case one fluorotic incisor was cut longitudinally for micro-ATR. Using transmission and powdered samples, FTIR showed a higher C-H content in the fluorotic enamel compared with control enamel (p<0.05, n=4 in the flurotic, and n=5 in the control group). Results from the micro-ATR-FTIR spectroscopic analysis on one longitudinally cut incisor carried out at six points reveal a higher C-H bond content at the surface of the enamel, with values decreasing toward the dentine-enamel junction, and reaching the lowest values at the subsuperficial enamel. These results agree with the morphological data, which indicate that in the rat incisor the fluorotic lesion is superficial, rather than subsuperficial, as in the case of human enamel. The results also suggest that the increased C-H bond content may extend toward the more basal enamel (intraosseous), indicating that fluorotic enamel may intrinsically contain more protein. Finally, particularly when coupled to ATR, FTIR is a suitable tool to study the rat incisor enamel, which is a largely used model of normal and abnormal amelogenesis. Further studies along this line may definitely answer some questions regarding protein content in fluorotic enamel as well as their origin.

  3. Comparison of rates of enamel synthesis in impeded and unimpeded rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Skobe, Z; Heeley, J D; Dobeck, J M; Prostak, K S; Maravelis, L; Stern, D N

    1993-01-01

    Periodic intubations of rats with solutions of fluoride (F) lead to the appearance of bands of disrupted pigmentation in continuously erupting incisors. Distances between fluorotic bands reflect time intervals between intubations. In this experiment, the periodicity of fluorotic banding was used for estimation of the rate of enamel synthesis in impeded and unimpeded rat incisors. Rats kept on a low-F diet and distilled water were intubated two or four times per week with 2 mg NaF/150 g body weight. In a group of rats, one of the mandibular incisors was cut at the gingival margin after two weeks, and intubations were continued for an additional two weeks. In another group of F-intubated rats, incisors were cut or notched at the gingival margin twice, six days apart. Control rats either received the same periodic F intubations or were maintained on the low-F diet without intubation. Measurements of spacing between fluorotic bands were identical in impeded and unimpeded teeth, even though the latter erupted at a faster rate. In an unimpeded mandibular incisors, there was a significant elongation of the secretory zone and a shortening of the pigmentation zone, resulting in reduced pigmentation intensity of the erupted portions of the teeth. The results show that the rate of enamel synthesis is independent of the eruption rate.

  4. Relationship between cell proliferation and eruption rate in the rat incisor.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J R; Omar, N F; Do Carmo, E R; Neves, J S; Soares, M A M; Narvaes, E A; Novaes, P D

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to further define the relationship between cell proliferation and the rate of tooth eruption in the rat incisor. Vinblastine is a drug that blocks cellular mitosis and was used to inhibit cell proliferation in the odontogenic region of rat incisors that were submitted to a shortening treatment or to higher masticatory forces. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: normofunctional (control group for incisor eruption), hypofunctional (incisor submitted to eruption acceleration), hyperfunctional (incisors under higher masticatory forces), hypofunctional with vinblastine and hyperfunctional with vinblastine. In incisors submitted to shortening procedures, a significant decrease in the eruption rate and cell proliferation was observed two days after vinblastine injection, suggesting that incisor eruption is dependent on cell proliferation.

  5. Reversed palatal perforation by upper incisors in ageing blind mole-rats (Spalax ehrenbergi)

    PubMed Central

    ZURI, I.; TERKEL, J.

    2001-01-01

    Blind mole-rats (Spalax ehrenbergi) are fossorial solitary rodents that present striking morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations to the subterranean environment in which they live. Previous studies have shown that mole-rats are specialised in tooth-digging. The rapid eruption-rate of their incisors has evolved to compensate for their excessive wear by excavation. Males use their incisors more than females for digging and fighting, and their rate of incisor eruption is significantly more rapid than in females. Since mole-rats use their incisors for digging throughout the year, we suggest that continuous mechanical pressure on their oral tissues concentrated at the apical sites of the upper incisors leads to cell and tissue fatigue. We provide evidence for 5 stages of palatal perforation by the upper incisors at their apical sites, with maximum perforation characterising aged males. Interspecies comparisons with 7 other fossorial and semi-fossorial rodent species, and with beavers, which expose their incisors to enormous mechanical pressure, revealed that this palatal perforation is unique to the male mole-rat. We suggest that while the fast eruption rate of incisors in the mole-rat compensates for the rapid wear resulting from digging, evolutionary adaptation to continuous tooth-digging is still ongoing, since the physical pressure of digging at the apical sites of the upper incisors leads to tissue destruction, breakage of the palatal bone and possibly to death, as a result of maxillary inflammation. PMID:11760890

  6. The distribution of magnesium in developing rat incisor dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfort, J.; Driessens, F.C.; Heijligers, H.J.; Beertsen, W. )

    1991-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that rat incisor dentin contains a considerable amount of magnesium that is distributed heterogeneously. The cementum-related dentin, especially its incisal portion, is richest in magnesium. It was the purpose of the present study to investigate the changes that occur in the magnesium content during dentin maturation. Cross-sections were prepared from rat incisors at the apical, middle, and incisal levels. By means of an electron microprobe, tracings were made of the Ca-, Mg-, and P- signal frequencies. Comparison of corresponding dentin layers within and between the cross-sections showed that the Mg/P molar ratio was always higher in the cementum-related dentin (CRD) than in the enamel-related dentin (ERD) and increased from the apex toward the incisal edge. Especially in the incisal cross-section, an increase in Mg/P was found from the older (peripheral) toward the younger (central) dentin layers. As the Mg/P ratio varied from 0.07 to 0.33, the Ca/P ratio was found to fluctuate from 1.48 to 1.15. The two ratios appeared to be highly correlated (r = -0.97; p less than 0.001), suggesting that Mg replaces Ca and is bound to phosphate.

  7. Simulating certain aspects of hypogravity: Effects on the mandibular incisors of suspended rats (PULEH model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Winter, F.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of a hypogravity simulating model on the rate of mandibular incisor formation, dentinogenesis and, amelogenesis in laboratory rats was studied. The model is the partial unloading by elevating the hindquarters. In this system, rat hindquarters are elevated 30 to 40 deg from the cage floors to completely unload the hindlimbs, but the animals are free to move about using their forelimbs. This model replicates the fluid sift changes which occur during the weightlessness of spaceflight and produces an osteopenia in the weight bearing skeletons. The histogenesis and/or mineralization rates of the mandibular incisor during the first 19d of PULEH in young growing rats are recorded.

  8. Growth and the modeling/remodeling of the alveolar bone of the rat incisor.

    PubMed

    Merzel, José; Salmon, Cristiane R

    2008-07-01

    The modeling and remodeling of the rat incisor alveolar bone was followed as the animals grew. The weight of the hemimandible, the length of the socket, and the width of the lower incisor were measured. Osteoclasts and resorption areas were identified by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Fluorochrome markers were used to detect and measure osteogenic activities. In the socket related to the periodontal ligament, osteoclasts appeared in scattered sites as well as isolated sites of osteogenic activity, apparently without any variation related to the age of the animals. At the socket facing the dental follicle of young rats, the inner surface was lined with osteoclasts. The number of osteoclasts decreased steadily as the rats grew. In 1-year-old rats, in addition to a few scattered osteoclasts, the internal aspect of the labial wall showed some sites lined with osteoblasts and cement lines indicative of prior bone formation. In young rats, there was a continuous osteogenic activity at the external surface of this wall. The thickness of the labial wall of the socket remained apparently constant; therefore, bone resorption must have occurred at the internal side of the wall. Such osteogenic activity was not observed in old rats. The main forces acting on rat incisors, biting and eruption, are continuous through the life of the animals. Thus, these results indicate that the modeling of the alveolar bone related to the dental follicle, in young rats, can only be associated with another force, specifically, the growth of the incisor. PMID:18461598

  9. Is electrical stimulation of the rat incisor an appropriate experimental nociceptive stimulus?

    PubMed

    Rajaona, J; Dallel, R; Woda, A

    1986-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not tooth pulp stimulation in the rat can selectively activate the pulp nerve fibers without excitation of the periodontium and to decide if the nerve fibers situated in the pulp of the rat's incisor are involved in the nociceptive reactions caused by an intrapulpal stimulation. The experiments were carried out on 20 awake and freely moving Sprague-Dawley rats. Bipolar stimulating electrodes were inserted into the pulp of the left lower incisor and in the right incisor after removal of the pulp. Special cares were taken to avoid, on the right side, direct stimulation of the stump of the apical nerve. The jaw opening reflexes were recorded from the digastric muscles ipsilaterally to the stimulated teeth and the thresholds were compared. Using the same animals, four typical and reproducible nociceptive behavioral reactions caused by a long tooth pulp stimulation were also observed (shock of 0.5 ms at 50 Hz during 1 s). The stimulus intensity was progressively increased, and the threshold of each reaction was recorded. For each of the 20 rats tested, the jaw opening reflex and the nociceptive reactions did not disappear after removal of the pulp, but the threshold of the responses to the stimulation of the nonvital tooth were significantly above the threshold of the responses to the stimulation of the vital incisor. The conclusion was tooth pulp stimulation activates the periodontal nerve fibers in the rat, and stimulation of the incisor pulp is significant in pain study in the rat because the thresholds of the jaw opening reflex and the nociceptive reactions were increased after the tooth pulp tissue was removed. PMID:3732470

  10. Electron microprobe analyses of Ca, S, Mg and P distribution in incisors of Spacelab-3 rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, G. D.; Simmons, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of Ca, S, Mg and P was mapped within the incisors of Spacelab-3 rats using an electron microprobe. The data indicate that Flight rats maintained in orbit for 7 days have significantly higher Ca/Mg ratios in dentin due to both higher Ca and lower Mg content than in dentin of ground-based Controls. There is no statistical difference in distribution of either P or S within Fligth animals and Controls, but there is clear indication that, for P at least, the reason is the greater variability of the Control data. These results are consistent with those obtained on a previous NASA/COSMOS flight of 18.5 days duration, although they are not pronounced. The results further suggest that continuously growing rat incisors provide useful records of the effects of weightlessness on Ca metabolism.

  11. Effect of single-dose amoxicillin on rat incisor odontogenesis: a morphological study.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Kaido; Sawada, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Takaaki; Shintani, Seikou

    2012-06-01

    The effect of exposure to amoxicillin on tooth development remains to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of amoxicillin on rat incisor odontogenesis. Male Wistar rats weighing approximately 100 g were given a single intraperitoneal injection of 3.0 g/kg body weight amoxicillin. One week after injection, the rats were fixed, and the lower incisors were demineralized and prepared into paraffin sections for light microscopy (LM) and immunohistochemistry. Undemineralized samples were embedded in resin and ground for processing for contact microradiography (CMR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Serum calcium, phosphate, and magnesium concentrations were measured. At 1 week after amoxicillin administration, LM, CMR, and SEM revealed a clear increase in the area of interglobular dentin, representing disruption of mineralization by odontoblasts. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated moderate levels of the small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoprotein family dentin matrix protein 1 in large areas of interglobular dentin. On the other hand, no morphological alteration or hypomineralization was observed in the enamel. Serum calcium values showed no significant differences between the control and experimental rats during the experimental period although both serum phosphate and magnesium levels increased at day 1 after amoxicillin injection. The results suggest that a single dose of amoxicillin specifically affects normal tooth dentin mineralization, but not enamel mineralization in rat incisor odontogenesis. The present results further our understanding of the clinical association between dentin abnormality and amoxicillin exposure during tooth development.

  12. C-fos expression in rat brain nuclei following incisor tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Magdalena, C M; Navarro, V P; Park, D M; Stuani, M B S; Rocha, M J A

    2004-01-01

    In the rat experimental model, molar tooth movement induced by Waldo's method is known to cause a temporally and spatially defined pattern of brain neuronal activation. Since orthodontic correction usually involves the entire dental arch, we used a spring-activated appliance to extend the investigation to incisors, and we included brain regions related to antinociception. Adjustment of the non-activated appliance on incisors resulted in c-fos expression in the dorsal raphe, peri-aqueductal gray matter, and the locus coeruleus, in addition to trigeminal sensory subnuclei and the parabrachial nucleus, where neuronal activation has already been detected in previous studies on molar tooth movement. Appliance activation with a 70-g force resulted in a further increase in Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the trigeminal sensory subnucleus caudalis and in the dorsal raphe. This result suggests that there is a recruitment of neurons related to nociception and to antinociception when tooth movement is increased.

  13. Impact of gamma radiation on the eruption rate of rat incisors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; El-Haddad, Khaled; Ali, Mohamed; Talaat, Mona

    2015-09-01

    The present work aims to test the effect of gamma radiation on the rate of eruption of rat incisors. One hundred and five adult male albino rats were used and irradiated at different gamma doses. The effects of irradiation were investigated by numerical measurements of eruption rate, histological investigation using light microscope and spectral analysis using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). No detectable changes were observed in the groups with smaller radiation doses. There was a significant decrease in the eruption rate starting from the 4 Gy radiation dose. The observation of histological sections revealed disturbance in cellular elements responsible for eruption as well as periodontal disturbance in the samples irradiated with 4 and 6 Gy. FTIR Spectroscopy of control group and the group irradiated by 0.5 Gy showed similar absorption bands with minor differences. However, samples irradiated by 1 Gy showed significant changes in both molecular structure and conformation related to carbonates and hydroxyl groups. From the previous results, it could be concluded that gamma irradiation negatively affects the eruption rate of the rat incisors especially with higher doses.

  14. The effects of spaceflight on the mineralization of rat incisor dentin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Rosenberg, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Specific effects of space flight on dentin formation on the lower incisors of male rats were determined. Data were Fourier analyzed to determine the spectra of chemical growth rhythms. It was found that Calcium and P were more concentrated in the newly forming dentin of the Flight rats than in comparable regions of control tissues. There was no significant difference in the mean S-concentration between the two groups, but the pattern of S-distribution in the recently formed dentin from the Flight rats was different from that in the control group. Sulfur fluctuations in flight animals periodically peak above the irregular background fluctuations, but there are no comparable sulfur peaks across the dentin in the control. It is indicated that spaceflight has measurable effects on dentinogenesis, and may also bear on the problem of the regulatory role of proteoglycans in mineralization and the maturation of mineral and matrix moieties in skeletal tissue.

  15. A compilation of partial sequences of randomly selected cDNA clones from the rat incisor.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Y; Nakashima, M; Amizuka, N; Warshawsky, H; Goltzman, D; Yamada, K M; Yamada, Y

    1995-01-01

    The formation of tooth organs is regulated by a series of developmental programs. We have initiated a genome project with the ultimate goal of identifying novel genes important for tooth development. As an initial approach, we constructed a unidirectional cDNA library from the non-calcified portion of incisors of 3- to 4-week-old rats, sequenced cDNA clones, and classified their sequences by homology search through the GenBank data base and the PIR protein data base. Here, we report partial DNA sequences obtained by automated DNA sequencing on 400 cDNA clones randomly selected from the library. Of the sequences determined, 51% represented sequences of new genes that were not related to any previously reported gene. Twenty-six percent of the clones strongly matched genes and proteins in the data bases, including amelogenin, alpha 1(I) and alpha 2(I) collagen chains, osteonectin, and decorin. Nine percent of clones revealed partial sequence homology to known genes such as transcription factors and cell surface receptors. A significant number of the previously identified genes were expressed redundantly and were found to encode extracellular matrix proteins. Identification and cataloging of cDNA clones in these tissues are the first step toward identification of markers expressed in a tissue- or stage-specific manner, as well as the genetic linkage study of tooth anomalies. Further characterization of the clones described in this paper should lead to the discovery of novel genes important for tooth development. PMID:7876422

  16. [Appositional rate of incisor dentin and hematic calcium level in rats. Application of time marking method using lead acetate].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, S

    1990-12-01

    Matsumoto et al. have reported that the remineralization of rat incisor dentin following administration of various drugs depends upon the hematic calcium (hCa) level in parathyroidectomized (PTX) rats. It is known that injected lead according to a time marking method deposits at the mineralizing front in hard tissues. In the present study, we observed the alteration of the mineralizing front of the incisor dentin and examined the dependency of the dentin remineralization on the hCa level in PTX rats given 1,25 (OH)2D3. Male Wistar rats (7-8 weeks old) were used. They were fed a synthetic diet containing 0.3% Ca or 0.02% Ca (Ca-deficient) from 3 days before PTX. In order to mark the time in the incisor dentin, lead acetate was injected at 3 day intervals. Exp. I: A group of rats fed a diet containing 0.3% Ca was given a single injection (400 ng/kg) of 1,25 (OH)2D3 on the 9th day after PTX. Exp. II: four groups of rats were given daily injections of various doses (vehicle, 25, 50 and 100 ng/kg) of 1,25 (OH)2D3 from the 11th day after PTX for 13 days. The distance between the two lead-lines observed in the histological sections of the incisor was measured as an indicator of the appositional rate of dentin. In rats given a diet containing Ca below 0.3%, the hCa level was about 5 mg/dl after PTX. Mineralization of the incisor dentin was suppressed markedly, and a hematoxylin unstained zone was observed in the histological sections, indicating that the mineralizing front had been stagnant. In Exp I, a high dosage of 1,25 (OH)2D3 raised the hCa level to over 8 mg/dl within 12 hours; formation of a new mineralizing front and remineralization of the dentin were observed. In Exp. II, daily injections of 1.25 (OH)2D3 raised the hCa levels gradually and dose dependently. The hCa levels in groups of rats given 50 and 100 ng/kg of 1,25 (OH)2D3 were over 8 and 10 mg/dl respectively after the 6th day from the beginning of the drug administrations. The distance between the two lead

  17. Peptide Characterization of Mature Fluorotic and Control Human Enamel.

    PubMed

    Lelis, Isabel Maria Porto; Molina, Gabriela F; Souza, Cláudia; Perez, Walter B; Laure, Helen J; Rosa, José C; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high fluoride levels during amelogenesis causes enamel fluorosis. This study aimed to determine and compare the amino acid sequences in the enamel of fluorotic and control teeth. This investigation included enamel samples obtained from erupted and non-erupted third molars with either TF grade 4-6 (n=7) fluorosis or no sign of fluorosis (controls, n=7). The samples were kept frozen at -20 °C until protein extraction. Samples were etched and processed with a cocktail of proteinase inhibitors and immediately analyzed. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) followed by MASCOT search aided the peptides analysis. The more abundant peptides bore the N-terminal amelogenin sequences WYQSIRPPYP (which is specific for the X-encoded amelogenin) and MPLPPHPGHPGYINF (which does not show sexual dimorphism) were not different in control or fluorotic enamel. There was no missing proteolytic cleavage in the fluorotic samples, which suggested that the increased amount of protein described in fluorotic enamel did not stem from the decreased ability of proteinases to cleave the proteins in humans. This study showed how to successfully obtain peptide from superficial enamel. A relatively low number of teeth was sufficient to provide good data on the actual peptides found in mature enamel. PMID:27007349

  18. Peptide Characterization of Mature Fluorotic and Control Human Enamel.

    PubMed

    Lelis, Isabel Maria Porto; Molina, Gabriela F; Souza, Cláudia; Perez, Walter B; Laure, Helen J; Rosa, José C; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high fluoride levels during amelogenesis causes enamel fluorosis. This study aimed to determine and compare the amino acid sequences in the enamel of fluorotic and control teeth. This investigation included enamel samples obtained from erupted and non-erupted third molars with either TF grade 4-6 (n=7) fluorosis or no sign of fluorosis (controls, n=7). The samples were kept frozen at -20 °C until protein extraction. Samples were etched and processed with a cocktail of proteinase inhibitors and immediately analyzed. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) followed by MASCOT search aided the peptides analysis. The more abundant peptides bore the N-terminal amelogenin sequences WYQSIRPPYP (which is specific for the X-encoded amelogenin) and MPLPPHPGHPGYINF (which does not show sexual dimorphism) were not different in control or fluorotic enamel. There was no missing proteolytic cleavage in the fluorotic samples, which suggested that the increased amount of protein described in fluorotic enamel did not stem from the decreased ability of proteinases to cleave the proteins in humans. This study showed how to successfully obtain peptide from superficial enamel. A relatively low number of teeth was sufficient to provide good data on the actual peptides found in mature enamel.

  19. Effects of chronic fluoride exposure on morphometric parameters defining the stages of amelogenesis and ameloblast modulation in rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Smith, C E; Nanci, A; Denbesten, P K

    1993-10-01

    The response of ameloblasts to long-term (6 weeks) exposure to 100 ppm fluoride was examined in continuously erupting mandibular incisors of female Sprague-Dawley rats as compared to control rats receiving a similar diet (Teklad L-356) but no sodium fluoride in their drinking water. After treatment, animals from both groups were perfused intravascularly with glutaraldehyde, and the incisors were removed and processed for light microscope morphometric analyses directly from 1 microns thick Epon sections. Other animals were injected intravenously with calcein (green fluorescence) followed 4 hours later by xylenol orange (red fluorescence) in order to reveal smooth-ended ameloblast modulation bands and thereby allow quantification of parameters related to the creation and movement of modulation waves within the maturation zone of these teeth. The results indicated that rat incisors expressed four major changes in normal amelogenesis which could be attributed to the chronic fluoride treatment. First, ameloblasts produced a thinner than normal enamel layer by the time they completed the secretory stage and entered the maturation stage of amelogenesis. Second, enamel organ cells within the maturation zone, especially those from the papillary layer, were shorter in height than normal. Third, ameloblasts related to maturing enamel in areas where it was partially soluble and/or fully soluble in EDTA modulated at a rate that was much slower than normal. In some locations ameloblasts remained ruffle-ended for as much as 30% longer than normal per cycle. This upset the usual pattern such that fewer total modulation cycles were completed per unit time by these ameloblasts. Fourth, enamel proteins were lost from the maturing enamel layer at a rate that was about 40% slower than normal. The data suggested that ameloblasts detected the delay in the extracellular breakdown and/or loss of enamel proteins and they responded by remaining ruffle-ended for longer intervals than usual

  20. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses of the chronology of healing process after immediate tooth replantation in incisor rat teeth.

    PubMed

    Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Okamoto, Roberta; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Pedrini, Denise; da Silva, Paula Ervolino; Saito, Celia Tomiko Matida Hamata; Marão, Heloísa Fonseca; Sedlacek, Paulo

    2013-02-01

    Dental tissues have special characteristics, and its regenerative capacity is noteworthy. However, understanding the circumstances that lead to regeneration is challenging. In this study, the chronology of the healing process after immediate replantation of rat incisor teeth was examined by histological and immunohistochemical analyses within a 60-day period. Thirty-six male Wistar rats had their maxillary right incisors extracted and replanted after 15 min in saline storage. The rats were sacrificed immediately 3, 7, 15, 28, and 60 days after replantation. The histological analysis showed rupture of the periodontal ligament and formation of a blood clot, which started being replaced by a connective tissue after 3 days. At 7 days, the gingival mucosa epithelium was reinserted and areas of root resorption could be seen. At 15 days, the periodontal ligament was repaired. At 3 days, the pulp presented an absence of the odontoblast layer, which started being replaced by a connective tissue. This tissue suffered gradual calcification, filling the root canal at 28 and 60 days. The root ends were closed. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed greater expression of OP, OPG, and RANK proteins in the initial periods (0 and 3 days), while TRAP expression predominated at 28 and 60 days (P < 0.05). In conclusion, in delayed tooth replantation, there is great new bone formation activity in the earlier periods of the repair process, while a predominance of bone resorption and remodeling is observed in the more advanced periods.

  1. Depressed eruption rate of the rat maxillary incisor in a drug-induced uncompensated hemolytic state model

    SciTech Connect

    Giglio, M.J.; Sanz, A.M.; Bozzini, C.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Female rats weighing about 180 g were separated into two groups. One group (A) received phenylhydrazine (PHZ) every other day during three weeks (for induction of an uncompensated hemolytic state), while the control group (C) received saline. The evidence for the establishment of the uncompensated hemolytic state was obtained by hematocrit value, reticulocyte count, and red-cell-volume-59Fe uptake. Body-weight gain (which is a measure of overall body growth rate), body-length gain (which is a measure of longitudinal skeletal growth rate), food intake, and maxillary incisor eruption rate (ER) were significantly depressed in rats of group A during the PHZ-injection period, in relation to rats of group C. These results indicate that anemia and/or associated factors depress ER, along with body growth and skeletal growth.

  2. Micro-CT evaluation of the radioprotective effect of resveratrol on the mandibular incisors of irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Gabriella Lopes de Rezende; Pimenta, Luiz André; Almeida, Solange Maria de

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a microcomputed tomographic evaluation of the radioprotective effect of resveratrol on the volume of mandibular incisors of irradiated rats. A second aim was to make a quantitative assessment of the effect of x-ray exposure on these dental tissues. Twenty adult male rats were divided into four groups: control, irradiated control, resveratrol, and irradiated resveratrol. The resveratrol groups received 100 mg/kg of resveratrol, whereas the irradiated groups were exposed to 15 Gy of irradiation. The animals were sacrificed 30 days after the irradiation procedure, and their mandibles were removed and scanned in a microcomputed tomography unit. The images were loaded into Mimics software to allow segmentation of the mandibular incisor and assessment of its volume. The results were compared by One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test, considering a 5% significance level. The irradiated groups showed significantly diminished volumes of the evaluated teeth, as compared with the control group (p < 0.05). The resveratrol group presented higher values than those of the irradiated groups, and volumes similar to those of the control group. High radiation doses significantly affected tooth formation, resulting in alterations in the dental structure, and thus lower volumes. Moreover, resveratrol showed no effective radioprotective impact on dental tissues. Future studies are needed to evaluate different concentrations of this substance, in an endeavor to verify its potential as a radioprotector for these dental tissues. PMID:26981750

  3. [Effects of strontium on incisor and femurs in rats under drinking condition at constant concentrations of fluoride].

    PubMed

    Hirata, Y

    1990-09-01

    Thirty 28-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 experimental groups of 6 animals, and fed low-fluoride diet (0.07 ppm F) and drinking water containing fluoride at constant concentration (20 ppm F) ad libitum for 49 days in combination with strontium chloride added to provide 0, 5, 10, 20, 40 ppm Sr. Enamel mottling was observed through over-all experimental period, and at an end of the experiment, all animals were sacrificed. There was no significant difference in weight gain among groups. Enamel mottling of mandibular incisors in Sr groups appeared at 7th day (cumulated fluoride ingested: under 3.0mg), while mottling in control group (0 ppm Sr and 20 ppm F) appeared at 14th day (cumulated fluoride ingested: ca. 6.6 mg). However, severity of mottling was higher in low-strontium group (5 and 10 ppm Sr) than in high-strontium groups (20 and 40 ppm Sr). Data of contents of Sr, F, Ca and P in incisors and femurs obtained through chemical analysis suggested that an exchange of Sr and Ca would take place in apatite and that the exchange reaction of F- and OH- could be urged by Sr. Further, data of serum F level demonstrated that the fluoride retention in serum could be urged by lower level of strontium rather than higher one.

  4. The effect of partial damage to the enamel-related periodontium combined with root resection on eruption of the rat incisor eruption.

    PubMed

    Merzel, José; Nunes, Silvana F; Novaes, Pedro D

    2004-03-01

    Previous work has indicated that the enamel-related periodontium (ERP) has a role in the eruptive process of the rat lower incisor. By combining partial damage of this tissue with resection of the odontogenic organ, we examined the effect of the damage on subsequent incisor eruption. The connective tissue of the enamel-related periodontium was regenerated in less than 2 weeks, showing morphology close to normal. The injured part of the enamel organ was neither regenerated nor repaired, and a cement-like tissue, continuous with the true acellular cement, was formed on the denuded enamel. Before tooth exfoliation, the operated teeth erupted at a slower rate compared with root-resected and sham-operated incisors, probably because of the absence of a substantial part of the enamel organ due to surgical damage. As with the coronal dental follicle and the enamel organ in rat molars, the enamel-related periodontium and the enamel organ of rat incisors may have some control on their eruptive process. PMID:14725812

  5. Increase of MT1-MMP, TIMP-2 and Ki-67 proteins in the odontogenic region of the rat incisor post-shortening procedure.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jose Rosa; Omar, Nádia Fayez; Dos Santos Neves, Juliana; Narvaes, Eliene Aparecida Orsini; Novaes, Pedro Duarte

    2010-12-01

    MT1-MMP and TIMP-2 are well known for their roles in remodelling of extracellular matrix components. However, reports are emerging on the involvement of these molecules in cell kinetics. In the rat incisor tooth, a shortening treatment increases the eruption and cell proliferation rates. However, the role of MT1-MMP and TIMP-2 proteins in these processes is still to be evaluated. Male Wistar rats were divided in two groups. In the normofunctional group (NF) the lower teeth of the rats remained in a normal eruption process. In the hypofunctional group (HP) rats their lower left incisor tooth was shortened every 2 days during 12 days. The eruption rate was estimated during the shortening period and MT1-MMP, TIMP-2 and Ki-67 protein expression from the odontogenic region was measured after the treatment. In HP groups an increase in eruption rate, and in MT1-MMP/TIMP-2 and Ki-67 expression were observed. We conclude that there is a relationship between the increase in eruption rate, and in levels of MT1-MMP, TIMP-2 and Ki-67 in the HP group. This suggests that MT1-MMP and TIMP-2 may have some role in cell proliferation during the eruption of the rat incisor tooth.

  6. Immunolocalization and activity of the MMP-9 and MMP-2 in odontogenic region of the rat incisor tooth after post shortening procedure.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Jose Rosa; Omar, Nádia Fayez; dos Santos Neves, Juliana; Narvaes, Eliene Aparecida Orsini; Novaes, Pedro Duarte

    2011-04-01

    MMP-9 and MMP-2 are metalloproteinases which degrade the denatured collagen fibers. However, there is no report about roles of these MMPs in the odontogenic region of the adult rat incisor tooth under different eruption conditions. Male Wistar rats were divided in a normofunctional group (NF) in which their lower teeth remained in a normal eruption. In a hypofunctional group (HP) rats underwent shortening of their lower left incisor tooth every 2 days during 12 days. The eruption rate as well as the expression and activities of MMP-9 and MMP-2 were evaluated using imunohistochemistry and zymography. Although the shortening increased the eruption rate, no changes in the MMP-9 and MMP-2 were observed. We conclude that in adult rats, in opposite to development of tooth, the MMP-9 and MMP-2 present in the odontogenic region does not seem to play a direct role in the remodeling matrix, even after post-shortening procedures which to lead an acceleration of the eruption process in the incisor.

  7. Distribution of non-collagenous dentin matrix proteins and proteoglycans, and their relation to calcium accumulation in bisphosphonate-affected rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Ohma, N; Takagi, Y; Takano, Y

    2000-06-01

    It has been reported that multiple injections of 1-hydroxyethylidene- 1,1-bisphosphonate (HEBP) to rats prevent mineralization of incisor dentin, thereby revealing high concentrations of calcium in the non-mineralized matrix of circumpulpal dentin. To identify the molecules responsible for calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin matrix, rats were injected daily with HEBP (8 mg P/kg) for 7 d, and the incisors processed for various histochemical and immunohistochemical staining of non-collagenous matrices of dentin. Cuprolinic blue reactions for proteoglycans (PGs) were equally distributed in non-mineralized matrix of mantle and circumpulpal dentin layers. Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and osteopontin (OPN) immunoreactions were found in non-mineralized circumpulpal dentin matrix, but not in mantle dentin. In normal incisors, however, predentin matrix showing significant DSP immunoreactivity was negative for Ca-GBHA reactions. HEBP-affected, non-mineralized OPN immunopositive bone matrix was also non-reactive for calcium. From these observations, neither PGs, OPN nor DSP appear to be responsible for calcium accumulation in HEBP-affected circumpulpal dentin. Stains-all reactive component, possibly dentin phosphoprotein (DPP), only showed the same distribution as that of Ca-GBHA in both HEBP-affected and normal dentin matrix, implicating a possible contribution of DPP to calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin and, hence, to appositional mineralization of dentin. PMID:10872993

  8. Immediate replantation of maxillary incisors in rats: effects of tooth immersion in sodium fluoride and subsequent removal of the periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T; Niccoli-Filho, W; Sonoda, C K; Martins, A P; de Souza, R

    1999-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of maintaining the periodontal ligament (PDL) in immediate replantation as well as chemical treatment of the root surface have been a matter of discussion because the vitality of such tissue in surgery is always questioned. This study evaluated the effects of conserving the tooth in sodium fluoride and the removal of the PDL before replantation of incisors in rats. There was more cementum-dentin resorption in the group with the PDL. The group without the PDL showed more discreet resorption, repair occurred through the newly formed bone tissue in the PDL space and ankylosis was more extensive than in the group with the PDL.

  9. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction characterization of healthy and fluorotic human dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaço, M. V.; Barroso, R. C.; Porto, I. M.; Gerlach, R. F.; Costa, F. N.; Braz, D.; Droppa, R.; de Sousa, F. B.

    2012-10-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basic physical-chemistry reactions of demineralization and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction. All the scattering profile measurements were carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory—LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. X-ray diffraction experiments were performed both in powder samples and polished surfaces. The powder samples were analyzed to obtain the characterization of a typical healthy enamel pattern. The polished surfaces were analyzed in specific areas that have been identified as fluorotic ones. X-ray diffraction data were obtained for all samples and these data were compared with the control samples and also with the literature data.

  10. Transient expression of heat shock protein (Hsp)25 in the dental pulp and enamel organ during odontogenesis in the rat incisor.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, H; Ajima, H; Kawano, Y; Nozawa-Inoue, K; Wakisaka, S; Maeda, T

    2000-10-01

    The expression of heat shock protein (Hsp) 25 during odontogenesis in the dental pulp and enamel organ of rat incisors was investigated by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. In the process of dentin formation, immature odontoblasts first exhibited Hsp 25-immunoreactivity, and increased in immunointensity with the advance of their differentiation. In the dental pulp, in contrast, intense immunoreaction in the mesenchymal cells became weak or negative in parallel with the progress of cell differentiation. The immunoreaction for Hsp 25 in the enamel organ revealed a characteristic stage-related alteration during amelogenesis. In secretory ameloblasts, the immunoreaction for Hsp 25 was found throughout their cell bodies, intense reactivity being located near the proximal and distal terminal webs. At the maturation stage, ruffle-ended ameloblasts (RA) consistently showed Hsp 25-immunoreactivity throughout the cell bodies, whereas smooth-ended ameloblasts (SA) lacking a ruffled border were weak in immunoreaction at the distal cytoplasm. Other cellular elements of the enamel organ were negative. The subcellular localization of Hsp 25-immunoreactivity in this study appeared essentially identical to that of actin filaments as demonstrated by confocal microscopy using rhodamine-labeled phalloidin. These immunocytochemical data suggest that the Hsp 25 molecule is involved in reinforcement of the cell layer following cell movement during odontogenesis and in the formation and maintenance of the ruffled border of RA.

  11. Radioautography of rat incisor dentin as a continuous record of the incorporation of a single dose of /sup 3/H-labeled proline and tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Josephsen, K.; Warshawsky, H.

    1982-05-01

    After injection of labeled precursors such as /sup 3/H-proline or /sup 3/H-tyrosine into rats, the incisor dentin contains a continuous and stable record of precursor incorporation into labeled proteins. This record was visualized and quantitated with radioautography in order to evaluate the quantitative changes in enamel where newly secreted proteins randomize with older proteins and both are eventually lost. Up to 4 hours after injection, the pulse-dose was incorporated as a highly labeled band of predentin. The band was entirely within calcified dentin at 2 days and was further removed from new predentin by 4 and 8 days. Dentin which formed proximal to the heavily labeled band contained an amount of radioactivity reflecting the level of labeled precursor available at that time. A standardizing factor for experimental error was obtained by quantitating the reaction in the heavily labeled band, and a post-pulse incorporation factor was determined from the amount of radioactivity added per day as weakly labeled dentin. The variation within the heavily labeled band was assumed to reflect experimental error. The number of grains in the bands were averaged from 4 hours to 8 days to give the standardizing factor. This was multiplied by the ratio of enamel to dentin counts in the same section to obtain a corrected enamel count. With proline it amounted to 5% increase per day from 1 to 4 days and 2.5% per day from 4 to 8 days after injection. In addition, with /sup 3/H-proline the incorporation into predentin increased from 30 minutes to 4 hours. With tyrosine, the counts increased from 30 minutes to 1 hour, but decreased by nearly one third from 1 to 4 hours. This was interpreted as a loss of short-lived matrix proteins including procollagen peptides produced during conversion from procollagen to tropocollagen in the predentin.

  12. Fluctuations in surface pH of maturing rat incisor enamel are a result of cycles of H(+)-secretion by ameloblasts and variations in enamel buffer characteristics.

    PubMed

    Damkier, Helle H; Josephsen, Kaj; Takano, Yoshiro; Zahn, Dirk; Fejerskov, Ole; Frische, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    It is disputed if ameloblasts in the maturation zone of the enamel organ mainly buffer protons released by hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal growth or if they periodically secrete protons to create alternating acidic and alkaline conditions. The latter hypothesis predicts alternating pH regimes in maturing enamel, which would be affected by pharmacological interference with ameloblast H(+)-secretion. This study tests these predictions. Colorimetric pH-indicators and ratiometric fluorometry were used to measure surface pH in maturation zone enamel of rat incisors. Alternating acidic (down to pH6.24±0.06) and alkaline zones (up to pH7.34±0.08) were found along the tooth coinciding with ameloblast morphological cycles. Underlying the cyclic pattern, a gradual decrease in pH towards the incisal edge was seen. Vinblastine or FR167356 (H(+)-ATPase-inhibitor) disturbed ameloblast acid-secretion, especially in the early parts of acidic zones. Enamel surface pH reflects the titration state of surface PO4(3-)-ions. At the pH-values observed, PO4(3-) would be protonated (pKa>12) and HA dissolved. However, by molecular dynamics simulations we estimate the pKa of HPO4(2-) at an ideal HA surface to be 4.3. The acidic pH measured at the enamel surface may thus only dissolve non-perfect domains of HA crystals in which PO4(3-) is less electrostatically shielded. During repeated alkaline/acidic cycles, near-perfect HA-domains may therefore gradually replace less perfect HA-domains resulting in near-perfect HA-crystals. In conclusion, cyclic changes in ameloblast H(+)-secretion and the degree of enamel maturation determine enamel surface pH. This is in accordance with a hypothesis implicating H(+)-ATPase mediated acid-secretion by ameloblasts.

  13. Tensile strength of orthodontic brackets bonded directly to fluorotic and nonfluorotic teeth: an in vitro comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ng'ang'a, P M; Ogaard, B; Cruz, R; Chindia, M L; Aasrum, E

    1992-09-01

    Information related to bonding of orthodontic brackets to fluorotic teeth is scanty. The purpose of this study was to compare, in vitro, the tensile bond strength and the bond failure site of brackets bonded directly to fluorotic and nonfluorotic teeth. The etching patterns were also evaluated. The study involved 26 teeth classified as score 3 and 4, and 26 as score 0 with the Thylstrup and Fejerskov's (TF) fluorosis index. In addition to the clinical classification, difference in the concentration of fluoride in the teeth was verified by acid etching. Brackets were bonded with a composite resin after etching the enamel surface with 40% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds. Tensile bond strength was determined with an Instron testing machine. The bond failure site was assessed by the percentage of residue cement on the tooth surface after debonding and the etching pattern by SEM. The mean concentration of fluoride was 2888.5 ppm (SD 1081.7) in the fluorotic teeth and 1227.1 ppm (SD 526.3) in the nonfluorotic teeth. The mean bond strength was 7.8 N/mm2 (SD 1.47) for the fluorotic teeth and 8.6 N/mm2 (SD 2.19) for the nonfluorotic teeth. The difference between the means for bond strength was not statistically significant (p greater than 0.05). Bond failure site was primarily at the bracket-adhesive interface. The mean percentage of adhesive on the enamel surface after debonding was 70% (SD 25.90) for the fluorotic teeth and 75% (SD 24.66) for nonfluorotic teeth. The difference in the means was not statistically significant (p greater than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Molar incisor hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Karine; Correia, Adriana de Sales Cunha; Cunha, Robson Frederico

    2009-01-01

    Enamel defects are common alterations that can occur in both the primary or permanent dentition. A range of etiological factors related to this pathology can be found in the literature. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is a kind of enamel defect alteration that requires complex treatment solutions, and for this reason, it is of great clinical interest for dental practice. This article describes the management of a clinical case of MIH in a 7-year-old child. The different treatment options depending on the extension of the defect, the degree of tooth eruption and the hygiene and diet habits of the patient are also discussed.

  15. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Rao, Murali H; Aluru, Srikanth C; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Bandlapalli, Anila; Patel, Nikunj

    2016-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect affecting teeth. High prevalence rates of MIH and its clinical implications are significant for both the patients and clinicians. A wide variation in defect prevalence (2.4-40.2%) is reported. It seems to differ with regions and various birth cohorts. Some of the recent prevalence studies are tabulated. Patient implications include hypersensitive teeth, rapid progression of caries, mastication impairment due to rapid attrition, and esthetic repercussions. Implications for clinicians include complexity in treatment planning and treatment implementation, poor prognosis of the restorations, difficulty in achieving pain control during treatment, and behavior management problems. Intention of this paper is to review the etio-pathogenesis, prevalence, clinical features, diagnostic features, and eventually present a sequential treatment approach, i.e., in accordance with current clinical practice guidelines. PMID:27595731

  16. Esthetic restoration of primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Carranza, F; García-Godoy, F

    1999-04-01

    A simple and esthetic technique for restoring cariously involved primary maxillary incisors is described. The technique includes mini-pins, a preformed celluloid crown and resin-based composite. PMID:10477982

  17. Effect of Moringa oleifera on hematological parameters of calves reared in industrial fluorotic area

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Kruti Debnath; Das, M. R.; Pati, M.; Pati, P. D.; Gupta, A. R.; Patra, R. C.; Senapati, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the ameliorative potential of dried Moringa oleifera fruit powder in fluorosis affected calves reared around the vicinity of aluminium smelter plant. Materials and Methods: Total 107 calves were screened on the basis of clinical signs and higher plasma fluoride (more than 0.2 ppm) level for evidence of fluorosis. Out of that, 90 samples found positive and from them 18 calves of 6-12 months age group were selected and divided equally into three groups named as Group II, III, and IV. Group II remained as disease control group whereas Group III calves were supplemented with dried M. oleifera fruit powder of 25 g/calve for 60 days. Group IV calves were supplemented with calcium carbonate at 100 mg/kg body weight and boric acid at 10 mg/kg for the same experimental period. Group I consisted of six numbers of healthy calves taken from the non-fluorotic zone, i.e. Bhubaneswar. Plasma fluoride level, hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV), total leukocyte count (TLC), differential count (DC), total erythrocyte count, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular Hb (MCH), and MCH concentration (MCHC) were estimated on day 0, 30, and 60 of the experiment. Results: Supplementation of dried M. oleifera fruit powder to fluorosis affected calves resulted in significant reduction in plasma fluoride level and increase in Hb%, PCV, TLC and altered DC. Similar results were also recorded in calcium+boron group, except PCV and Hb. No significant changes were observed in MCV, MCH, and MCHC values. Conclusion: The present study concluded that supplementation of dried M. oleifera fruit powder daily for 60 days has shown protection against chronic fluoride toxicity in calves. PMID:27047044

  18. Mandibular incisor extraction treatment in Angle's Class I malocclusion with peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisors

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ankit H; Shah, Darshit H

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning are essential for obtaining ideal treatment result in cases involving mandibular incisor extraction. This case report describes a 15-year-old female with balanced soft-tissue profile, peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisors, and moderate mandibular anterior crowding treated with a mandibular incisor extraction. Ideal overbite and overjet were achieved. “Black triangle” formation was avoided due to the bodily movement of mandibular incisors and the use of uprighting springs for ideal axial inclination of mandibular incisors. A mandibular incisor extraction can be an effective treatment option in carefully selected clinical situations. PMID:27556022

  19. [Incisor repositioning: a new approach in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Dallel, Ines; Khemiri, Mourad; Fathallah, Safa; Ben Rejeb, Salwa; Tobji, Samir; Ben Amor, Adel

    2015-12-01

    Lower incisors axis has a "key" position in different cephalometric analysis. However, several critics are directed towards the cephalometric profile and cephalometric landmarks (point, line and angle). The published norms and the cephalometric standards recommended for the optimal positioning of incisors could only be used as general clinical guidelines. Incisor repositioning to achieve optimal facial aesthetics requires taking into consideration the hard and soft tissues of the face, the profile, the muscular dynamics as well as the facial growth. In this work, we propose a new approach of incisor repositioning taking into account the variability of periodontal, functional and aesthetic factors.

  20. Asporin and the mineralization process in fluoride-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Houari, Sophia; Wurtz, Tilmann; Ferbus, Didier; Chateau, Danielle; Dessombz, Arnaud; Berdal, Ariane; Babajko, Sylvie

    2014-06-01

    Microarray analysis of odontoblastic cells treated with sodium fluoride has identified the asporin gene as a fluoride target. Asporin is a member of the small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan/protein (SLRP) family that is believed to be important in the mineralization process. In this study, asporin expression and distribution were investigated by systematic analysis of dentin and enamel, with and without fluoride treatment. Specific attention was focused on a major difference between the two mineralized tissues: the presence of a collagenous scaffold in dentin, and its absence in enamel. Normal and fluorotic, continually growing incisors from Wistar rats treated with 2.5 to 7.5 mM sodium fluoride (NaF) were studied by immunochemistry, in situ hybridization, Western blotting, and RT-qPCR. Asporin was continuously expressed in odontoblasts throughout dentin formation as expected. Asporin was also found, for the first time, in dental epithelial cells, particularly in maturation-stage ameloblasts. NaF decreased asporin expression in odontoblasts and enhanced it in ameloblasts, both in vivo and in vitro. The inverse response in the two cell types suggests that the effector, fluoride, is a trigger that elicits a cell-type-specific reaction. Confocal and ultrastructural immunohistochemistry evidenced an association between asporin and type 1 collagen in the pericellular nonmineralized compartments of both bone and dentin. In addition, transmission electron microscopy revealed asporin in the microenvironment of all cells observed. Thus, asporin is produced by collagen-matrix-forming and non-collagen-matrix-forming cells but may have different effects on the mineralization process. A model is proposed that predicts impaired mineral formation associated with the deficiency and excess of asporin.

  1. Velocardiofacial syndrome with single central incisor.

    PubMed

    Oberoi, Snehlata; Vargervik, Karin

    2005-01-15

    Three siblings and their mother are reported who all had cytogenetically proven velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS). One boy had normal dental and craniofacial findings, except for an increased cranial base angle. His sister had only one central incisor in the maxilla. One central incisor had also been missing in the primary dentition. She had no labial frenulum present. Cephalometry showed a small maxillary unit length indicating mild maxillary hypoplasia, an increased anterior face height, steep mandibular plane angle, retruded chin, and a large cranial base angle. Dental measurements showed retroclined lower incisors and increased interincisal angle. A second sister had a cleft of the secondary palate. All permanent teeth were present with the exception of a missing central incisor in the lower jaw: the single lower central incisor was situated in the midline. Her cephalometry showed similar findings as in her sister. All three siblings required palate surgery for speech. Mother was not available for detailed dental and other oral investigations. A single maxillary central incisor has previously been reported in VCFS, but to our knowledge a single central incisor in the mandible has not been reported previously in this entity.

  2. Macrodontic maxillary incisor in alagille syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cozzani, Mauro; Fontana, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the surgical-orthodontic guided-eruption of a deeply impacted macrodontic maxillary central incisor in a 10-year-old patient with Alagille syndrome (ALGS). In the first stage, orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance on deciduous teeth allowed to create enough space for the eruption of the maxillary right central incisor. The second stage included closed surgical exposure and vertical traction. After impacted tooth erupted in the proper position, accessory periodontal treatment and dental reshaping procedures may be indicated to camouflage macrodontic incisor with the adjacent teeth. This is the first report that presents a patient with ALGS undergoing orthodontic and surgical treatment. PMID:23814595

  3. [Incisors with a mind of their own].

    PubMed

    van Heumen, C M; Termeer, D; Oosterkamp, B C M; Meijer, G J

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man, known to have hypodontia, was bothered by his over-erupted central incisors. After the placement of implants and the accompanying crown- and bridgework, the central incisors appear to be increasingly over-erupted. The history shows that this phenomenon has already been seen in the past. Three mechanisms can be responsible for the over-eruption, specifically: continuous facial growth, over-eruption of both central incisors in the maxilla as a consequence of agenesis of opposing dentition and relapse of the orthodontic treatment as a result of the fact that orthodontic retention is not readily possible. After the central incisors were first cut in such a way that an acceptable incisal line has again been formed, the single-unit fixed dental prostheses on the front elements were replaced with porcelain ones. PMID:25174187

  4. Management of horizontally impacted dilacerated lateral incisor

    PubMed Central

    Katta, Anil Kumar; Peddu, Revathi; Vannala, Venkataramana; Dasari, Vaishnavi

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary lateral incisor with odontome and retained deciduous tooth is not often seen in regular dental practice. Impaction of anterior teeth cause generalized spacing which affects the esthetics of the face. Here we report a case of an 18-year-old patient with horizontally impacted dilacerated lateral incisor, which was bought into occlusion with the help of orthodontic tooth movement within a span of 18 months. PMID:26538954

  5. [Upper lateral incisor with 2 canals].

    PubMed

    Fabra Campos, H

    1991-01-01

    Clinical case summary of the patient with an upper lateral incisor with two root canals. The suspicion that there might be an anatomic anomaly in the root that includes a complex root canal system was made when an advanced radicular groove was detected in the lingual surface or an excessively enlarged cingulum.

  6. [Upper lateral incisor with 2 canals].

    PubMed

    Fabra Campos, H

    1991-01-01

    Clinical case summary of the patient with an upper lateral incisor with two root canals. The suspicion that there might be an anatomic anomaly in the root that includes a complex root canal system was made when an advanced radicular groove was detected in the lingual surface or an excessively enlarged cingulum. PMID:1659854

  7. Dental transposition of canine and lateral incisor and impacted central incisor treatment: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gebert, Tarcisio Jacinto; Palma, Vinícius Canavarros; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dental transposition and impaction are disorders related to ectopic eruption or failure in tooth eruption, which can affect child physical, mental and social development and may be difficult to be clinically solved. Methods We describe a case of transposition between the upper left canine and lateral incisor associated with impaction of the central incisor on the same side, in a 12-year-old patient. Conservative treatment involving surgical-orthodontic correction of transposed teeth and traction of the central incisor was conducted. Conclusion The option of correcting transposition and orthodontic traction by means of the segmented arch technique with devices such as cantilever and TMA rectangular wire loops, although a complex alternative, was proved to be esthetically and functionally effective. PMID:24713567

  8. Management of Traumatized Permanent Incisors. Revascularization and Delayed Replantation.

    PubMed

    Gharechahi, Maryam; Shojaeian, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a clinical case of a 9-year-old boy with a traumatic injury to the maxillary central incisors 24 hours after a fall in his schoolyard. The upper left central incisor was avulsed and was kept in saliva for four hours from the moment of trauma until its replantation. The right one was necrotized after one month. We describe successful revascularization treatment of right necrotic immature upper incisor and delayed replantation of left one. After 18 months, radiolucent lesions in the periapical areas of both maxillary central incisors had healed, and root apex development was noted with thickening of the walls in tooth #8. PMID:26939157

  9. Current controversies in late incisor crowding.

    PubMed

    Samspon, W J

    1995-01-01

    Although the terminology is mildly controversial, late incisor crowding (tertiary crowding, late secondary crowding, post-adolescent crowding) is widely regarded as a normal maturation event which is likely to affect most individuals to some extent. Disagreement arises when attempts are made to quantify the change and to predict the timing of the crowding. Most young adults experience some degree of loss of incisor alignment, usually near the anticipated emergence time for the third molars, and almost characteristically it is the lower anterior teeth which best demonstrate the phenomenon. Unfortunately, the physiological crowding changes are frequently confused with orthodontic treatment relapse. Greater controversy surrounds the aetiology of the undesirable crowding changes and despite many attempts we are still not in the enlightened position of explaining, predicting or preventing the problem (except by permanent retention). It is illogical to assume a single cause as the beguilingly simple observation of crowding belies the complexity of possible interacting factors. Perhaps it is a capricious combination of: tooth size and arch form; facial growth pattern (differential soft tissue and skeletal maturation); continuing late growth rotations; cumulative effects of resting, functional and parafunctional soft tissue pressures; lack of compensating attrition; and an ill-defined, mesially acting force emanating from the back of the dental arch. Many theories have attempted to resolve the mystery of the mesially acting force, including: pressure from erupting third molars; an inherent mesial migration; continuing mesial and occlusal dental drifting; maturation and contraction of periodontal soft tissues (particularly the transseptal fibres); the anterior component of occlusal forces; and the lower anterior arch contracting influence of the incisor overbite.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Prosthetic considerations in the restoration of orthodontically treated maxillary lateral incisors to replace missing central incisors: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Chaushu, S; Becker, A; Zalkind, M

    2001-04-01

    The treatment of young patients with missing maxillary incisors poses a challenge to prosthodontists and orthodontists. The 2 principal treatment options are (1) the reopening or maintenance of space for future autotransplantation and/or prosthodontic restoration of the missing teeth, or (2) total orthodontic space closure, followed by prosthodontic modification of the lateral incisors to simulate the central incisors. This article discusses only the second option and describes 2 alternative methods for the modification of crown anatomy. These procedures facilitate the orthodontic closure of missing central incisor spaces to ensure satisfactory, esthetic results. PMID:11319528

  11. Compound odontoma associated with impacted maxillary incisors.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan, S; Krishnan, I S

    2012-01-01

    Odontomas are considered to be the most common odontogenic tumors of the oral cavity. Some authors consider it as malformations rather than true neoplasms. The exact etiology of odontomes is still not known. Most odontomes are asymptomatic and are discovered during routine radiographic investigations. Odontomes generally cause disturbances in the eruption of the teeth, most commonly delayed eruption or deflection. The present report describes the surgical management of a case of compound odontoma in a 10-year-old boy who presented with a complaint of swelling in the maxillary right anterior region and retained deciduous incisors. The related literature is also being reviewed in this article.

  12. Esthetic restoration of discolored primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Fred S

    2005-01-01

    Restoring primary teeth can be a strenuous task for many dentists who would like to have an esthetic, easy-to-use and relatively quick restoration for children. But, the restoration of carious, fractured or discolored primary incisors gives the dentist the satisfaction of knowing that he/she has restored the smile and self-confidence of a growing child. This article describes a technique which is relatively easy and produces a beautiful outcome in a relatively short time. The author has used the technique in hundreds of children for over twenty-five years. Modifications in the technique have been made as newer materials and techniques have evolved. PMID:15739584

  13. How much incisor decompensation is achieved prior to orthognathic surgery?

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Calum; Laverick, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To quantify incisor decompensation in preparation for orthognathic surgery. Study design: Pre-treatment and pre-surgery lateral cephalograms for 86 patients who had combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment were digitised using OPAL 2.1 [http://www.opalimage.co.uk]. To assess intra-observer reproducibility, 25 images were re-digitised one month later. Random and systematic error were assessed using the Dahlberg formula and a two-sample t-test, respectively. Differences in the proportions of cases where the maxillary (1100 +/- 60) or mandibular (900 +/- 60) incisors were fully decomensated were assessed using a Chi-square test (p<0.05). Mann-Whitney U tests were used to identify if there were any differences in the amount of net decompensation for maxillary and mandibular incisors between the Class II combined and Class III groups (p<0.05). Results: Random and systematic error were less than 0.5 degrees and p<0.05, respectively. A greater proportion of cases had decompensated mandibular incisors (80%) than maxillary incisors (62%) and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.029). The amount of maxillary incisor decompensation in the Class II and Class III groups did not statistically differ (p=0.45) whereas the mandibular incisors in the Class III group underwent statistically significantly greater decompensation (p=0.02). Conclusions: Mandibular incisors were decompensated for a greater proportion of cases than maxillary incisors in preparation for orthognathic surgery. There was no difference in the amount of maxillary incisor decompensation between Class II and Class III cases. There was a greater net decompensation for mandibular incisors in Class III cases when compared to Class II cases. Key words:Decompensation, orthognathic, pre-surgical orthodontics, surgical-orthodontic. PMID:25136421

  14. Restoration of decayed primary incisors using strip crowns.

    PubMed

    Pollard, M A; Curzon, J A; Fenlon, W L

    1991-05-01

    Caries of the primary incisors is a common problem that can be arrested if recognized early enough. However, the arrested decay is unsightly. Celluloid 'strip' crown forms, used with composite resin, now allow the restoration of even the most badly decayed primary incisors. The authors describe this quick and efficient technique. PMID:1884866

  15. Surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canals of maxillary incisors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents surgical endodontic management outcomes of maxillary incisors that were infected via the lateral canals. Two cases are presented in which endodontically-treated maxillary central incisors had sustained lateral canal infections. A surgical endodontic treatment was performed on both teeth. Flap elevation revealed vertical bone destruction along the root surface and infected lateral canals, and microscopy revealed that the lateral canals were the origin of the lesions. After the infected lateral canals were surgically managed, both teeth were asymptomatic and labial fistulas were resolved. There were no clinical or radiographic signs of surgical endodontic management failure at follow-up visits. This case report highlights the clinical significance and surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canal of maxillary incisor. It is important to be aware of root canal anatomy variability in maxillary incisors. Maxillary central incisors infected via the lateral canal can be successfully managed by surgical endodontic treatment. PMID:25671217

  16. Surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canals of maxillary incisors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Min; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Baik; Park, Sang-Hyuk

    2015-02-01

    This case report presents surgical endodontic management outcomes of maxillary incisors that were infected via the lateral canals. Two cases are presented in which endodontically-treated maxillary central incisors had sustained lateral canal infections. A surgical endodontic treatment was performed on both teeth. Flap elevation revealed vertical bone destruction along the root surface and infected lateral canals, and microscopy revealed that the lateral canals were the origin of the lesions. After the infected lateral canals were surgically managed, both teeth were asymptomatic and labial fistulas were resolved. There were no clinical or radiographic signs of surgical endodontic management failure at follow-up visits. This case report highlights the clinical significance and surgical endodontic management of infected lateral canal of maxillary incisor. It is important to be aware of root canal anatomy variability in maxillary incisors. Maxillary central incisors infected via the lateral canal can be successfully managed by surgical endodontic treatment.

  17. Impacted permanent incisors associated with compound odontoma.

    PubMed

    Machado, Cintia de Vasconcellos; Knop, Luégya Amorin Henriques; da Rocha, Maria Celina Barreiros Siquara; Telles, Paloma Dias da Silva

    2015-01-12

    Odontomas are the most common odontogenic tumours of the maxillary bones, characterised by a slow growth and benign behaviour. They are usually small, asymptomatic and diagnosed after routine radiographic examination. The aim of this study was to report a case of a compound odontoma in the anterior maxilla of a 7-year-old girl, which was causing the impaction of the maxillary right central and lateral incisors, as well as the prolonged retention of the corresponding primary teeth. We also aimed to review the literature about these tumours, since they are not part of the dentist's day-to-day clinical practice. The clinical and radiographic features, the diagnosis and treatment of the case were discussed in this work.

  18. Unerupted incisors--characteristic features and associated anomalies.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, Adriana; Camilleri, Audrey; Camilleri, Simon

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the association of unerupted incisors with other dental anomalies and to indicate the aetiological and clinical relevance of such associations. Forty-one patients with unerupted incisors were examined. The group comprised 30 males and 11 females, ranging in age from 7 to 39 years. The patients were assessed for nine dental anomalies: hyperdontia, hypodontia, microdontia, enamel hypoplasia, infraocclusion of the primary molars and ectopia of the canines, premolars, first permanent molars, and second permanent molars. The patients were matched with respect to age and gender to 41 consecutively selected control subjects with similar selection criteria but no history of problems with incisor eruption. The prevalence rates of the dental anomalies in association with failure of eruption of incisors were compared to the reference rates in the control group by means of Pearson chi-square tests. The results of this study revealed that unerupted incisors were more frequent in males than in females. A statistically significant association (P = 0.006) was found between unerupted incisors and other inherited dental anomalies, namely ectopic teeth, hyperdontia, and enamel hypoplasia. Unerupted incisors may be considered part of a spectrum of inheritable dental anomalies. PMID:19745002

  19. Review of Dilaceration of Maxillary Central Incisor: A Mutidisciplinary Challenge.

    PubMed

    Walia, Pawanjit Singh; Rohilla, Ajit Kumar; Choudhary, Shweta; Kaur, Ravneet

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to primary dentition may interfere with the development of permanent dentition. Among the many malformations, dilaceration is particularly important to the clinician. Management of dilacerated maxillary central incisor requires a multidisciplinary approach. The main purpose of this review is to present the etiological factors, the mechanism, clinical features, radiographic features and treatment of dilaceration of the maxillary central incisors. How to cite this article: Walia PS, Rohilla AK, Choudhary S, Kaur R. Review of Dilaceration of Maxillary Central Incisor: A Multidisciplinary Challenge. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):90-98.

  20. Review of Dilaceration of Maxillary Central Incisor: A Mutidisciplinary Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rohilla, Ajit Kumar; Choudhary, Shweta; Kaur, Ravneet

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traumatic injuries to primary dentition may interfere with the development of permanent dentition. Among the many malformations, dilaceration is particularly important to the clinician. Management of dilacerated maxillary central incisor requires a multidisciplinary approach. The main purpose of this review is to present the etiological factors, the mechanism, clinical features, radiographic features and treatment of dilaceration of the maxillary central incisors. How to cite this article: Walia PS, Rohilla AK, Choudhary S, Kaur R. Review of Dilaceration of Maxillary Central Incisor: A Multidisciplinary Challenge. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):90-98. PMID:27274164

  1. Post-traumatic impaction of maxillary incisors: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paoloni, Valeria; Pavoni, Chiara; Mucedero, Manuela; Bollero, Patrizio; Laganà, Giuseppina; Cozza, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim To provide clinicians with useful information for immediate diagnosis and management of impacted maxillary incisors due to trauma. Methods We present a case of post-traumatic impaction of a central right maxillary incisor in a young patient. The treatment plan consisted in the interceptive management (surgical and orthodontic), the valuation of the necessary space to move the impacted tooth in the normal position and the biomechanical approach for anchorage, avoiding prosthetic/implants replacement. Results The therapy of an impacted maxillary incisor due to trauma requires a multidisciplinary approach: orthodontic, surgical, endodontic and periodontal considerations are essential for successful treatment. Conclusions Surgical exposure and orthodontic traction is the treatment most often used in case of posttraumatic impacted incisor: this technique in fact can lead to suitable results at the periodontal, occlusal and esthetics levels at an early stage and more definitively than with other treatment options. PMID:23991268

  2. [Failure in anterior rehabilitation of agenesic maxillary lateral incisors].

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Michel; Philippart-Rochaix, Martine; Philip-Alliez, Camille

    2016-03-01

    Agenesis of the maxillary lateral incisors poses particular problems for dentists, orthodontists and patients. Treatment of these ageneses is still highly controversial, both functionally and esthetically. The patient's smile and anterior guidance are affected and must be restored. The diagnosis is easy. Few mistakes are possible. However, managing patients with missing maxillary lateral incisors can be a challenge, commonly involving two possible treatment approaches: space opening to replace the missing lateral incisor with a prosthetic unit (denture, bridge or implant) or orthodontic space closure replacing the missing lateral incisor with the maxillary canine camouflaged to mimic the appearance of a lateral incisor. One of these two options will be adopted using multiple means...liable to trigger a multitude of possible errors. Ultimately, optimal results can only be achieved if there is excellent coordination between different practitioners in various specialties. Each clinician will have a specific role to play. Also, the patient and family are at the heart of the decision-making process, by virtue of their consent (treatment duration, financial resources) and their motivation. This multi-factorial, multi-disciplinary decision process means that treatment of the lateral incisor is an ongoing challenge for the clinician striving for the best possible result. Each case is different. No set rules exist. No single factor can be neglected if we are to avoid "failure". PMID:27083223

  3. [Failure in anterior rehabilitation of agenesic maxillary lateral incisors].

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Michel; Philippart-Rochaix, Martine; Philip-Alliez, Camille

    2016-03-01

    Agenesis of the maxillary lateral incisors poses particular problems for dentists, orthodontists and patients. Treatment of these ageneses is still highly controversial, both functionally and esthetically. The patient's smile and anterior guidance are affected and must be restored. The diagnosis is easy. Few mistakes are possible. However, managing patients with missing maxillary lateral incisors can be a challenge, commonly involving two possible treatment approaches: space opening to replace the missing lateral incisor with a prosthetic unit (denture, bridge or implant) or orthodontic space closure replacing the missing lateral incisor with the maxillary canine camouflaged to mimic the appearance of a lateral incisor. One of these two options will be adopted using multiple means...liable to trigger a multitude of possible errors. Ultimately, optimal results can only be achieved if there is excellent coordination between different practitioners in various specialties. Each clinician will have a specific role to play. Also, the patient and family are at the heart of the decision-making process, by virtue of their consent (treatment duration, financial resources) and their motivation. This multi-factorial, multi-disciplinary decision process means that treatment of the lateral incisor is an ongoing challenge for the clinician striving for the best possible result. Each case is different. No set rules exist. No single factor can be neglected if we are to avoid "failure".

  4. Incisor wear and age in Yellowstone bison

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christianson, D.A.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Podruzny, K.M.; Olexa, E.M.

    2005-01-01

    Biologists commonly use tooth eruption and wear patterns or cementum annuli techniques to estimate age of ungulates. However, in some situations the accuracy or sampling procedures of either approach are undesirable. We investigated the progression of several quantitative measures of wear with age, using permanent first incisors from Yellowstone bison (Bison bison), and tested for differences between sexes and herds. We further investigated the relationship of wear and age to explore an age-estimation method. Labial-lingual width (LLW) correlated best with assigned age (r2=0.66, males; r2=0.76 females). Labial-lingual width differed between sexes, with females showing ∼0.2 mm more wear than males. Additionally, differences in rate of wear existed between bison of the northern and central Yellowstone herds (1.2 and 0.9 mm/year, respectively). We developed a regression formula to test the power of LLW as an estimator of Yellowstone bison age. Our method provided estimated ages within 1 year of the assigned age 73% and 82% of the time for female and male bison, respectively.

  5. Establishment of crown-root domain borders in mouse incisor.

    PubMed

    Juuri, Emma; Saito, Kan; Lefebvre, Sylvie; Michon, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    Teeth are composed of two domains, the enamel-covered crown and the enamel-free root. The understanding of the initiation and regulation of crown and root domain formation is important for the development of bioengineered teeth. In most teeth the crown develops before the root, and erupts to the oral cavity whereas the root anchors the tooth to the jawbone. However, in the continuously growing mouse incisor the crown and root domains form simultaneously, the crown domain forming the labial and the root domain the lingual part of the tooth. While the crown-root border on the incisor distal side supports the distal enamel extent, reflecting an evolutionary diet adaptation, on the incisor mesial side the root-like surface is necessary for the attachment of the interdental ligament between the two incisors. Therefore, the mouse incisor exhibits a functional distal-mesial asymmetry. Here, we used the mouse incisor as a model to understand the mechanisms involved in the crown-root border formation. We analyzed the cellular origins and gene expression patterns leading to the development of the mesial and distal crown-root borders. We discovered that Barx2, En1, Wnt11, and Runx3 were exclusively expressed on the mesial crown-root border. In addition, the distal border of the crown-root domain might be established by cells from a different origin and by an early Follistatin expression, factor known to be involved in the root domain formation. The use of different mechanisms to establish domain borders gives indications of the incisor functional asymmetry.

  6. [Disproportionate eruption of maxillary and mandibular incisors in the long-tailed ground squirrel].

    PubMed

    Klevezal', G A; Potapova, E G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract-The surface of the maxillary and mandibular incisors of Spermophilus undulatus long-tailed ground squirrels, including those born in the current year and those that have hibernated (trapped one month or later after hibernation) is studied. The presence of daily growth on the incisors' surface allows the evaluation of their eruption rate; a specific change in the character of the incisors' eruption corresponds to winter hibernation (hibernation zone), which serves as the time mark. Correlation between the eruption rates of the maxillary and mandibular incisors typical for rodents is found in yearlings and some animals after hibernation. The eruption rate of the mandibular incisors is higher than the eruption rate of the maxillary incisors and can be taken as proportional to their length. In individuals that have hibernated and show proportional eruption of the incisors, the proportion of the total length of the incisor formed before and after hibernation is equal for the maxillary and mandibular incisors. In the individuals that have hibernated and show the correlation of the total length of the maxillary and mandibular incisors typical for rodents, the eruption rate of the mandibular incisor is equal to or less than the eruption rate of the maxillary incisor and the proportion of the incisor formed before hibernation is greater in the mandibular incisor than in the maxillary. This disproportionate pattern of incisor eruption is not typical for rodents and is a result of inequal grinding of the maxillary and mandibular incisors, which ultimately results in the normal ratio of the total length of the maxillary and mandibular incisors.

  7. Esthetic periodontal surgery for impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Ju; Lin, Yi-Chun; Kaung, Shou-Shin; Yang, Shue-Fen; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Clinicians do not frequently see impacted dilacerated maxillary incisors in their patients. When they do, there are several diagnostic and management challenges for correcting root dilacerations. An unfavorable esthetic outcome might occur as a result of soft-tissue complications during surgical eruption procedures. We present 2 patients with an impacted and dilacerated maxillary central incisor. Computed tomography scans with 3-dimensional reformation were used to accurately assess the positions of the dilacerated teeth, the degree of dilaceration, and the stage of root formation. The therapy primarily involved 2-stage crown exposure surgery combined with orthodontic traction. An apicoectomy was performed on 1 dilacerated tooth; the other exhibited pulp vitality. This article highlights the periodontal surgical strategies for the esthetic management of inverted crowns. Through periodontal plastic surgery and interdisciplinary cooperation, the impacted dilacerated central incisors were properly aligned, and successful esthetic results were achieved. PMID:22999678

  8. Characteristics of incisor-premolar hypodontia in families.

    PubMed

    Arte, S; Nieminen, P; Apajalahti, S; Haavikko, K; Thesleff, I; Pirinen, S

    2001-05-01

    Nonsyndromic tooth agenesis is a genetically and phenotypically heterogenous condition. It is generally assumed that different phenotypic forms are caused by different mutated genes. We analyzed inheritance and phenotype of hypodontia and dental anomalies in 214 family members in three generations of 11 probands collected for genetic linkage study on incisor-premolar hypodontia (IPH). Our analysis confirms the autosomal-dominant transmission with reduced penetrance of IPH. The prevalence of hypodontia and/or peg-shaped teeth was over 40% in first- and second-degree relatives and 18% in first cousins of the probands. Four of nine noted obligate carriers of hypodontia gene had dental anomalies, including small upper lateral incisors, ectopic canines, taurodontism, and rotated premolars. These anomalies were also observed at higher than normal frequency in relatives affected with hypodontia. We conclude that incisor-premolar hypodontia is a genetic condition with autosomal-dominant transmission and that it is associated with several other dental abnormalities.

  9. Familial aggregation of maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA)

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Pallavi; Ansari, Afroz Alam; Choudhary, Kartik; Saxena, Aditya

    2013-01-01

    Agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular second premolars is the most frequent form of hypodontia. Its prevalence varies across population from 0.8% to 4.5%. Genetic aberrations and environmental factors may cause agenesis of one or more teeth. The management of child having such a problem is very important since diastema in teeth especially in upper anteriors not only affects child's physical appearance but also its psychological development as the child wants to look like other children. In this article is presented a case of non-syndromic agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors (MLIA) and mandibular central incisors in a 10-year-old boy (patient) in permanent dentition with its management along with the radiographic investigations and photographic presentations of the other members of his family affected with this condition. PMID:23536620

  10. Orthodontic treatment of a mandibular incisor extraction case with invisalign.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, Khalid H

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding.

  11. Orthodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Incisor Extraction Case with Invisalign

    PubMed Central

    Zawawi, Khalid H.

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding. PMID:25024852

  12. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Kotumachagi Sangappa; Uma, H L; Nagarathna, J; Kumar, Pravin

    2015-01-01

    Eruption disturbances related to the position include ectopic eruption and transpositions. The occurrence of ectopic eruption is most commonly associated with maxillary incisors. The normal eruption, position and morphology of these teeth are crucial to craniofacial development, facial esthetics as well as phonetics. It is essential that the clinicians have thorough knowledge of the eruption disturbances in order to make an appropriate, as well as timely intervention, as dictated by the complexity of the problem. How to cite this article: Suresh KS, Uma HL, Nagarathna J, Kumar P. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):227-233. PMID:26604543

  13. A rare occurrence of geminated-taloned maxillary lateral incisor.

    PubMed

    Neeraja, R; Kayal, Vizhi G

    2012-05-01

    The talon cusp is a developmental anomaly characterized by the presence of an accessory cusp like structure projecting from the cingulum area of the anterior teeth. Gemination is an anomaly caused by a single tooth germ that attempted to divide during its development. These developmental anomalies may cause clinical problems including esthetic impairment, pain, caries and tooth crowding. Co-occurrence of two anomalies in a teeth is rare. This paper presents an unusual case of talon cusp on geminated permanent lateral incisor. How to cite this article: Neeraja R, Kayal VG. A Rare Occurrence of Geminated-Taloned Maxillary Lateral Incisor. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):136-138.

  14. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Kotumachagi Sangappa; Uma, HL; Nagarathna, J

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eruption disturbances related to the position include ectopic eruption and transpositions. The occurrence of ectopic eruption is most commonly associated with maxillary incisors. The normal eruption, position and morphology of these teeth are crucial to craniofacial development, facial esthetics as well as phonetics. It is essential that the clinicians have thorough knowledge of the eruption disturbances in order to make an appropriate, as well as timely intervention, as dictated by the complexity of the problem. How to cite this article: Suresh KS, Uma HL, Nagarathna J, Kumar P. Management of Ectopically Erupting Maxillary Incisors: A Case Series. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):227-233. PMID:26604543

  15. Lower molar and incisor displacement associated with mandibular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Bravo, L A; Ben-Bassat, Y; Curry, S; Korn, E L

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the amount of alveolar modeling at the apices of the mandibular incisor and first molar specifically associated with appositional and resorptive changes on the lower border of the mandible during growth and treatment. Cephalometric data from superimpositions on anterior cranial base, mandibular implants of the Björk type, and anatomical "best fit" of mandibular border structures were integrated using a recently developed strategy, which is described. Data were available at annual intervals between 8.5 and 15.5 years for a previously described sample of approximately 30 children with implants. The average magnitudes of the changes at the root apices of the mandibular first molar and central incisor associated with modeling/remodeling of the mandibular border and symphysis were unexpectedly small. At the molar apex, mean values approximated zero in both anteroposterior and vertical directions. At the incisor apex, mean values approximated zero in the anteroposterior direction and averaged less than 0.15 mm/year in the vertical direction. Standard deviations were roughly equal for the molar and the incisor in both the anteroposterior and vertical directions. Dental displacement associated with surface modeling plays a smaller role in final tooth position in the mandible than in the maxilla. It may also be reasonably inferred that anatomical best-fit superimpositions made in the absence of implants give a more complete picture of hard tissue turnover in the mandible than they do in the maxilla.

  16. Esthetic improvement in the patient with one missing maxillary central incisor restored with porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong-Jin; Yang, Jae-Ho; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun; Han, Jung-Suk

    2010-09-01

    This article describes esthetic improvement in a patient with a missing maxillary left central incisor. Space analysis of the anterior dentition showed that minor tooth rearrangement was needed. Optimal space distribution for restorations was attained by orthodontic treatment. Through transforming tooth shape with porcelain laminate veneers, the maxillary left lateral incisor was transformed into central incisor and the maxillary left canine into a lateral incisor. The maxillary right central incisor was also restored for esthetic improvement. In a case of changing a tooth shape with porcelain laminate veneers, pre-treatment evaluation, space analysis and diagnostic wax-up are important factors.

  17. The Dance of Tusks: Rediscovery of Lower Incisors in the Pan-American Proboscidean Cuvieronius hyodon Revises Incisor Evolution in Elephantimorpha.

    PubMed

    Mothé, Dimila; Ferretti, Marco P; Avilla, Leonardo S

    2016-01-01

    The incisors of proboscideans (tusks and tushes) are one of the most important feature in conservation, ecology and evolutionary history of these mammals. Although the absence of upper incisors is rare in proboscideans (occurring only in deinotheres), the independent losses of lower incisors are recognized for most of its lineages (dibelodont condition). The presence of lower incisors in the Pan-American gomphothere Cuvieronius hyodon was reported a few times in literature, but it was neglected in systematic studies. We analyzed several specimens of Cuvieronius hyodon from the Americas and recognized that immature individuals had lower incisors during very early post-natal developmental stages. Subsequently, these are lost and lower incisors alveoli close during later developmental stages, before maturity. Moreover, for the first time in a formal cladistic analysis of non-amebelodontine trilophodont gomphotheres, Rhynchotherium and Cuvieronius were recovered as sister-taxa. Among several non-ambiguous synapomorphies, the presence of lower incisors diagnoses this clade. We recognize that the presence of lower incisors in Cuvieronius and Rhynchotherium is an unique case of taxic atavism among the Elephantimorpha, since these structures are lost at the origin of the ingroup. The rediscovery of the lower incisors in Cuvieronius hyodon, their ontogenetic interpretation and the inclusion of this feature in a revised phylogenetic analysis of trilophodont gomphotheres brought a better understanding for the evolutionary history of these proboscideans.

  18. The Dance of Tusks: Rediscovery of Lower Incisors in the Pan-American Proboscidean Cuvieronius hyodon Revises Incisor Evolution in Elephantimorpha

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The incisors of proboscideans (tusks and tushes) are one of the most important feature in conservation, ecology and evolutionary history of these mammals. Although the absence of upper incisors is rare in proboscideans (occurring only in deinotheres), the independent losses of lower incisors are recognized for most of its lineages (dibelodont condition). The presence of lower incisors in the Pan-American gomphothere Cuvieronius hyodon was reported a few times in literature, but it was neglected in systematic studies. We analyzed several specimens of Cuvieronius hyodon from the Americas and recognized that immature individuals had lower incisors during very early post-natal developmental stages. Subsequently, these are lost and lower incisors alveoli close during later developmental stages, before maturity. Moreover, for the first time in a formal cladistic analysis of non-amebelodontine trilophodont gomphotheres, Rhynchotherium and Cuvieronius were recovered as sister-taxa. Among several non-ambiguous synapomorphies, the presence of lower incisors diagnoses this clade. We recognize that the presence of lower incisors in Cuvieronius and Rhynchotherium is an unique case of taxic atavism among the Elephantimorpha, since these structures are lost at the origin of the ingroup. The rediscovery of the lower incisors in Cuvieronius hyodon, their ontogenetic interpretation and the inclusion of this feature in a revised phylogenetic analysis of trilophodont gomphotheres brought a better understanding for the evolutionary history of these proboscideans. PMID:26756209

  19. Atypical presentation of bilateral supplemental maxillary central incisors with unusual talon cusp.

    PubMed

    Nuvvula, Sivakumar; Pavuluri, Chaitanya; Mohapatra, Abinash; Nirmala, S V S G

    2011-01-01

    Delayed eruption of maxillary permanent central incisors in a child poses a distressing esthetic quandary to parents, by virtue of its location in the dental architecture. Well-aligned anterior teeth add confidence to smile and have enhanced self-esteem, which is critical even in early life. Impaction of the maxillary central incisors compared to third molars or the canines is less reported; bilateral supplemental maxillary central incisors related to impacted permanent maxillary central incisors are rare and one of the supplemental central incisors showing unusual talon is still infrequent. A case of impacted maxillary permanent central incisors related to supplemental maxillary central incisors, with one of them showing an unusual talon cusp, is presented. PMID:21911955

  20. Fragment Reattachment after Atypical Crown Fracture in Maxillary Central Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Vanessa Torraca Peraro; Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Jordão, Keren Cristina Fagundes; Paleari, André Gustavo; Dantas, Andrea Abi-Rached; Segalla, José Claudio Martins; de Oliveira Junior, Osmir Batista

    2014-01-01

    Background. Fracture by trauma is one of the most common types of dental injury in the permanent dentition among children and teenagers. Aim. The aim of this study was to report the treatment performed to an atypical dental trauma case in a maxillary central incisor of a young patient by means of reattachment of the tooth fragment. Case Description. A 12-year-old male patient suffered a vertical crown fracture to the maxillary right central incisor. After clinical and radiographic examinations, a conservative restorative treatment which consisted in the reattachment of the tooth fragment with flow resin was performed in order to preserve the dental element and to obtain maximum aesthetics. Conclusion. The reattachment of fractured fragment is a fast and easy technique that can be used successfully as an option to restore dental element which suffered trauma. Clinical Significance. This technique restores the aesthetics and function of the dental element with minimal discomfort to the patient. PMID:25610663

  1. Compound odontoma associated with an impacted permanent central incisor.

    PubMed

    Shelton, J T; Owens, B M; Schuman, N J

    1997-10-01

    In this case report, an eleven-year-old female presented to a rural dental clinic for routine dental examination. Upon evaluation of the dentition, the attending dentist discovered an over-retained primary tooth. Radiographically, a compound odontoma was present, gingival to an unerupted permanent maxillary left central incisor (number nine) and apical to the erupted primary central incisor (F). The odontoma and its overlying primary tooth were removed by an oral surgeon. The extraction site has healed uneventfully and an Orthodontic treatment plan was formulated. The etiology of odontomas is unknown but thought to be caused by trauma, infection, inheritance and/or genetic mutation. These lesions are usually found in the second decade of life and are more common in male patients. Treatment consists of complete enucleation and curettage of the odontoma site.

  2. Age estimation using maxillary central incisors: A radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Nitin; Ahuja, Parul; Sinha, Abhishek; Singh, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Background: In the field of forensic dentistry, secondary changes in teeth with advancing age have been used as reliable predictors of age in various studies. Aim: The purpose of the present study was to present a method for assessing the chronological age based on the relationship between age and morphological parameters of maxillary central incisors. Materials and Methods: Fifty subjects between 20-70 years of age were included in the study. Intraoral periapical radiographs were taken in relation to maxillary central incisors using paralleling technique. The following measurements were recorded: lengths of tooth, pulp, root and width of root and pulp at three different points. Regression formulas were used to calculate the dental age. Results: The mean estimated age showed no statistically significant difference from the actual mean age (P > 0.05). Also, maximum difference was seen for root length variable (-1.035 ± 1.86 years). PMID:23741151

  3. A Rare Occurrence of Geminated-Taloned Maxillary Lateral Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Vizhi G

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The talon cusp is a developmental anomaly characterized by the presence of an accessory cusp like structure projecting from the cingulum area of the anterior teeth. Gemination is an anomaly caused by a single tooth germ that attempted to divide during its development. These developmental anomalies may cause clinical problems including esthetic impairment, pain, caries and tooth crowding. Co-occurrence of two anomalies in a teeth is rare. This paper presents an unusual case of talon cusp on geminated permanent lateral incisor. How to cite this article: Neeraja R, Kayal VG. A Rare Occurrence of Geminated-Taloned Maxillary Lateral Incisor. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):136-138. PMID:25206153

  4. A rare occurrence of geminated-taloned maxillary lateral incisor.

    PubMed

    Neeraja, R; Kayal, Vizhi G

    2012-05-01

    The talon cusp is a developmental anomaly characterized by the presence of an accessory cusp like structure projecting from the cingulum area of the anterior teeth. Gemination is an anomaly caused by a single tooth germ that attempted to divide during its development. These developmental anomalies may cause clinical problems including esthetic impairment, pain, caries and tooth crowding. Co-occurrence of two anomalies in a teeth is rare. This paper presents an unusual case of talon cusp on geminated permanent lateral incisor. How to cite this article: Neeraja R, Kayal VG. A Rare Occurrence of Geminated-Taloned Maxillary Lateral Incisor. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):136-138. PMID:25206153

  5. Primary incisor restoration using resin-veneered stainless steel crowns.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1998-01-01

    The restoration of primary incisors with extensive caries lesions is a clinical challenge of severe dimensions. Not only are these teeth difficult to restore, but the patient's behavior can affect the treatment negatively. Requirements for an acceptable restoration include natural color; durability; adhesive cementation that is biocompatible with the pulp; easily and rapidly placed; requires only one treatment visit. Compared to other options, stainless steel crowns are the easiest to place. The most attractive restoration for these cases today is the adhesively bonded resin-composite crown, made by using acetate crown-form matrices, but this is being surpassed by the stainless steel crown forms (3M Unitek) that can be preveneered. This article describes a step-by-step method of placing preveneered stainless steel crowns for primary incisors. PMID:9617447

  6. Is bodily advancement of the lower incisors possible?

    PubMed

    Strahm, Catherine; De Sousa, Ana Paula; Grobéty, Dominique; Mavropoulos, Anestis; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2009-08-01

    Some Class II malocclusions are due, at least in part, to a retruded lower dental arch relative to the mandibular body. The purpose of this study was to determine if a direct anterior force on the lower incisors could lead to bodily movement of these teeth. Twenty-seven patients (9 males, 18 females; mean age: 9.8 years) were treated with a reverse headgear (RHG) in the lower dental arch combined with labial root torque of the lower incisors. An activator was added to disclude the arches. This group was compared with 26 patients (10 males, 16 females; mean age: 9.7 years) treated with an activator combined with conventional posterior extraoral traction on the upper molars. All patients had a second stage of treatment with fixed appliances and Class II elastic wear. At the end of treatment, all patients had a Class I relationship and a normal overjet. Lateral cephalograms were taken before (T1), after the first stage (T2), and at the end of active (T3) treatment. Independent sample t-tests were used to assess the differences between the two groups of patients. In the RHG group, despite the applied root torque, the lower incisors showed anterior crown tipping. Labial root displacement was not observed. At T2, this labial tipping partially relapsed. Furthermore, the use of RHG appeared to decrease bone apposition in the anterior part of the symphysis, leading to a reduction in width. Bodily advancement of the lower incisors was not achieved with the application of labial root torque and anteriorly directed force on the mandibular arch. The width limit of the lower anterior apical base should be respected during orthodontic treatment planning.

  7. Dual embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors: clinical implications in patients with cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Garib, Daniela Gamba; Rosar, Julia Petruccelli; Sathler, Renata; Ozawa, Terumi Okada

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cleft lip and palate are craniofacial anomalies highly prevalent in the overall population. In oral clefts involving the alveolar ridge, variations of number, shape, size and position are observed in maxillary lateral incisors. The objective of this manuscript is to elucidate the embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors in order to understand the etiology of these variations. Contextualization: The hypothesis that orofacial clefts would split maxillary lateral incisor buds has been previously reported. However, recent studies showed that maxillary lateral incisors have dual embryonic origin, being partially formed by both the medial nasal process and the maxillary process. In other words, the mesial half of the lateral incisor seems to come from the medial nasal process while the distal half of the lateral incisor originates from the maxillary process. In cleft patients, these processes do not fuse, which results in different numerical and positional patterns for lateral incisors relating to the alveolar cleft. In addition to these considerations, this study proposes a nomenclature for maxillary lateral incisors in patients with cleft lip and palate, based on embryology and lateral incisors position in relation to the alveolar cleft. Conclusion: Embryological knowledge on the dual origin of maxillary lateral incisors and the use of a proper nomenclature for their numerical and positional variations renders appropriate communication among professionals and treatment planning easier, in addition to standardizing research analysis. PMID:26560830

  8. Gene expression and dental enamel structure in developing mouse incisor.

    PubMed

    Sehic, Amer; Risnes, Steinar; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Khuu, Cuong; Osmundsen, Harald

    2010-04-01

    At the mouse incisor tip the initially differentiated ameloblasts produce a thin, prism-free enamel, while further apically, in the immediate adjacent segment, the enamel thickness increases and the four-layered enamel of mouse incisor is formed. Comparative gene-expression profiling was carried out on RNA isolated from these two segments of incisor tooth germs at embryonic day (E)17.5 and at postnatal days (P)0, 1, 2, and 10 using microarrays to measure messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) species present in the segments. Validation of expression data was achieved using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. Bioinformatic data suggested enhanced cellular apoptosis in the incisal tip segment, which, together with diminished expression of the Amelx and Enam genes, may contribute to the production of the thin enamel seen in this tooth segment. For genes exhibiting higher levels of expression in the adjacent segment where complex enamel is being formed, bioinformatic analysis suggested significant associations with cellular functions involving the actin cytoskeleton, cellular development, morphology, and movement. This is suggested to reflect that ameloblasts with Tomes' process are being organized in transverse rows, facilitating the transverse movement that results in prism decussation in the inner enamel of the adjacent segment. Bioinformatic analysis of miRNA expression data lends support to these suggestions.

  9. In vitro effects of retinoic acid on mouse incisor development.

    PubMed

    Bloch-Zupan, A; Mark, M P; Weber, B; Ruch, J V

    1994-10-01

    The developing dentition is known to express the complete set of retinoic acid (RA) nuclear receptors and cytoplasmic RA-binding proteins (CRABPI and II), and RA is required for in vitro mouse molar morphogenesis, so the role of RA during in vitro mouse incisor development was investigated. Histological procedures, immunocytochemical detection of proliferating cells, immunofluorescence detection of laminin, and in situ hybridization with RNA probes for CRABPI and II were done on the tooth-germ cultures either in the presence or in the absence of RA. RA appeared to control initial morphogenesis, particularly the asymmetrical growth of the cervical loop, and to regulate required differential mitotic activity. RA seemed also to be involved in asymmetrical laminin deposition. The distribution of the CRABP gene transcripts was similar during in vivo and in vitro incisor development. However, CRABPI gene transcript distribution in the labial part of the epithelial loop was detected in vitro only in the presence of RA. A direct role of the CRABPs during tooth development is, however, unlikely because Ch55, a synthetic RA analogue that does not bind to CRABP, had the same effects as RA on in vitro incisor development. PMID:7741659

  10. Periodontal response to two intracanal medicaments in replanted monkey incisors.

    PubMed

    Thong, Y L; Messer, H H; Siar, C H; Saw, L H

    2001-12-01

    Intracanal medicaments are recommended for use in replanted teeth to inhibit inflammatory root resorption. This study compared the effect of calcium hydroxide (Pulpdent) and a corticosteroid-antibiotic paste (Ledermix) on periodontal healing and root resorption following replantation. Incisors of eight Macaca fascicularis monkeys were extracted, stored dry for 15 min and replanted. After 11 days, root canals in two adjacent maxillary incisors were treated with one medicament and contralateral incisors with the other medicament, or left as untreated controls. Animals were sacrificed 8 weeks later and the teeth prepared for histomorphometric evaluation of periodontal ligament inflammation and root resorption. Periodontal ligament inflammation and inflammatory root resorption were markedly inhibited by both calcium hydroxide and corticosteroid-antibiotic relative to untreated controls. Replacement resorption was lowest in the corticosteroid-antibiotic group, and significantly (P<0.05) more normal periodontal ligament was present in this group (79.6%) than in calcium hydroxide and control groups (64.6% and 62.7%, respectively). Treatment with the corticosteroid-antibiotic inhibited inflammatory resorption and was slightly more effective than calcium hydroxide in producing a periodontal healing response. PMID:11766092

  11. Traumatic loss of a maxillary central incisor treated with nonextraction orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiyou; Kang, Ting; Duan, Yinzhong

    2013-02-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a girl who lost her maxillary left central incisor from trauma. The patient had a concave profile, a Class I molar relationship on the right side and a Class II molar relationship on the left side, with a slight maxillary retrusion, an anterior edge-to-edge bite, and a posterior crossbite. Therefore, the treatment consisted of rapid palatal expansion to widen the maxilla in a transverse direction along with reverse headgear to improve the incisor relationship. The crown of the left canine was modified to resemble the left lateral incisor, and a porcelain veneer was placed to make the left lateral incisor resemble the left central incisor. This case report illustrates how orthodontics alone can be used to treat a missing central incisor, without a bridge or an implant. PMID:23374932

  12. Splitting placodes: effects of bone morphogenetic protein and Activin on the patterning and identity of mouse incisors.

    PubMed

    Munne, Pauliina M; Felszeghy, Szabolcs; Jussila, Maria; Suomalainen, Marika; Thesleff, Irma; Jernvall, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    The single large rodent incisor in each jaw quadrant is evolutionarily derived from a mammalian ancestor with many small incisors. The embryonic placode giving rise to the mouse incisor is considerably larger than the molar placode, and the question remains whether this large incisor placode is a developmental requisite to make a thick incisor. Here we used in vitro culture system to experiment with the molecular mechanism regulating tooth placode development and how mice have thick incisors. We found that large placodes are prone to disintegration and formation of two to three small incisor placodes. The balance between one large or multiple small placodes was altered through the regulation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Activin signaling. Exogenous Noggin, which inhibits BMP signaling, or exogenous Activin cause the development of two to three incisors. These incisors were more slender than normal incisors. Additionally, two inhibitor molecules, Sostdc1 and Follistatin, which regulate the effects of BMPs and Activin and have opposite expression patterns, are likely to be involved in the incisor placode regulation in vivo. Furthermore, inhibition of BMPs by recombinant Noggin has been previously suggested to cause a change in the tooth identity from the incisor to the molar. This evidence has been used to support a homeobox code in determining tooth identity. Our work provides an alternative interpretation, where the inhibition of BMP signaling can lead to splitting of the large incisor placode and the formation of partly separate incisors, thereby acquiring molar-like morphology without a change in tooth identity.

  13. Surgical Management of Mandibular Central Incisors with Dumbbell Shaped Periapical Lesion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Patil, Jayaprakash D.; Jayaprakash, Thumu; Chaitanya, C. H. Krishna; Kalluru, Rama S.

    2014-01-01

    Dental traumatic injuries may affect the teeth and alveolar bone directly or indirectly. Pulpal necrosis and chronic and apical periodontitis with cystic changes are the most common sequelae of the dental traumatic injuries, if the teeth are not treated immediately. This case report focuses on the conventional and surgical management of mandibular central incisors. A twenty-four-year-old male patient presented with pain in the mandibular central incisors. Radiographic examination revealed mandibular central incisors with dumbbell shaped periapical lesion. After root canal treatment, parendodontic surgery was performed for mandibular central incisors. After one-year recall examination, the teeth were asymptomatic and periapical lesion had healed. PMID:25105031

  14. Treatment of cariously involved fused maxillary primary lateral and central incisors.

    PubMed

    ElBadrawy, H E; Diab, M

    2001-01-01

    A 3-and-a-half-year-old male child presented with fused cariously involved right maxillary primary central and lateral incisors as well as a previously traumatized non-vital left primary central incisor with a draining fistula. The child also had other restorative needs and the decision taken was to address all needs under a G.A. With respect to the fused incisors, these were split and root canals treatment was performed for all three incisors which were then restored with stainless steel crowns with esthetic facings. PMID:11572502

  15. Intrusion of incisors in adult patients with marginal bone loss.

    PubMed

    Melsen, B; Agerbaek, N; Markenstam, G

    1989-09-01

    Elongated and spaced incisors are common problems in patients suffering from severe periodontal disease. Thirty patients characterized by marginal bone loss and deep overbite were treated by intrusion of incisors. Three different methods for intrusion were applied: (1) J hooks and extraoral high-pull headgear, (2) utility arches, (3) intrusion bent into a loop in a 0.17 x 0.25-inch wire, and (4) base arch as described by Burstone. The intrusion was evaluated from the displacement of the apex, incision, and the center of resistance of the most prominent or elongated central incisor. Change in the marginal bone level and the amount of root resorption were evaluated on standardized intraoral radiographs. The pockets were assessed by standardized probing and the clinical crown length was measured on study casts. The results showed that the true intrusion of the center of resistance varied from 0 to 3.5 mm and was most pronounced when intrusion was performed with a base arch. The clinical crown length was generally reduced by 0.5 to 1.0 mm. The marginal bone level approached the cementoenamel junction in all but six cases. All cases demonstrated root resorption varying from 1 to 3 mm. The total amount of alveolar support--that is, the calculated area of the alveolar wall--was unaltered or increased in 19 of the 30 cases. The dependency of the results on the oral hygiene, the force distribution, and the perioral function was evaluated in relation to the individual cases. It was obvious that intrusion was best performed when (1) forces were low (5 to 15 gm per tooth) with the line of action of the force passing through or close to the center of resistance, (2) the gingiva status was healthy, and (3) no interference with perioral function was present.

  16. Incisor-molar relationships in chimpanzees and other hominoids: implications for diet and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Pickford, Martin

    2005-01-01

    In chimpanzees, the cutting edge of the incisor battery is longer in relation to the length of the molar row than in any other hominoid, extant or fossil, the only other lineage approaching it being the orangutan. Apart from their increased mesio-distal dimensions, the upper and lower incisors of chimpanzees differ in additional ways from those of almost all other hominoids. The I2/ is enlarged, so that the difference in size between it and the central upper incisor is less than it is in the heteromorphic upper incisors of other hominoids. The lower incisors are expanded mesio-distally, so much so that isolated I/2 crowns can resemble upper central incisors. In chimpanzees the lingual surface of the lower incisors is generally more procumbent than it is in other hominoids, which have more vertically oriented incisor crowns and there is a greater difference in enamel thickness between labial and lingual sides. The re-orientation of the lower incisor crown is reflected in the root, which in lateral view is anteriorly concave in chimpanzees whereas it is more orthogonal or convex in other hominoids. The molars of chimpanzees, especially the lowers, have extensive and relatively deep occlusal basins, and the main cusps are peripheralised and labio-lingually compressed, making them more trenchant than those of other hominoids. This paper examines the incisor-lower molar proportions in extinct and living hominoids and develops a new hypothesis about the evolution of the dentition of chimpanzees and links it to their diet. It also examines the incisor-molar proportions of hominids and African apes in order to throw light on the phylogenetic relationships between them. It is shown that chimpanzees are highly derived in this respect and that several recent ideas concerning the chimp-like appearance of the last common ancestor of hominids and African apes are likely to be incorrect. PMID:15503253

  17. Dental management of a talon cusp on a primary incisor.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Richard K; Chussid, Steven

    2007-01-01

    There are many treatment options for the pediatric patient with a talon cusp (TC). The purpose of this paper was to report the case of a TC involving a primary maxillary right central incisor in a 14-month-old male causing displacement of the affected tooth. The etiology of a TC is thought to be a disturbance during the morphodifferentiation stage of tooth development. Clinical problems include: (1) occlusal interferences; (2) esthetic disturbances; (3) accidental cusp fracture; (4) tongue irritation; (5) nursing difficulty; (6) caries; and (7) displacement of the affected tooth. The TC affecting the central incisor was reduced over a period of 4 visits, followed by immediate placement of a 5% sodium fluoride varnish at the conclusion of each reduction visit. Restoration of esthetics and function was evident within 1 month following complete cusp reduction. There were no clinical signs of any problems related to the reduction, and the prognosis was considered to be guarded. The pediatric patient was placed on a 6-month oral hygiene maintenance follow-up.

  18. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Negre-Barber, A; Montiel-Company, J M; Boronat-Catalá, M; Catalá-Pizarro, M; Almerich-Silla, J M

    2016-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9-86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6-88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9-17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47-0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39-35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH. PMID:27558479

  19. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Negre-Barber, A; Montiel-Company, J M; Boronat-Catalá, M; Catalá-Pizarro, M; Almerich-Silla, J M

    2016-08-25

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9-86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6-88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9-17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47-0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39-35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH.

  20. Identification of genetic risk factors for maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

    PubMed

    Alves-Ferreira, M; Pinho, T; Sousa, A; Sequeiros, J; Lemos, C; Alonso, I

    2014-05-01

    Tooth agenesis affects 20% of the world population, and maxillary lateral incisors agenesis (MLIA) is one of the most frequent subtypes, characterized by the absence of formation of deciduous or permanent lateral incisors. Odontogenesis is a complex mechanism regulated by sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, controlled by activators and inhibitors involved in several pathways. Disturbances in these signaling cascades can lead to abnormalities in odontogenesis, resulting in alterations in the formation of the normal teeth number. Our aim was to study a large number of genes encoding either transcription factors or key components in signaling pathways shown to be involved in tooth odontogenesis. We selected 8 genes-MSX1, PAX9, AXIN2, EDA, SPRY2, TGFA, SPRY4, and WNT10A-and performed one of the largest case-control studies taking into account the number of genes and variants assessed, aiming at the identification of MLIA susceptibility factors. We show the involvement of PAX9, EDA, SPRY2, SPRY4, and WNT10A as risk factors for MLIA. Additionally, we uncovered 3 strong synergistic interactions between MLIA liability and MSX1-TGFA, AXIN2-TGFA, and SPRY2-SPRY4 gene pairs. We report the first evidence of the involvement of sprouty genes in MLIA susceptibility. This large study results in a better understanding of the genetic components and mechanisms underlying this trait.

  1. Preformed resin-veneered stainless steel crowns for restoration of primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P; Helpin, M L

    1996-05-01

    Stainless steel crown forms with bonded resin veneers for primary incisors are commercially available to dentists. This type of preveneered crown was developed to serve as a convenient, durable, reliable, and esthetic solution to the difficult challenge of restoring severely carious primary incisors. This article describes preveneered crowns, reviews their advantages and disadvantages, and details a technique for placement of such restorations.

  2. Variations in the shape of permanent maxillary lateral incisors in Sundanese.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, D; Satravaha, S

    1984-01-01

    During a survey in Java we found unusual shaped upper lateral incisors. A total of 110 school children shows 3 cases with pegging, approximately 20% with canine-like shape. In all cases the lateral incisor was present. Compared with other publication the incidence of pegging is low, the canine-like variation never described as far as we know.

  3. Orthodontic Management of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rongo, Roberto; Cupo, Antonello; Valletta, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a woman, aged 15 years, with permanent dentition, brachyfacial typology, with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. Multibracket straightwire fixed appliance was used to open the space for dental implant placement, and treat the impaired occlusion. The missing lateral incisors were substituted with oral implants. PMID:24711929

  4. Variation in Size and Form between Left and Right Maxillary Central Incisor Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Vadavadagi, Suneel V; Hombesh, M N; Choudhury, Gopal Krishna; Deshpande, Sumith; Anusha, C V; Murthy, D Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the variation in size of left and right maxillary central incisors for male patients (using digital calipers of 0.01 mm accuracy). To compare the variation in size of left and right maxillary central incisors for female patients (using digital calipers of 0.01 mm accuracy). To find out the difference between the maxillary central incisors of men and women. Its clinical applicability if difference exists. Materials and Methods: A total of 70 dental students of PMNM Dental College and Hospital were selected. Of 70 dental students, 40 male and 30 female were selected. Impressions were made for all subjects, using irreversible hydrocolloid (Algitex, manufacturer DPI, Batch-T-8804) using perforated stock metal trays. The mesiodistal crown width and cervical width were measured for each incisor and recorded separately for left and right teeth. The length was measured for each incisor and recorded separately for left and right maxillary central incisor using digitec height caliper. Results: The mean value of maximum crown length of maxillary left central incisor of male was greater in length compared with maxillary right central incisor. Mean value of maximum crown length for male patient right and left side was greater compared with maximum crown length of female patient. Conclusion: When compared the dimensions of teeth between two sex, male group shows larger values to female group. PMID:25859104

  5. Orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors: a 3D finite element method study

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Armando Yukio; Maruo, Hiroshi; Argenta, Marco André; Maruo, Ivan Toshio; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In orthodontic treatment, intrusion movement of maxillary incisors is often necessary. Therefore, the objective of this investigation is to evaluate the initial distribution patterns and magnitude of compressive stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) in a simulation of orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors, considering the points of force application. Methods: Anatomic 3D models reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography scans were used to simulate maxillary incisors intrusion loading. The points of force application selected were: centered between central incisors brackets (LOAD 1); bilaterally between the brackets of central and lateral incisors (LOAD 2); bilaterally distal to the brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 3); bilaterally 7 mm distal to the center of brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 4). Results and Conclusions: Stress concentrated at the PDL apex region, irrespective of the point of orthodontic force application. The four load models showed distinct contour plots and compressive stress values over the midsagittal reference line. The contour plots of central and lateral incisors were not similar in the same load model. LOAD 3 resulted in more balanced compressive stress distribution. PMID:27007765

  6. Preformed resin-veneered stainless steel crowns for restoration of primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P; Helpin, M L

    1996-05-01

    Stainless steel crown forms with bonded resin veneers for primary incisors are commercially available to dentists. This type of preveneered crown was developed to serve as a convenient, durable, reliable, and esthetic solution to the difficult challenge of restoring severely carious primary incisors. This article describes preveneered crowns, reviews their advantages and disadvantages, and details a technique for placement of such restorations. PMID:8941812

  7. Lower incisor extraction treatment with the Invisalign® technique: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Giancotti, Aldo; Garino, Francesco; Mampieri, Gianluca

    2015-03-01

    The extraction of a lower incisor can lead to satisfactory orthodontic results for patients with moderate to severe lower incisor crowding. Invisalign(®) is a treatment modality for such treatments, moving teeth with precision and reducing inconvenience for the patient. Three case reports are presented in this article supporting the above statements.

  8. The Single-tooth Implant Treatment of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors Using Angled Abutments: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, Suleyman Hakan; Keyf, Filiz; Pekkan, Gurel

    2009-01-01

    The maxillary lateral incisor is the second most common congenitally absent tooth. There are several treatment options for replacing the missing maxillary lateral incisor, including canine substitution, tooth-supported restoration, or single-tooth implant. Dental implants are an appropriate treatment option for replacing missing maxillary lateral incisor teeth in adolescents when their dental and skeletal development is complete. This case report presents the treatment of a patient with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors using dental implants with angled abutments. PMID:21528038

  9. Stereological determination of the volume of the rat hemimandible tissues.

    PubMed

    Silva, M A; Merzel, J

    2001-07-01

    Rodent incisors are useful models to study the development and behavior of dental and periodontal tissues. Some studies require three-dimensional reconstructions of the tooth but none of the described methods yield actual volumetric data. Unlike the rat lower incisors the hemimandible can be easily isolated and its volume was determined by Cavalieri's geometrical principle. This method associated with point-counting volumetry was used to calculate the volume of the structures found in that bone mainly those related to the lower incisor. For 172 g male rats the mean volume of the hemimandible was 182.7 mm(3), statistically not different from 184.9 mm(3) the mean volume of the same hemimandibles determined by Archimedes' principle. The coefficients of error (CE) of Cavalieri's estimates for the hemimandible, incisor as a whole (the tooth itself, odontogenic region and periodontium) and bone tissue were less than 0.04. For the incisor individual tissues the CEs were usually above 0.05, however their calculated volumes are probably not different from the actual ones. The data for incisors and their periodontal tissues and for bone, because of continuous growth of these structures, are meaningful only for rats of the same gender, strain and weight range. PMID:11455534

  10. Dens invaginatus in a geminated maxillary lateral incisor.

    PubMed

    Pallivathukal, Renjith George; Misra, Alok; Nagraj, Sumanth Kumbargere; Donald, Preethy Mary

    2015-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) and gemination are two developmental abnormalities that are well reported in the dental literature, but their coexistence in a single tooth is rare. Such situations worsen the risk factors associated with these anomalies, and the treatment plan should be customised as they possess altered morphology and anatomy. A 19-year-old girl came for evaluation of a cracked tooth in the front region of the upper jaw. The tooth showed clinical features of gemination and radiographic features of DI, and was diagnosed as DI in geminated maxillary lateral incisor. The differential diagnoses based on clinical appearance without radiographic investigation may warrant the treatment approach if these two abnormalities coexist in a single tooth. The report also highlights the importance of three-dimensional imaging in diagnosis and treatment planning of teeth with altered pulp canal anatomy. There are few reported cases in the literature detailing the treatment options for these two anomalies occurring in the same tooth.

  11. Correction of palatally displaced maxillary lateral incisors without brackets

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Yoonjung; Kim, Minji

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the orthodontic treatment of a 25-year-old Korean female patient with anterior crowding, including palatally displaced lateral incisors. Her facial profile was satisfactory, but 3.5 mm of maxillary anterior crowding was observed. To correct this crowding, we decided to minimize the use of the conventional fixed orthodontic appliances and employed a less bulky and more aesthetic appliance for applying light continuous force. We determined the final positions of the maxillary teeth via a working model for diagnostic set up and achieved space gaining and alignment with simple Ni-Ti spring and stainless steel round tubes. Tooth alignment was achieved efficiently and aesthetically without the conventional brackets. PMID:24015390

  12. Hypomineralized Second Primary Molars as Predictor of Molar Incisor Hypomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Negre-Barber, A.; Montiel-Company, J. M.; Boronat-Catalá, M.; Catalá-Pizarro, M.; Almerich-Silla, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect of dental enamel that shares features with hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPM). Prior to permanent tooth eruption, second primary molars could have predictive value for permanent molar and incisor hypomineralization. To assess this possible relationship, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 8 and 9 years from the INMA cohort in Valencia (Spain). A calibrated examiner (linear-weighted Kappa 0.83) performed the intraoral examinations at the University of Valencia between November 2013 and 2014, applying the diagnostic criteria for MIH and HSPM adopted by the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. 100 children (24.2%) presented MIH and 60 (14.5%) presented HSPM. Co-occurrence of the two defects was observed in 11.1% of the children examined. The positive predictive value was 76.7% (63.9–86.6) and the negative predictive value 84.7% (80.6–88.3). The positive likelihood ratio (S/1-E) was 10.3 (5.9–17.9) and the negative likelihood ratio (1-S/E) 0.57 (0.47–0.68). The odds ratio was 18.2 (9.39–35.48). It was concluded that while the presence of HSPM can be considered a predictor of MIH, indicating the need for monitoring and control, the absence of this defect in primary dentition does not rule out the appearance of MIH. PMID:27558479

  13. [Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH)--a literature review].

    PubMed

    Gotler, M; Ratson, T

    2010-04-01

    MIH was defined by Weerheijm (2001) as "hypomineralisation of systemic origin of 1-4 permanent first molars, frequently associated with affected incisors". The prevalence of MIH varies between 2.8% and 25%, dependent upon the study. At their sixth congress in 2003, The European Association of pediatric dentistry defined criteria for diagnosis of the phenomena. It included the presence of demarcated opacity, posteruptive enamel breakdown, atypical restoration, extracted molar due to MIH and unerupted teeth. According to the teeth involved and to the time of the crown formation, researches focused on environmental and systemic conditions as possible reasons for MIH.The etiologies were divided into five groups: Exposure to environmental contaminants, pre/peri and neonatal problems, exposure to fluoride, common childhood illnesses and medically compromised children. The clinical implications include highly sensitive teeth, difficulty to achieve adequate anesthesia, behavioral problems and anxiety, rapid progression of caries and the esthetic implications. A six step approach to management was described suggested: risk identification, early diagnosis, remineralization and desensitization, prevention of caries and posteruption breakdown, restorations and extractions and finally maintenance. Restoring an affected molar can vary from adhesive intra coronal restorations (resin composite is the material of choice) to extra coronal restorations (e.g. preformed metal crown). Esthetic solutions to affected incisors may include microabrasion (that shows little improvement) and resin composite or porcelain veneer. The key for a successful treatment is early diagnosis, intense follow up and usage of remineralizating agents as soon as the teeth erupt. There is still need for further research to clarify the etiological factors and improve the durability of restoration in affected teeth.

  14. Developmental disturbances associated with agenesis of the permanent maxillary lateral incisor.

    PubMed

    Pinho, T; Maciel, P; Pollmann, C

    2009-12-19

    The aim of this study was to characterise the intra and extra-oral phenotype associated with agenesis of the permanent maxillary lateral incisor. We compared three groups: (1) subjects with agenesis of one or both permanent maxillary lateral incisors (n=80); (2) first and second degree relatives of group 1 with no agenesis of the permanent maxillary lateral incisor and (3) subjects with no agenesis of the maxillary lateral incisor or family history of it (n=49). For each of the 201 subjects detailed clinical information was reviewed and panoramic radiographs were analysed. Considering only the sample with unilateral agenesis, microdontia of the contralateral permanent maxillary lateral incisor was significantly more frequent in group 1 (82.4%) than in group 2 (25%) and the control group (2%). This supports the theory that microdontia is a variable expression of the same developmental disturbance that causes tooth agenesis. The absence of third molars occurred more often in group 1 (36.2%) than in groups 2 and 3 (18.6% and 18.9% respectively), confirming that agenesis of third molars was markedly associated with the agenesis of the permanent maxillary lateral incisor. Agenesis of teeth other than third molars was not significantly different among subjects with agenesis of the permanent maxillary lateral incisor and their relatives. The frequencies of supernumerary teeth, permanent maxillary canine impaction, general health condition and minor anomalies were not significantly different between the three groups. PMID:19876043

  15. Root resorption of upper permanent incisor caused by impacted canine. An analysis of 23 cases.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, H; Yoshida, T; Murayama, S; Hanada, K; Nakajima, T

    1984-08-01

    Unusual root resorption of 12 central and 11 lateral upper permanent incisors in 11 patients is described. The degree of resorption ranged from loss of the apical 1/4 to almost complete loss of root structure. Excepting 1 case, permanent canines were partially or completely impacted and their crowns were in close apposition to the resorbed surfaces of the incisors. The roots of the canines were either in the process of formation or completely formed. The findings suggest that the pressure from the canine which persists in moving downward despite the lack of space to permit normal eruption could cause root resorption of adjacent incisors even in the absence of systemic factors. Of 14 extracted incisors, 10 were replaced orthodontically by the impacted canines, whereas the spaces of the extracted incisors were restored by prosthetic means in the 4 other cases. 6 incisors were preserved without any treatment and 2 with the aid of a sapphire dento-osseous anchor pin. Since the resorbed incisors were mostly free of pain, early detection by radiographic examination is essential to establish a proper diagnosis.

  16. Lower incisor position in different malocclusions and facial patterns

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sayago, Estrella; Barrera-Mora, Jose M.; Ruiz-Navarro, Maria B.; Llamas-Carreras, Jose M.; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The position of lower incisor has been of considerable concern when planning an orthodontic treatment, having been recognized as one of diagnostic keys, Very important in the development of malocclusion and facial pattern. Objectives: In this study we claim to determine the importance of the position and inclination of lower incisor in the different malocclusions and facial patterns, and to base which of the cephalometric measurement parameters are the mostreliable. Material and Methods: Ninety lateral radiographies were taken, and they were classified by skeletal malocclusion and facial pattern.These teleradiographies have been performed cephalometric analysis, which includelower incisor position belong the following analysis: Ricketts, Riolo, Tweed, McHorris, Jarabak-MSE and Holdaway. Study Design: Cross-sectional study where we perform statistical analysis Anova test, Pearson correlations and Bonferroni analysis. Results: The analyzed measurements present a statistically significant differentiation in lower incisor inclination respect to the anterior cranial base, McHorris angle, angulation of lower incisor respect to occlusal plane and mandibular plane. Conclusions: There are statistically significant differentiation in lower incisor position and inclination respect the malocclusion and individual facial pattern. Key words:Lower incisor, cephalometric analysis, facial patterns, facial biotype, skeletal malocclusions. PMID:23229262

  17. [Incisors crossbite correction with spring inclined plane appliance: principles and procedures].

    PubMed

    Suphanthavanich, K; Raungpaka, S

    1990-01-01

    The spring inclined plane is one of the removable appliances that can be used to correct incisors crossbite which is designed for the early treatment period. In order to prevent skeletal malocclusion and reestablish proper muscle balance. The appliance is very simple which composes of clasps on the first molar both sides and spring 0.9 millimetre diameter. This spring was bended as an inclined plane above the lower incisors. The force from this spring will push upper incisors anteriorly. The spring inclined plane is very effective in mixed dentition. Nevertheless this spring is appropriate to use in the patient who can not wear the removeable orthodontic appliance in the upper jaw.

  18. Notching and anterior beveling on fossil horse incisors: Indicators of domestication?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Richard A.; Rogers, Laurine A.

    1988-01-01

    One of the lines of evidence cited for possible late Pleistocene human control of horses has been the presence of notching and anterior beveling on horse incisor teeth recovered from upper and middle Paleolithic sites in Europe. Similar forms of wear have been found on the incisor teeth of wild horses from early and middle Pleistocene deposits in North America. Notching appears partly due to malocclusion and chipping. The causes of beveling are less certain but may involve the eating of bark. Therefore, the presence of notching and anterior beveling on horse incisor teeth may not be a reliable indicator of human control.

  19. Esthetic considerations for reshaping of autotransplanted premolars replacing maxillary central incisors: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lima, Juliana Paiva Marques; Neto, José Jeová Siebra Moreira; Beltrão, Haroldo César Pinheiro; Borges, Fátima Maria Cavalcante; Nogueira, Renato Luis Maia; de Araújo Lima, Augusto Darwin Moeira

    2009-12-01

    Autotransplantation is a safe and currently common procedure in cases of agenesis and tooth loss. Autotransplantation of premolars to replace missing maxillary central incisors has been shown to be an excellent treatment choice, especially in young patients in the 9-12-year-old age range. The choice for adequate restorative materials and techniques is also essential, direct composite resin being indicated in most cases. This paper reports the case of two premolars autotransplanted to replace both maxillary central incisors and addresses the esthetic issues involved in the reshaping of these teeth to incisor morphology. PMID:19788424

  20. Extraction of an incisor embedded within the nasal cavity in two guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, Nobuhide; ONO, Kaori; OMIYA, Tomoko; OGUCHI, Yukio; SETOGAWA, Moemi; MACHIDA, Yuuki

    2015-01-01

    Oral examination of two guinea pigs revealed that the unilateral incisor was absent. On radiographic examination, the incisor was identified within the nasal cavity in both patients. Under anesthesia in both patients, the skin was incised from the nostril to 1.5 cm proximal, and the premaxilla and part of the maxilla were exposed. The bone was removed using a surgical drill, and the incisor was exposed in the nasal cavity. The root was grasped with forceps and carefully extracted as it was degraded and very fragile. Diagnosis was easy using oral and radiographic examination. In guinea pig patients where an incisor is absent on oral examination, this condition should be considered. PMID:26118492

  1. Avulsed Immature Permanent Central Incisors Obturated With Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kahtani, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The endodontic management of immature permanent incisors in young children can be challenging. This case reported an avulsed immature maxillary central incisors that underwent complete endodontic obturation using mineral trioxide aggregate. A 10-year-old male who suffered a fall injury avulsed both his central incisors. The revascularization process was not possible due to patient compliance and geographic reasons. Mineral trioxide aggregate was utilized as a novel endodontic treatment. After one year post-injury, the teeth remained symptom-free, the clinical and radiographic follow-up showed evidence of healthy periodontium. How to cite this article: Al-Kahtani A. Avulsed Immature Permanent Central Incisors Obturated With Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Case Report. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):88-96. PMID:24155609

  2. Excess NF-κB induces ectopic odontogenesis in embryonic incisor epithelium.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, J; Kawasaki, K; Porntaveetus, T; Kawasaki, M; Otsuka-Tanaka, Y; Miake, Y; Ota, M S; Watanabe, M; Hishinuma, M; Nomoto, T; Oommen, S; Ghafoor, S; Harada, F; Nozawa-Inoue, K; Maeda, T; Peterková, R; Lesot, H; Inoue, J; Akiyama, T; Schmidt-Ullrich, R; Liu, B; Hu, Y; Page, A; Ramírez, Á; Sharpe, P T; Ohazama, A

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling plays critical roles in many physiological and pathological processes, including regulating organogenesis. Down-regulation of NF-κB signaling during development results in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. The roles of NF-κB signaling in tooth development, however, are not fully understood. We examined mice overexpressing IKKβ, an essential component of the NF-κB pathway, under keratin 5 promoter (K5-Ikkβ). K5-Ikkβ mice showed supernumerary incisors whose formation was accompanied by up-regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. Apoptosis that is normally observed in wild-type incisor epithelium was reduced in K5-Ikkβ mice. The supernumerary incisors in K5-Ikkβ mice were found to phenocopy extra incisors in mice with mutations of Wnt inhibitor, Wise. Excess NF-κB activity thus induces an ectopic odontogenesis program that is usually suppressed under physiological conditions.

  3. A comparative study of incisor procumbency and mandibular morphology in vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jillian S; Nicolay, Christopher W; Williams, Susan H

    2010-07-01

    The three species of vampire bats (Phyllostomidae: Desmodontinae), Desmodus rotundus, Diaemus youngi, and Diphylla ecaudata, are the only mammals that obtain all nutrition from vertebrate blood (sanguinivory). Because of the unique challenges of this dietary niche, vampire bats possess a suite of behavioral, physiological, and morphological specializations. Morphological specializations include a dentition characterized by small, bladelike, non-occlusive cheek teeth, large canines, and extremely large, procumbent, sickle-shaped upper central incisors. The tips of these incisors rest in cuplike pits in the mandible behind the lower incisors (mandibular pits). Here, we use microCT scanning and high-resolution radiography to describe the morphology of the mandible and anterior dentition in vampire bats, focusing on the relationship between symphyseal fusion, mandibular pit size, incisor size, and procumbency. In Desmodus and Diaemus, highly procumbent upper incisors are associated with relatively small mandibular pits, an unfused mandibular symphysis with substantial bony interdigitations linking the dentaries, and a diastema between the lower central incisors that helps to facilitate the lapping of blood from a wound. In Diphylla, less procumbent upper incisors are associated with relatively large mandibular pits, a completely fused mandibular symphysis, and a continuous lower toothrow lacking a central diastema. We hypothesize that symphyseal morphology and the presence or absence of the diastema are associated with the angle of upper incisor procumbency and mandibular pit development, and that spatial constraints influence the morphology of the symphysis. Finally, this morphological variation suggests that Diphylla utilizes a different feeding strategy as compared to Desmodus and Diaemus, possibly resulting from the functional demands of specialization on avian, rather than mammalian, blood.

  4. Class II, Division 1 Angle malocclusion with severe proclination of maxillary incisors.

    PubMed

    Montanha, Kátia

    2016-01-01

    Protrusion of maxillary incisors is a common complaint among patients seeking orthodontic treatment. This report addresses the correction of Class II Angle malocclusion with excessively bucally proclined maxillary incisors, in an adolescent female patient, through the use of extraoral and fixed appliances. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as part of the requirements for obtaining the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:27007768

  5. A comparative study of incisor procumbency and mandibular morphology in vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jillian S; Nicolay, Christopher W; Williams, Susan H

    2010-07-01

    The three species of vampire bats (Phyllostomidae: Desmodontinae), Desmodus rotundus, Diaemus youngi, and Diphylla ecaudata, are the only mammals that obtain all nutrition from vertebrate blood (sanguinivory). Because of the unique challenges of this dietary niche, vampire bats possess a suite of behavioral, physiological, and morphological specializations. Morphological specializations include a dentition characterized by small, bladelike, non-occlusive cheek teeth, large canines, and extremely large, procumbent, sickle-shaped upper central incisors. The tips of these incisors rest in cuplike pits in the mandible behind the lower incisors (mandibular pits). Here, we use microCT scanning and high-resolution radiography to describe the morphology of the mandible and anterior dentition in vampire bats, focusing on the relationship between symphyseal fusion, mandibular pit size, incisor size, and procumbency. In Desmodus and Diaemus, highly procumbent upper incisors are associated with relatively small mandibular pits, an unfused mandibular symphysis with substantial bony interdigitations linking the dentaries, and a diastema between the lower central incisors that helps to facilitate the lapping of blood from a wound. In Diphylla, less procumbent upper incisors are associated with relatively large mandibular pits, a completely fused mandibular symphysis, and a continuous lower toothrow lacking a central diastema. We hypothesize that symphyseal morphology and the presence or absence of the diastema are associated with the angle of upper incisor procumbency and mandibular pit development, and that spatial constraints influence the morphology of the symphysis. Finally, this morphological variation suggests that Diphylla utilizes a different feeding strategy as compared to Desmodus and Diaemus, possibly resulting from the functional demands of specialization on avian, rather than mammalian, blood. PMID:20544874

  6. [Treatment of complete traumatic avulsion of an incisor tooth in adults].

    PubMed

    Benmansour, A

    2013-05-01

    It is possible to replant an incisor tooth completely avulsed after trauma in adults. These cases are relatively frequent among athletes. It is essential to conserve the tooth in saline solution. The time before replantation must be as short as possible. The simple technique described here, which requires a minimum of material and no dental chair, makes it possible to replant an avulsed incisor with a good success rate. PMID:23803559

  7. Innovative biomechanics for orthodontic correction of torsiversion of maxillary central incisor caused by twin mesiodens

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Nitika; Kharbanda, Om Prakash; Duggal, Ritu

    2014-01-01

    Mesiodens is the most common type of supernumerary teeth found in the premaxilla between the two central incisors. Early and proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is critical in eluding the extent of treatment needed. This case report presents the successful orthodontic and esthetic management of an unusual case of Indian origin with twin mesiodens in the maxillary arch causing torsiversion and attrition of mandibular incisors due to occlusal trauma. PMID:24963264

  8. Analysis of fused maxillary incisor dentition in p53-deficient exencephalic mice

    PubMed Central

    KAUFMAN, M. H.; KAUFMAN, D. B.; BRUNE, R. M.; STARK, M.; ARMSTRONG, J. F.; CLARKE, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Out of a total of 21 exencephalic p53-deficient embryonic and newborn mice, 6 (28.6%) possessed fused maxillary incisor teeth. On histological analysis of the 5 examples seen on day 19.5 of gestation and newborn mice, 3 varieties were observed: an example of ‘simple’ fusion, 3 examples of simple fusion each of which contained a ‘dens in dente’ (‘tooth within a tooth’), and a single example in which the fused teeth were associated with a median supernumerary incisor tooth which, while deeply indenting the labial surface of the fused teeth, was in all locations a completely separate unit. 3-D reconstructions of the fused teeth demonstrated that they were all of the fusio subtotalis variety. No gross abnormalities were observed in the other dentition in these mice. It is noted that in mice fused maxillary incisor teeth are relatively commonly associated with both hypervitaminosis A-induced and trypan blue-induced exencephaly. It is believed that the presence of dens in dente within fused maxillary incisor teeth has only once been reported in mice, and the association between fused maxillary incisor teeth and a median supernumerary incisor tooth has not previously been reported in this species. PMID:9279659

  9. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of maxillary central incisors exposure in patients undergoing maxillary advancement

    PubMed Central

    Trento, Guilherme dos Santos; Bernabé, Felipe Bueno Rosettti; da Costa, Delson João; Rebellato, Nelson Luis Barbosa; Klüppel, Leandro Eduardo; Scariot, Rafaela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Patients with dentofacial deformities may undergo orthodontic or orthodontic-surgical treatment. Both modalities can affect esthetics. Objective: This study aims to evaluate clinical and radiographic changes in exposure of maxillary central incisors occurring after orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement. Methods: A total of 17 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement between September, 2010 and July, 2011 were selected. Exposure of maxillary central incisors was evaluated clinically and by lateral cephalograms. Measurements were taken one week before and three months after surgery. Data were paired in terms of sex, age, nasolabial angle, height and thickness of the upper lip, the amount of maxillary advancement, clinical exposure and inclination of maxillary central incisor by statistical tests (CI 95%). Results: After maxillary advancement, incisor clinical exposure had increased even with relaxed lips and under forced smile. Moreover, there was a mean increase of 23.33% revealed by lateral cephalograms. There was an inverse correlation between upper lip thickness and incisors postsurgical exposure revealed by radiographic images (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Significant changes in the exposure of maxillary central incisors occur after maxillary advancement, under the influence of some factors, especially lip thickness. PMID:26691970

  10. Extraction of the lateral incisors to treat maxillary protrusion: quantitative evaluation of the stomatognathic functions.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Kuroda, Shingo; Sumiyoshi, Kumi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    To treat morphological abnormalities, impaction, and severe malposition of the teeth, the lateral incisors are sometimes extracted, followed by orthodontic space closure. This procedure often requires special consideration, not only with regard to esthetics but also for functional issues. However, thus far, few reports that have performed a functional evaluation in such cases. The purpose of this article is to report the successful treatment of an adult patient with a Class II division 1 malocclusion who was treated with extraction of the upper lateral incisors. The female patient, aged 23 years and 6 months, had a chief complaint of maxillary incisal protrusion and crooked teeth. In this patient, the upper lateral incisors were extracted to fulfill the patient's strong request, followed by orthodontic treatment using edgewise appliances. A high-pull J-hook headgear on the lower dental arch was used to prevent further labial inclination of the lower incisors. The total active treatment period was 37 months. The resulting occlusion and a satisfactory facial profile were maintained during a 4-year retention period. Additionally, this treatment did not affect the stomatognathic functions as assessed by the following criteria: range of the incisal path or condylar motion during maximal open-close movement, protrusive excursion, lateral excursion, and the chewing test. In conclusion, extraction of the upper lateral incisors can be an effective treatment choice when the upper lateral incisors are dwarfed, are nonvital, or demonstrate severe malposition.

  11. Evaluating Stress Distribution Pattern in Periodontal Ligament of Maxillary Incisors during Intrusion Assessed by the Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Parisa; Gerami, Alayar; Najafi, Amirhosein; Torkan, Sepideh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The use of miniscrews has expedited the true maxillary incisor intrusion and has minimized untoward side effects such as labial tipping. Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the stress distribution in the periodontal ligament of maxillary incisors when addressed to different models of intrusion mechanics using miniscrews by employing finite element methods. The degree of relative and absolute intrusion of maxillary incisors in different conditions was also evaluated. Materials and Method Finite element model of maxillary central incisor to first premolar was generated by assembling images obtained from a three-dimensional model of maxillary dentition. Four different conditions of intrusion mechanics were simulated with different placement sites of miniscrews as well as different points of force application. In each model, 25-g force was applied to maxillary incisors via miniscrews. Results In all four models, increased stress values were identified in the apical region of lateral incisor. Proclination of maxillary incisors was also reported in all the four models. The minimum absolute intrusion was observed when the miniscrew was placed between the lateral incisor and canine and the force was applied at right angles to the archwire, which is very common in clinical practice. Conclusion From the results yield by this study, it seems that the apical region of lateral incisor is the most susceptible region to root resorption during anterior intrusion. When the minimum flaring of maxillary incisors is required in clinical situations, it is suggested to place the miniscrew halfway between the roots of lateral incisor and canine with the force applied to the archwire between central and lateral incisor. In order to achieve maximum absolute intrusion, it is advised to place miniscrew between the roots of central and lateral incisors with the force applied at a right angle to the archwire between these two teeth. PMID:26636119

  12. Two cases with supernumerary teeth in lower incisor region.

    PubMed

    Yokose, Taishi; Sakamoto, Teruo; Sueishi, Kenji; Yatabe, Kenichi; Tsujino, Keiichirou; Kubo, Shuhei; Yakushiji, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Hideharu

    2006-02-01

    Abnormalities in number of teeth are occasionally noted in clinical cases. Many theories have been proposed as regards the causes of the occurrence of supernumerary teeth, including atavism theory, mechanical tooth germ separation theory, tissue induction theory, and dental laminar morphological disturbance theory. However, none of these theories alone offers a sufficient explanation for this phenomenon. The incidence of supernumerary permanent teeth is approximately 1-3%. These are the maxillary anterior teeth, the maxillary molars, and the maxillo-mandibular premolars in terms of descending order of site of occurrence. On the other hand, incidence in the mandibular anterior tooth area, of which there have been few detailed reports, is about 0.01%, a markedly low value. In this paper, we report two rare cases of supernumerary teeth in the mandibular incisor area. We discuss their etiology and orthodontic treatment, and detail a differential diagnosis between the normal and supernumerary teeth. We found that it was difficult to establish a clear etiology and differentiation between the normal and supernumerary teeth. PMID:16924155

  13. Cutaneous and periodontal inputs to the cerebellum of the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    PubMed Central

    Sarko, Diana K.; Leitch, Duncan B.; Catania, Kenneth C.

    2013-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) is a small fossorial rodent with specialized dentition that is reflected by the large cortical area dedicated to representation of the prominent incisors. Due to naked mole-rats’ behavioral reliance on the incisors for digging and for manipulating objects, as well as their ability to move the lower incisors independently, we hypothesized that expanded somatosensory representations of the incisors would be present within the cerebellum in order to accommodate a greater degree of proprioceptive, cutaneous, and periodontal input. Multiunit electrophysiological recordings targeting the ansiform lobule were used to investigate tactile inputs from receptive fields on the entire body with a focus on the incisors. Similar to other rodents, a fractured somatotopy appeared to be present with discrete representations of the same receptive fields repeated within each folium of the cerebellum. These findings confirm the presence of somatosensory inputs to a large area of the naked mole-rat cerebellum with particularly extensive representations of the lower incisors and mystacial vibrissae. We speculate that these extensive inputs facilitate processing of tactile cues as part of a sensorimotor integration network that optimizes how sensory stimuli are acquired through active exploration and in turn adjusts motor outputs (such as independent movement of the lower incisors). These results highlight the diverse sensory specializations and corresponding brain organizational schemes that have evolved in different mammals to facilitate exploration of and interaction with their environment. PMID:24302898

  14. Estimating the color of maxillary central incisors based on age and gender

    PubMed Central

    Gozalo-Diaz, David; Johnston, William M.; Wee, Alvin G.

    2008-01-01

    Statement of problem There is no scientific information regarding the selection of the color of teeth for edentulous patients. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate linear regression models that may be used to predict color parameters for central incisors of edentulous patients based on some characteristics of dentate subjects. Material and methods A spectroradiometer and an external light source were set in a noncontacting 45/0 degree (45-degree illumination and 0-degree observer) optical configuration to measure the color of subjects’ vital craniofacial structures (maxillary central incisor, attached gingiva, and facial skin). The subjects (n=120) were stratified into 5 age groups with 4 racial groups and balanced for gender. Linear first-order regression was used to determine the significant factors (α=.05) in the prediction model for each color direction of the color of the maxillary central incisor. Age, gender, and color of the other craniofacial structures were studied as potential predictors. Final predictions in each color direction were based only on the statistically significant factors, and then the color differences between observed and predicted CIELAB values for the central incisors were calculated and summarized. Results The statistically significant predictors of age and gender accounted for 36% of the total variability in L*. The statistically significant predictor of age accounted for 16% of the total variability in a*. The statistically significant predictors of age and gender accounted for 21% of the variability in b*. The mean ΔE (SD) between predicted and observed CIELAB values for the central incisor was 5.8 (3.2). Conclusions Age and gender were found to be statistically significant determinants in predicting the natural color of central incisors. Although the precision of these predictions was less than the median color difference found for all pairs of teeth studied, and may be considered an acceptable precision, further

  15. Clinical management of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Seda; Ozel, Emre; Arukaslan, Goze; Tekce, Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth with a follow-up for 18-months. A 35-year-old female patient was referred to our clinic with an extraoral sinus tract in the chin. The intraoral diagnosis revealed the fusion of her mandibular lateral incisors. Vitality pulp tests were negative for mandibular right central and lateral incisors. Radiographic examinations showed a fused tooth with two separate pulp chambers, two distinct roots, and two separate root canals. There were also periapical lesion of fused teeth and mandibular right central incisor, so endodontic treatment was carried out the related teeth. Radiographic examination revealed a complete healing of the lesion postoperatively at the end of 18-months. This paper reports the successful endodontic and restorative treatment of unilateral fused incisors. Because of the abnormal morphology of the crown and the complexity of the root canal system in fused teeth, treatment protocols require special attention. PMID:26962321

  16. Lateral incisor agenesis, canine impaction and characteristics of supernumerary teeth in a South European male population

    PubMed Central

    Delli, Konstantina; Livas, Christos; Bornstein, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of lateral incisor agenesis impacted canines and supernumerary teeth in a young adult male population. Materials and Methods: The panoramic radiographs of 1745 military students (mean age: 18.6 ± 0.52 years) who attended the Center of Aviation Medicine of the Armed Forces of Greece during the period 1997-2011 were initially analyzed for lateral incisor agenesis by two observers. After exclusion of the known orthodontic cases, a subgroup of 1636 examinees (mean age: 18.6 ± 0.44 years) was evaluated for canine impaction and supernumerary teeth. Results: Twenty-eight missing lateral incisors were observed in 22 military students, indicating an incidence of 1.3% in the investigated population. No lateral incisor agenesis was detected in the mandibular arch. A prevalence rate of 0.8% was determined for canine impaction in the sample of young adults. The majority of impacted teeth (86.7%) were diagnosed in the maxillary arch. Thirty-five supernumerary teeth were observed in 24 examinees (prevalence rate: 1.5%). The ratio of supernumerary teeth located in the maxilla versus the mandible was 2.2:1. The most common type of supernumerary tooth was the upper distomolar. Conclusion: The prevalence of lateral incisor agenesis, canine impaction, and supernumerary teeth ranged from 0.8 to 1.5% in the sample of male Greek military students. PMID:24926206

  17. Clinical management of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth: A case report.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, Seda; Ozel, Emre; Arukaslan, Goze; Tekce, Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a fused mandibular lateral incisor with supernumerary tooth with a follow-up for 18-months. A 35-year-old female patient was referred to our clinic with an extraoral sinus tract in the chin. The intraoral diagnosis revealed the fusion of her mandibular lateral incisors. Vitality pulp tests were negative for mandibular right central and lateral incisors. Radiographic examinations showed a fused tooth with two separate pulp chambers, two distinct roots, and two separate root canals. There were also periapical lesion of fused teeth and mandibular right central incisor, so endodontic treatment was carried out the related teeth. Radiographic examination revealed a complete healing of the lesion postoperatively at the end of 18-months. This paper reports the successful endodontic and restorative treatment of unilateral fused incisors. Because of the abnormal morphology of the crown and the complexity of the root canal system in fused teeth, treatment protocols require special attention. PMID:26962321

  18. Forces that fracture teeth during extraction with mandibular premolar and maxillary incisor forceps.

    PubMed

    Ahel, V; Ćabov, T; Špalj, S; Perić, B; Jelušić, D; Dmitrašinović, M

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to measure the forces that fracture teeth during extraction based on the effectiveness of the extraction forceps, and to compare them with data collected about forces applied to extracted teeth that did not fracture. We studied 208 patients whose teeth fractured during both the standard and our new method of extraction: maxillary incisors (n=79) extracted with forceps 1 (maxillary incisor forceps), and both maxillary (n=95) and mandibular incisors (n=34) extracted with forceps 13 (mandibular premolar forceps). Forces needed to fracture were assessed with a specially-designed instrument for measuring pressure and rotation. Mean (SD) pressure at the fracture site was significantly higher in maxillary incisors extracted with forceps 1 (1.26 (0.26) bar) then in both maxillary and mandibular incisors extracted with forceps 13 (0.96 (0.19) and 0.98 (0.16), p<0.001). Pressure at dislocation and both left and right rotation showed similar patterns. Pressure correlated to root surfaces of teeth ranging from r=0.35-0.54 but the correlation coefficients did not differ significantly between the teeth-forceps groups. Pressure was higher in fractured than in extracted teeth, and this varied from 3%-48%. In conclusion, forces that break teeth during extractions are sometimes only slightly higher than the extraction forces, so caution is needed during extraction.

  19. Gastrin-releasing peptide expression and its effect on the calcification of developing mouse incisor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Joon; Jin, Chengri; Kim, Eun-Jung; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-09-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is considered to be one of the cancer growth factors. This peptide's receptor (GRPR) is known as a G protein-coupled receptor, regulating intracellular calcium storage and releasing signals. This study is the first to investigate the function of GRP during mouse incisor development. We hypothesized that GRP is one of the factors that affects the regulation of calcification during tooth development. To verify the expression pattern of GRP, in situ hybridization was processed during incisor development. GRP was expressed at the late bell stage and hard tissue formation stage in the epithelial tissue. To identify the genuine function of GRP during incisor development, a gain-of-function analysis was performed. After GRP overexpression in culture, the phenotype of ameloblasts, odontoblasts and predentin was altered compared to control group. Moreover, enamel and dentin thickness was increased after renal capsule transplantation of GRP-overexpressed incisors. With these results, we suggest that GRP plays a significant role in the formation of enamel and dentin by regulating ameloblasts and predentin formation, respectively. Thus, GRP signaling is strongly related to calcium acquisition and secretion during mouse incisor development.

  20. The Effect of Changes in Lower Incisor Inclination on Gingival Recession

    PubMed Central

    Kamak, Gulen; Kamak, Hasan; Keklik, Hakan; Gurel, Hakan Gurcan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Orthodontic treatment may promote development of recessions. The mechanism by which orthodontic treatment influences occurrence of recessions remains unclear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a change of mandibular incisor inclination promotes development of labial gingival recessions. Materials and Methods. The study sample comprised dental casts and lateral cephalograms obtained from 109 subjects before orthodontic treatment (Tb) and after orthodontic treatment (Ta). Depending on the change of lower incisor inclination during treatment, the subjects were divided into three groups: Retroclination (R), Stable Position (S), and Proclination (P). The presence of gingival recessions of mandibular incisors and clinical crown heights were assessed on plaster models. Results and Conclusions. From Tb to Ta, Inc_Incl showed a statistically significant change in the R, P, and S groups (p < 0.05). Increase of clinical crown heights of the lower incisors (42, 4, and 31) was not statistically significant in any group. The only statistically significant intergroup difference was the greater increase of the clinical crown height of tooth number 32 in the P group in comparison with the R group (p = 0.049). The change of lower incisor inclination during treatment did not lead to development of labial gingival recessions in the study sample. PMID:25961071

  1. [Calcium and phosphorus content and the 45Ca incorporation into the bones and teeth of rats after a 22-day orbital space flight on board the "Cosmos-605" satellite ship].

    PubMed

    Prokhonchukov, A A; Tigranian, R A; Kolesnik, A G; Novikov, L L; Timofeeva, N T

    1977-01-01

    Examinations of 37 rats flow for 22 days onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-605 revealed no changes in the mineralization coefficient or the Ca and P content in humerus and teeth of the animals on the 2nd and 26th postflight days. Radioisotope studies showed changes in the specific activity of Ca45 incorporation in humerus and incisors. In flight rats the parameter decreased by 37-44%, in synchroneous animals it increased by 102% in bones and by 20% in incisors as compared with the vivarium controls on the 2nd postflight day. The specific activity of Ca45 incorporation was 92.7% in humerus and 44.2% in incisors of flight rats and 72.9% in humerus and 94.7% in incisors of synchroneous rats as compared with the vivarium controls on the 26th postflight day.

  2. Orthodontic treatment of a mandibular incisor fenestration resulting from a broken retainer.

    PubMed

    Farret, Marcel M; Farret, Milton M B; da Luz Vieira, Gustavo; Assaf, Jamal Hassan; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli S

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the orthodontic relapse with mandibular incisor fenestration in a 36-year-old man who had undergone orthodontic treatment 21 years previously. The patient reported that his mandibular 3 × 3 bonded retainer had been partially debonded and broken 4 years earlier. The mandibular left lateral incisor remained bonded to the retainer and received the entire load of the incisors; consequently, there was extreme labial movement of the root, resulting in dental avulsion. As part of the treatment, the root was repositioned lingually using a titanium-molybdenum segmented archwire for 8 months, followed by endodontic treatment, an apicoectomy, and 4 months of alignment and leveling of both arches. The treatment outcomes were excellent, and the tooth remained stable, with good integrity of the mesial, distal, and lingual alveolar bones and periodontal ligament. The 1-year follow-up showed good stability of the results. PMID:26232842

  3. A Novel approach of Esthetic Management and preserving Vitality of Dilacerated Permanent Maxillary Lateral Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, GR

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dilaceration of the permanent tooth usually is a consequence of traumatic injuries to the primary teeth. Although it may appear anywhere in the long axis of the tooth, i.e., crown, cementoenamel junction, or root, most often the root is involved. However, crown dilaceration is a rare condition representing 3% of the total injuries. Maxillary incisors are more susceptible to such injury and affected tooth may either erupt buccally or lingually or remain impacted. Hitherto, the treatment options also differ as per the clinical scenario. This article proposes a novel technique of restoring esthetic function of the affected permanent maxillary lateral incisor with crown-root dilaceration while preserving the vitality of tooth. How to cite this article: Achary RC, Ravi GR. A Novel approach of Esthetic Management and preserving Vitality of Dilacerated Permanent Maxillary Lateral Incisor. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):152-155. PMID:27365939

  4. A Novel approach of Esthetic Management and preserving Vitality of Dilacerated Permanent Maxillary Lateral Incisor.

    PubMed

    Achary, Ravindranath C; Ravi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Dilaceration of the permanent tooth usually is a consequence of traumatic injuries to the primary teeth. Although it may appear anywhere in the long axis of the tooth, i.e., crown, cementoenamel junction, or root, most often the root is involved. However, crown dilaceration is a rare condition representing 3% of the total injuries. Maxillary incisors are more susceptible to such injury and affected tooth may either erupt buccally or lingually or remain impacted. Hitherto, the treatment options also differ as per the clinical scenario. This article proposes a novel technique of restoring esthetic function of the affected permanent maxillary lateral incisor with crown-root dilaceration while preserving the vitality of tooth. How to cite this article: Achary RC, Ravi GR. A Novel approach of Esthetic Management and preserving Vitality of Dilacerated Permanent Maxillary Lateral Incisor. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):152-155.

  5. Class I malocclusion treatment: influence of a missing mandibular incisor on anterior guidance.

    PubMed

    Barros, Sérgio Estelita C; Janson, Guilherme; Torres, Fernando César; de Freitas, Marcos Roberto; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues

    2010-07-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a patient with a deep-overbite Angle Class I malocclusion, agenesis of a mandibular central incisor, and 2 supernumerary teeth, which caused impaction of the mandibular first premolars. The 15-year-old patient also had a convex profile, maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion, and deficiency of space for the correct alignment of teeth. Therefore, treatment consisted of fixed appliance therapy, cervical headgear, extraction of the supernumeraries and the mandibular and maxillary first premolars, and mesiodistal reduction of the maxillary incisors to solve the arch perimeter discrepancy as much as possible with interproximal stripping. This method of treatment significantly improved the patient's facial and dental esthetics and provided a good functional occlusion, despite the absence of a mandibular incisor, which generally impairs achieving adequate incisal guidance.

  6. Premature loss of the maxillary primary incisors: effect on speech production.

    PubMed

    Gable, T O; Kummer, A W; Lee, L; Creaghead, N A; Moore, L J

    1995-01-01

    The residual effect of premature loss due to extraction of the four maxillary primary incisors on speech production was studied. The articulation of twenty-six subjects who had their teeth extracted before the age of five years was evaluated at eight, nine, or ten years old and compared with the articulation of an age-matched comparison group with normal exfoliation of their incisors. T-tests for related measures revealed no statistically significant differences between the group with premature loss and the comparison group. These results suggest that loss of maxillary incisors in children younger than five years is not likely to result in defective articulation while the teeth are missing or when the permanent dentition is acquired.

  7. Management of an intruded primary central incisor with a natural crown under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Altunsoy, Mustafa; Bilgin, Mehmet Selim

    2014-01-01

    Tooth intrusion is the most common trauma during early infancy. Primary maxillary central incisors are the most affected teeth. There are a few treatment approaches which depend upon the severity of the trauma, and the treatment must be managed professionally. In this case report, a 3-year-old girl with a history of trauma 40 days before referring to our pediatric clinic is presented. Deciduous maxillary right central incisor was intruded through labial and alveolar socket and completely covered with soft tissue. The intruded deciduous incisor tooth was surgically extracted and impression was taken under general anesthesia. The removable partial prosthesis was completed by using the patient's own extracted tooth. Using natural crown on removable prosthesis gives psychological satisfaction to the patient and his/her family, and can be better tolerated since its shape, size, and color are exactly in harmony. PMID:24966781

  8. Immediate post-traumatic upper incisor reconstruction using composite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Panduric, Vlatko; Gabric, Dragana; Negovetic-Mandic, Visnja

    2008-02-01

    Single visit reconstruction of the fractured crown can be completed with composite resins if there is no bleeding due to the soft tissue injury. Clinical inspection revealed a complex crown fracture of the central incisor as well as a simple horizontal fracture of the lateral incisor crown of the enamel-dentin type. Vertical fracture separated the palatal enamel wall from the rest of the lateral incisor crown. After the completion of the endodontic sanitation, root canals were prepared for prefabricated composite posts and crown reconstructions were performed with the Finger Tip Technique by using composite resin materials. The advantage of this kind of reconstruction is preservation of the hard dental crown tissue removed in case of prosthetic therapy, especially in younger patients. Reconstruction can be finished in one visit, without the need for a dental technician and laboratory.

  9. Spectrophotometric color evaluation of permanent incisors, canines and molars. A cross-sectional clinical study

    PubMed Central

    POP-CIUTRILA, IOANA-SOFIA; COLOSI, HORATIU ALEXANDRU; DUDEA, DIANA; BADEA, MANDRA EUGENIA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims An accurate color reproduction represents the final validation level of an esthetic anterior or posterior restoration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the color of permanent maxillary incisors, canines and molars, using a clinical spectrophotometer. Methods The Vita Easyshade Advance 4.0® intraoral spectrophotometer was used by one clinician to determine the color of 369 permanent maxillary incisors, canines and molars. The best matches to Vitapan Classical® and 3D-Master® shade guides were recorded. A one-way analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis test were used to compare L*, a*, b*, c* and h* color coordinates among the 3 types of teeth. Differences between the mean values of all color coordinates were evaluated by use of Bonferroni corrections. Color difference (ΔE*) between incisors, canines and molars was calculated from ΔL*, Δa* and Δb* data and the results were compared to ΔE*=3.3 acceptability threshold. Results Except for Δa* and Δh* between canines and molars, statistically significant differences among the mean differences of all color coordinates were found when the 3 types of teeth were compared by pairs. The most frequently measured shades were A1 (48.4%), respectively 1M1 (31.5%) for incisors, B3 (36.6%), respectively 2M3 (39.8%) for canines and B3 (44.7%), respectively 2M3 (52%) for molars. Incisors had the highest lightness values, followed by canines and molars. Molars were the most chromatic with the highest a* and b* values. Conclusions Despite the limitations of this study, color differences among incisors, canines and molars were found to be statistically significant, above the clinical acceptability threshold established. In conclusion, successful esthetic restorations of permanent teeth of the same patient need an individual color assessment and reproduction of every type of tooth. PMID:26733753

  10. Maxillary lateral incisors with two canals and two separate curved roots

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ajit George; Rajesh, Ebenezar A. V.; George, Liza; Sujathan; Josy, Susan Ann

    2012-01-01

    Variation in the roots and root canal anatomy seems to be the norm rather than an exception. For a successful endodontic treatment, a clinician should have a thorough knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy and its variations. Maxillary lateral incisors usually exhibit single canal with a single root. In this case, clinical examination and radiographs clearly demonstrates the presence of two root canals with two separate curved roots. This case report emphasizes the need for attention during endodontic management of maxillary lateral incisors. PMID:23633825

  11. Agenesis of Maxillary Lateral Incisors: Treatment Involves Much More Than Just Canine Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Giordani Santos; Mucha, José Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed highlight some clinical features present in patients whose maxillary lateral incisors are missing, and proposed more logical, rational and predictable solutions to inform decision making in rehabilitation procedures. Methods: Literature review and discussion. Conclusion: Choosing the best possible treatment for congenital absence of maxillary lateral incisors depends on the multidisciplinary diagnosis of facial, occlusal, functional and periodontal features. It also depends on the individual long-term stability, and it does not only rely on canine-guided disocclusion. PMID:27006720

  12. Bilateral presence of two root canals in maxillary central incisors: A rare case study.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, M; Gokul, Kannan; Ramaprabha, B; Lakshmi, Amudha

    2014-04-01

    Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning and shaping followed by complete obturation of the canal system. Therefore, endodontic therapy requires specific and complete knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy, and its variations in presentation. The internal anatomy of the maxillary central incisor is well-known and usually presents one root canal system. This case report describes an endodontic treatment of traumatized both maxillary central incisors with two canal systems. Knowledge of dental anatomy is fundamental for proper endodontic practice. When root canal treatment is performed, the clinician should be aware that both external and internal anatomy may be abnormal.

  13. Management of a congenitally missing maxillary central incisor. A case study.

    PubMed

    Tichler, Howard M; Abraham, Jenny E

    2007-03-01

    When a maxillary lateral incisor is missing, often the treatment options can be clearly defined, that is, substitute an adjacent tooth for the missing one; open the space for an implant, a bonded bridge or fixed bridge. When a maxillary central incisor is missing and the space for the tooth is absent, the treatment choices become complicated, especially in a growing child. There must be multi-disciplinary coordination among the restorative dentist, the oral surgeon or periodontist, and the orthodontist to obtain the optimum result. At the initiation of treatment, this information must be relayed and the treatment plan agreed upon by the patient or the parents of the patient.

  14. The distribution of proliferating cells during odontogenesis in the incisor teeth of Plecoglossus altivelis.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Kin-ya; Yamada, Kumiko; Komada, Noritomo

    2007-08-01

    To examine the distribution of enameloid and proliferating cells during odontogenesis in the incisor teeth of Plecoglossus altivelis, we investigated the distribution of enameloid using alizarin red S and the distribution of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-immunoreactive cells during odontogenesis of the teeth of the fish. Enameloid was present over the entire surface layer of the incisor teeth. BrdU-immunoreactive cells were observed in the inner and outer enamel epithelium, the odontoblasts, and dental papilla cells around the regions currently being formed. These findings suggest that ameloblasts and odontoblasts actively divide around the region currently being formed, suggesting that enameloid and dentin are made in cooperation by ameloblasts and odontoblasts.

  15. Dental Items of Interest: The Case of Delphic Sibyl by Michelangelo: Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor or Mesiodens.

    PubMed

    Perciaccante, Antonio; Coralli, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    A case of an anomaly in the maxillary dental arch on "Delphic Sibyl," a fresco by Michelangelo is reported. An accurate analysis of this fresco shows a single incisor tooth is present precisely in the midline. We hypothesize that it may be a case of solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) and discuss the differential diagnosis with another similar anomaly--the mesiodens.

  16. Autotransplantation of a Supernumerary Tooth to Replace a Misaligned Incisor with Abnormal Dimensions and Morphology: 2-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Tirali, R. Ebru; Sar, Cagla; Ates, Ufuk; Kizilkaya, Metin; Cehreli, S. Burcak

    2013-01-01

    Autotransplantation is a viable treatment option to restore esthetics and function impaired by abnormally shaped teeth when a suitable donors tooth is available. This paper describes the autotransplantation and 2-year follow-up of a supernumerary maxillary incisor as a replacement to a misaligned maxillary incisor with abnormal crown morphology and size. The supernumerary incisor was immediately autotransplanted into the extraction site of the large incisor and was stabilized with a bonded semirigid splint for 2 weeks. Fixed orthodontic therapy was initiated 3 months after autotransplantation. Ideal alignment of the incisors was accomplished after 6 months along with radiographic evidence of apical closure and osseous/periodontal regeneration. In autogenous tooth transplantation, a successful clinical outcome can be achieved if the cases are selected and treated properly. PMID:23476813

  17. Correlation between maxillary central incisor crown morphology and mandibular dental arch form in normal occlusion subjects.

    PubMed

    Paranhos, Luiz Renato; Lima, Carolina Souto; da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Daruge Júnior, Eduardo; Torres, Fernando Cesar

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the morphology of the mandibular dental arch and the maxillary central incisor crown. Cast models from 51 Caucasian individuals, older than 15 years, with optimal occlusion, no previous orthodontic treatment, featuring 4 of the 6 keys to normal occlusion by Andrews (the first being mandatory) were observed. The models were digitalized using a 3D scanner, and images of the maxillary central incisor and mandibular dental arch were obtained. These were printed and placed in an album below pre-set models of arches and dental crowns, and distributed to 12 dental surgeons, who were asked to choose which shape was most in accordance with the models and crown presented. The Kappa test was performed to evaluate the concordance among evaluators while the chi-square test was used to verify the association between the dental arch and central incisor morphology, at a 5% significance level. The Kappa test showed moderate agreement among evaluators for both variables of this study, and the chi-square test showed no significant association between tooth shape and mandibular dental arch morphology. It may be concluded that the use of arch morphology as a diagnostic method to determine the shape of the maxillary central incisor is not appropriate. Further research is necessary to assess tooth shape using a stricter scientific basis.

  18. [Behavior of the periodontium during leveling of the mandibular incisors: what precautions are needed?].

    PubMed

    Castelli, Alicia; Le Gall, Michel; Monnet-Corti, Virginie

    2016-03-01

    Since the position of the mandibular incisors is one of the keys to successful treatment, most orthodontic treatments focus on control but take no special precautions regarding the periodontal environment. Can we trust the lateral headfilm alone when evaluating such slender quantities of bone surrounding the mandibular incisors? What is the true bone situation prior to treatment and above all, following alignment, leveling and uprighting of the incisors? We performed a prospective 3-year study on 50 patients to assess the periodontal behavior of the mandibular incisors following a leveling phase by means of a clinical approach using periodontal and radiologic probing based on measurements of bone thickness obtained by cone beam. The bone loss observed was not inconsiderable given the thinness of the initial bone. In the face of this clinical situation, we need to adapt our treatment by performing a pre-orthodontic periodontal check-up and by supplementing the diagnosis with 3D examinations for at-risk patients and by checking the incisal axes during the leveling phase. The advent of cone beam has provided us with a valuable tool making it possible to individualize orthodontic treatment and view the posttreatment bone environment and root positions. PMID:27083231

  19. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization: An Epidemiological Study with Prevalence and Etiological Factors in Indian Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ramesh K

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aims: To determine the prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) in Indian children and to analyze the possible etiological factors. Materials and methods: First permanent molars and all permanent incisors were examined in 1,369 children aged 8 to 12 years. Examinations were performed by two calibrated observers. The subjects were evaluated using judgment criteria proposed by Weerheijm et al in 2003. The parents accompanying children were given a questionnaire regarding pre- and postnatal history of the children. Results: A total of 191 children were diagnosed with MIH with a prevalence of 13.9%. Chi-square/Fisher exact test was used to compare the dichotomous variables. The relative risk with its 95% confidence interval was calculated to find the risk of clinical infections, such as chicken pox, jaundice, renal disorders, cardiac disorders, and affected molars with sex and type of delivery. Pre- and postnatal history of infection in a child was significantly correlated with the prevalence of MIH. Conclusion: The prevalence of MIH was 13.9% in the age group of 8 to 12 years. Prenatal and postnatal infections play an important role in hypomineralization of molars and incisors. How to cite this article: Mishra A, Pandey RK. Molar Incisor Hypomineralization: An Epidemiological Study with Prevalence and Etiological Factors in Indian Pediatric Population. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):167-171. PMID:27365942

  20. An Evolutionarily Conserved Enhancer Regulates Bmp4 Expression in Developing Incisor and Limb Bud

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Daniel J.; Aboukhalil, Anton; Li, Xiao; Choe, Sung E.; Ho, Joshua W. K.; Turbe-Doan, Annick; Robertson, Erin A.; Olsen, Bjorn R.; Bulyk, Martha L.; Amendt, Brad A.; Maas, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of Bmp4 expression during organogenesis, we used phylogenetic footprinting and transgenic reporter analyses to identify Bmp4 cis-regulatory modules (CRMs). These analyses identified a regulatory region located ∼46 kb upstream of the mouse Bmp4 transcription start site that had previously been shown to direct expression in lateral plate mesoderm. We refined this regulatory region to a 396-bp minimal enhancer, and show that it recapitulates features of endogenous Bmp4 expression in developing mandibular arch ectoderm and incisor epithelium during the initiation-stage of tooth development. In addition, this enhancer directs expression in the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) of the developing limb and in anterior and posterior limb mesenchyme. Transcript profiling of E11.5 mouse incisor dental lamina, together with protein binding microarray (PBM) analyses, allowed identification of a conserved DNA binding motif in the Bmp4 enhancer for Pitx homeoproteins, which are also expressed in the developing mandibular and incisor epithelium. In vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and in vivo transgenic reporter mutational analyses revealed that this site supports Pitx binding and that the site is necessary to recapitulate aspects of endogenous Bmp4 expression in developing craniofacial and limb tissues. Finally, Pitx2 chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated direct binding of Pitx2 to this Bmp4 enhancer site in a dental epithelial cell line. These results establish a direct molecular regulatory link between Pitx family members and Bmp4 gene expression in developing incisor epithelium. PMID:22701669

  1. Canine transposition following trauma and loss of a central incisor: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B; Durning, P; McLaughlin, W; Nicholson, P T

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this article is to make clinicians aware of the possibility of canine transposition following loss of the upper central incisor. Using two case reports it considers the opportunities for rehabilitation of the occlusion, and discusses surgical, orthodontic and restorative considerations. PMID:15784937

  2. Resin-based composite coronal augmentation of diminutive lateral incisors: an update.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Bond, James

    2006-10-01

    The 2 cases presented here document methods of enlarging diminutive lateral incisors using bonded resin-based composite materials. Former methods are reviewed, and descriptions of a matrix strip stabilization technique and the use of a self-etching adhesive agent are included. PMID:17120388

  3. In vivo administration of dental epithelial stem cells at the apical end of the mouse incisor

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Giovanna; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia; Natsiou, Despoina; Putignano, Angelo; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based tissue regeneration is an attractive approach that complements traditional surgical techniques for replacement of injured and lost tissues. The continuously growing rodent incisor provides an excellent model system for investigating cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie tooth renewal and regeneration. An active population of dental epithelial progenitor/stem cells located at the posterior part of the incisor, commonly called cervical loop area, ensures the continuous supply of cells that are responsible for the secretion of enamel matrix. To explore the potential of these epithelial cells in therapeutic approaches dealing with enamel defects, we have developed a new method for their in vivo administration in the posterior part of the incisor. Here, we provide the step-by-step protocol for the isolation of dental epithelial stem cells and their delivery at targeted areas of the jaw. This simple and yet powerful protocol, consisting in drilling a hole in the mandibular bone, in close proximity to the cervical loop area of the incisor, followed up by injection of stem cells, is feasible, reliable, and effective. This in vivo approach opens new horizons and possibilities for cellular therapies involving pathological and injured dental tissues. PMID:25914649

  4. Interim Restorative Approach for the Management of Congenitally Missing Permanent Mandibular Incisors: Presentation of Three Cases

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Prashanth; Hallur, Jayadev M.; Gowda, Rachana Narse

    2011-01-01

    Congenital missing of mandibular permanent incisors with retained primary incisors may jeopardize the esthetic appearance and psychological development of children, especially during the years of transition into adolescence. The retained primary teeth are necessary for the maintenance and normal development of alveolar bone, which in turn is essential for future definitive rehabilitation. In such situations, an interim restoration may be provided before any definitive treatment is given to comfort the young patient during this transition period. Interim restorations may include resin-modified additions to the existing teeth as well as more sophisticated restorations such as resin-retained bridge and removable partial dentures. However, this restoration differs for different clinical situations based on various factors such as age and patient compliance, and also consideration has to be given for the growth changes of the child. The aim of this present paper is to discuss the esthetic management of three cases with bilateral agenesis of permanent mandibular incisors and retained primary incisors with composite interim restoration. PMID:22567446

  5. Reattachment of fractured teeth fragments in mandibular incisors: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Mohammed K

    2015-01-01

    The majority of dental trauma involves anterior teeth, especially the maxillary central incisors. A mandibular incisor fracture with or without pulp tissue involvement is considerably less common. Different approaches for treating these fractured teeth have been reported in the literature. The type of treatment rendered depends mainly on the extent of fracture, pulp involvement, radicular fracture, biologic width infringement or violation, and presence of the fractured piece. This case report illustrates reattachment of fractured fragments on two mandibular incisors without pulp exposure using a new proposed reattachment method using a combination of two different types of composite materials together with an orthodontic lingual retention wire. An 8-year-old female patient presented with fractured mandibular left incisors (Ellis class II fracture). Broken pieces were saved and brought in a closed container in water. Periapical radiographs revealed no evidence of pulpal involvement in either tooth and no periapical radiolucency was noticed. Fractured fragments and the broken teeth were prepared with circumferential bevels. Reattachment of the fractured fragments were done using two types of composite resin materials and a lingual orthodontic retention wire was also used. The patient was recalled after 8 months to follow up both teeth. Clinical examination revealed excellent composite restorations covering the fracture lines. PMID:25897267

  6. Reattachment of fractured teeth fragments in mandibular incisors: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Mohammed K

    2015-01-01

    The majority of dental trauma involves anterior teeth, especially the maxillary central incisors. A mandibular incisor fracture with or without pulp tissue involvement is considerably less common. Different approaches for treating these fractured teeth have been reported in the literature. The type of treatment rendered depends mainly on the extent of fracture, pulp involvement, radicular fracture, biologic width infringement or violation, and presence of the fractured piece. This case report illustrates reattachment of fractured fragments on two mandibular incisors without pulp exposure using a new proposed reattachment method using a combination of two different types of composite materials together with an orthodontic lingual retention wire. An 8-year-old female patient presented with fractured mandibular left incisors (Ellis class II fracture). Broken pieces were saved and brought in a closed container in water. Periapical radiographs revealed no evidence of pulpal involvement in either tooth and no periapical radiolucency was noticed. Fractured fragments and the broken teeth were prepared with circumferential bevels. Reattachment of the fractured fragments were done using two types of composite resin materials and a lingual orthodontic retention wire was also used. The patient was recalled after 8 months to follow up both teeth. Clinical examination revealed excellent composite restorations covering the fracture lines.

  7. Chemical and structural composition of Atlantic Canadian moose (Alces alces) incisors with patterns of high breakage.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Cynthia S Kendall; Clough, Michael J; Broders, Hugh G; Tubrett, Mike

    2011-11-15

    Analysis of mammalian teeth can provide information regarding local environmental conditions. For example, a high incidence of breakage and wear within a population may indicate poor food quality. Individuals consuming a diet causing high mechanical stress on their teeth, and/or lacking the appropriate minerals for proper development, could experience degradation of tooth condition. Previously, we documented a high rate of incisor tooth breakage, with age, in two genetically distinct moose populations in Atlantic Canada. In this study, multi-element (11B, 63Cu, 64Zn, 75As, 85Rb, 88Sr, 111Cd, 118Sn, 137Ba, 208Pb, 232Th, and 238U) analyses using laser ablation ICP-MS were performed on moose incisors from multiple North American regions. The purpose was to determine whether the elemental composition of moose incisors varies among regions, and whether that variation is related to tooth degradation among Atlantic Canadian populations. A principal components analysis revealed that nearly 50% of the elemental variation in the inner enamel matrix of moose teeth was explained by three groupings of elements. The element groupings revealed differences among geographic regions, but did not explain the variation between incisors that were broken and those that were not. Regression models indicate that the elemental group which includes Cu, Pb, and Zn is related to decreases in incisal integrity. It is likely that other environmental factors contribute to the occurrence of increased incisor breakage in affected populations. The relationship between food resource quantity and quality, as a function of moose density, is hypothesized to explain loss of tooth integrity.

  8. One Odontogenic Cell-Population Contributes to the Development of the Mouse Incisors and of the Oral Vestibule.

    PubMed

    Hovorakova, Maria; Lochovska, Katerina; Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Domonkosova Tibenska, Kristina; Dornhoferova, Michaela; Horakova-Smrckova, Lucie; Bodorikova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The area of the oral vestibule is often a place where pathologies appear (e.g., peripheral odontomas). The origin of these pathologies is not fully understood. In the present study, we traced a cell population expressing Sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the beginning of tooth development using Cre-LoxP system in the lower jaw of wild-type (WT) mice. We focused on Shh expression in the area of the early appearing rudimentary incisor germs located anteriorly to the prospective incisors. The localization of the labelled cells in the incisor germs and also in the inner epithelial layer of the vestibular anlage showed that the first very early developmental events in the lower incisor area are common to the vestibulum oris and the prospective incisor primordia in mice. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of human historical tooth-like structures found in the vestibular area of jaws confirmed their relation to teeth and thus the capability of the vestibular tissue to form teeth. The location of labelled cells descendant of the early appearing Shh expression domain related to the rudimentary incisor anlage not only in the rudimentary and functional incisor germs but also in the externally located anlage of the oral vestibule documented the odontogenic potential of the vestibular epithelium. This potential can be awakened under pathological conditions and become a source of pathologies in the vestibular area. PMID:27611193

  9. One Odontogenic Cell-Population Contributes to the Development of the Mouse Incisors and of the Oral Vestibule

    PubMed Central

    Hovorakova, Maria; Lochovska, Katerina; Zahradnicek, Oldrich; Domonkosova Tibenska, Kristina; Dornhoferova, Michaela; Horakova-Smrckova, Lucie; Bodorikova, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The area of the oral vestibule is often a place where pathologies appear (e.g., peripheral odontomas). The origin of these pathologies is not fully understood. In the present study, we traced a cell population expressing Sonic hedgehog (Shh) from the beginning of tooth development using Cre-LoxP system in the lower jaw of wild-type (WT) mice. We focused on Shh expression in the area of the early appearing rudimentary incisor germs located anteriorly to the prospective incisors. The localization of the labelled cells in the incisor germs and also in the inner epithelial layer of the vestibular anlage showed that the first very early developmental events in the lower incisor area are common to the vestibulum oris and the prospective incisor primordia in mice. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of human historical tooth-like structures found in the vestibular area of jaws confirmed their relation to teeth and thus the capability of the vestibular tissue to form teeth. The location of labelled cells descendant of the early appearing Shh expression domain related to the rudimentary incisor anlage not only in the rudimentary and functional incisor germs but also in the externally located anlage of the oral vestibule documented the odontogenic potential of the vestibular epithelium. This potential can be awakened under pathological conditions and become a source of pathologies in the vestibular area. PMID:27611193

  10. The variation in the size and shape of the human speech pattern with incisor-tooth relation.

    PubMed

    Howell, P G

    1987-01-01

    A mandibular kinesiograph was used to monitor the movement of the lower incisors of young dentate adults reading a standard text. An interface to a microcomputer which recorded and analysed these movements. As the tracings accumulated on the computer monitor, a characteristic pattern was produced. The dimensions of this speech pattern, or envelope of movement, were measured and correlated with the subject's sex and incisor classification. Four distinct patterns were found and these correlated well with incisor classification. Small differences were noted in the dimensions of the speech envelope between men and women, but these were not significant. PMID:3479100

  11. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity and Myocardial Damage: Antioxidant Offered Protection in Second Generation Rats

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Mahaboob P.; Sujitha, N. S.

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate the extent of peroxidative changes and histological alterations in the myocardium of rats exposed to high fluoride for two generations, in addition to ameliorative role of selenium and vitamin E on the above indices. Adult albino Wistar rats were given fluoride through drinking water (200 ppm F) and maintained subsequently for two generations, while they were exposed to fluoride throughout the experiment. Fluoride treatment significantly increased the lipid peroxidation and decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, viz., catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione level in auricle and ventricle regions of the heart. Decreased feed and water consumption, organ somatic index and marginal drop in body growth rate were observed. Decreased antioxidant enzymes and increased malondialdehyde levels might be related to oxidative damage that occurs variably in the myocardium of rats. Biochemical changes were supported by the histological observations, which also revealed that chronic exposure to fluoride causes damage to the myocardium. Results of this study can be taken as an index of cardio-toxicity in rats exposed to water fluoridation. Further, oral supplementation of selenium and vitamin E not only inhibited oxidative stress but also enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Administration of antioxidants during fluoride exposure significantly overcame cardiac fluoride toxicity and therefore may be a therapeutic strategy for fluorotic victims. PMID:21976813

  12. Thyroid function in hemidecorticate rats.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, C O; Tosello, D O; Fernandez, G A; Merzel, J

    1988-01-01

    1. Thyroid function was evaluated in hemidecorticate (HD) and control (C) rats by determining serum T3 and T4 levels and the development of incisors and mandibles and through analysis of various histological features of the thyroid such as follicle size, colloid droplet content and [3H]-glycine uptake by follicular cells. 2. HD animals presented normal levels of circulating T3 but significantly lower T4 levels. 3. There was slight atrophy of the gland in HD animals and fewer colloid droplets were present in the cytoplasm of the follicular cells in this group, indicating a reduction in the breakdown of thyroglobulin. [3H]-glycine uptake by HD indicated that the rate of thyroglobulin biosynthesis was not altered in the experimental animals. 4. The growth of mandibles (weight) and incisors (weight and length) was reduced in HD compared to the control animals. 5. These results suggest that hemidecortication causes mild hypothyroidism (trophoprivic type) probably by affecting hypothalamic function.

  13. Comparison of the Physiological Properties of Human Periodontal-Masseteric Reflex Evoked by Incisor and Canine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ohmori, Hiroko; Kirimoto, Hiroaki; Ono, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The present study was designed to clarify whether the bilateral cooperation in the human periodontal-masseteric reflex (PMR) differs between central incisors and canines. Methods: Surface array electrodes were placed on the bilateral masseter muscles to simultaneously record the firing activities of single motor units from both sides in seven healthy adults. During light clenching, mechanical stimulation was applied to the right maxillary central incisor and canine to evoke the PMR. Unitary activity was plotted with respect to the background activity and firing frequency. The slope of the regression line (sRL) and the correlation coefficient (CC) between the central incisor and canine and the lateral differences between these values were compared. Results: There were significant differences in the sRL and CC, as well as lateral differences, between the central incisor- and canine-driven PMR. Discussion: These results suggest that the PMR differs depending on both the tooth position and laterality. PMID:22754541

  14. Removable orthodontic appliance with nickel-titanium spring to reposition the upper incisors in an autistic patient.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kan; Jang, Insan; Kubota, Kazumi; Hoshino, Tomonori; Hotokezaka, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Noriaki; Fujiwara, Taku

    2013-01-01

    A newly designed removable appliance with a shape-memory wire was used for the orthodontic treatment of the anterior teeth in an 11-year-old child who had autism and intellectual disability. The device was designed to reduce the lateral incisor crossbite and the central incisors' labial rotation. The child was treated for 1 year with this removable appliance. Tooth movement was analyzed using cephalograms and surface data were derived from study models. This device proved to be very durable. The lateral incisor crossbite was corrected, and the inclination of the upper central incisors and the interincisal angle were improved. This appliance exerts light and continuous orthodontic force, without requiring any adjustments of the spring wire. The appliance also facilitated orthodontic treatment in a child with intellectual disability in whom treatment with a standard orthodontic device would be unsuitable.

  15. Unilateral Fusion of Maxillary Lateral Incisor: Diagnosis Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Iury Oliveira; Estrela, Carlos; Souza, Vinícius Rezende; Lopes, Lawrence Gonzaga; de Souza, João Batista

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this paper is to report a dental fusion case focusing on clinical and radiographic features for the diagnosis. Method. To report a case of right maxillary lateral incisor fusion and a supernumerary tooth, the anatomy of the root canal and dental united portion were assessed by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Results. The clinical examination showed dental juxtaposition with the absence of interdental papilla and esthetic impairment in the right maxillary lateral incisor region. The periapical radiography did not provide enough information for the differential diagnosis due to the inherent limitations of this technique. CBCT confirmed the presence of tooth fusion. Conclusion. CBCT examination supports the diagnosis and provides both the identification of changes in tooth development and the visualization of their extent and limits. PMID:25587463

  16. Ageing horses by an examination of their incisor teeth: an (im)possible task?

    PubMed

    Muylle, S; Simoens, P; Lauwers, H

    1996-03-30

    It is generally considered that the age of a horse can be determined by examining its incisor teeth. However, the criteria used to determine age from dental configurations differ widely. The existence of this variety of rules and guidelines was the challenge for the present examination. Detailed descriptions of the incisor teeth of 212 horses of registered age were recorded and the results were compared with the age criteria of various authors. The time at which teeth were shed and the appearance of dental stars seemed to be more reliable features than the disappearance of the cups. The disappearance of the marks occurred four years later than usually stated. Other criteria, such as the presence of the seven-year notch and Galvayne's groove, were too variable and inconsistent to be reliable for the determination of age. PMID:8730689

  17. A Simplified Method for the Restoration of Severely Decayed Primary Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Maryam; Parisay, Iman; Khorakian, Fatemeh; Nik, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Caries and dental trauma are common reasons for primary anterior teeth restorations in children. This non-control clinical trial was designed to evaluate crown restorations reinforced with a sectioned file post for the restoration of severely damaged primary maxillary incisors. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight primary maxillary incisors of 12 children (3–5 years old) with early childhood caries (ECC) received composite restorations with a custom made post. The restorations were evaluated using the modified United State Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. The results were statistically analyzed by descriptive –analytical tests. Results: In this trial, the quality of marginal adaptation decreased after three and 12 months intervals. Recurrent carious lesions were observed during intervals. In terms of restoration retention, only one patient lost both the post and the restoration at the 12-month follow up. Conclusion: The sectioned file post technique showed good retention and aesthetics for restoring severely damaged primary maxillary anterior teeth. PMID:26622269

  18. Interdisciplinary Management of Maxillary Canine Buccal Ectopia Associated with Peg Shaped Lateral Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Sawhny, Asheesh

    2016-01-01

    Aligning a displaced maxillary canine into the dental arch is one of the most complicated problems in orthodontics. In cases of extremely high displacement, the tooth is frequently removed surgically. Because of the upper canines' significance to dental esthetics and functional occlusion, such a decision is a very serious one. The purpose of this report is to illustrate an interdisciplinary approach involving both orthodontic management and conservative tooth restoration. The case was treated through an orthodontic nonextraction fixed appliance mechanotherapy for successful alignment of buccally ectopic upper left canine followed by a conservative direct composite tooth buildup of peg lateral incisor associated with the upper left ectopic canine in a 16-year-old adolescent North Indian female. Posttreatment records demonstrated good alignment of the displaced tooth and restoration of normal anatomy of the peg shaped lateral incisor. PMID:27725890

  19. Ageing horses by an examination of their incisor teeth: an (im)possible task?

    PubMed

    Muylle, S; Simoens, P; Lauwers, H

    1996-03-30

    It is generally considered that the age of a horse can be determined by examining its incisor teeth. However, the criteria used to determine age from dental configurations differ widely. The existence of this variety of rules and guidelines was the challenge for the present examination. Detailed descriptions of the incisor teeth of 212 horses of registered age were recorded and the results were compared with the age criteria of various authors. The time at which teeth were shed and the appearance of dental stars seemed to be more reliable features than the disappearance of the cups. The disappearance of the marks occurred four years later than usually stated. Other criteria, such as the presence of the seven-year notch and Galvayne's groove, were too variable and inconsistent to be reliable for the determination of age.

  20. Facial talon cusp on mandibular incisor: a rare case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Suresh K; Verma, Pradhuman; Dutta, Sanjay; Verma, Kanika Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Talon cusp is a relatively rare developmental dental anomaly thought to arise as a result of evagination on the surface of a tooth crown before calcification has occurred. It is characterized by cusp-like projections from the cingulum area, or cemento-enamel junction of maxillary or mandibular anterior teeth, in both the primary and permanent dentition, usually observed on the lingual surface of the affected tooth. The cusp may or may not contain an extension of the pulp. The etiology remains unknown. The incidence is 0.04-8%. Any tooth may have a talon cusp but most of the cases involve maxillary lateral incisors. The anomaly has been reported to be rare especially when it occurs on mandibular teeth. This article reports a case of talon cusp on permanent mandibular central incisor that too on facial aspect which makes it a rare entity. PMID:25099002

  1. Management of a Horizontally Impacted and Dilacerated Central Incisor in the Early Mixed Dentition.

    PubMed

    Dave, Heemanshu R; Samrit, Vilas D; Duggal, Ritu; Kharbanda, Om Prakash

    2015-01-01

    An impacted maxillary incisor in the early mixed dentition can pose a clinical challenge for orthodontists and pediatric dentists. Clinical observations supported with a 3-D imaging technique can help not only in assessing the precise location of the impacted tooth and its relation with neighboring teeth but also in correctly executing a treatment plan. The purpose of this paper is to describe the management of a severely rotated and horizontally impacted central incisor using intrabony rotation and simultaneous orthodontically-guided eruption. Timely intervention avoided disturbance in arch integrity and meticulous management helped to produce an excellent outcome in terms of function, esthetics, and stability of occlusion during two years of follow-up.

  2. Dental Items of Interest: The Case of Delphic Sibyl by Michelangelo: Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor or Mesiodens.

    PubMed

    Perciaccante, Antonio; Coralli, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    A case of an anomaly in the maxillary dental arch on "Delphic Sibyl," a fresco by Michelangelo is reported. An accurate analysis of this fresco shows a single incisor tooth is present precisely in the midline. We hypothesize that it may be a case of solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) and discuss the differential diagnosis with another similar anomaly--the mesiodens. PMID:26930847

  3. All the Mandibular Incisors with Double Canals in a Single Patient: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Daokar, Sadashiv G; Kalekar (Yadao), Anita S; Ghunawat, Dhananjay B; Kakde, Deepak D

    2015-01-01

    Single rooted tooth are considered to be the easiest for root canal treatment. The literature has documented cases with single rooted tooth showing more than single canal. Understanding of root canal morphology thus is an important aspect to be considered for successful endodontic treatment. The case presented here shows a rare entity of having double canals in all the mandibular incisors in a single patient. PMID:25859107

  4. Crowns to create esthetics for mal-aligned central incisors: a case report.

    PubMed

    Savadi, Ravindra C; Savadi, Anupama R; Kumar, Preeti Satheesh

    2011-06-01

    This case report describes the smile design of crowded upper central anteriors in a female patient aged 25 years. The patient wanted the correction to be completed in a short period of time. A smile design schedule was drawn up involving root canal treatment of the central incisors and placing posts in both the teeth. All ceramic crowns were then fabricated to establish a very satisfactory and pleasing esthetics.

  5. Age estimation from pulp/tooth area ratio in maxillary incisors among Egyptians using dental radiographic images.

    PubMed

    Zaher, Jaklin Fekri; Fawzy, Irene Atef; Habib, Sahar Refaat; Ali, Magdy Mohamed

    2011-02-01

    Age estimation from dental radiographs is a non-destructive, simple method to obtain information. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability of age estimation from Egyptians' incisors radiographs. 144 periapical radiographs of maxillary (central & lateral) incisors (both sexes) aged 12-60 were used. Digital camera was used to image the radiographs. Images were computed and pulp/tooth area ratios were determined by AutoCAD Program. Data were subjected to correlation and regression analysis which showed statistically significant correlation (r = 0.23 &P = 0.006 for maxillary central incisors and r = -0.2 &P = 0.05 for maxillary lateral incisors) between age and pulp tooth area ratio. Linear regression equations were determined separately for both central and lateral incisors along with the corresponding Standard Error of Estimate, which ranged from 1.2 to 5.08 years. Consequently, it was concluded that pulp/tooth area ratios of incisors are reliable for estimation of age among Egyptians in forensic work. PMID:21315299

  6. Scaling and adaptations of incisors and cheek teeth in caviomorph rodents (Rodentia, Hystricognathi).

    PubMed

    Becerra, Federico; Vassallo, Aldo I; Echeverría, Alejandra I; Casinos, Adrià

    2012-10-01

    The South American hystricognath rodents are one of the most diverse mammalian clades considering their occupied habitats, locomotor modes and body sizes. This might have been partly evolved by diversification of their masticatory apparatus' structure and its ecological commitment, for example, chisel-tooth digging. In this phylogeny-based comparative study, we test the relationship between ecological behavior and mechanical features of their incisors and molariforms. In 33 species of nine families of caviomorph rodents, we analyze incisor attributes related to structural stress resistance and molar features related with grinding capacity, for example, second moment of inertia and enamel index (EI) (enamel band length/occlusal surface area), respectively. Most of these variables scaled isometrically to body mass, with a strong phylogenetic effect. A principal component analysis discrimination on the EI clustered the species according to their geographic distribution. We presume that selective pressures in Andean-Patagonian regions, on particular feeding habits and chisel-tooth digging behaviors, have modeled the morphological characteristics of the teeth. Subterranean/burrower ctenomyids, coruros, and plains viscachas showed the highest bending/torsion strength and anchorage values for incisors; a simplified enamel pattern in molariforms would be associated with a better grinding of the more abrasive vegetation present in more open and drier biomes.

  7. Simultaneous Replacement of Maxillary Central Incisors with CEREC Biogeneric Reference Technique: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Akgungor, Gokhan; Sen, Deniz; Bal, Eray; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Biogeneric Reference Technique (BRT) of the CEREC 3D v.3.8 software is an effective technique for single anterior ceramic crowns because it provides computer-controlled match of the tooth form to the contralateral tooth. BRT also enables the fabrication of two or more anterior all-ceramic crowns simultaneously. This clinical report demonstrates the clinical application of BRT for designing and milling two central incisors in one appointment using a single optical impression. After completing the virtual design of the first central incisor, it was copied and a mirror image was created. The second central incisor was designed using this replicated image and therefore a computer-controlled symmetry was obtained. The crowns were milled from monolithic feldspathic ceramic blocks and adhesively luted with dual-cured resin cement following dentin conditioning. At the two-year follow-up appointment, the restorations were intact, no adverse effects were noted, and the resultant appearance was highly satisfactory for the patient. A step-by-step protocol is described from design to cementation of these restorations. PMID:23875091

  8. Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein required for eruption of incisors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kii, Isao; Amizuka, Norio; Minqi, Li; Kitajima, Satoshi; Saga, Yumiko; Kudo, Akira . E-mail: akudo@bio.titech.ac.jp

    2006-04-14

    A characteristic tooth of rodents, the incisor continuously grows throughout life by the constant formation of dentin and enamel. Continuous eruption of the incisor is accompanied with formation of shear zone, in which the periodontal ligament is remodeled. Although the shear zone plays a role in the remodeling, its molecular biological aspect is barely understood. Here, we show that periostin is essential for formation of the shear zone. Periostin {sup -/-} mice showed an eruption disturbance of incisors. Histological observation revealed that deletion of periostin led to disappearance of the shear zone. Electron microscopy revealed that the disappearance of the shear zone resulted from a failure in digestion of collagen fibers in the periostin {sup -/-} mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis using anti-periostin antibodies demonstrated the restricted localization of periostin protein in the shear zone. Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein, and immunoelectron microscopy showed a close association of periostin with collagen fibrils in vivo. These results suggest that periostin functions in the remodeling of collagen matrix in the shear zone.

  9. Rare Root Morphology of a Maxillary Central Incisor Associated With Gingival Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Monea, Monica; Moldovan, Cosmin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dilaceration is a developmental disturbance characterized by the angulation of the crown or root of a permanent tooth, which is often related to trauma of primary dentition. We report a case of a dilacerated root in a maxillary central incisor associated with gingival hyperplasia in a patient under fixed orthodontic treatment, a combination of pathological conditions that had never been mentioned before in the scientific literature. A 10-year-old female patient presented to the Department of Odontology and Oral Pathology with tenderness to palpation and bleeding from the oral aspect of the central incisor, alerted by the proliferation of the gingiva. During clinical examination, the palpation performed with a dental probe revealed a carious lesion with dental pulp exposure on the distal aspect of right central incisor and the presence of a sessile mass of inflamed gingival tissue that proliferated inside the defect. On the preoperative radiograph a dilacerated root canal was noted, without periapical bone resorption. The main diagnosis was irreversible pulpitis and gingival hyperplasia and the treatment option was surgical removal of the inflamed tissue with histopathological examination and root canal treatment. Successful endodontic treatment with a good prognosis was recorded. The measurement of the root curvature proved to be extremely helpful in choosing the right endodontic technique and made the treatment easier than expected. An important observation was that, despite the rare clinical and radiographic aspect of this dilacerated tooth, the endodontic treatment proved to be relatively easy to perform and, therefore, the prognosis was considered favorable. PMID:27149498

  10. Upper lip changes correlated to maxillary incisor retraction--a metallic implant study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Adilson Luiz; Sakima, Maurício Tatsuei; Pinto, Ary dos Santos; Bowman, S Jay

    2005-07-01

    The soft tissue changes after the extraction of maxillary first premolars and subsequent anterior tooth retraction were evaluated for 16 Class II, division 1 patients. Pre- and posttreatment lateral head cephalograms were evaluated using superimpositions on Björk-type metallic implants in the maxilla. The patient sample was divided into group I patients, those who did exhibit lip seal at rest in the pretreatment cephalogram and group II patients, those who did not exhibit lip seal at rest in the pretreatment cephalogram. Upper incisor retraction was followed by a similar ratio of upper lip retraction in both the lip seal and nonsealed groups (1:0.75 and 1:0.70 mean ratios, respectively). However, those without lip seal did demonstrate more retraction at stomion (USt). The final upper lip position (Ls) was reasonably correlated with retraction of the cervical maxillary incisor point (cU1) with determination coefficients of 63.6% in the lip sealed and 68.5% in the lip incompetent groups. Although labial and nasolabial angles tended to open after incisor retraction, there was little predictability for this response.

  11. Interproximal wear versus incisors extraction to solve anterior lower crowding: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Natália Valli; Silveira, Giordani Santos; Pereira, Daniele Masterson Tavares; Mattos, Claudia Trindade; Mucha, José Nelson

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine by means of a systematic review the best treatment, whether interproximal wear or incisor extraction, to correct anterior lower crowding in Class I patients in permanent dentition. METHODS: A literature review was conducted using MEDLINE, Scopus and Web of Science to retrieve studies published between January 1950 and October 2013. In selecting the sample, the following inclusion criteria were applied: studies involving interproximal wear and/or extraction of mandibular incisors, as well as Class I cases with anterior lower crowding in permanent dentition. RESULTS: Out of a total of 943 articles found after excluding duplicates, 925 were excluded after abstract analysis. After full articles were read, 13 were excluded by the eligibility criteria and one due to methodological quality; therefore, only fours articles remained: two retrospective and two randomized prospective studies. Data were collected, analyzed and organized in tables. CONCLUSION: Both interproximal wear and mandibular incisor extraction are effective in treating Class I malocclusion in permanent dentition with moderate anterior lower crowding and pleasant facial profile. There is scant evidence to determine the best treatment option for each case. Clinical decision should be made on an individual basis by taking into account dental characteristics, crowding, dental and oral health, patient's expectations and the use of set-up models. PMID:25741827

  12. Scaling and adaptations of incisors and cheek teeth in caviomorph rodents (Rodentia, Hystricognathi).

    PubMed

    Becerra, Federico; Vassallo, Aldo I; Echeverría, Alejandra I; Casinos, Adrià

    2012-10-01

    The South American hystricognath rodents are one of the most diverse mammalian clades considering their occupied habitats, locomotor modes and body sizes. This might have been partly evolved by diversification of their masticatory apparatus' structure and its ecological commitment, for example, chisel-tooth digging. In this phylogeny-based comparative study, we test the relationship between ecological behavior and mechanical features of their incisors and molariforms. In 33 species of nine families of caviomorph rodents, we analyze incisor attributes related to structural stress resistance and molar features related with grinding capacity, for example, second moment of inertia and enamel index (EI) (enamel band length/occlusal surface area), respectively. Most of these variables scaled isometrically to body mass, with a strong phylogenetic effect. A principal component analysis discrimination on the EI clustered the species according to their geographic distribution. We presume that selective pressures in Andean-Patagonian regions, on particular feeding habits and chisel-tooth digging behaviors, have modeled the morphological characteristics of the teeth. Subterranean/burrower ctenomyids, coruros, and plains viscachas showed the highest bending/torsion strength and anchorage values for incisors; a simplified enamel pattern in molariforms would be associated with a better grinding of the more abrasive vegetation present in more open and drier biomes. PMID:22730038

  13. Soft Tissue Stability around Single Implants Inserted to Replace Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 3D Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, F. G.; Picciocchi, G.; Park, K. B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the soft tissue stability around single implants inserted to replace maxillary lateral incisors, using an innovative 3D method. Methods. We have used reverse-engineering software for the superimposition of 3D surface models of the dentogingival structures, obtained from intraoral scans of the same patients taken at the delivery of the final crown (S1) and 2 years later (S2). The assessment of soft tissues changes was performed via calculation of the Euclidean surface distances between the 3D models, after the superimposition of S2 on S1; colour maps were used for quantification of changes. Results. Twenty patients (8 males, 12 females) were selected, 10 with a failing/nonrestorable lateral incisor (test group: immediate placement in postextraction socket) and 10 with a missing lateral incisor (control group: conventional placement in healed ridge). Each patient received one immediately loaded implant (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongbuk, South Korea). The superimposition of the 3D surface models taken at different times (S2 over S1) revealed a mean (±SD) reduction of 0.057 mm (±0.025) and 0.037 mm (±0.020) for test and control patients, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.069). Conclusions. The superimposition of the 3D surface models revealed an excellent peri-implant soft tissue stability in both groups of patients, with minimal changes registered along time. PMID:27298621

  14. Effectiveness of three methods for evaluating root canal anatomy of mandibular incisors.

    PubMed

    Prado, Marina C; Gusman, Heloisa; Belladonna, Felipe G; Prado, Maíra; Ormiga, Fabíola

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of clinical observation, clinical microscopic observation, and tooth-clearing technique in determining the number of canals in mandibular incisors. Root canal ramifications were also analyzed. Using clinical and microscopic analyses, we determined the number of canal entrances in 277 mandibular incisors. In addition, tooth-clearing technique was used to determine the number of canals and frequency of ramifications in the samples. The kappa coefficient was used to compare the different methods with regard to frequency of canals. Most teeth had one canal entrance. The proportion of teeth with two canals was 23.5% by tooth-clearing analysis, 5.8% by clinical microscopy, and 1.1% by clinical analysis. A large number of samples had some type of ramification (40.1%), and most ramifications were present in teeth with two canals. The most frequent ramification was lateral canals (8.3%). Clinical microscopy improved identification of a second canal in mandibular incisors. However, it did not identify second canals in all teeth with two canals. (J Oral Sci 58, 347-351, 2016). PMID:27665973

  15. The Multidisciplinary Management of Fused Maxillary Lateral Incisor with a Supernumerary Tooth in Cleft Lip Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Yagci, Ahmet; Cantekin, Kenan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmis; Pala, Kansad

    2014-01-01

    Fusion, an uncommon anomaly of the hard dental tissues, is potentially the cause of clinical problems related to esthetics, tooth spacing, and other periodontal complications. This paper describes a multidisciplinary approach involving surgical, endodontic, restorative, and orthodontic attention for the successful, functional, and esthetic rehabilitation of a maxillary left lateral incisor fused with a supernumerary tooth in unilateral cleft lip adolescence in contralateral side. After clinical and radiographic examinations, a fusion between the left maxillary lateral incisor and a supernumerary tooth was diagnosed in the patient, and a small connection was detected between the pulp systems of the two root canals. The case reported in this paper presents the successful resolution of a fused maxillary lateral incisor with a supernumerary tooth, using endodontic, surgical, restorative, and orthodontic management. The decision made in extracting or retaining the fused tooth depends on the arch discrepancy and esthetic needs. Future studies, with long-term followup, will be helpful in evaluating the long-term efficacy of the different treatment options. PMID:24516763

  16. Rare Root Morphology of a Maxillary Central Incisor Associated With Gingival Hyperplasia: An Endodontic Case Report.

    PubMed

    Monea, Monica; Moldovan, Cosmin

    2016-05-01

    Dilaceration is a developmental disturbance characterized by the angulation of the crown or root of a permanent tooth, which is often related to trauma of primary dentition. We report a case of a dilacerated root in a maxillary central incisor associated with gingival hyperplasia in a patient under fixed orthodontic treatment, a combination of pathological conditions that had never been mentioned before in the scientific literature.A 10-year-old female patient presented to the Department of Odontology and Oral Pathology with tenderness to palpation and bleeding from the oral aspect of the central incisor, alerted by the proliferation of the gingiva. During clinical examination, the palpation performed with a dental probe revealed a carious lesion with dental pulp exposure on the distal aspect of right central incisor and the presence of a sessile mass of inflamed gingival tissue that proliferated inside the defect. On the preoperative radiograph a dilacerated root canal was noted, without periapical bone resorption.The main diagnosis was irreversible pulpitis and gingival hyperplasia and the treatment option was surgical removal of the inflamed tissue with histopathological examination and root canal treatment. Successful endodontic treatment with a good prognosis was recorded.The measurement of the root curvature proved to be extremely helpful in choosing the right endodontic technique and made the treatment easier than expected. An important observation was that, despite the rare clinical and radiographic aspect of this dilacerated tooth, the endodontic treatment proved to be relatively easy to perform and, therefore, the prognosis was considered favorable.

  17. Endodontic configuration of the lower incisors in a Romanian population: a radiological study.

    PubMed

    Perlea, Paula; Nistor, Cristina Coralia; Toma, C; Dimitriu, B

    2013-01-01

    The significant rate of failure of endodontic treatment to lower incisors was attributed to poor knowledge of their endodontic morphology. As emphasized by Tinelli ME et al. (2011), the morphology of the endodontic system is strongly related to ethnicity, making possible the existence of important anatomical variations at different population groups. The present study analyzes, using radiological means, the endodontic anatomy of lower incisors extracted from a Romanian population. Five hundred seventy-five lower central and lateral incisors were radiographed and Weine's classification was used to evaluate their endodontic morphology. After processing the data, it was concluded that 81% of the studied teeth have one canal and the remaining 19% have two canals. In terms of endodontic configuration, 81% of 575 studied teeth are Weine Type I, 17% Type II, 1% Type III and 1% Type IV. Results obtained in this study are within existing international endodontic literature. Type II and IV configurations have a high degree of treatment difficulty. This requires thorough clinical and radiological examination of several incidents, possibly cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and individualized therapeutic means to ensure treatment success. This study is the first of this magnitude in the Romanian specialty literature.

  18. On the cutting edge of organ renewal: identification, regulation and evolution of incisor stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jimmy Kuang-Hsien; Mushegyan, Vagan; Klein, Ophir D.

    2014-01-01

    The rodent incisor is one of a number of organs that grow continuously throughout the life of an animal. Continuous growth of the incisor arose as an evolutionary adaptation to compensate for abrasion at the distal end of the tooth. The sustained turnover of cells that deposit the mineralized dental tissues is made possible by epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells residing at the proximal end of the incisor. A complex network of signaling pathways and transcription factors regulates the formation, maintenance, and differentiation of these stem cells during development and throughout adulthood. Research over the past 15 years has led to significant progress in our understanding of this network, which includes FGF, BMP, Notch, and Hh signaling, as well as cell adhesion molecules and microRNAs. This review surveys key historical experiments that laid the foundation of the field and discusses more recent findings that definitively identified the stem cell population, elucidated the regulatory network, and demonstrated possible genetic mechanisms for the evolution of continuously growing teeth. PMID:24307456

  19. Soft Tissue Stability around Single Implants Inserted to Replace Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A 3D Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mangano, F G; Luongo, F; Picciocchi, G; Mortellaro, C; Park, K B; Mangano, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the soft tissue stability around single implants inserted to replace maxillary lateral incisors, using an innovative 3D method. Methods. We have used reverse-engineering software for the superimposition of 3D surface models of the dentogingival structures, obtained from intraoral scans of the same patients taken at the delivery of the final crown (S1) and 2 years later (S2). The assessment of soft tissues changes was performed via calculation of the Euclidean surface distances between the 3D models, after the superimposition of S2 on S1; colour maps were used for quantification of changes. Results. Twenty patients (8 males, 12 females) were selected, 10 with a failing/nonrestorable lateral incisor (test group: immediate placement in postextraction socket) and 10 with a missing lateral incisor (control group: conventional placement in healed ridge). Each patient received one immediately loaded implant (Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongbuk, South Korea). The superimposition of the 3D surface models taken at different times (S2 over S1) revealed a mean (±SD) reduction of 0.057 mm (±0.025) and 0.037 mm (±0.020) for test and control patients, respectively. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.069). Conclusions. The superimposition of the 3D surface models revealed an excellent peri-implant soft tissue stability in both groups of patients, with minimal changes registered along time. PMID:27298621

  20. Agenesis of Permanent Mandibular Central Incisors: A Concordant Condition in Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Namineni, Srinivas; Tupalli, Abhinaya Reddy; Challa, Santhosh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Concordance is an identical expression of phenotype in two related individuals. Concordance expression of hypodontia is an uncommon condition where associated individuals are affected with exactly similar kind and number of missing teeth. There is very limited documentation of this condition either in twins or in siblings, and literature shows paucity of data with regard to this anomaly. To the best of our knowledge, there is only one such case reported in the literature, which has actually showed similar missing lower central incisors in siblings. This report presents a case of two girl siblings aged 11 and 13 years with congenital bilateral missing of permanent mandibular central incisors, which is an absolute concordant condition. Apart from discussing etiology, clinical implications and management, this article highlights the significance of concordant and discordant condition of hypodontia and expression of this condition in twins and siblings. How to cite this article: Kagitha PK, Namineni S, Tupalli AR, Challa SK. Agenesis of Permanent Mandibular Central Incisors: A Concordant Condition in Siblings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):74-77. PMID:27274160

  1. Evaluation of the relationship between upper incisor exposure and cephalometric variables in Korean young adults

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Eon-Hwa; Cho, Jin-Hyoung; Chae, Jong-Moon; Kim, Sang-Cheol; Chang, Na-Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to classify Korean young adults into 3 groups on the basis of upper incisor exposure rates (UIERs) and to compare the skeletal, dental, and soft tissue variables. Methods Samples were obtained from 127 students at the College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University in South Korea. Facial photographs of frontal posed smiles and lateral cephalograms of the subjects were taken. The subjects were divided into 3 groups on the basis of UIERs and 20 measurements were compared among the 3 groups. The correlations between the variables were determined. Results Male and female subjects showed significant differences in the group distribution. Male subjects showed higher frequencies of low smiles, and female subjects showed higher frequencies of high smiles. The vertical height of the anterior alveolar process of the maxilla directly correlated with the UIER. However, the UIER showed no significant correlation with the vertical height of the anterior basal bone or the inclination of the upper incisor axis. In female subjects, the upper central incisor clinical crown length showed an inverse correlation with the UIER. However, this variable showed no significant correlation with the UIER in male subjects. Conclusions The UIER was directly correlated with the levator muscle activity of the upper lip and inversely correlated with the upper lip thickness, yet there was no correlation between the UIER and upper lip length at rest. PMID:24228237

  2. A Digital Stereomicroscopic Study of the Radicular Wall Thickness of Two-Canal Mandibular Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Khedmat, Sedigheh; Mohamadian, Sohayla; Kharrazifard, Mohamad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the radicular wall thickness in mandibular incisors with two canals and find the maximum and minimum thickness to prevent root canal treatment (RCT) procedural errors. Materials and Methods: A total of 160 extracted mandibular incisors were selected and radiographed; out of which, 55 had two canals. Three parallel transverse sections were made in each tooth at 1mm below the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), mid-root and 1 millimeter to the apex. Specimens were evaluated under a stereomicroscope and the thickness of radicular walls in each section was determined for the buccal, lingual and proximal surfaces. Data were statistically analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Results: The thickness of radicular wall decreased from the cervical towards the apex. In all three sections (cervical, mid-root and apical), the thickness of lingual wall was significantly greater than the buccal wall. Also, the thickness of buccal and lingual walls was significantly higher than that of the proximal walls. Conclusion: The lingual radicular wall had the highest thickness in two-canal mandibular incisors. Therefore, in these teeth, the lingual canal is a better choice for post placement. PMID:26877738

  3. A multidisciplinary treatment of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors: a 14-year follow-up case report

    PubMed Central

    de ALMEIDA, Renato Rodrigues; MORANDINI, Ana Carolina Faria; de ALMEIDA-PEDRIN, Renata Rodrigues; de ALMEIDA, Marcio Rodrigues; CASTRO, Renata Cristina Faria Ribeiro; INSABRALDE, Natalia Martins

    2014-01-01

    Absence of the maxillary lateral incisor creates an aesthetic problem which can be managed in various ways. The condition requires careful treatment planning and consideration of the options and outcomes following either space closure or prosthetic replacement. Recent developments in restorative dentistry have warranted a re-evaluation of the approach to this clinical situation. Factors relating both to the patient and the teeth, including the presentation of malocclusion and the effect on the occlusion must be considered. The objective of this study was to describe the etiology, prevalence and alternative treatment modalities for dental agenesis and to present a clinical case of agenesis of the maxillary lateral incisors treated by the closure of excessive spaces and canine re-anatomization. A clinical case is presented to illustrate the interdisciplinary approach between orthodontics and restorative dentistry for improved esthetic results. In this report, the treatment of a girl with a Class II malocclusion of molars and canines with missing maxillary lateral incisors and convex facial profile is shown. Treatment was successfully achieved and included the space closure of the areas corresponding to the missing upper lateral incisors, through movement of the canines and the posterior teeth to mesial by fixed appliances as well as the canines transformation in the maxillary lateral incisors. This is a 14-year follow-up case report involving orthodontics and restorative dentistry in which pretreatment, post-treatment, and long-term follow-up records for the patient are presented. PMID:25466480

  4. Upper incisor to Soft Tissue Plane (UI-STP): a new reference for diagnosis and planning in dentofacial deformities.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Alfaro, Federico

    2010-09-01

    Planning in orthognathic surgery has been and still is an open issue. We have evolved from 2D classical cephalometric hard-tissue planning to 2D soft tissue planning, and finally to 3D and hard and soft tissue evaluation. This, to our knowledge, is the first description of a new Soft Tissue Plane (STP) and its relationship with the anterior position of the upper incisor (UI). Profile photographs of 110 "attractive individuals" with lips at rest or smiling and with upper incisor shown were used. The photographs used were of 65 professional models from two international agencies and 45 individuals considered most attractive in the internet forums, which included catwalk models and actors. In 86 cases (78.18 %), the incisor was located in front of the STP (A). In 15 cases (13.63%), it was on the plane (N); and in the remaining 9 cases (8.18%), it was behind (P). Despite the limitations of this study and based on our series, we can conclude that the upper incisor is located at or in front of the Soft Tissue Plane (STP) in 91.81% of the attractive facial profiles studied. On the other hand, the relative position of the upper incisor to the soft tissue plane (UI-STP) could be a useful diagnostic and planning tool in orthodontic and surgical management of dentofacial deformities.

  5. Age estimation by pulp/tooth ratio in lateral and central incisors by peri-apical X-ray.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, R; Cunha, E; Wasterlain, S N; De Luca, S; Sassaroli, E; Pagliara, F; Nuzzolese, E; Cingolani, M; Ferrante, L

    2013-07-01

    Since 2004, several papers on the analysis of the apposition of secondary dentine have been published. The aim of this paper was to study a sample of peri-apical X-ray images of upper and lower incisors, both lateral and medial, to examine the application of pulp/tooth area ratio as an indicator of age. A sample of 116 individuals, 62 men and 54 women, aged between 18 and 74 years, was studied. Data were fitted with age as a linear function of the pulp/tooth ratio of incisors. The total variance explained by the regression equation ranged from 51.3% of age, when lower lateral incisors were used as explanatory variable, to 81.6% when upper lateral incisors were used. The accuracy of the corresponding regression model yielded ME = 8.44 and 5.34 years, respectively. These results show that, although incisors are less reliable than canines or lower premolars, they can be used to estimate age-at-death when the latter are absent.

  6. Upper incisor to Soft Tissue Plane (UI-STP): a new reference for diagnosis and planning in dentofacial deformities.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Alfaro, Federico

    2010-09-01

    Planning in orthognathic surgery has been and still is an open issue. We have evolved from 2D classical cephalometric hard-tissue planning to 2D soft tissue planning, and finally to 3D and hard and soft tissue evaluation. This, to our knowledge, is the first description of a new Soft Tissue Plane (STP) and its relationship with the anterior position of the upper incisor (UI). Profile photographs of 110 "attractive individuals" with lips at rest or smiling and with upper incisor shown were used. The photographs used were of 65 professional models from two international agencies and 45 individuals considered most attractive in the internet forums, which included catwalk models and actors. In 86 cases (78.18 %), the incisor was located in front of the STP (A). In 15 cases (13.63%), it was on the plane (N); and in the remaining 9 cases (8.18%), it was behind (P). Despite the limitations of this study and based on our series, we can conclude that the upper incisor is located at or in front of the Soft Tissue Plane (STP) in 91.81% of the attractive facial profiles studied. On the other hand, the relative position of the upper incisor to the soft tissue plane (UI-STP) could be a useful diagnostic and planning tool in orthodontic and surgical management of dentofacial deformities. PMID:20383095

  7. Replantation after extended dry storage of avulsed permanent incisors: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Cobankara, Funda Kont; Ungor, Mete

    2007-08-01

    A 15-year-old boy lost his maxillary right and left central incisor teeth in a bicycle accident. He was referred to our clinic 1 week after the injury. The crown-root integrities of both the teeth were not damaged. Although the teeth were stored under dry conditions for 1 week, reimplantation of the teeth was planned to retain the teeth in the mouth for as long a period as possible because of the patient's age. Following the debridement and sterilization of root surfaces in 2.5% NaOCl, root canals were prepared and filled with calcium hydroxide. Then, about 2 mm of the apexes were resected to ensure that the roots easily seated in the alveolar socket and the prepared cavities in root ends were obturated with the amalgam. The teeth were placed into their respective sockets and splinted temporarily. The root canal therapy was completed 5 weeks later. Ankylosis was observed radiographically after 10 months. The patient is now 23 years old and he is still able to use both the central incisors functionally. However, there is a pink appearance on the cervical buccal surface of left central incisor because of progressive replacement resorption. In this case, the new treatment plan is to perform a permanent restoration with dental implants following the extraction of both teeth. Even though the long-term prognosis is uncertain, this treatment technique has provided an advantage for the patient in his adolescent period by maintaining the height of alveolar bone and making the provision of an aesthetically acceptable permanent restoration at a later age possible.

  8. Rare Root Morphology of a Maxillary Central Incisor Associated With Gingival Hyperplasia: An Endodontic Case Report.

    PubMed

    Monea, Monica; Moldovan, Cosmin

    2016-05-01

    Dilaceration is a developmental disturbance characterized by the angulation of the crown or root of a permanent tooth, which is often related to trauma of primary dentition. We report a case of a dilacerated root in a maxillary central incisor associated with gingival hyperplasia in a patient under fixed orthodontic treatment, a combination of pathological conditions that had never been mentioned before in the scientific literature.A 10-year-old female patient presented to the Department of Odontology and Oral Pathology with tenderness to palpation and bleeding from the oral aspect of the central incisor, alerted by the proliferation of the gingiva. During clinical examination, the palpation performed with a dental probe revealed a carious lesion with dental pulp exposure on the distal aspect of right central incisor and the presence of a sessile mass of inflamed gingival tissue that proliferated inside the defect. On the preoperative radiograph a dilacerated root canal was noted, without periapical bone resorption.The main diagnosis was irreversible pulpitis and gingival hyperplasia and the treatment option was surgical removal of the inflamed tissue with histopathological examination and root canal treatment. Successful endodontic treatment with a good prognosis was recorded.The measurement of the root curvature proved to be extremely helpful in choosing the right endodontic technique and made the treatment easier than expected. An important observation was that, despite the rare clinical and radiographic aspect of this dilacerated tooth, the endodontic treatment proved to be relatively easy to perform and, therefore, the prognosis was considered favorable. PMID:27149498

  9. Structural and Morphometric Comparison of Lower Incisors in PACAP-Deficient and Wild-Type Mice.

    PubMed

    Sandor, B; Fintor, K; Reglodi, D; Fulop, D B; Helyes, Z; Szanto, I; Nagy, P; Hashimoto, H; Tamas, A

    2016-06-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with widespread distribution. PACAP plays an important role in the development of the nervous system, it has a trophic and protective effect, and it is also implicated in the regulation of various physiological functions. Teeth are originated from the mesenchyme of the neural crest and the ectoderm of the first branchial arch, suggesting similarities with the development of the nervous system. Earlier PACAP-immunoreactive fibers have been found in the odontoblastic and subodontoblastic layers of the dental pulp. Our previous examinations have shown that PACAP deficiency causes alterations in the morphology and structure of the developing molars of 7-day-old mice. In our present study, morphometric and structural comparison was performed on the incisors of 1-year-old wild-type and PACAP-deficient mice. Hard tissue density measurements and morphometric comparison were carried out on the mandibles and the lower incisors with micro-CT. For structural examination, Raman microscopy was applied on frontal thin sections of the mandible. With micro-CT morphometrical measurements, the size of the incisors and the relative volume of the pulp to dentin were significantly smaller in the PACAP-deficient group compared to the wild-type animals. The density of calcium hydroxyapatite in the dentin was reduced in the PACAP-deficient mice. No structural differences could be observed in the enamel with Raman microscopy. Significant differences were found in the dentin of PACAP-deficient mice with Raman microscopy, where increased carbonate/phosphate ratio indicates higher intracrystalline disordering. The evaluation of amide III bands in the dentin revealed higher structural diversity in wild-type mice. Based upon our present and previous results, it is obvious that PACAP plays an important role in tooth development with the regulation of morphogenesis, dentin, and enamel mineralization. Further studies are

  10. External apical root resorption in maxillary incisors in orthodontic patients: associated factors and radiographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Korwanich, Narumanus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the incidence and degree of external apical root resorption of maxillary incisors after orthodontic treatment and to evaluate particular associated factors related to external apical root resorption. Materials and Methods The records and maxillary incisor periapical radiographs of 181 patients were investigated. Crown and root lengths were measured and compared on the pre- and post-treatment periapical radiographs. Crown length was measured from the center of the incisal edge to the midpoint of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Root length was measured from the CEJ midpoint to the root apex. A correction factor for the enlargement difference was used to calculate root resorption. Results The periapical radiographs of 564 teeth showed that the average root resorption was 1.39±1.27 (8.24±7.22%) and 1.69±1.14 mm (10.16±6.78%) for the maxillary central and lateral incisors, respectively. The results showed that the dilacerated or pointed roots, maxillary premolar extraction cases, and treatment duration were highly significant factors for root resorption (p<0.001). Allergic condition was a significant factor at p<0.01. Age at the start of treatment, large overjet, and history of facial trauma were also factors significantly associated with root resorption (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in root resorption among the factors of gender, overbite, tongue-thrusting habit, types of malocclusion, and types of bracket. Conclusion These results suggested that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in pre-treatment extraction patients who have pointed or dilacerated roots and need long treatment duration. PMID:23071964

  11. Fracture resistance of upper central incisors restored with different posts and cores

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei Dastjerdi, Maryam; Amirian Chaijan, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors restored with different posts and cores. Materials and Methods Forty-eight upper central incisors were randomly divided into four groups: cast post and core (group 1), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) post and composite core (group 2), composite post and core (group 3), and controls (group 4). Mesio-distal and bucco-lingual dimensions at 7 and 14 mm from the apex were compared to ensure standardization among the groups. Twelve teeth were prepared for crown restoration (group 4). Teeth in other groups were endodontically treated, decoronated at 14 mm from the apex, and prepared for posts and cores. Resin-based materials were used for cementation in groups 1 and 2. In group 3, composite was used directly to fill the post space and for core build-up. All samples were restored by standard metal crowns using glass ionomer cement, mounted at 135° vertical angle, subjected to thermomechanical aging, and then fractured using a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to analyze the data. Results Fracture resistance of the groups was as follows: Control (group 4) > cast post and core (group 1) > fiber post and composite core (group 2) > composite post and core (group 3). All samples in groups 2 and 3 fractured in restorable patterns, whereas most (58%) in group 1 were non-restorable. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, FRC posts showed acceptable fracture resistance with favorable fracture patterns for reconstruction of upper central incisors. PMID:26295027

  12. Maturogenesis of Two Maxillary Central Incisors: A Case Report with 10 Years of Follow Up

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the treatment of two immature maxillary central incisors in a 7-year-old female patient. She suffered complicated crown fracture because of trauma, and the root formation was incomplete. White mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was selected as the pulp-capping material after cervical pulpotomy to preserve the pulp tissue vitality and achieve maturogenesis. Follow-up evaluations showed successful treatment in terms of preservation of pulp vitality and demonstrated marked continuous physiological root development. During 10 years of follow-up, both teeth were clinically asymptomatic, and radiographic evaluations showed apparent root regeneration with apical root-end closure without pulp or periapical pathosis. PMID:26622286

  13. A Fused Maxillary Central Incisor and Its Multidisciplinary Treatment: An 18-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Brunet-Llobet, Lluís; Lahor-Soler, Eduard; Cahuana, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Fused teeth may cause aesthetic, spacing, periodontal, eruption, and caries problems. The present case report describes a 7-year-old boy patient with a chief complaint of unerupted maxillary incisor. Radiographic examination indicated a fused tooth which had two fused roots but two independent root canals. A complex management of a fused tooth is really difficult to standardize. In this case an orthodontic, endodontic, and surgical treatment (intentional replantation) allowed the tooth to be retained until 18 years following intervention. Maintenance of the root and alveolar bone in young adults at least until full skeletal maturation should be the main treatment objective. PMID:24738034

  14. Non-Surgical Root Canal Treatment of Dens Invaginatus 3 in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Saeed; Donyavi, Zakyeh; Esmaealzade, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the clinical management of an unusual dens invaginatus type 3. A case of dens invaginatus in a maxillary lateral incisor with a periapical lesion is reported. The patient presented with pain and localized swelling. Despite the complex anatomy and diagnosis of dens invaginatus, non-surgical root canal treatment was performed successfully. Key Learning Points: - Dens invaginatus may be presented in different forms, and the etiology of this phenomenon is not fully understood. - Due to abnormal anatomical configuration, dens invaginatus presents technical difficulties in its clinical management. - Non-surgical root canal treatment can be performed successfully. PMID:24171017

  15. Re-attachment of Subgingivally Oblique Fractured Central Incisor Using a Fiber Post

    PubMed Central

    Adanir, Necdet; Ok, Evren; Erdek, Yesim

    2008-01-01

    This case report presents a 32 year old male with an oblique fractured maxillary right central incisor. The procedure used to repair the fracture included flap surgery with an intrasulcular incision and endodontic treatment. The root canal was filled with a root canal sealer and gutta-percha. After root canal obturation, fragments were luted with composite resin using a glass fibers post. After 12 months, clinical and radiographic examinations showed a stable reattachment of the fragments, good aesthetics and periodontal health. (Eur J Dent 2008;2:138–141) PMID:19212525

  16. Mandibular lateral incisor with Vertucci Type IV root canal morphological system: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Kanika

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the root canal anatomy are commonly occurring phenomenon. A thorough knowledge of root canal anatomy and its variation is necessary for successful completion of endodontic treatment. Mandibular anteriors are known for having extra canals. The role of genetics and racial variations may result in difference of incidence of root number and canal number. This paper attempts at explaining a rare case of successful endodontic management of two-rooted lateral incisor with awareness of data pertaining to number of canals, knowledge of canal morphology, correct radiographic interpretation, and tactile examination of canal wall which are important in detecting the presence of multiple canals. PMID:27003981

  17. Implant Prosthetic Rehabilitation with Bone Regenerative Techniques after Fracture of the Upper Central Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Amato, Massimo; Bruno, Vincenzo; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Cerutti, Antonio; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    A case of implant-bone prosthetic rehabilitation, after the fracture of the maxillary central incisors, which had been treated with grafting of a bone substitute, is reported. This case was followed by the normal procedures of implantology within the traditional timeframe for bone regeneration. However, a barrier membrane was not used which shows that even along with the use of graft material a sufficient amount of bone could be achieved for a subsequent rehabilitation. Therefore, after a five-year follow-up period, osseointegration was maintained with no marginal bone loss. PMID:23762642

  18. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis in association with solitary median maxillary central incisor: unique radiologic features.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sara; Orta, Pedro; Renk, Elizabeth M; Inman, Jared C

    2016-09-01

    Solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) coexists in 34%-65% of patients initially diagnosed with congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis. SMMCI, a genetic syndrome, warrants consideration for further screening because of its high prevalence of other diagnostic possibilities-specifically central defects, like nasal obstruction and hypothalamo-pituitary axis abnormalities. We report on a presentation of SMMCI with congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis which highlights the unique radiologic features and notes the relationship between these two central associated findings in the literature. PMID:27594945

  19. Compound odontoma associated with an unerupted and dilacerated maxillary primary central incisor in a young patient.

    PubMed

    Yeung, K H; Cheung, R C T; Tsang, M M H

    2003-05-01

    The occurrence of odontoma in the primary dentition is uncommon. There are very few reports of non-eruption of a dilacerated primary tooth in the literature. A rare case of compound odontoma in association with an unerupted dilacerated maxillary primary incisor in a young patient is reported. There was also a developing supernumerary tooth in the vicinity of the odontoma. The clinical features and management of these conditions are discussed. The relevant literature is reviewed. A possible causal relationship between odontoma and dilaceration is highlighted.

  20. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor associated with an unerupted mandibular lateral incisor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare, benign odontogenic tumor that predominantly appears in the second decade of life in female patients. Most AOTs occur in the anterior part of the maxilla and are usually associated with impacted anterior teeth. There are three types of AOT, follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral, which are classified based on the location of the lesion and its association with the impacted tooth. We report a rare case of AOT associated with an impacted right mandibular lateral incisor in an 11-year-old female patient. PMID:26734563

  1. Esthetic and biologic mode of reattaching incisor fracture fragment utilizing glass fiber post

    PubMed Central

    Manju, M.; Shanthraj, Srinivas L.; Savitha, K. C.; Sethi, Ntasha

    2015-01-01

    Trauma to the anterior teeth affects the esthetic and psychological well-being of the patient. Advancement in the adhesive dentistry has facilitated the restoration of the coronal tooth fractures by minimally invasive procedures when the original tooth fragment is available. Reattachment of fractured fragment offers immediate treatment with improved preponderant aesthetics and restoration of function. Here, we describe a case of complicated fracture of the maxillary left immature permanent central incisor, which was treated endodontically followed by esthetic reattachment of the fractured fragment using the glass fiber post. Functional demands and esthetic considerations of the patient were fully met with this biologic mode of fragment reattachment. PMID:26283849

  2. Multidisciplinary treatment approach to restore deep horizontally fractured maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita P; Karandikar, Aamod B

    2014-01-01

    This case report demonstrates sequential periodontic, orthodontic and prosthodontic treatment modalities to save and restore deep horizontally fractured maxillary central incisor. The location of fracture was deep in the mucosa which reveals less than 2 mm of tooth structure to receive the crown. The procedures like surgical crown lengthening, endodontic post placement, orthodontic forced eruption, core build-up and metal-ceramic crown restoration were sequentially performed to conserve the fractured tooth. Forced eruption is preferred to surgical removal of supporting alveolar bone, since forced eruption preserves the biologic width, maintains esthetics, and at the same time exposes sound tooth structure for the placement of restorative margins.

  3. Orthodontic-associated localized gingival recession of lower incisors: who should treat it?

    PubMed

    Chaushu, Stella; Stabholz, Ayala

    2013-07-01

    Gingival recession of lower incisors in the young population has become more prevalent in association with the increased uptake of orthodontic treatment. The two main predisposing factors are thin gingival biotype and bone dehiscence caused by labially displaced roots. Management is sometimes challenging, and the achievement of a successful result requires close cooperation between the orthodontist and periodontist. This article proposes a decision tree, which includes both orthodontic and periodontal considerations, to help the clinician in making the correct diagnosis and choosing the most suitable treatment in post-orthodontic gingival recessions. PMID:24568245

  4. Eruptive malpositioning of the mandibular permanent lateral incisors: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Bradley, E J; Bell, R A

    1990-01-01

    Ectopic eruption of the mandibular permanent lateral incisors involving the loss of the adjacent primary canines is not uncommon, yet the extreme distalization and transposition of such teeth (partial or true) has been reported infrequently. Three cases that illustrate various anomalous eruption-exfoliation patterns are presented. Theories that attempt to explain the etiology of anomalous eruption positions are discussed. However, the multifactorial process of growth and development makes it difficult to identify specific primary etiological factors. Treatment options also are discussed and illustrated, with emphasis on early orthodontic intervention for optimal results.

  5. Using Composite Resin Inclined Plane for the Repositioning of a Laterally Luxated Primary Incisor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes the repositioning of a laterally luxated primary central incisor with occlusal interference, using a composite inclined plane. The patient was a 4-year-old girl who applied to our clinic three days after the injury. Because of the time delay between injury and presentation, it was not possible to reposition the tooth with pressure. Following a root-canal treatment, an inclined plane was prepared on the lower primary incisors, using composite resin. The tooth was repositioned in two weeks, and the inclined plane was then removed. After 1 year of follow-up, the treatment was found to be successful, both clinically and radiographically. The use of a composite inclined plane, accompanied by careful follow-up, is an effective alternative to extraction for laterally luxated primary incisors with occlusal interference. PMID:21228962

  6. Skeletal Class III malocclusion with unilateral congenitally missing maxillary incisor treated by maxillary protractor and edgewise appliances.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Masako; Fukuoka, Hayato; Miyazawa, Ken; Goto, Shigemi

    2010-03-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a 10-year-old female patient with a combination of Angle Class III malocclusion, a missing maxillary right lateral incisor, a supernumerary tooth with a short root on the lingual side of the maxillary incisor, a skeletal Class III jaw base relationship caused by a diminutive maxilla, and retroposition of the maxilla. We chose to close the space of the missing tooth, as well as the space created by extraction of the maxillary lateral incisor, by forward movement of the canine and premolars using a maxillary protractor with edgewise appliances. As a result, both the maxillary premolars and the molars were moved mesially, and a Class II molar relationship with tight interdigitation was achieved. Our results suggest that the combination of maxillary protractor and nontorque brackets was effective not only for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion, but also for forward movement of the maxillary posterior teeth.

  7. Using composite resin inclined plane for the repositioning of a laterally luxated primary incisor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Volkan; Sari, Saziye

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes the repositioning of a laterally luxated primary central incisor with occlusal interference, using a composite inclined plane. The patient was a 4-year-old girl who applied to our clinic three days after the injury. Because of the time delay between injury and presentation, it was not possible to reposition the tooth with pressure. Following a root-canal treatment, an inclined plane was prepared on the lower primary incisors, using composite resin. The tooth was repositioned in two weeks, and the inclined plane was then removed. After 1 year of follow-up, the treatment was found to be successful, both clinically and radiographically. The use of a composite inclined plane, accompanied by careful follow-up, is an effective alternative to extraction for laterally luxated primary incisors with occlusal interference.

  8. The adaptive significance of enamel loss in the mandibular incisors of cercopithecine primates (Mammalia: Cercopithecidae): a finite element modelling study.

    PubMed

    Kupczik, Kornelius; Lev-Tov Chattah, Netta

    2014-01-01

    In several primate groups enamel is reduced or absent from the lingual (tongue) side of the mandibular incisor crowns akin to other placental and marsupial mammalian groups such as rodents, lagomorphs and wombats. Here we investigate the presumed adaptation of crowns with unilateral enamel to the incision of tough foods in cercopithecines, an Old World monkey subfamily, using a simulation approach. We developed and validated a finite element model of the lower central incisor of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with labial enamel only to compute three-dimensional displacements and maximum principal stresses on the crown subjected to compressive loads varying in orientation. Moreover, we developed a model of a macaque incisor with enamel present on both labial and lingual aspects, thus resembling the ancestral condition found in the sister taxon, the leaf-eating colobines. The results showed that, concomitant with experimental results, the cercopithecine crown with unilateral enamel bends predominantly towards the inside of the mouth, while displacements decreased when both labial and lingual enamel are present. Importantly, the cercopithecine incisor crown experienced lower maximum principal stress on the lingual side compared to the incisor with enamel on the lingual and labial aspects under non-axial loads directed either towards the inside or outside of the mouth. These findings suggest that cercopithecine mandibular incisors are adapted to a wide range of ingestive behaviours compared to colobines. We conclude that the evolutionary loss of lingual enamel in cercopithecines has conferred a safeguard against crown failure under a loading regime assumed for the ingestion (peeling, scraping) of tough-skinned fruits. PMID:24831704

  9. Tooth-type specific expression of dHAND/Hand2: possible involvement in murine lower incisor morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Abe, Makoto; Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Takashi; Kato, Joji; Tabata, Makoto J; Srivastava, Deepak; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Kurisu, Kojiro

    2002-11-01

    dHAND/Hand2 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor required for the development of the heart, pharyngeal arches, and vasculature and is expressed during embryogenesis. However, there are no reports on the involvement of the dHAND gene in tooth development. In the present study, the expression of dHAND was examined in developing tooth germs of mice. The dHAND gene was expressed in the mesenchyme of the presumptive incisor region of the lower jaw at an early stage and in the mesenchyme of the lower incisor tooth germ at a later stage. However, the dHAND gene was not expressed in the upper incisor region or the upper and lower molar regions during jaw development. Treatment of tooth germ explants of lower incisors with antisense oligodeoxinucleotide (ODN) against dHAND prevented the differentiation of tooth germ cells, including ameloblasts and odontoblasts, the formation of dentin and enamel, and the proliferation of tooth germ cells and increased the apoptosis of tooth germ cells, suggesting that dHAND is essential for these cells during development. On the other hand, the treatment of tooth germ explants of upper incisor and upper or lower molars did not induce severe effects on their development. Treatment of the explants with basic fibroblast growth factor in association with antisense ODN partially rescued them from the effects of antisense ODN. The present results suggest that the dHAND gene plays important roles in type-specific development of lower incisors, and that basic fibroblast growth factor is involved downstream of the dHAND pathway in tooth germ cells. PMID:12397375

  10. The Adaptive Significance of Enamel Loss in the Mandibular Incisors of Cercopithecine Primates (Mammalia: Cercopithecidae): A Finite Element Modelling Study

    PubMed Central

    Kupczik, Kornelius; Lev-Tov Chattah, Netta

    2014-01-01

    In several primate groups enamel is reduced or absent from the lingual (tongue) side of the mandibular incisor crowns akin to other placental and marsupial mammalian groups such as rodents, lagomorphs and wombats. Here we investigate the presumed adaptation of crowns with unilateral enamel to the incision of tough foods in cercopithecines, an Old World monkey subfamily, using a simulation approach. We developed and validated a finite element model of the lower central incisor of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with labial enamel only to compute three-dimensional displacements and maximum principal stresses on the crown subjected to compressive loads varying in orientation. Moreover, we developed a model of a macaque incisor with enamel present on both labial and lingual aspects, thus resembling the ancestral condition found in the sister taxon, the leaf-eating colobines. The results showed that, concomitant with experimental results, the cercopithecine crown with unilateral enamel bends predominantly towards the inside of the mouth, while displacements decreased when both labial and lingual enamel are present. Importantly, the cercopithecine incisor crown experienced lower maximum principal stress on the lingual side compared to the incisor with enamel on the lingual and labial aspects under non-axial loads directed either towards the inside or outside of the mouth. These findings suggest that cercopithecine mandibular incisors are adapted to a wide range of ingestive behaviours compared to colobines. We conclude that the evolutionary loss of lingual enamel in cercopithecines has conferred a safeguard against crown failure under a loading regime assumed for the ingestion (peeling, scraping) of tough-skinned fruits. PMID:24831704

  11. The adaptive significance of enamel loss in the mandibular incisors of cercopithecine primates (Mammalia: Cercopithecidae): a finite element modelling study.

    PubMed

    Kupczik, Kornelius; Lev-Tov Chattah, Netta

    2014-01-01

    In several primate groups enamel is reduced or absent from the lingual (tongue) side of the mandibular incisor crowns akin to other placental and marsupial mammalian groups such as rodents, lagomorphs and wombats. Here we investigate the presumed adaptation of crowns with unilateral enamel to the incision of tough foods in cercopithecines, an Old World monkey subfamily, using a simulation approach. We developed and validated a finite element model of the lower central incisor of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with labial enamel only to compute three-dimensional displacements and maximum principal stresses on the crown subjected to compressive loads varying in orientation. Moreover, we developed a model of a macaque incisor with enamel present on both labial and lingual aspects, thus resembling the ancestral condition found in the sister taxon, the leaf-eating colobines. The results showed that, concomitant with experimental results, the cercopithecine crown with unilateral enamel bends predominantly towards the inside of the mouth, while displacements decreased when both labial and lingual enamel are present. Importantly, the cercopithecine incisor crown experienced lower maximum principal stress on the lingual side compared to the incisor with enamel on the lingual and labial aspects under non-axial loads directed either towards the inside or outside of the mouth. These findings suggest that cercopithecine mandibular incisors are adapted to a wide range of ingestive behaviours compared to colobines. We conclude that the evolutionary loss of lingual enamel in cercopithecines has conferred a safeguard against crown failure under a loading regime assumed for the ingestion (peeling, scraping) of tough-skinned fruits.

  12. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Rat-like and Squirrel-like Rodents.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, Elisabetta; Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    The order Rodentia comprises more than 2000 species divided into 3 groups based on anatomic and functional differences of the masseter muscle. Myomorph and sciuromorph species have elodont incisors and anelodont cheek teeth, unlike hystrichomorph species which have full anelodont dentition. Diseases of incisors and cheek teeth of rat-like and squirrel-like rodents result in a wide variety of symptoms and clinical signs. Appropriate diagnostic testing and imaging techniques are required to obtain a definitive diagnosis, formulate a prognosis, and develop a treatment plan. A thorough review of elodontoma, odontoma, and pseudo-odontoma is provided, including treatment of pseudo-odontomas in prairie dogs. PMID:27497210

  13. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Rat-like and Squirrel-like Rodents.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, Elisabetta; Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    The order Rodentia comprises more than 2000 species divided into 3 groups based on anatomic and functional differences of the masseter muscle. Myomorph and sciuromorph species have elodont incisors and anelodont cheek teeth, unlike hystrichomorph species which have full anelodont dentition. Diseases of incisors and cheek teeth of rat-like and squirrel-like rodents result in a wide variety of symptoms and clinical signs. Appropriate diagnostic testing and imaging techniques are required to obtain a definitive diagnosis, formulate a prognosis, and develop a treatment plan. A thorough review of elodontoma, odontoma, and pseudo-odontoma is provided, including treatment of pseudo-odontomas in prairie dogs.

  14. Adaptive diversity of incisor enamel microstructure in South American burrowing rodents (family Ctenomyidae, Caviomorpha).

    PubMed

    Vieytes, Emma C; Morgan, Cecilia C; Verzi, Diego H

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the morphofunctional and adaptive significance of variation in the upper incisor enamel microstructure of South American burrowing ctenomyids and other octodontoid taxa. We studied the specialized subterranean tooth-digger daggerEucelophorus chapalmalensis (Pliocene - Middle Pleistocene), and compared it with other fossil and living ctenomyids with disparate digging adaptations, two fossorial octodontids and one arboreal echimyid. Morphofunctionally significant enamel traits were quite similar among the species studied despite their marked differences in habits, digging behaviour and substrates occupied, suggesting a possible phylogenetic constraint for the Octodontoidea. In this context of relative similarity, the inclination of Hunter-Schreger bands, relative thickness of external index (EI) and prismless enamel zone were highest in daggerEucelophorus, in agreement with its outstanding craniomandibular tooth-digging specialization. Higher inclination of Hunter-Schreger bands reinforces enamel to withstand high tension forces, while high external index provides greater resistance to wear. Results suggest increased frequency of incisor use for digging in daggerEucelophorus, which could be related to a more extreme tooth-digging strategy and/or occupancy of hard soils. Higher external index values as recurring patterns in distant clades of tooth-digging rodents support an adaptive significance of this enamel trait.

  15. Intentional replantation for a periodontally involved hopeless incisor by using autologous platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Tözüm, Tolga Fikret; Keçeli, Hüseyin Gencay; Serper, Ahmet; Tuncel, Behram

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present case is to describe the use of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in an intentional replantation procedure for a periodontally involved lower right central incisor with 18 months follow-up. Brief information is also given on the preoperative preparation of PRP in the dental office. PRP preparation is a new biotechnology, and the prepared material contains thrombocyte concentrates and high levels of growth factors. This material promotes healing time in a range of various sites. In this case, a tooth with severe periodontal breakdown was treated with PRP with intentional replantation procedure. This tooth was previously treated with root canal treatment and root planing. The tooth was extracted, and was replanted with autologous PRP. Clinical and radiographic follow-up for 18 months demonstrated new bone formation around the apical portion of the root and all clinical parameters indicated a trend of healing. The mobility of this previously grade III mobile incisor returned to normal limits. We speculate that intentional replantation with PRP application may induce wound healing and may induce bone formation.

  16. Localized periodontal defect associated with unusual furcation involvement on a mandibular incisor.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeHyun; Intini, Giuseppe; Kim, David M; Levin, Liran

    2013-10-01

    A localized periodontal defect associated with an unusual furcation on a mandibular central incisor and its treatment sequences are presented. A 54-year-old woman presented with a persistent localized periodontal defect, which was not responsive to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. An exploratory surgery revealed complete through and through furcation involvement on the right mandibular central incisor, resulting in a three-walled infrabony defect. Following thorough mechanical debridement and root planing, the infrabony aspect of the defect was grafted with freeze-dried bone allograft combined with the recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB. The flaps were positioned to enable patient's home care and professional dental cleaning. Follow-up examination revealed uneventful healing and resolution of the infrabony periodontal defect. Clinicians should be aware of this unusual condition and consider it as a potential etiology when dealing with a persistent localized periodontal defect in the mandibular anterior sextant, which may not respond to the conventional nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Eliminating the active disease as well as enabling careful maintenance and oral hygiene may prevent further deterioration and result in a stable long-term outcome preserving the compromised tooth. PMID:23878844

  17. Re-eruption of an intruded immature permanent incisor with necrotic pulp: a case report.

    PubMed

    Altun, Ceyhan; Güven, Günseli; Cehreli, Zafer C; Gurbuz, Taskin; Aydin, Cumhur

    2008-01-01

    Intrusive luxation is a serious dental injury that causes damage to the pulp and supporting structures of a tooth because of its dislocation into the alveolar process. This paper presents the case of the re-eruption of a severely intruded immature permanent incisor with a crown-root fracture. A 9-year-old boy was referred to the clinic 1 day after a fall. Clinical and radiographic examinations revealed intrusive luxation of the immature left permanent incisor and a crown-root fracture without pulp exposure. Palatal gingivectomy was done 2 weeks later to facilitate re-eruption. Root canal therapy with intracanal calcium hydroxide paste was initiated during the first month owing to severe spontaneous pain. Six months later, the tooth re-erupted to a normal position, after which root canal obturation and a final esthetic restoration were done. The present case demonstrates the possibility of obtaining re-eruption of intruded immature permanent teeth with interim medication (calcium hydroxide) in the root canal.

  18. Prevalence of lesions in incisors of mule deer from Colorado Springs, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Borrero, L.M.; Scanlon, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Lesions in teeth may be influenced by exposure to fluorides, malnutrition and trauma. Incisors of 228 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) taken from the USAF Academy, Colorado Springs, CO during the 1993 hunting season were examined for lesions. A classification scheme (scale = 0--5) for lesions was derived from the method of Shupe et al. 1963. Lesions were present in at least one incisor of 84.6% of deer. Of the deer with lesions, 86% had at least one tooth with very slight effect (one to few white spots), 9.8% had a slight effect (generalized mottling), 2.6% had a moderate effect (generalized mottling and wear), 10.04% had a marked effect (mottling and hypoplasia of the enamel) , and 0.5 % ad severe effects (hypoplasia of the enamel and abnormal wear). Lesions that affect the enamel are produced during the period of formation of the tooth. The severity of lesions depends on the cause and the length of exposure to the causative agent. Generally mottling and hypoplasia of the enamel are associated with fluorosis. The relationship of lesions to bone and tooth fluoride concentrations was examined.

  19. Investigation of the maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and associated dental anomalies in an orthodontic patient population

    PubMed Central

    Kamak, Hasan; Yildirim, Hanifi; Ceylan, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of maxillary lateral incisor (MLI) agenesis and associated dental anomalies as well as skeletal patterns in an orthodontic population, and then to compare it with the prevalence of these anomalies in the general population. Study Design: The material of the present study included the records of the 3872 orthodontic patients. The followings were recorded for each subject with the agenesis of MLI: Age, sex, unilateral or bilateral absence, anterior-posterior skeletal relationship of the maxilla and mandible, and presence of associated dental anomalies. The occurrence of these anomalies was compared with data previously reported for the general populations. Results: Of the 3872 patients examined, 94 were found to have agenesis of the MLI, representing a prevalence of 2.4 per cent, with females being more frequently observed. The most commonly found associated anomalies were ectopic eruption of maxillary canines and reduced or peg- shaped contralateral incisor with the frequencies of 21.3 per cent and 20.2 per cent respectively. Conclusions: Patients with agenesis of MLI showed a significantly higher prevalence of skeletal Class III malocclusion compared with the general population. The prevalence of ectopic eruption, transposition, and transmigration of the maxillary canine and reduced or peg- shaped MLIs were significantly increased. Key words:Hypodontia, missing laterals, associated dental anomalies. PMID:22549676

  20. Adaptive diversity of incisor enamel microstructure in South American burrowing rodents (family Ctenomyidae, Caviomorpha)

    PubMed Central

    Vieytes, Emma C; Morgan, Cecilia C; Verzi, Diego H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the morphofunctional and adaptive significance of variation in the upper incisor enamel microstructure of South American burrowing ctenomyids and other octodontoid taxa. We studied the specialized subterranean tooth-digger †Eucelophorus chapalmalensis (Pliocene – Middle Pleistocene), and compared it with other fossil and living ctenomyids with disparate digging adaptations, two fossorial octodontids and one arboreal echimyid. Morphofunctionally significant enamel traits were quite similar among the species studied despite their marked differences in habits, digging behaviour and substrates occupied, suggesting a possible phylogenetic constraint for the Octodontoidea. In this context of relative similarity, the inclination of Hunter–Schreger bands, relative thickness of external index (EI) and prismless enamel zone were highest in †Eucelophorus, in agreement with its outstanding craniomandibular tooth-digging specialization. Higher inclination of Hunter–Schreger bands reinforces enamel to withstand high tension forces, while high external index provides greater resistance to wear. Results suggest increased frequency of incisor use for digging in †Eucelophorus, which could be related to a more extreme tooth-digging strategy and/or occupancy of hard soils. Higher external index values as recurring patterns in distant clades of tooth-digging rodents support an adaptive significance of this enamel trait. PMID:17584181

  1. Correction of a Severely Rotated Maxillary Incisor by Elastics in Mixed Dentition Complicated by a Mesiodens.

    PubMed

    Sidiq, Mohsin; Yousuf, Asif; Bhat, Manohar; Sharma, Rajesh; Bhargava, Neha; Ganta, Shravani

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case study was to report a potentially convenient approach instead of a conventional orthodontic procedure for correcting severe rotation of anterior tooth of an 11-year-old Indian boy, with a mixed dentition class I malocclusion. The child reported seeking treatment for severely rotated upper right central incisor with mesiodens and a single tooth crossbite. The supernumerary tooth was first extracted and bondable buttons were placed on the rotated tooth, an appliance composed of a removable plate with Adam's clasp with distal extension and a loop for engagement of elastics was delivered. Circumferential supracrestal fibrotomy was performed on the corrected derotated tooth. Then, Hawley's appliance with a z-spring and posterior bite plane was fabricated and placed for correction of crossbite. Thus, this removable appliance can be a simplified and a cost-effective treatment alternative for derotation of anterior tooth, especially during the mixed dentition period. How to cite this article: Sidiq M, Yousuf A, Bhat M, Sharma R, Bhargava N, Ganta S. Correction of a Severely Rotated Maxillary Incisor by Elastics in Mixed Dentition Complicated by a Mesiodens. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):234-238.

  2. A morphometric analysis of maxillary central incisor on the basis of facial appearance in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ji-Eun; Yang, Hong-So

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to identify a more esthetic width-to-length ratio by analyzing maxillary central incisor of Korean adult population. Information regarding tooth ratio in the Korean population may be useful to clinicians when restoring anterior teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 40 men and 40 women were included in this study. The NON-MEDIA group included 40 non-celebrities, who were healthy and 25 to 39 years old, with normal dentofacial appearance. The MEDIA group consisted of 40 celebrities selected only on the basis of their soft-tissue facial appearance. The facial photographs of 40 celebrities were collected from the Internet websites. The width and length of the maxillary central incisor were measured using Adobe Photoshop® 7.0, a software for analysis, measurement and edition of photographs. Data were analyzed statistically using the Independent t-test at 5% statistical significance level. RESULTS The mean ratio for the MEDIA group was 0.77, whereas that of the NON-MEDIA group was 0.88. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant. No significant gender differences were found in the width-to-length ratio in MEDIA group. In NON-MEDIA group, however, there were significant differences between female and male. CONCLUSION After analyzing maxillary anterior teeth of Korean adults, our results were in accordance with the general Western standards of esthetics. A dentist restoring the natural look and beauty of teeth will have to consider those standards. PMID:22439095

  3. Theoretical Study of the Effect of Enamel Parameters on Laser-Induced Surface Acoustic Waves in Human Incisor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ling; Sun, Kaihua; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu; Lu, Jian

    2015-06-01

    The laser ultrasound technique has great potential for clinical diagnosis of teeth because of its many advantages. To study laser surface acoustic wave (LSAW) propagation in human teeth, two theoretical methods, the finite element method (FEM) and Laguerre polynomial extension method (LPEM), are presented. The full field temperature values and SAW displacements in an incisor can be obtained by the FEM. The SAW phase velocity in a healthy incisor and dental caries is obtained by the LPEM. The methods and results of this work can provide a theoretical basis for nondestructive evaluation of human teeth with LSAWs.

  4. Retreatment of a Maxillary Lateral Incisor With Two Separate Root Canals Confirmed With Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Seda; Helvacioglu-Yigit, Dilek; Sinanoglu, Alper; Ozel, Emre

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a rare case of a maxillary lateral incisor exhibiting two separate root canals confirmed by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 65-year-old female patient with an esthetic complaint regarding her maxillary left lateral incisor was referred to our clinic. During a radiographical examination, an endodontically treated root canal and an extra root canal with an apical lesion were observed. The retreatment was performed. CBCT findings confirmed the root canal mophology of the maxillary left lateral with two distinct canals. We conclude that the CBCT imaging is an adjunctive tool for better assessment of complex root canal systems. PMID:26015823

  5. Temporary management of permanent central incisors loss caused by trauma in primary dentition with natural crowns: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tüzüner, Tamer; Kuşgöz, Adem; Nur, Bilge Gülsüm

    2009-10-01

    Primary teeth injuries may cause developmental disturbances in the permanent dentition and loss of permanent incisors could be treated with different options. In this case report, an 11-year-old boy, with a history of trauma at the age of 4 years, is presented. Premature loss of permanent upper right central and upper left central teeth because of the mobility and arrest in root development were treated using patient's own natural crowns on a removable appliance. This treatment option could be considered as an esthetic and functional temporary management of permanent central incisors loss until the definitive treatment will be completed in the future.

  6. Management of a Two-rooted Maxillary Central Incisor Using Cone-beam Computed Tomography: Importance of Three-dimensional Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Gupta, Saurabh; Saxena, Payal; Khetarpal, Shaleen; Solanki, Mishthu

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a two-rooted maxillary central incisor, stressing the importance of three-dimensional imaging in treatment planning and conservative approach of management. Endodontic treatment of this central incisor was carried out with a successful outcome. PMID:26697155

  7. Orthodontic Treatment of Maxillary Incisors with Severe Root Resorption Caused by Bilateral Canine Impaction in a Class II Division 1 Patient.

    PubMed

    Chang, Na-Young; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Mi-Young; Cho, Jin-Woo; Cho, Jin-Hyoung; An, Ki-Yong; Chae, Jong-Moon

    2016-01-01

    This case report shows the successful alignment of bilateral impacted maxillary canines. A 12-year-old male with the chief complaint of the protrusion of his maxillary anterior teeth happened to have bilateral maxillary canine impaction on the labial side of his maxillary incisors. Four maxillary incisors showed severe root resorption because of the impacted canines. The patient was diagnosed as skeletal Class II malocclusion with proclined maxillary incisors. The impacted canine was carefully retracted using sectional buccal arch wires to avoid further root resorption of the maxillary incisors. To distalize the maxillary dentition, two palatal miniscrews were used. After 25 months of treatment, the maxillary canines were well aligned without any additional root resorption of the maxillary incisors.

  8. The effect of maxillary first premolar extraction and incisor retraction on mandibular position: testing the central dogma of "functional orthodontics".

    PubMed

    Luecke, P E; Johnston, L E

    1992-01-01

    It has been argued by a vocal coterie of disaffected dentists that premolar extraction, incisor retraction, and "backward-pulling" mechanics conspire to "distalize" the condyles and, pari passu, to produce craniomandibular dysfunction. Given the gravity of this conjecture, it seemed appropriate to test the predictions it generates in a sample of patients of the type most often said to be at risk: 42 "edgewise" patients with Class II, Division 1 malocclusions, treated in conjunction with the extraction of two maxillary first premolars. Regional and anterior cranial-base cephalometric superimpositions were used to quantify the individual components of the molar and overjet corrections, to measure both at the chin and condyles the mandibular displacement seen during treatment, and to examine the extent to which this displacement is related to the correction of maxillary incisor protrusion. Although the present patients underwent marked upper incisor retraction (on average, about 5 mm), lip retraction was much less pronounced, and 70% of the sample showed a net forward displacement of mandibular basal bone. Significantly, changes in condylar position were not correlated with incisor retraction, as the "functional orthodontists" would have it, but rather with the changes in the buccal occlusion and the growth of the maxilla. Thus, 30% of the patients who showed evidence of distal displacement were generally nongrowing patients who underwent more than average anchorage loss in the mandible and less than average loss in the maxilla.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Five root canals in peg lateral incisor with dens invaginatus: A case report with new nomenclature for the five canals

    PubMed Central

    Jaikailash, Shanmugam; Kavitha, Mahendran; Ranjani, Muthukrishnan Sudharshana; Saravanan, Balasubramaniam

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes endodontic treatment completed in a peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisor, with single root and five root canals of which, one is due to dens invaginatus. Cone beam computed tomogram scanning confirmed the unique morphology of the tooth. New nomenclature for the five canals is proposed. PMID:25125854

  10. The effects of day length, hibernation, and ambient temperature on incisor dentin in the Turkish hamster (Mesocricetus brandti).

    PubMed

    Batavia, Mariska; Nguyen, George; Zucker, Irving

    2013-05-01

    Dentin is deposited on a circadian basis, and daily layers manifest as bands on the medial surfaces of rodent incisors. Hibernation alters dentin deposition, and a distinct hibernation mark has been described on incisor surfaces of several rodent species; the factors that influence the morphology of this mark are poorly understood. We tested the effects of day length, torpor expression, and ambient temperature on incisor surface morphology in Turkish hamsters housed in one of four conditions: long days (LDs) at 22 °C, short days (SDs) at 22 °C, SDs at 5 °C, and SDs at 13 °C. Body temperature was monitored continuously with implanted radio transmitters, and teeth examined postmortem. Teeth of SD hamsters had narrower, less distinct circadian increments than those of LD hamsters, but the width of ultradian increments was similar in both photoperiods. Hibernation at both 5 and 13 °C was associated in most specimens with very narrow, sharply defined dentin increments and increased tooth heterogeneity. Hamsters in SDs at 5 °C that did not hibernate lacked characteristic hibernation increments. At 5 °C, but not 13 °C, the number and cumulative width of hibernation increments were related to number and cumulative duration of periodic arousals. Our results suggest that incremental deposition of dentin in rodent incisors may be a useful trait for characterizing hibernation behavior in both evolutionary and historical contexts.

  11. Novel treatment of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis of incisor teeth in a 22-year-old Arabian mare.

    PubMed

    Grier-Lowe, Candace K; Anthony, James

    2015-08-01

    Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis is a rarely reported condition in the incisor and canine teeth of older horses. Histologically, there is internal and external resorption of the tooth with formation of excessive cementum. Once lesions become infected or supragingival this condition is very painful. The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of hypercementosis in an Arabian mare are described.

  12. Hyperlipidemia induced by high-fat diet enhances dentin formation and delays dentin mineralization in mouse incisor.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Pishan

    2016-10-01

    Dyslipidemia has become a serious health problem in children and adolescents worldwide for its high prevalence. Since hard tissues of permanent teeth form mainly during this period and lipids are actively involved in tooth development, the effects of hyperlipidemia on dental tissue formation and mineralization need to be illustrated. In this study, hyperlipidemia model was established in mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD). Micro-CT and histomorphological analyses were performed on the mandibular bones to assess the morphological changes of the mandibular incisor and first molar. After 4 weeks of HFD feeding, mice had significantly elevated serum lipid levels compared with mice fed with control diet. After 8 weeks, the mandibular incisor presented significantly increased dentin thickness and decreased diameter of pulp cavity in HFD-fed mice compared with control diet-fed mice, while its gross morphology and enamel thickness were not altered. In the mandibular first molar, dentin thickness of root did not show difference between the two groups. Histological section showed that mandibular incisor of HFD-fed mice manifested a wider predentin region and a lower mineral apposition rate compared with that of the control mice. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia induced by HFD feeding enhances dentin formation and delays dentin mineralization in the developing mouse incisor. PMID:27558143

  13. Novel treatment of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis of incisor teeth in a 22-year-old Arabian mare

    PubMed Central

    Grier-Lowe, Candace K.; Anthony, James

    2015-01-01

    Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis is a rarely reported condition in the incisor and canine teeth of older horses. Histologically, there is internal and external resorption of the tooth with formation of excessive cementum. Once lesions become infected or supragingival this condition is very painful. The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of hypercementosis in an Arabian mare are described. PMID:26246633

  14. Novel treatment of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis of incisor teeth in a 22-year-old Arabian mare.

    PubMed

    Grier-Lowe, Candace K; Anthony, James

    2015-08-01

    Equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis is a rarely reported condition in the incisor and canine teeth of older horses. Histologically, there is internal and external resorption of the tooth with formation of excessive cementum. Once lesions become infected or supragingival this condition is very painful. The clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of hypercementosis in an Arabian mare are described. PMID:26246633

  15. Hyperlipidemia induced by high-fat diet enhances dentin formation and delays dentin mineralization in mouse incisor.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Zhang, Jin; Yang, Pishan

    2016-10-01

    Dyslipidemia has become a serious health problem in children and adolescents worldwide for its high prevalence. Since hard tissues of permanent teeth form mainly during this period and lipids are actively involved in tooth development, the effects of hyperlipidemia on dental tissue formation and mineralization need to be illustrated. In this study, hyperlipidemia model was established in mice fed with high-fat diet (HFD). Micro-CT and histomorphological analyses were performed on the mandibular bones to assess the morphological changes of the mandibular incisor and first molar. After 4 weeks of HFD feeding, mice had significantly elevated serum lipid levels compared with mice fed with control diet. After 8 weeks, the mandibular incisor presented significantly increased dentin thickness and decreased diameter of pulp cavity in HFD-fed mice compared with control diet-fed mice, while its gross morphology and enamel thickness were not altered. In the mandibular first molar, dentin thickness of root did not show difference between the two groups. Histological section showed that mandibular incisor of HFD-fed mice manifested a wider predentin region and a lower mineral apposition rate compared with that of the control mice. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia induced by HFD feeding enhances dentin formation and delays dentin mineralization in the developing mouse incisor.

  16. Biosynthesis of rat enamel matrix components in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, S.; Shimokawa, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1982-12-01

    The biosynthesis of enamel matrix components of developing rat incisors was investigated by measuring the incorporation of /sup 3/H-proline, /sup 32/P-phosphate, and /sup 35/S-sulfate in vivo. /sup 3/H- and /sup 32/P-radioactivity was found in what seemed to be a prototype of enamel proteins. Subsequent shifts in other protein and peptide fractions were observed. /sup 35/S was also incorporated into components other than the above-mentioned proteins.

  17. Corono-radicular biological restoration of maxillary central incisors by direct method

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Sonia; Sahoo, Sujit Ranjan; Pandharkar, Kartik

    2014-01-01

    This case report refers to the esthetic and functional restorations of extensively damaged maxillary central incisors with dental caries in a 32-year-old woman, with the use of posts and crowns made from natural extracted teeth. Proper restoration of such teeth with the use of natural teeth fragments are known as “biological restoration.” Biological restorations can be done by using the fragments of the patients own tooth and if that is not available, tooth fragment can be obtained from an extracted tooth. These biological posts and crowns present a low cost option and an alternative technique for the morphofunctional recovery of extensively damaged teeth. There are limitations with the use of natural extracted teeth (homogenous bonding) for restoration such as the difficulty of finding teeth with a similar color and shape as that of the destroyed element, or patient may refuse to accept a tooth fragment from another patient, which prevents execution of the restoration. PMID:25540666

  18. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment of a maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus type II: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shadmehr, Elham; Kiaani, Sima; Mahdavian, Parinaz

    2015-01-01

    Dens invaginatus is a rare developmental anomaly of teeth with complex root canal system morphology. The present case describes a peg shape maxillary lateral incisor with dens invaginatus (Oehlers type II), necrotic pulp, and an associated large periradicular lesion. Nonsurgical endodontic treatment was performed with the aim of removing the blind sac with diamond bur under the use of operating surgical microscope. The root canal system was obturated with thermoplastic technique. Final restoration was done using composite. The 20-months clinical and radiological follow up revealed an asymptomatic tooth with healing of the periapical pathology; however, for complete healed periradicular lesion more follow up is needed. This case illustrated that a dens invaginatus malformed teeth with a large periradicular lesion can be managed successfully with nonsurgical root canal therapy (NSRCT). PMID:25878686

  19. Management of a complicated crown-root fracture in a young permanent incisor using intentional replantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengyan; Heffernan, Michelle; Vann, William F

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this case presentation is to review the rationale for and illustrate the clinical procedures involved in intentional replantation of a maxillary central incisor following a complicated crown-root fracture. The treatment of complicated crown-root fractures in children often is compromised by a fracture below the gingival margin and/or bone. This makes isolation difficult and comprises the hermetic seal that is critical for a successful endodontic treatment. Orthodontic or surgical extrusion with gingivectomy has been suggested; however, these approaches can be expensive, time-consuming, esthetically compromising, and unsatisfactory when the fracture line is deep below the gingiva. Our presentation will discuss the treatment options for such cases and introduce the concept of intentional replantation as an option to manage complicated crown-root fractures in young permanent anterior teeth.

  20. Surgical Retreatment of an Invaginated Maxillary Central Incisor Following Overfilled Endodontic Treatment: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ozbas, Hakan; Subay, Rustem Kemal; Ordulu, Melike

    2010-01-01

    This case report presents the periapical surgical retreatment of an Oehlers Class III invaginated maxillary central incisor with extruded root canal filling into the periapical lesion. After local anesthesia, a full-thickness mucoperiosteal flap was reflected, and the granulomatous tissue and extruded gutta-percha points were curetted carefully. A deep and wide root-end cavity was prepared and filled with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). At 6 months and 2 years after the treatment, the tooth exhibited no clinical symptoms, and the radiograph performed during the 2-year follow-up showed a complete periapical healing around the root end. The present report indicates that MTA retrofilling can be used successfully in the surgical retreatment of dens invaginatus type III cases in which the invagination exits apically. PMID:20613922

  1. Palatogingival Groove: Recognizing and Managing the Hidden Tract in a Maxillary Incisor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Deepak, Passi; Vivek, Sharma; Ranjan Dutta, Shubha

    2015-01-01

    Palatogingival grooves are developmental malformations quite notorious for precipitating endodontic - periodontal lesions. Owing to their inconspicuous occurrence, funnel-shaped morphology and variable extent on tooth root, they promote adherence of plaque and bacteria to levels significant for the development of pathology. Several treatment approaches have been recognized in literature for the management of this anomaly. Here in this report, a 25-year-old patient reported with the complaint of pain and swelling in maxillary right lateral incisor. Clinical examination confirmed an endodontic - periodontal lesion in relation to palatogingival groove. Endodontic treatment was instituted, followed by odontoplasty of the groove and restoration with newer calcium silicate cement, Biodentine. Combined endodontic - periodontal approach was successful in resolving the pathology with complete healing seen both clinically and radiographically. Timely diagnosis, prevention and management are highly recommended to prevent tooth loss due to complications arising secondary to their presence. PMID:26124612

  2. Bilateral supplemental permanent maxillary lateral incisors in a non-syndromic patient

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Mandeep Kaur; Uppal, Amandeep Singh; Kochhar, Gulsheen Kaur; Singh, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    A supernumerary tooth is an additional entity to the normal series and can be seen in all quadrants of the jaw. Occurrence may be single or multiple, unilateral or bilateral, erupted or impacted in one or in both jaws. Multiple supernumeraries are rare in individuals with no other associated disease or syndromes. The conditions commonly associated with an increased prevalence of supernumerary teeth include cleft lip and palate, cleidocranial dysplasia and Gardner syndrome. The supplemental supernumerary refers to a duplication of teeth in normal series and is found at the end of a tooth series. A supplemental tooth may closely resemble the teeth of the group to which it belongs or it may bear little resemblance in size or shape to the teeth with which it is associated. This report presents a case with bilateral supplemental upper permanent lateral incisors without any symptoms of associated disorders. PMID:25168674

  3. A Case of Successful Retreatment of a Maxillary Lateral Incisor with a Supernumerary Root

    PubMed Central

    Aminsobhani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the morphology of the root canal system is a pre-requisite for achieving a successful outcome in root canal treatment. In this report, a patient with a maxillary lateral incisor which had previously undergone orthograde endodontic retreatment for two times is discussed. The tooth had been misdiagnosed with a palatal groove or a root fracture, its prognosis had been determined to be poor and extraction was advised by a practitioner. During our evaluation, an unrecognized supernumerary root and root canal were detected and the tooth was maintained successfully with orthograde endodontic retreatment. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnification were of significance in the treatment process of this case. PMID:27252762

  4. Zirconia crowns for rehabilitation of decayed primary incisors: an esthetic alternative.

    PubMed

    Ashima, G; Sarabjot, K Bhatia; Gauba, K; Mittal, H C

    2014-01-01

    Esthetic management of extensively decayed primary maxillary anterior teeth requiring full coronal coverage restoration is usually challenging to the pediatric dentists especially in very young children. Many esthetic options have been tried over the years each having its own advantages, disadvantages and associated technical, functional or esthetic limitations. Zirconia crowns have provided a treatment alternative to address the esthetic concerns and ease of placement of extra-coronal restorations on primary anterior teeth. The present article presents a case where grossly decayed maxillary primary incisors were restored esthetically and functionally with ready made zirconia crowns (ZIRKIZ, HASS Corp; Korea). After endodontic treatment the decayed teeth were restored with zirconia crowns. Over a 30 months period, the crowns have demonstrated good retention and esthetic results. Dealing with esthetic needs in children with extensive loss of tooth structure, using Zirconia crowns would be practical and successful. The treatment described is simple and effective and represents a promising alternative for rehabilitation of decayed primary teeth.

  5. Palatogingival Groove: Recognizing and Managing the Hidden Tract in a Maxillary Incisor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sarang; Deepak, Passi; Vivek, Sharma; Ranjan Dutta, Shubha

    2015-06-01

    Palatogingival grooves are developmental malformations quite notorious for precipitating endodontic - periodontal lesions. Owing to their inconspicuous occurrence, funnel-shaped morphology and variable extent on tooth root, they promote adherence of plaque and bacteria to levels significant for the development of pathology. Several treatment approaches have been recognized in literature for the management of this anomaly. Here in this report, a 25-year-old patient reported with the complaint of pain and swelling in maxillary right lateral incisor. Clinical examination confirmed an endodontic - periodontal lesion in relation to palatogingival groove. Endodontic treatment was instituted, followed by odontoplasty of the groove and restoration with newer calcium silicate cement, Biodentine. Combined endodontic - periodontal approach was successful in resolving the pathology with complete healing seen both clinically and radiographically. Timely diagnosis, prevention and management are highly recommended to prevent tooth loss due to complications arising secondary to their presence.

  6. Agenesis of maxillary lateral incisor in an Angle Class II, Division 1 malocclusion patient

    PubMed Central

    Thiesen, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    The present case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a patient with agenesis of maxillary left lateral incisor and Angle Class II, Division 1 malocclusion. The patient also presented with maxillary midline deviation and inclination of the occlusal plane in the anterior region. Treatment objectives were: correction of sagittal relationship between the maxilla and the mandible; correction of midline deviation, so as to cause maxillary and mandibular midlines to coincide; correction of overbite and leveling of the occlusal plane, so as to create ideal conditions for esthetic rehabilitation of anterior teeth. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO) as a requirement for the title of certified by the BBO. PMID:26560829

  7. Implant-Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Bilateral Agenesis of Maxillary Lateral Incisors with a Mini Split Crest.

    PubMed

    Figliuzzi, M M; Giudice, A; Pileggi, S; Pacifico, D; Marrelli, M; Tatullo, M; Fortunato, L

    2016-01-01

    The reported clinical case describes the surgical procedure of ridge augmentation by using a "split crest" technique with a partial thickness flap and a subsequent implant-prosthetic rehabilitation aimed at treating a bilateral agenesis of the upper lateral incisors. In such cases with vestibule-palatal and mesial-distal scarce bone thicknesses associated with the need of a proper functional and aesthetic rehabilitation, the split crest technique is particularly suitable. In the case we reported, because of the poor bone thicknesses, we performed a minimally invasive split crest which allowed a correct insertion of the fixtures. This technique allowed us to achieve an optimal functional and aesthetic rehabilitation; moreover, we obtained a good emergency profile, ensuring the vitality of the close teeth and ensuring a good primary stability and the following osseointegration of dental implants. PMID:27190658

  8. [Prevention of the eruption of an upper later incisor by a compound odontoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Vlcek, Daniel; Reichart, Peter A; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Sleiter, Roberto; Bornstein, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    Odontomas are the most common odontogenic tumours. They are considered as hamartomas - a local tissue malformation without autonomous growth potential - and are non-neoplastic. Clinically and histopathologically, compound and complex odontomas can be differentiated. Compound odontomas consist of a varying number of tooth-like structures and histology show dental tissues in an orderly pattern. Most often compound odontomas are diagnosed in young patients in the anterior maxilla. Patients are rarely complaining of symptoms and they are usually diagnosed during routine radiographic examinations or due to late eruption of permanent or persistence of deciduous teeth. The following case report presents a disturbed eruption of a lateral right incisor of the maxilla in a 8-year old female patient. Clinical, radiological and histopathological characteristics of this lesion will be discussed as well as therapy and follow-up.

  9. A new computational method for automatic dental measurement: The case of maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Di Angelo, L; Di Stefano, P; Bernardi, S; Continenza, M A

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a new automatic approach to determine the accurate measure of human teeth. The aim of the proposed computer based method is to reduce inaccuracy of measurement with respect to traditional approaches. Starting from a 3D model of the teeth which is obtained from 3D scanning, the method algorithmically evaluates the most important dimensional features detectable in central incisors. For this purpose, specific rules are put forward and implemented in original software with a view to identifying repere points, from which to detect dimensional features both unambiguously and accurately. The automatic method which is proposed here is verified by means of the analysis of real teeth and is then compared with the current state-of-the-art methods for teeth measurement. PMID:26851728

  10. Implant-Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Bilateral Agenesis of Maxillary Lateral Incisors with a Mini Split Crest

    PubMed Central

    Figliuzzi, M. M.; Giudice, A.; Pileggi, S.; Pacifico, D.; Marrelli, M.; Tatullo, M.; Fortunato, L.

    2016-01-01

    The reported clinical case describes the surgical procedure of ridge augmentation by using a “split crest” technique with a partial thickness flap and a subsequent implant-prosthetic rehabilitation aimed at treating a bilateral agenesis of the upper lateral incisors. In such cases with vestibule-palatal and mesial-distal scarce bone thicknesses associated with the need of a proper functional and aesthetic rehabilitation, the split crest technique is particularly suitable. In the case we reported, because of the poor bone thicknesses, we performed a minimally invasive split crest which allowed a correct insertion of the fixtures. This technique allowed us to achieve an optimal functional and aesthetic rehabilitation; moreover, we obtained a good emergency profile, ensuring the vitality of the close teeth and ensuring a good primary stability and the following osseointegration of dental implants. PMID:27190658

  11. Direct pulp capping in an immature incisor using a new bioactive material

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Sham S.; Hegde, Sundeep K.; Adhikari, Fardin; Bhat, Vidya S.

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of the pulp in a traumatized immature fractured incisor tooth is of prime importance in order to achieve apexogenesis, a natural apical closure. The main factor influencing this is pulpal protection by a bioactive material proving optimum marginal seal in preventing any microleakage. This case report presents an 8-year-old female diagnosed with Ellis Class 3 fracture of immature tooth 11 involving the mesial pulp horn. Under rubber dam isolation, a partial pulpotomy was performed and the pulp was sealed using a new bioactive material BIODENTINE to stimulate apexogenesis, dentine replacement and pulp protection. The fractured segment was reattached for optimum esthetics, which was a concern for the patient. The patient was followed-up for 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, which revealed continued apical closure and maintenance of pulp vitality. The patient remained asymptomatic. This case report provides evidence for the potential use of Biodentine as an effective pulp capping material in the future. PMID:25191081

  12. Palatogingival Groove: Recognizing and Managing the Hidden Tract in a Maxillary Incisor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sarang; Deepak, Passi; Vivek, Sharma; Ranjan Dutta, Shubha

    2015-06-01

    Palatogingival grooves are developmental malformations quite notorious for precipitating endodontic - periodontal lesions. Owing to their inconspicuous occurrence, funnel-shaped morphology and variable extent on tooth root, they promote adherence of plaque and bacteria to levels significant for the development of pathology. Several treatment approaches have been recognized in literature for the management of this anomaly. Here in this report, a 25-year-old patient reported with the complaint of pain and swelling in maxillary right lateral incisor. Clinical examination confirmed an endodontic - periodontal lesion in relation to palatogingival groove. Endodontic treatment was instituted, followed by odontoplasty of the groove and restoration with newer calcium silicate cement, Biodentine. Combined endodontic - periodontal approach was successful in resolving the pathology with complete healing seen both clinically and radiographically. Timely diagnosis, prevention and management are highly recommended to prevent tooth loss due to complications arising secondary to their presence. PMID:26124612

  13. Replacement of mandibular central incisors with implant-supported crowns: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Daniel; Zuhr, Otto; Hürzeler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Anterior teeth are often affected by accidental dental trauma and may eventually be lost. When the neighboring teeth are unharmed, implant-supported crowns are often the preferred treatment choice. When not only the teeth but also the supporting hard and soft tissue has been lost, surgical reconstruction may be needed. However, in combined horizontal and vertical class III defects, the available augmentation techniques are often not predictable. In this case report, two neighboring mandibular central incisors were replaced by two implants after soft and hard tissue augmentation with the cortical bone plate method. The interdental soft tissue was reconstructed with remarkable success, making this an example of what can be achieved in cases such as this. PMID:27092347

  14. Very Large Inflammatory Odontogenic Cyst with Origin on a Single Long Time Traumatized Lower Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Filipe; Andre, Saudade; Moreira, Andre; Carames, Joao

    2015-01-01

    One of the consequences of traumatic injuries is the chance of aseptic pulp necrosis to occur which in time may became infected and give origin to periapical pathosis. Although the apical granulomas and cysts are a common condition, there appearance as an extremely large radiolucent image is a rare finding. Differential diagnosis with other radiographic-like pathologies, such as keratocystic odontogenic tumour or unicystic ameloblastoma, is mandatory. The purpose of this paper is to report a very large radicular cyst caused by a single mandibular incisor traumatized long back, in a 60-year-old male. Medical and clinical histories were obtained, radiographic and cone beam CT examinations performed and an initial incisional biopsy was done. The final decision was to perform a surgical enucleation of a lesion, 51.4 mm in length. The enucleated tissue biopsy analysis was able to render the diagnosis as an inflammatory odontogenic cyst. A 2 year follow-up showed complete bone recovery. PMID:26393219

  15. Assessment of association between molar incisor hypomineralization and hypomineralized second primary molar

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Rakesh; Chandak, Shweta; Chandwani, Manisha; Singh, Prabhat; Pimpale, Jitesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The term molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) has been described as a clinical entity of systemic origin affecting the enamel of one or all first permanent molars and also the incisors; less frequently the second primary molars have also been reported to develop hypomineralization of the enamel, along with MIH. Aim: To scrutinize the association between hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPMs) and MIH and their prevalence in schoolgoing pupils in Nagpur, Maharashtra, India and the associated severity of dental caries. Design: A sample of 1,109 pupils belonging to 3–12-year-old age group was included. The entire sample was then divided into Group I (3–5 years) and Group II (6–12 years). The scoring criteria proposed by the European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry for hypomineralization was used to score HSPM and MIH. The International Caries Detection and Assessment System II (ICDAS II) was used for appraising caries status in the hypomineralized molars. The examination was conducted by a single calibrated dentist in schools in daylight. The results, thus obtained, were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test and odds ratio. Result: Of the children examined, 10 in Group I (4.88%) had HSPM and 63 in Group II (7.11%) had MIH in at least one molar. In Group II, out of 63 subjects diagnosed with MIH, 30 subjects (48%) also had HSPM. Carious lesions with high severity were appreciated in hypomineralized molars. Conclusion: The prevalence of HSPM was 4.88% and of MIH was 7.11%. Approximately half of the affected first permanent molars were associated with HSPM. The likelihood of development of caries increased with the severity of hypomineralization defect. PMID:27011930

  16. Torquing an upper central incisor with aligners--acting forces and biomechanical principles.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Wolfram; Zapf, Antonia; Dathe, Henning; Fialka-Fricke, Julia; Fricke-Zech, Susanne; Gruber, Rudolf; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Sadat-Khonsari, Reza

    2010-12-01

    The forces delivered by aligners during torquing have still not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to measure the forces delivered to an upper central incisor during torquing with three different materials of the same thickness, and to describe the biomechanical principles of torquing with aligners. Five identical appliances were manufactured from each of three materials, all with a thickness of 1.0 mm (Ideal Clear®, Erkodur®, and Biolon®). An upper central incisor, as part of the measuring device, was torqued in defined steps in the vestibular and palatal directions with the respective appliance in place. For statistical analysis, the resulting forces, Fx (forces acting in the palatal and facial directions) and Fz (intrusive force as a side-effect) at a displacement of ±0.15 and ±0.8 mm from the tooth at the gingival margin were calculated. The mean Fx forces for ±0.15 mm displacement ranged from -1.89 N [standard deviation (SD) 0.48] to 0.11 N (SD 0.1). The mean Fz forces were between -0.97 N (SD 0.57) and -0.07 N (SD 0.22). The highest intrusive forces were measured during palatal displacement of the measuring tooth. An influence of direction of displacement on the levels of force was observed, especially for Fz at the greater displacement of ±0.8 mm. In relation to the intended amount of root movement during torquing, aligners tend to 'lift up' and therefore no effective force couple can be established for further root control. The force delivery properties are also influenced by the material used and the shape of the tooth.

  17. Initial forces generated by three types of thermoplastic appliances on an upper central incisor during tipping.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Wolfram; Fialka-Fricke, Julia; Dathe, Henning; Fricke-Zech, Susanne; Zapf, Antonia; Gruber, Rudolf; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Sadat-Khonsari, Reza

    2009-12-01

    The force properties of thermoformed appliances have not been systematically investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to quantify the forces delivered by thermoplastic appliances manufactured from three different materials, with the same thickness, on a central upper incisor, during tipping. Five identical appliances were manufactured from three different materials all with a thickness of 1.0 mm (Ideal Clear, Erkodur, and Biolon). For measuring the forces, an isolated measuring tooth, as part of a standardized resin model incorporated in a newly developed measuring device, was tipped in nine 2.7 arc minute (0.04629 degree) steps, from 0 to 0.416 degrees in the vestibular and palatal directions around a rotational axis through the virtual apex, after positioning an appliance on the model. For statistical analysis, the force components Fx/tipping and Fz/intrusion at a displacement of +/-0.151 mm from the incisor edge were determined. Means and standard deviations (SDs) were calculated. The Kruskal-Wallis test for overall effects and the Wilcoxon two-sample test for individual group pairings were used (P < 0.05 significance level). The mean Fx forces ranged from -2.82 N (SD 0.62) to 5.42 N (SD 0.56). The mean Fz forces were between -0.14 N (SD 0.52) and -2.3 N (SD 0.43). The highest intrusive forces were measured during vestibular displacement of the measuring tooth. The forces delivered by the Biolon appliance were found to be much greater (P < 0.01) than those of the other materials. The forces delivered by the materials investigated were mostly higher than those stated in the literature.

  18. An Identification Key to Rodent Prey in Owl Pellets from the Northwestern and Southeastern United States: Employing Incisor Size to Distinguish among Genera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hager, Stephen B.; Cosentino, Bradley J.

    2006-01-01

    We present an identification key to the common rodent prey found in owl pellets from the Northwestern (NW) and Southeastern (SE) United States that is based on differences in incisor size (arc diameter) among genera.

  19. Strain Distribution in Root Surface Dentin of Maxillary Central Incisors during Lateral Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Raphael; Metzger, Zvi; Brosh, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    Aim To precisely quantify the circumferential strains created along the radicular dentin of maxillary incisors during a simulated clinical procedure of lateral compaction. Methods Six miniature strain gauges were bonded on the roots of fourteen recently extracted maxillary central incisors that were subjected to root canal instrumentation. The strain gauges were bonded at three levels (apical, middle, and coronal) and four aspects (buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal) of the roots. Each tooth was embedded in a PVC cylinder containing polyvinyl-siloxane impression material. Root filling was then performed by simulating the clinical procedure of lateral compaction using nickel-titanium finger spreaders. The force applied to the spreader and the strains developing in the surface root dentin were continuously recorded at a frequency of 10 Hz. Results The highest strains that developed during lateral compaction were in the mesial and distal aspects at the apical level of the root. The magnitudes of the maximal mesial/distal strains at the apical as well as the mid-root levels were approximately 2.5–3 times higher than those at the buccal/lingual aspects (p = 0.041). The strains decreased significantly (p<0.04) from the apical through the mid-root levels to the coronal level, yielding gradients of 2.5- and 6-fold, respectively. The mesial and distal strains were consistently tensile and did not differ significantly; however, the buccal strains were generally 35–65% higher than the lingual strains (p = 0.078). Lateral compaction resulted in the gradual build-up of residual strains, resulting in generation of a 'stair-step' curve. These strains declined gradually and almost completely disappeared after 1000 sec. Conclusions With proper mounting of several miniature strain gauges at various levels and aspects of the root, significant circumferential strains can be monitored under clinically relevant compaction forces. The residual strains at the end of lateral

  20. Secretion of Shh by a neurovascular bundle niche supports mesenchymal stem cell homeostasis in the adult mouse incisor

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hu; Feng, Jifan; Seidel, Kerstin; Shi, Songtao; Klein, Ophir; Sharpe, Paul; Chai, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are typically defined by their in vitro characteristics, and as a consequence the in vivo identity of MSCs and their niches are poorly understood. To address this issue, we used lineage tracing in a mouse incisor model and identified the neurovascular bundle (NVB) as an MSC niche. We found that NVB sensory nerves secrete Shh protein, which activates Gli1 expression in periarterial cells that contribute to all mesenchymal derivatives. These periarterial cells do not express classical MSC markers used to define MSCs in vitro. In contrast, NG2+ pericytes represent an MSC subpopulation derived from Gli1+ cells; they express classical MSC markers and contribute little to homeostasis but are actively involved in injury repair. Likewise, incisor Gli1+ cells but not NG2+ cells exhibit typical MSC characteristics in vitro. Collectively, we demonstrate that MSCs originate from periarterial cells and are regulated by Shh secretion from a NVB. PMID:24506883

  1. Social judgments made by children (10–15 year old) in relation to visible incisors trauma: School-based cross-sectional study in Khartoum state, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Awooda, Elhadi Mohieldin; Ali, Yasmeen Abdul-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dento-alveolar trauma is a very common occurrence in childhood; however, there is a paucity of data about children's judgments in relation to dental status. There is a significant correlation between the children's incisor teeth status and the social judgments made by their peers. Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the social attributes of a school child would be influenced by his or her incisor teeth status. Also, it is aimed to determine the judgment between male and female children and different age groups within the same class. Setting and Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among 178 male and female children from year 5 (age 10–11 years) of primary school and year 2 of secondary school (age 14–15 years) within Khartoum state. Materials and Methods: Students were invited to look at colored photographs of four different children's faces and to make a social judgment about these children's photographs. Using a previously validated child-centered questionnaire, participants rated subjects using a four-point Likert scale for three negative and six positive attributes. Statistical Analysis: Total attribute scores were tested for significant differences, according to whether the subject had visible incisor trauma or not, using t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) test with the level of significance set at P ≤ 0.05. Results: Children with visible incisor trauma were given more negative attributes than children without incisor trauma (P = 0.05). Results were similar in both genders and both school years. Younger students within the same class gave more negative attributes toward children with visible incisor trauma than their older peers, with P = 0.04 and P = 0.9 for children aged 10 years and 11 years, respectively. Conclusion: The data confirmed results of previous studies that children with visible incisor trauma are seen more negatively than those without visible incisor trauma. PMID:26539397

  2. Conservative Treatment of an Invaginated Maxillary Lateral Incisor with a C-shaped Canal Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, Maryam; Moghim Farooji, Elaheh; Abuchenari, Javad; Bidar, Maryam; Eslami, Neda

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the non-surgical treatment of an invaginated maxillary lateral incisor with two fused roots. The mesial root had a C-shaped canal, while the distal one had a type III dens invagination. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to help with the diagnosis and treatment decision making. Clinical and radiographic follow-up revealed satisfactory periapical repair and absence of symptoms after 15 months. PMID:26576164

  3. Management of synodontia between dilacerated permanent maxillary central incisor and supernumerary tooth with aid of cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Das, Suroopa; Warhadpande, Manjusha M.; Redij, Saurabh Anil; Sabir, Husain; Shirude, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    A malformed tooth characterized by one or more developmental disturbances is often difficult to treat. When such teeth are present in anterior region, they pose a technical challenge for the clinician to restore esthetics as well as function. This case describes endodontic, surgical, and restorative management of fused and dilacerated maxillary central incisor. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used in the present case to aid in understanding of complicated tooth morphology and managing the case successfully. PMID:25829699

  4. Adhesive placement of a zirconia fixed partial denture to replace a maxillary central incisor: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Kalogirou, Marietta; Trushkowsky, Richard; Andrade, Jorje; David, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The replacement of a single maxillary incisor is an esthetic challenge. Many options provide various degrees of longevity and ease of fabrication. The introduction of zirconia-supported fixed partial dentures (FPDs) has seen increased use in the last several years. However, abutment preparation guidelines and laboratory fabrication have to adhere to the guidelines established by the manufacturers and clinical researchers. Zirconia FPDs can provide long-term strength and esthetics if they are designed and fabricated appropriately. PMID:21462621

  5. Replacement of missing lateral incisors with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic veneer-fixed dental prostheses: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Bissasu, Sami M; Al-houri, Nabil A

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message This report describes the use of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic veneer-fixed dental prostheses in replacing congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. This kind of prosthesis has an advantage over a lingual-retainer resin-bonded fixed dental prosthesis in its capability of changing the color and shape of the abutment teeth. The prostheses provided an acceptable esthetics and comfort for the patient. PMID:25356269

  6. Treatment outcome and efficacy of an aligner technique – regarding incisor torque, premolar derotation and molar distalization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of orthodontic treatment using the Invisalign® system. Particularly, we analyzed the influence of auxiliaries (Attachment/Power Ridge) as well as the staging (movement per aligner) on treatment efficacy. Methods We reviewed the tooth movements of 30 consecutive patients who required orthodontic treatment with Invisalign®. In all patients, one of the following tooth movements was performed: (1) Incisor Torque >10°, (2) Premolar derotation >10° (3) Molar distalization >1.5 mm. The groups (1)-(3) were subdivided: in the first subgroup (a) the movements were supported with the use of an attachment, while in the subgroup (b) no auxiliaries were used (except incisor torque, in which Power Ridges were used). All tooth movements were performed in a split-mouth design. To analyze the clinical efficacy, pre-treatment and final plaster cast models were laser-scanned and the achieved tooth movement was determined by way of a surface/surface matching algorithm. The results were compared with the amount of tooth movement predicted by ClinCheck®. Results The overall mean efficacy was 59% (SD = 0.2). The mean accuracy for upper incisor torque was 42% (SD = 0.2). Premolar derotation showed the lowest accuracy with approximately 40% (SD = 0.3). Distalization of an upper molar was the most effective movement, with efficacy approximately 87% (SD = 0.2). Conclusion Incisor torque, premolar derotation and molar distalization can be performed using Invisalign® aligners. The staging (movement/aligner) and the total amount of planned movement have an significant impact on treatment efficacy. PMID:24923279

  7. The Relationship between Palatal Displacement of Upper Canines and Incisors Widths in a Syrian Sample of Patients with Uncrowded Arches.

    PubMed

    Mahaini, Luai

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study investigates mesiodistal crown size of the maxillary and mandibular incisors of patients with palatally impacted canines (PDC). Pretreatment dental casts of orthodontic patients with PDC of one or both maxillary canines (N: 33) were collected. This PDC sample was matched according to age and sex with pretreatment dental casts from unaffected orthodontic patients. For the PDC and matched control samples, maximum mesiodistal crown diameters were recorded for the four incisors on the right side only. The results showed that, on average, the mesiodistal crown diameters for the maxillary and mandibular incisors measured smaller in the PDC sample than in the control sample. These findings of statistically significant tooth-size reductions associated with PDC occurrence indicate a generalized pattern of reduced tooth size as a characteristic associated with the PDC anomaly. Further, the presence of generalized tooth-size reduction in cases with palatally displaced canines help explain why most orthodontic treatment plans for PDC patients are of the nonextraction type.

  8. Sex determination using the mesio-distal dimension of permanent maxillary incisors and canines in a modern Chilean population.

    PubMed

    Peckmann, Tanya R; Logar, Ciara; Garrido-Varas, Claudia E; Meek, Susan; Pinto, Ximena Toledo

    2016-03-01

    The pelvis and skull have been shown to be the most accurate skeletal elements for the determination of sex. Incomplete or fragmentary bones are frequently found at forensic sites however teeth are often recovered in forensic cases due to their postmortem longevity. The goal of the present research was to investigate sexual dimorphism between the mesio-distal dimension of the permanent maxillary incisors and canines for the determination of sex in a contemporary Chilean population. Three hundred and three dental models (126 males and 177 females) from individuals ranging in age from 13 years to 37 years old were used from the School of Dentistry, University of Chile. The statistical analyses showed that only the central incisors and canines were sexually dimorphic. Discriminant function score equations were generated for use in sex determination. The average accuracy of sex classification ranged from 59.7% to 65.0% for the univariate analysis and 60.1% to 66.7% for the multivariate analysis. Comparisons to other populations were made. Overall, the accuracies ranged from 54.4% to 63.3% with males most often identified correctly and females most often misidentified. The determination of sex from the mesio-distal width of incisors and canines in Chilean populations does not adhere to the Mohan and Daubert criteria and therefore would not be presented as evidence in court.

  9. Use of a Resin-Bonded Bridge to Replace a Congenitally Missing Lateral Incisor: Treatment of "Intrusion" of Teeth.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Paul S; Bahat, Oded; Froum, Stuart J; Daftary, Fereidoun; Rosenthal, Howard; Feldman, Sylvan

    2016-07-01

    Craniofacial growth is an important factor to consider when providing dental implant treatment for adolescents to replace missing teeth. Ongoing longitudinal observation has demonstrated that such tooth replacements may appear intruded over time, because there may be ongoing downward and anterior movement of both the alveolus and the teeth at a rate exceeding that of the dental implant, which acts like an ankylosed unit. This case reports on a 23.5-year-old female patient who, at age 16, had orthodontics completed and was left with a space where the maxillary right lateral incisor was congenitally missing with the hope of future restoration with a dental implant. A resin-bonded bridge had been placed to fill the space in the interim. After approximately 7.5 years, the bridge loosened and the patient sought an implant option as its replacement. Clinical images revealed that the bridge, which contained two bonded wings, may have limited physiologic growth, causing both the maxillary right central incisor and canine to appear intruded compared with the left central incisor and canine. This case illustrates, at the very least, that growth and development may not be complete in females aged 16 years and that the way in which a missing tooth is replaced must be carefully considered given the impact that ongoing growth and development may have on restorative care. Moreover, further growth and development may also impact adults.

  10. Finite element analysis of maxillary incisor displacement during en-masse retraction according to orthodontic mini-implant position

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Won; Lim, Joong-Ki; Lee, Kee-Joon; Sung, Sang-Jin; Chun, Youn-Sic

    2016-01-01

    Objective Orthodontic mini-implants (OMI) generate various horizontal and vertical force vectors and moments according to their insertion positions. This study aimed to help select ideal biomechanics during maxillary incisor retraction by varying the length in the anterior retraction hook (ARH) and OMI position. Methods Two extraction models were constructed to analyze the three-dimentional finite element: a first premolar extraction model (Model 1, M1) and a residual 1-mm space post-extraction model (Model 2, M2). The OMI position was set at a height of 8 mm from the arch wire between the second maxillary premolar and the first molar (low OMI traction) or at a 12-mm height in the mesial second maxillary premolar (high OMI traction). Retraction force vectors of 200 g from the ARH (-1, +1, +3, and +6 mm) at low or high OMI traction were resolved into X-, Y-, and Z-axis components. Results In M1 (low and high OMI traction) and M2 (low OMI traction), the maxillary incisor tip was extruded, but the apex was intruded, and the occlusal plane was rotated clockwise. Significant intrusion and counter-clockwise rotation in the occlusal plane were observed under high OMI traction and -1 mm ARH in M2. Conclusions This study observed orthodontic tooth movement according to the OMI position and ARH height, and M2 under high OMI traction with short ARH showed retraction with maxillary incisor intrusion. PMID:27478801

  11. α11β1 Integrin-Dependent Regulation of Periodontal Ligament Function in the Erupting Mouse Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Svetlana N.; Barczyk, Malgorzata; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Beertsen, Wouter; Zigrino, Paola; Aszodi, Attila; Miosge, Nicolai; Forsberg, Erik; Gullberg, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The fibroblast integrin α11β1 is a key receptor for fibrillar collagens. To study the potential function of α11 in vivo, we generated a null allele of the α11 gene. Integrin α11−/− mice are viable and fertile but display dwarfism with increased mortality, most probably due to severely defective incisors. Mutant incisors are characterized by disorganized periodontal ligaments, whereas molar ligaments appear normal. The primary defect in the incisor ligament leads to halted tooth eruption. α11β1-defective embryonic fibroblasts displayed severe defects in vitro, characterized by (i) greatly reduced cell adhesion and spreading on collagen I, (ii) reduced ability to retract collagen lattices, and (iii) reduced cell proliferation. Analysis of matrix metalloproteinase in vitro and in vivo revealed disturbed MMP13 and MMP14 synthesis in α11−/− cells. We show that α11β1 is the major receptor for collagen I on mouse embryonic fibroblasts and suggest that α11β1 integrin is specifically required on periodontal ligament fibroblasts for cell migration and collagen reorganization to help generate the forces needed for axial tooth movement. Our data show a unique role for α11β1 integrin during tooth eruption. PMID:17420280

  12. Use of a Resin-Bonded Bridge to Replace a Congenitally Missing Lateral Incisor: Treatment of "Intrusion" of Teeth.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Paul S; Bahat, Oded; Froum, Stuart J; Daftary, Fereidoun; Rosenthal, Howard; Feldman, Sylvan

    2016-07-01

    Craniofacial growth is an important factor to consider when providing dental implant treatment for adolescents to replace missing teeth. Ongoing longitudinal observation has demonstrated that such tooth replacements may appear intruded over time, because there may be ongoing downward and anterior movement of both the alveolus and the teeth at a rate exceeding that of the dental implant, which acts like an ankylosed unit. This case reports on a 23.5-year-old female patient who, at age 16, had orthodontics completed and was left with a space where the maxillary right lateral incisor was congenitally missing with the hope of future restoration with a dental implant. A resin-bonded bridge had been placed to fill the space in the interim. After approximately 7.5 years, the bridge loosened and the patient sought an implant option as its replacement. Clinical images revealed that the bridge, which contained two bonded wings, may have limited physiologic growth, causing both the maxillary right central incisor and canine to appear intruded compared with the left central incisor and canine. This case illustrates, at the very least, that growth and development may not be complete in females aged 16 years and that the way in which a missing tooth is replaced must be carefully considered given the impact that ongoing growth and development may have on restorative care. Moreover, further growth and development may also impact adults. PMID:27548400

  13. Genes expressed in dental enamel development are associated with molar-incisor hypomineralization.

    PubMed

    Jeremias, Fabiano; Koruyucu, Mine; Küchler, Erika C; Bayram, Merve; Tuna, Elif B; Deeley, Kathleen; Pierri, Ricardo A; Souza, Juliana F; Fragelli, Camila M B; Paschoal, Marco A B; Gencay, Koray; Seymen, Figen; Caminaga, Raquel M S; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2013-10-01

    Genetic disturbances during dental development influence variation of number and shape of the dentition. In this study, we tested if genetic variation in enamel formation genes is associated with molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH), also taking into consideration caries experience. DNA samples from 163 cases with MIH and 82 unaffected controls from Turkey, and 71 cases with MIH and 89 unaffected controls from Brazil were studied. Eleven markers in five genes [ameloblastin (AMBN), amelogenin (AMELX), enamelin (ENAM), tuftelin (TUFT1), and tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11)] were genotyped by the TaqMan method. Chi-square was used to compare allele and genotype frequencies between cases with MIH and controls. In the Brazilian data, distinct caries experience within the MIH group was also tested for association with genetic variation in enamel formation genes. The ENAM rs3796704 marker was associated with MIH in both populations (Brazil: p=0.03; OR=0.28; 95% C.I.=0.06-1.0; Turkey: p=1.22e-012; OR=17.36; 95% C.I.=5.98-56.78). Associations between TFIP11 (p=0.02), ENAM (p=0.00001), and AMELX (p=0.01) could be seen with caries independent of having MIH or genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans detected by real time PCR in the Brazilian sample. Several genes involved in enamel formation appear to contribute to MIH.

  14. Er:YAG Laser and Fractured Incisor Restorations: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, C.; Petruzzella, S.; Podda, R.; Merigo, E.; Nammour, S.; Vescovi, P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of an Er:YAG laser on enamel and dentine in cases of dental restorations involving fractured teeth, utilizing the dental fragment. Materials and Methods. Seventy-two freshly extracted bovine incisors were fractured at the coronal level by using a hammer applied with a standardized method, and the fragment was reattached by using three different methods: Er:YAG laser, orthophosphoric acid, and laser plus acid. The different groups were evaluated by a test realized with the dynamometer to know the force required to successfully detach the reattached fragment and by a microinfiltration test by using a 0.5% methylene blue solution followed by the optic microscope observation. Results. The compression test showed only a slight difference between the three groups, without any statistical significance. The infiltration test used to evaluate the marginal seal between the fracture fragment and the tooth demonstrated that etching with Er:YAG laser alone or in combination with orthophosphoric acid gives better results than orthophosphoric acid alone, with a highly significant statistical result. Discussion. Reattaching a tooth fragment represents a clinically proven methodology, in terms of achieving resistance to detachment, and the aim of this work was to demonstrate the advantages of Er:YAG laser on this procedure. Conclusion. This “in vitro” study confirms that Er:YAG laser can be employed in dental traumatology to restore frontal teeth after coronal fracture. PMID:23091491

  15. Computer-assisted intraosseous anaesthesia for molar and incisor hypomineralisation teeth. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Cabasse, C; Marie-Cousin, A; Huet, A; Sixou, J L

    2015-03-01

    Anesthetizing MIH (Molar and Incisor Hypomineralisation) teeth is one of the major challenges in paediatric dentistry. Computer-assisted IO injection (CAIO) of 4% articaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (Alphacaine, Septodont) has been shown to be an efficient way to anesthetize teeth in children. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of this method with MIH teeth. This preliminary study was performed using the Quick Sleeper system (Dental Hi Tec, Cholet, France) that allows computer-controlled rotation of the needle to penetrate the bone and computer-controlled injection of the anaesthetic solution. Patients (39) of the department of Paediatric Dentistry were included allowing 46 sessions (including 32 mandibular first permanent molars) to be assessed. CAIO showed efficacy in 93.5% (43/46) of cases. Failures (3) were due to impossibility to reach the spongy bone (1) and to achieve anaesthesia (2). This prospective study confirms that CAIO anaesthesia is a promising method to anesthetize teeth with MIH that could therefore be routinely used by trained practitioners.

  16. Stress distributions in maxillary central incisors restored with various types of post materials and designs.

    PubMed

    Madfa, A A; Kadir, M R Abdul; Kashani, J; Saidin, S; Sulaiman, E; Marhazlinda, J; Rahbari, R; Abdullah, B J J; Abdullah, H; Abu Kasim, N H

    2014-07-01

    Different dental post designs and materials affect the stability of restoration of a tooth. This study aimed to analyse and compare the stability of two shapes of dental posts (parallel-sided and tapered) made of five different materials (titanium, zirconia, carbon fibre and glass fibre) by investigating their stress transfer through the finite element (FE) method. Ten three-dimensional (3D) FE models of a maxillary central incisor restored with two different designs and five different materials were constructed. An oblique loading of 100 N was applied to each 3D model. Analyses along the centre of the post, the crown-cement/core and the post-cement/dentine interfaces were computed, and the means were calculated. One-way ANOVAs followed by post hoc tests were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the post materials and designs (p=0.05). For post designs, the tapered posts introduced significantly higher stress compared with the parallel-sided post (p<0.05), especially along the centre of the post. Of the materials, the highest level of stress was found for stainless steel, followed by zirconia, titanium, glass fibre and carbon fibre posts (p<0.05). The carbon and glass fibre posts reduced the stress distribution at the middle and apical part of the posts compared with the stainless steel, zirconia and titanium posts. The opposite results were observed at the crown-cement/core interface.

  17. The application of fiber core posts in restoring badly destroyed primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Aly A

    2002-01-01

    Early childhood caries (ECC) represents a challenge to pediatric dentists especially, when teeth are badly destroyed. ECC involves the upper anterior teeth early in life and by the time the dentist sees the child, most of the coronal structure is lost. Dentally, this is a very devastating situation for both the dentist and parents, as in many cases, extraction of these teeth is the only option. With the introduction of new adhesive systems and restorative materials, a new approach for treating these teeth is explained and documented by clinical cases, where fiber core posts are introduced into the root canals of primary incisors for a distance of 2 to 3 mm. It is retained in place by flowable composite, then the coronal part is reconstructed by a strip crown to restore the crown form. After a follow up period of one year, only 2 teeth out of 30 had to be extracted. The failure was attributed to failure in pulpal therapy rather than failure in the restorations, which were totally intact. A laboratory testing of the fracture load resistance of the restored teeth proved that this technique significantly improved the fracture load resistance of composite celluloid crowns, making it a valuable procedure to consider when the coronal tooth structure is not enough to support and retain a composite celluloid strip crown. PMID:11990042

  18. Relapse of incisor crowding: A visit to the prince of salina

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    The management of the retention period after comprehensive orthodontic treatment is of great importance, as a primary goal of clinician. Considerable controversy still surrounds the problem of stability after the retention period. Many studies analyze factors associated to the presence of crowding or incisor irregularity and find predictive features on its relapse. Most studies have reported little o no correlation between the treatment changes in the biological parameters - clinical, biometric (irregularity index, intermolar width, intercanine width, arch length, overjet, overbite), or cephalometric variables- that ocurred and the posttretament and postretention changes that may predict their future development. This article provides a bibliographical overview on the relapse of dental alignment in treated cases. In a brief historical introduction, the first studies on the long-term stability of orthodontic results are analysed. The article then goes on to assess studies that focus attention on anteroinferior alignment before finally studying relapse of upper crowding. It concludes by making some final comments in the light of the bibliography provided and the differents schools regarding retention needs and methods. Key words:Retention, stability, irregularity, dental alignment. PMID:23229267

  19. Modified subfossil aye-aye incisors from southwestern Madagascar: species allocation and paleoecological significance.

    PubMed

    MacPhee, R D; Raholimavo, E M

    1988-01-01

    Two of the three drilled aye-aye incisors collected in 1901 by Grandidier at the subfossil site of Lamboharana were recently rediscovered in uncatalogued collections of the Institut de Paléontologie in Paris. These teeth are not much wider or thicker than those of the extant aye-aye (Daubentonia madagascariensis), but their arc of curvature is noticeably greater. These facts indicate that the teeth probably belong to D. robusta, a large extinct aye-aye whose dentition is otherwise unknown. No other remains referable to Daubentonia have been reported from Lamboharana, although D. robusta is known from other localities in the southwest. The presence of Daubentonia in southern Madagascar does not demonstrate that this region was markedly more humid or densely forested in the recent past. It remains to be established whether the extinction of D. robusta throughout its range in southern Madagascar, and local disappearance of D. madagascariensis everywhere but in the eastern forest biotope, is due to late Holocene climatic change, to anthropogenic effects, or both factors combined. PMID:3254846

  20. Genes Expressed in Dental Enamel Development Are Associated with Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Jeremias, Fabiano; Koruyucu, Mine; Küchler, Erika C.; Bayram, Merve; Tuna, Elif B.; Deeley, Kathleen; Pierri, Ricardo A.; Souza, Juliana F.; Fragelli, Camila M.B.; Paschoal, Marco A.B.; Gencay, Koray; Seymen, Figen; Caminaga, Raquel M.S.; dos Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disturbances during dental development influence variation of number and shape of the dentition. In this study, we tested if genetic variation in enamel formation genes is associated with molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH), also taking into consideration caries experience. DNA samples from 163 cases with MIH and 82 unaffected controls from Turkey, and 71 cases with MIH and 89 unaffected controls from Brazil were studied. Eleven markers in five genes [ameloblastin (AMBN), amelogenin (AMELX), enamelin (ENAM), tuftelin (TUFT1), and tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11)] were genotyped by the TaqMan method. Chi-square was used to compare allele and genotype frequencies between cases with MIH and controls. In the Brazilian data, distinct caries experience within the MIH group was also tested for association with genetic variation in enamel formation genes. The ENAM rs3796704 marker was associated with MIH in both populations (Brazil: p=0.03; OR=0.28; 95% C.I.=0.06–1.0; Turkey: p=1.22e–012; OR=17.36; 95% C.I.=5.98–56.78). Associations between TFIP11 (p=0.02), ENAM (p=0.00001), and AMELX (p=0.01) could be seen with caries independent of having MIH or genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans detected by real time PCR in the Brazilian sample. Several genes involved in enamel formation appear to contribute to MIH. PMID:23790503

  1. Sequelae of trauma to primary maxillary incisors. I. Complications in the primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Borum, M K; Andreasen, J O

    1998-02-01

    Two hundred and eighty-seven children with a total of 545 traumatized primary upper incisors were followed using standardized procedures until the age of 10. Extraction was the only treatment offered when intervention was necessary. The immediate as well as the long-term consequences of trauma were studied on the basis of this material. Consequences in the primary dentition comprised: color changes (53%), pulp necrosis (25%), pulp canal obliteration (36%), gingival retraction (6%), permanent displacement after luxation (5-22%), pathological root resorption (1-10%) as well as disturbances in physiological root resorption (4%) and, lastly, premature tooth loss (46%). In a multivariate analysis of the development of pulp necross in primary teeth after trauma, the following decisive factors were found: age of the patient at the time of injury, degree of displacement of the tooth as well as the degree of loosening and presence of crown fracture. The factors found to influence development of pulp canal obliteration were: displacement of the tooth at time of injury as well as detectable physiologic root resorption at time of trauma. The presence of crown fracture seemed to decrease the risk of obliteration. The need for scientifically based treatment strategies for managing and reducting complications after trauma in the primary dentition is stressed.

  2. Stress distributions in maxillary central incisors restored with various types of post materials and designs.

    PubMed

    Madfa, A A; Kadir, M R Abdul; Kashani, J; Saidin, S; Sulaiman, E; Marhazlinda, J; Rahbari, R; Abdullah, B J J; Abdullah, H; Abu Kasim, N H

    2014-07-01

    Different dental post designs and materials affect the stability of restoration of a tooth. This study aimed to analyse and compare the stability of two shapes of dental posts (parallel-sided and tapered) made of five different materials (titanium, zirconia, carbon fibre and glass fibre) by investigating their stress transfer through the finite element (FE) method. Ten three-dimensional (3D) FE models of a maxillary central incisor restored with two different designs and five different materials were constructed. An oblique loading of 100 N was applied to each 3D model. Analyses along the centre of the post, the crown-cement/core and the post-cement/dentine interfaces were computed, and the means were calculated. One-way ANOVAs followed by post hoc tests were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the post materials and designs (p=0.05). For post designs, the tapered posts introduced significantly higher stress compared with the parallel-sided post (p<0.05), especially along the centre of the post. Of the materials, the highest level of stress was found for stainless steel, followed by zirconia, titanium, glass fibre and carbon fibre posts (p<0.05). The carbon and glass fibre posts reduced the stress distribution at the middle and apical part of the posts compared with the stainless steel, zirconia and titanium posts. The opposite results were observed at the crown-cement/core interface. PMID:24834856

  3. A retrospective evaluation of 204 diagonal incisor malocclusion corrections in the horse.

    PubMed

    DeLorey, Mary S

    2007-09-01

    The goal of this retrospective study was to record the direction of the diagonal incisor malocclusion (DIM) and excursion to molar contact (EMC) distances both before and after corrective procedures to determine if any general trends were apparent which may aid in predicting the outcome of DIM corrections. Pre-correction and post-correction data were compared to confirm a benefit to the patient from the corrective procedure. The results of this preliminary study reveal a few general trends to serve as basic guidelines for the practitioner Lateral EMC distances to the left and right in cases of DIM are commonly asymmetric. When prudently performed, corrective measures usually result in increased symmetry of EMCs. In cases of DIM, the side with the shorter EMC is more likely to remain the same rather than change after DIM correction. Decreases of EMC in one or both directions are much more common than increases in EMC after correction. In 100-300 quadrant DIMs, the EMC to the right will most likely decrease and in 200-400 quadrant DIMs, the EMC to the left will most likely decrease. Despite these helpful findings, the data obtained from this study strongly suggest the existence of multiple etiologies and progressive compensatory mechanisms complicating precise prediction of correction outcome.

  4. Widespread risks of dental fluorosis in cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) residing on petrochemical waste sites.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Stair, E L; Lochmiller, R L; Rafferty, D P; Schroder, J L; Basta, N T; Lish, J W; Qualls, C W

    2001-01-26

    Fluoride has been identified as a ubiquitous contaminant of soils where petrochemical wastes have been disposed. The purpose of this study was to assess how widespread toxicity risks are to resident vertebrates from chronic exposure to fluoride in the soil of petrochemical-contaminated waste sites. In total, 573 wild cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) were examined. The rats that were seasonally collected from 12 contaminated and 12 ecologically matched reference sites across Oklahoma over a 3-yr period. The risks of cotton rats exposed to fluoride were analyzed by means of gross examination, histopathology, and scanning electron microscopy of rat incisors. Cotton rats from reference sites showed no pathologic changes in incisors (98%). In comparison, 46% of cotton rats from contaminated sites had various degrees of dental lesions. The prevalence and severity of dental lesions in cotton rats from contaminated sites were significantly influenced by season. There was a 45% increase in prevalence and a 65% increase in severity of dental lesions from summer to winter. This study demonstrated that cotton rats are very sensitive biomonitors for assessing toxicity risks from soils contaminated with fluoride and that such assessments should consider seasonal influences.

  5. Survival rate and fracture strength of maxillary incisors, restored with different kinds of full veneers.

    PubMed

    Stappert, C F J; Stathopoulou, N; Gerds, T; Strub, J R

    2005-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the survival rate and fracture strength of different kinds of ceramic full veneers, fabricated with a new experimental press ceramic (EPC VP2117/TC2, Ivoclar-Vivadent AG, Schaan, Liechtenstein). Eighty, caries-free human maxillary central incisors were used as abutments and were randomly divided into one control group and four test-groups of 16 samples each. In group A, unprepared teeth served as control. In the test groups, four different types of full veneer preparations were performed. In test groups B/C, the preparation was maintained in enamel and the contact point was on the tooth/on the veneer, respectively. In test groups D/E, the preparation was extended into dentin and the contact point was on the tooth/on the veneer, respectively. All veneers were adhesively luted using Variolink II (Ivoclar-Vivadent AG). Then, the samples were exposed to the artificial mouth for 1.2 million chewing cycles (49 N). After exposure in the artificial mouth, a survival rate of the abutment teeth of 81-100% was reported among the different groups, but was not significantly different between the groups. However, no failures of the ceramic materials could be recognized. The median fracture strength of group A was 713.3 N, of group B 647.1 N, of group C 594.8 N, of group D 483.8 N and of group E 502.6 N. Among the different groups no significant difference was found. All mean values obtained were within the limits of clinical acceptance, indicating further clinical investigations on full veneers made out of the EPC.

  6. Prenatal factors associated with the neonatal line thickness in human deciduous incisors.

    PubMed

    Kurek, M; Żądzińska, E; Sitek, A; Borowska-Strugińska, B; Rosset, I; Lorkiewicz, W

    2015-06-01

    The neonatal line (NNL) is used to distinguish developmental events observed in enamel which occurred before and after birth. However, there are few studies reporting relationship between the characteristics of the NNL and factors affecting prenatal conditions. The aim of the study was to determine prenatal factors that may influence the NNL thickness in human deciduous teeth. The material consisted of longitudinal ground sections of 60 modern human deciduous incisors obtained from full-term healthy children with reported birth histories and prenatal factors. All teeth were sectioned in the labio-lingual plane using diamond blade (Buechler IsoMet 1000). Final specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy at magnifications 320×. For each tooth, linear measurements of the NNL thickness were taken on its labial surface at the three levels from the cemento-enamel junction. The difference in the neonatal line thickness between tooth types and between males and females was statistically significant. A multiple regression analyses confirmed influence of two variables on the NNL thickness standardised on tooth type and the children's sex (z-score values). These variables are the taking of an antispasmodic medicine by the mother during pregnancy and the season of the child's birth. These two variables together explain nearly 17% of the variability of the NNL. Children of mothers taking a spasmolytic medicine during pregnancy were characterised by a thinner NNL compared with children whose mothers did not take such medication. Children born in summer and spring had a thinner NNL than children born in winter. These results indicate that the prenatal environment significantly contributes to the thickness of the NNL influencing the pace of reaching the post-delivery homeostasis by the newborn's organism. PMID:25618810

  7. Relationship between dental anomalies and orthodontic root resorption of upper incisors.

    PubMed

    Van Parys, Katrien; Aartman, Irene H A; Kuitert, Reinder; Zentner, Andrej

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the potential relationship between the occurrence of orthodontic root resorption and presence of dental anomalies such as tooth agenesis and pipette-shaped roots. Dental anomalies and root resorption were assessed on dental panoramic tomographs (DPT) of 88 subjects, 27 males and 61 females, mean age 28.4 (SD = 11.3 years), selected from orthodontic patients on the basis of the following exclusion criteria: previous fixed appliance treatment, bad quality of the DPTs and no visibility of the periodontal ligament of every tooth, and younger than 15 years of age at the onset of treatment with fixed edgewise appliance lasting at least 18 months. A pipette-shaped root was identified as defined by a drawing. Tooth agenesis was assessed on DPTs and from subjects' dental history. Root resorption was calculated as the difference between the root length before and after treatment, with and without a correction factor (crown length post-treatment/crown length pre-treatment). If one of the four upper incisors showed root resorption of ≥2.3 mm with both formulas, the patient was scored as having root resorption. Chi-square tests indicated that there was no relationship between orthodontic root resorption and agenesis (P = 0.885) nor between orthodontic root resorption and pipette-shaped roots (P = 0.800). There was no relationship between having one of the anomalies and root resorption either (P = 0.750). In the present study, it was not possible to confirm on DPTs a relationship between orthodontic root resorption and dental anomalies, such as agenesis and pipette-shaped roots.

  8. Intracanal bisphosphonate does not inhibit replacement resorption associated with delayed replantation of monkey incisors.

    PubMed

    Thong, Yo Len; Messer, Harold H; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Saw, Lip Hean; Yoong, Lai Thong

    2009-08-01

    Progressive replacement resorption following delayed replantation of avulsed teeth has proved to be an intractable clinical problem. A wide variety of therapeutic approaches have failed to result in the predictable arrest of resorption, with a good long-term prognosis for tooth survival. Bisphosphonates are used in the medical management of a range of bone disorders and topically applied bisphosphonate has been reported to inhibit root resorption in dogs. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a bisphosphonate (etidronate disodium) as an intracanal medicament in the root canals of avulsed monkey teeth, placed before replantation after 1 h of extraoral dry storage. Incisors of six Macaca fascicularis monkeys were extracted and stored dry for 1 h. Teeth were then replanted after canal contamination with dental plaque (negative control) or after root canal debridement and placement of etidronate sealed in the canal space. A positive control of calcium hydroxide placed 8-9 days after replantation was also included. All monkeys were sacrificed 8 weeks later and block sections were prepared for histomorphometric assessment of root resorption and periodontal ligament status. Untreated teeth showed the greatest extent of root resorption (46% of the root surface), which was predominantly inflammatory in nature. Calcium hydroxide treated teeth showed the lowest overall level of resorption (<30% of the root surface), while the bisphosphonate-treated group was intermediate (39%). Ankylosis, defined as the extent of the root surface demonstrating direct bony union to both intact and resorbed root surface, was the lowest in the untreated control group (15% of the root surface), intermediate in the calcium hydroxide group (27%) and the highest in the bisphosphonate group (41%). Bony attachment to the tooth root was divided approximately equally between attachment to intact cementum and to previously resorbed dentin. Overall, bisphosphonate resulted in a worse outcome than

  9. Finite element analysis of equine incisor teeth. Part 2: investigation of stresses and strain energy densities in the periodontal ligament and surrounding bone during tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Schrock, P; Lüpke, M; Seifert, H; Staszyk, C

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the hypothetical contribution of biomechanical loading to the onset of equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH) and to elucidate the physiological age-related positional changes of the equine incisors. Based on high resolution micro-computed tomography (μCT) datasets, 3-dimensional models of entire incisor arcades and the canine teeth were constructed representing a young and an old incisor dentition. Special attention was paid to constructing an anatomically correct model of the periodontal ligament (PDL). Using previously determined Young's moduli for the equine incisor PDL, finite element (FE) analysis was performed. Resulting strains, stresses and strain energy densities (SEDs), as well as the resulting regions of tension and compression within the PDL and the surrounding bone were investigated during occlusion. The results showed a distinct distribution pattern of high stresses and corresponding SEDs in the PDL and bone. Due to the tooth movement, peaks of SEDs were obtained in the PDL as well as in the bone on the labial and palatal/lingual sides of the alveolar crest. At the root, highest SEDs were detected in the PDL on the palatal/lingual side slightly occlusal of the root tip. This distribution pattern of high SEDs within the PDL coincides with the position of initial resorptive lesions in EOTRH affected teeth. The position of high SEDs in the bone can explain the typical age-related alteration of shape and angulation of equine incisors.

  10. Growth and wear of incisor and cheek teeth in domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) fed diets of different abrasiveness.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jacqueline; Clauss, Marcus; Codron, Daryl; Schulz, Ellen; Hummel, Jürgen; Fortelius, Mikael; Kircher, Patrick; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    Although patterns of tooth wear are crucial in palaeo-reconstructions, and dental wear abnormalities are important in veterinary medicine, experimental investigations on the relationship between diet abrasiveness and tooth wear are rare. Here, we investigated the effect of four different pelleted diets of increasing abrasiveness (due to both internal [phytoliths] and external abrasives [sand]) or whole grass hay fed for 2 weeks each in random order to 16 rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) on incisor and premolar growth and wear, and incisor and cheek tooth length. Wear and tooth length differed between diets, with significant effects of both internal and external abrasives. While diet abrasiveness was linked to tooth length for all tooth positions, whole forage had an additional effect on upper incisor length only. Tooth growth was strongly related to tooth wear and differed correspondingly between diets and tooth positions. At 1.4-3.2 mm/week, the growth of cheek teeth measured in this study was higher than previously reported for rabbits. Dental abnormalities were most distinct on the diet with sand. This study demonstrates that concepts of constant tooth growth in rabbits requiring consistent wear are inappropriate, and that diet form (whole vs. pelleted) does not necessarily affect cheek teeth. Irrespective of the strong effect of external abrasives, internal abrasives have the potential to induce wear and hence exert selective pressure in evolution. Detailed differences in wear effects between tooth positions allow inferences about the mastication process. Elucidating feedback mechanisms that link growth to tooth-specific wear represents a promising area of future research.

  11. Morphometric analysis of pulp size in maxillary permanent central incisors correlated with age: An indirect digital study

    PubMed Central

    Ravindra, S. V.; Mamatha, G. P.; Sunita, J. D.; Balappanavar, Aswini Y.; Sardana, Varun

    2015-01-01

    Context: Teeth are hardest part of the body and are least affected by the taphonomic process. They are considered as one of the reliable methods of identification of a person in forensic sciences. Aim: The aim of the following study is to establish morphometeric measurements by AutoCad 2009 (Autodesk, Inc) of permanent maxillary central incisors in different age groups of Udaipur population. Setting and Design: Hospital-based descriptive cross-sectional study carried out in Udaipur. Materials and Methods: A study was carried out on 308 subjects of both genders with the age range of 9-68 years. Standardized intra-oral radiographs were made by paralleling technique and processed. The radiographs were scanned and the obtained images were standardized to the actual size of radiographic film. This was followed by measuring them using software AutoCad 2009. Statistical Analysis Used: F-test, post-hoc test, Pearson's correlation test. Results: For left maxillary central incisor, the total pulp area was found to be of 38.41 ± 12.88 mm and 14.32 ± 7.04 mm respectively. For right maxillary central incisor, the total pulp size was 38.39 ± 14.95 mm and 12.35 ± 5 mm respectively. Males (32.50, 32.87 mm2) had more pulp area when compared with females (28.82, 30.05 mm2). Conclusion: There was a decrease in total pulp area with increasing age which may be attributed to secondary dentin formation. PMID:26816461

  12. Bilateral dens evaginatus (talon cusp) in permanent maxillary lateral incisors: a rare developmental dental anomaly with great clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Manuja, Naveen; Chaudhary, Seema; Nagpal, Rajni; Rallan, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    Talon cusp is an accessory cusp-like structure which projects from the cingulum area or cementoenamel junction. It is important for dentists to be aware of the potential complications that may occur with talon cusp. Early diagnosis and treatment is important, especially to prevent pulpal complications in permanent teeth which may be in developing stage in paediatric patients. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of bilateral talon cusp in permanent maxillary lateral incisors. Associated dental anomalies and clinical problems are discussed along with successful management of the case with conservative therapy. PMID:23813995

  13. Treatment of a maxillary central incisor with class III invasive cervical resorption and compromised ferrule: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Harris, Bryan T; Caicedo, Ricardo; Lin, Wei-Shao; Morton, Dean

    2014-05-01

    This clinical report presents the treatment of a maxillary central incisor with class III invasive cervical resorption and a compromised ferrule. Nonsurgical endodontic therapy combined with periodontal surgery was provided for debridement. Direct light-polymerizing resin-modified glass ionomer cement and a zirconia crown were used to repair the defect. Symptomatic endodontic complication was diagnosed with localized cone beam computed tomography at 6-month follow-up, and periapical microsurgery was rendered. The patient was followed-up for 30 months after treatment and had no further complications. PMID:24423455

  14. Partial replacement of the dentin-pulp complex by periodontal supporting tissues in a traumatically intruded primary maxillary incisor.

    PubMed

    Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; de Oliveira, Paulo Tambasco; da Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes a case of a 9-year-old patient who presented a completely intruded primary maxillary incisor because of a traumatic injury sustained at the age of 3 years. After tooth extraction, histological analysis revealed that the dentin-pulp complex was partially replaced by cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. No signs of ankylosis were noticed. It is suggested that the lack of spontaneous re-eruption of the traumatized primary tooth after 6 years could be due to the development of functional periodontal supporting tissues in the pulp chamber secondary to the traumatism.

  15. Spontaneous eruption of an occult incisor fragment from the lip after eight months: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Rao, Dinesh; Hegde, Sapna

    2006-01-01

    Large majorities of dental traumas are associated with soft-tissue injury and tooth fragments. They are often found embedded in the oral soft tissues, most commonly the lip. Early detection and complete removal of such fragments is critical in order to prevent infection and scarring. Adequate communication between medical and dental professionals involved is of considerable value in the management of such cases. This report presents a case of spontaneous extrusion of an occult incisor fragment from the lower lip, eight months after trauma. PMID:16683665

  16. Management of an Endodontic-Periodontal Lesion in a Maxillary Lateral Incisor with Palatal Radicular Groove: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sooratgar, Aidin; Tabrizizade, Mehdi; Nourelahi, Maryam; Asadi, Yasin; Sooratgar, Hosein

    2016-01-01

    The radicular groove is a developmental anomaly that predisposes the tooth to periodontal break-down. Sometimes the situation becomes more complicated by pulp necrosis and development of a combined endodontic-periodontal lesion which is a diagnostic and treatment challenge for the clinician. This report presents the successful management of an endodontic-periodontal lesion in a maxillary lateral incisor that has a developmental palatal radicular groove using a combination of nonsurgical endodontic therapy and periodontal regenerative techniques. Conclusion: The combination of nonsurgical endodontic and periodontal regenerative treatment is a predictable method in treating combined endodontic-periodontal lesions caused by palato-gingival groove. PMID:27141225

  17. Orthodontic management of bilateral maxillary canine-first premolar transposition and bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Elena Di; Giuseppe, Biagio Di; Tepedino, Michele; Chimenti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Maxillary canine-first premolar transposition (Mx.C.P1) is an uncommon dental positional anomaly that may create many orthodontic problems from both esthetic and functional points of view. OBJECTIVE: In this report we show the orthodontic management of a case of Mx.C.P1 associated with bilateral maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and unilateral mandibular second premolar agenesis METHODS: The patient was treated with a multibracket appliance and the extraction of the lower premolar. RESULTS: treatment was completed without the need for any prosthetic replacement. PMID:25992994

  18. Compound odontoma associated with impacted maxillary central incisor dictates a need to be vigilant to canine eruption pattern: A 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Singla, Shilpy; Gupta, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Canine deviation from its path of eruption is usually followed by either delayed or impaction of canine. One of the important and not so noticed reasons for canine displacement is formerly impacted central incisor. The difference in age of eruption of these two teeth is 4 years; however, the absence of maxillary incisor should be perceived with utmost conviction about impending canine displacement leading to its impaction as well. This case presents similar picture where composite, compound odontoma with respect to maxillary central incisor led to its impaction resulted in deviated path of eruption for erupting canine. This canine displacement to worsen prognosis ended up getting impacted if not dealt with cautiously in the later stages of occlusal development. PMID:27307685

  19. Compound odontoma associated with impacted maxillary central incisor dictates a need to be vigilant to canine eruption pattern: A 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Singla, Shilpy; Gupta, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Canine deviation from its path of eruption is usually followed by either delayed or impaction of canine. One of the important and not so noticed reasons for canine displacement is formerly impacted central incisor. The difference in age of eruption of these two teeth is 4 years; however, the absence of maxillary incisor should be perceived with utmost conviction about impending canine displacement leading to its impaction as well. This case presents similar picture where composite, compound odontoma with respect to maxillary central incisor led to its impaction resulted in deviated path of eruption for erupting canine. This canine displacement to worsen prognosis ended up getting impacted if not dealt with cautiously in the later stages of occlusal development.

  20. Compound odontoma associated with impacted maxillary central incisor dictates a need to be vigilant to canine eruption pattern: A 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Shilpy; Gupta, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Canine deviation from its path of eruption is usually followed by either delayed or impaction of canine. One of the important and not so noticed reasons for canine displacement is formerly impacted central incisor. The difference in age of eruption of these two teeth is 4 years; however, the absence of maxillary incisor should be perceived with utmost conviction about impending canine displacement leading to its impaction as well. This case presents similar picture where composite, compound odontoma with respect to maxillary central incisor led to its impaction resulted in deviated path of eruption for erupting canine. This canine displacement to worsen prognosis ended up getting impacted if not dealt with cautiously in the later stages of occlusal development. PMID:27307685

  1. A study on evaluation of center of resistance of maxillary four incisors during simultaneous intrusion and retraction: A finite element study

    PubMed Central

    Aruna, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the center of resistance of maxillary incisors during simultaneous intrusion and retraction. Subjects and Methods: In this study, the following steps were employed namely, (1) Preprocessing - the creation of geometric model, mesh generation and boundary conditions. (2) Postprocessing - the tooth movement and determination of center of resistance. Results: The center of the mid-sagittal plane approximately 6 mm apical and 4 mm posterior to a line perpendicular to the occlusal plane from the labial alveolar crest of the central incisor resistance for the maxillary four incisors was located within the. Conclusion: Finite element is a sound mechanical method of analysis as it was sufficient enough to provide insight into interactions between orthodontic forces, and dental tissues and reliability of this study. Further by using this study clinically, the center of resistance can be precisely located in single rooted tooth during orthodontic treatment. PMID:25210384

  2. Bacterial penetration of the root canal of intact incisor teeth after a simulated traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Love, R M

    1996-12-01

    One of the aims in treating traumatised teeth is to maintain the vitality of the pulp or allow conditions favourable for pulp revascularisation. However, infection of the pulp and root canal system may prevent this. A number of pathways have been proposed that allow bacteria to invade the root canal system, however most of these pathways cannot account for pulp infection in teeth that did not sustain injury to the periodontal attachment. Enamel/dentine cracks have been proposed as a portal for bacterial invasion of seemingly intact teeth and the aim of this study was to determine if bacteria could invade the root canal system after a simulated traumatic episode. Twenty intact and sound upper central incisors were chosen and prepared. One tooth was selected as a sterility control and the external crown surface of the remaining 19 teeth was subjected to infection with Streptococcus gordonii in a bacterial microleakage model. Over 7 days samples of growth media from the root canal system were taken and tested for bacteria. Sixteen of the teeth did not demonstrate bacterial invasion over the time frame. These teeth were then prepared for testing in a pendulum impact device and were subjected to a blow which did not fracture the crowns or dislodge the tooth from its simulated alveolus. The teeth were then prepared and tested in the bacterial microleakage model. After impact seven of the teeth demonstrated bacterial invasion of the root canal system (P = 0.002). These teeth were then reprepared for testing in the bacterial microleakage model. The crowns of five teeth, selected at random, were coated with two layers of light cured unfilled resin, the remaining two were used as positive controls. All the teeth coated with resin did not demonstrate bacterial invasion (P = 0.00), while the positive controls demonstrated invasion. The results suggested that enamel/dentine infractions were pathways for bacterial invasion of the root canal system of traumatised teeth. The

  3. Effect of Ligation Method on Maxillary Arch Force/Moment Systems for a Simulated Lingual Incisor Malalignment

    PubMed Central

    Seru, Surbhi; Romanyk, Dan L; Toogood, Roger W; Carey, Jason P; Major, Paul W

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of this study were to determine whether there is a difference in the magnitude of forces and moments produced by elastic ligation when compared to passive ligation, and whether these forces and moments propagate differently along the arch for the two ligation types. A lingual incisor malalignment was used in this study. Methods: The Orthodontic Simulator (OSIM) was used to quantify the three-dimensional forces and moments applied on the teeth given a lingually displaced incisor. A repeated measures MANOVA was performed to statistically analyze the data. Results: The interaction factor illustrated convincing evidence that there is a difference in maximum force and moment values for all outcome variables between ligation types considering all tooth positions along the arch. The mean differences for FX and FY between ligation types were found to be clinically significant, with values for elastic ligation consistently higher than passive ligation. Conclusion: It was found that the maximum forces and moments produced by elastic ligation are greater than those produced by passive ligation and that the magnitude of this difference for the mesiodistal and buccolingual forces is clinically relevant. Additionally, it was determined that elastic ligation causes forces and moments to propagate further along the arch than passive ligation for all outcome variables. PMID:25400715

  4. An Immature Type II Dens Invaginatus in a Mandibular Lateral Incisor with Talon's Cusp: A Clinical Dilemma to Confront

    PubMed Central

    Singal, Deepa; Giri, K. Y.; Keerthi, S. Sruthi

    2014-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) is a malformation of teeth probably resulting from an infolding of the dental papilla during tooth development. DI is classified as type I, II, and III by Oehlers depending on the severity of malformation. The maxillary lateral incisor is the most commonly affected tooth. Structural defects do exist in the depth of the invagination pits, and as a consequence, the early development of caries and the subsequent necrosis of the dental pulp, as well as abscess and cyst formation are clinical implications associated with DI. Occasionally, we can see more than one developmental anomaly occurring in a single tooth. In such cases it becomes important to identify the anomalies and initiate a proper treatment plan for good prognosis. In this paper, an unusual case of DI which clinically presented as a huge talons cusp affecting a mandibular lateral incisor tooth is described. This case report illustrates grinding of the talons cusp followed by nonsurgical endodontic management of dens invaginatus type II with an immature apex and periapical lesions, in which Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) shows a complete periapical healing with bone formation at the site of the lesions. PMID:24660071

  5. Temperature changes on the root surfaces of mandibular incisors after an 810-nm high-intensity intracanal diode laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca Alvarez, Andrea; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Daliberto Frugoli, Alexandre; Fernando, Casemiro; Correa Aranha, Ana Cecilia; Davidowicz, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Temperature changes caused by laser irradiation can promote damage to the surrounding dental tissues. In this study, we evaluated the temperature changes of recently extracted human mandibular incisors during intracanal irradiation with an 810-nm diode laser at different settings. Fifty mandibular incisors were enlarged up to an apical size of ISO No. 40 file. After the final rinse with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 0.2% lauryl sodium sulfate biologic detergent, and sterile water, samples were irradiated with circular movements from apex to crown through five different settings of output power (1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 W) in continuous mode. The temperature changes were measured on both sides of the apical and middle root thirds using two thermopar devices. A temperature increase of 7 °C was considered acceptable as a safe threshold when applying the diode laser. Results: The results showed that only 3.5-W output power increased the outer surface temperature above the critical value. Conclusion: The recommended output power can be stipulated as equal to or less than 3 W to avoid overheating during diode laser irradiation on thin dentin walls.

  6. Finite elements study of the Flexi Post and Flexi Flange post systems in a maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Lewgoy, Hugo Roberto; Youssef, Michel Nicolau; Matson, Maurício Rufaiel; Bocangel, Jorge Antônio Javier Saldivar; Netto, Camillo Anauate; Amore, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    The use of post and core systems has become an excellent alternative for restoring endodontically treated teeth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the von Mises, maximal compressive and tensile stresses distribution using the Finite Element Method (FEM) on human teeth restored with different post and core systems. The analysis was made on endodontically treated maxillary central incisors. The post systems used in this investigation were the stainless steel or titanium Flexi Post/Flexi Flange. Composite resin was used as core material and resin cement was the cement material of choice to seat a full porcelain crown. The bi-dimensional mathematical model was created from pictures taken from an intact human maxillary central incisor and prefabricated posts. This image was transferred to a personal computer in the MSC/Nastran 4.5 software. A static and linear analysis treatment was performed when a 45 load of 100 N was applied on the lingual surface of the tooth. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that the post design and its material can alter the stress pattern distribution. PMID:14569354

  7. Fracture resistance of cementum-extended composite fillings in severely damaged deciduous incisors: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Seraj, Bahman; Ehsani, Sara; Taravati, Shirin; Ghadimi, Sara; Fatemi, Mostafa; Safa, Sahar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the fracture resistance of the cementum-extended and conventional composite fillings with or without intracanal composite posts in severely damaged deciduous incisors. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was performed on 60 extracted deciduous maxillary incisors that were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1: Composite filling (CF); Group 2: Composite filling with composite posts (CF + CP); Group 3: Composite filling extended 0.5 mm to cementum (ceCF); Group 4: Composite filling extended 0.5 mm to cementum with composite posts (ceCF + CP). The fracture resistance was assessed by exerting a progressively increasing load with a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min in a Universal Testing Machine. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed by SPSS-18 using one-way analysis of variance at α < 0.05. Results: The mean fracture resistance (MFR) values of the experimental groups were 410.57 ± 139.44 N, 564.44 ± 92.63 N, 507.5 ± 76.37 N and 601.08 ± 96.04 N. A significant difference was found between the MFR of Groups 1 and 2, Groups 1 and 4 and Groups 3 and 4 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: A superior outcome was achieved by intracanal composite posts in both conventional and cementum-extended composite fillings. PMID:25512722

  8. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors with varying ferrule heights and configurations: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Smita; Thareja, Prerna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the best ferrule configuration of endodontically treated teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were collected. Teeth were allocated into following four groups of each having 10 teeth. Group 1 teeth restored with crowns (CRN), Group 2 endodontically treated teeth restored with crowns (RCT and CRN), Group 3 endodontically treated teeth restored with cast dowel cores and crowns incorporating uniform 2 mm ferrule (2 FRL), Group 4 endodontically treated teeth restored with cast dowel cores and crowns incorporating uniform 1 mm ferrule (1 FRL). Crown preparation was performed with varying ferrule heights, crowns were cemented with resin modified glass ionomer cement and were kept in 100% humidity for 3 days, all specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Results were obtained in the form of kilo Newton and Newton. Result: The statistical analysis applied was an analysis of variance to detect the presence of group differences. Pair wise comparisons between the groups were analyzed with the Tukey Kramer significant difference test for multiple comparisons. Conclusion: Ferrule had a significant role in the fracture resistance of custom cast post core restored teeth. Endodontically treated maxillary central incisors with a uniform 2 mm ferrule were more fracture resistant than those with a uniform 1 mm ferrule. PMID:24778504

  9. Endodontic and periodontal management of a severely affected maxillary lateral incisor having combined mucosal fenestration and palatogingival groove

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Sood, Vishal; Yadav, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal fenestrations, wherein the tooth root apices are clinically discernible in the oral cavity subsequent to loss of overlying alveolar bone and mucosa, are rare pathologic entities. Palato gingival grooves- anatomic aberrations are also infrequent occurrences that notoriously predispose to periodontal pathologies of varying extent. Both conditions independently are known to popularly affect maxillary lateral incisors. Coexistent fenestration defect and palato gingival groove in the same tooth is extremely rare and undoubtedly is a perfect combination to precipitate severe endodontic-periodontal consequences. In this report, a 34-year-old patient presented to the dental department with complaint of esthetics in relation to exposed root of right maxillary lateral incisor. On closer inspection, a palato gingival groove in addition to fenestration defect was evident on the root surface along with a periodontal pocket of >5 mm. An interdisciplinary treatment was instituted which included endodontic treatment followed by root end resection, osseous bone graft placement and guided tissue regeneration procedures for repair of mucosal fenestration defect. Debridement of the palatal pocket, with saucerization of the groove and restoration with glass ionomer cement were simultaneously employed to correct the palatal defect. PMID:26229283

  10. Changes in force associated with the amount of aligner activation and lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Ren, Chaochao; Wang, Zheyao; Zhao, Pai; Wang, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to measure the orthodontic forces generated by thermoplastic aligners and investigate the possible influences of different activations for lingual bodily movements on orthodontic forces, and their attenuation. Methods Thermoplastic material of 1.0-mm in thickness was used to manufacture aligners for 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 mm activations for lingual bodily movements of the maxillary central incisor. The orthodontic force in the lingual direction delivered by the thermoplastic aligners was measured using a micro-stress sensor system for the invisible orthodontic technique, and was monitored for 2 weeks. Results Orthodontic force increased with the amount of activation of the aligner in the initial measurements. The attenuation speed in the 0.6 mm group was faster than that of the other groups (p < 0.05). All aligners demonstrated rapid relaxation in the first 8 hours, which then decreased slowly and plateaued on day 4 or 5. Conclusions The amount of activation had a substantial influence on the orthodontic force imparted by the aligners. The results suggest that the activation of lingual bodily movement of the maxillary central incisor should not exceed 0.5 mm. The initial 4 or 5 days is important with respect to orthodontic treatment incorporating an aligner. PMID:27019820

  11. Collagen synthesis in rat gingiva during tooth movement

    SciTech Connect

    Boisson, M.; Gianelly, A.A.

    1981-09-01

    The response of the gingiva to an increased interdental space was studied by creating a diastema between the central incisors of rats and analyzing autoradiographically the incorporation of H3 proline in the gingiva to detect increased collagen production. In addition, conventional histologic methods were used to determine changes in the gingival architecture. The results indicate that the gingiva responds to an increased space in at least two ways. One is the production of more collagen fibers. The other involves the reorientation of the existing fibers in a horizontal plane as the gingival papilla becomes flattened.

  12. Effects of the antiepileptics phenytoin and zonisamide on dentin formation and bone mineral density of the mandible in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, A; Saito, T; Mayanagi, H; Kamei, J; Onodera, K

    2004-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the effects of the antiepileptics phenytoin and zonisamide on changes in the mineral density of the incisor and bone mineral density (BMD) of the mandibular head, and on the rate of dentin formation using histomorphometric measurements. After repeated administration of phenytoin or zonisamide to male growing rats, the mineral density of the lower incisors and mandibular head were determined by analyzing microradiographs and dentin formation rates were determined by histomorphometric measurements. Results showed a significant decrease in the mean values of BMD of the mandibular head and lower incisors in groups treated with phenytoin or zonisamide compared with the vehicle-treated group (p < 0.05). The percent rates of decrease in mineral density of the incisors for phenytoin and zonisamide were 6.8% and 4.0%, respectively. Phenytoin and zonisamide significantly reduced the dentin formation rate for the mesial and distal areas compared with the vehicle-treated group. Thus, epileptic children who are treated over a long period with antiepileptics, especially at primary school age, should ensure good oral hygiene so as not to suffer bone loss, edentulism or gingival overgrowth. PMID:15672119

  13. A method for intratracheal instillation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Morrow, W G

    1975-06-01

    A method was developed to provide safe, rapid, and accurate intratracheal instillation of radionuclides into the rat lung. Rats were anesthetized with halothane and suspended vertically on an animal support stand with rubber bands attached to the incisor teeth, holding the mouth open. A speculum was inserted into the trachea and the radionuclide was injected from a syringe through tubing inserted through the tracheal speculum into the trachea. The amount of radionuclide retained in the lung varied by less than a factor of 2 within groups of rats observed 4 hr-20 da after employing this method of instillation. When a volume of 2 ml was instilled, the radionuclide distribution between the left and right lung was similar to that observed following incorporation by inhalation. Instillations of less than 2 ml showed unequal distribution of radionuclide between the right and left lung.

  14. Conditional Knockout of the MicroRNA 17-92 Cluster in Type-I Collagen-Expressing Cells Decreases Alveolar Bone Size and Incisor Tooth Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M; Mohan, S; Xing, M J; Kesavan, C

    2016-01-01

    To test the role of the miR17-92 (miR) cluster in dental bones, we evaluated the incisor tooth phenotype by micro-CT in 5- and 12-week-old conditional knockout (CKO) mice deficient in the miR17-92 cluster in type-I collagen-expressing cells and bone strength by finite element analysis. The incisor teeth of CKO mice showed a 23-30 % reduction in tissue volume and bone volume. Accordingly, the stiffness and failure load of incisor teeth assessed by finite element analysis showed an 18-40 % decrease in CKO compared to wild-type mice. A positive correlation between bone parameters and strength data suggests that the decreased mechanical properties of incisor teeth are due to decreased tissue volume and bone volume. Subsequently, we found that the width of alveolar bone was reduced by 25 % with a 16 % increase in periodontal ligament space, suggesting that the CKO mice are more susceptible to tooth movement. Since alveolar bone is populated primarily by osteoblast lineage cells, it is likely that the reduction in periosteal expansion of alveolar bone in the lower jaw of CKO mice results from decreased periosteal bone formation. Overall, our phenotype analysis demonstrates that the miR17-92 cluster is essential for development and maintenance of tooth strength by regulating its tooth size.

  15. Endodontic treatment of a maxillary lateral incisor presenting dens invaginatus and transposition to the region of the canine--case report.

    PubMed

    Pécora, J D; Saquy, P C; de Souza, J E; Sousa Neto, M D

    1991-01-01

    Endodontic treatment was performed in a maxillary lateral incisor presenting two different types of anomalies: dens invaginatus and transposition to the region of the canine. The two transposed teeth were subsequently restored with light-cured composite, bringing dental esthetics to normal in a single session.

  16. Conditional Knockout of the MicroRNA 17-92 Cluster in Type-I Collagen-Expressing Cells Decreases Alveolar Bone Size and Incisor Tooth Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M; Mohan, S; Xing, M J; Kesavan, C

    2016-01-01

    To test the role of the miR17-92 (miR) cluster in dental bones, we evaluated the incisor tooth phenotype by micro-CT in 5- and 12-week-old conditional knockout (CKO) mice deficient in the miR17-92 cluster in type-I collagen-expressing cells and bone strength by finite element analysis. The incisor teeth of CKO mice showed a 23-30 % reduction in tissue volume and bone volume. Accordingly, the stiffness and failure load of incisor teeth assessed by finite element analysis showed an 18-40 % decrease in CKO compared to wild-type mice. A positive correlation between bone parameters and strength data suggests that the decreased mechanical properties of incisor teeth are due to decreased tissue volume and bone volume. Subsequently, we found that the width of alveolar bone was reduced by 25 % with a 16 % increase in periodontal ligament space, suggesting that the CKO mice are more susceptible to tooth movement. Since alveolar bone is populated primarily by osteoblast lineage cells, it is likely that the reduction in periosteal expansion of alveolar bone in the lower jaw of CKO mice results from decreased periosteal bone formation. Overall, our phenotype analysis demonstrates that the miR17-92 cluster is essential for development and maintenance of tooth strength by regulating its tooth size. PMID:27643583

  17. The Shape of the Maxillary Central Incisors and Its Correlation with Maxillary Anterior Papillary Display: A Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Nichani, Ashish S; Ahmed, Arshia Zainab; Ranganath, V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define shapes of maxillary central incisors and determine their relationship with the visual display of interdental papillae during smiling. A sample of 100 patients aged 20 to 25 years were recruited. Photographs were taken and gingival angle, crown width (CW), crown length (CL), contact surface (CS), CW/CL ratio, CS/CL ratio, gingival smile line (GSL), and interdental smile line (ISL) were measured. The data showed an increase in GA leading to an increase in CW and CS/CL ratio. Women showed a higher percentage of papillary display compared with men. This study reinforces the proposed hypothesis that the shape of the teeth and papilla affect the periodontium. PMID:27333012

  18. Aesthetic Rehabilitation of a Complicated Crown-Root Fracture of the Maxillary Incisor: Combination of Orthodontic and Implant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Avila, Érica Dorigatti; de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Campos Velo, Marilia Mattar de Amoêdo; Mollo, Francisco de Assis; Borelli Barros, Luiz Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a complex rehabilitation, of fractured tooth, with implants in anterior region considering the orthodontics extrusion to clinical success. At 7 years old, the patient fractured the maxillary left central incisor and the dentist did a crown with the fragment. Twenty years later, the patient was referred to a dental clinic for orthodontic treatment, with the chief complaint related to an accentuated deep bite, and a professional started an orthodontic treatment. After sixteen months of orthodontic treatment, tooth 21 fractured. The treatment plan included an orthodontic extrusion of tooth 21 and implant placement. This case has been followed up and the clinical and radiographic examinations show excellence esthetic results and satisfaction of patient. The forced extrusion can be a viable treatment option in the management of crown root fracture of an anterior tooth to gain bone in a vertical direction. This case emphasizes that to achieve the esthetic result a multidisciplinary approach is necessary. PMID:24872900

  19. Surgical Treatment of an Immature Short-Rooted Traumatized Incisor with an Extensive Apical Lesion Using CEM Cement

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Saeed; Fazlyab, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    Severe traumatic injuries to immature teeth often cause damage to periodontal ligament as well as dental pulp; pulp necrosis, root resorption and subsequent apical lesion are common consequences. This article reports the surgical management of an infected immature maxillary central incisor associated with a gigantic periradicular lesion and severe root resorption. The tooth had a history of trauma and the patient suffered from purulent sinus tract and tooth mobility. After unsuccessful multi-session disinfection with calcium hydroxide, root end surgery was planned. During flap surgery and lesion enucleation, the root end was cleaned and filled with calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement. After one year, the radiographic examination revealed that the lesion was almost completely replaced with newly formed bone. In addition, clinical examination showed favorable outcomes; the tooth was symptom-free and in function. Due to chemical, physical and biological properties of CEM cement, this biomaterial might be considered as the root-end filling material of choice. PMID:25834603

  20. Mineralized deposits in pulps of incompletely developed permanent monkey incisors after pulpotomy with tungsten carbide fissure burs.

    PubMed

    Heide, S; Koppang, H S

    1994-06-01

    The exposed pulp of incompletely developed permanent incisors of nine monkeys were treated with partial pulpotomy with tungsten carbide fissure burs on an air turbine equipment. The pulps were capped with calcium hydroxide (Dycal) followed by insertion of conventional amalgam. The results were studied by conventional light microscopy after 1 and 6 months. Rod-like mineralized pulpal deposits were seen in five of the nine animals, in 9 out of 67 teeth, evenly distributed at the two observation times. Also the lengths of the deposits appeared similar, while the thickness had increased markedly after 6 months. After 1 month the presence of a central vessel lumen was observed in the deposits. The results seemed to indicate that the mechanism of formation was an initial pathologic mineralization of the vessel wall, and a growth of the deposits by the elaboration of fibrous, atubular dentin on to the outside of this wall.

  1. Management of Delayed Eruption of Permanent Maxillary Incisor associated with the Presence of Supernumerary Teeth: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Rajni; Singh, Mousumi; Chaudhary, Seema

    2011-01-01

    A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch. Clinically, supernumerary teeth are able to cause different local disorders. It is important for the dentist to be aware of the clinical complications of supernumerary teeth, the most common being the delayed eruption of permanent teeth. Early diagnosis and management of supernumerary teeth is important to prevent the need for more complex surgical and orthodontic treatment. This case report highlights the problem of delayed eruption of permanent maxillary left central incisor in a 9-year-old boy due to two supernumerary teeth, one tuberculate type and other impacted inverted mesiodens.

  2. Prevalence of molar incisor hypomineralization in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru City, India

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Priya; Gupta, Tulika; Sharma, Akhilesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) is a developmental defect. The prevalence of MIH ranges widely from 2.4% to 40.2%. Aim: This study was under taken to determine the prevalence of MIH in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru City, India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in a representative sample of 2500 school children aged 7–9 years of Bengaluru, India. Oral examination was carried out by a single trained calibrated examiner under natural daylight. Results: Twelve children (0.48%) were diagnosed with MIH. A total of 68 teeth were observed with MIH. All four first permanent molars were affected in 50% of children. In the molar group, mandibular molars (29.41%) were more frequently affected than maxillary molars (27.94%). Conclusion: The prevalence of MIH in 7–9-year-old children of Bengaluru was 0.48%, with no gender predilection. PMID:27041893

  3. A pilot study of the effects of mechanical shortening of ewes' incisors (bite correction) on body weight and the development of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Orr, M B; Mackey, D; McNally, K

    1991-09-01

    A field trial was set up to determine the effects of mechanical shortening of long incisors (bite correction) of ewes with early periodontal disease on the progress of the disease and on their body weights. On a farm near Te Anau with a high prevalence of periodontal disease in sheep, the body weights of 75 sound mouth ewes and two groups each of 75 ewes with periodontal disease were recorded. At the start of the trial, the incisors of the ewes in one of the groups with periodontal disease were shortened using a grinder. The trial ran for 2 years. The mouths of almost all the sheep which had sound mouths at the start of the trial remained sound throughout. This suggests that on periodontal disease-prone farms it may be possible to select ewes at 3 or 4 years of age which will retain sound mouths throughout much of thei-r productive lives. Throughout the trial, sheep with advanced periodontal disease tended to be lighter than sheep with mild periodontal disease and those in turn tended to be lighter than sheep with sound mouths. Mechanical shortening of the incisors did not alter the proportion which subsequently developed advanced periodontal disease. Seventeen to eighteen percent of ewes in both periodontal disease groups had developed advanced periodontal disease by the end of the trial. There was no significant difference in body weight between the group with shortened incisors and the group with untreated periodontal disease. Consequently, the trial provides no evidence that the mechanical shortening of the incisors of ewes will improve their productivity. PMID:16031632

  4. [Differences between laypersons and orthodontists in recognizing the light reflection zone on the maxillary central incisors crowns].

    PubMed

    Shmuli, T; Wasserstein, A; Turgeman, R; Brezniak, N

    2014-07-01

    The light reflection zone (LRZ) is a new parameter that may serve as a tool for the diagnosis of smile esthetics. It is a bright white dot or area that appears on the surface of the maxillary central incisors and/or the gingiva of the front teeth, visible in intra-oral and smile extra-oral photographs. Recently it was found that the general population defines a nicer smile when the LRZ is located in the gingival area of the upper central incisors' surface rather than the incisal third. The aim of this study was to find out in two populations that are not aware of this new parameter, laypersons and orthodontists, whether there is a difference in the identification of the LRZ and the importance of the LRZ in determining the quality of the smile. Twelve pairs of facial photographs, including 10 of ordinary smiling persons and 2 of smiling models, were presented to 108 laypersons and 30 orthodontists. The only difference between each pair was the location of the LRZ that was moved, compared to the original photograph, gingivally or incisally respectively, using Photoshop (Adobe). Each participant was asked to mark whether he/she noticed a difference between the 2 pictures, and if so, to score the nicer smile. Data analysis was carried out using Chi square test and Fisher's exact test (SPSS v17). The results showed that both populations had difficulty in recognizing the differences between the pictures that were based solely on the LRZ parameter. However, when differences were recognized, most of the participants in both populations pointed on the smile where the LRZ was located gingivally as the nicer one. The orthodontic population recognized the difference between the two pictures, in which only the LRZ was changed, to a lesser extent compared to the laypersons populations. This result was with statistical significance (p = 0.007).

  5. Analysis of dentinal stress distribution of maxillary central incisors subjected to various post-and-core applications.

    PubMed

    Toksavul, Suna; Zor, Mehmet; Toman, Muhitten; Güngör, Mehmet Ali; Nergiz, Ibrahim; Artunç, Celal

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the stress distribution on an endodontically treated maxillary central incisor restored with different post-and-core systems by using a three-dimensional finite element analysis model. Seven three-dimensional finite element models were created. Each model contained cortical bone, cancelous bone, periodontal ligament, 3 mm apical root canal filling, post-and-core and all-ceramic crowns. Two different pre-fabricated zirconia ceramic post systems, a glass fiber-reinforced post system and a titanium post system were modeled. As a control, an all-ceramic crown on an endodontically treated maxillary central incisor without a post-and-core was modeled. Each model received a 45 degrees oblique occlusal load at a constant intensity of 100 N. In each model, the ratio of Von Mises stress distribution was compared. The greatest stresses were observed in the coronal third of the roots on facial surfaces. The ratio of Von Mises stress distribution in dentin for the zirconia ceramic post (CosmoPost) and ceramic core (Cosmo Ingot), zirconia ceramic post (CosmoPost) and composite core (Tetric Ceram), glass fiber-reinforced post (FRC Postec) and composite core (Tetric Ceram), titanium post (Er post) and composite core (Tetric Ceram), zirconia ceramic post (Cerapost) and ceramic core (Cosmo Ingot), zirconia ceramic post (Cerapost) and composite core (Tetric Ceram) and the control group were 0.886, 0.889, 0.988, 0.924, 0.889, 0.893 and 1, respectively. The stress concentrations in dentin created by two different zirconia ceramic post systems were nearly the same. The zirconia ceramic post systems created slightly less stress concentration in dentin than the glass fiber-reinforced and titanium posts.

  6. The effects of incisor inclination changes on the position of point A in Class II division 2 malocclusion using three-dimensional evaluation: a long-term prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiushuo; Zhang, Caixia; Zhou, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate change in the sagittal position of point A due to orthodontic treatment by orthodontic community-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and methods: 40 subjects (22 males and 18 females) who had Class II division 2 malocclusion were recruited, and 40 subjects (23 males and 17 females) who had minor crowding in the beginning of the treatment and required no or minimal maxillary anterior tooth movement were served as control. The changes in maxillary incisor inclination, sagittal position of point A, SNA angle, and movement of incisor root apex and incisal edge were calculated before and after CBCT treatment. Results: Maxillary incisors were significantly proclined in the study group but not in the control group. This proclination resulted in 2.95 mm backward movement of the root apex and 6.23 mm forward movement of the incisal edge of maxillary incisors. Point A moved 1.24 mm and 0.18 mm backward in the study and control groups, respectively. Incisor root apex and incisal edge almost remained stable in the control group. No significant change was observed in the SNA angle in both the study and control groups. However, the change in SNA between the two groups was found to be significant. Conclusions: Proclination of maxillary incisors with backward movement of incisor root apex caused posterior movement of point A. This posterior movement significantly affects the SNA angle. PMID:25419382

  7. Comparison of Stress Distribution in a Maxillary Central Incisor Restored with Two Prefabricated Post Systems with and without Ferrule Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Sabarinathan; Raja, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction When restoring an endodontically treated tooth with deficient coronal tooth structure, posts can be used to strengthen the tooth. Recently prefabricated posts are widely used as they exclude the need for complex laboratory procedures making the procedure time saving. But the post-placement can produce stresses that cause root fracture. Different techniques can be used to study the stress distribution due to different posts, but most of them are two-dimensional and difficult to reproduce. Aim The aim of the study was to compare the stress distribution in a maxillary central incisor with Titanium and Glass fiber posts with and without ferrule using the three dimensional finite element analysis. Materials and Methods In this study 3D finite element analysis was used. Four models P1(Endodontically treated maxillary central incisor with a ferrule of coronal dentin and restored with parallel sided prefabricated titanium post and composite resin core), P2 (Endodontically treated maxillary central incisor restored with parallel sided prefabricated Titanium post and composite resin core without a ferrule of coronal dentin), P3 (Endodontically treated maxillary central incisor with a ferrule of coronal dentin and restored with parallel sided prefabricated glass fiber reinforced composite post and composite core), P4 (Endodontically treated maxillary central incisor restored with parallel sided prefabricated glass fiber reinforced composite post and composite core without a ferrule of coronal dentin), were modeled using PRO E software. Then stress analysis was done using ANSYS WORKBENCH 10.0software. A load of 100 N was applied to the models at 2mm from the incisal edge on the palatal surface with an angle of 45o to the long axis of the tooth. Results The results suggested that maximum stresses were seen around posts in order of Titanium post without ferrule followed by Titanium post with ferrule next Glass fiber post without ferrule followed by Glass fiber post

  8. Combined impact of exercise and temperature in learning and memory performance of fluoride toxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Basha, P Mahaboob; Sujitha, N S

    2012-12-01

    In previous studies, we investigated a link between high fluoride exposure and functional IQ deficits in rats. This study is an extension conducted to explore the combined influence of physical exercise and temperature stress on the learning ability and memory in rats and to assess whether any positive modulation could be attenuated due to exercise regimen subjected to F-toxicated animals at different temperatures. Accumulation of ingested fluoride resulted significant inhibition in acetylcholinesterase activity (P < 0.05), plasma cortisol levels (P < 0.05), and impaired the acquisition, performance, latency time, and retention in fluoride-exposed animals. Fluoride-toxicated rats took more number of sessions during the learning phase [F (5, 35) = 19.065; P < 0.05] and post hoc analysis on the number of correct choices revealed that there was a significant effect of treatments [F (5, 30) = 15.763; P < 0.05]; sessions [F (8, 240) = 58.698; P < 0.05]; and also significant difference in the interactions [F (40, 240) = 1.583; P < 0.05]. The latency data also revealed a significant difference between groups [F (5, 30) = 28.085; P < 0.05]; time = [F (8, 240) = 136.314; P < 0.05]; and there was a significant difference in the interactions [F (40, 240) = 2.090; P < 0.05]. In order to ascertain if interdependence between fluoride concentrations and the foregoing free radical parameters, respective correlation coefficients were calculated and results clearly emphasize the positive role of exercise in the promotion of cognitive functions by decreasing fluoride levels in rat hippocampus. A significant recovery in cognitive function was noticed in all the exercised animals due to reduced burden of brain oxidative stress. In comparison to exercise regimens performed at different temperatures, high (35 °C) and low temperatures (20 °C) led to a slower acquisition and poor retention of the task when compared to

  9. Intentional replantation of an immature permanent lower incisor because of a refractory peri-apical lesion: case report and 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Shintani, S; Tsuji, M; Toyosawa, S; Ooshima, T

    2004-05-01

    We performed an intentional replantation of an immature lower incisor that had a refractory peri-apical lesion. The incisor was extracted and the peri-apical lesion was removed by curettage. The root canal of the tooth was then rapidly irrigated, and filled with a calcium hydroxide and iodoform paste (Vitapex(R)), after which the tooth was fixed with an arch wire splint. Five years later, no clinical or radiographic abnormalities were found, and the root apex was obturated by an apical bridge formation. A team of two dentists is essential to prevent a prolonged operation time, thus eliminating any of the causes of ankylosis. Furthermore, calcium hydroxide and iodoform paste, along with an arch wire splint retained with composite resin, led to good healing of the periodontal tissue after the intentional replantation. Our results indicate that intentional replantation is a useful method for an immature tooth with refractory peri-apical problems.

  10. Amalgamation of allogenic bone graft, platelet-rich fibrin gel, and PRF membrane in auto-transplantation of an impacted central incisor.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Zainab; Kumar, Yuvika Raj; Mohanty, Sujata; Khetrapal, Ambica

    2015-01-01

    "Social six" teeth refers to the maxillary incisors and canines that play a vital role in the appearance of an individual and absence of any one of them has a significant psycho-social impact. Hence, early treatment and rehabilitation of the same are extremely important. A multitude of treatment options ranging from orthodontic extrusion, extraction followed by implant placement, fixed partial denture, and auto-transplantation have been advocated. This case report discusses the unique amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), demineralized freeze-dried bone graft with use of PRF membrane during auto-transplantation of an impacted central incisor. The authors have focused on maximum usage of autogenous materials in the most economic and least invasive manner. Furthermore, this amalgamation has been used to provide rehabilitation in the least span of time.

  11. Amalgamation of allogenic bone graft, platelet-rich fibrin gel, and PRF membrane in auto-transplantation of an impacted central incisor

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Zainab; Kumar, Yuvika Raj; Mohanty, Sujata; Khetrapal, Ambica

    2015-01-01

    “Social six” teeth refers to the maxillary incisors and canines that play a vital role in the appearance of an individual and absence of any one of them has a significant psycho-social impact. Hence, early treatment and rehabilitation of the same are extremely important. A multitude of treatment options ranging from orthodontic extrusion, extraction followed by implant placement, fixed partial denture, and auto-transplantation have been advocated. This case report discusses the unique amalgamation of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), demineralized freeze-dried bone graft with use of PRF membrane during auto-transplantation of an impacted central incisor. The authors have focused on maximum usage of autogenous materials in the most economic and least invasive manner. Furthermore, this amalgamation has been used to provide rehabilitation in the least span of time. PMID:26097366

  12. Temporary replacement of missing maxillary lateral incisors with orthodontic miniscrew implants in growing patients: rationale, clinical technique, and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Cope, Jason B; McFadden, David

    2014-09-01

    The missing maxillary lateral incisor in adolescent patients presents an orthodontic challenge. Historically, there have been three treatment options to address this clinical problem: (1) canine substitution, (2) tooth auto-transplantation, and (3) dental restoration. Unfortunately, these methods are not without limitation. A novel treatment concept, originating in 2003 and utilizing orthodontic miniscrew implants, is presented along with the rationale, clinical technique and 8 years of follow-up. PMID:25138368

  13. New prediction equations for the estimation of maxillary mandibular canine and premolar widths from mandibular incisors and mandibular first permanent molar widths: A digital model study

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of the study was to generate new prediction equations for the estimation of maxillary and mandibular canine and premolar widths based on mandibular incisors and first permanent molar widths. Methods A total of 2,340 calculations (768 based on the sum of mandibular incisor and first permanent molar widths, and 1,572 based on the maxillary and mandibular canine and premolar widths) were performed, and a digital stereomicroscope was used to derive the the digital models and measurements. Mesiodistal widths of maxillary and mandibular teeth were measured via scanned digital models. Results There was a strong positive correlation between the estimation of maxillary (r = 0.85994, r2 = 0.7395) and mandibular (r = 0.8708, r2 = 0.7582) canine and premolar widths. The intraclass correlation coefficients were statistically significant, and the coefficients were in the strong correlation range, with an average of 0.9. Linear regression analysis was used to establish prediction equations. Prediction equations were developed to estimate maxillary arches based on Y = 15.746 + 0.602 × sum of mandibular incisors and mandibular first permanent molar widths (sum of mandibular incisors [SMI] + molars), Y = 18.224 + 0.540 × (SMI + molars), and Y = 16.186 + 0.586 × (SMI + molars) for both genders, and to estimate mandibular arches the parameters used were Y = 16.391 + 0.564 × (SMI + molars), Y = 14.444 + 0.609 × (SMI + molars), and Y = 19.915 + 0.481 × (SMI + molars). Conclusions These formulas will be helpful for orthodontic diagnosis and clinical treatment planning during the mixed dentition stage. PMID:27226963

  14. An In Vitro Study on the Effects of Post-Core Design and Ferrule on the Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Maxillary Central Incisors

    PubMed Central

    Sreedevi, S; Sanjeev, R; Raghavan, Rekha; Abraham, Anna; Rajamani, T; Govind, Girish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endodontically treated teeth have significantly different physical and mechanical properties compared to vital teeth and are more prone to fracture. The study aims to compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with and without post reinforcement, custom cast post-core and prefabricated post with glass ionomer core and to evaluate the ferrule effect on endodontically treated teeth restored with custom cast post-core. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 human maxillary central incisors with similar dimensions devoid of any root caries, restorations, previous endodontic treatment or cracks were selected from a collection of stored extracted teeth. An initial silicone index of each tooth was made. They were treated endodontically and divided into four groups of ten specimens each. Their apical seal was maintained with 4 mm of gutta-percha. Root canal preparation was done and then post core fabrication was done. The prepared specimens were subjected to load testing using a computer coordinated UTM. The fracture load results were then statistically analyzed. One-way ANOVA was followed by paired t-test. Results: 1. Reinforcement of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors with post and core, improved their fracture resistance to be at par with that of endodontically treated maxillary central incisor, with natural crown. 2. The fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors is significantly increased when restored with custom cast post-core and 2 mm ferrule. Conclusion: With 2 mm ferrule, teeth restored with custom cast post-core had a significantly higher fracture resistance than teeth restored with custom cast post-core or prefabricated post and glass ionomer core without ferrule. PMID:26464537

  15. Effect of labiolingual inclination of a maxillary central incisor and surrounding alveolar bone loss on periodontal stress: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether labial tooth inclination and alveolar bone loss affect the moment per unit of force (Mt/F) in controlled tipping and consequent stresses on the periodontal ligament (PDL). Methods Three-dimensional models (n = 20) of maxillary central incisors were created with different labial inclinations (5°, 10°, 15°, and 20°) and different amounts of alveolar bone loss (0, 2, 4, and 6 mm). The Mt/F necessary for controlled tipping (Mt/Fcont) and the principal stresses on the PDL were calculated for each model separately in a finite element analysis. Results As labial inclination increased, Mt/Fcont and the length of the moment arm decreased. In contrast, increased alveolar bone loss caused increases in Mt/Fcont and the length of the moment arm. When Mt/F was near Mt/Fcont, increases in Mt/F caused compressive stresses to move from a predominantly labial apical region to a palatal apical position, and tensile stresses in the labial area moved from a cervical position to a mid-root position. Although controlled tipping was applied to the incisors, increases in alveolar bone loss and labial tooth inclination caused increases in maximum compressive and tensile stresses at the root apices. Conclusions Increases in alveolar bone loss and labial tooth inclination caused increases in stresses that might cause root resorption at the root apex, despite the application of controlled tipping to the incisors. PMID:27226961

  16. Influence of post and resin cement on stress distribution of maxillary central incisors restored with direct resin composite.

    PubMed

    Spazzin, A O; Galafassi, D; de Meira-Júnior, A D; Braz, R; Garbin, C A

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the influence of two endodontic post systems and the elastic modulus and film thickness of resin cement on stress distribution in a maxillary central incisor (MCI) restored with direct resin composite using finite element analysis (FEA). A three-dimensional model of an MCI with a coronary fracture and supporting structures was performed. A static chewing pressure of 2.16 N/mm2 was applied to two areas on the palatal surface of the composite restoration. Zirconia ceramic (ZC) and glass fiber (GF) posts were considered. The stress distribution was analyzed in the post, dentin and cement layer when ZC and GF posts were fixed to the root canals using resin cements of different elastic moduli (7.0 and 18.6 GPa) and different layer thicknesses (70 and 200 microm). The different post materials presented a significant influence on stress distribution with lesser stress concentration when using the GF post. The higher elastic modulus cement created higher stress levels within itself. The cement thicknesses did not present significant changes. PMID:19363979

  17. 3D FEA of cemented glass fiber and cast posts with various dental cements in a maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Madfa, Ahmed A; Al-Hamzi, Mohsen A; Al-Sanabani, Fadhel A; Al-Qudaimi, Nasr H; Yue, Xiao-Guang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse and compare the stability of two dental posts cemented with four different luting agents by examining their shear stress transfer through the FEM. Eight three-dimensional finite element models of a maxillary central incisor restored with glass fiber and Ni-Cr alloy cast dental posts. Each dental post was luted with zinc phosphate, Panavia resin, super bond C&B resin and glass ionomer materials. Finite element models were constructed and oblique loading of 100 N was applied. The distribution of shear stress was investigated at posts and cement/dentine interfaces using ABAQUS/CAE software. The peak shear stress for glass fiber post models minimized approximately three to four times of those for Ni-Cr alloy cast post models. There was negligible difference in peak of shear stress when various cements were compared, irrespective of post materials. The shear stress had same trend for all cement materials. This study found that the glass fiber dental post reduced the shear stress concentration at interfacial of post and cement/dentine compared to Ni-Cr alloy cast dental post.

  18. 3D FEA of cemented glass fiber and cast posts with various dental cements in a maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Madfa, Ahmed A; Al-Hamzi, Mohsen A; Al-Sanabani, Fadhel A; Al-Qudaimi, Nasr H; Yue, Xiao-Guang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse and compare the stability of two dental posts cemented with four different luting agents by examining their shear stress transfer through the FEM. Eight three-dimensional finite element models of a maxillary central incisor restored with glass fiber and Ni-Cr alloy cast dental posts. Each dental post was luted with zinc phosphate, Panavia resin, super bond C&B resin and glass ionomer materials. Finite element models were constructed and oblique loading of 100 N was applied. The distribution of shear stress was investigated at posts and cement/dentine interfaces using ABAQUS/CAE software. The peak shear stress for glass fiber post models minimized approximately three to four times of those for Ni-Cr alloy cast post models. There was negligible difference in peak of shear stress when various cements were compared, irrespective of post materials. The shear stress had same trend for all cement materials. This study found that the glass fiber dental post reduced the shear stress concentration at interfacial of post and cement/dentine compared to Ni-Cr alloy cast dental post. PMID:26543733

  19. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Ferrule Designs on Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Incisors Restored with Bonded Posts and Cores

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi Izadi, Z.; Jalalian, E.; Eyvaz Ziaee, A.; Zamani, L.; Javanshir, B.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In cases of severe hard tissue loss, 2 mm circumferential ferrule is difficult to achieve. So in these cases we should use different ferrule designs. This in vitro study investigated the effect of different ferrule designs on the fracture resistance of teeth restored with bonded post and cores. Materials and Methods: Forty freshly-extracted central incisors were endodontically treated. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups; group 1 were teeth with 2 mm circumferential ferrule above the CEJ, group 2 were teeth with 2 mm ferrule only on the palatal side of the teeth, group 3 consisted of teeth with 2 mm ferrule only on the facial side and group 4 were teeth with 2 mm ferrule on the palatal and facial side of teeth with interproximal concavities. All teeth were restored with fiber posts and composite cores. The specimen was mounted on a universal testing machine and compressive load was applied to the long axis of the specimen until failure occurred. Results: The fracture resistance was 533.79 ± 232.28 in group 1, 634.75± 133.35 in group 2, 828.90 ±118.27 in group 3 and 678.78± 160.20 in group 4. The post hoc analysis showed statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 3. Conclusions: The results of this in vitro study showed that facial ferrule increases the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with bonded post and cores. PMID:21998789

  20. Accuracy of CBCT, Digital Radiography and Cross-Sectioning for the Evaluation of Mandibular Incisor Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Assadian, Hadi; Dabbaghi, Arash; Gooran, Morteza; Eftekhar, Behrouz; Sharifi, Sanaz; Shams, Nassim; Dehghani Najvani, Ali; Tabesh, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), digital radiography and tooth sectioning in evaluating root canal morphology of mandibular incisors in an in vitro setting. Methods and Materials: A total of 76 samples were imaged using CBCT, and digital radiography in straight and angled views. The samples were then sectioned at different distances from the apex for further visualization under stereomicroscope. The agreement between the observers was statistically analyzed by kappa correlation coefficient and the chi-square test. Results: The results showed that the majority of the samples had a single canal (Vertucci’s Type I). CBCT analysis reported more frequent multi-canal roots in comparison with the other techniques. In pairwise comparisons, the highest agreement was found between digital radiographic imaging and microscopic cross-sectioning both in terms of canal configuration and the number of root canals. Conclusion: None of the used imaging techniques per se could adequately show the exact internal anatomical configuration in accordance with the gold standard. PMID:27141217

  1. Neonatal line width in deciduous incisors from Neolithic, mediaeval and modern skeletal samples from north-central Poland.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Marta; Żądzińska, Elżbieta; Sitek, Aneta; Borowska-Strugińska, Beata; Rosset, Iwona; Lorkiewicz, Wiesław

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal line is usually the first accentuated incremental line visible on the enamel. The prenatal environment significantly contributes to the width of the neonatal line, influencing the pace of reaching post-delivery homeostasis by the newborn's organism. Studies of the enamel of the earliest developing deciduous teeth can provide an insight into the prenatal development and the perinatal conditions of children of past human populations, thus being an additional source contributing to consideration of the influence of prenatal and perinatal factors modifying growth processes. The aim of this study was to examine whether the neonatal line, reflecting the conditions of the prenatal and perinatal environment, differed between the Neolithic, the mediaeval and the modern populations from the Kujawy region in north-central Poland. The material consisted of longitudinally ground sections of 57 human deciduous incisors obtained from children aged 1.0-7.5 years representing three archaeological series from Brześć Kujawski site. All teeth were sectioned in the labio-linqual plane using a diamond blade (Buechler IsoMet 1000). Final specimens were observed with the microscope Delta Optical Evolution 300 at 10× and 40× magnifications. For each tooth, linear measurements of the neonatal line width were performed on its labial surface at the three levels from the cemento-enamel junction. No significant difference was found in the mean neonatal line width depending on the tooth type and archaeological site, although the thickest neonatal line characterised children from the Neolithic series. In all analysed series, the neonatal line width was diversified depending on the child's age at death. The value of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient calculated for the correlation between the child's age at death and the neonatal line width was statistically significant. A clear increase in the width of the neonatal line was thus observed along with a decrease in the child

  2. A comparative study to evaluate the vertical position of maxillary central incisor and canine in relation to incisive papilla line

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mayank; Verma, Ashok Kumar; Chaturvedi, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the vertical distance of maxillary central incisor (CI) and maxillary canine (CA) from the incisive papilla (IP) line and their variation with age and sex. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentulous subjects following the inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomly selected from the local population. On the basis of gender and age, subjects were divided into four groups: Ma, Mb, Fa and Fb . Maxillary impressions of selected subjects were made and corresponding casts were retrieved. The cast was positioned on the surveyor and the center of IP was transferred to the labial side of maxillary right CI and CA regions with the help of analyzing rod of the surveyor and a line was drawn in this region which was referred to as “IP line”. The measurements were made from the IP line to the mesio-incisal line angle of right maxillary CI-IP and cusp tip of right maxillary CA with the help of digital vernier caliper (CA to IP). Result: The mean vertical distance of maxillary CI-IP ranged from 6.31 ± 0.74 mm to 7.04 ± 0.87 mm and the mean vertical distance of maxillary CA-IP ranged from 5.83 ± 0.80 mm to 6.30 ± 0.82 mm. Conclusion: The CA position in relation to the IP line is more stable to its position than the CI position irrespective of age and sex. PMID:25125915

  3. Association between Molar Incisor Hypomineralization in Schoolchildren and Both Prenatal and Postnatal Factors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa-Faria, Patrícia; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Bendo, Cristiane Baccin; Zarzar, Patrícia Maria; Vale, Miriam Pimenta

    2016-01-01

    Background Although studies throughout the world have investigated potential factors involved in the occurrence of molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH), the findings are varied and inconclusive. Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of MIH and identify associated prenatal, perinatal and postnatal factors among Brazilian schoolchildren aged 8 and 9 years. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with a randomly selected population-based sample of 1181 schoolchildren. Information on demographic and socioeconomic characteristics as well as prenatal, perinatal and postnatal aspects was obtained through questionnaires. The clinical examination included the investigation of MIH based on the criteria of the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry. Dental caries in the permanent dentition and developmental defects of enamel (DDE) on the primary second molars were also recorded. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics, bivariate tests and Poisson regression with robust variance. Results The prevalence of MIH was 20.4%. MIH was more frequent among children with dental caries in the permanent dentition (PR: 2.67; 95% CI: 1.98–3.61), those with DDE on the primary second molars (PR: 2.54; 95% CI: 1.87–3.45) and those who experienced asthma/bronchitis in the first four years of life (PR: 1.93; 95% CI: 1.45–2.56). Conclusions The prevalence of MIH was high and was associated with dental caries, the presence of DDE on primary second molars and the experience of asthma/bronchitis in early life. These findings could be useful in the identification of children in need of shorter recall intervals to prevent the consequences of MIH, such as enamel breakdown dental caries. PMID:27280451

  4. Alterations of the rat temporomandibular joint in functional posterior displacement of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Cholasueksa, Purisa; Warita, Hiroyuki; Soma, Kunimichi

    2004-10-01

    Functional malocclusion that induces posterior condylar displacement may affect the remodeling processes of the temporomandibular joint structures. We tested the hypothesis that intermittent posterior condylar displacement due to functional malocclusion traumatizes condylar cartilage and joint innervated nerve fibers. Thirty-nine eight-week-old Wistar rats were used. To induce functional posterior condylar displacement, guiding appliances were attached to maxillary incisors of 24 rats for four, seven, and 14 days. Fifteen normal rats served as controls. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or processed for immunohistochemistry of protein gene product 9.5 and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Functional posterior condylar displacement led to a diminution in proliferative cells, reduction in cartilage width, and re-expression of GAP-43-immunoreactive nerve fibers. These results indicate that intermittent posterior condylar displacement due to functional malocclusion causes dysfunctional remodeling of condylar cartilage and nerve injury.

  5. Non-linear viscoelastic finite element analysis of the effect of the length of glass fiber posts on the biomechanical behaviour of directly restored incisors and surrounding alveolar bone.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Marco; Sorrentino, Roberto; Zarone, Fernando; Apicella, Davide; Aversa, Raffaella; Apicella, Antonio

    2008-07-01

    The study aimed at estimating the effect of insertion length of posts with composite restorations on stress and strain distributions in central incisors and surrounding bone. The typical, average geometries were generated in a FEA environment. Dentin was considered as an elastic orthotropic material, and periodontal ligament was coupled with nonlinear viscoelastic mechanical properties. The model was then validated with experimental data on displacement of incisors from published literature. Three post lengths were investigated in this study: root insertion of 5, 7, and 9 mm. For control, a sound incisor model was generated. Then, a tearing load of 50 N was applied to both sound tooth and simulation models. Post restorations did not seem to affect the strain distribution in bone when compared to the control. All simulated post restorations affected incisor biomechanics and reduced the root's deforming capability, while the composite crowns underwent a higher degree of deformation than the sound crown. No differences could be noticed in incisor stress and strain. As for the influence of post length, it was not shown to affect the biomechanics of restored teeth. PMID:18833761

  6. Evaluation of the mineralization degree of the vestibular surface of the upper central incisors with a 655-nm diode laser in mouth breathers: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro Ladalardo, Thereza C. C. G.; Cappellette, Mario, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Anthero de Azevedo, Ramiro; Pignatari, Shirley; Weckx, Luc L. M.

    2003-06-01

    Mouth breathing unbalances the physiological mechanisms of the dental surface hydration by compromising lip closure, and, very often, causing the vestibular positioning of upper incisors. That variance leads to the interruption of the dental demineralization and remineralization feedback, prevailing a demineralized condition of the dental surface which increases caries risk. The laser fluorescence examination allows an early demineralization diagnosis, thus it makes possible through preventive measures to minimize the risk factor - dental mineral structure loss - in the bacterial infection of the demineralized area, and hence, preventing invasive therapeutical procedures. A DIAGNOdent apparatus was used to evaluate the mineralization degree of the upper central incisors in 40 patients - twenty of them with a mouth breathing diagnosis; the remaining twenty were nasal breathers (control group). Age ranging from 6 to 12 years, both male and female. To measure the vestibular surface of the incisors, it was divided into 3 segments: cervical, medial and incisal. The average of the results pertaining to the mouth breathing patients was as follows: tooth 11 cervical third - 5.45, medial third - 7.15, incisal third - 7.95, and tooth 21 - cervical third - 5.95, medial third - 7.25, incisal third - 8.15. The control patients, nasal breathers, presented the following results: tooth 11 cervical third - 1.75, medial third - 2.30, incisal third - 1.85, and tooth 21 - cervical third - 1.80, medial third - 2.20, incisal third - 2.15. The mouth breathing patients showed demineralization in the teeth examined at the initial stage, subclinical, comparing with the control patients, nasal breathers, who did not present any mineral deficit in these teeth.

  7. The effect of central incisor's root proximity to the cortical plate and apical root resorption in extraction and non-extraction treatment

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Akhil; Sharma, Vijay P; Singh, Gulshan K; Tikku, Tripti; Agarwal, Nidhi; Mengi, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The present study was conducted to investigate the relevance of cortical plate proximity of maxillary central incisor root, maxillary alveolar bone width, and the apical root resorption in extraction and non-extraction orthodontically treated cases. Further, the correlation between the apical root resorption and the various parameters was investigated. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 lateral head cephalographs, 40 pre-treatment and 40 post-treatment, of orthodontic subjects with a mean age of 15 years treated with fixed standard edgewise appliance were obtained. All subjects were divided into two groups as extraction and non-extraction cases. Twelve linear and three angular parameters were measured and evaluated. The paired “t”-test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and the stepwise regression analysis were done to test the relationship between the apical root resorption and the various parameters. Results and Conclusions: The study revealed slightly greater amount of apical root resorption in extraction subjects as compared to non-extraction subjects. However, no statistically significant difference was found between the two treatment modalities. In extraction subjects, the apical root resorption was directly proportional to the pre-treatment length of maxillary central incisor and inversely proportional to the root width in apical one-third region, though there was a weak correlation. In non-extraction subjects, the pre-treatment anteroposterior position of the root apex of maxillary central incisor in the alveolar bone, in combination with its root width in the apical one-third region formed the predictive factors for the variance in the amount of the apical root resorption, though there was a weak correlation. Furthermore, the changes in the alveolar widths at the root apex and mid-root region were considered as predictive factors for the amount of apical root resorption during extraction and non-extraction treatment, respectively. PMID

  8. Management of a Previously Treated, Calcified, and Dilacerated Maxillary Lateral Incisor: A Combined Nonsurgical/Surgical Approach Assisted by Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Pooja Gupta; Dudeja, Krishan Kumar; Garg, Arvind; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Grover, Shibani

    2016-06-01

    Teeth with calcified canals, dilacerated roots, and associated large periradicular lesions involving both cortical plates pose a challenge to dentists. In addition to the nonsurgical endodontic treatment, such teeth may require surgical intervention with concomitant use of bone grafting materials and barrier techniques. These techniques, when combined with the use of a host modulating agent such as platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), may improve the chances of success. A 26-year-old woman was referred for dental treatment with a recurrence of an intraoral sinus tract 2 months after periradicular surgery in the upper anterior region. Clinical and radiographic examinations revealed a calcified and perforated maxillary left lateral incisor with a severely dilacerated root as well as an associated large radiolucent lesion surrounding the roots of the maxillary left central and lateral incisors. A cone-beam computed tomographic scan of the anterior maxilla showed erosion of the labial and palatal cortical plates in the same region. A calcified canal in the lateral incisor was negotiated up to the straight line portion of the canal. Periradicular surgery with root-end resection was performed, and root-end filling was performed with mineral trioxide aggregate. The perforation present on the middle third of the labial surface of the root was repaired with mineral trioxide aggregate, and the canal was cleaned, shaped, and obturated. A PRF scaffold was prepared and used with a collagen membrane and a freeze-dried bone allograft. Follow-up visits after 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year revealed satisfactory clinical and radiographic healing. The combined use of nonsurgical and surgical modes of treatment cannot be overemphasized in this case. The use of PRF along with a bone graft and a barrier membrane may have enhanced the speed of healing and the resolution of periradicular radiolucency by enhancing bone regeneration. PMID:27140443

  9. Evaluation of the Load-bearing Capacity of Fractured Incisal Edge of Maxillary Permanent Central Incisors restored with a Glass Fiber-reinforced Nanocomposite: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Srilatha, KT; Nandlal, B; Dhull, Kanika Singh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the load-bearing capacity of fractured incisal edge of maxillary permanent central incisors restored with a nanocomposite and a glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite. Materials and methods: Thirty-six extracted sound maxillary central incisors randomly divided in three groups were used for the present study. Group I (control) contained untreated teeth. Samples in experimental groups II and III were prepared by cutting the incisal (one-third) part of the crown horizontally and subjected to enamel preparations and restored with a nanocomposite and a glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite respectively. All restored teeth were stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours. Fracture resistance was evaluated as peak load at failure (Newton) for samples tested in a cantilever-bending test using Hounsfield universal testing machine. Failure modes were microscopically examined. Results: Highest mean peak failure load (Newton) among experimental groups was observed in glass fiber-reinforced nano composite group (863.50 ± 76.12 N) followed by nanocomposite group (633.67 ± 40.14 N). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the restoration technique significantly affected the load-bearing capacity (p < 0.001). Scheffe’s post-hoc comparison test (subset for α = 0.05) revealed that there was significant difference in the mean peak failure load values of nanocomposite and glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite groups when considered together (p < 0.001). Experimental groups showed similar types of failure modes with majority occurring ascohesive and mixed type. Fifty-eight percent of the teeth in glass fiber-reinforced nanocomposite group fractured below the cementoenamel junction. Conclusion: By using fiber-reinforced composite substructure under conventional composites in the repair of fractured incisors, the load-bearing capacity of the restored incisal edge could be substantially

  10. Calcium metabolism in bone and teeth of rats during exposure to restriction of motor activity and to swimming exercise.

    PubMed

    Zorbas, Y G; Charapakhin, K P; Kuznetsov, N A; Kakurin, V J

    1999-06-01

    The effects of motor activity restriction for 90 days (hypokinesia, HK) and swimming training (T) on calcium metabolism in rat bones and teeth were evaluated. Male Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: untrained vivarium control rats (UVCR), untrained hypokinetic rats (UHKR), trained hypokinetic rats (THKR) and trained vivarium control rats (TVCR). Hypokinesia was obtained keeping the animals for 90 days in small individual cages which restricted their movements in all directions without hindering food and water intakes. Rats of THKR and TVCR were forced to swim for 15 to 90 minutes everyday. On the 1st, 7th, 15th day of a prehypokinetic period and on the 5th, 10th, 20th, 40th, 60th and 90th day of the hypokinetic period, six rats of each group were decapitated. Radioactive calcium was injected to the animals 70 days before autopsy. Calcium and phosphorus in serum, bones (molars, incisors, upper and lower jaws, parietal, scapular, clavicle, pelvic and tibial bones) and in the respective ash residues were measured. Body and bone weights, and radioactive calcium were also determined. Under prolonged exposure to HK (THKR and UHKR groups), bone weights and bone and ash Ca and P concentrations decreased, whereas serum Ca and P and 45Ca resorption increased, in comparison to the respective values in the UVCR and TVCR groups. Swimming exercise apparently did not modify calcium metabolism in the hypokinetic or control rats. PMID:10517263

  11. The Ability of Dental Specialists to Distinguish Lateral Incisor Metal-Free From Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal Implant Supported Crowns.

    PubMed

    De Melo, Eduardo V; Kauling, Ana Elisa C; Freitas, Sérgio Fernando T; Cardoso, Antônio C; Ferreira, Cimara Fortes

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of dental specialists to distinguish lateral incisor metal-free from porcelain-fused-to-metal implant supported crowns in the anterior region. Five single-tooth implants in the maxillary lateral incisor region were restored with two types of implant-supported crowns (porcelain-fused-to-metal and metal-free). Photographs were presented to 20 evaluators. The evaluators had to answer whether the crown was: metal-free, porcelain-fused-to-metal or they could not tell the difference. The results showed that groups 1 (all participants), 3 (Restorative & Prosthodontic specialists), 4 (graduated 10 years) and 5 (graduated > 10 years) failed to respond correctly (P > 0.05) to which type of crown was presented to them. Group 2 (Periodontology & Implantology specialists) showed an accuracy rate of 35.6% (P = 0.009), in relation to metal-free crowns, 5.6 which is below the random index. The authors concluded that the evaluators from the 5 groups studied were unable to significantly distinguish which type of crown was used in the 10 presented situations.

  12. Management of bilateral invasive cervical resorption lesions in maxillary incisors using a novel calcium silicate-based cement: A case report.

    PubMed

    Karypidou, Athanasia; Chatzinikolaou, Ino-Dimitra; Kouros, Pantelis; Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth; Economides, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a pathologic process leading to progressive and usually destructive loss of tooth structure. The pathogenic mechanism is not completely understood and the diagnosis may be challenging. The aim of this article is to present an unusual case of bilateral presence of invasive cervical resorption lesions in maxillary central incisors and to discuss the treatment procedures using a novel repair material. The management of the present case was carried out in three phases. The first stage of the treatment aimed at curetting the active tissue from the resorption cavity and restoring the defect with the novel calcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine, Septodont). In the maxillary left central incisor it was not possible to remove the resorptive tissue without exposing the pulp, and therefore root canal treatment was performed. At the second phase, a full-thickness flap was raised in order to expose and repair the defect that was extending subgingivally. At the third phase teeth were restored with composite resin. The patient was kept under review and after a follow-up period of 2 years neither signs of periradicular lesion nor recurrence of resorption were observed. The teeth were asymptomatic, and restorations appeared to be in excellent condition. In conclusion, Biodentine seems to be a promising material for the treatment of invasive cervical resorption lesions. PMID:27341468

  13. Amputation of an Extra-root with an Endodontic Lesion in an Invaginated Vital Maxillary Lateral Incisor: A Rare Case with Seven-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Mehmet Kemal; Asgary, Saeed; Tekin, Uğur; Güneri, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    The developmental abnormality of tooth resulting from the infolding of enamel/dentin into the root is called dens invaginatus. Management of such cases is usually challenging due to the morphological complexity of root canal system. This report presents a rare treatment protocol of a clinical case of Oehler's type III dens invaginatus combined with an endodontic lesion in a vital maxillary lateral incisor. Access to the endodontic lesion located between the central and lateral incisors was achieved by reflection of a full mucoperiosteal flap. Granulomatous tissue as well as aberrant root was removed and the surface of the root and adjacent coronal region were reshaped. Three years later, the patient was orthodontically treated. Seven years after completion of surgical/orthodontic management, the tooth remained asymptomatic and functional with normal periodontium/vital pulp. Radiographically, the healing of the lesion was observed. Actually, vitality of the invaginated tooth and communication between the invagination and the root canal were the most important factors in determining such minimally invasive treatment protocol. Depending on the anatomy of the root canal system, surgical amputation of an invaginated root can be performed to achieve a successful outcome in Oehler's type III dens invaginatus cases, even though it is associated with apical periodontitis. PMID:27141224

  14. Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: Update on the Functional and Esthetic Parameters of Patients Treated with Implants or Space Closure and Teeth Recontouring

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary lateral incisor agenesis (MLIA) is a condition that affects both dental esthetics and function in young patients, and represents an important challenge for clinicians. Although several treatment options are available, the mesial repositioning of the canines followed by teeth recontouring into lateral incisors; or space opening/maintenance followed by implant placement have recently emerged as two important treatment approaches. In this article, the current and latest literature has been reviewed in order to summarize the functional and esthetic outcomes obtained with these two forms of treatment of MLIA patients in recent years. Indications, clinical limitations and the most important parameters to achieve the best possible results with each treatment modality are also discussed. Within the limitations of this review, it is not possible to assert at this point in time that one treatment approach is more advantageous than the other. Long-term followup studies comparing the existing treatment options are still lacking in the literature, and they are necessary to shed some light on the issue. It is possible, however, to state that adequate multidisciplinary diagnosis and planning are imperative to define the treatment option that will provide the best individual results for patients with MLIA. PMID:25646137

  15. The Ability of Dental Specialists to Distinguish Lateral Incisor Metal-Free From Porcelain-Fused-to-Metal Implant Supported Crowns.

    PubMed

    De Melo, Eduardo V; Kauling, Ana Elisa C; Freitas, Sérgio Fernando T; Cardoso, Antônio C; Ferreira, Cimara Fortes

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of dental specialists to distinguish lateral incisor metal-free from porcelain-fused-to-metal implant supported crowns in the anterior region. Five single-tooth implants in the maxillary lateral incisor region were restored with two types of implant-supported crowns (porcelain-fused-to-metal and metal-free). Photographs were presented to 20 evaluators. The evaluators had to answer whether the crown was: metal-free, porcelain-fused-to-metal or they could not tell the difference. The results showed that groups 1 (all participants), 3 (Restorative & Prosthodontic specialists), 4 (graduated 10 years) and 5 (graduated > 10 years) failed to respond correctly (P > 0.05) to which type of crown was presented to them. Group 2 (Periodontology & Implantology specialists) showed an accuracy rate of 35.6% (P = 0.009), in relation to metal-free crowns, 5.6 which is below the random index. The authors concluded that the evaluators from the 5 groups studied were unable to significantly distinguish which type of crown was used in the 10 presented situations. PMID:26466439

  16. Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: Functional and Periodontal Aspects in Patients Treated with Implants or Space Closure and Tooth Re-Contouring

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Hayacibara, Roberto Massayuki; Silva, Rafael Santos; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate functional and periodontal aspects in patients with unilateral or bilateral congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors, treated with either implants or space closure and tooth re-contouring. The sample consisted of 68 volunteers, divided into 3 groups: SCR - space closure and tooth re-contouring with composite resin (n = 26); SOI – implants placed in the area of agenesis (n = 20); and CG - control group (n = 22). A modified Helkimo questionnaire and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used by a single, previously calibrated evaluator to assess signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. The periodontal assessment involved the following aspects: plaque index, bleeding upon probing, pocket depth greater than 3 mm, gingival recession, abfraction, periodontal biotype and papilla index. The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test and the nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α=.05). No differences in periodontal status were found between treatments. None of the groups were associated with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorder. Both treatment alternatives for patients with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors were satisfactory and achieved functional and periodontal results similar to those of the control group. PMID:23346262

  17. Amputation of an Extra-root with an Endodontic Lesion in an Invaginated Vital Maxillary Lateral Incisor: A Rare Case with Seven-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Çalışkan, Mehmet Kemal; Asgary, Saeed; Tekin, Uğur; Güneri, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    The developmental abnormality of tooth resulting from the infolding of enamel/dentin into the root is called dens invaginatus. Management of such cases is usually challenging due to the morphological complexity of root canal system. This report presents a rare treatment protocol of a clinical case of Oehler’s type III dens invaginatus combined with an endodontic lesion in a vital maxillary lateral incisor. Access to the endodontic lesion located between the central and lateral incisors was achieved by reflection of a full mucoperiosteal flap. Granulomatous tissue as well as aberrant root was removed and the surface of the root and adjacent coronal region were reshaped. Three years later, the patient was orthodontically treated. Seven years after completion of surgical/orthodontic management, the tooth remained asymptomatic and functional with normal periodontium/vital pulp. Radiographically, the healing of the lesion was observed. Actually, vitality of the invaginated tooth and communication between the invagination and the root canal were the most important factors in determining such minimally invasive treatment protocol. Depending on the anatomy of the root canal system, surgical amputation of an invaginated root can be performed to achieve a successful outcome in Oehler’s type III dens invaginatus cases, even though it is associated with apical periodontitis. PMID:27141224

  18. Accentuated lines in the enamel of primary incisors from skeletal remains: A contribution to the explanation of early childhood mortality in a medieval population from Poland.

    PubMed

    Żądzińska, Elżbieta; Lorkiewicz, Wiesław; Kurek, Marta; Borowska-Strugińska, Beata

    2015-07-01

    Physiological disruptions resulting from an impoverished environment during the first years of life are of key importance for the health and biological status of individuals and populations. Studies of growth processes in archaeological populations point to the fact that the main causes of childhood mortality in the past are to be sought among extrinsic factors. Based on this assumption, one would expect random mortality of children, with the deceased individuals representing the entire subadult population. The purpose of this study is to explore whether differences in early childhood survival are reflected in differences in deciduous tooth enamel, which can provide an insight into the development of an individual during prenatal and perinatal ontogeny. Deciduous incisors were taken from 83 individuals aged 2.0-6.5 years from a medieval inhumation cemetery dated AD 1300-1600. Prenatal and postnatal enamel formation time, neonatal line width, and the number of accentuated lines were measured using an optical microscope. The significantly wider neonatal line and the higher frequency of accentuated lines in the enamel of the incisors of children who died at the age of 2-3 years suggest the occurrence of stronger or more frequent stress events in this group. These results indicate that in skeletal populations mortality was not exclusively determined by random external factors. Individuals predisposed by an unfavorable course of prenatal and perinatal growth were more likely to die in early childhood. PMID:25711723

  19. Calcium and magnesium content in hard tissues of rats under condition of subchronic lead intoxication.

    PubMed

    Todorovic, Tatjana; Vujanovic, Dragana; Dozic, Ivan; Petkovic-Curcin, Aleksandra

    2008-03-01

    Lead manifests toxic effects in almost all organs and tissues, especially in: the nervous system, hematopoietic system, kidney and liver. This metal has a special affinity for deposition in hard tissue, i.e., bones and teeth. It is generally believed that the main mechanism of its toxicity relies on its interaction with bioelements, especially with Ca and Mg. This article analyses the influence of Pb poisoning on Ca and Mg content in hard tissues, (mandible, femur, teeth and skull) of female and young rats. Experiments were carried out on 60 female rats, AO breed, and on 80 of their young rats (offspring). Female rats were divided into three groups: the first one was a control group, the second one received 100 mg/kg Pb2+ kg b.wt. per day in drinking water, the third one received 30 mg/kg Pb(2+) kg b.wt. per day in drinking water. Young rats (offspring) were divided into the same respective three groups. Lead, calcium and magnesium content in hard tissues (mandible, femur, teeth-incisors and skull) was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry in mineralized samples. There was a statistically significant Pb deposition in all analyzed female and young rat hard tissues. Ca and Mg contents were significantly reduced in all female and young rat hard tissues. These results show that Pb poisoning causes a significant reduction in Ca and Mg content in animal hard tissues, which is probably the consequence of competitive antagonism between Pb and Ca and Mg.

  20. Impact of Ellagic Acid in Bone Formation after Tooth Extraction: An Experimental Study on Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Obaidi, Mazen M. Jamil; Al-Bayaty, Fouad Hussain; Hussaini, Jamal; Khor, Goot Heah

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate the impact of ellagic acid (EA) towards healing tooth socket in diabetic animals, after tooth extraction. Methods. Twenty-four Sprague Dawley male rats weighing 250–300 g were selected for this study. All animals were intraperitoneally injected with 45 mg/kg (b.w.) of freshly prepared streptozotocin (STZ), to induce diabetic mellitus. Then, the animals were anesthetized, and the upper left central incisor was extracted and the whole extracted sockets were filled with Rosuvastatin (RSV). The rats were separated into three groups, comprising 8 rats each. The first group was considered as normal control group and orally treated with normal saline. The second group was regarded as diabetic control group and orally treated with normal saline, whereas the third group comprised diabetic rats, administrated with EA (50 mg/kg) orally. The maxilla tissue stained by eosin and hematoxylin (H&E) was used for histological examinations and immunohistochemical technique. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were used to evaluate the healing process in the extracted tooth socket by immunohistochemistry test. Results. The reactions of immunohistochemistry for FGF-2 and ALP presented stronger expression, predominantly in EA treated diabetic rat, than the untreated diabetic rat. Conclusion. These findings suggest that the administration of EA combined with RSV may have accelerated the healing process of the tooth socket of diabetic rats, after tooth extraction. PMID:25485304

  1. The Effects of Inflammatory Tooth Pain on Anxiety in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Maryam; Ebrahimnejad, Hamed; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Amirkhosravi, Ladan; Raoof, Ramin; Esmaeili Mahani, Saeed; Ramazani, Mohsen; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to examine the effects of induced inflammatory tooth pain on anxiety level in adult male rats. Methods: The mandibular incisors of 56 adult male rats were cut off and prefabricated crowns were fixed on the teeth. Formalin and capsaicin were injected intradentally to induce inflammatory tooth pain. Diazepam treated group received diazepam 30 minutes before intradental injection. The anxiety-related behavior was evaluated with elevated plus maze test. Results: Intradental application of chemical noxious stimuli, capsaicin and formalin, significantly affected nociceptive behaviors (P<0.001). Capsaicin (P<0.001) and formalin (P<0.01) significantly increased the anxiety levels in rats by decrease in the duration of time spent in open arm and increase in the duration of time spent in closed arm. Rats that received capsaicin made fewer open arm entries compared to the control animals (P<0.05). Capsaicin (P<0.001) and formalin (P<0.01) treated rats showed more stretch attend postures compared to the control and sham operated animals. In diazepampretreated rats, capsaicin induced algesic effect was prevented (P<0.001). Conclusion: Inflammatory pulpal pain has anxiogenic effect on rats, whereas diazepam premedication showed both anxiolytic and pain reducing effects. PMID:27563419

  2. Histomorphometric and microchemical characterization of maturing dental enamel in rats fed a boron-deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Haro Durand, Luis A; Mesones, Rosa Vera; Nielsen, Forrest H; Gorustovich, Alejandro A

    2010-06-01

    Few reports are available in the literature on enamel formation under nutritional deficiencies. Thus, we performed a study to determine the effects of boron (B) deficiency on the maturing dental enamel, employing the rat continuously erupting incisor as the experimental model. Male Wistar rats, 21 days old, were used throughout. They were divided into two groups, each containing ten animals: +B (adequate; 3-mg B/kg diet) and -B (boron deficient; 0.07-mg B/kg diet). The animals were maintained on their respective diets for 14 days and then euthanized. The mandibles were resected, fixed, and processed for embedding in paraffin and/or methyl methacrylate. Oriented histological sections of the continuously erupting incisor were obtained at the level of the mesial root of the first molar, allowing access to the maturation zone of the developing enamel. Dietary treatment did not affect food intake and body weight. Histomorphometric evaluation using undecalcified sections showed a reduction in enamel thickness (hypoplasia), whereas microchemical characterization by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry did not reveal alterations in enamel mineralization.

  3. Experiment K-310: The effect of spaceflight on osteogenesis and dentinogenesis in the mandibles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Russell, J. E.; Winter, F.; Rosenberg, G. D.; Walker, W. V.

    1981-01-01

    Normal rates of dentinogenesis and osteogenesis in the body of the mandible were observed. The total calcium, inorganic phosphorus and hydroxyproline levels in the jaws and incisors of the flight rats were normal. Gravity density fractionation studies suggested, however, that spaceflight caused a delay in the normal maturation of bone mineral and matrix; normal values were reestablished by 6 days postflight. The teeth were spared. The circadian and ultradian patterns of dentin calcification were normal during spaceflight and recovery periods, but the enamel rhythms displayed a greater amplitude of sulfur concentrations and this abnormal calcium to sulfur ratios only during exposure to zero gravity. The rat mandible and teeth do not suffer the deficits of bone formation common to weight bearing parts of the skeleton during spaceflight. The only derangements detected were in the quality of the matrix and mineral moieties.

  4. Ex vivo fracture resistance of endodontically treated maxillary central incisors restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts and experimental dentin posts

    PubMed Central

    Kathuria, Ambica; Kavitha, M; Khetarpal, Suchit

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To compare the fracture resistance of teeth restored with fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts and experimental dentin posts milled from human root dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty maxillary central incisors were divided into three groups of ten each. Twenty teeth were restored with FRC posts and solid dentin posts and numbered as Groups 2 and 3 respectively while Group 1 acted as the control, without any post. The teeth were loaded at 135° angle to their long axes after core build-up and the failure loads were recorded. Results: One-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni multiple comparisons revealed a significant difference among test groups with the control group showing the highest fracture resistance, followed by the dentin post group and lastly the FRC post group. Conclusions: Teeth restored with dentin posts exhibited better fracture resistance than those restored with FRC posts. PMID:22144812

  5. Reconstruction and Intentional Replantation of a Maxillary Central Incisor with a Complete Vertical Root Fracture: A Rare Case Report with Three Years Follow up.

    PubMed

    Dua, Deepti; Dua, Ankur

    2015-09-01

    Vertical root fractures in teeth present with challenges not only with diagnosis but also with management. The prognosis in such teeth is generally questionable with extraction of the tooth being the most common treatment option. However, conservative treatment options such as reconstruction of the fractured fragments with adhesive resin followed by intentional replantation have been recently suggested. There are only a few case reports that describe management of complete vertical root fracture by reconstruction of fragments. The present case report describes successful management of an unusual complete vertical root fracture of a maxillary right central incisor in a 23-year-old male by reconstructing the fragments with a dual cure resin followed by intentional replantation. At the three year follow up, the tooth was asymptomatic, radiographically sound with probing depth and mobility within normal physiological limits.

  6. Reconstruction and Intentional Replantation of a Maxillary Central Incisor with a Complete Vertical Root Fracture: A Rare Case Report with Three Years Follow up

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    Vertical root fractures in teeth present with challenges not only with diagnosis but also with management. The prognosis in such teeth is generally questionable with extraction of the tooth being the most common treatment option. However, conservative treatment options such as reconstruction of the fractured fragments with adhesive resin followed by intentional replantation have been recently suggested. There are only a few case reports that describe management of complete vertical root fracture by reconstruction of fragments. The present case report describes successful management of an unusual complete vertical root fracture of a maxillary right central incisor in a 23-year-old male by reconstructing the fragments with a dual cure resin followed by intentional replantation. At the three year follow up, the tooth was asymptomatic, radiographically sound with probing depth and mobility within normal physiological limits. PMID:26501026

  7. Endodontic and Esthetic Management of a Dilacerated Maxillary Central Incisor Having Two Root Canals Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography as a Diagnostic Aid

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sarang; Grover, Shibani; Sharma, Vivek; Srivastava, Dhirendra; Mittal, Meenu

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the primary dentition are quite common. When primary teeth are subjected to trauma, force transmission and/or invasion of the underlying tooth germs lying in close proximity can result in a variety of disturbances in the permanent successors. Few of these disturbances include hypoplasia, dilaceration, or alteration in the eruption sequence and pattern. Dilaceration is defined as an angulation or sharp bend or curve in the linear relationship of the crown of a tooth to its root. A rare case of maxillary left central incisor having crown dilaceration and Vertucci's type II canal configuration with symptomatic periapical periodontitis is reported. Cone beam computed tomography was used for better understanding of the anomaly and complicated root canal morphology. The tooth was successfully managed by nonsurgical root canal therapy and restoration with resin composite to restore esthetics. PMID:24955260

  8. Subepithelial Connective Tissue Graft in Combination with a Tunnel Technique for the Treatment of Miller Class II and III Gingival Recessions in Mandibular Incisors: Clinical and Esthetic Results.

    PubMed

    Nart, Jose; Valles, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    There is limited evidence regarding the effect of the subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG) on root coverage in the mandibular anterior region. A sample of 15 Miller Class II and III recessions were treated in 15 patients using a SCTG with a tunnel technique. After a mean follow-up of 20.53 months, the mean percentage of root coverage was 83.25% for all treated recessions. Furthermore, a statistically significant increase of keratinized tissue was observed at the end of the evaluation period (2.66 mm; P = .001). The combination of tunnel technique and SCTG should be considered a treatment option to obtain root coverage in mandibular incisors with Class II and III recession defects. PMID:27333018

  9. Digital dissection of the masticatory muscles of the naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber (Mammalia, Rodentia)

    PubMed Central

    Faulkes, Chris G.

    2014-01-01

    The naked mole-rat, Heterocephalus glaber, of the family Bathyergidae is a subterranean rodent that feeds on underground roots and tubers and digs extensive tunnel systems with its incisors. It is a highly unusual mammal with regard to its social structure, longevity, pain insensitivity and cancer resistance, all of which have made it the subject of a great deal of research in recent years. Yet, much of the basic anatomy of this species remains undocumented. In this paper, we describe the morphology of the jaw-closing musculature of the naked mole-rat, as revealed by contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography. This technique uses an iodine stain to enable the imaging of soft tissues with microCT. The iodine-enhanced scans were used to create 3D reconstructions of the naked mole-rat masticatory muscles from which muscle masses were calculated. The jaw-closing musculature of Heterocephalus glaber is relatively very large compared to other rodents and is dominated by the superficial masseter, the deep masseter and the temporalis. The temporalis in particular is large for a rodent, covering the entirety of the braincase and much of the rear part of the orbit. The morphology of the masseter complex described here differs from two other published descriptions of bathyergid masticatory muscles, but is more similar to the arrangement seen in other rodent families. The zygomaticomandibularis (ZM) muscle does not protrude through the infraorbital foramen on to the rostrum and thus the naked mole-rat should be considered protrogomorphous rather than hystricomorphous, and the morphology is consistent with secondarily lost hystricomorphy as has been previously suggested for Bathyergidae. Overall, the morphology of the masticatory musculature indicates a species with a high bite force and a wide gape–both important adaptations for a life dominated by digging with the incisors. PMID:25024917

  10. Relationship of central incisor implant placement to the ridge configuration anterior to the nasopalatine canal in dentate and partially edentulous individuals: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aims of this study were to investigate the ridge contour anterior to the nasopalatine canal, and the difference between the incidences of the nasopalatine canal perforation in dentate and partially edentulous patients by cone-beam computed tomography. Methods. Cone-beam computed tomography scan images from 72 patients were selected from database and divided into dentate and partially edentulous groups. The configuration of the ridge anterior to the canal including palatal concavity depth, palatal concavity height, palatal concavity angle, bone height coronal to the incisive foramen, and bone width anterior to the canal was measured. A virtual implant placement procedure was used, and the incidences of perforation were evaluated after implant placement in the cingulum position with the long axis along with the designed crown. Results. Comparing with variable values from dentate patients, the palatal concavity depth and angle were greater by 0.9 mm and 4°, and bone height was shorter by 1.1 mm in partially edentulous patients, respectively. Bone width in edentulous patients was narrower than in dentate patients by 1.2 mm at incisive foramen level and 0.9 mm at 8 mm subcrestal level, respectively. After 72 virtual cylindrical implants (4.1 × 12 mm) were placed, a total of 12 sites (16.7%) showed a perforation and three-fourths occurred in partially edentulous patients. After replacing with 72 tapered implants (4.3 × 13 mm), only 6 implants (8.3%) broke into the canal in the partially edentulous patient group. Conclusions. The nasopalatine canal may get close to the implant site and the bone width anterior to the canal decreases after the central incisor extraction. The incidence of nasopalatine canal perforation may occur more commonly during delayed implant placement in central incisor missing patients. PMID:26557434

  11. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

    PubMed Central

    PIROLO, Rodrigo; MONDELLI, Rafael Francisco Lia; CORRER, Gisele Maria; GONZAGA, Carla Castiglia; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max) and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO) before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD) at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E) and lightness (∆L) variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05). Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001). All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L). The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively). Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching. PMID:25075672

  12. Effects of icariin on orthodontic tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Wang, Xu-Xia; Zhao, Bing-Jie; Bu, Jie; Su, Yu-Ran; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is achieved through bone remodeling of the alveolar bone. Icariin, the active ingredient isolated from Herba Epimedii which is a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) commonly used for osteoporosis treatment in China. The purpose of the study is to explore the effect of icariin on OTM in rats, and analyze the possible mechanism involved. Methods: 48 rats were selected and divided into 2 groups: the control group and the experimental group. Rats in the experimental group were given 20 mg/kg/day icariin by intragastric administration, while the control group received the same volume solvent. All rats were placed a closed coil spring between their upper first molar and incisor, exerting a force of about 40 g to establish animal models of OTM. As the first molar moved mesially, a space between the first and second molar was created. The rats were sacrificed in batch on the 7th, 14th, 21st and 28th days after orthodontic treatment. The amount of tooth movement was measured, and histomorphometric analysis based on slices from periodontium adjacent to the maxillary first molars were used to observe new bone formation, bone resorption and quantify osteoclasts. Key results: Icariin increased OTM (P<0.05) by 65.2%, 35.3%, 11.7% and 16.7% on day 7, 14, 21, 28 respectively compared with the control group. The number of osteoclasts in the icariin group showed a transient but sudden increase and then a persistent decrease. Conclusions: Icariin could accelerate OTM in rats through promoting bone remodeling of alveolar bone. PMID:26309512

  13. Uncoupling Protein-2 is an Antioxidant that is Up-Regulated in the Enamel Organ of Fluoride-Treated Rats*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Maiko; Sierant, Megan L.; Antone, Jerry V.; Everett, Eric T.; Whitford, Gary M.; Bartlett, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Dental fluorosis is characterized by subsurface hypomineralization and retention of enamel matrix proteins. Fluoride (F−) exposure generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can cause ER-stress. We therefore screened oxidative stress arrays to identify genes regulated by F− exposure. Vitamin E is an antioxidant so we asked if a diet high in vitamin E would attenuate dental fluorosis. Maturation stage incisor enamel organs (EO) were harvested from F− treated rats and mice were assessed to determine if vitamin E ameliorates dental fluorosis. Uncoupling protein-2 (Ucp2) was significantly up-regulated by F− (~1.5 & 2.0 fold for the 50 or 100 ppm F− treatment groups respectively). Immunohistochemical results on maturation stage rat incisors demonstrated that UCP2 protein levels increased with F− treatment. UCP2 down-regulates mitochondrial production of ROS, which decreases ATP production. Thus, in addition to reduced protein translation caused by ER-stress, a reduction in ATP production by UCP2 may contribute to the inability of ameloblasts to remove protein from the hardening enamel. Fluoride treated mouse enamel had significantly higher quantitative fluorescence (QF) than the untreated controls. No significant QF difference was observed between control and vitamin E enriched diets within a given F− treatment group. Therefore, a diet rich in vitamin E did not attenuate dental fluorosis. We have identified a novel oxidative stress response gene that is up-regulated in vivo by F− and activation of this gene may adversely affect ameloblast function. PMID:25158175

  14. Endo-restorative treatment of a severly discolored upper incisor: resolution of the “aesthetic” problem through Componeer veneering System

    PubMed Central

    Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Sofan, Afrah Ali Abdullah; Sofan, Eshrak Ali Abdullah; Romeo, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Re-establishing a patient’s lost dental aesthetic appearance is one of the most important topics for contemporary dentistry. New treatment materials and methods have been coming on the scene, day by day, in order to achieve such an aim. Most dentists prefer more conservative and aesthetic approaches, such as direct or indirect veneer restorations, instead of full-ceramic crowns for anteriors where aesthetics is really important. The aim of the study is to evaluate clinically the effectiveness of a direct composite veneering system in resolving aesthetic problem of an upper incisor with a multidisciplinary treatment approach. Methods Patient with a severe discolored upper incisor came to our attention; at the X-ray exam there was an evidence of a past not good root canal treatment and also old and incongruent composite obturation. After removing all the material inside the root canal was performed a new correct endodontic filling, then Authors tried to bleach the tooth trough “walking-bleach” technique with a hydrogen peroxide (30 volumes) and sodium perborate solution without excellent results. So it was decided to insert a glass-fiber post and than to perform a direct composite veneer with Componeer System (Coltene). Componeer System is a system of prefabricated composite veneers that are abled to be applied directly in the first appointment: after a conservative preparation of the tooth, it must be used an adhesive agent (for example a “three steps”) and then with composite stratification it’s possible to apply the componeer veneer (choosing the right measure, modified as necessary) as the last covering aesthetic layer. Result The evaluation of result of this multidisciplinary treatment was essentially clinical and radiological; in fact it’s possible to observe, from a clinical point of view, the good aesthetic aspect of the direct composite restoration with componeer veneer that offers also some advantages: conservative preparation with

  15. Buriti oil (Mauritia flexuosa L.) negatively impacts somatic growth and reflex maturation and increases retinol deposition in young rats.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Maria C; Aquino, Jailane S; Soares, Juliana; Figueiroa, Edigleide B; Mesquita, Hanni M; Pessoa, Debora C; Stamford, Tania M

    2015-11-01

    Buriti oil contains nutrients such as essential fatty acids and vitamins, which are directly involved with neonates' development. However, the refining process of this oil can change its nutrient profile. This study investigated the effects of maternal consumption of Buriti oil (crude or refined), on reflex and somatic development and retinol levels in neonatal rats. Thirty-six Wistar male neonate rats born from mothers who consumed diet with 7% lipids during gestation and lactation were used. Rats were randomized into three groups: rats receiving diet added of soybean oil (control-CG), crude Buriti oil (CB) and refined Buriti oil (RB). Offspring weight, tail length, reflex ontogeny and somatic maturation were assessed during lactation. At the end of the experiment, serum and liver retinol concentrations were measured. Animals from CB and RB groups showed delayed onset of palm grasp, righting reflex and cliff avoidance reflexes compared to the control group (CG). However, animals from RB group showed anticipation of auditory startle compared to those from BC group. Regarding somatic maturation indicators, animals from RB group showed delayed eye opening and eruption of superior and inferior incisors in relation to control and anticipation in the auditory conduit opening in relation to CB group. Rats from CB and RB groups showed higher serum and liver vitamin A contents. Buriti oil delays physical parameters and reflex maturation and increases serum and liver retinol deposition among neonatal rats.

  16. Endodontic Management of a Mandibular Incisor Exhibiting Concurrence of Fusion, Talon Cusp and Dens Invaginatus using CBCT as a Diagnostic Aid

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Varun

    2016-01-01

    Teeth with aberrant anatomy present a challenge to the endodontist. Advanced tools like cone beam computed tomography aid in exploring the details of endodontic architecture in such cases. The aim of this case report is to highlight the advantage of CBCT in endodontic management of teeth with multiple dental anomalies. A mandibular lateral incisor associated with an extraoral sinus tract revealed unusual clinical anatomy. A provisional diagnosis of type III dens in dente was made based on radiographic findings. Considering the complex anatomy, CBCT was advised to get a confirmatory diagnosis. The anatomic details revealed by CBCT differed significantly from the provisional diagnosis. A final diagnosis of concurrence of fusion with a supernumerary tooth, talon cusp and type II dens invaginatus was established and endodontic treatment of the concerned tooth was carried out. Non-surgical endodontic treatment resulted in successful resolution of the sinus tract and healing of the periapical lesion. CBCT, thus proves to be an excellent diagnostic tool for management of teeth with unusual anatomy, paving way for a conservative treatment free of endodontic mishaps. PMID:27042591

  17. Evaluation of a three-stage method for improving mandibular retrognathia with labially inclined incisors using genioplasty, segmental osteotomy, and two-jaw surgery.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Hiro-O; Koshikawa-Matsuno, Mino; Inoue, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    We have sometimes encountered difficulty in improving labially inclined teeth, particularly in patients with mandibular retrognathia, because the symphysis menti is often thin and insufficient space is available to permit sagittal rotation of the teeth without root exposure from the alveolar bone. We have previously described a three-stage method to overcome this problem, involving genioplasty for improving the retruded chin, and to construct the infrastructure for subsequent subapical segmental alveolar osteotomy, subapical segmental alveolar osteotomy itself, and, finally, two-jaw surgery. Bone augmentation with thin cortical bone at the gap created on the upper surface of the advanced genial segment was also addressed in the previous report. In the present study, to confirm the benefits of the three-stage method using objective data, cephalometric evaluation was performed in each step. In all cases, pogonion (Pog) was moved forward substantially. Net linear forward movement of Pog and net changes in SN-Pog were from 12 mm to 20 mm and from 4.8° to 7.0°, respectively. Angle of mandibular incisors and interincisal angle also improved to desirable levels. Although this method requires three separate surgeries, the approach safely improves the clinical situation and accentuates treatment efficacy. PMID:24963302

  18. Endodontic Management of a Mandibular Incisor Exhibiting Concurrence of Fusion, Talon Cusp and Dens Invaginatus using CBCT as a Diagnostic Aid.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Ruchi; Kumar, Varun

    2016-02-01

    Teeth with aberrant anatomy present a challenge to the endodontist. Advanced tools like cone beam computed tomography aid in exploring the details of endodontic architecture in such cases. The aim of this case report is to highlight the advantage of CBCT in endodontic management of teeth with multiple dental anomalies. A mandibular lateral incisor associated with an extraoral sinus tract revealed unusual clinical anatomy. A provisional diagnosis of type III dens in dente was made based on radiographic findings. Considering the complex anatomy, CBCT was advised to get a confirmatory diagnosis. The anatomic details revealed by CBCT differed significantly from the provisional diagnosis. A final diagnosis of concurrence of fusion with a supernumerary tooth, talon cusp and type II dens invaginatus was established and endodontic treatment of the concerned tooth was carried out. Non-surgical endodontic treatment resulted in successful resolution of the sinus tract and healing of the periapical lesion. CBCT, thus proves to be an excellent diagnostic tool for management of teeth with unusual anatomy, paving way for a conservative treatment free of endodontic mishaps.

  19. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Analysis of Serum Proteins in Wistar Rats Treated with Sodium Fluoride: Insight into the Potential Mechanism and Candidate Biomarkers of Fluorosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yan; Zeng, Beibei; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Yanli; Wang, Nanlan; Wu, Yanqiu; Shen, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Fluorosis induced by exposure to high level fluoride is quite widespread in the world. The manifestations of fluorosis include dental mottling, bone damage, and impaired malfunction of soft tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of fluorosis has not been clarified until now. To explore the underlying mechanisms of fluorosis and screen out serum biomarkers, we carried out a quantitative proteomics study to identify differentially expressed serum proteins in Wistar rats treated with sodium fluoride (NaF) by using a proteomics approach of isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). We fed Wistar rats drinking water that had 50, 150, and 250 mg/L of dissolved NaF for 24 weeks. For the experimental duration, each rat was given an examination of the lower incisors to check for the condition of dental fluorosis (DF). By the end of the treatment, fluoride ion concentration in serum and lower incisors were detected. The results showed that NaF treatment can induce rat fluorosis. By iTRAQ analysis, a total of 37 differentially expressed serum proteins were identified between NaF-treated and control rats. These proteins were further analyzed by bioinformatics, out of which two proteins were validated by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assays (ELISA). The major proteins were involved in complement and coagulation cascade, inflammatory response, complement activation, defense response, and wound response, suggesting that inflammation and immune reactions may play a key role in fluorosis pathogenesis. These proteins may contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of fluoride toxicity, and may serve as potential biomarkers for fluorosis. PMID:27690006

  20. Chronic postnatal ornithine administration to rats provokes learning deficit in the open field task.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Carolina Maso; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Grings, Mateus; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Ritter, Luciana; Zanatta, Angela; Knebel, Lisiane Aurélio; Lobato, Vannessa Araujo; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Wajner, Moacir

    2012-12-01

    Hyperornithinemia is the biochemical hallmark of hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome, an inherited metabolic disease clinically characterized by mental retardation whose pathogenesis is still poorly known. In the present work, we produced a chemical animal model of hyperornithinemia induced by a subcutaneous injection of saline-buffered Orn (2-5 μmol/g body weight) to rats. High brain Orn concentrations were achieved, indicating that Orn is permeable to the blood brain barrier. We then investigated the effect of early chronic postnatal administration of Orn on physical development and on the performance of adult rats in the open field, the Morris water maze and in the step down inhibitory avoidance tasks. Chronic Orn treatment had no effect on the appearance of coat, eye opening or upper incisor eruption, nor on the free-fall righting reflex and on the adult rat performance in the Morris water maze and in the inhibitory avoidance tasks, suggesting that physical development, aversive and spatial localization were not changed by Orn. However, Orn-treated rats did not habituate to the open field apparatus, implying a deficit of learning/memory. Motor activity was the same for Orn- and saline- injected animals. We also verified that Orn subcutaneous injections provoked lipid peroxidation in the brain, as determined by a significant increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels. Our results indicate that chronic early postnatal hyperornithinemia may impair the central nervous system, causing minor disabilities which result in specific learning deficiencies. PMID:22699997

  1. Effect of supplementary zinc on orthodontic tooth movement in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Sadegh, Ahmad Akhoundi Mohammad; Rezvaneh, Ghazanfari; Shahroo, Etemad-Moghadam; Mojgan, Alaeddini; Azam, Khorshidian; Shahram, Rabbani; Reza, Shamshiri Ahmad; Nafiseh, Momeni

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Osteoclasts and osteoblasts are responsible for regulating bone homeostasis during which the trace element zinc has been shown to exert a cumulative effect on bone mass by stimulating osteoblastic bone formation and inhibiting osteoclastic bone resorption. Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of zinc (Zn) on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in a rat model. Material and Methods: A total of 44 male Wistar rats were divided into four groups of 11 animals each and received 0, 1.5, 20 and 50 ppm Zn in distilled water for 60 days. In the last 21 days of the study, nickel-titanium closed coil springs were ligated between maxillary right incisors and first molars of all rats, and tooth movement was measured at the end of this period. Histological analysis of hematoxylin/eosin slides was performed to assess root resorption lacunae, osteoclast number and periodontal ligament (PDL) width. Results: Mean OTM was calculated as 51.8, 49.1, 35.5 and 45 µm in the 0, 1.5, 20 and 50 ppm zinc-receiving groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in neither OTM nor histological parameters among the study groups (p > 0.05). Conclusion: According to the results obtained in the current investigation, increase in supplementary zinc up to 50 ppm does not affect the rate of OTM neither bone and root resorption in rats. PMID:27275614

  2. Normalization of periodontal tissues in osteopetrotic mib mutant rats, treated with CSF-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, A.; Yamauchi, M.; Sotowski, R.; Ostrowski, K.

    1998-01-01

    The osteopetrotic mib mutation in rats causes defects in the skeletal bone tissue in young animals. These defects, i.e. slow bone remodelling, changes in both crystallinity and mineral content, are transient and undergo normalization, even without any treatment in 6-wk-old animals. Treatment with CSF-1 (colony stimulating factor-1) accelerates the normalization process in skeletal bones. The periodontal tissues around the apices of incisors show abnormalities caused by the slow remodelling process of the mandible bone tissue, the deficiency of osteoclasts and their abnormal morphology, as well as the disorganization of periodontal ligament fibres. In contrast to the skeletal tissues, these abnormalities would not undergo spontaneous normalization. Under treatment with colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), the primitive bone trabeculae of mandible are resorbed and the normalization of the number of osteoclasts and their cytology occurs. The organization of the periodontal ligament fibres is partially restored, resembling the histological structure of the normal one.

  3. Effects of fluoride, calcium, and phosphate administration on mineralization in rats.

    PubMed

    Larsen, M J; Fejerskov, O; Jensen, S J

    1980-01-01

    Seven days before a fluoride injection of 20 mg sodium fluoride per kg body weight, 3-month-old rats grown on a standard pellet diet containing 0.8% calcium and 1.4% phosphate were given a diet of rice with only 0.025% calcium and 0.1% phosphate. Microradiographs of the continuously growing incisors showed a hypermineralized and subsequent hypomineralized zone. Blood analysis demonstrated a decrease and a subsequent reestablishment of plasma calcium concentration. In some experiments calcium and phosphate were administered to compensate the hypocalcemia which prevented the hypomineralized zone from arising. A delay of calcium and phosphate administration led to formation of a mineralized band within the hypomineralized zone. The results are discussed with reference to calcium homeostasis.

  4. Effects of fibrin adhesive material (Tissucol) on alveolar healing in rats under stress.

    PubMed

    Alves-Rezende, M C; Okamoto, T

    1997-01-01

    The effects of Tissucol on alveolar healing following stress were evaluated histologically, comparing three groups of 28 male albino rats each. Stress was applied and their right upper incisors were extracted. Group A served as an empty control site. In Group B, Tissucol was applied into the alveolar cavity. Group C received local antifibrinolytic treatment (alveolar irrigation with epsilon-aminocaproic acid solution) before implant of Tissucol into the tooth socket. Four animals in each group were killed at 1, 3, 6, 9, 15, 21 and 24 days after surgery. Results showed that: 1) Tissucol did not interfere with connective and osseous tissue formation; 2) Tissucol allowed new bone formation; 3) Tissucol residues in Group B in sections of 24-day specimens did not impair healing; 4) Tissucol was usually completely resorbed and healing was complete 24 days after surgery in Group C.

  5. In vivo evaluation of the effects of hydraulic calcium silicate dental cements on plasma and liver aluminium levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Demirkaya, Kadriye; Can Demirdöğen, Birsen; Öncel Torun, Zeynep; Erdem, Onur; Çetinkaya, Serdar; Akay, Cemal

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to test whether the presence of three hydraulic calcium silicate dental cements--MTA Angelus, MTA Fillapex, and Theracal LC--in the dental extraction socket of an in vivo model, would affect the levels of aluminium (Al) in the plasma and liver. Following anesthesia, the right upper incisor of each male Wistar albino rat was extracted and polyethylene tubes filled with MTA Angelus, MTA Fillapex, or Theracal LC were inserted into the depth of the extraction socket and gingival tissue was sutured. The rats were killed 7, 30, or 60 d after the operation. Blood and liver samples were obtained from the rats before they were killed, and the levels of Al were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Plasma Al levels were higher in the rats in which the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cements were implanted, especially MTA Angelus and MTA Fillapex, compared with control rats. In liver samples, however, the differences in Al level were not statistically significant. Our results show that Al might have been released into the circulation from the three dental cements tested, especially MTA Angelus and MTA Fillapex. Further research should be carried out on the possible biological effects of Al liberated from dental cements.

  6. Finite element modelling of squirrel, guinea pig and rat skulls: using geometric morphometrics to assess sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cox, P G; Fagan, M J; Rayfield, E J; Jeffery, N

    2011-01-01

    Rodents are defined by a uniquely specialized dentition and a highly complex arrangement of jaw-closing muscles. Finite element analysis (FEA) is an ideal technique to investigate the biomechanical implications of these specializations, but it is essential to understand fully the degree of influence of the different input parameters of the FE model to have confidence in the model's predictions. This study evaluates the sensitivity of FE models of rodent crania to elastic properties of the materials, loading direction, and the location and orientation of the models’ constraints. Three FE models were constructed of squirrel, guinea pig and rat skulls. Each was loaded to simulate biting on the incisors, and the first and the third molars, with the angle of the incisal bite varied over a range of 45°. The Young's moduli of the bone and teeth components were varied between limits defined by findings from our own and previously published tests of material properties. Geometric morphometrics (GMM) was used to analyse the resulting skull deformations. Bone stiffness was found to have the strongest influence on the results in all three rodents, followed by bite position, and then bite angle and muscle orientation. Tooth material properties were shown to have little effect on the deformation of the skull. The effect of bite position varied between species, with the mesiodistal position of the biting tooth being most important in squirrels and guinea pigs, whereas bilateral vs. unilateral biting had the greatest influence in rats. A GMM analysis of isolated incisor deformations showed that, for all rodents, bite angle is the most important parameter, followed by elastic properties of the tooth. The results here elucidate which input parameters are most important when defining the FE models, but also provide interesting glimpses of the biomechanical differences between the three skulls, which will be fully explored in future publications. PMID:21974720

  7. Finite element modelling of squirrel, guinea pig and rat skulls: using geometric morphometrics to assess sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cox, P G; Fagan, M J; Rayfield, E J; Jeffery, N

    2011-12-01

    Rodents are defined by a uniquely specialized dentition and a highly complex arrangement of jaw-closing muscles. Finite element analysis (FEA) is an ideal technique to investigate the biomechanical implications of these specializations, but it is essential to understand fully the degree of influence of the different input parameters of the FE model to have confidence in the model's predictions. This study evaluates the sensitivity of FE models of rodent crania to elastic properties of the materials, loading direction, and the location and orientation of the models' constraints. Three FE models were constructed of squirrel, guinea pig and rat skulls. Each was loaded to simulate biting on the incisors, and the first and the third molars, with the angle of the incisal bite varied over a range of 45°. The Young's moduli of the bone and teeth components were varied between limits defined by findings from our own and previously published tests of material properties. Geometric morphometrics (GMM) was used to analyse the resulting skull deformations. Bone stiffness was found to have the strongest influence on the results in all three rodents, followed by bite position, and then bite angle and muscle orientation. Tooth material properties were shown to have little effect on the deformation of the skull. The effect of bite position varied between species, with the mesiodistal position of the biting tooth being most important in squirrels and guinea pigs, whereas bilateral vs. unilateral biting had the greatest influence in rats. A GMM analysis of isolated incisor deformations showed that, for all rodents, bite angle is the most important parameter, followed by elastic properties of the tooth. The results here elucidate which input parameters are most important when defining the FE models, but also provide interesting glimpses of the biomechanical differences between the three skulls, which will be fully explored in future publications. PMID:21974720

  8. Effects of short-term acetaminophen and celecoxib treatment on orthodontic tooth movement and neuronal activation in rat.

    PubMed

    Stabile, A C; Stuani, M B S; Leite-Panissi, C R A; Rocha, M J A

    2009-08-14

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been used for pain relief in orthodontics, but clinical studies reported that they may reduce tooth movement (TM). By other side, TM seems to activate brain structures related to nociception, but the effects of NSAIDs in this activation have not been studied yet. We analyzed the effect of short-term treatment with acetaminophen or celecoxib in the separation of rat upper incisors, as well as in neuronal activation of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, following tooth movement. Thirty rats (400-420 g) were pretreated through oral gavage (1 ml/dose) with acetaminophen (200mg/kg), celecoxib (50mg/kg) or vehicle (carboxymethylcellulose 0.4%). After 30 min, they received an activated (30 g) orthodontic appliance for TM. In controls, this appliance was immediately removed after its introduction. Rats received ground food, and every 12h, one of the drugs or vehicle. After 48 h, they were anesthetized, maxilla was radiographed, and were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde. Brains were further processed for Fos immunohistochemistry. TM induced incisor distalization (p<0.05) and neuronal activation of the spinal trigeminal nucleus. Treatment with both drugs did not affect tooth movement, but reduced c-fos expression in the caudalis subnucleus. No changes in c-fos expression were seen in the oralis and interpolaris subnuclei. We conclude that neither celecoxib nor acetaminophen seems to affect tooth movement, when used for 2 days, but both drugs are able to reduce the activation of brain structures related to nociception. Short-term treatment with celecoxib, thus, may be a therapeutic alternative to acetaminophen when the latter is contraindicated.

  9. Rats! Oh No, Not Rats!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Gary E.

    1987-01-01

    Examples of problems encountered in a new library building--including rats and humidity--and a description of the library's collections provide a framework for this presentation of the California State Library's emergency management planning. Current preservation efforts are documented and the library's disaster and security plans are described.…

  10. Temporary anti-cancer & anti-pain effects of mechanical stimulation of any one of 3 front teeth (1st incisor, 2nd incisor, & canine) of right & left side of upper & lower jaws and their possible mechanism, & relatively long term disappearance of pain & cancer parameters by one optimal dose of DHEA, Astragalus, Boswellia Serrata, often with press needle stimulation of True ST. 36.

    PubMed

    Omura, Yoshiaki; Horiuchi, Nobuko; Jones, Marilyn K; Lu, Dominic P; Shimotsuura, Yasuhiro; Duvvi, Harsha; Pallos, Andrew; Ohki, Motomu; Suetsugu, Akihiro

    2009-01-01

    One minute downward pressure on the tip of any one of the front 3 teeth (1st incisor, 2nd incisor, and canine) at the right and left sides of the upper and lower jaw by a wooden toothpick induced temporary disappearance (20 min approximately 4 hours) of abnormally increased pain parameters (pain grading, Substance P, & TXB2), and cancer parameters (Telomere, Integrin alpha5beta1, Oncogene C-fos Ab2, etc. of Astrocytoma, Glioblastoma, squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus, adenocarcinoma of lung, breast cancer, adenocarcinoma of colon, prostate cancer). The effect included temporary disappearance of headache, toothache, chest and abdominal pain, and backache, often with improved memory & concentration. Since these beneficial changes resembled the effects of giving one optimal dose of DHEA, increase of DHEA was measured. Above mechanical stimulation of one of these front teeth increased abnormally reduced DHEA levels of less than 10 ng to norm1 100 approximately 130 ng BDORT units and normal cell (NC) telomeres from markedly reduced values to near normal values, and improved acetylcholine in the Hippocampus. Large organ representation areas for the Adrenal gland & Hippocampus may exist at these front teeth. This method can be used for emergency pain control and can explain the beneficial effect of bruxism and tooth brushing, through the increase of DHEA levels and activities of the Hippocampus by increasing Acetylcholine. Increasing NC telomere to optimally high level resulted in disappearance of pain and improvement or significant reduction of malignant tumor. Repeated daily press needle stimulation of True ST. 36 increased NC telomere 450-700 ng BDORT units. One optimal dose of DHEA increased NC telomere 525 ng DBORT units and eliminated the pain and abnormally increased cancer parameters; effect of one optimal dose lasted 0.5-11 months. One optimal dose of Boswellia Serrata or Astragalus not only increased NC telomere 650 ng BDORT units, eliminating pain and cancer

  11. Examination of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on orthodontic tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dogru, Mehmet; Akpolat, Veysi; Dogru, Arzum Guler; Karadede, Beyza; Akkurt, Atilim; Karadede, M. Irfan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) affect the amount of orthodontic tooth movement in rats. The experiments were performed on 18 male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were randomly divided into three groups (n = 6): cage-control (Cg-Cnt) group (n = 6); sinusoidal electromagnetic field (SEMF) group (n = 6); and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) group (n = 6). In SEMF and PEMF groups, rats were subjected to 1.5 mT EMF exposure eight hours per day for eight days. In order to obtain tooth movement, holes were drilled on the right and left maxillary central incisors of the rats at a distance 1.5–2 mm away from the gingiva and 20 g of orthodontic forces were applied to the teeth. Generated linear model for repeated measures and Bonferroni tests were used to evaluate the differences between the groups. Interactions among groups by days were found by using Pillai's trace multivariate test. The results showed that significant differences were present among the groups (F = 5.035; p = 0.03) according to the extent of tooth movement. Significant differences between the amount of tooth movements were determined especially after the fifth day and the following days six, seven and eight (p < 0.001). Within the limitations, according to the results of the present study, the application of ELF-EMF accelerated the orthodontic tooth movement in rats. PMID:26019497

  12. Identification of new rat dentin proteoglycans utilizing C18 chromatography.

    PubMed

    Steinfort, J; van de Stadt, R; Beertsen, W

    1994-09-01

    Although only one small PG has been identified in dentin until now, a preliminary investigation has shown indications of the presence of several new proteoglycans (PGs) in rat incisor dentin. The aim of the present investigation was to isolate and characterize these PGs, which were labeled with 35S to facilitate the analysis. C18 chromatography resolved five dentin PGs. Based on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their size varied from 100 to 400 kDa. The core proteins of the first four PGs appeared as 25, 40, 70, and 115 kDa bands. They stained turquoise with Stains All but did not stain with Coomassie Brilliant Blue. The core protein of the fifth PG appeared at about 45 kDa. This core protein stained with Coomassie Brilliant Blue but not with Stains All. In all PGs, the glycosaminoglycans consisted mainly of chondroitin 4-sulfate. To investigate their incorporation into predentin (young dentin that is not yet mineralized) and dentin, rat dentin PGs were pulse-labeled by injecting rats with [35S]sulfate at 5, 28, 55, or 177 h before killing the animals. Radiolabeling of predentin PGs was highest after 5 h and decreased rapidly (76%) over the next 50 h. In dentin PGs, a large percentage (34%) of the final quantity of incorporated 35S (at 177 h) was already present at 5 h. C18 chromatography of dentin PGs for each of the four time intervals showed similar 35S distribution patterns representing all five PGs, whereas the predentin appeared to contain mainly the fifth PG. This study demonstrates the existence of several apparently novel PGs in dentin that can be resolved by the use of a new method. These PGs were found in mineralized dentin and are thought to be rapidly transported toward the mineralization front. Part of the predentin PGs, on the other hand, seems to be lost as mineralization proceeds.

  13. Effects of nicotine on bone during orthodontic tooth movement in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Bakathir, Manal A.; Linjawi, Amal I.; Omar, Samia S.; Aboqura, Ahad B.; Hassan, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of nicotine on orthodontic tooth movement and accompanying histological and immunohistochemical changes in rats. Methods: An experimental study conducted at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between 2013 and 2014. Thirty-two rats randomly divided into 4 groups. Three were experimental, received daily nicotine injections: group A: 0.37 mg/kg, group B: 0.57 mg/kg, and group C: 0.93 mg/kg. The control group (group D) received a daily injection of 0.5 mL saline. All rats were subjected to 30 g of orthodontic force on the maxillary left first molars and incisors using a nickel-titanium closed-coil spring. The distance between the 2 teeth was assessed before and after 14 days of force application. Histological, immunohistochemical, and histomorphometric assessments were performed on sections from groups C and D. Results: Groups C (p<0.001) and D (p<0.001) showed the significantly greatest and least amounts of tooth movement . The results were statistically dose-dependent. Unbalanced resorption-apposition bone remodeling patterns and increased osteoclast cell distribution were observed in the nicotine group with significantly smaller percentages of bone surface areas mesially and distally (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical stains showed low alkaline phosphatase activity and intense tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity in the nicotine group. Conclusions: Nicotine accelerated orthodontic tooth movement with unbalanced bone resorption and apposition patterns around the moving teeth. PMID:27652365

  14. Role of nitro-oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of experimental rat periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    BOŞCA, ADINA BIANCA; MICLĂUŞ, VIOREL; ILEA, ARANKA; CÂMPIAN, RADU SEPTIMIU; RUS, VASILE; RUXANDA, FLAVIA; RAŢIU, CRISTIAN; UIFĂLEAN, ANA; PÂRVU, ALINA ELENA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Periodontitis is a common chronic adult condition that implicates oxidative damage to gingival tissue, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. This study aimed at assessing the association between the nitro-oxidative stress and the periodontal tissues destructions in experimental rat periodontitis. Methods Periodontitis was induced in 15 male albino rats by repetitive lesions to the gingiva adjacent to the inferior incisors, performed daily, for 16 days. On D1, D3, D6, D8, and D16 the onset and evolution of periodontitis were monitored by clinical and histopathological examinations; blood was collected and serum nitro-oxidative stress was evaluated through total nitrites and nitrates, total oxidative status, total antioxidant capacity, and oxidative stress index. Results The results demonstrated that there was a graded and continuous increase in serum levels of total nitrites and nitrates, total oxidative status and oxidative stress index, which was consistent with the severity of periodontal destructions during periodontitis progression. However, total antioxidant capacity was not significantly influenced by the disease progression. Conclusions In experimental rat periodontitis, the systemic nitro-oxidative stress was associated with the severity of periodontal destructions assessed clinically and histopathologically. Therefore, systemic nitro-oxidative stress parameters might be used as diagnostic tools in periodontitis. PMID:27004039

  15. Epidermal growth factor advances some aspects of development but retards others in both rats and hamsters.

    PubMed

    Smart, J L; da Silva, V A; Malheiros, L R; Paumgartten, F J; Massey, R F

    1989-03-01

    The present experiments were undertaken to confirm the recent suggestion that epidermal growth factor (EGF) can have both retarding and accelerating effects on development, using a greater number of developmental indices than hitherto; to extend such studies to another species, the golden hamster, and to compare the responses of males and females. On each of days 0-3, one male and one female rat pup from each of 16 litters of 6 pups were injected subcutaneously with human EGF (0.5 micrograms/g body weight), one male and one female with vehicle, and the remaining two pups were not injected. As expected, EGF accelerated incisor eruption and eye-opening. However, EGF retarded the detachment of the pinna and the appearance of the auditory startle response. Free-fall righting was little affected. Hamster litters were left undisturbed till day 7 to minimise infanticide. Thereafter, experimental design was as far as possible the same as for the rats. Pups from 18 litters were injected on days 7-10. EGF advanced eye-opening, but retarded auditory startling, vaginal opening and the weaning growth spurt. Free-fall righting was unaffected. Hence, EGF had similar accelerating and retarding effects on development in both rats and hamsters. Also, these effects were the same in males and females for most indices. PMID:2809131

  16. Effects of Carbonated Soft Drink Consumption on Orthodontic Tooth Movements in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Aghili, Hossein Agha; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Yassaei, Soghra; Fatahi meybodi, Seyed Amirreza; Zaeim, Mohammad Hosein Toudeh; Moghadam, Mahdjoubeh Goldani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this animal study was to evaluate the possible effects of Carbonated Soft Drink consumption on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement in rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two experimental groups and one control group. In the experimental groups (A&B), the water in the dietary regimen was replaced with soft drinks (Fanta® in group A and Cola® in group B) two weeks before placement of orthodontic appliances. Then 5-mm nickel-titanium closed-coil springs were placed between the maxillary right first molars and first incisors under general anesthesia. This regimen continued for two weeks more and animals drank soft drink ad libitum. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were sacrificed, and interproximal tooth movements were measured. Results: The mean amounts of tooth movement were 0.19mm in group A, 0.22mm in group B and 0.37mm in group C. Statistical analysis with analysis of variance (ANOVA) test showed significant differences between all groups. The least movement occurred in group A that had received Fanta® drink. Conclusion: CSDs consumption decreases the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. The role of soft drinks in decreasing tooth movement might be related to its effects on bone metabolism. PMID:24910686

  17. Effect of Atorvastatin on Orthodontic Tooth Movement in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    MirHashemi, Amir Hossein; Afshari, Maryam; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Dehpour, Ahmadreza; Sheikhzade, Sedigheh; Akhoundi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Statins are used as cholesterol-lowering drugs by many patients and have been recently shown to affect bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of atorvastatinon on orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups of 12 samples each. Group A, served as control with no medication while groups B and C received a daily gavage of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as vehicle and atorvastatin (5 mg/kg) as test substance, respectively. In all three groups, 6mm nickel-titanium closed-coil springs were ligated between the maxillary incisors and first left molars to deliver an initial force of 60g. Tooth movement was measured following sacrifice, 21 days after appliance insertion. Root resorption, PDL width and osteoclast number were histologically evaluated and compared between the groups. Results: The mean amount of tooth movement was 0.62 mm in group A, 0.59 mm in group B and 0.38 mm in group C. OTM reduction following administration of atorvastatin was statistically significant (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference in the studied histologic variables among the three groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: According to the results obtained in the current study, atorvastatin appears to reduce tooth movement in rats; however its effect on osteoclasts, especially osteoclastic function, requires further investigation. PMID:24910664

  18. Alveolar bone healing process in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). A radiographic densitometry study

    PubMed Central

    MANRIQUE, Natalia; PEREIRA, Cassiano Costa Silva; GARCIA, Lourdes Maria Gonzáles; MICARONI, Samuel; de CARVALHO, Antonio Augusto Ferreira; PERRI, Sílvia Helena Venturoli; OKAMOTO, Roberta; SUMIDA, Doris Hissako; ANTONIALI, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important public health problems worldwide. If undiagnosed or untreated, this pathology represents a systemic risk factor and offers unfavorable conditions for dental treatments, especially those requiring bone healing. Objectives The purpose of this study was to demonstrate, by analysis of bone mineral density (BMD), that the alveolar bone healing process is altered in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Material and Methods Wistar rats and SHRs were submitted to extraction of the upper right incisor and were euthanized 7, 14, 21, 28 and 42 days after surgery. Right maxillae were collected, radiographed and analyzed using Digora software. BMD was expressed as minimum (min), middle (med) and maximum (max) in the medium (MT) and apical (AT) thirds of the dental alveolus. Results The results were compared across days and groups. Wistar showed difference in med and max BMD in the MT between 7 and 28 and also between 14 and 28 days. The AT exhibited significant difference in med and min BMD between 7 and 28 days, as well as difference in min BMD between 28 and 42 days. SHRs showed lower med BMD in the MT at 28 days when compared to 21 and 42 days. Differences were observed across groups in med and min BMD at day 28 in the MT and AT; and in max BMD at 14, 21 and 42 days in the MT. Conclusions These results suggest that the alveolar bone healing process is delayed in SHRs comparing with Wistar rats. PMID:22666841

  19. The Effect of Ovariectomy and Orchiectomy on Orthodontic Tooth Movement and Root Resorption in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Seifi, Massoud; Ezzati, Baharak; Saedi, Sara; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Root resorption (RR) after orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) is known as a multifactorial complication of orthodontic treatments. Hormonal deficiencies and their effect on bone turnover are reported to have influences on the rate of tooth movement and root resorption. Purpose This study was designed to evaluate the effect of female and male steroid sex hormones on tooth movement and root resorption. Materials and Method Orthodontic appliances were placed on the right maxillary first molars of 10 ovariectomized female and 10 orchiectomized male Wistar rats as experimental groups and 10 female and 10 male healthy Wistar rats as control groups. NiTi closed-coil springs (9mm, Medium, 011"×.030", Ortho Technology®; Tampa, Florida) were placed between the right incisors and the first right maxillary molars to induce tipping movement in the first molars with the application of a 60g force. After 21 days, the rats were sacrificed and tooth movement was measured by using a digital caliper (Guanglu, China). Orthodontic induced root resorption (OIRR) was assessed by histomorphometric analysis after hematoxylin and eosin staining of sections of the mesial root. Results The rate of tooth movement was significantly higher in all female rats, with the root resorption being lower in the experimental group. The rate of tooth movement in experimental male rats was significantly higher than the control group (p= 0.001) and the rate of root resorption was significantly lower in the experimental group (p= 0.001). Conclusion It seems that alterations in plasma levels of estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone hormones can influence the rate of OTM and RR. The acceleration in tooth movement increased OTM and decreased RR. PMID:26636117

  20. The Immediate Aesthetic and Functional Restoration of Maxillary Incisors Compromised by Periodontitis Using Short Implants with Single Crown Restorations: A Minimally Invasive Approach and Five-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Marincola, Mauro; Lombardo, Giorgio; Pighi, Jacopo; Corrocher, Giovanni; Mascellaro, Anna; Lehrberg, Jeffrey; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The functional and aesthetic restoration of teeth compromised due to aggressive periodontitis presents numerous challenges for the clinician. Horizontal bone loss and soft tissue destruction resulting from periodontitis can impede implant placement and the regeneration of an aesthetically pleasing gingival smile line, often requiring bone augmentation and mucogingival surgery, respectively. Conservative approaches to the treatment of aggressive periodontitis (i.e., treatments that use minimally invasive tools and techniques) have been purported to yield positive outcomes. Here, we report on the treatment and five-year follow-up of patient suffering from aggressive periodontitis using a minimally invasive surgical technique and implant system. By using the methods described herein, we were able to achieve the immediate aesthetic and functional restoration of the maxillary incisors in a case that would otherwise require bone augmentation and extensive mucogingival surgery. This technique represents a conservative and efficacious alternative to the aesthetic and functional replacement of teeth compromised due to aggressive periodontitis. PMID:26649207

  1. Strontium ranelate improved tooth anchorage and reduced root resorption in orthodontic treatment of rats.

    PubMed

    Kirschneck, Christian; Wolf, Michael; Reicheneder, Claudia; Wahlmann, Ulrich; Proff, Peter; Roemer, Piero

    2014-12-01

    The anchorage mechanisms currently used in orthodontic treatment have various disadvantages. The objective of this study was to determine the applicability of the osteoporosis medication strontium ranelate in pharmacologically induced orthodontic tooth anchorage. In 48 male Wistar rats, a constant orthodontic force of 0.25 N was reciprocally applied to the upper first molar and the incisors by means of a Sentalloy(®) closed coil spring for two to four weeks. 50% of the animals received strontium ranelate at a daily oral dosage of 900 mg per kilogramme of body weight. Bioavailability was determined by blood analyses. The extent of tooth movement was measured both optometrically and cephalometrically (CBCT). Relative alveolar gene expression of osteoclastic markers and OPG-RANKL was assessed by qRT-PCR and root resorption area and osteoclastic activity were determined in TRAP-stained histologic sections of the alveolar process. Compared to controls, the animals treated with strontium ranelate showed up to 40% less tooth movement after four weeks of orthodontic treatment. Gene expression and histologic analyses showed significantly less osteoclastic activity and a significantly smaller root resorption area. Blood analyses confirmed sufficient bioavailability of strontium ranelate. Because of its pharmacologic effects on bone metabolism, strontium ranelate significantly reduced tooth movement and root resorption in orthodontic treatment of rats. Strontium ranelate may be a viable agent for inducing tooth anchorage and reducing undesired root resorption in orthodontic treatment. Patients under medication of strontium ranelate have to expect prolonged orthodontic treatment times. PMID:25281203

  2. Transplacental and early life exposure to inorganic arsenic affected development and behavior in offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Xi, Shuhua; Sun, Wenjuan; Wang, Fengzhi; Jin, Yaping; Sun, Guifan

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the developmental neurotoxicity of arsenic in offspring rats by transplacental and early life exposure to sodium arsenite in drinking water, the pregnant rats or lactating dams, and weaned pups were given free access to drinking water, which contained arsenic at concentrations of 0, 10, 50, 100 mg/L from GD 6 until PND 42. A battery of physical and behavioral tests was applied to evaluate the functional outcome of pups. Pups in arsenic exposed groups weighed less than controls throughout lactation and weaning. Body weight of 10, 50 and 100 mg/L arsenic exposed groups decreased significantly on PND 42, 16 and 12, respectively. Physical development (pinna unfolding, fur appearance, incisor eruption, or eye opening) in pups displayed no significant differences between control and arsenic treated groups. The number of incidences within the 100 mg/L arsenic treated group, in tail hung, auditory startle and visual placing showed significant decrease compared to the control group (p < 0.05). In square water maze test, the trained numbers to finish the trials successfully in 50 and 100 mg/L arsenic exposed groups increased remarkably compared to control group, and there was a dose-related increase (p < 0.01) observed. Taken together, these data show that exposure of inorganic arsenite to pregnant dams and offspring pups at levels up to 100 mg/L in drinking water may affect their learning and memory functions and neuromotor reflex.

  3. Kinetics of gene expression of alkaline phosphatase during healing of alveolar bone in rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Willian Caetano; Fabris, André Luís da Silva; Hassumi, Jaqueline Suemi; Gonçalves, Alaíde; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Okamoto, Roberta

    2016-06-01

    Immunohistochemical studies and molecular biology have enabled us to identify numerous proteins that are involved in the metabolism of bone, and their encoding genes. Among these is alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme that is responsible for the initiation of mineralisation of the extracellular matrix during alveolar bone repair. To evaluate the gene expression of ALP during this process, we studied nine healthy adult male rats, which had their maxillary central incisors extracted from the right side and were randomly divided into three groups. During three experimental periods, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days, the alveoli were curetted, the rats killed, and samples analysed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The RNAm that encodes the gene for the synthesis of ALP was expressed during the three periods analysed, but its concentration was significantly increased at 14 and 28 days compared with at 7 days. There was no significant difference between 14 and 28 days (p=0.0005). We conclude that genes related to ALP are expressed throughout the healing process and more intensively during the later periods (14 and 28 days), which coincides with the increased formation of mineralised bone. PMID:26935214

  4. The Influence of Shockwave Therapy on Orthodontic Tooth Movement Induced in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Hazan-Molina, Hagai; Aizenbud, Itay; Kaufman, Hana; Teich, Sorin; Aizenbud, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Shockwave therapy is used in medicine due to its ability to stimulate healing processes. The application of orthodontic force evokes an inflammatory reaction resulting in tooth movement. Shockwave therapy might have an effect on both inflammatory and periodonal ligament cytokine profiles. Our aim was to evaluate the fluctuations of different inflammatory cytokines after orthodontic force induction with and without shockwave therapy. An orthodontic appliance was applied between the rats' molars and incisors. In conjunction with the commencement of orthodontic force, the rats were treated with a single episode of 1000 shock waves and the gingival crevicular fluid was collected for 3 days. The expression and concentration of different cytokines was evaluated by a commercial 4-multiplex fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. The level of all cytokines displayed a similar trend in both shockwave-treated and untreated groups; the concentration peaked on the first day and declined thereafter. In all cases, however, the cytokine levels were smaller in the shockwave-treated than in untreated animals; a significant difference was found for sRANKL and borderline difference for IL-6 on Day 1. We conclude that shockwave therapy during the induction of orthodontic tooth movement influences the expression of inflammatory cytokines.

  5. Effect of spaceflight on the non-weight-bearing bones of rat skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Russell, J. E.; Winter, F.; Tran Van, P.; Vignery, A.; Baron, R.; Rosenberg, G. D.; Walker, W. V.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the integrated growth and remodeling of nonweight-bearing bones (the mandibles, teeth, and ribs) were studied. Rats prelabeled with tetracycline to mark the surfaces of bone and tooth formation were subjected to spaceflight conditions for 18.5 days, followed by further injections of tetracycline on days 6 and 29 postflight.Results show that spaceflight conditions did not alter the rate of periosteal bone formation in the ribs and regions of the mandibles covered by masticatory muscles, although bone formation-calcification rates were found to be impaired at those sites in the jaw that had no contiguous muscle (molar region). The remodeling activity on the alveolar bone around the buccal roots of the molar teeth was found to be significantly reduced. While total Ca, P, and hydroxyproline concentrations in the jaws, incisors, and ribs were normal after spaceflight, it was determined that weightless conditions caused a delay in the maturation of bone mineral and matrix in the jaws. These anomalies were found to be corrected by 29 days postflight. These results indicate that most of the nonweight-bearing bones of the rat skeleton are at risk to the effects of weightlessness.

  6. Effects of fluoride on matrix proteins and their properties in rat secretory enamel.

    PubMed

    Aoba, T; Moreno, E C; Tanabe, T; Fukae, M

    1990-06-01

    This publication concerns the selective adsorption of rat enamel proteins onto hydroxyapatite, their solubility in aqueous solutions, and the effect that systemic fluoride has on these properties. The enamel proteins used as adsorbates were extracted in 0.5 mol/L acetic acid from the secretory enamel of the upper and lower incisors of SD rats (females, 200-220 g body weight). Equilibration of the proteins with hydroxyapatite was performed in two solutions: (i) 50 mmol/L acetate buffer at pH 6.0 and 0 degrees C, and (ii) 50 mmol/L Tris buffer containing 4 mol/L guanidine at pH 7.4 and room temperature. Enamel was dissected from animals, which were given either de-ionized water (control group) or water containing 25, 50, 75, or 100 ppm fluoride as NaF for four weeks. From these enamel samples, the proteins were extracted in sequence with 160 mmol/L NaCl and 3 mmol/L phosphate (pH 7.3), 50 mmol/L carbonate buffer (pH 10.8), and finally, with 0.5 mol/L acetic acid for dissolution of the enamel mineral. The F, Ca, and P contents of the various enamel samples were determined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Evaluation of laser photobiomodulation (λ 780 nm) on repair of dental replantation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos de Carvalho, Fabíola; Vasconcelos, Rebeca M.; Santos, Laila; dos Santos Barbosa, Artur F.; Aguiar, Marcio C.; Cangussu, Maria Cristina T.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.; Pedreira Ramalho, Luciana M.

    2014-02-01

    Up to date the success of tooth replantation is still limited. The majority of the teeth is lost due to progressive external root resorption. The aim of this study was to assess, histologically, the effect of laser photobiomodulation on repair after tooth replantation. Sixty Wistar Albinus rats had the right upper incisor extracted and then divided into 4 groups: G1 - absence of storage medium; G2 - milk u s e d as storage medium; G3 - milk used as storage medium a n d followed by GaAlAs laser irradiation on dental surfaces and at the entrance of alveolus; G4 - milk used as storage medium associated with laser irradiation as in G3 before and after replantation on the buccal and palatal mucosa every 48 hours for 15 days. The animals were sacrificed at 15, 30 and 60 days after replantation. The results showed that after 15 days G4 exhibit more intense chronic inflammation, with presence of clastic cells and moderate inflammatory root resorption (p<0.05) when compared to G3, which presented absence of those parameters. At day 30 in G1, G2 and G4 mild to moderate chronic inflammation and severe external root resorption were observed. G3 remained with no inflammation and inflammatory root resorption with 30 and 60 days of healing experimental times. The results suggest that laser irradiation on the dental entrance of the dental alveolus prior to tooth replantation has a positive biomodulative effect on the healing process in rats.

  8. Effect of chemically induced propionic acidemia on neurobehavioral development of rats.

    PubMed

    Brusque, A M; Mello, C F; Buchanan, D N; Terracciano, S T; Rocha, M P; Vargas, C R; Wannmacher, C M; Wajner, M

    1999-11-01

    High levels of propionic acid (PPA) comparable to those of human propionic acidemia were achieved in blood (1-5 mmol/l) and brain (1 micromol/g) of rats by administering saline-buffered propionate (pH 7.4) subcutaneously twice a day from the 6th to the 28th day of life. PPA doses ranged from 1.44 to 1.92 micromol/g body weight as a function of animal age. Control rats were treated with saline in the same volumes. Growth and development of physical landmarks were assessed by monitoring the following parameters daily: body weight, upper incisor eruption, eye opening, and hair coat. Development of some reflexes was also monitored, and a specific subset of motor skills was evaluated at days 14 and 21 of life by the free-fall righting test and the spontaneous alternation test. Chronic PPA administration had no effect on body weight, cerebral cortex weight, or cerebellum weight, but caused slight but significant delays in the day of appearance of hair coat and eye opening, indicating an effect of PPA on the development of physical parameters. Free-fall righting was impaired in PPA-treated animals. On the other hand, PPA administration had no effect on the performance of the animals in the spontaneous alternation tests. Long-term effects of early PPA administration were investigated by assessing animal performance in an aversive task (two-way shuttle avoidance task) and in a nonaversive (open-field task) behavioral task at 60 days of age. PPA-treated rats did not habituate to the open field, and presented a lack of retention of the shuttle-avoidance task. Our results suggest that early postnatal PPA administration to rats alters normal development and induces long-term behavioral deficits in aversive and nonaversive tasks. PMID:10548267

  9. Rat Bite Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who have been bitten by an infected rat or, in some cases, squirrels, mice, cats, and ...

  10. Beyond knockout rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guanyi; Tong, Chang; Kumbhani, Dhruv S; Ashton, Charles; Yan, Hexin

    2011-01-01

    The ability to “knockout” specific genes in mice via embryonic stem (ES) cell-based gene-targeting technology has significantly enriched our understanding of gene function in normal and disease phenotypes. Improvements on this original strategy have been developed to enable the manipulation of genomes in a more sophisticated fashion with unprecedented precision. The rat is the model of choice in many areas of scientific investigation despite the lack of rat genetic toolboxes. Most recent advances of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and rat ES cells are diminishing the gap between rat and mouse with respect to reverse genetic approaches. Importantly, the establishment of rat ES cell-based gene targeting technology, in combination with the unique advantages of using rats, provides new, exciting opportunities to create animal models that mimic human diseases more faithfully. We hereby report our recent results concerning finer genetic modifications in the rat, and propose their potential applications in addressing biological questions. PMID:21383544

  11. Masticatory biomechanics of the Laotian rock rat, Laonastes aenigmamus, and the function of the zygomaticomandibularis muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Joanna; Herrel, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The Laotian rock rat, Laonastes aenigmamus, is one of the most recently discovered species of rodent, and displays a cranial morphology that is highly specialised. The rostrum of L. aenigmamus is exceptionally elongate and bears a large attachment site for the infraorbital portion of the zygomaticomandibularis muscle (IOZM), which is particularly well-developed in this species. In this study, we used finite element analysis to investigate the biomechanical performance of the Laotian rock rat cranium and to elucidate the function of the IOZM. A finite element model of the skull of L. aenigmamus was constructed and solved for biting on each of the teeth (incisors, premolar and molars). Further load cases were created and solved in which the origin of the IOZM had been moved anteriorly and posteriorly along the rostrum. Finally, a set of load cases were produced in which the IOZM was removed entirely, and its force was redistributed between the remaining masticatory muscles. The analysis showed that, during biting, the most stressed areas of the skull were the zygomatic and orbital regions. Compared to other rodents, L. aenigmamus is highly efficient at incisor gnawing, but less efficient at molar chewing. However, a relatively constant bite force across the molar tooth row may be an adaptation to folivory. Movement of the origin of the IOZM had little on the patterns of von Mises stresses, or the overall stress experienced by the cranium. However, removal of the IOZM had a substantial effect on the total deformation experienced by the skull. In addition, the positioning and presence of the IOZM had large impact on bite force. Moving the IOZM origin to the anterior tip of the rostrum led to a substantially reduced bite force at all teeth. This was hypothesised to be a result of the increasing horizontal component to the pull of this muscle as it is moved anteriorly along the rostrum. Removal of the IOZM also resulted in reduced bite force, even when the total input

  12. Masticatory biomechanics of the Laotian rock rat, Laonastes aenigmamus, and the function of the zygomaticomandibularis muscle.

    PubMed

    Cox, Philip G; Kirkham, Joanna; Herrel, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The Laotian rock rat, Laonastes aenigmamus, is one of the most recently discovered species of rodent, and displays a cranial morphology that is highly specialised. The rostrum of L. aenigmamus is exceptionally elongate and bears a large attachment site for the infraorbital portion of the zygomaticomandibularis muscle (IOZM), which is particularly well-developed in this species. In this study, we used finite element analysis to investigate the biomechanical performance of the Laotian rock rat cranium and to elucidate the function of the IOZM. A finite element model of the skull of L. aenigmamus was constructed and solved for biting on each of the teeth (incisors, premolar and molars). Further load cases were created and solved in which the origin of the IOZM had been moved anteriorly and posteriorly along the rostrum. Finally, a set of load cases were produced in which the IOZM was removed entirely, and its force was redistributed between the remaining masticatory muscles. The analysis showed that, during biting, the most stressed areas of the skull were the zygomatic and orbital regions. Compared to other rodents, L. aenigmamus is highly efficient at incisor gnawing, but less efficient at molar chewing. However, a relatively constant bite force across the molar tooth row may be an adaptation to folivory. Movement of the origin of the IOZM had little on the patterns of von Mises stresses, or the overall stress experienced by the cranium. However, removal of the IOZM had a substantial effect on the total deformation experienced by the skull. In addition, the positioning and presence of the IOZM had large impact on bite force. Moving the IOZM origin to the anterior tip of the rostrum led to a substantially reduced bite force at all teeth. This was hypothesised to be a result of the increasing horizontal component to the pull of this muscle as it is moved anteriorly along the rostrum. Removal of the IOZM also resulted in reduced bite force, even when the total input

  13. Long-term changes in brain cholinergic system and behavior in rats following gestational exposure to lead: protective effect of calcium supplement.

    PubMed

    Basha, Chand D; Reddy, Rajarami G

    2015-12-01

    Our earlier studies showed that lactational exposure to lead (Pb) caused irreversible neurochemical alterations in rats. The present study was carried out to examine whether gestational exposure to Pb can cause long-term changes in the brain cholinergic system and behavior of rats. The protective effect of calcium (Ca) supplementation against Pb toxicity was also examined. Pregnant rats were exposed to 0.2% Pb (Pb acetate in drinking water) from gestational day (GD) 6 to GD 21. The results showed decrease in body weight gain (GD 6-21) of dams, whereas no changes were observed in offspring body weight at different postnatal days following Pb exposure. Male offspring treated with Pb showed marginal alterations in developmental landmarks such as unfolding of pinnae, lower and upper incisor eruption, fur development, eye slit formation and eye opening on postnatal day (PND) 1, whereas significant alterations were found in the righting reflex (PNDs 4-7), slant board behavior (PNDs 8-10) and forelimb hang performance (PNDs 12-16). Biochemical analysis showed decrease in synaptosomal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and an increase in acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus on PND 14, PND 21, PND 28 and in the four-month age group of rats following Pb exposure. Significant deficits were also observed in total locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and open field behavior in selected age groups of Pb-exposed rats. These alterations were found to be maximal on PND 28, corresponding with the greater blood lead levels observed on PND 28. Addition of 0.02% Ca to Pb reversed the Pb-induced impairments in the cholinergic system as well as in behavioral parameters of rats. In conclusion, these data suggest that gestational exposure to Pb is able to induce long-term changes in neurological functions of offspring. Maternal Ca administration reversed these neurological effects of Pb later in life, suggesting a protective effect of calcium in Pb

  14. Reviewing the morphology of the jaw-closing musculature in squirrels, rats, and guinea pigs with contrast-enhanced microCT.

    PubMed

    Cox, Philip G; Jeffery, Nathan

    2011-06-01

    Rodents are defined by their unique masticatory apparatus and are frequently separated into three nonmonophyletic groups--sciuromorphs, hystricomorphs, and myomorphs--based on the morphology of their masticatory muscles. Despite several comprehensive dissections in previous work, inconsistencies persist as to the exact morphology of the rodent jaw-closing musculature, particularly, the masseter. Here, we review the literature and document for the first time the muscle architecture noninvasively and in 3D by using iodine-enhanced microCT. Observations and measurements were recorded with reference to images of three individuals, each belonging to one of the three muscle morphotypes (squirrel, guinea pig, and rat). Results revealed an enlarged superficial masseter muscle in the guinea pig compared with the rat and squirrel, but a reduced deep masseter (possibly indicating reduced efficiency at the incisors). The deep masseter had expanded forward to take an origin on the rostrum and was also separated into anterior and posterior parts in the rat and squirrel. The zygomaticomandibularis muscle was split into anterior and posterior parts in all the three specimens by the masseteric nerve, and in the rat and guinea pig had an additional rostral expansion through the infraorbital foramen. The temporalis muscle was found to be considerably larger in the rat, and its separation into anterior and posterior parts was only evident in the rat and squirrel. The pterygoid muscles were broadly similar in all three specimens, although the internal pterygoid was somewhat enlarged in the guinea pig implying greater lateral movement of the mandible during chewing in this species. PMID:21538924

  15. Long-term changes in brain cholinergic system and behavior in rats following gestational exposure to lead: protective effect of calcium supplement

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Chand D.

    2015-01-01

    Our earlier studies showed that lactational exposure to lead (Pb) caused irreversible neurochemical alterations in rats. The present study was carried out to examine whether gestational exposure to Pb can cause long-term changes in the brain cholinergic system and behavior of rats. The protective effect of calcium (Ca) supplementation against Pb toxicity was also examined. Pregnant rats were exposed to 0.2% Pb (Pb acetate in drinking water) from gestational day (GD) 6 to GD 21. The results showed decrease in body weight gain (GD 6–21) of dams, whereas no changes were observed in offspring body weight at different postnatal days following Pb exposure. Male offspring treated with Pb showed marginal alterations in developmental landmarks such as unfolding of pinnae, lower and upper incisor eruption, fur development, eye slit formation and eye opening on postnatal day (PND) 1, whereas significant alterations were found in the righting reflex (PNDs 4–7), slant board behavior (PNDs 8–10) and forelimb hang performance (PNDs 12–16). Biochemical analysis showed decrease in synaptosomal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and an increase in acetylcholine (ACh) levels in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus on PND 14, PND 21, PND 28 and in the four-month age group of rats following Pb exposure. Significant deficits were also observed in total locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and open field behavior in selected age groups of Pb-exposed rats. These alterations were found to be maximal on PND 28, corresponding with the greater blood lead levels observed on PND 28. Addition of 0.02% Ca to Pb reversed the Pb-induced impairments in the cholinergic system as well as in behavioral parameters of rats. In conclusion, these data suggest that gestational exposure to Pb is able to induce long-term changes in neurological functions of offspring. Maternal Ca administration reversed these neurological effects of Pb later in life, suggesting a protective effect of calcium

  16. Pantoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, increases orthodontic tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mohsen; Alimoradi, Houman; Kheirandish, Yasaman; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Meysamie, Alipasha; Fatahi Meybodi, Seyed Amir Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Pantoprazole, is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prescribed for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal disorders, which in high doses has been suggested to decrease calcium absorption leading to hypocalcaemia and therefore osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to assess whether pantoprazol, could alter the rate of orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in rats. Materials and Methods: A time course study was established using 72 rats which were divided into six groups of 12 samples each (four: vehicle; eight: pantoprazole + vehicle). Pantoprazole at a dose of 200 mg/kg suspended in carboxymethyl cellulose (0.25 percent) was administered by a gastric tube. The upper incisors and first molars were ligated by a 5 mm nickel-titanium closed-coil spring to deliver an initial force of 60 g. Animals were euthanized two weeks after orthodontic treatment followed by assessment of tooth movement and histomorphometric evaluation of the detached maxillae. Lateral skull radiographs were obtained once a week, starting from the first day to the 6th week of the study. OTM and bone density data were analyzed using independent sample t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: No significant changes in OTM measurements and optical density were observed in vehicle-receiving animals during the study (P=0.994). OTM was significantly increased after six weeks pantoprazole therapy which continued until the 7th week of the experiment (P=0.007). Optical density significantly increased in the pantoprazole-treated rats after six weeks. Conclusion: Long term PPI therapy at high doses could lead to osteoporosis and enhanced OTM. PMID:25140207

  17. TNF Accelerates Death of Mandibular Condyle Chondrocytes in Rats with Biomechanical Stimulation-Induced Temporomandibular Joint Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Lei; Liao, Lifan; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if temporomandibular joint chondrocyte apoptosis is induced in rats with dental biomechanical stimulation and what a role TNF takes. Methods Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group) and exposed to incisor mal-occlusion induced by unilateral anterior crossbite biomechanical stimulation. Two groups were sampled at 2 or 4 weeks. The other two groups were treated with local injections of a TNF inhibitor or PBS into the temporomandibular joints area at 2 weeks and then sampled at 4 weeks. Twenty-four rats either served as unilateral anterior crossbite mock operation controls (n = 8/group) with sampling at 2 or 4 weeks or received a local injection of the TNF inhibitor at 2 weeks with sampling at 4 weeks. Chondrocytes were isolated from the temporomandibular joints of 6 additional rats and treated with TNF in vitro. Joint samples were assessed using Hematoxylin&eosin, Safranin O, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR, fluorogenic activity assays and Western blot analyses. The isolated chondrocytes were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation led to temporomandibular joint cartilage degradation, associated with an increase in TUNEL-positive chondrocytes number, caspase-9 expression levels, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria at 2 weeks without changes in TNF and caspase-8 levels until after 4 weeks. TNF stimulated apoptosis of the isolated chondrocytes and up-regulated caspase-8 expression, but did not change caspase-9 expression levels. Local injection of TNF inhibitor down-regulated caspase-8 expression and reduced TUNEL-positive cell number, but did not reverse cartilage thickness reduction, caspase-9 up-regulation or cytochrome c release. Conclusions Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation induces mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of articular chondrocytes. TNF accelerated the unilateral anterior crossbite induced chondrocytes apoptosis via death

  18. Parenteral monofluorophosphate (MFP) is a more potent inducer of enamel fluorotic defects in neonatal hamster molars than sodium fluoride.

    PubMed

    Lyaruu, Donacian M; Schoonderwoerd, Mark; Tio, Dane; Tse, Chukan; Bervoets, Theodore J; DenBesten, Pamela; Bronckers, Antonius L J J

    2014-07-01

    Supra-optimal intake of sodium fluoride (NaF) during early childhood results in formation of irreversible enamel defects. Monofluorophosphate (MFP) was considered as less toxic than NaF but equally cariostatic. We compared the potency of MFP and NaF to induce pre-eruptive sub-ameloblastic cysts and post-eruptive white spots and pits in developing hamster enamel. Hamster pups were injected subcutaneously with either NaF or MFP in equimolar doses of either 9 mg or 18 mg F/kg body weight. At 9 mg F/kg, MFP induced more but smaller sub-ameloblastic cysts with a collective cyst volume twice as large as that induced by NaF. Eight days after F injection, all F-injected groups had formed 4-6 white spots per molar, with an additional 2 pits per molar in the low MFP group. Twenty-eight days after injection, most white spots had turned into pits (5-6 per molar) and only the high MFP group still contained 2 white spots per molar. We conclude that parenterally applied MFP is more potent in inducing enamel defects than NaF. Most white spots formed turn into pits by functional use of the dentition. The higher potency of parenteral MFP may be associated with sustained elevated F levels in the enamel organ by enzymatic hydrolysis of MFP by alkaline phosphatase activity.

  19. "Borderline" fluorotic region in Serbia: correlations among fluoride in drinking water, biomarkers of exposure and dental fluorosis in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Antonijevic, Evica; Mandinic, Zoran; Curcic, Marijana; Djukic-Cosic, Danijela; Milicevic, Nemanja; Ivanovic, Mirjana; Carevic, Momir; Antonijevic, Biljana

    2016-06-01

    This study explores relation between dental fluorosis occurrence in schoolchildren, residents of Ritopek, a small local community near Belgrade, and fluoride exposure via drinking water. Additionally, fluoride levels were determined in children's urine and hair samples, and efforts were made to correlate them with dental fluorosis. Dental fluorosis and caries prevalence were examined in a total of 52 schoolchildren aged 7-15 years (29 boys and 23 girls). Fluoride levels in three types of samples were analyzed using composite fluoride ion-selective electrode. Results showed high prevalence of dental fluorosis (34.6 %) and low prevalence of dental caries (23.1 %, mean DMFT 0.96) among children exposed to wide range of water fluoride levels (0.11-4.14 mg/L, n = 27). About 11 % of water samples exceeded 1.5 mg/L, a drinking-water quality guideline value for fluoride given by the World Health Organization (2006). Fluoride levels in urine and hair samples ranged between 0.07-2.59 (n = 48) and 1.07-19.83 mg/L (n = 33), respectively. Severity of dental fluorosis was positively and linearly correlated with fluoride levels in drinking water (r = 0.79). Fluoride levels in urine and hair were strongly and positively correlated with levels in drinking water (r = 0.92 and 0.94, respectively). Fluoride levels in hair samples appeared to be a potentially promising biomarker of fluoride intake via drinking water on one hand, and severity of dental fluorosis on the other hand. Based on community fluorosis index value of 0.58, dental fluorosis revealed in Ritopek can be considered as "borderline" public health issue.

  20. "Borderline" fluorotic region in Serbia: correlations among fluoride in drinking water, biomarkers of exposure and dental fluorosis in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Antonijevic, Evica; Mandinic, Zoran; Curcic, Marijana; Djukic-Cosic, Danijela; Milicevic, Nemanja; Ivanovic, Mirjana; Carevic, Momir; Antonijevic, Biljana

    2016-06-01

    This study explores relation between dental fluorosis occurrence in schoolchildren, residents of Ritopek, a small local community near Belgrade, and fluoride exposure via drinking water. Additionally, fluoride levels were determined in children's urine and hair samples, and efforts were made to correlate them with dental fluorosis. Dental fluorosis and caries prevalence were examined in a total of 52 schoolchildren aged 7-15 years (29 boys and 23 girls). Fluoride levels in three types of samples were analyzed using composite fluoride ion-selective electrode. Results showed high prevalence of dental fluorosis (34.6 %) and low prevalence of dental caries (23.1 %, mean DMFT 0.96) among children exposed to wide range of water fluoride levels (0.11-4.14 mg/L, n = 27). About 11 % of water samples exceeded 1.5 mg/L, a drinking-water quality guideline value for fluoride given by the World Health Organization (2006). Fluoride levels in urine and hair samples ranged between 0.07-2.59 (n = 48) and 1.07-19.83 mg/L (n = 33), respectively. Severity of dental fluorosis was positively and linearly correlated with fluoride levels in drinking water (r = 0.79). Fluoride levels in urine and hair were strongly and positively correlated with levels in drinking water (r = 0.92 and 0.94, respectively). Fluoride levels in hair samples appeared to be a potentially promising biomarker of fluoride intake via drinking water on one hand, and severity of dental fluorosis on the other hand. Based on community fluorosis index value of 0.58, dental fluorosis revealed in Ritopek can be considered as "borderline" public health issue. PMID:26423526

  1. Prenatal MDMA exposure delays postnatal development in the rat: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Heuland, Emilie; Germaux, Marie-Aure; Galineau, Laurent; Chalon, Sylvie; Belzung, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA (ecstasy) is a synthetic illicit drug which is widely consumed throughout the world. Drug abuse during pregnancy may have an impairing effect on the progeny of drug-abusing mothers. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of prenatal MDMA exposure on the progeny development, using a rat model. Pregnant animals were injected daily with MDMA (10 mg/kg) between the 13th and 20th days of gestation. Male and female pups were then tested throughout the lactation period on the appearance and improvement of physical and sensory motor parameters. Appearance of some physical features (eyes opening and incisor eruption) and neurological reflexes as well as improving performances in negative geotaxis, gait and inclined board tests were delayed in pups prenatally exposed to MDMA compared to saline-treated pups. In contrast, functions that are necessary for survival such as forelimb reflex (that enables suckling) were present in both groups. At four weeks of age, MDMA animals recovered to normal level in all studied parameters. The delay in physical and neurological reflex development could be interpreted as alterations in maturation of some neuronal circuitries induced by prenatal MDMA exposure.

  2. What is Desert RATS?

    NASA Video Gallery

    The mission manager and test coordinators for the 2011 mission explain why Desert RATS was started 14 years ago, questions being studied in this year's activities, technologies being tested and the...

  3. Anhedonia in postpartum rats.

    PubMed

    Navarre, Brittany M; Laggart, Jillian D; Craft, Rebecca M

    2010-01-12

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is a debilitating illness, yet little is known about its causes. The purpose of this study was to examine a major symptom of depression during the postpartum period, anhedonia, by comparing sucrose preference in female rats that had undergone actual pregnancy or hormone-simulated pregnancy (HSP) to their respective controls. Whereas HSP rats showed significantly less preference than vehicle control rats for 1% sucrose solution during the first three weeks of the "postpartum" period, previously pregnant females showed only slightly depressed sucrose preference for the first 1-2 days postpartum, compared to non-pregnant controls. Habituation to 1% sucrose during the pregnancy period, which increased preference upon later testing in previously pregnant rats tested on postpartum day 2, did not significantly increase preference in HSP rats, suggesting that depressed preference in the latter group was not due to neophobia. Pre-treatment with desipramine did not prevent suppressed sucrose preference in HSP rats, and preference was even further suppressed following chronic sertraline treatment. These results suggest that estradiol withdrawal following HSP may cause anhedonia during the early "postpartum" period. In contrast, females that have undergone actual pregnancy are less likely to show this effect, suggesting that postpartum hormonal changes other than the dramatic decline in estradiol may buffer its negative mood effects.

  4. DENTAL MINERALIZATION AND SALIVARY ACTIVITY ARE REDUCED IN OFFSPRING OF SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS (SHR)

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Gracieli Prado; dos Santos, Otoniel Antonio Macedo; Sassaki, Kikue Takebayashi; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Antoniali, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Several pathologies have been diagnosed in children of hypertensive mothers; however, some studies that evaluated the alterations in their oral health are not conclusive. This study analyzed the salivary gland activity and dental mineralization of offsprings of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Thirty-day-old SHR males and Wistar rats were studied. The salivary flow was evaluated by injection of pilocarpine, the protein concentration and salivary amylase activity, by the Lowry method and kinetic method at 405 nm, respectively. Enamel and dentin mineralization of the mandibular incisors was quantified with aid of the microhardness meter. The results were analyzed by the ANOVA or Student's t test (p<0.05). It was noticed that the salivary flow rate (0.026 mL/min/100 g ± 0.002) and salivary protein concentration (2.26 mg/mL ± 0.14) of SHR offspring were reduced compared to Wistar normotensive offspring (0.036 mL/min/100 g ± 0.003 and 2.91 mg/mL ± 0.27, respectively), yet there was no alteration in amylase activity (SHR: 242.4 U/mL ± 36.9; Wistar: 163.8 U/mL ± 14.1). Microhardness was lower both in enamel (255.8 KHN ± 2.6) and dentin (59.9 KHN ± 0.8) for the SHR teeth compared to the Wistar teeth (enamel: 328.7 KHN ± 3.3 and dentin: 67.1 KHN ± 1.0). These results suggest that the SHR offspring are more susceptible to development of pathologies impairing oral health, once they presented lesser flow and salivary protein concentration and lower dental mineralization. PMID:19089272

  5. Adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis in rat dental tissues. A histochemical study to differentiate the enzymes involved.

    PubMed

    Mörnstad, H; Sundström, B

    1976-07-19

    The purpose of this study was to try to differentiate histochemically between the various enzymes which may catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP in developing rat dental tissues. Freeze cut and freeze dried sections of molar and incisor teeth were incubated in lead capture-based media at pH 5.0, 7.2 or 9.4 with one of the following substrates: beta-glycerophosphate, AMP, ADP, ATP, AMP-PNP and tetrasodium pyrophosphate. To establish the enzymatic nature of the hydrolysis parallel sections were incubated after prior fixation in either formaldehyde or glutaraldehyde. By comparing the enzymatic stainings obtained with the various substrates and at the different pH:s, it was concluded that ATP can be visibly hydrolyzed in rat dental tissues by alkaline phosphatase (stratum intermedium, apical part of maturation ameloblasts, basal part of all ameloblasts, odontoblasts and subodontoblastic layer), specific ATPase (apical and basal parts of secretory ameloblasts) and ATP pyrophosphatase and/or adenylate cyclase (stratum intermedium, odontoblasts). Acid phosphatase, specific ADPase, 5'-nucleotidase, inorganic pyrophosphatase, 3':5'-cyclic-AMP-phosphodiesterase and adenylate kinase on the other hand, seem not to be engaged in the ATP hydrolysis to such a degree as to complicate the interpretation of the histochemical staining. The alkaline phosphatase part of the ATP hydrolysis appeared to be rather insensitive to aldehyde fixation, while the hydrolysis effected by specific ATPase and ATP pyrophosphatase and/or adenylate cyclase was extinguished after fixation with formaldehyde for 4 h or glutaraldehyde for 10 min.

  6. Delayed replantation of rat teeth after use of reconstituted powdered milk as a storage medium.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Cláudia Letícia Vendrame; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Sundefeld, Maria Lúcia Marçal Mazza; Negri, Márcia Regina

    2009-02-01

    Minimal extraoral dry storage period and moist storage for the avulsed tooth are identified as key steps for the treatment protocol of tooth replantation. Among the possible moist storage media, bovine milk has stood out because of its capacity of preserving the integrity of the periodontal ligament (PDL) fibers. This condition has attracted the attention to investigate the use of powdered milk, which is one of the presentation forms of bovine milk, as a feasible storage medium in cases of delayed tooth replantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing process after delayed replantation of rat teeth stored in reconstituted powdered milk and long shelf-life (ultra high temperature) whole milk. Forty maxillary right rat incisors were assigned to four groups (n = 10): group I--the teeth were extracted and immediately replanted into theirs sockets; group II--the teeth were stored for 60 min in 200 ml of freshly reconstituted powdered milk; group III--the teeth were stored for 60 min in 200 ml of long shelf-life whole milk; group IV--the teeth were kept dry for the same time. All procedures were performed at room temperature. Next, the root canals of teeth in groups II, III, and IV were instrumented, filled with a calcium hydroxide-based paste, and replanted into their sockets. All animals received systemic antibiotic therapy and were killed by anesthetic overdose 60 days after replantation. The pieces containing the replanted teeth were removed, fixed, decalcified, and paraffin-embedded. Semi-serial 6-microm-thick sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histomorphological analysis. There was statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between groups I and IV regarding the presence of replacement resorption and PDL remnants on root surface. The powdered milk and long shelf-life whole milk presented similar results to each other and may be indicated as storage media for avulsed teeth.

  7. Histomorphometric evaluation of the effect of systemic and topical ozone on alveolar bone healing following tooth extraction in rats.

    PubMed

    Erdemci, F; Gunaydin, Y; Sencimen, M; Bassorgun, I; Ozler, M; Oter, S; Gulses, A; Gunal, A; Sezgin, S; Bayar, G R; Dogan, N; Gider, I K

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic and topical ozone applications on alveolar bone healing following tooth extraction. One hundred and twelve male Wistar rats were divided into eight groups of 14 rats each; seven groups were experimental (A-G) and one formed the control group (K). The experimental groups were further divided into two sub-groups, with seven rats in each - sacrificed on days 14 and 28 (subgroups 1 and 2). The maxillary right central incisors were extracted under general anaesthesia following the administration of local anaesthesia. After sacrifice, semi-serial histological sections were prepared, and mineralized and trabecular bone and osteoid and osteoblast surfaces were measured. Measurements of the trabecular bone showed statistically higher values in the groups treated with systemic ozone (D(2): 50.01 ± 2.12; E(2): 49.03 ± 3.03; F(2): 48.76 ± 2.61; G(2): 50.24 ± 3.37) than in the groups that underwent topical ozone administration (A(2): 46.01 ± 3.07; B(2): 46.79 ± 3.09; C(2): 47.07 ± 2.12; P = 0.030 (G(2)-A(2), G(2)-B(2), G(2)-C(2))). Within the limitations of the current study, it may be concluded that postoperative long-term systemic ozone application can accelerate alveolar bone healing following extraction. However, additional studies are required to clarify the effects of the different ozone applications on new bone formation.

  8. Reduced dental calcium expression and dental mass in chronic sleep deprived rats: Combined EDS, TOF-SIMS, and micro-CT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yi-Jie; Huang, Yung-Kai; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Pai, Man-Hui; Lee, Ai-Wei; Mai, Fu-Der; Chang, Hung-Ming

    2015-08-01

    Teeth are the hardest tissue in the body. The growth of teeth is closely regulated by circadian rhythmicity. Considering that sleep deprivation (SD) is a severe condition that disrupts normal circadian rhythmicity, this study was conducted to determine whether calcium expression (the major element participating in teeth constitution), and dental mass would be significantly impaired following SD. Adolescent rats subjected to 3 weeks of SD were processed for energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analyses. The EDS and TOF-SIMS results indicated that high calcium intensity was detected in both the upper and lower incisors of untreated rats. Micro-CT analysis corresponded closely with spectral data in which an enhanced dental mass was calculated in intact animals. However, following SD, both calcium expression and the dental mass were remarkably decreased to nearly half those of the untreated values. Because SD plays a detrimental role in impairing dental structure, establishing satisfactory sleep behavior would therefore serve as a crucial strategy for preventing or improving prevalent dental dysfunctions.

  9. Role of trace elements (Zn, Sr, Fe) in bone development: energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence study of rat bone and tooth tissue.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Karina; Drzazga, Zofia; Kaszuba, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common debilitating disease around the world and it is more and more established among young people. There are well known recommendations for nutrition of newborns and children concerning adequate calcium and vitamin D intake in order to maintain proper bone density. Nevertheless, important role in structure and function of a healthy bone tissue is played by an integration between all constituents including elements other than Ca, like trace elements, which control vital processes in bone tissue. It is important from scientific point of view as well as prevention of bone diseases, to monitor the mineralization process considering changes of the concentration of minerals during first stage of bone formation. This work presents studies of trace element (zinc, strontium, and iron) concentration in bones and teeth of Wistar rats at the age of 7, 14, and 28 days. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to examine mandibles, skulls, femurs, tibiae, and incisors. The quantitative analysis was performed using fundamental parameters method (FP). Zn and Sr concentrations were highest for the youngest individuals and decreased with age of rats, while Fe content was stable in bone matrix for most studied bones. Our results reveal the necessity of monitoring concentration of not only major, but also minor elements, because the trace elements play special role in the first period of bone development. PMID:24615876

  10. Temporal expression in rats of receptor tyrosine kinase Tie2 during early wound healing after tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hirotaka; Kasai, Shuya; Maesawa, Chihaya

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role of Tie2 in regulating wound healing after tooth extraction. Wistar rats underwent maxillary incisor tooth extraction, and immunodetection techniques were used to determine Tie2 expression in the healing wound. The wound was initially filled with blood coagulum containing densely aggregated erythrocytes, leukocytes, fibrin, and endothelial progenitor cells, indicating that blood vessel formation started in the socket. Tie2 was detected on monocytic cell membranes. On day 3, fibroblastic cells proliferated in the coagulum, small vessels appeared by day 5, and new bone formed in the vessel-rich area. Robust woven bone trabeculae were present around vessels by day 7, and woven bone and osteoclast-like giant cells were present on day 10. Woven bone surrounded sinusoidal capillary-like vessels. Full-length (140-160 kDa) Tie2 was not detected at any time, although Tie2 fragments were present in the healing wound. N-terminus- and C-terminus-specific Tie2 antibodies detected 40-kDa and 60-kDa fragments or 70-kDa and 50-kDa fragments, respectively. The levels of these fragments decreased during the first 3 days and started to increase by day 5-10. The Tie2 extracellular domain initially inhibited angiogenesis, and its degradation relieved inhibition of new vessel formation. The onset of vessel formation in the wound may be induced by scattered endothelial progenitor cells. PMID:26666854

  11. N-Acetyl cysteine restores viability and function of rat odontoblast-like cells impaired by polymethylmethacrylate dental resin extract.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kojima, Norinaga; Att, Wael; Hori, Norio; Suzuki, Takeo; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    There is concern that dental-resin materials directly loaded on a prepared tooth adversely affect dental pulp tissue by releasing the resin chemicals through dentinal tubes. This study determined whether self-curing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin extract adversely affected the viability and function of odontoblast-like cells and whether the cytotoxicity of this resin, if any, could be eliminated by N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant amino acid derivative. Odontoblast-like cells isolated from rat maxillary incisor dental pulp tissue were exposed to a PMMA resin extract with or without N-acetyl cysteine for 1 h and then cultured in osteoblastic media. The percentage of viable cells 24 h after seeding was 20% in cells exposed to the resin extract without N-acetyl cysteine, whereas 45% of cells were viable after exposure to the N-acetyl cysteine-supplemented extract. The cells that had been exposed to the extract showed a strong tendency for apoptosis associated with the increased reactive oxygen species production and decreased intracellular glutathione level, which was improved by the addition of N-acetyl cysteine. N-Acetyl cysteine supplementation almost completely restored the significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization by the resin extract. These results conclusively demonstrated that exposure of odontoblast-like cells to the resin extract impaired the cell viability and function and, more intriguingly, N-acetyl cysteine supplementation to the extract significantly prevented these toxic effects.

  12. Influence of methionine and vitamin E on fluoride concentration in bones and teeth of rats exposed to sodium fluoride in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Iwona; Birkner, Ewa; Gutowska, Izabela; Romuk, Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2012-06-01

    Increased exposure to fluorine-containing compounds leads to accumulation of fluorides in hard tissues of bones and teeth, which may result in numerous skeletal and dental disorders. This study evaluates the influence of methionine and vitamin E on fluoride concentration in bones and teeth of rats subjected to long-term exposure to sodium fluoride in drinking water. The study was conducted in 30 3-month-old female Wistar FL rats. The animals were divided into five groups, six rats per group. The control group consisted of rats receiving only distilled water as drinking water. All other groups received NaF in the amount of 10 mg/kg of body mass/day in their drinking water. In addition, respective animal groups received: NaF + Met group--10 mg of methionine/kg of body mass/day, NaF + Met + E group--10 mg of methionine/kg of body mass/day and 3 mg of vitamin E (tocopheroli acetas)/rat/day and NaF + E group--3 mg of vitamin E/rat/day. Femoral bones and incisor teeth were collected for the study, and the fluoride concentration was determined using a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Fluoride concentration in both bones and teeth was found to be higher in the NaF and NaF + Met groups compared to the control group. In groups NaF + Met + E and NaF + E, the study material contained much lower fluoride concentration compared to the NaF group, while the effect was more prominent in the NaF + E group. The results of the studies indicate that methionine and vitamin E have opposite effects on accumulation of fluorides in hard tissue in rats. By stimulating fluoride accumulation, methionine reduces the adverse effect of fluorides on soft tissue, while vitamin E, which prevents excessive accumulation of fluorides in bones and teeth, protects these tissues from fluorosis. Therefore, it seems that combined application of both compounds would be optimal for the prevention of the adverse effects of chronic fluoride intoxication.

  13. Adrenarche in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Duarte; Xiao, Fang; Gouveia, Alexandra M; Ferreira, Jorge G; Vinson, Gavin P

    2006-10-01

    Normal pubertal development in humans involves two distinct processes: maturation of adrenal androgen secretion (adrenarche) and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (gonadarche). One factor thought to contribute to the adrenarche in man is increased adrenal 17-hydroxylase (CYP17) activity. In the rat, there is evidence for adrenal involvement in the initiation of puberty, but the adrenal glands of this species are generally thought to express CYP17 only very poorly at best. To further examine the nature of postnatal adrenal development in rat, plasma samples and adrenal tissues were taken from animals aged 2-90 days, circulating adrenal steroids assayed, and adrenal zones assessed quantitatively. A relative increase in zona reticularis, and peaks of circulating cortisol, androstenedione, and 17-OH-progesterone were observed around postnatal days 16-20, clearly before the development of the gonads, which begins at 30-35 days. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR confirmed a peak in mRNA coding for CYP17 in adrenal tissue from rats of similar age. The results suggest that the rat adrenal has the capacity to secrete steroids arising from 17-hydroxylation, and that this may contribute to a process similar to human adrenarche.

  14. Rat on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken on Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's rock abrasion tool, also known as 'rat' (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  15. Behavior modulation of rats to a robotic rat in multi-rat interaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Sugahara, Yusuke; Takanishi, Atsuo; Okabayashi, Satoshi; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study the behavioral response of rats to a robotic rat during multi-rat interaction. Experiments are conducted in an open-field where a robotic rat called WR-5 is put together with three laboratory rats. WR-5 is following one rat (target), while avoiding the other two rats (outside observers) during interaction. The behavioral characteristics of each target rat is evaluated by scoring its locomotor activity and frequencies of performing rearing, body grooming and mounting actions. Additionally, the frequency of being mounted by other rats is also measured. Experimental results show that the target becomes more active after interaction. The rat species, with more active behavioral characteristics, is more susceptible to being adjusted by the robot. The increased time spent by the outside observers in the vicinity of the robot indicates that a biomimetic robot has the promise for modulating rat behavior even without direct interaction. Thus, this study provide a novel approach to shaping the sociality of animals living in groups. PMID:26414400

  16. Behavior modulation of rats to a robotic rat in multi-rat interaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qing; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Sugahara, Yusuke; Takanishi, Atsuo; Okabayashi, Satoshi; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study the behavioral response of rats to a robotic rat during multi-rat interaction. Experiments are conducted in an open-field where a robotic rat called WR-5 is put together with three laboratory rats. WR-5 is following one rat (target), while avoiding the other two rats (outside observers) during interaction. The behavioral characteristics of each target rat is evaluated by scoring its locomotor activity and frequencies of performing rearing, body grooming and mounting actions. Additionally, the frequency of being mounted by other rats is also measured. Experimental results show that the target becomes more active after interaction. The rat species, with more active behavioral characteristics, is more susceptible to being adjusted by the robot. The increased time spent by the outside observers in the vicinity of the robot indicates that a biomimetic robot has the promise for modulating rat behavior even without direct interaction. Thus, this study provide a novel approach to shaping the sociality of animals living in groups.

  17. Rat retinal transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S.; Korbolina, Elena E.; Ershov, Nikita I.; Kolosova, Natalia G.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in the elderly, remains poorly understood due to the paucity of animal models that fully replicate the human disease. Recently, we showed that senescence-accelerated OXYS rats develop a retinopathy similar to human AMD. To identify alterations in response to normal aging and progression of AMD-like retinopathy, we compared gene expression profiles of retina from 3- and 18-mo-old OXYS and control Wistar rats by means of high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). We identified 160 and 146 age-regulated genes in Wistar and OXYS retinas, respectively. The majority of them are related to the immune system and extracellular matrix turnover. Only 24 age-regulated genes were common for the two strains, suggestive of different rates and mechanisms of aging. Over 600 genes showed significant differences in expression between the two strains. These genes are involved in disease-associated pathways such as immune response, inflammation, apoptosis, Ca2+ homeostasis and oxidative stress. The altered expression for selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. To our knowledge, this study represents the first analysis of retinal transcriptome from young and old rats with biologic replicates generated by RNA-Seq technology. We can conclude that the development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is associated with an imbalance in immune and inflammatory responses. Aging alters the expression profile of numerous genes in the retina, and the genetic background of OXYS rats has a profound impact on the development of AMD-like retinopathy. PMID:23656783

  18. Erythrocytosis in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Subha; Hoffman, George C.; Stowe, Nicholas T.; Smeby, Robert R.; Bumpus, F. Merlin

    1972-01-01

    During the study of an inbred strain of Wistar rats which spontaneously develop hypertension when they reach a weight of approximately 150 g, it was found that these animals also develop an erythrocytosis. A significant increase in red cell count was observed in spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats (8-11 × 106 RBC/mm3) when compared with normotensive rats (6-7 × 106 RBC/mm3) of the same strain. This increase in red cell count paralleled the increase in body weight and the rise in blood pressure. Since the plasma volume, as measured with labeled albumin was normal, there was an absolute increase in red cells. The hematocrit and hemoglobin content of the blood measured in SH rats were only slightly greater than those found in normotensive rats. However, the mean cell volume (MCV) of the red cells in the SH rats was 45-47 μ3 as compared with 51-53 μ3 in normotensive rats. A fourfold increase in 24 hr 59Fe incorporation into the red cells was found in the SH rats when compared with normotensive controls. The bone marrow of the SH rats showed erythroid hyperplasia. When the SH rats were treated with α-methyldopa (Aldomet 200 mg/kg daily, i.p.) the red cell count fell in parallel with the drop in blood pressure. No change in red cell count or blood pressure was observed in normotensive rats treated in the same manner. The erythropoietin titer was high in SH rats, and was undetectable in normotensive rats. These observations suggest a direct relationship between the hypertension and the erythrocytosis mediated by erythropoietin; both are genetically controlled. PMID:5011107

  19. DELAYED TOOTH REPLANTATION AFTER ROOT SURFACE TREATMENT WITH SODIUM HYPOCHLORITE AND SODIUM FLUORIDE: HISTOMORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Sottovia, André Dotto; Sonoda, Celso Koogi; Poi, Wilson Roberto; Panzarini, Sônia Regina; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira

    2006-01-01

    In cases of delayed tooth replantation, non-vital periodontal ligament remnants have been removed with sodium hypochlorite in an attempt to control root resorption. Nevertheless, reports of its irritating potential in contact with the alveolar connective tissue have been described. Therefore, this study evaluated the healing process on delayed replantation of rat teeth, after periodontal ligament removal by different treatment modalities. Twenty-four rats, assigned to 3 groups (n=8), had their upper right incisor extracted and left on the workbench for desiccation during 60 min. Afterwards, the teeth in group I were immersed in saline for 2 min. In group II, root surfaces were scrubbed with gauze soaked in saline for 2 min; and in group III, scrubbing was done with gauze soaked in 1% sodium hypochlorite solution. Thereafter, root surfaces were etched with 37% phosphoric acid and immersed in 2% acidulate-phosphate sodium fluoride solution, at pH 5.5. Root canals were filled with a calcium hydroxide-based paste and the teeth were replanted. The animals were sacrificed 60 days postoperatively and the pieces containing the replanted teeth were processed and paraffin-embedded. Semi-serial transversally sections were obtained from the middle third of the root and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histomorphometric analysis. Data were analyzed statistically using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. The results showed that root structure and cementum extension were more affected by resorption in group III (p<0.05). All groups were affected by root resorption but the treatment performed in group III was the least effective for its control. The treatment accomplished in groups I and II yielded similar results to each other. PMID:19089038

  20. Prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide impaired the maternal care and the physical and behavioral development of offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Sandini, Thaísa M; Udo, Mariana S B; Reis-Silva, Thiago M; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Spinosa, Helenice de S

    2014-08-01

    Plants that contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) have been reported as contaminants of pastures and food, as well as being used in herbal medicine. PAs are responsible for poisoning events in livestock and human beings. The aim of this present study was to evaluate effects of prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide, the main PA found in the butanolic residue (BR) of Senecio brasiliensis, on both physical and behavioral parameters of Wistar rat offspring. The toxicity and maternal behavior were also evaluated. For this, pregnant Wistar rats received integerrimine N-oxide from the BR of Senecio brasiliensis, by gavage, on gestational days 6-20 (during organogenesis and fetal development period) at doses of 3, 6 and 9 mg/kg. During treatment, maternal body weight gain, and food and water intake were evaluated. After parturition, maternal behavior and aggressive maternal behavior were analyzed. In addition, physical development and behavioral assessments were observed in both male and female pups. Results showed that prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide of S. brasiliensis induced maternal toxicity, impairment in maternal behavior and aggressive maternal behavior, mainly in the highest dose group. Between sexes comparison of pups showed loss of body weight, delayed physical development such as pinna detachment, hair growth, eruption of incisor teeth, eye and vaginal openings. These pups also showed a delay of palmar grasp, surface righting reflex, negative geotaxis and auditory startle reflexes. Thus, prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide induces maternal toxicity, impairment of maternal care and delayed in physical and behavioral development of the offspring.

  1. Prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide impaired the maternal care and the physical and behavioral development of offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Sandini, Thaísa M; Udo, Mariana S B; Reis-Silva, Thiago M; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Spinosa, Helenice de S

    2014-08-01

    Plants that contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) have been reported as contaminants of pastures and food, as well as being used in herbal medicine. PAs are responsible for poisoning events in livestock and human beings. The aim of this present study was to evaluate effects of prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide, the main PA found in the butanolic residue (BR) of Senecio brasiliensis, on both physical and behavioral parameters of Wistar rat offspring. The toxicity and maternal behavior were also evaluated. For this, pregnant Wistar rats received integerrimine N-oxide from the BR of Senecio brasiliensis, by gavage, on gestational days 6-20 (during organogenesis and fetal development period) at doses of 3, 6 and 9 mg/kg. During treatment, maternal body weight gain, and food and water intake were evaluated. After parturition, maternal behavior and aggressive maternal behavior were analyzed. In addition, physical development and behavioral assessments were observed in both male and female pups. Results showed that prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide of S. brasiliensis induced maternal toxicity, impairment in maternal behavior and aggressive maternal behavior, mainly in the highest dose group. Between sexes comparison of pups showed loss of body weight, delayed physical development such as pinna detachment, hair growth, eruption of incisor teeth, eye and vaginal openings. These pups also showed a delay of palmar grasp, surface righting reflex, negative geotaxis and auditory startle reflexes. Thus, prenatal exposure to integerrimine N-oxide induces maternal toxicity, impairment of maternal care and delayed in physical and behavioral development of the offspring. PMID:24881561

  2. Delayed physical and neurobehavioral development and increased aggressive and depression-like behaviors in the rat offspring of dams fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Giriko, Catherine Ássuka; Andreoli, Carla Albuquerque; Mennitti, Laís Vales; Hosoume, Lilian Fazion; Souto, Tayane Dos Santos; Silva, Alexandre Valotta da; Mendes-da-Silva, Cristiano

    2013-12-01

    Early maternal exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD) may influence the brain development of rat offspring and consequently affect physiology and behavior. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the somatic, physical, sensory-motor and neurobehavioral development of the offspring of dams fed an HFD (52% calories from fat, mainly saturated) and the offspring of dams fed a control diet (CD - 14.7% fat) during lactation from the 1st to the 21st postnatal day (P). Maternal body weights were evaluated during lactation. In the progeny, somatic (body weight, head and lengths axes) and physical (ear unfolding, auditory conduit opening, eruption of the incisors and eye opening) development and the consolidation of reflex responses (palm grasp, righting, vibrissa placing, cliff avoidance, negative geotaxis, auditory startle response and free-fall righting) were determined during suckling. Depressive and aggressive behaviors were tested with the forced swimming test (FST) and the "foot-shock" test on days 60 and 110, respectively. The open field test was used to assess motor function. Compared to controls, the HFD-pups exhibited decreases in body weight (P7-P21) and body length (P4-P18), but by days P71 and P95, these pups were overweight. All indicators of physical maturation and the consolidation of the following reflexes, vibrissa placing, auditory startle responses, free-fall righting and negative geotaxis, were delayed in HFD-progeny. In addition, the pups from HFD dam rats also exhibited reduced swimming and climbing times in the FST and increased aggressive behavior. No changes in locomotion were observed. These findings show developmental and neurobehavioral changes in the rat offspring of dams fed the HFD during lactation and suggest possible disruption of physical and sensory-motor maturation and increased susceptibility to depressive and aggressive-like behavior.

  3. Gravitational Biology: The Rat Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session JP3, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Morphology of brain, pituitary and thyroid in the rats exposed to altered gravity; Biochemical Properties of B Adrenoceptors After Spaceflight (LMS-STS78) or Hindlimb Suspension in Rats; Influence of Hypergravity on the Development of Monoaminergic Systems in the Rat Spinal Cord; A Vestibular Evoked Potentials (VsEPs) Study of the Function of the Otolith Organs in Different Head Orientations with respect to Earth Gravity Vector in the Rat; Quantitative Observations on the Structure of Selected Proprioceptive Components in Adult Rats that Underwent About Half of their Fetal Development in Space; Effects of a Nine-Day Shuttle Mission on the Development of the Neonatal Rat Nervous System, A Behavioral Study; Muscle Atrophy Associated to Microgravity in Rat, Basic Data For Countermeasures; Simulated Weightlessness by Unloading in the Rat, Results of a Time Course Study of Biochemical Events Occurring During Unloading and Lack of Effect of a rhBNP-2 Treatment on Bone Formation and Bone Mineral Content in Unloading Rats; and Cytological Mechanism of the Osteogenesis Under Microgravity Conditions.

  4. URINARY CALCULI IN GERMFREE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Bengt E.; Norman, Arne

    1962-01-01

    In a colony of germfree rats 50 per cent of the males had urinary calculi composed of calcium citrate and calcium oxalate. Genetically closely related conventional animals on the same sterilized diet did not present a single case of stone formation. The tendency to calculus formation disappeared when germfree animals were contaminated with the intestinal flora from conventional rats. The calculus formation can readily be explained by the high calcium, high citrate, and high pH of the urine. This pattern was changed to that of conventional rats when the germfree rats were infected with intestinal microorganisms. PMID:13903130

  5. Laughing rats are optimistic.

    PubMed

    Rygula, Rafal; Pluta, Helena; Popik, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Emotions can bias human decisions- for example depressed or anxious people tend to make pessimistic judgements while those in positive affective states are often more optimistic. Several studies have reported that affect contingent judgement biases can also be produced in animals. The animals, however, cannot self-report; therefore, the valence of their emotions, to date, could only be assumed. Here we present the results of an experiment where the affect-contingent judgement bias has been produced by objectively measured positive emotions. We trained rats in operant Skinner boxes to press one lever in response to one tone to receive a food reward and to press another lever in response to a different tone to avoid punishment by electric foot shock. After attaining a stable level of discrimination performance, the animals were subjected to either handling or playful, experimenter-administered manual stimulation - tickling. This procedure has been confirmed to induce a positive affective state in rats, and the 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalisations (rat laughter) emitted by animals in response to tickling have been postulated to index positive emotions akin to human joy. During the tickling and handling sessions, the numbers of emitted high-frequency 50-kHz calls were scored. Immediately after tickling or handling, the animals were tested for their responses to a tone of intermediate frequency, and the pattern of their responses to this ambiguous cue was taken as an indicator of the animals' optimism. Our findings indicate that tickling induced positive emotions which are directly indexed in rats by laughter, can make animals more optimistic. We demonstrate for the first time a link between the directly measured positive affective state and decision making under uncertainty in an animal model. We also introduce innovative tandem-approach for studying emotional-cognitive interplay in animals, which may be of great value for understanding the emotional-cognitive changes

  6. Prospective cognition in rats

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to develop animal models of memory are critical for understanding the neural substrate of memory. Memory is essential for daily life and enables information to be stored and retrieved after seconds to years. The ability to remember episodes from the past is thought to be related to the ability to plan for the future. Here we focus on a particular aspect of prospective cognition, namely the ability to remember to take action when a future scenario occurs. This review focuses on a recently developed method to evaluate prospective memory in the rat. Available evidence suggests that rats remember to take action in the future, but little is known about the temporal specificity of such memories or about the flexibility and limitations of prospective memories. Recent studies that suggest that rats remember a specific past episode are reviewed to underscore potential approaches that may be used to explore the range and limits of prospective cognition. The review highlights some directions to explore, including the temporal specificity of prospective cognition, the range of flexibility or creativity within prospective cognition, and the constraints imposed by multiple motivational systems. PMID:23180886

  7. Sertraline delays the somatic growth and reflex ontogeny in neonate rats.

    PubMed

    Deiró, T C B J; Manhães-de-Castro, R; Cabral-Filho, J E; Barreto-Medeiros, J M; Souza, S L; Marinho, S M O C; Castro, F M M; Toscano, A E; Jesus-Deiró, R A; Barros, K M F T

    2006-02-28

    This study investigated the somatic maturation and ontogeny of reflexes in neonate rats treated with sertraline (Sert) during the suckling period. The animals were divided into four groups; three that received daily doses of Sert (5, 10 or 15 mg/kg s.c.; groups Sert5, Sert10, and Sert15, respectively), and a fourth group that received distilled water (Dw) (1 ml/kg/b.w.). Growth indicators (body weight, axis of the head and tail length) were measured daily, from the 1st to the 21st postnatal day. The reflexes (righting, free-fall righting, negative geotaxis, cliff avoidance, auditory startle response, vibrissa placing and palm grasp) and physical-feature maturation (ear unfolding, auditory conduit opening, irruption of the lower incisors and eye opening) were recorded each day of the animal's life. All groups were compared to the Dw group. The body weight gain was reduced in all the Sert groups. Moreover, a delay in the growth of the body length was observed in all the Sert groups. Higher Sert doses reduced the speed of growth in the tail length. The medio-lateral head axis reduced in Sert15 and Sert5 doses. Otherwise, Sert10 had a temporary acceleration in this growth, but the growth of the anteroposterior head axis had a delay in all the Sert groups. The highest doses induced a delay in physical-feature maturation. The palm grasp reflex (disappearance) was retarded in Sert10; cliff avoidance advanced in Sert10; negative-geotaxis and free-fall righting retarded in Sert15. The findings suggest that altered serotonergic system activity induced by sertraline early in life could play a role in the retardation of the somatic growth ontogeny as well as a delay in the maturation of some reflexes.

  8. [Cereal grain preference of rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, P Y

    1990-07-01

    Cereal grains are usually used as the main material for preparing rodenticide baits. However, the preferences for different grains varies according to species and habitats of rats, and locations. A formula accepted at one location may not be suitable in other places, where rats are accustomed to different types of food. It is therefore important to understand the feeding habits of local rat species before implementing a control program. Seven kinds of grains, including hulled rice, corn, barley, wheat, sorghum, pranuts, and sweet potatoes were tested to study the preferences of rats in the laboratory. The results revealed that Bandicota nemorivaga, Rattus losea and R. norvegicus prefer hulled rice; Apodemus agrarius and Mus musculus prefer peanuts, and R. rattus prefers corn. The influence of quality and nutrient contents of baits on the consumption of the rats is also discussed. PMID:2402029

  9. [Cereal grain preference of rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, P Y

    1990-07-01

    Cereal grains are usually used as the main material for preparing rodenticide baits. However, the preferences for different grains varies according to species and habitats of rats, and locations. A formula accepted at one location may not be suitable in other places, where rats are accustomed to different types of food. It is therefore important to understand the feeding habits of local rat species before implementing a control program. Seven kinds of grains, including hulled rice, corn, barley, wheat, sorghum, pranuts, and sweet potatoes were tested to study the preferences of rats in the laboratory. The results revealed that Bandicota nemorivaga, Rattus losea and R. norvegicus prefer hulled rice; Apodemus agrarius and Mus musculus prefer peanuts, and R. rattus prefers corn. The influence of quality and nutrient contents of baits on the consumption of the rats is also discussed.

  10. Nephrotoxicity of ifosfamide in rats.

    PubMed

    Springate, J E; Van Liew, J B

    1995-01-01

    Renal proximal tubule cell injury is an important side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent ifosfamide in humans. We investigated the effect of this medication on kidney function in rats. Animals received either 40 or 80 mg kg(-1) ifosfamide intraperitoneally daily for 3 days every 3 weeks for a total of four treatment courses. Ifosfamide-treated rats had significantly lower body weight and hematocrit than sterile water-treated control rats. Animals receiving 40 mg kg(-1) ifosfamide developed isolated phosphaturia after their fourth and final treatment course. Rats receiving 80 mg kg(-1) ifosfamide had low-grade glucosuria, phosphaturia and proteinuria throughout the study. Urine flow rate, creatinine clearance, urinary sodium and potassium excretion and kidney glutathione and malondialdehyde content were not affected by ifosfamide at either dose. These findings indicate that ifosfamide produces abnormalities in rat renal function resembling subclinical Fanconi syndrome.

  11. War on Rats, 1972 Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    District of Columbia Dept. of Environmental Services, Washington, DC.

    The City of Washington, D.C., with federal funding, declared war on one of the city's most pressing problems--rats. The War on Rats Program, in conjunction with Operation Clean Sweep, made a city-wide survey of rat infestations and recorded the areas of heavy rat infestation. After the problem areas had been identified, community organizations…

  12. Radiation induced heart disease in hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lauk, S.; Trott, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive Wistar rats were given single doses of X rays to their heart. Irradiation decreased the blood pressure before any myocardial radiation damage was apparent. Male rats, which were more hypertensive than female rats, had a shorter survival time after local heart irradiation than female rats. Antihypertensive treatment with hydralazine did not increase the survival time. It is considered that myocardial hypertrophy is the cause of the increased susceptibility of spontaneously hypertensive rats to local heart irradiation.

  13. Histometric evaluation of the healing of the dental alveolus in rats after irradiation with a low-powered GaA1As laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarelli, Rosane F. Z.; Lamano-Carvalho, Tereza L.; Brentegani, Luis G.

    1999-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate histometrically the effect of the irradiation with semiconductor diode GaAlAs 790 nm low-powered laser in the chronology of alveolar repair of rats. Lasers of low intensity possesses an eminently analgesic, anti-inflammatory and bioestimulant effect, producing an increase of the local micro-circulation and in the speed of healing. Groups of five animals had their upper right incisors extracted under anesthesia and the mucous sutured; three groups received 1.5 J/cm2 of irradiation immediately after the extraction with laser for sweeping on the operated area. After that, the animals were sacrificed in the periods of 7, 14 and 21 days after the dental extraction. The material was decalcified and processed for inclusion in paraffin. Longitudinal sections of 7 micrometers in the alveolus were made and stained with HE. The histometric analysis was performed with the Merz grid, and 2000 points were counted in each cervical, middle and apical thirds of the alveolus, assessing the percentage of the bone tissue. The result shows that low-powered intensity laser produced acceleration in osseous formation (10%) in some periods.

  14. Generation of Hprt-disrupted rat through mouse←rat ES chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Isotani, Ayako; Yamagata, Kazuo; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    We established rat embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from a double transgenic rat line which harbours CAG-GFP for ubiquitous expression of GFP in somatic cells and Acr3-EGFP for expression in sperm (green body and green sperm: GBGS rat). By injecting the GBGS rat ES cells into mouse blastocysts and transplanting them into pseudopregnant mice, rat spermatozoa were produced in mouse←rat ES chimeras. Rat spermatozoa from the chimeric testis were able to fertilize eggs by testicular sperm extraction combined with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (TESE-ICSI). In the present paper, we disrupted rat hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (Hprt) gene in ES cells and produced a Hprt-disrupted rat line using the mouse←rat ES chimera system. The mouse←rat ES chimera system demonstrated the dual advantages of space conservation and a clear indication of germ line transmission in knockout rat production. PMID:27062982

  15. Rat myocardial protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Steer, J H; Hopkins, B E

    1981-07-01

    1. Myocardial protein degradation rates were determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated left hemi-atria in vitro. 2. After two 20 min preincubations the rate of tyrosine release from hemi-atria was constant for 4 h. 3. Skeletal muscle protein degradation was determined by following tyrosine release from rat isolated hemi-diaphragm (Fulks, Li & Goldberg, 1975). 4. Insulin (10(-7) M) inhibited tyrosine release from hemi-atria and hemi-diaphragm to a similar extent. A 48 h fast increased tyrosine release rate from hemi-diaphragm and decreased tyrosine release rate from hemi-atria. Hemi-diaphragm tyrosine release was inhibited by 15 mmol/l D-glucose but a variety of concentrations of D-glucose (0, 5, 15 mmol/l) had no effect on tyrosine release from hemi-atria. Five times the normal plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine and valine had no effect on tyrosine release from either hemi-atria or hemi-diaphragm.

  16. Stress-reactive rats (high-avoidance female rats) have a shorter lifespan than stress-nonreactive rats (low-avoidance female rats)

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Ryo; Kumagai, Fumiaki; Marumo, Hideki; Usumi, Kenji; Saito, Yoshiaki; Kuwagata, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Although Hatano high-avoidance and low-avoidance rats (HAA and LAA, respectively) have been selectively bred for good versus poor avoidance learning, HAA rats are known to be more reactive to stress than LAA rats. In this study, HAA and LAA female rats were compared during reproductive aging by observing estrous cycles from 8 to 11 months of age. Furthermore, these rats were allowed to live out their natural lifespans, that is, until 24 months of age, in order to compare their survival and to clarify the relationship between reproductive aging and tumor development. At eight months of age, 2 of 35 HAA rats and 20 of 35 LAA rats had abnormal estrous cycles. The median lifespan of the HAA rats (673 days) was shorter than that of the LAA rats (733 days). The incidence of pituitary neoplasia was higher in the HAA rats than in the LAA rats. These results suggest that HAA female rats (i.e., stress-reactive rats) have a shorter lifespan than LAA female rats (i.e., stress-nonreactive rats) and develop pituitary neoplasia, which was one of the causal factors in their accelerated mortality. However, the onset of an age-matched abnormal cycle did not correspond with their lifespan. PMID:27182111

  17. Effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure of Wi-Fi on development of teeth and changes in teeth element concentration in rats. [corrected].

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Zülfikar Zahit; Kırzıoğlu, Zühal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Özmen, Özlem

    2015-02-01

    The present study determined the effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure to Wi-Fi (2.45 GHz)-induced electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on tooth and surrounding tissue development as well as the element levels in growing rats. Twenty-four rats and their offspring were equally divided into two separate groups identified as experiment and control. The experiment group was exposed to 2.45 GHz EMR for 2 h/day during the periods of pregnancy (21 days) and lactation (21 days). The offspring of these dams were also exposed to EMR up to decapitation. The control group was exposed to cage stress for 2 h per day using the same protocol established for the experimental group. On the 7th, 14th, and 21st days after birth, 8 male offspring rats from each of the two groups were decapitated, and the jaws were taken for histological and immunohistochemical examination. Caspase-3 (1/50 dilution) was used in the immunohistochemical examination for apoptotic activity. On the last day of the experiment, the rats' incisors were also collected. In samples that were histologically and immunohistochemically examined, there was an increase in apoptosis and caspase-3 in both the control and the Wi-Fi groups during the development of the teeth. However, no significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of development and apoptotic activity. Results from the elemental analysis showed that iron and strontium concentrations were increased in the Wi-Fi group, whereas boron, copper, and zinc concentrations were decreased. There were no statistically significant differences in calcium, cadmium, potassium, magnesium, sodium, or phosphorus values between the groups. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations between the experimental and control groups showed that exposure to 2.45 GHz EMR for 2 h per day does not interfere with the development of teeth and surrounding tissues. However, there were alterations in the elemental composition of the teeth, especially

  18. Beta-endorphin in genetically hypoprolactinemic rat: IPL nude rat

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, H.; Sabbagh, I.; Abou-Samra, A.B.; Bertrand, J.

    1986-01-20

    Beta-endorphin has been reported to regulate not only stress- and suckling-induced but also basal prolactin secretion. In the aim to better evaluate the endogenous beta-endorphin-prolactin interrelation, the authors measured beta-endorphin levels in a new rat strain, genetically hypoprolactinemic and characterized by a total lack of lactation: IPL nude rat. Beta-endorphin was measured using a specific anti-h-..beta.. endorphin in plasma and extracts of anterior and neurointermediate lobes of the pituitary, hypothalamus and brain. Pituitary extracts were also chromatographed on Sephadex G50 column. Results obtained showed that in IPL nude females on diestrus and males, the beta-endorphin contents of the neurointermediate lobe was significantly lower than in normal rats, while the values found in the other organs and plasma were similar. However, elution pattern of the anterior pituitary extracts from male rats showed greater immunoactivity eluting as I/sup 125/ h-beta-endorphin than in normal rat; this was not the case for the female rat. These results are consistent with a differential regulation of beta-endorphin levels of anterior and neurointermediate lobe by catecholamines. Moreover they suggest that PRL secretion was more related to neurointermediate beta-endorphin. 40 references, 2 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Hormonal changes in antiorthostatic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, V.; Popovic, P.; Honeycutt, C.

    1982-01-01

    Hypokinesia, especially hypokinesia with negative tilt ('antiorthostatic hypokinesia'), mimics some of the effects of weightlessness. It is shown that cardiac output is increased during early exposure of rats to antiorthostatic hypokinesia. The increase of the stroke volume and of the cardiac output observed in the antiorthostatic hypokinetic rats is probably the consequence of a blood volume shift toward the chest brought forth by head-down positioning of the animals. It is also possible that struggling of the animals to escape from the harness and an increased metabolism contribute to the elevation of cardiac output. In order to study this hypothesis 'stress hormones' were measured in the antiorthostatic rats. Plasma levels of ACTH, corticosterone and prolactin were measured in the arterial blood (0.3 ml) sampled before, during and after hypokinesia from chronic aortic cannulas of the rats.

  20. Autoshaping in micrencephalic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, L.H.; Oakley, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    An autoshaping procedure in which the illumination of a lever was predictive of food reinforcement was used to compare learning in rats with micrencephaly induced by irradiation on the 16th day of gestation and in sham-irradiated controls. Both groups showed equivalent levels of lever-directed activity, and the micrencephalic animals differentiated as well as the control animals between the predictive lever and a nonpredictive lever. The micrencephalic animals were able to redistribute their lever-directed activity when the significance of the levers was reversed and did so more readily than the control animals. Results support the claim that association learning survives either traumatic or developmental neocortical damage and have implications for remedial procedures following both head injury and developmental cerebral pathology in humans.

  1. Do infant rats cry?

    PubMed

    Blumberg, M S; Sokoloff, G

    2001-01-01

    In the current revival of interest in the emotional and mental lives of animals, many investigators have focused attention on mammalian infants that emit distress vocalizations when separated from the home environment. Perhaps the most intensively studied distress vocalization is the ultrasonic vocalization of infant rats. Since its discovery, this vocalization has been interpreted both as a communicatory signal for the elicitation of maternal retrieval and as the manifestation of emotional distress. In contrast, the authors examined the cardiovascular causes and consequences of the vocalization, and on the basis of this work, they hypothesized that the vocalization is the acoustic by-product of the abdominal compression reaction (ACR), a maneuver that results in increased venous return to the heart. Therefore, the vocalization may be analogous to a sneeze, serving a physiological function while incidentally producing sound. PMID:11212634

  2. Signal detection in the rat.

    PubMed

    HACK, M H

    1963-02-22

    An auditory detection experiment was performed with rats as subjects, and the data were analyzed with a signal detection model. Rats were run at fixed sound pressure levels, and their responses were partitioned so that operating characteristics could be constructed. Measures of detectability, (d(e))((1/2)), were calculated from the operating characteristics, and show that (d(e))((1/2)) is a function of sound pressure levels, rising as these levels rise.

  3. Senescence-accelerated OXYS rats

    PubMed Central

    Stefanova, Natalia A; Kozhevnikova, Oyuna S; Vitovtov, Anton O; Maksimova, Kseniya Yi; Logvinov, Sergey V; Rudnitskaya, Ekaterina A; Korbolina, Elena E; Muraleva, Natalia A; Kolosova, Nataliya G

    2014-01-01

    Senescence-accelerated OXYS rats are an experimental model of accelerated aging that was established from Wistar stock via selection for susceptibility to cataractogenic effects of a galactose-rich diet and via subsequent inbreeding of highly susceptible rats. Currently, we have the 102nd generation of OXYS rats with spontaneously developing cataract and accelerated senescence syndrome, which means early development of a phenotype similar to human geriatric disorders, including accelerated brain aging. In recent years, our group found strong evidence that OXYS rats are a promising model for studies of the mechanisms of brain aging and neurodegenerative processes similar to those seen in Alzheimer disease (AD). The manifestation of behavioral alterations and learning and memory deficits develop since the fourth week of age, i.e., simultaneously with first signs of neurodegeneration detectable on magnetic resonance imaging and under a light microscope. In addition, impaired long-term potentiation has been demonstrated in OXYS rats by the age of 3 months. With age, neurodegenerative changes in the brain of OXYS rats become amplified. We have shown that this deterioration happens against the background of overproduction of amyloid precursor protein (AβPP), accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ), and hyperphosphorylation of the tau protein in the hippocampus and cortex. The development of AMD-like retinopathy in OXYS rats is also accompanied by increased accumulation of Aβ in the retina. These published data suggest that the OXYS strain may serve as a spontaneous rat model of AD-like pathology and could help to decipher the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24552807

  4. EXPERIMENTAL PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN PREGNANT RATS.

    PubMed

    Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Cecatto, Vanessa; Biazim, Samia Khalil; Ferreira, José Henrique Fermino; Danielli, Caroline; Genske, Rodrigo Daniel; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira; Franco, Marcello Fabiano de

    2015-12-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. There are few reports in the literature about the disease damages during pregnancy and the consequences to the fetuses and breeding. This study evaluated the implications of PCM during pregnancy on offspring and mothers in Wistar rats. Groups of rats were submitted to systemic Pb infection, by intraperitoneal infusion, and mated 30 days after the infection date. Immediately after birth, rats and neonates were sacrificed to obtain organs for standard histological examination, morphometric analysis, fungi recovery by plating (CFU) and dosing of anti-Pb antibodies by ELISA. There were no stillbirths or miscarriages, however, the fetuses from infected pregnant rats had lower body and organ weight but the fertility rate was 100%. The largest number of CFU was recovered from the organ of pregnant rats, the pathological examination revealed more severe infection in the same group, further on the largest number of granulomas and fungal field. It can be concluded that the PCM was more severe in the group of pregnant rats, with implications to the weight of offspring.

  5. EXPERIMENTAL PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS IN PREGNANT RATS

    PubMed Central

    LOTH, Eduardo Alexandre; CECATTO, Vanessa; BIAZIM, Samia Khalil; FERREIRA, José Henrique Fermino; DANIELLI, Caroline; GENSKE, Rodrigo Daniel; GANDRA, Rinaldo Ferreira; de FRANCO, Marcello Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. There are few reports in the literature about the disease damages during pregnancy and the consequences to the fetuses and breeding. This study evaluated the implications of PCM during pregnancy on offspring and mothers in Wistar rats. Groups of rats were submitted to systemic Pb infection, by intraperitoneal infusion, and mated 30 days after the infection date. Immediately after birth, rats and neonates were sacrificed to obtain organs for standard histological examination, morphometric analysis, fungi recovery by plating (CFU) and dosing of anti-Pb antibodies by ELISA. There were no stillbirths or miscarriages, however, the fetuses from infected pregnant rats had lower body and organ weight but the fertility rate was 100%. The largest number of CFU was recovered from the organ of pregnant rats, the pathological examination revealed more severe infection in the same group, further on the largest number of granulomas and fungal field. It can be concluded that the PCM was more severe in the group of pregnant rats, with implications to the weight of offspring. PMID:27049707

  6. Recovery from changes in the blood and nasal cavity and/or lungs of rats caused by exposure to methanol-fueled engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Maejima, K.; Suzuki, T.; Numata, H.; Maekawa, A.; Nagase, S.; Ishinishi, N. )

    1993-07-01

    One group of male, pathogen-free, Fischer 344 rats was exposed to about 17-fold diluted exhaust generated by an M85 methanol-fueled engine (methanol with 15% gasoline) without catalyst for 8 h, and then the rates of recovery from the resulting increased levels of plasma formaldehyde and carboxyhemoglobin in their erythrocytes were measured. The carboxyhemoglobin level in the erythrocytes was restored within 4 h, whereas the plasma formaldehyde level was still elevated after 4 h but was restored to the normal level within 8 h. No methanol or formic acid was detected in the plasma. Another group of rats was exposed to the same dilution of exhaust for 8 h/d for 7 d, and then the recovery from histopathological damage of the nasal cavity and lungs was also examined. Hyperplasia/squamous metaplasia and erosion of the respiratory epithelium lining the nasoturbinate, maxilloturbinate, or nasal septum, and infiltration of neutrophils into the submucosa at level 1 (level of the posterior edge of the upper incisor teeth) were observed immediately after the exposure period. Lesions of the respiratory epithelium at level 2 (incisive papilla) were less than those at level 1. Slight lesions at levels 1 or 2 were still noticed 1 wk after exposure, but not 4 wk after exposure. Just after exposure, decreases of Clara cells in the terminal bronchiolus and of cilia in the bronchial/bronchiolar epithelium were also observed. Moreover, focal hypertrophy of alveolar walls and increase of macrophages were observed in parts adjacent to respiratory bronchiolus. One week after the exposure period, these changes were no longer seen. These results indicate that changes in the blood and in the nasal cavity and lungs caused by methanol-fueled engine exhaust are reversible. However, complete recovery from damage of the nasal cavity caused by 7-d exposure takes 4 wk, and recovery from elevated plasma formaldehyde and erythrocyte carboxyhemoglobin levels caused by a single 8-h exposure takes 4-8 h.

  7. False Context Fear Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Sarah; Holmes, Nathan M.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Four experiments used rats to study false context fear memories. In Experiment 1, rats were pre-exposed to a distinctive chamber (context A) or to a control environment (context C), shocked after a delay in a second chamber (context B) and tested either in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze just as much as control rats in B but more than control…

  8. Does rat fetal DNA induce preeclampsia in pregnant rats?

    PubMed

    Konečná, B; Borbélyová, V; Celec, P; Vlková, B

    2015-02-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA in maternal circulation is higher during preeclampsia. It is unclear whether it is the cause or the consequence of the disease. The aim of this study was to prove whether injected rat fetal DNA induces preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant Wistar rats. They received daily i.p. injections of water or rat fetal DNA (400 μg) from gestation day 14 to 18. Blood pressure, proteinuria, placental and fetal weight were measured at gestation day 19. Plasma DNase activity, proteinuria and creatinine clearance were assessed. There was no significant difference in any of the measured parameters. The results of this study do not confirm the hypothesis that fetal DNA might induce preeclampsia. This is in contrast to others using human fetal DNA in mice. Further studies should be focused on the effects of fetal DNA from the same species protected from DNase activity.

  9. Prospective memory in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A. George; Crystal, Jonathon D.

    2011-01-01

    The content of prospective memory is comprised of representations of an action to perform in the future. When people form prospective memories, they temporarily put the memory representation in an inactive state while engaging in other activities, and then activate the representation in the future. Ultimately, successful activation of the memory representation yields an action at an appropriate, but temporally distant, time. A hallmark of prospective memory is that activation of the memory representation has a deleterious effect on current ongoing activity. Recent evidence suggests that scrub jays and non-human primates, but not other species, are capable of future planning. We hypothesized that prospective memory produces a selective deficit in performance at the time when rats access a memory representation but not when the memory representation is inactive. Rats were trained in a temporal bisection task (90 min/day). Immediately after the bisection task, half of the rats received an 8-g meal (meal group) and the other rats received no additional food (no-meal group). Sensitivity to time in the bisection task was reduced as the 90-min interval elapsed for the meal group but not for the no-meal group. This time-based prospective-memory effect was not based on response competition, an attentional limit, anticipatory contrast, or fatigue. Our results suggest that rats form prospective memories, which produces a negative side effect on ongoing activity. PMID:21922257

  10. Source memory in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Jonathon D.; Alford, Wesley T.; Zhou, Wenyi; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Source memory is a representation of the origin (source) of information. When source information is bound together, it makes a memory episodic, allowing us to differentiate one event from another [1, 2]. Here we asked if rats remember the source of encoded information. Rats foraged for distinctive flavors of food that replenished (or failed to replenish) at its recently encountered location according to a source-information rule. To predict replenishment, rats needed to remember where they had encountered a preferred food type (chocolate) with self-generated (walking along a runway encountering chocolate) or experimenter-generated (placement of the rat at the chocolate site by an experimenter) cues. Three lines of evidence implicate the presence of source memory. First, rats selectively adjusted revisits to the chocolate location based on source information, under conditions in which familiarity of events could not produce successful performance. Second, source memory was dissociated from location memory by different decay rates. Third, temporary inactivation of the CA3 region of the hippocampus with lidocaine selectively eliminated source memory, suggesting that source memory is dependent upon an intact hippocampus. Development of an animal model of source memory may be valuable to probe the biological underpinnings of memory disorders marked by impairments in source memory. PMID:23394830

  11. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  12. Using rats for vision research.

    PubMed

    Reinagel, P

    2015-06-18

    A wide variety of species are used for the study of visual neuroscience. This is beneficial because fundamental mechanisms and theoretical principles of vision are likely to be highly conserved, while different species exhibit different visual capacities and present different technical advantages for experiments. Eight years ago my laboratory adopted the hooded rat as our primary preparation for vision research. To some this may be surprising, as nocturnal rodents have often been presumed to have poor vision and weak visual behavior. This commentary will provide my personal perspective on how I came to work with rats; discuss an example research project for which rats have been advantageous; and comment on the opportunities and challenges of the preparation.

  13. Rats are sensitive to ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Fast, Cynthia D; Blaisdell, Aaron P

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated response decisions made under conditions of incomplete information in rats. In Experiment 1, rats were trained on either a positive patterning (PP; A-, B-, AB+) or a negative patterning (NP; A+, B+, AB-) instrumental lever-press discrimination. Subjects that had learned an NP discrimination responded less to Cue A when Cue B was covered at test. The cover did not, however, affect test responses to Cue A in the PP condition. In Experiment 2, rats received concurrent training on both PP and NP discriminations. After concurrent training, responses to Cue A were different with B covered versus uncovered for both NP and PP discriminations. We discuss possible accounts for why exposure to a nonlinearly soluble discrimination (NP) may have affected sensitivity to cue ambiguity produced by the cover. These results have interesting implications for representational processes engaged in problem solving.

  14. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  15. Hematopoiesis in antiorthostatic, hypokinesic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, C. D. R.; Johnson, P. C.; Lange, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Rats exposed to antiorthostatic, hypokinesia showed the following effects which are comparable to those seen in man during or after space flight: weight loss, reduced food and water consumption, transient increases in peripheral hematocrit and RBC count, decreasing MCV and reduced reticulocyte count. In addition, the hemoglobin P50 was shifted to the right. A significant shortening of RBC t1/2 was only seen after suspension. Changes in leukocyte and platelet numbers in suspended rats were also comparable to those in man during space flight, but leukocyte PHA sensitivity in rats showed no consistent alteration. The results demonstrate that this model reproduces many of the hematological effects of space flight and has potential as a tool in understanding the hematopoietic response to zero gravity.

  16. Teratology studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Mariline; Allais, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The rat is the rodent species of choice for the regulatory safety testing of xenobiotics, such as medicinal products, food additives, and other chemicals. Many decades of experience and extensive data have accumulated for both general and developmental toxicology investigations in this species. The high fertility and large litter size of the rat are advantages for teratogenicity testing. The study designs are well defined in the regulatory guidelines and are relatively standardized between testing laboratories across the world. Teratology studies address maternal- and embryo-toxicity following exposure during the period of organogenesis. This chapter describes the design and conduct of a teratology study in the rat in compliance with the regulatory guidelines. The procedures for the handling and housing of the pregnant animals, the caesarean examinations and the sampling of fetuses for morphological examinations are described. The utility and design of preliminary studies and the inclusion of satellite animals in the main study for toxicokinetic sampling are discussed.

  17. Swimming-based pica in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2016-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that voluntary or forced running in activity wheels yields pica behavior (kaolin clay intake) in rats (Nakajima, 2016; Nakajima and Katayama, 2014). The present study provides experimental evidence that a single 40-min session of swimming in water also generates pica in rats, while showering rats with water does not produce such behavior. Because kaolin intake has been regarded as a measure of nausea in rats, this finding suggests that swimming activity, as well as voluntary or forced running, induces nausea in rats. PMID:27370361

  18. Susceptibility of laboratory rats against genotypes 1, 3, 4, and rat hepatitis E viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko; Yasuda, Shumpei P; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji

    2013-04-12

    To determine whether or not rats are susceptible to hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, each of group containing three laboratory rats (Wistar) were experimentally inoculated with genotypes 1, 3, 4 and rat HEV by intravenous injection. Serum and stool samples were collected and used to detect HEV RNA and anti-HEV antibodies by RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. The virus infection was monitored up to 3 months after inoculation. None of the serum or stool samples collected from the rats inoculated with G1, G3, or G4 HEV indicated positive sign for virus replication. Although no alteration was observed in ALT level, rat HEV RNA was detected in stools from both of the rats inoculated with rat HEV, and both rats were positive for anti-rat HEV IgG and IgM from 3 weeks after inoculation. These results demonstrated that rats are susceptible to rat HEV but not to G1, G3, and G4 HEV. We also confirm that the nude rats were useful for obtaining a large amount of rat HEV and that the rat HEV was transmitted by the fecal-oral route.

  19. Slc:Wistar outbred rats show close genetic similarity with F344 inbred rats.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Satoshi; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Although Slc:Wistar rats are used widely in biomedical research as outbred rats, close similarities in growth curves, survival rates, and immunological and biochemical phenotypes have been reported between Slc:Wistar and F344 inbred rats. We reported previously that nine genetic variations that were fixed in Slc:Wistar rats had identical genotypes in F344 rats. Here, we examined the genetic characteristics of Slc:Wistar rats using 27 simple-sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) markers and compared them with other Wistar stocks available in Japan and with some F344 strains. Among 27 SSLP loci, 23 (85%) were fixed in the Slc:Wistar rats, which was the highest among the other Wistar stocks. The 23 fixed loci shared identical genotypes with corresponding loci in F344 rats. Further, the predominant allele types in the unfixed loci had allele frequencies as high as 80%, and these alleles were identical in the F344 rats. When the nine genetic variations reported previously are added, a total of 32 (89%) out of the 36 loci examined were fixed and identical in the Slc:Wistar and F344 rat genomes. These findings indicate the low genetic variation in Slc:Wistar rats and the high genetic similarity between the Slc:Wistar and F344 inbred rats. This study demonstrates the importance of characterizing outbred rats and the need to pay ample attention to the genetic characteristics the Slc:Wistar rats for their proper use.

  20. Struvite Urolithiasis in Long-Evans Rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jassia; Borjeson, Tiffany M; Parry, Nicola M A; Fox, James G

    2015-12-01

    Struvite urinary calculi, which are composed of magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate, can cause complications including sepsis and renal failure. Struvite calculi were identified within the urinary bladder and renal pelvis of 2 Long-Evans rats that died within days after arrival from a commercial vendor. The remaining rats in the shipment were screened by physical examination, radiography, and ultrasonography, revealing an additional 2 animals that were clinically affected. These rats were euthanized, necropsied, and yielded similar findings to those from the first 2 rats. In addition, urine samples had an alkaline pH and contained numerous bacteria (predominantly Proteus mirabilis), leukocytes, and crystals. All calculi were composed completely of struvite. Another 7 rats in the shipment had alkaline urine with the presence of blood cells; 6 of these rats also had abundant struvite crystals, and P. mirabilis was cultured from the urine of 3 rats. Further investigation by the vendor identified 2 of 100 rats with struvite calculi from the same colony. Although no specific cause could be implicated, the fact that all the affected rats came from the same breeding area suggests a genetic or environmental triggering event; a contribution due to diet cannot be ruled out. Our findings suggest that the affected rats had metabolic disturbances coupled with bacterial infection that predisposed them to develop struvite calculi. During sudden increases of struvite urinary calculi cases in rats, urine cultures followed by appropriate surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy is warranted. Additional factors, including diet, merit attention as well. PMID:26678365