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Sample records for rat median nerve

  1. Does Pulsed Magnetic Field Therapy Influence Nerve Regeneration in the Median Nerve Model of the Rat?

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Smeets, Ralf; Becker, Stephan T.; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pulsed magnetic field therapy on peripheral nerve regeneration after median nerve injury and primary coaptation in the rat. Both median nerves were surgically exposed and denervated in 24 female Wistar rats. A microsurgical coaptation was performed on the right side, whereas on the left side a spontaneous healing was prevented. The study group underwent a daily pulsed magnetic field therapy; the other group served as a control group. The grasping force was recorded 2 weeks after the surgical intervention for a period of 12 weeks. The right median nerve was excised and histologically examined. The histomorphometric data and the functional assessments were analyzed by t-test statistics and one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA indicated a statistically significant influence of group affiliation and grasping force (P = 0.0078). Grasping strength was higher on a significant level in the experimental group compared to the control group permanently from the 9th week to the end of the study. T-test statistics revealed a significantly higher weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle (P = 0.0385) in the experimental group. The histological evaluation did not reveal any statistically significant differences concerning the histomorphometric parameters. Our results suggest that the pulsed magnetic field therapy has a positive influence on the functional aspects of neural regeneration. More studies are needed to precisely evaluate and optimize the intensity and duration of the application. PMID:25143937

  2. Median Nerve Trauma in a Rat Model of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorder

    PubMed Central

    CLARK, BRIAN D.; BARR, ANN E.; SAFADI, FAYEZ F.; BEITMAN, LISA; AL-SHATTI, TALAL; AMIN, MAMTA; GAUGHAN, JOHN P.; BARBE, MARY F.

    2006-01-01

    Anatomical and physiological changes were evaluated in the median nerves of rats trained to perform repetitive reaching. Motor degradation was evident after 4 weeks. ED1-immunoreactive macrophages were seen in the transcarpal region of the median nerve of both forelimbs by 5–6 weeks. Fibrosis, characterized by increased immunoexpression of collagen type I by 8 weeks and connective tissue growth factor by 12 weeks, was evident. The conduction velocity (NCV) within the carpal tunnel showed a modest but significant decline after 9–12 weeks. The lowest NCV values were found in animals that refused to participate in the task for the full time available. Thus, both anatomical and physiological signs of progressive tissue damage were present in this model. These results, together with other recent findings indicate that work-related carpal tunnel syndrome develops through mechanisms that include injury, inflammation, fibrosis and subsequent nerve compression. PMID:12908929

  3. Prenatal exposure of diclofenac sodium affects morphology but not axon number of the median nerve of rats.

    PubMed

    Ayrancı, Ebru; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Aktaş, Abit; Rağbetli, Murat Ç; Kaplan, Suleyman

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of DS exposure on median nerve development in rats during prenatal life. Pregnant female rats were divided into three groups: a control group, a saline group and a DS group. Offspring of these animals were divided into 2 subgroups: 4 weeks old and 20 weeks old. Nerve samples were taken from the right legs and evaluated using stereological techniques in terms of the axon number, axon cross-sectional area, and myelin thickness. No drug-dependent macroscopic abnormality was observed in the nerve. No differences were noted for axon number in the control, saline, and DS groups of the same age and gender. No gender difference was found for axon number or axon area between the other matched groups. In conclusion, prenatal exposure to diclofenac sodium does not affect axon number in rats, but can alter the morphology of the male and female median nerve. PMID:23553140

  4. Five Roots Pattern of Median Nerve Formation.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Paraskevas, George; Tzika, Maria

    2016-01-01

    An unusual combination of median nerve's variations has been encountered in a male cadaver during routine educational dissection. In particular, the median nerve was formed by five roots; three roots originated from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus joined individually the median nerve's medial root. The latter (fourth) root was united with the lateral (fifth) root of the median nerve forming the median nerve distally in the upper arm and not the axilla as usually. In addition, the median nerve was situated medial to the brachial artery. We review comprehensively the relevant variants, their embryologic development and their potential clinical applications. PMID:27131354

  5. Low Median Nerve Transfers (Opponensplasty).

    PubMed

    Chadderdon, Robert Christopher; Gaston, R Glenn

    2016-08-01

    Opposition is the placement of the thumb opposite the fingers into a position from which it can work. This motion requires thumb palmar abduction, flexion, and pronation, which are provided by the abductor pollicis brevis, flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), and opponens pollicis. In the setting of a median nerve palsy, this function is typically lost, although anatomic variations and the dual innervation of the FPB may prevent complete loss at times. There are multiple well described and accepted tendon transfers to restore opposition, none of which have been proven to be superior to the others. PMID:27387078

  6. Anomalous median nerve associated with persistent median artery.

    PubMed Central

    Sañudo, J R; Chikwe, J; Evans, S E

    1994-01-01

    A right human forearm showed persistence of the median artery in combination with anomalies of the median nerve and of the palmar circulation. The median nerve formed a ring enclosing the median artery, gave off its 3rd palmar digital branch in the forearm, and had a high palmar cutaneous nerve origin and a double thenar supply. The superficial palmar arch was incomplete. The median artery extended into the hand, providing the 2nd common palmar digital artery and the artery to the radial side of the index finger. It anastomosed with the radial artery in the 1st web space. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7961153

  7. Effects of local lidocaine treatment before and after median nerve injury on mechanical hypersensitivity and microglia activation in rat cuneate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Chang; Yeh, Jiann-Horng; Chen, Chih-Li; Chou, Shiu-Huey; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2011-04-01

    This study examined the relationship between microglia activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) and behavioral hypersensitivity after chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the median nerve. We also investigated effects of local lidocaine pre- and post-treatment on microglia activation and development of hypersensitivity in this model. By immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, little immunoreactivity of OX-42, a microglia activation marker, was detected in the CN of normal rats. As early as 1 day after CCI, there was a significant increase in OX-42 immunoreactivity in the lesion side of CN, which reached a maximum at 14 days. Microinjection of minocycline, a microglia activation inhibitor, into the CN 1 day after CCI attenuated injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the animals received 1%, 2% or 5% lidocaine 15 min prior to median nerve CCI (pre-treatment), 5h (early post-treatment) or 1 day (late post-treatment) after median nerve CCI. Pre-treatment and early post-treatment with 2% and 5% lidocaine, but not 1% lidocaine, attenuated OX-42 immunoreactivity and behavioral hypersensitivity following median nerve injury. Late post-treatment with 1%, 2%, or 5% lidocaine failed to decrease OX-42 immunoreactivity and mechanical hypersensitivity in CCI rats. In conclusion, median nerve injury-induced microglia activation in the CN modulated development of behavioral hypersensitivity. High-concentration lidocaine was effective in decreasing microglia activation in the CN and in attenuating neuropathic pain sensations at the early stage following nerve injury, when microglia had not yet been activated.

  8. Intraneural Venous Malformations of the Median Nerve

    PubMed Central

    González Rodríguez, Alba; Midón Míguez, José

    2016-01-01

    Venous malformations arising from the peripheral nerve are a rare type of vascular malformation. We present the first case of an intraneural venous malformation of the median nerve to be reported in a child and review the previous two cases of median nerve compression due to a venous malformation that have been reported. These cases presented with painless masses in the volar aspect of the wrist or with symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Clinical suspicion should lead to the use of Doppler ultrasonography as the first-line diagnostic tool. Magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology can confirm the diagnosis, as phleboliths are pathognomonic of venous malformations. Surgical treatment appears to be the only modality capable of successfully controlling the growth of an intraneural malformation. Sclerotherapy and radiotherapy have never been used to treat this type of malformation. PMID:27462571

  9. Median Nerve Conduction in Healthy Nigerians: Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Owolabi, LF; Adebisi, SS; Danborno, BS; Buraimoh, AA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Because of lack of local normative data, electrodiagnostic laboratories in Nigeria apply standard values generated in the USA and Europe to diagnose different median nerve abnormalities. Aim: To develop normative values for motor and sensory median nerve conduction studies (NCSs) in Nigerian population. Subjects and Methods: In a cross-sectional study design, a total of 200 healthy volunteers were selected after clinical evaluation to exclude systemic or neuromuscular disorders. NCS of the median nerves was conducted on all the healthy volunteers according to a standardized protocol. The data included in the final analysis were amplitude, latency, and nerve conduction velocity. Ethical approval was obtained for the study. Results: The reference range for median nerve (motor) velocity, distal latency, and amplitude were 49.48–66.92, 1.95–4.52, and 4.3–11.3, respectively. The reference range for median nerve F-wave latency was 44.8–70.5. The reference range for median nerve (sensory) velocity, distal latency, and amplitude were 44.8–70.5, 1.98–4.52, and 16.6–58.4, respectively. Conclusion: Reference values for the nerve conduction parameters of the median (motor and sensory) in the study population were similar to those obtained in the literature. PMID:27213090

  10. Median nerve (anatomical variations) and carpal tunel syndrome - revisited.

    PubMed

    Mizia, Ewa; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Depukat, Pawel; Klimek-Piotrowska, Wieslawa; Pasternak, Artur; Mroz, Izabela; Bonczar, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome belongs to the most common causative factors of surgical interventions in the wrist region. Anatomy of carpal tunnel and median nerve is a subject of current revision. Authors paid attention to etiology of the syndrome based on review of literature and their own anatomical studies. They remind basic knowledge on the median nerve and indicate that only based on number of dissections a good orthopedic surgeon may acquire experience necessary to perform procedures in a most appropriate way.

  11. Myofibroma in the Palm Presenting with Median Nerve Compression Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Sarkozy, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Summary: A myofibroma is a benign proliferation of myofibroblasts in the connective tissue. Solitary myofibromas are a rare finding especially in an adult. We report a case of a 23-year-old man presenting with an enlarging mass over his right palm. The patient is an active weight lifter. He reported numbness and tingling in the median nerve distribution. Nerve conduction studies and magnetic resonance imaging scans suggested a tumor involving or compressing the median nerve. The final diagnosis of myofibroma was made only after the histopathological diagnosis. PMID:25426387

  12. Usefulness of additional measurements of the median nerve with ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Claes, F; Meulstee, J; Claessen-Oude Luttikhuis, T T M; Huygen, P L M; Verhagen, W I M

    2010-12-01

    High resolution sonography is a relatively new diagnostic technique in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Normal values in different studies, however, vary and this makes their practical use difficult. The aim of this study was to establish normal values for the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) and to investigate the value of measuring additional parameters. Ninety-eight wrists of 29 women and 25 men without signs or symptoms of CTS were included. Width and circumference of the wrist were measured. The CSA of the median nerve at the level of the pisiform bone was measured using ultrasonography. We found a significant correlation between the CSA of the median nerve at the wrist and wrist circumference. Measuring wrist circumference will establish the upper level of normal more accurately compared to predictions solely based upon gender. This has important implications in diagnosing CTS with ultrasonography. PMID:20429021

  13. Fascicular Topography of the Human Median Nerve for Neuroprosthetic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Badia, Jordi; Pascual-Font, Arán; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    One of the most sought-after applications of neuroengineering is the communication between the arm and an artificial prosthetic device for the replacement of an amputated hand or the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. For that, an electrode is placed around or inside the median nerve to serve as interface for recording and stimulation of nerve signals coming from the fascicles that innervate the muscles responsible for hand movements. Due to the lack of a standard procedure, the electrode implantation by the surgeon is strongly based on intuition, which may result in poor performance of the neuroprosthesis because of the suboptimal location of the neural interface. To provide morphological data that can aid the neuroprosthetic surgeon with this procedure, we investigated the fascicular topography of the human median nerve along the forearm and upper arm. We first performed a description of the fascicular content and branching patterns along the length of the arm. Next we built a 3D reconstruction of the median nerve so we could analyze the fascicle morphological features in relation to the arm level. Finally, we characterized the motor content of the median nerve fascicles in the upper arm. Collectively, these results indicate that fascicular organization occurs in a short segment distal to the epicondyles and remains unaltered until the muscular branches leave the main trunk. Based on our results, overall recommendations based on electrode type and implant location can be drawn to help and aid the neuroprosthetic procedure. Invasive interfaces would be more convenient for the upper arm and the most proximal third of the forearm. Epineural electrodes seem to be most suitable for the forearm segment after fascicles have been divided from the main trunk. PMID:27445660

  14. Fascicular Topography of the Human Median Nerve for Neuroprosthetic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Martínez, Ignacio; Badia, Jordi; Pascual-Font, Arán; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Navarro, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    One of the most sought-after applications of neuroengineering is the communication between the arm and an artificial prosthetic device for the replacement of an amputated hand or the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. For that, an electrode is placed around or inside the median nerve to serve as interface for recording and stimulation of nerve signals coming from the fascicles that innervate the muscles responsible for hand movements. Due to the lack of a standard procedure, the electrode implantation by the surgeon is strongly based on intuition, which may result in poor performance of the neuroprosthesis because of the suboptimal location of the neural interface. To provide morphological data that can aid the neuroprosthetic surgeon with this procedure, we investigated the fascicular topography of the human median nerve along the forearm and upper arm. We first performed a description of the fascicular content and branching patterns along the length of the arm. Next we built a 3D reconstruction of the median nerve so we could analyze the fascicle morphological features in relation to the arm level. Finally, we characterized the motor content of the median nerve fascicles in the upper arm. Collectively, these results indicate that fascicular organization occurs in a short segment distal to the epicondyles and remains unaltered until the muscular branches leave the main trunk. Based on our results, overall recommendations based on electrode type and implant location can be drawn to help and aid the neuroprosthetic procedure. Invasive interfaces would be more convenient for the upper arm and the most proximal third of the forearm. Epineural electrodes seem to be most suitable for the forearm segment after fascicles have been divided from the main trunk. PMID:27445660

  15. Tendon Transfers Part II: Transfers for Ulnar Nerve Palsy and Median Nerve Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Sammer, Douglas M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives After reading this article (part II of II), the participant should be able to: 1. Describe the anatomy and function of the median and ulnar nerves in the forearm and hand. 2. Describe the clinical deficits associated with injury to each nerve. 3. Describe the indications, benefits, and drawbacks for various tendon transfer procedures used to treat median and ulnar nerve palsy.4. Describe the treatment of combined nerve injuries. 5. Describe postoperative care and possible complications associated with these tendon transfer procedures. Summary This article discusses the use of tendon transfer procedures for treatment of median and ulnar nerve palsy as well as combined nerve palsies. Postoperative management and potential complications are also discussed. PMID:19730287

  16. Inter-hemispheric plasticity in patients with median nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Fornander, Lotta; Nyman, Torbjörn; Hansson, Thomas; Brismar, Tom; Engström, Maria

    2016-08-15

    Peripheral nerve injuries result in reorganization within the contralateral hemisphere. Furthermore, recent animal and human studies have suggested that the plastic changes in response to peripheral nerve injury also include several areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The objective of this study was to map the inter-hemispheric plasticity in response to median nerve injury, to investigate normal differences in contra- and ipsilateral activation, and to study the impact of event-related or blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design on ipsilateral activation. Four patients with median nerve injury at the wrist (injured and epineurally sutured >2 years earlier) and ten healthy volunteers were included. 3T fMRI was used to map the hemodynamic response to brain activity during tactile stimulation of the fingers, and a laterality index (LI) was calculated. Stimulation of Digits II-III of the injured hand resulted in a reduction in contralateral activation in the somatosensory area SI. Patients had a lower LI (0.21±0.15) compared to healthy controls (0.60±0.26) indicating greater ipsilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The spatial dispersion of the coordinates for areas SI and SII was larger in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hemisphere in the healthy controls, and was increased in the contralateral hemisphere of the patients compared to the healthy controls. There was no difference in LI between the event-related and blocked paradigms. In conclusion, patients with median nerve injury have increased ipsilateral SI area activation, and spatially more dispersed contralateral SI activation during tactile stimulation of their injured hand. In normal subjects ipsilateral activation has larger spatial distribution than the contralateral. Previous findings in patients performed with the blocked fMRI paradigm were confirmed. The increase in ipsilateral SI activation may be due to an interhemispheric disinhibition associated with

  17. Schwannoma of the Median Nerve at Mid Forearm Level

    PubMed Central

    Dusad, Tarun; Meena, D.S.; Saini, Narendra; Sharma, Yogesh; Khurana, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Schwannomas are also known as neurilemmoma that usually originate from Schwann cells located in the peripheral nerve sheaths. It usually occurs in the age group of 20 to 70 years. These are the commonest tumors of the peripheral nerves, 5% of which occur in the adults and 19% of the tumors occur in upper extremities. Schwannomas are generally presented as an asymptomatic mass. Discomfort may be the only presenting complaint of the patient. Paresthesia may be elicited on tapping the swelling. Magnetic resonanceimaging, and ultrasound are helpful in the diagnosis. Surgical removal is usually curative. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old male came to our hospital for a lump located at the volar side of the right mid forearm for 10 years with discomfort and paresthesia in median nerve distribution of hand which appeared in last two years. Total excision was performed for the lesion. Histopathological examination of the mass revealed typical features of schwannoma. At two months follow-up, the patient was symptom free with mild paresthesia in his index and middle fingers. Conclusion: Benign tumours involving peripheral nerves of the upper extremity are uncommon. Schwannomas are theoretically removable because they repulse fascicular groups without penetrating them, thus allowing their enucleation while preserving nerve continuity, as reported in our patient.

  18. Morphologic Characterization of Intraneural Flow Associated With Median Nerve Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Kevin D.; Volz, Kevin R.; Hutmire, Cristina; Roll, Shawn C.

    2013-01-01

    A prospective cohort of 47 symptomatic patients who reported for nerve conduction studies and 44 asymptomatic controls was examined with sonography to evaluate the median nerve. Doppler studies of the median nerve were collected with handheld sonography equipment and a 12-MHz linear broadband transducer. Strict inclusion criteria were established for assessing 435 waveforms from 166 wrists. Two sonographers agreed that 245 waveforms met the a priori criteria and analyzed the corresponding data. Spectral Doppler waveforms provided direct quantitative and qualitative data for comparison with indirect provocative testing results. These Doppler data were compared between the recruitment groups. No statistical difference existed in waveforms between the groups (P < .05). Trending of the overall data indicated that as the number of positive provocative tests increased, the mean peak systolic velocity within the carpal tunnel (mid) also increased, whereas the proximal mean peak systolic velocity decreased. However, by using multiple provocative tests as an indirect comparative measure, researchers may find mean peak spectral velocity at the carpal tunnel inlet a helpful direct measure in identifying patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:23772421

  19. Peripheral nerve lipoma: Case report of an intraneural lipoma of the median nerve and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Alisson Roberto; Finger, Guilherme; Schuster, Marcelo N.; Gobbato, Pedro Luis

    2016-01-01

    Adipose lesions rarely affect the peripheral nerves. This can occur in two different ways: Direct compression by an extraneural lipoma, or by a lipoma originated from the adipose cells located inside the nerve. Since its first description, many terms have been used in the literature to mention intraneural lipomatous lesions. In this article, the authors report a case of a 62-year-old female who presented with an intraneural median nerve lipoma and review the literature concerning the classification of adipose lesions of the nerve, radiological diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27695575

  20. Peripheral nerve lipoma: Case report of an intraneural lipoma of the median nerve and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Alisson Roberto; Finger, Guilherme; Schuster, Marcelo N.; Gobbato, Pedro Luis

    2016-01-01

    Adipose lesions rarely affect the peripheral nerves. This can occur in two different ways: Direct compression by an extraneural lipoma, or by a lipoma originated from the adipose cells located inside the nerve. Since its first description, many terms have been used in the literature to mention intraneural lipomatous lesions. In this article, the authors report a case of a 62-year-old female who presented with an intraneural median nerve lipoma and review the literature concerning the classification of adipose lesions of the nerve, radiological diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Morphometric studies of the muscular branch of the median nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Gabrielli, C; Pardi, P

    1996-01-01

    The branch from the median nerve to the thenar muscles has a proximal and lateral (recurrent) course and is vulnerable to lesions that affect these muscles. Because of its anatomical-clinical importance, this branch was studied in 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals of both sexes, aged between 23 and 77 y. It arose from the lateral branch of the median nerve in 83.3% of the cases. Its origin was distal to the flexor retinaculum in 48.3%, at the distal margin of the retinaculum in 31.6%, in the carpal tunnel in 18.3% and proximal to the retinaculum in 1.7%; it pierced the retinaculum in 15%. The point of recurrence of the branch was localised topographically to 34.6 +/- 3.6 mm from the distal wrist crease; the angle between its recurrent course and the longitudinal axis of the hand averaged 66.8 degrees. In 50% of the cases the muscular branch innervated abductor pollicis brevis (APB), opponens pollicis (OP) and the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), in 40% it supplied only APB and OP, and in 10% a short muscular branch gave rise to independent branches in the palm and which supplied APB, OP and the superficial head of FPB. The so called "accessory thenar branch' was found in 38.3%. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8886966

  2. Assessment of Median Nerve Mobility by Ultrasound Dynamic Imaging for Diagnosing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Tzung; Lee, Ming-Ru; Liao, Yin-Yin; Chen, Jiann-Perng; Hsu, Yen-Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral neuropathy and is characterized by median nerve entrapment at the wrist and the resulting median nerve dysfunction. CTS is diagnosed clinically as the gold standard and confirmed with nerve conduction studies (NCS). Complementing NCS, ultrasound imaging could provide additional anatomical information on pathological and motion changes of the median nerve. The purpose of this study was to estimate the transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements by analyzing ultrasound dynamic images to distinguish between normal subjects and CTS patients. Transverse ultrasound images were acquired, and a speckle-tracking algorithm was used to determine the lateral displacements of the median nerve in radial-ulnar plane in B-mode images utilizing the multilevel block-sum pyramid algorithm and averaging. All of the averaged lateral displacements at separate acquisition times within a single flexion-extension cycle were accumulated to obtain the cumulative lateral displacements, which were curve-fitted with a second-order polynomial function. The fitted curve was regarded as the transverse sliding pattern of the median nerve. The R2 value, curvature, and amplitude of the fitted curves were computed to evaluate the goodness, variation and maximum value of the fit, respectively. Box plots, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and a fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm were utilized for statistical analysis. The transverse sliding of the median nerve during finger movements was greater and had a steeper fitted curve in the normal subjects than in the patients with mild or severe CTS. The temporal changes in transverse sliding of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel were found to be correlated with the presence of CTS and its severity. The representative transverse sliding patterns of the median nerve during finger movements were demonstrated to be useful for quantitatively estimating

  3. Anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel: a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Civelek, Erdinc; Cansever, Tufan; Kabatas, Serdar; Yilmaz, Cem

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common focal peripheral neuropathy. Increased pressure in the carpal tunnel results in median nerve compression and impaired nerve perfusion, leading to discomfort and paresthesia in the affected hand. Surgical division of the transverse carpal ligament is preferred in severe cases of CTS and should be considered when conservative measures fail. A through knowledge of the normal and variant anatomy of the median nerve in the wrist is fundamental in avoiding complications during carpal tunnel release. This paper aims to briefly review the anatomic variations of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel and its implications in carpal tunnel surgery.

  4. Differential Diagnosis and Intervention of Proximal Median Nerve Entrapment: A Resident's Case Problem.

    PubMed

    Bair, Marcus R; Gross, Michael T; Cooke, Jennifer R; Hill, Carla H

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Resident's case problem. Background Entrapment neuropathies represent a diagnostic challenge and require a comprehensive understanding of the nerve's path and the anatomical structures that may cause compression of the nerve. This resident's case problem details the evaluation and differential diagnosis process for median nerve entrapment resulting from forceful and repetitive pronation/supination motions. Diagnosis Median nerve compression syndromes include pronator syndrome, anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome. A cluster of clinical special tests were performed to determine the anatomical site of median nerve entrapment. Based on the patient's history and clinical test results, a diagnosis of pronator syndrome was determined. Provocation testing specific to pronator syndrome assisted with further localizing the site of entrapment to the pronator teres muscle, which guided effective management strategies. Discussion This resident's case problem illustrates the importance of detailed anatomical knowledge and a differential diagnostic process when evaluating a patient with signs and symptoms of an entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve. Electrodiagnostic studies are useful in ruling out carpal tunnel and anterior interosseous nerve syndromes, but are often inconclusive in cases of pronator syndrome. Therefore, a diagnosis of pronator syndrome in this case problem was based on a detailed understanding of median nerve anatomy, potential sites of compression, and unique clinical features associated with this condition. Level of Evidence Differential diagnosis, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):800-808. Epub 5 Aug 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6723. PMID:27494058

  5. Development of Kinematic Graphs of Median Nerve during Active Finger Motion: Implications of Smartphone Use

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Certain hand activities cause deformation and displacement of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel due to the gliding motion of tendons surrounding it. As smartphone usage escalates, this raises the public’s concern whether hand activities while using smartphones can lead to median nerve problems. Objective The aims of this study were to 1) develop kinematic graphs and 2) investigate the associated deformation and rotational information of median nerve in the carpal tunnel during hand activities. Methods Dominant wrists of 30 young adults were examined with ultrasonography by placing a transducer transversely on their wrist crease. Ultrasound video clips were recorded when the subject performing 1) thumb opposition with the wrist in neutral position, 2) thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation and 3) pinch grip with the wrist in neutral position. Six still images that were separated by 0.2-second intervals were then captured from the ultrasound video for the determination of 1) cross-sectional area (CSA), 2) flattening ratio (FR), 3) rotational displacement (RD) and 4) translational displacement (TD) of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and these collected information of deformation, rotational and displacement of median nerve were compared between 1) two successive time points during a single hand activity and 2) different hand motions at the same time point. Finally, kinematic graphs were constructed to demonstrate the mobility of median nerve during different hand activities. Results Performing different hand activities during this study led to a gradual reduction in CSA of the median nerve, with thumb opposition together with the wrist in ulnar deviation causing the greatest extent of deformation of the median nerve. Thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation also led to the largest extent of TD when compared to the other two hand activities of this study. Kinematic graphs showed that the motion pathways of median nerve during

  6. Neuroma-in-continuity of the median nerve managed by nerve expansion and direct suture with vein conduit.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, J; Raimbeau, G; Rabarin, F; Fouque, P A; Saint-Cast, Y; Césari, B; Bigorre, N

    2014-06-01

    Autologous nerve grafting is the current standard for bridging large gaps in major sensory and motor nerves. It allows both function and pain improvement with predictable results. Clinical observations of nerve elongation caused by tumours have prompted experimental animal studies of induced gradual elongation of the nerve stump proximal to the gap. This technique allows direct suturing of the two nerve ends to bridge the gap. Here, we describe a case of neuroma-in-continuity of the median nerve managed by resection and direct suture after nerve elongation with a tissue expander. We are not aware of similar reported cases. Secondary repair 3 years after the initial injury improved the pain and hypersensitivity and restored a modest degree of protective sensory function (grade S1).

  7. Ultrasonographic reference sizes of the median and ulnar nerves and the cervical nerve roots in healthy Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Mukai, Tomoya; Ueno, Hiroki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify, for practical use, ultrasonographic reference values for nerve sizes at multiple sites, including entrapment and non-entrapment sites along the median and ulnar nerves and among the cervical nerve roots. We verified reliable sites and site-based differences between the reference values. In addition, we found associations between the reference nerve sizes and several physical characteristics (gender, dominant hand, age, height, weight, body mass index [BMI] and wrist circumference). Nerves were measured bilaterally at 26 sites or levels in 60 healthy Japanese adults (29 males; age, 35.4 ± 9.7 y; BMI, 22.3 ± 3.6 kg/m(2); wrist circumference, 16.0 ± 1.3 cm on the right side and 15.9 ± 1.2 cm on the left side). The mean reference nerve sizes were 5.6-9.1 mm(2) along the median nerve, 4.1-6.7 mm(2) along the ulnar nerve and 2.14-3.39 mm among the cervical nerve roots. Multifactorial regression analyses revealed that the physical characteristics most strongly associated with nerve size were age, BMI and wrist circumference at the entrapment sites (F = 7.6, p < 0.01, at the pisiform bone level of the carpal tunnel; F = 15.1, p < 0.001, at the level of Guyon's canal), as well as wrist circumference and gender at the non-entrapment sites (F = 70.6, p < 0.001, along the median nerve; F = 24.7, p < 0.001, along the ulnar nerve). Our results suggest that the factors with the greatest influence on nerve size differed between entrapment and non-entrapment sites. Site-based differences in nerve size were determined using one-way analyses of variance (p < 0.001). Intra- and inter-observer reliability was highest for the median nerve, at both the distal wrist crease and mid-humerus; at the arterial split along the ulnar nerve; and at the fifth cervical nerve root level. No systematic error was indicated by Bland-Altman analysis; the coefficients of variation were 5.5%-9.2% for intra-observer reliability and 7.1%-8.7% for inter

  8. Ultrasonographic reference sizes of the median and ulnar nerves and the cervical nerve roots in healthy Japanese adults.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takamichi; Ochi, Kazuhide; Hosomi, Naohisa; Mukai, Tomoya; Ueno, Hiroki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Toshiho; Kohriyama, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify, for practical use, ultrasonographic reference values for nerve sizes at multiple sites, including entrapment and non-entrapment sites along the median and ulnar nerves and among the cervical nerve roots. We verified reliable sites and site-based differences between the reference values. In addition, we found associations between the reference nerve sizes and several physical characteristics (gender, dominant hand, age, height, weight, body mass index [BMI] and wrist circumference). Nerves were measured bilaterally at 26 sites or levels in 60 healthy Japanese adults (29 males; age, 35.4 ± 9.7 y; BMI, 22.3 ± 3.6 kg/m(2); wrist circumference, 16.0 ± 1.3 cm on the right side and 15.9 ± 1.2 cm on the left side). The mean reference nerve sizes were 5.6-9.1 mm(2) along the median nerve, 4.1-6.7 mm(2) along the ulnar nerve and 2.14-3.39 mm among the cervical nerve roots. Multifactorial regression analyses revealed that the physical characteristics most strongly associated with nerve size were age, BMI and wrist circumference at the entrapment sites (F = 7.6, p < 0.01, at the pisiform bone level of the carpal tunnel; F = 15.1, p < 0.001, at the level of Guyon's canal), as well as wrist circumference and gender at the non-entrapment sites (F = 70.6, p < 0.001, along the median nerve; F = 24.7, p < 0.001, along the ulnar nerve). Our results suggest that the factors with the greatest influence on nerve size differed between entrapment and non-entrapment sites. Site-based differences in nerve size were determined using one-way analyses of variance (p < 0.001). Intra- and inter-observer reliability was highest for the median nerve, at both the distal wrist crease and mid-humerus; at the arterial split along the ulnar nerve; and at the fifth cervical nerve root level. No systematic error was indicated by Bland-Altman analysis; the coefficients of variation were 5.5%-9.2% for intra-observer reliability and 7.1%-8.7% for inter

  9. Anatomic variation--a bony canal for the median nerve at the distal humerus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kazuki, Kenichi; Egi, Takeshi; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Takaoka, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    We report a rare anatomic variation in which the median nerve travels in a bony canal of the distal humerus, separating from the brachial artery. We encountered this during neurolysis for posttraumatic median nerve palsy in a 10-year-old boy. We suggest that this anatomic variation was related strongly to this patient's median nerve palsy.

  10. Sleep Deprivation Aggravates Median Nerve Injury-Induced Neuropathic Pain and Enhances Microglial Activation by Suppressing Melatonin Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chiang, Rayleigh Ping-Ying; Chen, Chih-Li; Tsai, Yi-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep deprivation is common in patients with neuropathic pain, but the effect of sleep deprivation on pathological pain remains uncertain. This study investigated whether sleep deprivation aggravates neuropathic symptoms and enhances microglial activation in the cuneate nucleus (CN) in a median nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) model. Also, we assessed if melatonin supplements during the sleep deprived period attenuates these effects. Design: Rats were subjected to sleep deprivation for 3 days by the disc-on-water method either before or after CCI. In the melatonin treatment group, CCI rats received melatonin supplements at doses of 37.5, 75, 150, or 300 mg/kg during sleep deprivation. Melatonin was administered at 23:00 once a day. Participants: Male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 180-250 g (n = 190), were used. Measurements: Seven days after CCI, behavioral testing was conducted, and immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for qualitative and quantitative analyses of microglial activation and measurements of proinflammatory cytokines. Results: In rats who underwent post-CCI sleep deprivation, microglia were more profoundly activated and neuropathic pain was worse than those receiving pre-CCI sleep deprivation. During the sleep deprived period, serum melatonin levels were low over the 24-h period. Administration of melatonin to CCI rats with sleep deprivation significantly attenuated activation of microglia and development of neuropathic pain, and markedly decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation makes rats more vulnerable to nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain, probably because of associated lower melatonin levels. Melatonin supplements to restore a circadian variation in melatonin concentrations during the sleep deprived period could alleviate nerve injury-induced behavioral hypersensitivity. Citation: Huang CT, Chiang RP, Chen CL, Tsai YJ. Sleep

  11. In-continuity neuroma of the median nerve at the elbow.

    PubMed

    Alessandrino, Francesco; Pagani, C; Draghi, F

    2014-09-01

    Neuromas are a hyperplastic disorganised proliferation of cells that represent an attempt at nerve regeneration after trauma. They can be classified into terminal and in-continuity neuromas; the latter are observed when the nerve stumps are both connected. We present here the case of a 46-year-old male who sustained a deep cut at the volar aspect of the right elbow while repairing a glass. The injury caused partial transection of the median nerve, which was initially unrecognised. After several months, the patient presented pain at the volar aspect of the elbow, worsening with manual compression at the site of previous injury. Ultrasound showed an in-continuity neuroma with a hypoechoic and enlarged median nerve at the site of the sutured wound. The case report shows that ultrasound may be helpful in confirming the clinical diagnosis of neuroma and that it is useful to evaluate the percentage of the area affected by the lesion.

  12. Importance of tissue morphology relative to patient reports of symptoms and functional limitations resulting from median nerve pathology.

    PubMed

    Roll, Shawn C; Evans, Kevin D; Li, Xiaobai; Sommerich, Carolyn M; Case-Smith, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Significant data exist for the personal, environmental, and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome. Few data, however, explain the interrelationship of tissue morphology to these factors among patients with clinical presentation of median nerve pathology. Therefore, our primary objective was to examine the relationship of various risk factors that may be predictive of subjective reports of symptoms or functional deficits accounting for median nerve morphology. Using diagnostic ultrasonography, we observed real-time median nerve morphology among 88 participants with varying reports of symptoms or functional limitations resulting from median nerve pathology. Body mass index, educational level, and nerve morphology were the primary predictive factors. Monitoring median nerve morphology with ultrasonography may provide valuable information for clinicians treating patients with symptoms of median nerve pathology. Sonographic measurements may be a useful clinical tool for improving treatment planning and provision, documenting patient status, or measuring clinical outcomes of prevention and rehabilitation interventions. PMID:23245784

  13. A rare anatomical variant of the thenar branch discovered during open decompression of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Vinding, Mads T; Tarnowski, Jan R; Benyahia, Mostafa

    2010-12-01

    We describe a rare anatomical variant of the thenar branch of the median nerve during open release of the carpal tunnel. The thenar branch originated from the ulnar side of the median nerve and traversed supraligamentously close to the top of the transverse ligament. A high resolution clinical photograph shows the relation between the anatomical structures when the thenar variant is present in the carpal tunnel. This is one of the dangers faced by surgeons when doing open or endoscopic release of the carpal tunnel.

  14. Cadaveric Study of Anatomic Far Distal Musculocutaneous and Median Nerve Communication.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Namath S

    2016-01-01

    One of the more commonly reported variations in musculocutaneous and median nerves is a communication between the two. Such communications have been noted in the literature for well over a century, and numerous studies have attempted to quantify their rate of incidence and classify their different patterns. Most communications occur close to the brachial plexus in the proximal arm; communications distal to the musculocutaneous nerve perforation of the coracobrachialis have been reported with less frequency, and several rare and unique communication patterns have been reported as case studies. This paper describes a case of a communicating branch between the musculocutaneous and median nerves, distal to the origin of the brachialis muscle. This communication was found during a routine educational dissection and is closer to the level of the elbow than previously documented communications that are distal to the musculocutaneous perforation of the coracobrachialis. Identification and documentation of the variety of musculocutaneous and median nerve communications is relevant to clinical diagnosis of peripheral nerve pathologies, as well as for planning surgical approaches and procedures. PMID:27433406

  15. Cadaveric Study of Anatomic Far Distal Musculocutaneous and Median Nerve Communication.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Namath S

    2016-06-02

    One of the more commonly reported variations in musculocutaneous and median nerves is a communication between the two. Such communications have been noted in the literature for well over a century, and numerous studies have attempted to quantify their rate of incidence and classify their different patterns. Most communications occur close to the brachial plexus in the proximal arm; communications distal to the musculocutaneous nerve perforation of the coracobrachialis have been reported with less frequency, and several rare and unique communication patterns have been reported as case studies. This paper describes a case of a communicating branch between the musculocutaneous and median nerves, distal to the origin of the brachialis muscle. This communication was found during a routine educational dissection and is closer to the level of the elbow than previously documented communications that are distal to the musculocutaneous perforation of the coracobrachialis. Identification and documentation of the variety of musculocutaneous and median nerve communications is relevant to clinical diagnosis of peripheral nerve pathologies, as well as for planning surgical approaches and procedures.

  16. Reliability of automatic vibratory equipment for ultrasonic strain measurement of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yuichi; Ishii, Tomoo; Etou, Fumihiko; Sakai, Shinsuke; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to test the reliability of ultrasonic median nerve strain measurements using automatic vibratory equipment. Strain ratios of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel model and the reference coupler were measured at three different settings of the transducer: 0, +2 and +4 mm (+ = compressing the model down 2-4 mm initially). After measurement of the carpal tunnel model, a +4-mm setting was chosen for in vivo measurement. The median nerve strains of 30 wrists were measured by two examiners using the equipment. Intra- and inter-examiner correlation coefficients (CCs) for the strain ratios were calculated. The closest ratio was found in the +4-mm placement (strain ratio: 0.73, Young's modulus ratio: 0.79). The intra-examiner CC was 0.91 (p < 0.01), and the inter-examiner CCs were 0.72-0.78 (p < 0.01). The automatic vibratory equipment was useful in quantifying median nerve strain at the wrist.

  17. Effect of Wrist Angle on Median Nerve Appearance at the Proximal Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension. PMID:25658422

  18. Effect of wrist angle on median nerve appearance at the proximal carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Muraki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of wrist angle, sex, and handedness on the changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameters, namely longitudinal diameter (D1) and vertical diameter (D2). Ultrasound examination was conducted to examine the median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel in both dominant and nondominant hands of men (n = 27) and women (n = 26). A total of seven wrist angles were examined: neutral; 15°, 30°, and 45° extension; and 15°, 30°, and 45° flexion. Our results indicated sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry of MNCSA, D1 and D2 measurements. MNCSA was significantly reduced when the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions. At flexion positions, D1 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In contrast, at extension positions, D2 was significantly smaller than that at neutral. In conclusion, this study showed that MNCSA decreased as the wrist angle changed from neutral to flexion or extension positions in both dominant and nondominant hands of both sexes, whereas deformation of the median nerve differed between wrist flexion and extension.

  19. Structural changes of the carpal tunnel, median nerve and flexor tendons in MRI before and after endoscopic carpal tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Momose, Toshimitsu; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kobayashi, Seneki; Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the structural changes of the carpal tunnel, median nerve, and flexor tendons in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR). We studied 36 hands undergoing ECTR. In MRI, the cross-sectional area of the carpal tunnel and the median nerve at the hamate and the pisiform levels were measured. The distance from the volar side of carpal bone to the median nerve or tendons and the volar displacement were measured. In post-operative MRI, the transverse carpal ligament could not be well delineated and the carpal tunnel was significantly enlarged both at the hamate and pisiform levels. The median nerve was enlarged at the hamate level. The median nerve and flexor tendons significantly moved to the volar side. The volar displacement of the median nerve and flexor digitorum superficialis in the long and ring fingers was greater than the other tendons.

  20. A study of the sympathetic skin response and sensory nerve action potential after median and ulnar nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, M; Ghavanini, M R; Rahimi, H R; Raissi, G R

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare SSR with sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) responses in regeneration of injured peripheral nerves after nerve repair. We studied 10 male patients with a mean age of 26.7 years. All the patients had complete laceration of median or ulnar nerves. The patients were followed up at least for six months. SSR and SNAP assessment were performed every one to two months. Normal hands were used as controls. SSR was positive after 15.8 +/- 9.4 weeks (mean +/- 2 SD) and SNAP after 27.8 +/- 12.9 weeks (mean +/- 2 SD). The difference was statistically significant (P value < 0.001). This can be due to more rapid growth of sympathetic unmyelinated fibers relative to sensory myelinated fibers. This study also shows that recovery of the sudomotor activity following nerve repair is satisfactory in general and SSR can be used as a useful and sensitive method in the evaluation of sudomotor nerve regeneration.

  1. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Tamara L; Evans, Peter J; Seitz, William H; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 min of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve's circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1234-1240, 2016.

  2. Recurrent Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Median Nerve: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Jayakrishnan, K N; Acharya, A M

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve in a 39 year old lady with multiple local recurrences over thirteen years with no distant metastasis. The diagnosis of biphasic type of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. At the time of the fourth recurrence below elbow amputation was performed. This case is being reported for its rarity and propensity for local recurrence without distant metastasis. PMID:27595961

  3. Recurrent Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Median Nerve: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Jayakrishnan, K N; Acharya, A M

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve in a 39 year old lady with multiple local recurrences over thirteen years with no distant metastasis. The diagnosis of biphasic type of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. At the time of the fourth recurrence below elbow amputation was performed. This case is being reported for its rarity and propensity for local recurrence without distant metastasis.

  4. Carpal arch and median nerve changes during radioulnar wrist compression in carpal tunnel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the morphological changes of the carpal arch and median nerve during the application of radiounlarly directed compressive force across the wrist in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. Radioulnar compressive forces of 10 N and 20 N were applied at the distal level of the carpal tunnel in 10 female patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Immediately prior to force application and after 3 minutes of application, ultrasound images of the distal carpal tunnel were obtained. It was found that applying force across the wrist decreased the carpal arch width (p < 0.001) and resulted in increased carpal arch height (p < 0.01), increased carpal arch curvature (p < 0.001), and increased radial distribution of the carpal arch area (p < 0.05). It was also shown that wrist compression reduced the flattening of the median nerve, as indicated by changes in the nerve’s circularity and flattening ratio (p < 0.001). Statement of clinical significance This study demonstrated that the carpal arch can be non-invasively augmented by applying compressive force across the wrist, and that this strategy may decompress the median nerve providing symptom relief to patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:26662276

  5. Effects of grip force on median nerve deformation at different wrist angles.

    PubMed

    Loh, Ping Yeap; Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of grip on changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameter in the radial-ulnar direction (D1) and dorsal-palmar direction (D2) at three wrist angles. Twenty-nine healthy participants (19 men [mean age, 24.2 ± 1.6 years]; 10 women [mean age, 24.0 ± 1.6 years]) were recruited. The median nerve was examined at the proximal carpal tunnel region in three grip conditions, namely finger relaxation, unclenched fist, and clenched fist. Ultrasound examinations were performed in the neutral wrist position (0°), at 30°wrist flexion, and at 30°wrist extension for both wrists. The grip condition and wrist angle showed significant main effects (p < 0.01) on the changes in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. Furthermore, significant interactions (p < 0.01) were found between the grip condition and wrist angle for the MNCSA, D1, and D2. In the neutral wrist position (0°), significant reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2 were observed when finger relaxation changed to unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Clenched fist condition caused the highest deformations in the median nerve measurements (MNCSA, approximately -25%; D1, -13%; D2, -12%). The MNCSA was significantly lower at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension than in the neutral wrist position (0°) at unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Notably, clenched fist condition at 30°wrist flexion showed the highest reduction of the MNCSA (-29%). In addition, 30°wrist flexion resulted in a lower D1 at clenched fist condition. In contrast, 30°wrist extension resulted in a lower D2 at both unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Our results suggest that unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions cause reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. More importantly, unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension can lead to further deformation of the median nerve. PMID:27688983

  6. Effects of grip force on median nerve deformation at different wrist angles

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of grip on changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameter in the radial-ulnar direction (D1) and dorsal-palmar direction (D2) at three wrist angles. Twenty-nine healthy participants (19 men [mean age, 24.2 ± 1.6 years]; 10 women [mean age, 24.0 ± 1.6 years]) were recruited. The median nerve was examined at the proximal carpal tunnel region in three grip conditions, namely finger relaxation, unclenched fist, and clenched fist. Ultrasound examinations were performed in the neutral wrist position (0°), at 30°wrist flexion, and at 30°wrist extension for both wrists. The grip condition and wrist angle showed significant main effects (p < 0.01) on the changes in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. Furthermore, significant interactions (p < 0.01) were found between the grip condition and wrist angle for the MNCSA, D1, and D2. In the neutral wrist position (0°), significant reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2 were observed when finger relaxation changed to unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Clenched fist condition caused the highest deformations in the median nerve measurements (MNCSA, approximately −25%; D1, −13%; D2, −12%). The MNCSA was significantly lower at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension than in the neutral wrist position (0°) at unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Notably, clenched fist condition at 30°wrist flexion showed the highest reduction of the MNCSA (−29%). In addition, 30°wrist flexion resulted in a lower D1 at clenched fist condition. In contrast, 30°wrist extension resulted in a lower D2 at both unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Our results suggest that unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions cause reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. More importantly, unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension can lead to further deformation of the median nerve. PMID:27688983

  7. Effects of grip force on median nerve deformation at different wrist angles

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroki; Muraki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of grip on changes in the median nerve cross-sectional area (MNCSA) and median nerve diameter in the radial-ulnar direction (D1) and dorsal-palmar direction (D2) at three wrist angles. Twenty-nine healthy participants (19 men [mean age, 24.2 ± 1.6 years]; 10 women [mean age, 24.0 ± 1.6 years]) were recruited. The median nerve was examined at the proximal carpal tunnel region in three grip conditions, namely finger relaxation, unclenched fist, and clenched fist. Ultrasound examinations were performed in the neutral wrist position (0°), at 30°wrist flexion, and at 30°wrist extension for both wrists. The grip condition and wrist angle showed significant main effects (p < 0.01) on the changes in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. Furthermore, significant interactions (p < 0.01) were found between the grip condition and wrist angle for the MNCSA, D1, and D2. In the neutral wrist position (0°), significant reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2 were observed when finger relaxation changed to unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Clenched fist condition caused the highest deformations in the median nerve measurements (MNCSA, approximately −25%; D1, −13%; D2, −12%). The MNCSA was significantly lower at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension than in the neutral wrist position (0°) at unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Notably, clenched fist condition at 30°wrist flexion showed the highest reduction of the MNCSA (−29%). In addition, 30°wrist flexion resulted in a lower D1 at clenched fist condition. In contrast, 30°wrist extension resulted in a lower D2 at both unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions. Our results suggest that unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions cause reductions in the MNCSA, D1, and D2. More importantly, unclenched fist and clenched fist conditions at 30°wrist flexion and 30°wrist extension can lead to further deformation of the median nerve.

  8. Enhancement of median nerve regeneration by mesenchymal stem cells engraftment in an absorbable conduit: improvement of peripheral nerve morphology with enlargement of somatosensory cortical representation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Julia T; Bittencourt-Navarrete, Ruben Ernesto; de Almeida, Fernanda M; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Martinez, Ana Maria B; Franca, João G

    2014-01-01

    We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN), 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL) conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1), electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in three groups: MN Intact (n = 4), PCL-Only (n = 3), and PCL+MSC (n = 3). Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group) or without (PCL-Only group) injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to five animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383 ± 390 fibers; 2.3 mm(2), respectively) than the PCL-Only group (2,226 ± 575 fibers; 1.6 mm(2)). In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN.

  9. Enhancement of median nerve regeneration by mesenchymal stem cells engraftment in an absorbable conduit: improvement of peripheral nerve morphology with enlargement of somatosensory cortical representation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Julia T.; Bittencourt-Navarrete, Ruben Ernesto; de Almeida, Fernanda M.; Tonda-Turo, Chiara; Martinez, Ana Maria B.; Franca, João G.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the morphology and the cortical representation of the median nerve (MN), 10 weeks after a transection immediately followed by treatment with tubulization using a polycaprolactone (PCL) conduit with or without bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplant. In order to characterize the cutaneous representation of MN inputs in primary somatosensory cortex (S1), electrophysiological cortical mapping of the somatosensory representation of the forepaw and adjacent body parts was performed after acute lesion of all brachial plexus nerves, except for the MN. This was performed in ten adult male Wistar rats randomly assigned in three groups: MN Intact (n = 4), PCL-Only (n = 3), and PCL+MSC (n = 3). Ten weeks before mapping procedures in animals from PCL-Only and PCL+MSC groups, animal were subjected to MN transection with removal of a 4-mm-long segment, immediately followed by suturing a PCL conduit to the nerve stumps with (PCL+MSC group) or without (PCL-Only group) injection of MSC into the conduit. After mapping the representation of the MN in S1, animals had a segment of the regenerated nerve processed for light and transmission electron microscopy. For histomorphometric analysis of the nerve segment, sample size was increased to five animals per experimental group. The PCL+MSC group presented a higher number of myelinated fibers and a larger cortical representation of MN inputs in S1 (3,383 ± 390 fibers; 2.3 mm2, respectively) than the PCL-Only group (2,226 ± 575 fibers; 1.6 mm2). In conclusion, MSC-based therapy associated with PCL conduits can improve MN regeneration. This treatment seems to rescue the nerve representation in S1, thus minimizing the stabilization of new representations of adjacent body parts in regions previously responsive to the MN. PMID:25360086

  10. In-continuity neuroma of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Depaoli, R; Coscia, D R; Alessandrino, F

    2015-03-01

    Iatrogenic injuries of the median nerve after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome resulting in the formation of a neuroma are rare. We present here the case of two patients, one with a bifid median nerve, showing in-continuity neuroma after surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome. The patients reported persistent post-operative pain and showing symptoms. In both cases, ultrasound showed an in-continuity neuroma with a hypoechoic and enlarged median nerve at the carpal tunnel. The case report shows that ultrasound may be helpful in confirming the clinical diagnosis of neuroma and it is useful for evaluation of the percentage of the area affected by the tear.

  11. Median Nerve Somatosensory Evoked Potential in HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Boostani, Reza; Poorzahed, Ali; Ahmadi, Zahra; Mellat, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HTLV-I Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive Myelopathy that mainly involves the corticospinal tract. Despite pronounced involvement of the lower limbs, patients also have abnormalities in their upper limbs. So, we studied somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) of the median nerve in HAM/TSP patients to determine the extent of the involvement of the pathway of the central nervous system, especially the cervical spinal cord. Methods In this cross sectional study, 48 patients with HAM/TSP who were referred to Qaem Hospital in Mashhad from October 2010 to October 2011 were evaluated for various indices, including SSEPs of the median nerve for N9, N11, N13, and N20 waveforms and also N11–13 and N13–20 Inter Peak Latency (IPL), severity of disease (based on Osama criteria), disease duration (less or more than 2 years), age, and gender. SPSS software was used for data analysis. The t-test was used for quantitative data, and the chi-squared test was used for the qualitative variables. Results Thirty-four patients (70.2%) were females. The mean age was 45.6 ± 14.2 years. About SSEPs indices of the median nerve, N9 and N11 were normal in all patients, but N13 (50%), N20 (16.7%), IPL11–13 (58.3%), and IPL13–20 (22.9%) were abnormal. No significant relationships were found between age, gender, disease duration, and SSEPs indices (p > 0.05), but IPL11–13 and IPL13–20 had significant relationships with disease disability (p = 0.017 and p = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Despite the lack of obvious complaints of upper limbs, SSEPs indices of the median nerve from the cervical spinal cord to the cortex were abnormal, which indicated extension of the lesion from the thoracic spinal cord up to the cervical spinal cord and thalamocortical pathways. Also, abnormalities in the cervical spinal cord had a direct correlation with the severity of disability in patients with HAM/TSP. PMID:27382445

  12. Acute effects of neural mobilization and infrared on the mechanics of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Monara Kedma; Fontenele dos Santos, Gabrielly; Martins e Silva, Diandra Caroline; Mota de Freitas, Ana Cláudia; Henriques, Isadora Ferreira; Andrade, Peterson Marco; Machado, Dionis de Castro; Teixeira, Silmar; Neves, Marco Orsini; Dias, Gildário; Silva-Júnior, Fernando; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the acute effects of infrared and neural mobilization on the median nerve on the range of elbow extension of the dominant limb. [Subjects and Methods] Forty participants from university, neurologically asymptomatic, 12 males and 28 females (22.8 ± 1.9 years), were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1 (control) rested for 25 minutes in the supine position; Group 2 received the specific neural mobilization for the median nerve; Group 3 received an application of infrared for 15 minutes on the forearm; Group 4 received the same application of infrared followed by neural mobilization. The goniometric parameters of elbow extension were evaluated after the intervention. [Results] Significant differences of extension value were observed between Group 1 and Group 3 (15.75 degrees), and between Group 1 and Group 4 (14.60 degrees), and the average higher in Group 3 (26.35 degrees). [Conclusion] This research provides new experimental evidence that NM in relation to superficial heat produces an immediate effect on elbow range of motion versus NM isolated. PMID:27390402

  13. Median and anterior interosseous nerve entrapment syndromes versus carpal tunnel syndrome: a study of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Tchoryk, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Two patients presented with forearm and hand pain, and were initially examined by their medical doctors. The first case was diagnosed as a possible neuralgia due to congenital cervical spinal fusion. The second case had a radiographic study taken of the elbow and hand, which was negative and therefore no conclusive diagnosis or treatment was given. This article will discuss the anatomical path of the median and anterior interosseous nerves in the forearm, the possible areas of neural entrapment or irritation and the resulting symptoms and signs as compared to carpal tunnel syndrome. The patient’s presenting symptoms were found to be the most significant detail when differentiating the type of neurological entrapment. In both cases, the patients presented with a gradual progression of anterior forearm pain, numbness or discomfort that radiated to the hand and fingers. To find the cause of this repetitive type of irritation, the functional movement patterns of the upper extremity kinetic chain was assessed including the cervicothoracic and scapulothoracic regions. Provocative tests were used to confirm the site of irritation. The first case showed pronator quadratus weakness. The second patient’s symptoms were reproduced with resisted elbow flexion and pronation while digital pressure was applied to the median nerve. Acute care was directed at the specific area of irritation/inflammation with electrotherapeusis. The treatment also consisted of spinal and joint manipulation, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques, strengthening and endurance rehabilitation exercises aimed at restoring the proper kinematics of the upper extremity

  14. [Bilateral reversed palmaris longus muscle--a rare cause of peripheral median nerve compression syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Giunta, R; Brunner, U; Wilhelm, K

    1993-10-01

    A rare case of median nerve compression syndrome outside the carpal tunnel in the distal forearm is reported. A 21-year-old man suffered while working from symptoms of temporary median nerve compression in both forearms; this was caused by hypertrophy of reversed palmaris longus muscles. Resection of the abnormal muscle bellies relieved the symptoms immediately. Only ten similar cases have been reported in the literature, and this is the first case with bilateral symptoms.

  15. Pressure Monitoring of Intraneural an Perineural Injections Into the Median, Radial, and Ulnar Nerves; Lessons From a Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Andrzej; Szarko, Matthew; Vala, Arber; De Andres, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nerve damage after regional anesthesia has been of great concern to anesthetists. Various modalities have been suggested to recognize and prevent its incidence. An understudied area is the measurement of intraneural pressure during peripheral nerve blockade. Previous investigations have produced contradicting results with only one study being conducted on human cadavers. Objectives: The purpose of this investigation was to systematically record intraneural and perineural injection pressures on the median, ulnar, and radial nerves exclusively as a primary outcome. Materials and Methods: Ultrasonography-guided injections of 1 mL of 0.9% NaCl over ten seconds were performed on phenol glycerine embalmed cadaveric median, ulnar, and radial nerves. A total of 60 injections were performed, 30 intraneural and 30 perineural injections. The injections pressure was measured using a controlled disc stimulation device. Anatomic dissection was used to confirm needle placement. Results: Intraneural needle placement produced significantly greater pressures than perineural injections did. The mean generated pressures in median, radial, and ulnar nerves were respectively 29.4 ± 9.3, 27.3 ± 8.5, and 17.9 ± 7.0 pound per square inch (psi) (1 psi = 51.7 mmHg) for the intraneural injections and respectively 7.2 ± 2.5, 8.3 ± 2.5, and 6.7 ± 1.8 psi for perineural injections. Additionally the intraneural injection pressures of the ulnar nerve were lower than those of the median and radial nerves. Conclusions: Obtained results demonstrate significant differences between intraneural and perineural injection pressures in the median, ulnar, and radial nerves. Intraneural injection pressures show low specificity but high sensitivity suggesting that pressure monitoring might be a valuable tool in improving the safety and efficacy of peripheral nerve blockade in regional anesthesia. Peripheral nerves “pressure mapping” hypothetically might show difference amongst various

  16. A Human Hair Keratin Hydrogel Scaffold Enhances Median Nerve Regeneration in Nonhuman Primates: An Electrophysiological and Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Lauren A.; Plate, Johannes F.; Mannava, Sandeep; Barnwell, Jonathan C.; Koman, L. Andrew; Li, Zhongyu; Smith, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    A human hair keratin biomaterial hydrogel scaffold was evaluated as a nerve conduit luminal filler following median nerve transection injury in 10 Macaca fascicularis nonhuman primates (NHP). A 1 cm nerve gap was grafted with a NeuraGen® collagen conduit filled with either saline or keratin hydrogel and nerve regeneration was evaluated by electrophysiology for a period of 12 months. The keratin hydrogel-grafted nerves showed significant improvement in return of compound motor action potential (CMAP) latency and recovery of baseline nerve conduction velocity (NCV) compared with the saline-treated nerves. Histological evaluation was performed on retrieved median nerves and abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscles at 12 months. Nerve histomorphometry showed a significantly larger nerve area in the keratin group compared with the saline group and the keratin APB muscles had a significantly higher myofiber density than the saline group. This is the first published study to show that an acellular biomaterial hydrogel conduit filler can be used to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration and motor recovery in an NHP model. PMID:24083825

  17. A widely displaced Galeazzi-equivalent lesion with median nerve compromise.

    PubMed

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil; Fu, Katherine

    2012-08-18

    We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a right distal radial fracture accompanied by a severely displaced complete distal ulnar physeal separation and associated median nerve compromise. This injury is known as Galeazzi-equivalent lesion in children and is an extremely rare injury associated with growth arrest. Recognition of the lesion can be difficult but wide displacement may be associated with other significant injuries such as neurovascular compromise. Prompt intervention reversed the neurological symptoms. At 10-month postoperation there was neither growth arrest nor loss of motion. Complete separation of the ulna physis remains often because of soft tissue interposition or capsule problems and prompt reduction is recommended in the literature as a priority.

  18. Distribution patterns of the muscular branch of the median nerve in the thenar region.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Del Sol, M; Sarmento, A; Gabrielli, C

    1995-01-01

    Studies on the distribution patterns of the muscular branch of the median nerve to the thenar muscles are scarce. Available accounts give only general descriptions. To establish the distribution pattern more precisely, we dissected 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals, ranging in age from 23 to 77 y. The distribution pattern of the muscular branch was classified into 3 types. In 50% of subjects there were branches to the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and opponens pollicis (OP) (type I). In 40% there were branches only to APB and OP (type II). In the remainder (type III) the muscular branch provided independent branches to APB, OP and FPB, to APB and OP, or to APB and FPB, after dividing precociously. Types I and II were further subdivided according to the site, direction and number of the individual branches. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7649846

  19. Pre and postoperative median nerve conduction in patients with pituitary tumour.

    PubMed

    Verma, A K; Mahapatra, A K

    1994-07-01

    A study of median nerve sensory conduction at the wrist was performed in 34 patients with pituitary adenomas prior to and following surgery. In 31 patients this was done bilaterally. They included 11 patients with acromegalic features, 3 of whom had features of carpal tunnel syndrome. Six out of 11 (55%) acromegalics had abnormal latencies and conduction velocities pre-operatively. Among the remaining patients only 3 had conduction delay pre-operatively. Postoperative improvement in conduction velocity and latency was recorded in 24 patients although significant improvement was observed in only 13 patients. All 3 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome had significant improvement in conduction velocities and latencies following the surgery. There was no definite relationship between conduction velocity and the pre-operative hormonal profile.

  20. A widely displaced Galeazzi-equivalent lesion with median nerve compromise

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Ilias; Fogg, Quentin; Ashwood, Neil; Fu, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a right distal radial fracture accompanied by a severely displaced complete distal ulnar physeal separation and associated median nerve compromise. This injury is known as Galeazzi-equivalent lesion in children and is an extremely rare injury associated with growth arrest. Recognition of the lesion can be difficult but wide displacement may be associated with other significant injuries such as neurovascular compromise. Prompt intervention reversed the neurological symptoms. At 10-month postoperation there was neither growth arrest nor loss of motion. Complete separation of the ulna physis remains often because of soft tissue interposition or capsule problems and prompt reduction is recommended in the literature as a priority. PMID:22907852

  1. Mechanisms responsible for the effect of median nerve electrical stimulation on traumatic brain injury-induced coma: orexin-A-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhen; Du, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the median nerve is a noninvasive technique that facilitates awakening from coma. In rats with traumatic brain injury-induced coma, median nerve stimulation markedly enhances prefrontal cortex expression of orexin-A and its receptor, orexin receptor 1. To further understand the mechanism underlying wakefulness mediated by electrical stimulation of the median nerve, we evaluated its effects on the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 in the prefrontal cortex in rat models of traumatic brain injury-induced coma, using immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. In rats with traumatic brain injury, NR1 expression increased with time after injury. Rats that underwent electrical stimulation of the median nerve (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0 mA for 15 minutes) showed elevated NR1 expression and greater recovery of consciousness than those without stimulation. These effects were reduced by intracerebroventricular injection of the orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation of the median nerve promotes recovery from traumatic brain injury-induced coma by increasing prefrontal cortex NR1 expression via an orexin-A-mediated pathway. PMID:27482224

  2. Mechanisms responsible for the effect of median nerve electrical stimulation on traumatic brain injury-induced coma: orexin-A-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhen; Du, Qing

    2016-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of the median nerve is a noninvasive technique that facilitates awakening from coma. In rats with traumatic brain injury-induced coma, median nerve stimulation markedly enhances prefrontal cortex expression of orexin-A and its receptor, orexin receptor 1. To further understand the mechanism underlying wakefulness mediated by electrical stimulation of the median nerve, we evaluated its effects on the expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR1 in the prefrontal cortex in rat models of traumatic brain injury-induced coma, using immunohistochemistry and western blot assays. In rats with traumatic brain injury, NR1 expression increased with time after injury. Rats that underwent electrical stimulation of the median nerve (30 Hz, 0.5 ms, 1.0 mA for 15 minutes) showed elevated NR1 expression and greater recovery of consciousness than those without stimulation. These effects were reduced by intracerebroventricular injection of the orexin receptor 1 antagonist SB334867. Our results indicate that electrical stimulation of the median nerve promotes recovery from traumatic brain injury-induced coma by increasing prefrontal cortex NR1 expression via an orexin-A-mediated pathway. PMID:27482224

  3. Transverse ultrasound assessment of median nerve deformation and displacement in the human carpal tunnel during wrist movements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexiang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Passe, Sandra M; Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, a compression neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, are aggravated by wrist motion, but the effect of these motions on median nerve motion are unknown. To better understand the biomechanics of the abnormal nerve, it is first necessary to understand normal nerve movement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deformation and displacement of the normal median nerve at the proximal carpal tunnel level on transverse ultrasound images during different wrist movements, to have a baseline for comparison with abnormal movements. Dynamic ultrasound images of both wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were obtained during wrist maximal flexion, extension and ulnar deviation. To simplify the analysis, the initial and final shape and position of the median nerve were measured and analyzed. The circularity of the median nerve was significantly increased and the aspect ratio and perimeter were significantly decreased in the final image compared with the first image during wrist flexion with finger extension, wrist flexion with finger flexion and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (p < 0.01). There were significant differences in median nerve displacement vector between finger flexion, wrist flexion with finger extension and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (all p's < 0.001). The mean amplitudes of median nerve motion in wrist flexion with finger extension (2.36 ± 0.79 normalized units [NU]), wrist flexion with finger flexion (2.46 ± 0.84 NU) and wrist ulnar deviation with finger extension (2.86 ± 0.51 NU) were higher than those in finger flexion (0.82 ± 0.33 NU), wrist extension with finger extension (0.77 ± 0.46 NU) and wrist extension with finger flexion (0.81 ± 0.58 NU) (p < 0.0001). In the normal carpal tunnel, wrist flexion and ulnar deviation could induce significant transverse displacement and deformation of the median nerve.

  4. Apparent Transverse Compressive Material Properties of the Digital Flexor Tendons and the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Main, Erin K; Goetz, Jessica E; Rudert, M James; Goreham-Voss, Curtis M; Brown, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a frequently encountered peripheral nerve disorder caused by mechanical insult to the median nerve, which may in part be a result of impingement by the adjacent digital flexor tendons. Realistic finite element (FE) analysis to determine contact stresses between the flexor tendons and median nerve depends upon the use of physiologically accurate material properties. To assess the transverse compressive properties of the digital flexor tendons and median nerve, these tissues from ten cadaveric forearm specimens were compressed transversely while under axial load. The experimental compression data were used in conjunction with an FE-based optimization routine to determine apparent hyperelastic coefficients (μ and α) for a first-order Ogden material property definition. The mean coefficient pairs were μ=35.3kPa, α =8.5 for the superficial tendons, μ=39.4kPa, α=9.2 for the deep tendons, μ=24.9kPa, α=10.9 for the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon, and μ=12.9kPa, α=6.5 for the median nerve. These mean Ogden coefficients indicate that the FPL tendon was more compliant at low strains than either the deep or superficial flexor tendons, and that there was no significant difference between superficial and deep flexor tendon compressive behavior. The median nerve was significantly more compliant than any of the flexor tendons. The material properties determined in this study can be used to better understand the functional mechanics of the carpal tunnel soft tissues and possible mechanisms of median nerve compressive insult, which may lead to the onset of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:21194695

  5. Improving the radial nerve neurodynamic test: An observation of tension of the radial, median and ulnar nerves during upper limb positioning.

    PubMed

    Manvell, Joshua J; Manvell, Nicole; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Reid, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    The radial nerve neurodynamic test (ULNT2b), used to implicate symptoms arising from the radial nerve, is proposed to selectively increase strain of the nerve without increasing strain of adjacent tissue, though this has not been established. This study aimed to determine the upper limb position that results in: (1) the greatest tension of the radial nerve and (2) the greatest difference in tension between the radial nerve and the other two major nerves of the upper limb: median and ulnar. Tension (N) of the radial, median and ulnar nerves was measured simultaneously using three buckle force transducers during seven upper limb positions in the axilla of ten embalmed whole body human cadavers (n = 20 limbs). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc tests determined differences in tension between nerves and between limb positions. A Composite position consisting of ULNT2b (scapular depression, shoulder internal rotation, elbow extension, forearm pronation, wrist flexion) with the addition of shoulder abduction 40° and extension 25°, wrist ulnar deviation and thumb flexion demonstrated significantly greater tension of the radial nerve than any other tested position (mean tension 11.32N; 95% CI 10.25, 12.29, p < 0.01), including ULNT2b (2.20N; 1.84, 2.57; p < 0.01). Additionally, the Composite position demonstrated the greatest difference in tension between the radial and median (mean difference 4.88N; 95% CI 3.16, 6.61; p < 0.01) and radial and ulnar nerves (9.26N, 7.54, 10.99; p < 0.01). This position constitutes a biomechanically plausible test to detect neuropathic pain related to the radial nerve. PMID:25892706

  6. Improving the radial nerve neurodynamic test: An observation of tension of the radial, median and ulnar nerves during upper limb positioning.

    PubMed

    Manvell, Joshua J; Manvell, Nicole; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Reid, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    The radial nerve neurodynamic test (ULNT2b), used to implicate symptoms arising from the radial nerve, is proposed to selectively increase strain of the nerve without increasing strain of adjacent tissue, though this has not been established. This study aimed to determine the upper limb position that results in: (1) the greatest tension of the radial nerve and (2) the greatest difference in tension between the radial nerve and the other two major nerves of the upper limb: median and ulnar. Tension (N) of the radial, median and ulnar nerves was measured simultaneously using three buckle force transducers during seven upper limb positions in the axilla of ten embalmed whole body human cadavers (n = 20 limbs). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc tests determined differences in tension between nerves and between limb positions. A Composite position consisting of ULNT2b (scapular depression, shoulder internal rotation, elbow extension, forearm pronation, wrist flexion) with the addition of shoulder abduction 40° and extension 25°, wrist ulnar deviation and thumb flexion demonstrated significantly greater tension of the radial nerve than any other tested position (mean tension 11.32N; 95% CI 10.25, 12.29, p < 0.01), including ULNT2b (2.20N; 1.84, 2.57; p < 0.01). Additionally, the Composite position demonstrated the greatest difference in tension between the radial and median (mean difference 4.88N; 95% CI 3.16, 6.61; p < 0.01) and radial and ulnar nerves (9.26N, 7.54, 10.99; p < 0.01). This position constitutes a biomechanically plausible test to detect neuropathic pain related to the radial nerve.

  7. Gender Differences in Biochemical and Electroneurographic Parameters of Median and Ulnar Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Tiric-Campara, Merita; Tupkovic, Emir; Denislic, Miro; Biscevic, Mirza; Skopljak, Amira; Zunic, Lejla; Djelilovic-Vranic, Jasminka; Alajbegovic, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this article are demonstrated differences in the aspects of the metabolic syndrome (MSy) between genders, as well as the association of MSy and neuropathy. The aim: The aim of our study was that in patients with newly discovered metabolic syndrome of both sexes make comparison of fasting blood glucose levels and after oral glucose tolerance test, as well as neurophysiological parameters of n.medianus and n.ulnaris. Patients and methods: All participants were examined dermatologically. The analysis included the 36 male and 36 female respondents with a newly discovered MSy. Results: The average age of men was 52.75±7.5 (40-65) years and women 52.1±7.7 (38-67) years. The average value of fasting blood glucose in women was 5.86±0.87 (4.5-8) mmol/L, and non significantly higher in men (p=0.0969) as 6.19±0.8 (4.7-8) mmol/L. Average values of blood sugar 120 minutes after oral glucose tolerance test were not significantly different (p=0.7052), and was 5.41±1.63 (3.3-9.7) mmol/L in women and 5.27±1.52 (2.7-9.8) mmol/L in men. Median motor velocity were significantly higher in women for n.medianus on the left (p=0.0024), n.ulnaris on the left (p=0.0081) and n.ulnaris on the right side (p=0.0293), and the median motor terminal latency were significantly longer in n.ulnaris on the left (p=0.0349) and n.ulnaris on the right side (p=0.011). There was no significant difference in the sensory conductivity velocity in n.medianus and n.ulnaris between the groups, but the amplitude with the highest peak of the sensory response was significantly higher in n.medianus on the left (p=0.0269) and n.ulnaris on the left side (p=0.0009) in female patients. Conclusion: The results indicate that there are differences in neurophysiological parameters of the investigated nerves between the genders, and that tested nerve structures in the course of MSy are affected slightly more in men. There were no significant differences in skin changes between genders. PMID:26862246

  8. Contemporaneous Evaluation of Intraoperative Ulnar and Median Nerve Somatosensory Evoked Potentials for Patient Positioning: A Review of Four Cases.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Justin W; EP, T; CNCT; Madhok, Ricky; Frendo, Christopher D; DeWal, Hargovind; Lee, George R; MS

    2016-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) are a valuable tool for assessing changes in peripheral nerve pathways caused by patient positioning during spinal surgeries. These changes, when left undiagnosed, may lead to postoperative neurological sequelae. Why an upper extremity SSEP attenuates due to positioning is not necessarily clear and can be multifactorial, affecting the peripheral nerves or elements of the brachial plexus. A conduction block can occur at any point along the course of the nerve secondary to entrapment, compression, and ischemia. These mechanisms of injury may be caused by extreme body habitus, the length of the procedure, or the patient's metabolic underpinnings. The goal of neuromonitoring for positional injury is to predict and prevent both peripheral nerve and brachial plexus injuries. Using ulnar and median nerve SSEPs contemporaneously may lead to better identification of compromised structures when an SSEP change to one or both of the nerves occurs. The investigators provide four case reports where intraoperative SSEP assessment of contemporaneous ulnar and median nerves prevented postoperative upper extremity neural deficits. PMID:27373054

  9. Contemporaneous Evaluation of Intraoperative Ulnar and Median Nerve Somatosensory Evoked Potentials for Patient Positioning: A Review of Four Cases.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Justin W; EP, T; CNCT; Madhok, Ricky; Frendo, Christopher D; DeWal, Hargovind; Lee, George R; MS

    2016-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) are a valuable tool for assessing changes in peripheral nerve pathways caused by patient positioning during spinal surgeries. These changes, when left undiagnosed, may lead to postoperative neurological sequelae. Why an upper extremity SSEP attenuates due to positioning is not necessarily clear and can be multifactorial, affecting the peripheral nerves or elements of the brachial plexus. A conduction block can occur at any point along the course of the nerve secondary to entrapment, compression, and ischemia. These mechanisms of injury may be caused by extreme body habitus, the length of the procedure, or the patient's metabolic underpinnings. The goal of neuromonitoring for positional injury is to predict and prevent both peripheral nerve and brachial plexus injuries. Using ulnar and median nerve SSEPs contemporaneously may lead to better identification of compromised structures when an SSEP change to one or both of the nerves occurs. The investigators provide four case reports where intraoperative SSEP assessment of contemporaneous ulnar and median nerves prevented postoperative upper extremity neural deficits.

  10. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the example of the median nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonography is an established method for imaging peripheral nerves. It serves to supplement the physical examination, electromyography, and magnetic resonance imaging. It enables the identification of post-traumatic changes of nerves, neuropathies secondary to compression syndromes, inflammatory or neoplastic nerve lesions as well as the evaluation of postoperative complications. In certain situations, this technique is the imaging method of choice. It is increasingly used in anesthesiology for regional anesthesia. As in the case of other ultrasound imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive, well-tolerated by patients, and relatively inexpensive. This article presents the histological structure of peripheral nerves and their appearance in ultrasonography. It also presents the examination technique, following the example of the median nerve, and includes a series of diagrams and ultrasound images. The interpretation of the shape, echogenicity, thickness and vascularity of nerves is described, as well as their relation to the surrounding tissues. The “elevator technique”, which consists of locating a set nerve at a characteristic anatomic point, and following it proximally or distally, has been explained. The undisputed benefits of the ultrasound examination have been presented, including its advantages over other diagnostic methods. These advantages include the dynamic component of the ultrasound examination and the possibility of correlating the patient's symptoms with the ultrasound images. As an example, the proper anatomy and the ultrasonographic appearance of the median nerve were described. This nerve's course is presented, its divisions, and characteristic reference points, so as to facilitate its location and identification, and enable subsequent use of the aforementioned “elevator technique”. This article opens a series of publications concerning anatomy, technique of examination and pathologies of peripheral nerves

  11. Endoscopic Excision of Supracondylar Humeral Spur for Decompression of the Median Nerve and Brachial Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory; Gupta, Prince; Phadnis, Joideep; Singhi, Prahalad K.

    2016-01-01

    The humeral supracondylar process and Struthers ligament comprise a relatively rare but well-known anatomic variant. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce clinical symptoms related to compression of the median nerve or brachial artery below the ligament. Previously, surgery has been performed with an open ligament release and supracondylar process excision. This article reports on the use of endoscopic findings and the method of ligament release and process excision. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides excellent visualization and enables the surgeon to perform dissection with magnification and precision. It allows the surgeon to introduce open surgical techniques into the depths of the wound in a controlled manner. Because of the dead space created, there is a risk of hematoma formation. Many of the concepts used in open surgery are now being used for endoscopic surgery, and vice versa. The barriers and differences among endoscopic, arthroscopic, and open procedures are being broken down. We report another endoscopic technique, which is part of the ongoing evolution of musculoskeletal surgery. PMID:27073779

  12. Endoscopic Excision of Supracondylar Humeral Spur for Decompression of the Median Nerve and Brachial Artery.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory; Gupta, Prince; Phadnis, Joideep; Singhi, Prahalad K

    2016-02-01

    The humeral supracondylar process and Struthers ligament comprise a relatively rare but well-known anatomic variant. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce clinical symptoms related to compression of the median nerve or brachial artery below the ligament. Previously, surgery has been performed with an open ligament release and supracondylar process excision. This article reports on the use of endoscopic findings and the method of ligament release and process excision. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides excellent visualization and enables the surgeon to perform dissection with magnification and precision. It allows the surgeon to introduce open surgical techniques into the depths of the wound in a controlled manner. Because of the dead space created, there is a risk of hematoma formation. Many of the concepts used in open surgery are now being used for endoscopic surgery, and vice versa. The barriers and differences among endoscopic, arthroscopic, and open procedures are being broken down. We report another endoscopic technique, which is part of the ongoing evolution of musculoskeletal surgery.

  13. Endoscopic Excision of Supracondylar Humeral Spur for Decompression of the Median Nerve and Brachial Artery.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory; Gupta, Prince; Phadnis, Joideep; Singhi, Prahalad K

    2016-02-01

    The humeral supracondylar process and Struthers ligament comprise a relatively rare but well-known anatomic variant. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce clinical symptoms related to compression of the median nerve or brachial artery below the ligament. Previously, surgery has been performed with an open ligament release and supracondylar process excision. This article reports on the use of endoscopic findings and the method of ligament release and process excision. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides excellent visualization and enables the surgeon to perform dissection with magnification and precision. It allows the surgeon to introduce open surgical techniques into the depths of the wound in a controlled manner. Because of the dead space created, there is a risk of hematoma formation. Many of the concepts used in open surgery are now being used for endoscopic surgery, and vice versa. The barriers and differences among endoscopic, arthroscopic, and open procedures are being broken down. We report another endoscopic technique, which is part of the ongoing evolution of musculoskeletal surgery. PMID:27073779

  14. [Variations in the configuration of somatosensory evoked potentials following stimulation of the median nerve].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H

    1989-09-01

    The variants of waveform patterns of cervical and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials to median nerve stimulation at the wrist were analysed in 86 normal subjects aged 15 to 71 years. In cervical SEP recordings the components N13, N14 and the trough-shaped variant of P17 showed the highest short-term stability. Immediate changes of the amplitude proportions of subcomponents within the potential, i.e. a lack of uniformity in waveforms, have to be considered normal. Significant associations were found between the occurrence of components N14 and an arm length of more than 68 cm and between the appearance of a plateau configuration of P17 and an age of at least 40 years. Considering definite criteria the latency of P17 can be used as an additional reliable parameter. In cortical SEP recordings the combination of an initial V-shaped pattern and a following bifid W-configuration appeared as the most frequent waveform profile. All parts of the potential but the positive waves of the primary complex revealed a high intraindividual stability. PMID:2507276

  15. Short-Latency Median-Nerve Somatosensory-Evoked Potentials and Induced Gamma-Oscillations in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Miho; Nishida, Masaaki; Juhasz, Csaba; Muzik, Otto; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.; Asano, Eishi

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that cortical gamma-oscillations are tightly linked with various forms of physiological activity. In the present study, the dynamic changes of intracranially recorded median-nerve somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and somatosensory-induced gamma-oscillations were animated on a three-dimensional MR image, and the…

  16. Combined Cubital and Carpal Tunnel Release Results in Symptom Resolution Outside of the Median or Ulnar Nerve Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Chimenti, Peter C.; McIntyre, Allison W.; Childs, Sean M.; Hammert, Warren C.; Elfar, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Resolution of symptoms including pain, numbness, and tingling outside of the median nerve distribution has been shown to occur following carpal tunnel release. We hypothesized that a similar effect would be found after combined release of the ulnar nerve at the elbow with simultaneous release of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel. Methods: 20 patients with combined cubital and carpal tunnel syndrome were prospectively enrolled. The upper extremity was divided into six zones and the location of pain, numbness, tingling, or strange sensations was recorded pre-operatively. Two-point discrimination, Semmes-Weinstein monofilament testing, and validated questionnaires were collected pre-operatively and at six-week follow-up. Results: Probability of resolution was greater in the median nerve distribution than the ulnar nerve for numbness (71% vs. 43%), tingling (86% vs. 75%). Seventy percent of the cohort reported at least one extra-anatomic symptom pre-operatively, and greater than 80% of these resolved at early follow-up. There was a decrease in pain as measured by validated questionnaires. Conclusion: This study documents resolution of symptoms in both extra-ulnar and extra-median distributions after combined cubital and carpal tunnel release. Pre-operative patient counseling may therefore include the likelihood of symptomatic improvement in a non-expected nerve distribution after this procedure, assuming no other concomitant pathology which may cause persistent symptoms. Future studies could be directed at correlating pre-operative disease severity with probability of symptom resolution using a larger population. PMID:27347239

  17. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  18. Median Nerve Injury Due to High-Pressure Water Jet Injection: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Emre, Ufuk; Unal, Aysun

    2009-08-01

    High-pressure injuries that occur accidentally are potentially destructive injuries that often affect the nondominant hands of young men. A variety of products such as paint, gasoline, grease, fuel oil, cement, thinner and solvents have been reported as destructive agents. High-pressure water jet injection injuries to soft tissues have rarely been reported. In this study, we present the first case of median nerve injury due to high-pressure water jet injection by a water spray gun. PMID:26815059

  19. Longitudinal design for sonographic measurement of median nerve swelling with controlled exposure to physical work using an animal model.

    PubMed

    Roll, Shawn C; Evans, Kevin D; Volz, Kevin R; Sommerich, Carolyn M

    2013-12-01

    In the study described here, we examined the feasibility of a longitudinal design to measure sonographically swelling of the median nerve caused by controlled exposure to a work task and to evaluate the relationship of changes in morphology to diagnostic standards. Fifteen macaques, Macaca fascicularis, pinched a lever in various wrist positions at a self-regulated pace (8 h/d, 5 d/wk, 18-20 wk). Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and cross-sectional area (CSA) were measured every 2 wk from baseline through working and a 6-wk recovery. Trending across all subjects revealed that NCV slowed and CSA at the carpal tunnel increased in the working arm, whereas no changes were observed in CSA either at the forearm or for any measure in the non-working arm. There was a small negative correlation between NCV and CSA in the working arm. This study provides validation that swelling can be observed using a longitudinal design. Longitudinal human studies are needed to describe the trajectory of nerve swelling for early identification of median nerve pathology.

  20. Longitudinal design for sonographic measurement of median nerve swelling with controlled exposure to physical work using an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Shawn C.; Evans, Kevin D.; Volz, Kevin R.; Sommerich, Carolyn M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a longitudinal design to sonographically measure swelling of the median nerve due to controlled exposure to a work task and to evaluate the relationship of changes in morphology to diagnostic standards. Fifteen macaca fascicularis pinched a lever in various wrist positions at a self-regulated pace (8 hours/day, 5 days/week, 18–20 weeks). Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and cross-sectional area (CSA) were obtained every two weeks from baseline through working and a 6-week recovery. Trending across all subjects showed that NCV slowed and CSA at the carpal tunnel increased in the working arm, while no changes were observed in CSA either at the forearm or for any measure in the non-working arm. There was a small negative correlation between NCV and CSA in the working arm. This study provides validation that swelling can be observed using a longitudinal design. Longitudinal human studies are needed to describe the trajectory of nerve swelling for early identification of median nerve pathology. PMID:24139197

  1. Diagnostic value of median nerve ultrasonography for screening of carpal tunnel syndrome in hypothyroid patients: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpour, Masoud; Mirzaasgari, Zahra; Rohani, Mohammad; Safdarian, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common peripheral entrapment neuropathy in patients with hypothyroid. The diagnosis of CTS is usually clinical and confirmed by electrodiagnostic (EDX) procedures. This study aimed to describe the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography (US) as an alternative method to nerve conduction study (NCS) for the diagnosis of subclinical CTS in patients with hypothyroidism. Methods: Between April 2013 and November 2014, from the patients with the diagnosis of hypothyroidism referring to the institute of endocrinology and metabolism of Firoozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, those who met our inclusion criteria entered this cross-sectional study. The patients divided into two groups of subclinical CTS with the age- and gender-matched control group. US measurements of the median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA) in the CT inlet were compared with the NCS results as the gold standard diagnostic test. Results: A total number of 152 wrists of 76 hypothyroid patients were examined in this study. The mean of median nerve CSA at the tunnel inlet was 9.96 ± 2.20 mm2 for the CTS group and 7.08 ± 1.38 mm2 for the control group (P < 0.05). 31 wrists (20.4%) were diagnosed as CTS using NCS while US diagnosed 19 wrists (12.5%) as CTS. Using receiver-operating-characteristics analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of US at the diagnosis of CTS were 45.0 and 95.8%, respectively, with a median nerve CSA cutoff point of 9.8 mm2. Positive and negative predictive values of US were 87.2 and 85.5%, respectively, with a test accuracy of 85.5%. Conclusion: According to our findings, US has an acceptable diagnostic value to confirm CTS in hypothyroid patients. However, it may not replace NCS due to low sensitivity. PMID:27326360

  2. Changes in Clinical Symptoms, Functions, and the Median Nerve Cross-Sectional Area at the Carpal Tunnel Inlet after Open Carpal Tunnel Release

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Young-Do; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Shin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between clinical symptoms and cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet before and after open carpal tunnel release (CTR). Methods Thirty-two patients (53 hands) that underwent open CTR for idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome were prospectively enrolled. Median nerve CSA at the carpal tunnel inlet was measured preoperatively and at 2 and 12 weeks after CTR by high resolution ultrasonography. The Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire (BCTQ) was also completed at these times. Results BCTQ symptom (BCTQ-S) score was significantly improved at 2 weeks postoperatively, but BCTQ function (BCTQ-F) score and CSA were significantly improved at 12 weeks postoperatively. Preoperative CSA was significantly correlated with preoperative BCTQ-S and BCTQ-F scores but was not significantly correlated with postoperative BCTQ scores or postoperative changes in BCTQ scores. Postoperative median nerve CSA was not significantly correlated with postoperative BCTQ-S or BCTQ-F scores, and postoperative changes in median nerve CSA were not significantly correlated with postoperative changes in BCTQ-S or BCTQ-F scores. Conclusions The study shows clinical symptoms resolve rapidly after open CTR, but median nerve swelling and clinical function take several months to recover. In addition, preoperative median nerve swelling might predict preoperative severities of clinical symptoms and functional disabilities. However, postoperative reductions in median nerve swelling were not found to reflect postoperative reductions in clinical symptoms or functional disabilities. PMID:27583113

  3. Application of implantable wireless biomicrosystem for monitoring nerve impedance of rat after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ting; Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Lung-Tai; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chu, Chun-Hsun; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is usually applied percutaneously for facilitating peripheral nerve regeneration. However, few studies have conducted long-term monitoring of the condition of nerve regeneration. This study implements an implantable biomicrosystem for inducing pulse current for aiding nerve repair and monitoring the time-course changes of nerve impedance for assessing nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve injury rat model. For long-term implantation, a transcutaneous magnetic coupling technique is adopted for power and data transmission. For in vivo study, the implanted module was placed in the rat's abdomen and the cuff electrode was wrapped around an 8-mm sciatic nerve gap of the rat for nerve impedance measurement for 42 days. One group of animals received monophasic constant current via the cuff electrode and a second group had no stimulation between days 8-21. The nerve impedance increased to above 150% of the initial value in the nerve regeneration groups with and without stimulation whereas the group with no nerve regeneration increased to only 113% at day 42. The impedance increase in nerve regeneration groups can be observed before evident functional recovery. Also, the nerve regeneration group that received electrical stimulation had relatively higher myelinated fiber density than that of no stimulation group, 20686 versus 11417 fiber/mm (2). The developed implantable biomicrosystem is proven to be a useful experimental tool for long-term stimulation in aiding nerve fiber growth as well as impedance assessment for understanding the time-course changes of nerve regeneration. PMID:23060343

  4. A single dose of lorazepam reduces paired-pulse suppression of median nerve evoked somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Stude, Philipp; Lenz, Melanie; Höffken, Oliver; Tegenthoff, Martin; Dinse, Hubert

    2016-05-01

    Paired-pulse behaviour in the somatosensory cortex is an approach to obtain insights into cortical processing modes and to obtain markers of changes of cortical excitability attributable to learning or pathological states. Numerous studies have demonstrated suppression of the response to the stimulus that follows a first one after a short interval, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive, although there is agreement that GABAergic mechanisms seem to play a crucial role. We therefore aimed to explore the influence of the GABAA agonist lorazepam on paired-pulse somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs). We recorded and analysed SEPs after paired median nerve stimulation in healthy individuals before and after they had received a single dose of 2.5 mg of lorazepam as compared with a control group receiving placebo. Paired-pulse suppression was expressed as a ratio of the amplitudes of the second and the first peaks. We found that, after lorazepam application, paired-pulse suppression of the cortical N20 component remained unchanged, but suppression of the N20-P25 complex was significantly reduced, indicative of GABAergic involvement in intracortical processing. Our data suggest that lorazepam most likely enhances inhibition within the cortical network of interneurons responsible for creating paired-pulse suppression, leading to reduced inhibitory drive with a subsequently reduced amount of suppression. The results provide further evidence that GABAA -mediated mechanisms are involved in the generation of median nerve evoked paired-pulse suppression. PMID:26929110

  5. A single dose of lorazepam reduces paired-pulse suppression of median nerve evoked somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Stude, Philipp; Lenz, Melanie; Höffken, Oliver; Tegenthoff, Martin; Dinse, Hubert

    2016-05-01

    Paired-pulse behaviour in the somatosensory cortex is an approach to obtain insights into cortical processing modes and to obtain markers of changes of cortical excitability attributable to learning or pathological states. Numerous studies have demonstrated suppression of the response to the stimulus that follows a first one after a short interval, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive, although there is agreement that GABAergic mechanisms seem to play a crucial role. We therefore aimed to explore the influence of the GABAA agonist lorazepam on paired-pulse somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs). We recorded and analysed SEPs after paired median nerve stimulation in healthy individuals before and after they had received a single dose of 2.5 mg of lorazepam as compared with a control group receiving placebo. Paired-pulse suppression was expressed as a ratio of the amplitudes of the second and the first peaks. We found that, after lorazepam application, paired-pulse suppression of the cortical N20 component remained unchanged, but suppression of the N20-P25 complex was significantly reduced, indicative of GABAergic involvement in intracortical processing. Our data suggest that lorazepam most likely enhances inhibition within the cortical network of interneurons responsible for creating paired-pulse suppression, leading to reduced inhibitory drive with a subsequently reduced amount of suppression. The results provide further evidence that GABAA -mediated mechanisms are involved in the generation of median nerve evoked paired-pulse suppression.

  6. Wake-promoting actions of median nerve stimulation in TBI-induced coma: An investigation of orexin-A and orexin receptor 1 in the hypothalamic region.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ying-Jun; Feng, Zhen; Wang, Liang; Wei, Tian-Qi

    2015-09-01

    A coma is a serious complication, which can occur following traumatic brain injury (TBI), for which no effective treatment has been established. Previous studies have suggested that neural electrical stimulation, including median nerve stimulation (MNS), may be an effective method for treating patients in a coma, and orexin‑A, an excitatory hypothalamic neuropeptide, may be involved in wakefulness. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this involvement remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to examine the arousal‑promoting role of MNS in rats in a TBI‑induced coma and to investigate the potential mechanisms involved. A total of 90 rats were divided into three groups, comprising a control group, sham‑stimulated (TBI) group and a stimulated (TBI + MNS) group. MNS was performed on the animals, which were in a TBI‑induced comatose state. Changes in the behavior of the rats were observed following MNS. Subsequently, hypothalamic tissues were extracted from the rats 6, 12 and 24 h following TBI or MNS, respectively. The expression levels of orexin‑A and orexin receptor‑1 (OX1R) in the hypothalamus were examined using immunohistochemistry, western blotting and an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrated that 21 rats subjected to TBI‑induced coma exhibited a restored righting reflex and response to pain stimuli following MNS. In addition, ignificant differences in the expression levels of orexin‑A and OXIR were observed among the three groups and among the time‑points. Orexin‑A and OX1R were upregulated following MNS. The rats in the stimulated group reacted to the MNS and exhibited a re‑awakening response. The results of the present study indicated that MNS may be a therapeutic option for TBI‑induced coma. The mechanism may be associated with increasing expression levels of the excitatory hypothalamic neuropeptide, orexin-A, and its receptor, OX1R, in the hypothalamic region.

  7. Somatosensory evoked potentials in cervical spondylosis. Correlation of median, ulnar and posterior tibial nerve responses with clinical and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; Jones, S J

    1985-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) following median, ulnar and tibial nerve stimulation were recorded from sites over the shoulders, neck and scalp in 34 patients with cervical spondylosis. Twenty control subjects were matched for sex and age. Detailed clinical and radiological data were assembled, with particular attention to the sensory modalities impaired and the locus and severity of cord compression. The patients were divided clinically into 4 groups: combined myelopathy and radiculopathy (6 cases), myelopathy alone (15), radiculopathy (6) and neck pain (7). Four cases are described in detail. SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with clinical myelopathy, but not with radiculopathy. Median and ulnar nerve responses were less often affected than tibial, even with myelopathy above C6 level. Tibial nerve SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with posterior column signs on the same side of the body, but not with anterolateral column sensory signs. In myelopathy cases, the SEP examination appeared to be more sensitive to sensory pathway involvement than clinical sensory testing. SEP abnormalities were infrequent in cases of radiculopathy and neck pain, bearing no relation to the clinical locus of root lesions. Abnormal SEPs consistent with subclinical posterior column involvement, however, were recorded in 1 patient with radiculopathy and 2 with neck pain. Follow-up recordings made postoperatively in 7 myelopathy cases reflected the clinical course (improvement, deterioration or no change) in 4, but failed to reflect improvement in 3. The correlation of SEP findings with radiological data was generally poor. SEP abnormalities were detected in 6 out of 8 patients with clinical myelopathy but no radiological evidence of posterior cord compression, suggesting that impairment of the blood supply may be an important factor contributing to cord damage. An application for SEPs in the clinical management of cervical spondylosis may lie in the detection of

  8. Motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) and lead content in sciatic nerve of lead-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Maehara, N.; Uchino, E.; Terayama, K.; Ohno, H.; Yamamura, K.

    1986-07-01

    There have been many pathological and electrophysiological studies of peripheral nerves in inorganic lead intoxication. Peripheral nerve conduction velocity (NCV) has been used as an objective measure of the effects of lead on the peripheral nerve function and has been examined with blood lead content. There have been few reports on the changes in NCV related to lead content in the peripheral nerve tissue under lead poisoning. In the present study, the authors have examined motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) of the tail by a non-invasive method and lead content of the peripheral nerve in lead-exposed rats. Furthermore, they have attempted to assess the relationship between these two parameters.

  9. [The impairment of A-delta fibers in median nerve compression at the wrist, using the cutaneous silent period].

    PubMed

    Duarte, Juan M; D'Onofrio, Héctor M; Rolón, Juan Ignacio; Bertotti, Alicia C

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel síndrome (CTS) is an entrapment neuropathy of the median nerve at the wrist, that leads to pain, paresthesia and painful dysesthesia. The electrophysiological diagnosis is based upon nerve conduction studies which evaluate thick nerve fibers. Our hypothesis is that there is an additional dysfunction of small fibers in CTS, which correlates with the degree of severity of the neuropathy. A retrospective study of 69 hands that belonged to 47 patients of both sexes (mean age 53.8, years, range 22-87) was performed, and, as a control group, 21 hands which corresponded to the asymptomatic side of those patients were evaluated. Motor and sensory conduction studies, as well as F-waves were performed to classify the neuropathy according to the degree of severity. Cutaneous silent period (CSP) was elicited in all hands. Mean onset latencies and durations of CSP were evaluated. Mean onset latencies were significantly prolonged in neuropathic hands (84.3 ± 16.3 msec) compared to asymptomatic hands (74.8 ± 11.6 msec) (p < 0.05). Mean latencies of the CSP were even prolonged (p < 0.05) in hands affected by a more severe neuropathy. In the 3 hands with most severe neuropathy, a CSP could not be elicited. In CTS an impairment of A-delta fibers was recorded through the CSP. The more severe the neuropathy is, the more impairment of A-delta fibers can be found. CSP may be assessed as a complement of motor and sensory nerve conduction studies in this neuropathy. PMID:27576280

  10. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the median nerve: A cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a three-year-old child: A case report and comprehensive literature review

    PubMed Central

    Senger, Jenna-Lynn; Classen, Dale; Bruce, Garth; Kanthan, Rani

    2014-01-01

    A three-year-old boy was investigated for inexplicable incessant crying. On examination, his left wrist was mildly swollen (three to four months) and sensitive. Exploration and carpal tunnel decompression of the left wrist with incisional biopsy was performed for the presence of a fusiform swelling intimately associated with the median nerve. Histopathology revealed the presence of enlarged nerve bundles admixed with mature fat cells and diffuse fibroblastic proliferation. Three months later, he underwent urgent contralateral carpal tunnel decompression for a similar presentation. The final diagnosis was bilateral fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of the median nerves causing acute bilateral compression neuropathy. FLH of the median nerve is an extremely unusual cause of acute bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome in a young child presenting with ‘incessant crying’. A comprehensive review of FLH including epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging, pathology, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25332651

  11. The role of median nerve terminal latency index in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome in comparison with other electrodiagnostic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Vahdatpour, Babak; Khosrawi, Saeid; Chatraei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) considers the most common compression neuropathy, which nerve conduction studies (NCSs) used for its detection routinely and universally. This study was performed to determine the value of the median TLI and other NCS variables and to investigate their sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of CTS. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out among 100 hands of healthy volunteers and 50 hands of patients who had a positive history of paresthesia and numbness in upper extremities. Information including age, gender, and result of sensory and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV), peak latency difference of median and ulnar nerves of fourth digit (M4-U4 peak latency difference), and TLI were recorded for analysis. Sensitivity and specificity of electro diagnostic parameters in the diagnosis of CTS was investigated. Results: Normal range of the median nerve TLI was 0.43 ± 0.077. There was no significant difference between two groups for MNCV means (P = 0. 45). Distal sensory latency and distal motor latency (DML) of median nerve and fourth digit median-ulnar peak latency differences (PM4-PU4) for CTS group was significantly higher (P < 0.001) and mean for sensory nerve conduction velocity was significantly higher in control group (P < 0.001). The most sensitive electrophysiological finding in CTS patients was median TLI (82%), but the most specific one was DML (98%). Conclusion: Although in early stages of CTS, we usually expect only abnormalities in the sensory studies, but TLI may better demonstrate the effect on median nerve motor fiber even in mild cases of CTS. PMID:27376049

  12. Anatomic observations of the carpal tunnel in cadavers with a report of unusual thickening of the perineurium of the median nerve.

    PubMed

    Karev, A

    1985-01-01

    The carpal tunnel of 50 cadavers (100 hands) was dissected. Macroscopic finding included 14 median nerves with pressure signs (in 4 cadavers, unilaterally and 5 bilaterally). In three cadavers, marked synovitis was seen around the tendons and the nerve; in one, lipoma was evident; and in the rest, thickening of the volar carpal ligament was seen. Microscopic examination of the compressed nerves showed concentric thickening of the perineurium, thrombosis of veins, and intrafascicular fibrosis. In one nerve, the thickening of the perineurium was not concentric, but only at that part of the fascicle adjacent to the volar carpal ligament in an "onion peel" form. PMID:3966111

  13. Assessment of the Kinetic Trajectory of the Median Nerve in the Wrist by High-Frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Hsun; Hsieh, Mei-Yu; Su, Fong-Chin; Wang, Shyh-Hau

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is typically diagnosed by physical examination or nerve conduction measurements. With these diagnostics however it is difficult to obtain anatomical information in the carpal tunnel. To further improve the diagnosis of CTS, an attempt using 30 MHz high-frequency ultrasound to noninvasively detect the local anatomical structures and the kinetic trajectory of the median nerve (MN) in the wrist was explored. Measurements were performed on the right wrist of 14 asymptomatic volunteers. The kinetic trajectory of the MN corresponding to flexion (from 0° to 90°) and extension (from 90° to 0°) movements of the fingers were detected by a cross correlation-based motion tracking technique. The average displacements of the MN according to finger movements were measured to be 3.74 and 2.04 mm for male and female subjects, respectively. Moreover, the kinetic trajectory of the MN in both the ulnar-palmar and total directions generally follows a sigmoidal curve tendency. This study has verified that the use of high-frequency ultrasound imaging and a motion tracking technique to sensitively detect the displacement and kinetic trajectory of the MN for the assessment of CTS patients is feasible. PMID:24787637

  14. Effect of oblique nerve grafting on peripheral nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Kotulska, Katarzyna; Marcol, Wiesław; Larysz-Brysz, Magdalena; Tendera, Zofia; Malinowska-Kołodziej, Izabela; Slusarczyk, Wojciech; Jedrzejowska-Szypułka, Halina; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    Current methods of peripheral nerve repair are to rejoin cut nerve stumps directly or to bridge large gaps with autologous nerve grafts. In both cases the surface of nerve stump endings is typically cut perpendicularly to the long axis of the nerve. The outcome of such operations, however, is still not satisfactory. In this study, we examine the effect of oblique nerve cutting and grafting on morphological as well as functional features of regeneration. In adult rats, sciatic nerve was cut and rejoined either directly or using an autologous graft, at 90 degrees or 30 degrees angle. Functional regeneration was assessed by walking track analysis during 12-week follow-up. Afterwards muscle weight was measured and histological studies were performed. The latter included nerve fibers and Schwann cells counting, as well as visualization of scar formation and epineural fibrosis. Nerves cut obliquely and rejoined showed better functional recovery than perpendicularly transected. Similar effect was observed after oblique grafting when compared to perpendicular one. Numbers of nerve fibers growing into the distal stump of the nerve as well as the number of Schwann cells were significantly higher in obliquely than in perpendicularly operated nerves. Moreover, growing axons were arranged more regularly following oblique treatment. These data indicate that joining or grafting the nerve stumps at acute angle is a more profitable method of nerve repair than the standard procedure performed at right angle. PMID:17066410

  15. Effects of Alcohol Injection in Rat Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Mazoch, Mathew J.; Cheema, Gulraiz A.; Suva, Larry J.; Thomas, Ruth L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the injection of dehydrated alcohol has been successful for the treatment of Morton's neuroma in the foot. In this study, we determined the cellular effect of injection of alcohol into and around the sciatic nerve of rats, and measured the extent of cell necrosis and/or any associated histologic or inflammatory changes. Methods Twenty-two male (~375g) Wistar rats were randomized into two groups each receiving alcohol injections into or around the sciatic nerve after nerve exposure under sterile technique. Group 1 rats were injected with a 0.5ml solution of 0.5% Marcaine in the left sciatic nerve as a control group. In the right sciatic nerve a 0.5ml solution of 4% ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine was injected. Group 2 rats received 0.5ml of 20%ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine injected into the left sciatic nerve and 0.5 ml of 30% ethanol with 0.5% Marcaine injected into the right sciatic nerve. In each group, the rats were placed in 3 subgroups: intraneural, perineural, perimuscular injections. All rats were sacrificed and tissue harvested for histologic evaluation at day 10 post injection. Results No evidence of alcohol-associated cell necrosis, apoptosis or apparent inflammation was observed in histologic specimens of any injected nerves, perineural tissue, or muscles in controls or experimental groups regardless of concentration of ethanol injected on day 10. Conclusion We concluded that alcohol injection (≤30% ethanol) into and/or around the sciatic nerve or the adjacent muscle of rats has no histologic evidence of necrosis or inflammation to the nerve or surrounding tissue. There was no observable histological change in apoptosis, or cell number, in response to the alcohol injection. PMID:25097192

  16. Perineural Dexmedetomidine as an Adjuvant Reduces the Median Effective Concentration of Lidocaine for Obturator Nerve Blocking: A Double-Blinded Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuechun; Sun, Jian; Zhuang, Xinqi; Lv, Guoyi; Li, Yize; Wang, Haiyun; Wang, Guolin

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that the addition of dexmedetomidine to local anesthetics can prolong peripheral nerve blocks; however, it is not known whether dexmedetomidine can reduce the quantity of local anesthetic needed. We hypothesized that adding dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to an obturator nerve block could reduce the median effective concentration of lidocaine. In this double-blinded randomized trial, 60 patients scheduled for elective transurethral resection of bladder tumors on the lateral wall were randomly divided into two groups: the control group (C group, n = 30) and the dexmedetomidine group (D group, n = 30). Two main branches of the obturator nerve (i.e., anterior and posterior) were identified using neural stimulation at the inguinal level, with only lidocaine used for the C group and 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine combined with lidocaine used for the D group. The median effective concentration was determined by an up-and-down sequential trial. The ratio of two consecutive concentrations was 1.2. The median effective concentration (95% confidence interval) of lidocaine was 0.57% (0.54%-0.62%) in the C group and 0.29% (0.28%-0.38%) in the D group. The median effective concentration of lidocaine was significantly lower in the D group than in the C group (p < 0.05). These results indicate that dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) in combination with lidocaine for obturator nerve block decreases the median effective concentration of lidocaine. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02066727 PMID:27341450

  17. Diagnostic Significance of Ultrasonographic Measurements and Median-Ulnar Ratio in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Correlation with Nerve Conduction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mesci, Nilgün; Çetinkaya, Yilmaz; Geler Külcü, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We determined the reliability of ultrasonography (US) measurements for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and their correlation with symptom duration and electrophysiology findings. We determined whether the ratio of the median-to-ulnar cross-sectional areas (CSAs) can support CTS diagnoses. Methods The pisiform CSA (CSApisiform), swelling ratio (SR), palmar bowing, and CSApisiform/ulnar CSA (CSAulnar) measurements made in two subgroups of CTS patients (having sensory affection alone or having both sensory and motor affection) were compared with controls. CSAulnar was measured in Guyon's canal at the level of most-protuberant portion of the pisiform bone. Results The values of all of the measured US parameters were higher in patients with CTS (n=50) than in controls (n=62). CSApisiform could be used to diagnose CTS of mild severity. All of the parameters were positively correlated with the distal latency of the compound muscle action potential, and all of them except for SR were negatively correlated with the sensory nerve conduction velocity. A CSApisiform/CSAulnar ratio of ≥1.79 had a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 76% for diagnosing CTS. Conclusions Only CSApisiform measurements were reliable for diagnosing early stages of CTS, and CSApisiform/CSAulnar had a lower diagnostic value for diagnosing CTS. PMID:27095524

  18. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the median nerve facilitates low motor cortex excitability in patients with spinocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chung; Chuang, Yu-Fen; Yang, Hsiao-Chu; Hsu, Miao-Ju; Huang, Ying-Zu; Chang, Ya-Ju

    2015-02-01

    The neuromodulation of motor excitability has been shown to improve functional movement in people with central nervous system damage. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of peripheral neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in motor excitability and its effects in people with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). This single-blind case-control study was conducted on young control (n=9), age-matched control (n=9), and SCA participants (n=9; 7 SCAIII and 2 sporadic). All participants received an accumulated 30 min of NMES (25 Hz, 800 ms on/800 ms off) of the median nerve. The central motor excitability, measured by motor evoked potential (MEP) and silent period, and the peripheral motor excitability, measured by the H-reflex and M-wave, were recorded in flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle before, during, and after the NMES was applied. The results showed that NMES significantly enhanced the MEP in all 3 groups. The silent period, H-reflex and maximum M-wave were not changed by NMES. We conclude that NMES enhances low motor excitability in patients with SCA and that the mechanism of the neuromodulation was supra-segmental. These findings are potentially relevant to the utilization of NMES for preparation of motor excitability. The protocol was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02103075).

  19. Does the ratio of the carpal tunnel inlet and outlet cross-sectional areas in the median nerve reflect carpal tunnel syndrome severity?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Rehemutula, Aierken; Peng, Feng; Yu, Cong; Wang, Tian-Bin; Chen, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Although ultrasound measurements have been used in previous studies on carpal tunnel syndrome to visualize injury to the median nerve, whether such ultrasound data can indicate the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome remains controversial. The cross-sectional areas of the median nerve at the tunnel inlet and outlet can show swelling and compression of the nerve at the carpal. We hypothesized that the ratio of the cross-sectional areas of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet to outlet accurately reflects the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome. To test this, high-resolution ultrasound with a linear array transducer at 5-17 MHz was used to assess 77 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The results showed that the cut-off point for the inlet-to-outlet ratio was 1.14. Significant differences in the inlet-to-outlet ratio were found among patients with mild, moderate, and severe carpal tunnel syndrome. The cut-off point in the ratio of cross-sectional areas of the median nerve was 1.29 between mild and more severe (moderate and severe) carpal tunnel syndrome patients with 64.7% sensitivity and 72.7% specificity. The cut-off point in the ratio of cross-sectional areas of the median nerve was 1.52 between the moderate and severe carpal tunnel syndrome patients with 80.0% sensitivity and 64.7% specificity. These results suggest that the inlet-to-outlet ratio reflected the severity of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Damon S.; Wimmers, Eric G.; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M.; Brat, Gabriel A.; Wu, Lehao W.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J.; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W. P. Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Repair and Hindlimb Transplant Model.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Damon S; Wimmers, Eric G; Ibrahim, Zuhaib; Grahammer, Johanna; Christensen, Joani M; Brat, Gabriel A; Wu, Lehao W; Sarhane, Karim A; Lopez, Joseph; Wallner, Christoph; Furtmüller, Georg J; Yuan, Nance; Pang, John; Sarkar, Kakali; Lee, W P Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the efficacy of local and intravenous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration to augment neuroregeneration in both a sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and rat hindlimb transplant model. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were harvested and purified from Brown-Norway (BN) rats. Sciatic nerve transections and repairs were performed in three groups of Lewis (LEW) rats: negative controls (n = 4), local MSCs (epineural) injection (n = 4), and systemic MSCs (intravenous) injection (n = 4). Syngeneic (LEW-LEW) (n = 4) and allogeneic (BN-LEW) (n = 4) hindlimb transplants were performed and assessed for neuroregeneration after local or systemic MSC treatment. Rats undergoing sciatic nerve cut-and-repair and treated with either local or systemic injection of MSCs had significant improvement in the speed of recovery of compound muscle action potential amplitudes and axon counts when compared with negative controls. Similarly, rats undergoing allogeneic hindlimb transplants treated with local injection of MSCs exhibited significantly increased axon counts. Similarly, systemic MSC treatment resulted in improved nerve regeneration following allogeneic hindlimb transplants. Systemic administration had a more pronounced effect on electromotor recovery while local injection was more effective at increasing fiber counts, suggesting different targets of action. Local and systemic MSC injections significantly improve the pace and degree of nerve regeneration after nerve injury and hindlimb transplantation. PMID:27510321

  2. Optical coherence tomography of the rat cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Chuang, Ying; Burnett, Arthur L.; Su, Li-Ming

    2007-02-01

    Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during radical prostatectomy, which are responsible for erectile function, may improve nerve preservation and postoperative potency. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of real-time, high-resolution, cross-sectional, in vivo tissue imaging. The rat prostate serves as an excellent model for studying the use of OCT for imaging the cavernous nerves, as the rat cavernous nerve is a large, visible, and distinct bundle allowing for easy identification with OCT in addition to histologic confirmation. Imaging was performed with the Niris OCT system and a handheld 8 Fr probe, capable of acquiring real-time images with 11-μm axial and 25-μm lateral resolution in tissue. Open surgical exposure of the prostate was performed on a total of 6 male rats, and OCT images of the prostate, cavernous nerve, pelvic plexus ganglion, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, and periprostatic fat were acquired. Cavernous nerve electrical stimulation with simultaneous intracorporeal pressure measurements was performed to confirm proper identification of the cavernous nerves. The prostate and cavernous nerves were also processed for histologic analysis and further confirmation. Cross-sectional and longitudinal OCT images of the cavernous nerves were acquired and compared with histologic sections. The cavernous nerve and ganglion could be differentiated from the surrounding prostate gland, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, bladder, and fatty tissue. We report preliminary results of OCT images of the rat cavernous nerves with histologic correlation and erectile stimulation measurements, thus providing interpretation of prostate structures as they appear in OCT images.

  3. Detection of catecholamine and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) containing nerve endings in the median eminence and the organon vasculosum laminae terminalis by fluorescence histochemistry and immunohistochemistry on the same microscopic sections.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Y; Watanabe, K; Kinoshita, H; Kubo, S; Sano, Y; Sin, S; Hashimura, E; Imagawa, K

    1979-02-01

    Distribution of catecholamine (CA) and LH-RH nerve endings in the median eminence (ME) and the organon vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) of the rat was investigated by application of fluorescence histochemistry and immunohistochemistry on the same sections of the tissue. In the ME, those two kinds of endings coexisted in the lateral portion of the middle part of ME, and in the wall of tuberoinfundibular sulcus, where they might be considered to have functional correlation. In the OVLT they were also distributed in fairly near distance, but they were not so closely associated as observed in the ME.

  4. The Prevalence of Anatomical Variations of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Joyeeta; Vikse, Jens; Ramakrishnan, Piravin Kumar; Walocha, Jerzy A.; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective The course and branches of the median nerve (MN) in the wrist vary widely among the population. Due to significant differences in the reported prevalence of such variations, extensive knowledge on the anatomy of the MN is essential to avoid iatrogenic nerve injury. Our aim was to determine the prevalence rates of anatomical variations of the MN in the carpal tunnel and the most common course patterns and variations in its thenar motor branch (TMB). Study Design A systematic search of all major databases was performed to identify articles that studied the prevalence of MN variations in the carpal tunnel and the TMB. No date or language restrictions were set. Extracted data was classified according to Lanz's classification system: variations in the course of the single TMB—extraligamentous, subligamentous, and transligamentous (type 1); accessory branches of the MN at the distal carpal tunnel (type 2); high division of the MN (type 3); and the MN and its accessory branches proximal to the carpal tunnel (type 4). Pooled prevalence rates were calculated using MetaXL 2.0. Results Thirty-one studies (n = 3918 hands) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence rates of the extraligamentous, subligamentous, and transligamentous courses were 75.2% (95%CI:55.4%-84.7%), 13.5% (95%CI:3.6%-25.7%), and 11.3% (95%CI:2.4%-23.0%), respectively. The prevalence of Lanz group 2, 3, and 4 were 4.6% (95%CI:1.6%-9.1%), 2.6% (95%CI:0.1%-2.8%), and 2.3% (95%CI:0.3%-5.6%), respectively. Ulnar side of branching of the TMB was found in 2.1% (95%CI:0.9%-3.6%) of hands. The prevalence of hypertrophic thenar muscles over the transverse carpal ligament was 18.2% (95%CI:6.8%-33.0%). A transligamentous course of the TMB was more commonly found in hands with hypertrophic thenar muscles (23.4%, 95%CI:5.0%-43.4%) compared to those without hypertrophic musculature (1.7%, 95%CI:0%-100%). In four studies (n = 423 hands), identical bilateral course of the TMB was

  5. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  6. Transverse Movement of the Median Nerve in the Carpal Tunnel during Wrist and Finger Motion in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Sawaizumi, Takuya; Kodera, Norie; Tomori, Yuji; Takai, Shinro

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. Repetitive wrist and finger motion has been suggested as a major factor of pathogenesis of CTS. However, little is known about the pathomechanics of CTS. We aimed to evaluate the movement of the median nerve in the carpal tunnel during wrist and finger motions using transverse ultrasound in 21 patients with CTS (5 men and 16 women with mean age 69.0 years). We examined quantitatively the median nerve location as a coordinate within the carpal tunnel at varied wrist positions with all fingers full extension and flexion respectively in the affected and unaffected sides. We thus found that at all wrist positions during finger motion, the median nerve moved significantly more ulnopalmarly in the affected side compared to the unaffected side (p < 0.05). Especially, at the wrist palmar-flexion position as a provocative test, the nerve moved significantly (p < 0.05) the most ulnopalmarly among all wrist positions in the affected side. The nerve was the most strongly compressed against the transverse carpal ligament by the flexor tendons. Additionally, the displacement amount of the nerve in the dorsal-palmar direction was significantly smaller in the affected side than in the unaffected side. These findings indicate that such a pattern of nerve movement has the potential to distinguish affected from unaffected individuals. This ultrasound information could be useful in better understanding of the pathomechanics of CTS, and in further improvement of diagnosis and treatment for CTS. PMID:26133190

  7. Histopathological effects of intramuscular metamizole sodium on rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Emir, Abdurrahman; Kalkan, Yıldıray; Bostan, Habib

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): We investigated the histopathological effects of metamizole sodium (MS) on the sciatic nerve. Materials and Methods: This study was performed using 48 adult male Wistar albino rats. Ten groups were constituted with 6 rats in each group. MS injection into the sciatic nerve (group 1), MS injection into the muscle [group 3 (50 mg/kg, 0.4 ml) and group 5 (50 mg/kg, 0.8 ml)], MS injection into the muscle cavity in the vicinity of the sciatic nerve [group 2 (50 mg/kg, 0.4 ml) and group 4 (50 mg/kg, 0.8 ml)], normal saline injection into the muscle in the vicinity of the sciatic nerve [group 6A (0.4 ml) and 6B (0.8 ml)], subjected to injury by drilling the entire layer of nerve without injecting any drug, normal saline injection in the sciatic nerve, and control group. Nerve and muscle samples were taken 7 days after administrations. Tissue sections were stained using a hematoxylin and eosin-Luxol® fast blue stain, assessed by a histologist. Results: The levels of axonal degeneration of the rats in groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6A, and 8 were found to be significantly higher compared to the levels of the rats in the control group (P<0.05). Myelin degeneration of the rats in all groups was found to be significantly higher compared to myelin degeneration of the rats in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: It was observed that MS could lead to injury in the sciatic nerve with a toxic effect due to diffusion. PMID:27746863

  8. A polylactic acid non-woven nerve conduit for facial nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumine, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    This study developed a biodegradable nerve conduit with PLA non-woven fabric and evaluated its nerve regeneration-promoting effect. The buccal branch of the facial nerve of 8 week-old Lewis rats was exposed, and a 7 mm nerve defect was created. A nerve conduit made of either PLA non-woven fabric (mean fibre diameter 460 nm), or silicone tube filled with type I collagen gel, or an autologous nerve, was implanted into the nerve defect, and their nerve regenerative abilities were evaluated 13 weeks after the surgery. The number of myelinated neural fibres in the middle portion of the regenerated nerve was the highest for PLA tubes (mean ± SD, 5051 ± 2335), followed by autologous nerves (4233 ± 590) and silicone tubes (1604 ± 148). Axon diameter was significantly greater in the PLA tube group (5.17 ± 1.69 µm) than in the silicone tube group (4.25 ± 1.60 µm) and no significant difference was found between the PLA tube and autograft (5.53 ± 1.93 µm) groups. Myelin thickness was greatest for the autograft group (0.65 ± 0.24 µm), followed by the PLA tube (0.54 ± 0.18 µm) and silicone tube (0.38 ± 0.12 µm) groups, showing significant differences among the three groups. The PLA non-woven fabric tube, composed of randomly-connected PLA fibres, is porous and has a number of advantages, such as sufficient strength to maintain luminal structure. The tube has demonstrated a comparable ability to induce peripheral nerve regeneration following autologous nerve transplantation.

  9. Centrally administered glucagon stimulates sympathetic nerve activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Krzeski, R; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Trzebski, A; Millhorn, D E

    1989-12-18

    The effect of pancreatic glucagon given intravenously, intracerebroventricularly and microinjected into the nucleus of the solitary tract on sympathetic activity in the cervical trunk and adrenal nerve was examined in rat. In each case glucagon caused a relatively long-lasting substantial increase in discharge of both nerves. This finding shows that glucagon can act centrally to stimulate sympathetic activity. The most probable site for the sympathoexcitatory effect of glucagon is the nucleus of the solitary tract. PMID:2598031

  10. Effect of splinting and exercise on intraneural edema of the median nerve in carpal tunnel syndrome--an MRI study to reveal therapeutic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Annina B; Elliott, James M; Strudwick, Mark W; Little, Mary; Coppieters, Michel W

    2012-08-01

    Splinting and nerve and tendon gliding exercises are commonly used to treat carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). It has been postulated that both modalities reduce intraneural edema. To test this hypothesis, 20 patients with mild to moderate CTS were randomly allocated to either night splinting or a home program of nerve and tendon gliding exercises. Magnetic resonance images of the wrist were taken at baseline, immediately after 10 min of splinting or exercise, and following 1 week of intervention. Primary outcome measures were signal intensity of the median nerve at the wrist as a measure of intraneural edema and palmar bowing of the carpal ligament. Secondary outcome measures were changes in symptom severity and function. Following 1 week of intervention, but not immediately after 10 min, signal intensity of the median nerve was reduced by ≈ 11% at the radioulnar level for both interventions (p = 0.03). This was accompanied by a mild improvement in symptoms and function (p < 0.004). A similar reduction in signal intensity is not observed in patients who only receive advice to remain active. No changes in signal intensity were identified further distally (p > 0.28). Ligament bowing remained unchanged (p > 0.08). Intraneural edema reduction is a likely therapeutic mechanism of splinting and exercise.

  11. Curcumin promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush injury in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxiong; Yu, Hailong; Liu, Jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qi; Xiang, Liangbi

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is capable of promoting peripheral nerve regeneration in normal condition. However, it is unclear whether its beneficial effect on nerve regeneration still exists under diabetic mellitus. The present study was designed to investigate such a possibility. Diabetes in rats was developed by a single dose of streptozotocin at 50 mg/kg. Immediately after nerve crush injury, the diabetic rats were intraperitoneally administrated daily for 4 weeks with curcumin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg), or normal saline, respectively. The axonal regeneration was investigated by morphometric analysis and retrograde labeling. The functional recovery was evaluated by electrophysiological studies and behavioral analysis. Axonal regeneration and functional recovery was significantly enhanced by curcumin, which were significantly better than those in vehicle saline group. In addition, high doses of curcumin (100 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg) achieved better axonal regeneration and functional recovery than low dose (50 mg/kg). In conclusion, curcumin is capable of promoting nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve crush injury in diabetes mellitus, highlighting its therapeutic values as a neuroprotective agent for peripheral nerve injury repair in diabetes mellitus.

  12. Effect of Frankincense Extract on Nerve Recovery in the Rat Sciatic Nerve Damage Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaowen; Ma, Jun; Wei, Qingwei; Feng, Xinxin; Qiao, Lu; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Binqing; Yu, Wenhui

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of frankincense extract on peripheral nerve regeneration in a crush injury rat model. Forty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: control and frankincense extract low-, medium-, and high-dose groups. At days 7, 14, 21, and 28 following the surgery, nerve regeneration and functional recovery were evaluated using the sciatic functional index (SFI), expression of GAP-43, and the proliferation of Schwann cells (SCs) in vivo and in vitro. At day 7, the SFI in the frankincense extract high-dose group was significantly improved compared with the control group. After day 14, SFI was significantly improved in the medium- and high-dose groups. There was no significant difference in GAP-43 expression among the groups at day 7. However, after day 14, expression of GAP-43 in the high-dose group was higher than that in the control group. Histological evaluation showed that the injured nerve of frankincense extract high-dose group recovered better than the other groups 28 days after surgery. Further, S100 immunohistochemical staining, MTT colorimetry, and flow cytometry assays all showed that frankincense extract could promote the proliferation of SCs. In conclusion, frankincense extract is able to promote sciatic nerve regeneration and improve the function of a crushed sciatic nerve. This study provides a new direction for the repair of peripheral nerve injury. PMID:27143985

  13. Characterization of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland and median eminence of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Calvo, J.R.; Rubio, A.; Goberna, R.; Guerrero, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of specific melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland (HG) and median eminence (ME) of the rat was studied using ({sup 125}I)melatonin. Binding of melatonin to membrane crude preparations of both tissues was dependent on time and temperature. Thus, maximal binding was obtained at 37{degree}C after 30-60 min incubation. Binding was also dependent on protein concentration. The specific binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin was saturable, exhibiting only the class of binding sites in both tissues. The dissociation constants (Kd) were 170 and 190 pM for ME and HG, respectively. The concentration of the binding sites in ME was 8 fmol/mg protein, and in the HG 4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, binding of ({sup 125}I)melatonin to ME or HG was inhibited by increasing concentration of native melatonin; 50% inhibition was observed at about 702 and 422 nM for ME and HG, respectively. Additionally, the ({sup 125}I)melatonin binding to the crude membranes was not affected by the addition of different drugs such as norepinephrine, isoproterenol, phenylephrine, propranolol, or prazosin. The results confirm the presence of melatonin binding sites in median eminence and show, for the first time, the existence of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland.

  14. [Central projections of the rat recurrent laryngeal nerve].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Font, A; Maranillo, E; Merchán, A; Vázquez, T; Sañudo, J R; Valderrama-Canales, F J

    2006-01-01

    Laryngeal nerves contain the fibres that control the laryngeal function. The studies carried out on the rat with the purpose of having a better knowledge of the functional components and the real origin of the fibres conveyed by the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) are few and in disagreement. No one of such papers were developed using biotinylated dextrane amines (BDA), a powerful tool for tracing neural pathways. The aim of our study was to identify in the rat using BDA, the nuclei of real origin of the fibres of the RLN, knowing in this way the functional components of this nerve. The study has been developed in 31 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, applying the BDA into the lesioned RLN. The results obtained in all the animals show that the rat's RLN does not contain afferent fibres, whereas the efferent fibres were originated within the ipsilateral nucleus ambiguus (NA). So, in the rat, the RLN seems to contain exclusively efferent fibres, probably been the superior laryngeal nerve who conveyed the afferent fibres.

  15. Effects of 90 min of manual repetitive work on skin temperature and median and ulnar nerve conduction parameters: a pilot study in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Mussoni, Patrizia; Graziosi, Francesca; Calabrese, Monica; Farioli, Andrea; Marinelli, Francesco; Violante, Francesco S

    2013-02-01

    To test whether the influence of manual activity should be considered when interpreting the results of nerve conduction study (NCS) of the upper limbs performed during work shifts, we evaluated the short-term effect of 90-min repetitive manual work on NCS parameters. Twenty-eight healthy volunteers underwent NCS of the dominant limb at the end of an interview (T(0)), after a 30-min rest in sitting position (T(1)) and after performing a standardized 90-min manual task (T(2)). The task was designed to simulate typical assembly and packing activities. No significant differences were observed for skin temperature (Ts) and NCS parameters between T(0) and T(1). Significantly (p < 0.001) higher Ts mean values were found at T(2) as compared to the previous tests for both females and males. The regression analysis showed an association between temperature variation and nerve conduction velocity values for the median and ulnar nerve at T(2) as compared to T(1). In females, a reduction of the mean sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) amplitude at T(2) was recorded, whereas an opposite trend was observed among males. Manual work is able to influence hand Ts and to modify NCS parameters. SNAP amplitudes changes suggest gender differences in peripheral nerve characteristics that deserve further investigation.

  16. Mandibular Branch of the Facial Nerve in Wistar Rats: New Experimental Model to Assess Facial Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Salomone, Raquel; Nascimento, Silvia Bona do; Ferreira, Ricardo Jose Rodriguez; Silva, Ciro Ferreira da; Costa, Heloisa Juliana Zabeu Rossi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The ideal animal model for nerve regeneration studies is the object of controversy, because all models described by the literature have advantages and disadvantages. Objective To describe the histologic and functional patterns of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of Wistar rats to create a new experimental model of facial nerve regeneration. Methods Forty-two male rats were submitted to a nerve conduction test of the mandibular branch to obtain the compound muscle action potential. Twelve of these rats had the mandibular branch surgically removed and submitted to histologic analysis (number, partial density, and axonal diameter) of the proximal and distal segments. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the functional and histologic variables studied. Conclusion These new histologic and functional standards of the mandibular branch of the facial nerve of rats establish an objective, easy, and greatly reproducible model for future facial nerve regeneration studies. PMID:25992106

  17. [The hypertensive effect of vasopressin administered into the median eminence of the hypothalamus in rats].

    PubMed

    Gindeva, R; Pencheva, T

    1991-01-01

    Data about direct effect of vasopressin (VP) on the central arterial pressure (AP) orientated us to investigate the effect of its local administration in the median eminence (ME) of the hypothalamus in rats. For this purpose VP was administered in ME under micropellet form. AP was measured indirectly on the tail of rats up to 96th hour after operation. After implantation of VP there was an elevation of AP with maximum in the first hour, which was statistically significant (p less than 0.01). Identical manipulation (sham operation) was performed to control the lesion effect. Transitory lowering of AP with maximum in the first hour was also established and it was statistically significant (p less than 0.001), For exclusion a nonspecific systemic effect of VP the same dose was administered in the parietal cortex, during which transitory and short-lasting reaction occurred in the first hour after the operation. The data indicate that the peptide, administered in ME under micropellet form, could induce a longlasting hypertensive effect.

  18. Chorda tympani nerve modulates the rat's avoidance of calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Golden, Glen J; Voznesenskaya, Anna; Tordoff, Michael G

    2012-03-20

    Calcium intake depends on orosensory factors, implying the presence of a mechanism for calcium detection in the mouth. To better understand how information about oral calcium is conveyed to the brain, we examined the effects of chorda tympani nerve transection on calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) taste preferences and thresholds in male Wistar rats. The rats were given bilateral transections of the chorda tympani nerve (CTX) or control surgery. After recovery, they received 48-h two-bottle tests with an ascending concentration series of CaCl(2). Whereas control rats avoided CaCl(2) at concentrations of 0.1mM and higher, rats with CTX were indifferent to CaCl(2) concentrations up to 10mM. Rats with CTX had significantly higher preference scores for 0.316 and 3.16 mM CaCl(2) than did control rats. The results imply that the chorda tympani nerve is required for the normal avoidance of CaCl(2) solution.

  19. Histochemical discrimination of fibers in regenerating rat infraorbital nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Sanger, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    In rat dorsal root ganglia, histochemical staining of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and cholinesterase (CE) yields a reciprocal pattern of activity: Sensory processes are CA positive and CE negative, whereas motor processes are CA negative and CE positive. In rat infraorbital nerve (a sensory peripheral nerve), we saw extensive CA staining of nearly 100% of the myelinated axons. Although CE reactivity in myelinated axons was extremely rare, we did observe CE staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers. Four weeks after transection of infraorbital nerves, CA-stained longitudinal sections of the proximal stump demonstrated 3 distinct morphological zones. A fraction of the viable axons retained CA activity to within 2 mm of the distal extent of the stump, and the stain is capable of resolving growth sprouts being regenerated from these fibers. Staining of unmyelinated autonomic fibers in serial sections shows that CE activity was not retained as far distally as is the CA sensory staining.

  20. Variable spatial magnetic field influences peripheral nerves regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Suszyński, Krzysztof; Marcol, Wiesław; Szajkowski, Sebastian; Pietrucha-Dutczak, Marita; Cieślar, Grzegorz; Sieroń, Aleksander; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2014-09-01

    Generator of spatial magnetic field is one of most recent achievements among the magnetostimulators. This apparatus allows to obtain the rotating magnetic field. This new method may be more effective than other widely used techniques of magnetostimulation and magnetotherapy. We investigated the influence of alternating, spatial magnetic field on the regeneration of the crushed rat sciatic nerves. Functional and morphological evaluations were used. After crush injury of the right sciatic nerve, Wistar C rats (n = 80) were randomly divided into four groups (control and three experimental). The experimental groups (A, B, C) were exposed (20 min/day, 5 d/week, 4 weeks) to alternating spatial magnetic field of three different intensities. Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and tensometric assessments were performed every week after nerve crush. Forty-eight hours before the sacrificing of animals, DiI (1,1'-di-octadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethyloindocarbocyanine perchlorate) was applied 5 mm distally to the crush site. Collected nerves and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were subjected to histological and immunohistochemical staining. The survival rate of DRG neurons was estimated. Regrowth and myelination of the nerves was examined. The results of SFI and tensometric assessment showed improvement in all experimental groups as compared to control, with best outcome observed in group C, exposed to the strongest magnetic field. In addition, DRG survival rate and nerve regeneration intensity were significantly higher in the C group. Above results indicate that strong spatial alternating magnetic field exerts positive effect on peripheral nerve regeneration and its application could be taken under consideration in the therapy of injured peripheral nerves. PMID:23781984

  1. [Central projections of the rat superior laryngeal nerve].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Font, A; Maranillo, E; Merchán, A; Vázquez, T; Safiudo, J R; Valderrama-Canales, F

    2006-01-01

    Laryngeal nerves contain the fibres that control the laryngeal function. On the rat, the studies on the functional components and the real origin of the fibres conveyed by the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) are few. No one of such works were developed using biotinylated dextrane amines (BDA), a powerful tool for tracing neural pathways. The aim of our study was to identify by using BDA, in the rat, the nuclei of real origin of the fibres of the SLN, knowing in this way the functional components of this nerve. The study has been developed in 11 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, applying the BDA into the damaged SLN. The results obtained in all the animals shown that the rat SLN carries efferent fibres originated within the ipsilateral nucleus ambiguous (NA) and dorsal nucleus of the vagus (DNV), and that afferent fibres reach the tractus solitari and the nucleus tractus solitari. So, in the rat, the SLN seems to convey efferent fibres from the NA and DNV and, probably, all the laryngeal afferent fibres.

  2. Multidimensional ultrasound imaging of the wrist: Changes of shape and displacement of the median nerve and tendons in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Filius, Anika; Scheltens, Marjan; Bosch, Hans G; van Doorn, Pieter A; Stam, Henk J; Hovius, Steven E R; Amadio, Peter C; Selles, Ruud W

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel may alter in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) due to fibrotic changes and increased carpal tunnel pressure. Ultrasound can visualize these potential changes, making ultrasound potentially an accurate diagnostic tool. To study this, we imaged the carpal tunnel of 113 patients and 42 controls. CTS severity was classified according to validated clinical and nerve conduction study (NCS) classifications. Transversal and longitudinal displacement and shape (changes) were calculated for the median nerve, tendons and surrounding tissue. To predict diagnostic value binary logistic regression modeling was applied. Reduced longitudinal nerve displacement (p≤ 0.019), increased nerve cross-sectional area (p≤ 0.006) and perimeter (p≤ 0.007), and a trend of relatively changed tendon displacements were seen in patients. Changes were more convincing when CTS was classified as more severe. Binary logistic modeling to diagnose CTS using ultrasound showed a sensitivity of 70-71% and specificity of 80-84%. In conclusion, CTS patients have altered dynamics of structures within the carpal tunnel.

  3. Refining the Sensory and Motor Ratunculus of the Rat Upper Extremity Using fMRI and Direct Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Younghoon R.; Pawela, Christopher P.; Li, Rupeng; Kao, Dennis; Schulte, Marie L.; Runquist, Matthew L.; Yan, Ji-Geng; Matloub, Hani S.; Jaradeh, Safwan S.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-01-01

    It is well understood that the different regions of the body have cortical representations in proportion to the degree of innervation. Our current understanding of the rat upper extremity has been enhanced using functional MRI (fMRI), but these studies are often limited to the rat forepaw. The purpose of this study is to describe a new technique that allows us to refine the sensory and motor representations in the cerebral cortex by surgically implanting electrodes on the major nerves of the rat upper extremity and providing direct electrical nerve stimulation while acquiring fMRI images. This technique was used to stimulate the ulnar, median, radial, and musculocutaneous nerves in the rat upper extremity using four different stimulation sequences that varied in frequency (5 Hz vs. 10 Hz) and current (0.5 mA vs. 1.0 mA). A distinct pattern of cortical activation was found for each nerve. The higher stimulation current resulted in a dramatic increase in the level of cortical activation. The higher stimulation frequency resulted in both increases and attenuation of cortical activation in different regions of the brain, depending on which nerve was stimulated. PMID:17969116

  4. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Assessment with Ultrasonography: Value of Inlet-to-Outlet Median Nerve Area Ratio in Patients versus Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhu, Jiaan; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Xu, Yiming; Wang, Gang; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of the Inlet-to-outlet median nerve area ratio (IOR) in patients with clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Forty-six wrists in 46 consecutive patients with clinical and electrodiagnostic evidence of CTS and forty-four wrists in 44 healthy volunteers were examined with ultrasonography. The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve was measured at the carpal tunnel inlet (the level of scaphoid-pisiform) and outlet (the level of the hook of the hamate), and the IOR was calculated for each wrist. Ultrasonography and electrodiagnostic tests were performed under blinded conditions. Electrodiagnostic testing combined with clinical symptoms were considered to be the gold standard test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic value between the inlet CSA and IOR. Results The study population included 16 men and 30 women (mean age, 45.3 years; range, 18–83 years). The control population included 18 men and 26 women (mean age, 50.4 years; range, 18–79 years). The mean inlet CSA was 8.7 mm2 in healthy controls and 14.6mm2 in CTS group (P<0.001). The mean IOR in healthy volunteers (1.0) was smaller than that in patients (1.6, P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed a diagnostic advantage to using the IOR rather than the inlet CSA (P<0.01). An IOR cutoff value of ≥ 1.3 would yield 93% specificity and 91% sensitivity in the diagnosis of CTS. Conclusion The IOR of median nerve area promises to be an effective means in the diagnosis of CTS. A large-scale, randomized controlled trial is required to determine how and when this parameter will be used. PMID:25617835

  5. Differences in risk factors for neurophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome and illness with similar symptoms but normal median nerve function: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To explore whether risk factors for neurophysiologically confirmed carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) differ from those for sensory symptoms with normal median nerve conduction, and to test the validity and practical utility of a proposed definition for impaired median nerve conduction, we carried out a case–control study of patients referred for investigation of suspected CTS. Methods We compared 475 patients with neurophysiological abnormality (NP+ve) according to the definition, 409 patients investigated for CTS but classed as negative on neurophysiological testing (NP-ve), and 799 controls. Exposures to risk factors were ascertained by self-administered questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated by logistic regression. Results NP+ve disease was associated with obesity, use of vibratory tools, repetitive movement of the wrist or fingers, poor mental health and workplace psychosocial stressors. NP-ve illness was also related to poor mental health and occupational psychosocial stressors, but differed from NP+ve disease in showing associations also with prolonged use of computer keyboards and tendency to somatise, and no relation to obesity. In direct comparison of NP+ve and NP-ve patients (the latter being taken as the reference category), the most notable differences were for obesity (OR 2.7, 95 % CI 1.9-3.9), somatising tendency (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9), diabetes (OR 1.6, 95% CI 0.9-3.1) and work with vibratory tools (OR 1.4, 95% CI 0.9-2.2). Conclusions When viewed in the context of earlier research, our findings suggest that obesity, diabetes, use of hand-held vibratory tools, and repeated forceful movements of the wrist and hand are causes of impaired median nerve function. In addition, sensory symptoms in the hand, whether from identifiable pathology or non-specific in origin, may be rendered more prominent and distressing by hand activity, low mood, tendency to somatise, and psychosocial stressors at work

  6. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates peripheral nerve degeneration in rat sciatic nerve crush injury.

    PubMed

    Renno, Waleed M; Al-Maghrebi, May; Alshammari, Ahmad; George, Preethi

    2013-02-01

    Recently, we have shown that green tea (GT) consumption improves both reflexes and sensation in unilateral chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve. Considering the substantial neuroprotective properties of GT polyphenols, we sought to investigate whether (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) could protect the sciatic nerve and improve functional impairments induced by a crushing injury. We also examined whether neuronal cell apoptosis induced by the crushing injury is affected by EGCG treatment. Histological examination of sciatic nerves from EGCG-treated (50mg/kg; i.p.) showed that axonotmized rats had a remarkable axonal and myelin regeneration with significant decrease in the number of myelinated axonal fibers compared to vehicle-treated crush group. Similarly, ultrastructural evaluation of EGCG-treated nerves displayed normal unmyelinated and myelinated axons with regular myelin sheath thickness and normalized appearance of Schmidt-Lantermann clefts. Extracellular matrix displayed normal collagen fibers appearance with distinctively organized distribution similar to sham animals. Analysis of foot position and extensor postural thrust test showed a progressive and faster recovery in the EGCG-treated group compared to vehicle-treated animals. EGCG-treated rats showed significant increase in paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical stimulation compared to vehicle-treated crush group. EGCG treatment also restored the mRNA expression of Bax, Bcl-2 and survivin but not that of p53 to sham levels on days 3 and 7 post-injury. Our results demonstrate that EGCG treatment enhanced functional recovery, advanced morphological nerve rescue and accelerated nerve regeneration following crush injury partly due to the down regulation of apoptosis related genes. PMID:23313191

  7. [Morphometry of the recurrent laryngeal nerves of the rat].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Font, A; Merchán, A; Maranillo, E; Brillas, A; Sañudo, J R; Valderrama-Canales, F J

    2006-12-01

    In mammals the recurrent laryngeal nerves are dissimilar in length between both sides. This asymmetry involves different time of arrival of the stimulus to the laryngeal musculature controlled by each nerve. Thus, several explanations have been addressed to elucidate the closest of the glottis at the same time despite the unlike length of the nerves. However, previous works on the topic lack of several important data. The present study compares, in two groups of 10 and 6 rats, the length and the composition of myelinated fibers in the recurrent laryngeal nerves of both sides, by means of light microscopy and a computerized morphometric analysis. The results show a mean difference of 0,84 cm longer the left than the right recurrent laryngeal nerve. No statistical differences were observed in the number of myelinated fibers between both sides. However, the myelinated fibers of the right side were statistically bigger in diameter than the fibers of the left side. The data are discussed in the context of the mechanisms for the compensation of the dissimilar length of both recurrent laryngeal nerves.

  8. Plexin a4 expression in adult rat cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    PlexinsA1-A4 participate in class 3 semaphorin signaling as co-receptors to neuropilin 1 and 2. PlexinA4 is the latest member of the PlexinA subfamily to be identified. In previous studies, we described the expression of PlexinA4 in the brain and spinal cord of the adult rat. Here, antibodies to PlexinA4 were used to reveal immunolabeling in most of the cranial nerve surveyed. Labeling was found in the olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, abducens, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, and hypoglossal nerves. This is the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of PlexinA4 in the adult cranial nerves. The findings will set the basis for future studies on the potential role of PlexinA4 in regeneration and repair of the adult central and peripheral nervous system.

  9. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates nerve regeneration following inferior alveolar nerve transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mai; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Masamichi; Iwata, Koichi; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury, which is frequently caused by orofacial surgery or trauma, induces sensory loss in orofacial regions innervated by the IAN. However, no effective treatment for orofacial sensory loss currently exists. We determined whether sensory loss in facial skin above the mental foramen following IAN transection was recovered by exposure of the transected IAN to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). Inferior alveolar nerve transection (IANX) was performed in 7-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. On day 7 after IANX, the effect of daily LIPUS (from day 0) on the transected IAN, in terms of sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, was examined. Moreover, the number of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the facial skin above the mental foramen of rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS was counted using the retrograde neurotracing technique. Daily exposure of the transected IAN to LIPUS significantly promoted recovery of the head-withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, and the number of TG neurons innervating the facial skin above mental foramen was significantly increased in rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS compared with sham or LIPUS-unexposed rats. Daily treatment of stumps of the transected IAN with LIPUS facilitated morphological and functional regeneration, suggesting that LIPUS is an effective and novel therapy for IAN injury. PMID:27058986

  10. Sciatic nerve regeneration in rats by a promising electrospun collagen/poly(ε-caprolactone) nerve conduit with tailored degradation rate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To cope with the limitations faced by autograft acquisitions particularly for multiple nerve injuries, artificial nerve conduit has been introduced by researchers as a substitute for autologous nerve graft for the easy specification and availability for mass production. In order to best mimic the structures and components of autologous nerve, great efforts have been made to improve the designation of nerve conduits either from materials or fabrication techniques. Electrospinning is an easy and versatile technique that has recently been used to fabricate fibrous tissue-engineered scaffolds which have great similarity to the extracellular matrix on fiber structure. Results In this study we fabricated a collagen/poly(ε-caprolactone) (collagen/PCL) fibrous scaffold by electrospinning and explored its application as nerve guide substrate or conduit in vitro and in vivo. Material characterizations showed this electrospun composite material which was made of submicron fibers possessed good hydrophilicity and flexibility. In vitro study indicated electrospun collagen/PCL fibrous meshes promoted Schwann cell adhesion, elongation and proliferation. In vivo test showed electrospun collagen/PCL porous nerve conduits successfully supported nerve regeneration through an 8 mm sciatic nerve gap in adult rats, achieving similar electrophysiological and muscle reinnervation results as autografts. Although regenerated nerve fibers were still in a pre-mature stage 4 months postoperatively, the implanted collagen/PCL nerve conduits facilitated more axons regenerating through the conduit lumen and gradually degraded which well matched the nerve regeneration rate. Conclusions All the results demonstrated this collagen/PCL nerve conduit with tailored degradation rate fabricated by electrospinning could be an efficient alternative to autograft for peripheral nerve regeneration research. Due to its advantage of high surface area for cell attachment, it is believed that this

  11. Low-energy laser action on median and radial nerve post-traumatic lesion after surgical suture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipa, Ciprian; Bunila, Daniela; Crangulescu, Nicolae; Nacu, Mihaela; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.; Stanciulescu, Viorica; Vasiliu, Virgil V.

    1996-01-01

    The low energy laser (LEL) biostimulatory effects on nervous tissue regeneration are well known. Thirty two patients with medial and/or radial nerve traumatic forearm lesion after surgical suture were divided into two groups: A-18 patients were treated with LEL; B-14 patients, witness, were treated with placebo lasers and classical medical and physical therapy. Lasers used were: HeNe, 632.5 nm wavelength, 2 mW power, and GaAlAs diode laser, 880 nm wavelength, pulsed emission with an output power 2 mW. Before, during, and after treatment EMG was done in order to measure objectively the efficiency of the treatment. We obtained good results after 4 - 5 months at 14 patients (77.7%) from group A and about the same results at 10 patients (71.3%) from group B, but after at least 8 months the good results were noticed concerning the improvements of EMG registration and on movements and force of the fingers. Finally we can say that the favorable results were obtained in at least twice shorter time with LEL treatment than with classical therapy.

  12. Low-level laser irradiation improves functional recovery and nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve crush rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chau-Zen; Chen, Yi-Jen; Wang, Yan-Hsiung; Yeh, Ming-Long; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Ho, Mei-Ling; Liang, Jen-I; Chen, Chia-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    The development of noninvasive approaches to facilitate the regeneration of post-traumatic nerve injury is important for clinical rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the effective dose of noninvasive 808-nm low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on sciatic nerve crush rat injury model. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 experimental groups: a normal group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 8 J/cm(2) and a sciatic nerve crush injury group with or without 808-nm LLLT at 3, 8 or 15 J/cm(2). Rats were given consecutive transcutaneous LLLT at the crush site and sacrificed 20 days after the crush injury. Functional assessments of nerve regeneration were analyzed using the sciatic functional index (SFI) and hindlimb range of motion (ROM). Nerve regeneration was investigated by measuring the myelin sheath thickness of the sciatic nerve using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by analyzing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) in sciatic nerve using western blot and immunofluorescence staining. We found that sciatic-injured rats that were irradiated with LLLT at both 3 and 8 J/cm(2) had significantly improved SFI but that a significant improvement of ROM was only found in rats with LLLT at 8 J/cm(2). Furthermore, the myelin sheath thickness and GAP43 expression levels were significantly enhanced in sciatic nerve-crushed rats receiving 808-nm LLLT at 3 and 8 J/cm(2). Taken together, these results suggest that 808-nm LLLT at a low energy density (3 J/cm(2) and 8 J/cm(2)) is capable of enhancing sciatic nerve regeneration following a crush injury. PMID:25119457

  13. Low-Level Laser-Accelerated Peripheral Nerve Regeneration within a Reinforced Nerve Conduit across a Large Gap of the Transected Sciatic Nerve in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Tsung-Bin; Chan, Shiuh-Chuan; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposed a novel combination of neural regeneration techniques for the repair of damaged peripheral nerves. A biodegradable nerve conduit containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin was annexed using beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-TCP, GGT) to bridge the transection of a 15 mm sciatic nerve in rats. Two trigger points were irradiated transcutaneously using 660 nm of gallium-aluminum arsenide phosphide (GaAlAsP) via laser diodes for 2 min daily over 10 consecutive days. Walking track analysis showed a significant improvement in sciatic functional index (SFI) (P < 0.01) and pronounced improvement in the toe spreading ability of rats undergoing laser stimulation. Electrophysiological measurements (peak amplitude and area) illustrated by compound muscle action potential (CMAP) curves demonstrated that laser stimulation significantly improved nerve function and reduced muscular atrophy. Histomorphometric assessments revealed that laser stimulation accelerated nerve regeneration over a larger area of neural tissue, resulting in axons of greater diameter and myelin sheaths of greater thickness than that observed in rats treated with nerve conduits alone. Motor function, electrophysiological reactions, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessments all demonstrate that the proposed therapy accelerated the repair of transected peripheral nerves bridged using a GGT nerve conduit. PMID:23737818

  14. Low-Level Laser-Accelerated Peripheral Nerve Regeneration within a Reinforced Nerve Conduit across a Large Gap of the Transected Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Huang, Tsung-Bin; Chan, Shiuh-Chuan; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2013-01-01

    This study proposed a novel combination of neural regeneration techniques for the repair of damaged peripheral nerves. A biodegradable nerve conduit containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin was annexed using beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-TCP, GGT) to bridge the transection of a 15 mm sciatic nerve in rats. Two trigger points were irradiated transcutaneously using 660 nm of gallium-aluminum arsenide phosphide (GaAlAsP) via laser diodes for 2 min daily over 10 consecutive days. Walking track analysis showed a significant improvement in sciatic functional index (SFI) (P < 0.01) and pronounced improvement in the toe spreading ability of rats undergoing laser stimulation. Electrophysiological measurements (peak amplitude and area) illustrated by compound muscle action potential (CMAP) curves demonstrated that laser stimulation significantly improved nerve function and reduced muscular atrophy. Histomorphometric assessments revealed that laser stimulation accelerated nerve regeneration over a larger area of neural tissue, resulting in axons of greater diameter and myelin sheaths of greater thickness than that observed in rats treated with nerve conduits alone. Motor function, electrophysiological reactions, muscular reinnervation, and histomorphometric assessments all demonstrate that the proposed therapy accelerated the repair of transected peripheral nerves bridged using a GGT nerve conduit. PMID:23737818

  15. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging of regeneration/degeneration after rat sciatic nerve injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sig Hwang, Min; Perrin, George; Muir, David; Mareci, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging was performed to investigate myelination and demyelination spatiotemporally in cut or crushed excised rat sciatic nerves in a 17.6 T magnet with a solenoid RF coil. Orientation independent measures of water diffusion, fractional anisotropy (FA) and averaged diffusivity (), were examined as MR parameters for the quantification of the myelin within the major peripheral nerve. Crushed nerves initially demonstrated decreased FA, followed by increase to FA of normal nerve with time. At 14 days post injury, FA of the nerve is high, 0.85, at the site proximal to the injury then FA decreases in a proximodistal gradient because the nerve remains more demyelinated toward the distal area. Cut sciatic nerves displayed a prolonged decrease of FA with time after injury. Also FA correlates with in these nerves. Therefore FA or may be a good indicator of myelination and demyelination in rat sciatic nerves and FA appears to be a more sensitive indicator of myelin.

  16. The central projections of the laryngeal nerves in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Font, Arán; Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; McHanwell, Stephen; Vázquez, Teresa; Maranillo, Eva; Sañudo, Jose; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J

    2011-08-01

    The larynx serves respiratory, protective, and phonatory functions. The motor and sensory innervation to the larynx controlling these functions is provided by the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Classical studies state that the SLN innervates the cricothyroid muscle and provides sensory innervation to the supraglottic cavity, whereas the RLN supplies motor innervation to the remaining intrinsic laryngeal muscles and sensory innervation to the infraglottic cavity, but recent data suggest a more complex anatomical and functional organisation. The current neuroanatomical tracing study was undertaken to provide a comprehensive description of the central brainstem connections of the axons within the SLN and the RLN, including those neurons that innervate the larynx. The study has been carried out in 41 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The central projections of the laryngeal nerves were labelled following application of biotinylated dextran amines onto the SLN, the RLN or both. The most remarkable result of the study is that in the rat the RLN does not contain any afferent axons from the larynx, in contrast to the pattern observed in many other species including man. The RLN supplied only special visceromotor innervation to the intrinsic muscles of the larynx from motoneurons in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb). All the afferent axons innervating the larynx are contained within the SLN, and reach the nucleus of the solitary tract. The SLN also contained secretomotor efferents originating from motoneurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and special visceral efferent fibres from the Amb. In conclusion, the present study shows that in the rat the innervation of the larynx differs in significant ways from that described in other species.

  17. The central projections of the laryngeal nerves in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Pascual-Font, Arán; Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; McHanwell, Stephen; Vázquez, Teresa; Maranillo, Eva; Sañudo, Jose; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J

    2011-01-01

    The larynx serves respiratory, protective, and phonatory functions. The motor and sensory innervation to the larynx controlling these functions is provided by the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) and the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Classical studies state that the SLN innervates the cricothyroid muscle and provides sensory innervation to the supraglottic cavity, whereas the RLN supplies motor innervation to the remaining intrinsic laryngeal muscles and sensory innervation to the infraglottic cavity, but recent data suggest a more complex anatomical and functional organisation. The current neuroanatomical tracing study was undertaken to provide a comprehensive description of the central brainstem connections of the axons within the SLN and the RLN, including those neurons that innervate the larynx. The study has been carried out in 41 adult male Sprague–Dawley rats. The central projections of the laryngeal nerves were labelled following application of biotinylated dextran amines onto the SLN, the RLN or both. The most remarkable result of the study is that in the rat the RLN does not contain any afferent axons from the larynx, in contrast to the pattern observed in many other species including man. The RLN supplied only special visceromotor innervation to the intrinsic muscles of the larynx from motoneurons in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb). All the afferent axons innervating the larynx are contained within the SLN, and reach the nucleus of the solitary tract. The SLN also contained secretomotor efferents originating from motoneurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and special visceral efferent fibres from the Amb. In conclusion, the present study shows that in the rat the innervation of the larynx differs in significant ways from that described in other species. PMID:21599662

  18. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Feng, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods: Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group), sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3) and macrophages (CD68) in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site.

  19. Immune cell distribution and immunoglobulin levels change following sciatic nerve injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; Feng, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): To investigate the systemic and local immune status of two surgical rat models of sciatic nerve injury, a crushed sciatic nerve, and a sciatic nerve transection Materials and Methods: Twenty-four adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operation (control group), sciatic nerve crush, and sciatic nerve transaction. Sciatic nerve surgery was performed. The percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ratio were determined by flow cytometry. Serum IgM and IgG levels were analyzed by ELISA. T-cells (CD3) and macrophages (CD68) in sciatic nerve tissue sections were identified through immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared to sham-operated controls, in rats that underwent nerve injury, the percentage of CD4+ cells and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the peripheral blood were significantly decreased 7 days after surgery, serum IgM levels were increased 14 days after surgery, and serum IgG levels were increased 21 days after surgery. There were a large number of CD3+ cells and a small number of CD68+ cells in sciatic nerve tissue sections 21 days after surgery, indicating T-cell and macrophage activation and infiltration. Local IgG deposition was also detected at the nerve injury site 21 days after surgery. Conclusion: Rat humoral and cellular immune status changed following sciatic nerve injury, particularly with regard to the cellular immune response at the nerve injury site. PMID:27635205

  20. Integration of aortic nerve inputs in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Mifflin, S W

    2000-01-01

    The integration of arterial baroreceptor afferent inputs was studied in renal wrap hypertensive (HT) and normotensive (NT) rats. In anesthetized and paralyzed rats, aortic nerve (AN)-evoked depressor responses were reduced in HT compared with NT rats (P<0.05). We tested the hypothesis that the attenuated baroreflex was associated with altered integration of baroreceptor inputs within the nucleus of the solitary tract. Based on onset latency and the ability of monosynaptic neurons (MSNs) to respond to each of 2 AN stimuli separated by 5 ms, cells in HT and NT rats were divided into 3 groups: short-latency MSNs (SLMSNs), long-latency MSNs (LLMSNs), and polysynaptic neurons (PSNs). A higher percentage of PSNs (73% versus 61%) and a lower percentage of SLMSNs (20% versus 27%) or LLMSNs (7% versus 12%) were found in HT rats (P<0.05). In addition, in HT compared with NT rats, the AN onset latency was greater in PSNs (29. 9+/-1.1 versus 26.7+/-0.8 ms) but not in SLMSNs (5.0+/-0.5 versus 5. 0+/-0.3 ms) or LLMSNs (22.9+/-1.2 versus 24.1+/-0.7 ms) (P<0.05). Finally, in HT compared with NT rats, the number of PSNs responding to a single AN stimulus with multiple action potentials was increased (40% versus 19%) (P<0.05). This was not observed in SLMSNs (26% versus 13%) or LLMSNs (12% versus 18%). The results indicate that renal wrap hypertension is associated with reduced AN-evoked depressor responses. There also were alterations in the integration of AN afferent inputs within the nucleus of the solitary tract, and these alterations were most marked in the PSN population.

  1. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  2. Peripheral Nerve Repair in Rats Using Composite Hydrogel-Filled Aligned Nanofiber Conduits with Incorporated Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jenny; Limburg, Sonja; Joshi, Sunil K.; Landman, Rebeccah; Park, Michelle; Zhang, Qia; Kim, Hubert T.

    2013-01-01

    Repair of peripheral nerve defects with current synthetic, tubular nerve conduits generally shows inferior recovery when compared with using nerve autografts, the current gold standard. We tested the ability of composite collagen and hyaluronan hydrogels, with and without the nerve growth factor (NGF), to stimulate neurite extension on a promising aligned, nanofiber poly-L-lactide-co-caprolactone (PLCL) scaffold. In vitro, the hydrogels significantly increased neurite extension from dorsal root ganglia explants. Consistent with these results, the addition of hydrogels as luminal fillers within aligned, nanofiber tubular PLCL conduits led to improved sensory function compared to autograft repair in a critical-size defect in the sciatic nerve in a rat model. Sensory recovery was assessed 3 and 12 weeks after repair using a withdrawal assay from thermal stimulation. The addition of hydrogel did not enhance recovery of motor function in the rat model. The NGF led to dose-dependent improvements in neurite out-growth in vitro, but did not have a significant effect in vivo. In summary, composite collagen/hyaluronan hydrogels enhanced sensory neurite outgrowth in vitro and sensory recovery in vivo. The use of such hydrogels as luminal fillers for tubular nerve conduits may therefore be useful in assisting restoration of protective sensation following peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23659607

  3. Toxicity and median effective doses of oxime therapies against percutaneous organophosphorus pesticide and nerve agent challenges in the Hartley guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Snider, Thomas H; Babin, Michael C; Jett, David A; Platoff, Gennady E; Yeung, David T

    2016-01-01

    Anticholinesterases, such as organophosphorus pesticides and warfare nerve agents, present a significant health threat. Onset of symptoms after exposure can be rapid, requiring quick-acting, efficacious therapy to mitigate the effects. The goal of the current study was to identify the safest antidote with the highest therapeutic index (TI = oxime 24-hr LD50/oxime ED50) from a panel of four oximes deemed most efficacious in a previous study. The oximes tested were pralidoxime chloride (2-PAM Cl), MMB4 DMS, HLö-7 DMS, and obidoxime Cl2. The 24-hr median lethal dose (LD50) for the four by intramuscular (IM) injection and the median effective dose (ED50) were determined. In the ED50 study, male guinea pigs clipped of hair received 2x LD50 topical challenges of undiluted Russian VX (VR), VX, or phorate oxon (PHO) and, at the onset of cholinergic signs, IM therapy of atropine (0.4 mg/kg) and varying levels of oxime. Survival was assessed at 3 hr after onset clinical signs. The 3-hr 90th percentile dose (ED90) for each oxime was compared to the guinea pig pre-hospital human-equivalent dose of 2-PAM Cl, 149 µmol/kg. The TI was calculated for each OP/oxime combination. Against VR, MMB4 DMS had a higher TI than HLö-7 DMS, whereas 2-PAM Cl and obidoxime Cl2 were ineffective. Against VX, MMB4 DMS > HLö-7 DMS > 2-PAM Cl > obidoxime Cl2. Against PHO, all performed better than 2-PAM Cl. MMB4 DMS was the most effective oxime as it was the only oxime with ED90 < 149 µmol/kg against all three topical OPs tested. PMID:27432237

  4. Effect of Platelet Rich Plasma and Platelet Rich Fibrin on sciatic nerve regeneration in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Lichtenfels, Martina; Colomé, Lucas; Sebben, Alessandra Deise; Braga-Silva, Jefferson

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) and Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF) on peripheral nerve repair. Thirty-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into four equal treatments groups: autologous nerve grafts (ANG), silicon tube plus saline solution (SS), silicon tube plus PRP, and silicon tube plus PRF. In ANG group, 10 mm segment from sciatic nerve was excised and reimplanted between the nerve stumps. In the SS, PRP, and PRF groups, 5 mm segment from sciatic nerve was excised and bridged with a 12 mm silicone conduit to create a 10 mm nerve gap. The conduit was filled in accordance with the different treatments. Walking track analysis was performed periodically and on the 90th post-operative day histomorphometric analysis was performed. The ANG, PRF, and PRP groups presented a significant functional improvement in relation to the SS group (P = 0.001) on 90 days after surgery. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that the ANG group achieved a larger nerve fiber diameter in proximal stump while comparing with the SS group (P =0.037) and showed larger fiber diameter in median stump in comparison to the PRP group (P = 0.002) and PRF group (P = 0.001). Axonal diameter and myelin sheath thickness showed no statistical significant difference between the groups in the three stumps (P ≥ 0.05). This study suggests that PRP and PRF have positive effects on the functional nerve recovery; however, these groups don't achieve a significant improvement on the histomorphometric analysis.

  5. Elicitation of feeding, drinking, and gnawing following microinjections of muscimol into the median raphe nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    Klitenick, M A; Wirtshafter, D

    1989-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that injections of muscimol into the median raphe nucleus (MR) result in large increases in locomotor activity and food intake. The current experiment extends these results by showing that intra-MR muscimol injections in nondeprived rats also elicit nonprandial drinking and gnawing of wooden blocks. These findings indicate that stimulation of GABA receptors within the MR is able to energize a wide range of oral behaviors and is compatible with the view that the MR may be part of a "nonspecific" behavioral activation system. PMID:2730501

  6. Brain cortical mapping by simultaneous recording of functional near infrared spectroscopy and electroencephalograms from the whole brain during right median nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mikinobu; Hori, Etsuro; Takamoto, Kouichi; Tran, Anh Hai; Satoru, Kohno; Ishikawa, Akihiro; Ono, Taketoshi; Endo, Shunro; Nishijo, Hisao

    2009-11-01

    To investigate relationships between hemodynamic responses and neural activities in the somatosensory cortices, hemodynamic responses by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded simultaneously while subjects received electrical stimulation in the right median nerve. The statistical significance of the hemodynamic responses was evaluated by a general linear model (GLM) with the boxcar design matrix convoluted with Gaussian function. The resulting NIRS and EEGs data were stereotaxically superimposed on the reconstructed brain of each subject. The NIRS data indicated that changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration increased at the contralateral primary somatosensory (SI) area; responses then spread to the more posterior and ipsilateral somatosensory areas. The EEG data indicated that positive somatosensory evoked potentials peaking at 22 ms latency (P22) were recorded from the contralateral SI area. Comparison of these two sets of data indicated that the distance between the dipoles of P22 and NIRS channels with maximum hemodynamic responses was less than 10 mm, and that the two topographical maps of hemodynamic responses and current source density of P22 were significantly correlated. Furthermore, when onset of the boxcar function was delayed 5-15 s (onset delay), hemodynamic responses in the bilateral parietal association cortices posterior to the SI were more strongly correlated to electrical stimulation. This suggests that GLM analysis with onset delay could reveal the temporal ordering of neural activation in the hierarchical somatosensory pathway, consistent with the neurophysiological data. The present results suggest that simultaneous NIRS and EEG recording is useful for correlating hemodynamic responses to neural activity.

  7. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment improved the rate of autograft peripheral nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenli; Wang, Yuexiang; Tang, Jie; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Guo, Quanyi; Guo, Zhiyuan; Li, Pan; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been widely used in clinic for the treatment of repairing pseudarthrosis, bone fractures and of healing in various soft tissues. Some reports indicated that LIPUS accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration including Schwann cells (SCs) and injured nerves. But little is known about its appropriate intensities on autograft nerves. This study was to investigate which intensity of LIPUS improved the regeneration of gold standard postsurgical nerves in experimental rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats were made into 10 mm right side sciatic nerve reversed autologous nerve transplantation and randomly treated with 250 mW/cm2, 500 mW/cm2 or 750 mW/cm2 LIPUS for 2–12 weeks after operation. Functional and pathological results showed that LIPUS of 250 mW/cm2 significantly induced faster rate of axonal regeneration. This suggested that autograft nerve regeneration was improved. PMID:27102358

  8. Rat Whisker Movement after Facial Nerve Lesion: Evidence for Autonomic Contraction of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, James T.; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Hohman, Marc H.; Knox, Christopher J.; Weinberg, Julie S.; Kleiss, Ingrid J.; Hadlock, Tessa A.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrissal whisking is often employed to track facial nerve regeneration in rats; however, we have observed similar degrees of whisking recovery after facial nerve transection with or without repair. We hypothesized that the source of non-facial nerve-mediated whisker movement after chronic denervation was from autonomic, cholinergic axons traveling within the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve (ION). Rats underwent unilateral facial nerve transection with repair (N=7) or resection without repair (N=11). Post-operative whisking amplitude was measured weekly across 10 weeks, and during intraoperative stimulation of the ION and facial nerves at ≥18 weeks. Whisking was also measured after subsequent ION transection (N=6) or pharmacologic blocking of the autonomic ganglia using hexamethonium (N=3), and after snout cooling intended to elicit a vasodilation reflex (N=3). Whisking recovered more quickly and with greater amplitude in rats that underwent facial nerve repair compared to resection (P<0.05), but individual rats overlapped in whisking amplitude across both groups. In the resected rats, non-facial-nerve mediated whisking was elicited by electrical stimulation of the ION, temporarily diminished following hexamethonium injection, abolished by transection of the ION, and rapidly and significantly (P<0.05) increased by snout cooling. Moreover, fibrillation-related whisker movements decreased in all rats during the initial recovery period (indicative of reinnervation), but re-appeared in the resected rats after undergoing ION transection (indicative of motor denervation). Cholinergic, parasympathetic axons traveling within the ION innervate whisker pad vasculature, and immunohistochemistry for vasoactive intestinal peptide revealed these axons branching extensively over whisker pad muscles and contacting neuromuscular junctions after facial nerve resection. This study provides the first behavioral and anatomical evidence of spontaneous autonomic innervation

  9. Transcriptome profiling of the rat retina after optic nerve transection

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masayuki; Tanaka, Yuji; Omodaka, Kazuko; Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Nakamura, Orie; Tsuda, Satoru; Nakazawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases characterized by alterations in the contour of the optic nerve head (ONH), with corresponding visual field defects and progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). This progressive RGC death is considered to originate in axonal injury caused by compression of the axon bundles in the ONH. However, the molecular pathomechanisms of axonal injury-induced RGC death are not yet well understood. Here, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to examine transcriptome changes in rat retinas 2 days after optic nerve transection (ONT), and then used computational techniques to predict the resulting alterations in the transcriptional regulatory network. RNA-seq revealed 267 differentially expressed genes after ONT, 218 of which were annotated and 49 unannotated. We also identified differentially expressed transcripts, including potentially novel isoforms. An in silico pathway analysis predicted that CREB1 was the most significant upstream regulator. Thus, this study identified genes and pathways that may be involved in the pathomechanisms of axonal injury. We believe that our data should serve as a valuable resource to understand the molecular processes that define axonal injury-driven RGC death and to discover novel therapeutic targets for glaucoma. PMID:27353354

  10. Epineurial Window Is More Efficient in Attracting Axons than Simple Coaptation in a Sutureless (Cyanoacrylate-Bound) Model of End-to-Side Nerve Repair in the Rat Upper Limb: Functional and Morphometric Evidences and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Papalia, Igor; Magaudda, Ludovico; Righi, Maria; Ronchi, Giulia; Viano, Nicoletta; Geuna, Stefano; Colonna, Michele Rosario

    2016-01-01

    End-to-side nerve coaptation brings regenerating axons from the donor to the recipient nerve. Several techniques have been used to perform coaptation: microsurgical sutures with and without opening a window into the epi(peri)neurial connective tissue; among these, window techniques have been proven more effective in inducing axonal regeneration. The authors developed a sutureless model of end-to-side coaptation in the rat upper limb. In 19 adult Wistar rats, the median and the ulnar nerves of the left arm were approached from the axillary region, the median nerve transected and the proximal stump sutured to the pectoral muscle to prevent regeneration. Animals were then randomly divided in two experimental groups (7 animals each, 5 animals acting as control): Group 1: the distal stump of the transected median nerve was fixed to the ulnar nerve by applying cyanoacrylate solution; Group 2: a small epineurial window was opened into the epineurium of the ulnar nerve, caring to avoid damage to the nerve fibres; the distal stump of the transected median nerve was then fixed to the ulnar nerve by applying cyanoacrylate solution. The grasping test for functional evaluation was repeated every 10–11 weeks starting from week-15, up to the sacrifice (week 36). At week 36, the animals were sacrificed and the regenerated nerves harvested and processed for morphological investigations (high-resolution light microscopy as well as stereological and morphometrical analysis). This study shows that a) cyanoacrylate in end-to-side coaptation produces scarless axon regeneration without toxic effects; b) axonal regeneration and myelination occur even without opening an epineurial window, but c) the window is related to a larger number of regenerating fibres, especially myelinated and mature, and better functional outcomes. PMID:26872263

  11. Nerve growth factor receptor molecules in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Taniuchi, M.; Schweitzer, J.B.; Johnson, E.M. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have developed a method to immunoprecipitate rat nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor proteins and have applied the method to detect NGF receptor molecules in the rat brain. Crosslinking /sup 125/I-labeled NGF to either PC12 cells or cultured rat sympathetic neurons yielded two radiolabeled molecules (90 kDa and 220 kDa) that were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibody 192-IgG. Further, 192-IgG precipitated two radiolabeled proteins, with the expected sizes (80 kDa and 210 kDa) of noncrosslinked NGF receptor components, from among numerous surface-iodinated PC12 cell proteins. These results demonstrate the specific immunoprecipitation of NGF receptor molecules by 192-IgG. They applied the /sup 125/I-NGF crosslinking and 192-IgG-mediated immunoprecipitation procedures to plasma membrane preparations of rat brain: NGF receptor molecules of the same molecular masses as the peripheral receptor components were consistently detected in all regions and in preparations from whole brains. Removal of the peripheral sympathetic innervation of the brain did not eliminate these NGF receptor proteins, indicating that the receptor is endogenous to central nervous system tissues. They also observed retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-labeled 192-IgG from the parietal cortex to the nucleus basalis and from the hippocampus to the nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca and the medial septal nucleus. These findings demonstrate the presence in brain of NGF receptor molecules indistinguishable from those of the peripheral nervous system.

  12. Histamine H(3) receptor-mediated modulation of perivascular nerve transmission in rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengyuan; Takatori, Shingo; Jin, Xin; Koyama, Toshihiro; Tangsucharit, Panot; Li, Simin; Zamami, Yoshito; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2011-03-25

    The rat mesenteric artery has been shown to be innervated by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing (CGRPergic) vasodilator nerves. The present study was designed to investigate the involvement of histamine H(3) receptors in the neurotransmission of perivascular adrenergic and CGRPergic nerves. The mesenteric vascular beds without an endothelium isolated from male Wistar rats were perfused with Krebs solution and perfusion pressure was measured. In preparations with resting tension, the selective H(3) receptor agonist (R)-α-methylhistamine (α-methylhistamine; 10-100nM) significantly reduced periarterial nerve stimulation (2-8Hz)-induced vasoconstriction and noradrenaline release in the perfusate without an effect on the vasoconstriction induced by exogenously injected noradrenaline (0.5, 1.0nmol). In preparations with active tone produced by methoxamine (2μM) and in the presence of guanethidine (5μM), the periarterial nerve stimulation (1, 2Hz)-induced vasodilator response was inhibited by α-methylhistamine (0.1-1μM) perfusion without affecting vasodilation induced by exogenously injected CGRP (5pmol). Clobenpropit (histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, 1μM) canceled the α-methylhistamine-induced decrease in the periarterial nerve stimulation-induced vasoconstriction and noradrenaline release and periarterial nerve stimulation-induced vasodilation. These results suggest that the stimulation of H(3) receptors located in rat perivascular nerves inhibits presynaptically the neurotransmission of not only adrenergic nerves, but also CGRP nerves, by decreasing neurotransmitters.

  13. Restoring motor control and sensory feedback in people with upper extremity amputations using arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the median and ulnar nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. S.; Wark, H. A. C.; Hutchinson, D. T.; Warren, D. J.; O'Neill, K.; Scheinblum, T.; Clark, G. A.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. An important goal of neuroprosthetic research is to establish bidirectional communication between the user and new prosthetic limbs that are capable of controlling >20 different movements. One strategy for achieving this goal is to interface the prosthetic limb directly with efferent and afferent fibres in the peripheral nervous system using an array of intrafascicular microelectrodes. This approach would provide access to a large number of independent neural pathways for controlling high degree-of-freedom prosthetic limbs, as well as evoking multiple-complex sensory percepts. Approach. Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs, 96 recording/stimulating electrodes) were implanted for 30 days into the median (Subject 1-M, 31 years post-amputation) or ulnar (Subject 2-U, 1.5 years post-amputation) nerves of two amputees. Neural activity was recorded during intended movements of the subject’s phantom fingers and a linear Kalman filter was used to decode the neural data. Microelectrode stimulation of varying amplitudes and frequencies was delivered via single or multiple electrodes to investigate the number, size and quality of sensory percepts that could be evoked. Device performance over time was assessed by measuring: electrode impedances, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), stimulation thresholds, number and stability of evoked percepts. Main results. The subjects were able to proportionally, control individual fingers of a virtual robotic hand, with 13 different movements decoded offline (r = 0.48) and two movements decoded online. Electrical stimulation across one USEA evoked >80 sensory percepts. Varying the stimulation parameters modulated percept quality. Devices remained intrafascicularly implanted for the duration of the study with no significant changes in the SNRs or percept thresholds. Significance. This study demonstrated that an array of 96 microelectrodes can be implanted into the human peripheral nervous system for up to 1 month durations. Such an

  14. Specific neurotoxin lesions of median raphe serotonergic neurons disrupt maternal behavior in the lactating rat.

    PubMed

    Barofsky, A L; Taylor, J; Tizabi, Y; Kumar, R; Jones-Quartey, K

    1983-11-01

    Impairments in lactation after electrolytic lesions of the median raphe (MR) nucleus have been corrected by treatment with PRL. Specific serotonin neurotoxin lesions were used in the present study to determine whether decrements in litter growth after electrolytic lesions could be attributed to serotonergic neuron damage at the MR locus, and whether MR lesions (MRL) disrupted suckling-induced PRL release. Intracerebral microinjection of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) into the MR nucleus produced dose-related decrements in litter growth after either 4 micrograms (sham, 1.35 +/- 0.05; MRL, 1.04 +/- 0.05 g/pup X day; P less than 0.001) or 8 micrograms 5,7-DHT (sham, 1.35 +/- 0.06; MRL, 0.87 +/- 0.11 g/pup X day; P less than 0.001). Despite hypothalamic serotonin depletions of 15% and 55%, respectively, for the two doses of 5,7-DHT, there was no difference between sham and MRL animals in either basal or suckling-induced PRL release. When lesions were placed on day 1 of lactation (L) so that killing on day 7-L corresponded to the early maximal neurotoxin effect, MRL mothers still showed litter growth decrements (0.37 +/- 0.07; sham, 0.98 +/- 0.08 g/pup X day; P less than 0.001) and normal PRL values. When maternal behavior was examined, MRL animals exhibited a higher incidence of abnormal behaviors (failure to retrieve pups, cannibalism, and failure to initiate suckling during a 1-h test period; Fisher's exact P, Sham vs. MRL, less than 0.01, less than 0.05, and 0.15, respectively) than sham animals or animals with 5,7-DHT lesions in the dorsal raphe nucleus or superior colliculus. In addition, suckling behavior scores, determined from daily suckling behavior observations, were lowest in the MRL group and correlated with litter growth only in this group (r = 0.789; P less than 0.01). These data suggest that serotonergic elements in the MR nucleus play an obligatory role in maintaining normal maternal behavior during lactation, but they are not involved in suckling

  15. Photostimulation of sensory neurons of the rat vagus nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Albert Y.; Li, Gong; Wells, Jonathon; Kao, Joseph P. Y.

    2008-02-01

    We studied the effect of infrared (IR) stimulation on rat sensory neurons. Primary sensory neurons were prepared by enzymatic dissociation of the inferior (or "nodose") ganglia from the vagus nerves of rats. The 1.85-μm output of a diode laser, delivered through a 200-μm silica fiber, was used for photostimulation. Nodose neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, which is a non-selective cation channel that opens in response to significant temperature jumps above 37 C. Opening TRPV1 channels allows entry of cations, including calcium (Ca 2+), into the cell to cause membrane depolarization. Therefore, to monitor TRPV1 activation consequent to photostimulation, we used fura-2, a fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator, to monitor the rise in intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+]i). Brief trains of 2-msec IR pulses activated TRPV1 rapidly and reversibly, as evidenced by transient rises in [Ca 2+]i (referred to as Ca 2+ transients). Consistent with the Ca 2+ transients arising from influx of Ca 2+, identical photostimulation failed to evoke Ca 2+ responses in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+. Furthermore, the photo-induced Ca 2+ signals were abolished by capsazepine, a specific blocker of TRPV1, indicating that the responses were indeed mediated by TRPV1. We discuss the feasibility of using focal IR stimulation to probe neuronal circuit properties in intact neural tissue, and compare IR stimulation with another photostimulation technique-focal photolytic release of "caged" molecules.

  16. The potential role of nerve growth factor in cryoneurolysis-induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hui; Feng, Yi; Gao, Zhifeng; Yang, Ba-Xian

    2012-10-01

    Cryoanalgesia is suggested as a risk factor of neuropathic pain. The current study investigated the pain behavior of sciatic nerve cryoneurolysis (SCN) in adult male rats. The role of nerve growth factor (NGF) was also studied. The mechanical threshold was significantly elevated in SCN group than sham-operation group within 14days after surgery. After 28days, 22 out of 39 SCN rats (56.4%) represented mechanical hyperalgesia. There were much more NGF-immunoreactive nerve cells expressed in the dorsal horn in SCN rats with hyperalgesia. The NGF protein levels of SCN rats measured by Western blot were higher than sham-operation rats, while they were significantly higher in SCN rats with hyperalgesia than those without hyperalgesia. Pain-related behavior improved after anti-NGF treatment, compared with vehicle control group. NGF is associated with SCN-induced neuropathic pain. Peripherally secreted NGF may play an important role in this mechanism. PMID:22580175

  17. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries.

  18. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries. PMID:26671004

  19. Rat sciatic nerve reconstruction across a 30 mm defect bridged by an oriented porous PHBV tube with Schwann cell as artificial nerve graft.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mina; Biazar, Esmaeil; Keshel, Saeed Heidari; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz; Doostmohamadpour, Jafar; Janfada, Alireza; Montazeri, Arash

    2014-01-01

    An oriented poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit has been used to evaluate its efficiency based on the promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. The oriented porous micropatterned artificial nerve conduit was designed onto the micropatterned silicon wafers, and then their surfaces were modified with oxygen plasma to increase cell adhesion. The designed conduits were investigated by cell culture analyses with Schwann cells (SCs). The conduits were implanted into a 30 mm gap in sciatic nerves of rats. Four months after surgery, the regenerated nerves were monitored and evaluated by macroscopic assessments and histology and behavioral analyses. Results of cellular analyses showed suitable properties of designed conduit for nerve regeneration. The results demonstrated that in the polymeric graft with SCs, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed with restoration of nerve continuity and formatted nerve fibers with myelination. Histological results demonstrated the presence of Schwann and glial cells in regenerated nerves. Functional recovery such as walking, swimming, and recovery of nociceptive function was illustrated for all the grafts especially conduits with SCs. This study proves the feasibility of the artificial nerve graft filled with SCs for peripheral nerve regeneration by bridging a longer defect in an animal model. PMID:24399063

  20. Rat Sciatic Nerve Reconstruction Across a 30 mm Defect Bridged by an Oriented Porous PHBV Tube With Schwann Cell as Artificial Nerve Graft

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An oriented poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) nerve conduit has been used to evaluate its efficiency based on the promotion of peripheral nerve regeneration in rats. The oriented porous micropatterned artificial nerve conduit was designed onto the micropatterned silicon wafers, and then their surfaces were modified with oxygen plasma to increase cell adhesion. The designed conduits were investigated by cell culture analyses with Schwann cells (SCs). The conduits were implanted into a 30 mm gap in sciatic nerves of rats. Four months after surgery, the regenerated nerves were monitored and evaluated by macroscopic assessments and histology and behavioral analyses. Results of cellular analyses showed suitable properties of designed conduit for nerve regeneration. The results demonstrated that in the polymeric graft with SCs, the rat sciatic nerve trunk had been reconstructed with restoration of nerve continuity and formatted nerve fibers with myelination. Histological results demonstrated the presence of Schwann and glial cells in regenerated nerves. Functional recovery such as walking, swimming, and recovery of nociceptive function was illustrated for all the grafts especially conduits with SCs. This study proves the feasibility of the artificial nerve graft filled with SCs for peripheral nerve regeneration by bridging a longer defect in an animal model. PMID:24399063

  1. Improved peripheral nerve regeneration in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by oral lumbrokinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Chung; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Ke, Cherng-Jyh; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the therapeutic effects of lumbrokinase, a group of enzymes extracted from the earthworm, on peripheral-nerve regeneration using well-defined sciatic nerve lesion paradigms in diabetic rats induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ). We found that lumbrokinase therapy could improve the rats' circulatory blood flow and promote the regeneration of axons in a silicone rubber conduit after nerve transection. Lumbrokinase treatment could also improve the neuromuscular functions with better nerve conductive performances. Immunohistochemical staining showed that lumbrokinase could dramatically promote calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression in the lamina I-II regions in the dorsal horn ipsilateral to the injury and cause a marked increase in the number of macrophages recruited within the distal nerve stumps. In addition, the lumbrokinase could stimulate the secretion of interleukin-1 (IL-1), nerve growth factor (NGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in dissected diabetic sciatic nerve segments. In conclusion, the administration of lumbrokinase after nerve repair surgery in diabetic rats was found to have remarkable effects on promoting peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:25787300

  2. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-Bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD.

  3. Identification of Changes in Gene expression of rats after Sensory and Motor Nerves Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Lu, Shi-Bi; Xu, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a sequence of events in the distal stump of axotomized nerves. Despite large numbers of researches concentrating on WD, the biological mechanism still remains unclear. Hence we constructed a rat model with both motor and sensory nerves injury and then conducted a RNA-seq analysis. Here the rats were divided into the 4 following groups: normal motor nerves (NMN), injured motor nerves (IMN), normal sensory nerves (NSN) and injured sensory nerves (ISN). The transcriptomes of rats were sequenced by the Illumina HiSeq. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of 4 combinations including NMN vs. IMN, NSN vs. ISN, NMN vs. NSN and IMN vs. ISN were identified respectively. For the above 4 combinations, we identified 1666, 1514, 95 and 17 DEGs. We found that NMN vs. IMN shared the most common genes with NSN vs. ISN indicating common mechanisms between motor nerves injury and sensory nerves injury. At last, we performed an enrichment analysis and observed that the DEGs of NMN vs IMN and NSN vs. ISN were significantly associated with binding and activity, immune response, biosynthesis, metabolism and development. We hope our study may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of nerves degeneration and regeneration during WD. PMID:27253193

  4. Biomechanical and functional variation in rat sciatic nerve following cuff electrode implantation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nerve cuff electrodes are commonly and successfully used for stimulating peripheral nerves. On the other hand, they occasionally induce functional and morphological changes following chronic implantation, for reasons not always clear. We hypothesize that restriction of nerve mobility due to cuff implantation may alter nerve conduction. Methods We quantified acute changes in nerve-muscle electrophysiology, using electromyography, and nerve kinematics in anesthetized Sprague Dawley rat sciatic nerves during controlled hindlimb joint movement. We compared electrophysiological and biomechanical response in uncuffed nerves and those secured within a cuff electrode using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analysis. Results Tethering resulting from cuff implantation resulted in altered nerve strain and a complex biomechanical environment during joint movement. Coincident with biomechanical changes, electromyography revealed significantly increased variability in the response of conduction latency and amplitude in cuffed, but not free, nerves following joint movement. Conclusion Our findings emphasize the importance of the mechanical interface between peripheral nerves and their devices on neurophysiological performance. This work has implications for nerve device design, implantation, and prediction of long-term efficacy. PMID:24758405

  5. Differential gene expression in proximal and distal nerve segments of rats with sciatic nerve injury during Wallerian degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Li, Huaiqin; Sun, Yi; Yin, Dexin; Zhao, Qin; Cui, Shusen; Yao, Dengbing

    2014-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration is a subject of major interest in neuroscience. A large number of genes are differentially regulated during the distinct stages of Wallerian degeneration: transcription factor activation, immune response, myelin cell differentiation and dedifferentiation. Although gene expression responses in the distal segment of the sciatic nerve after peripheral nerve injury are known, differences in gene expression between the proximal and distal segments remain unclear. In the present study in rats, we used microarrays to analyze changes in gene expression, biological processes and signaling pathways in the proximal and distal segments of sciatic nerves undergoing Wallerian degeneration. More than 6,000 genes were differentially expressed and 20 types of expression tendencies were identified, mainly between proximal and distal segments at 7–14 days after injury. The differentially expressed genes were those involved in cell differentiation, cytokinesis, neuron differentiation, nerve development and axon regeneration. Furthermore, 11 biological processes were represented, related to responses to stimuli, cell apoptosis, inflammatory response, immune response, signal transduction, protein kinase activity, and cell proliferation. Using real-time quantitative PCR, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, microarray data were verified for four genes: aquaporin-4, interleukin 1 receptor-like 1, matrix metalloproteinase-12 and periaxin. Our study identifies differential gene expression in the proximal and distal segments of a nerve during Wallerian degeneration, analyzes dynamic biological changes of these genes, and provides a useful platform for the detailed study of nerve injury and repair during Wallerian degeneration. PMID:25206781

  6. An alternative to nerve repair using an antioxidant compound: a histological study in rats.

    PubMed

    Salles, Marcos B; Gehrke, Sergio A; Koo, Samuel; Allegrini, Sergio; Rogero, Sizue O; Ikeda, Tamiko I; Cruz, Áurea S; Shinohara, Elio H; Yoshimoto, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The fascicular composition and organisation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) were determined to confirm the microarchitecture of the IAN bundles into each of the mandibular teeth, including the composition of the mental nerve. The aim of this study was to evaluate peripheral nerve repair after the application of an antioxidant compound to the damaged nerve tissue to elevate the concentration and bioavailability of elements capable of favouring tissue repair. Twenty-five Wistar rats were divided into groups: The Control 1 (Ctl 1) (n = 5) animals had the ischiatic nerve exposed with no suture injury and were sacrificed at 30 days post-operatively. The Control 2 (Ctl 2) (n = 10) animals had the ischiatic nerve exposed, and the nerve was injured using suture in three distinct regions. In the experimental (Exp) animals (n = 10), an antioxidant organic compound was applied to the nerve injury site. The animals with nerve injury (Ctl2 and Exp group) were sacrificed at 15 and 30 days post-operatively. The histological analysis showed less degeneration in the Exp group at 15 and 30 days post-operatively. Nerve neoformation forming a connection between the distal and proximal suture sites was observed in the experimental group. This study presented an alternative to nerve repair using an antioxidant compound. PMID:25578694

  7. The Effect of Sildenafil on Recuperation from Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Mehmet Fatih; Parlakpınar, Hakan; Ceylan, Mehmet Fethi; Ediz, Levent; Şamdancı, Emine; Kekilli, Ersoy; Sağır, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Severe functional and anatomical defects can be detected after the peripheral nerve injury. Pharmacological approaches are preferred rather than surgical treatment in the treatment of nerve injuries. Aims: The aim of this study is to perform histopathological, functional and bone densitometry examinations of the effects of sildenafil on nerve regeneration in a rat model of peripheral nerve crush injury. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: The study included a total of thirty adult Sprague-Dawley rats that were divided into three groups of ten rats each. In all rats, a crush injury was created by clamping the right sciatic nerve for one minute. One day before the procedure, rats in group 1 were started on a 28-day treatment consisting of a daily dose of 20 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate given orally via a nasogastric tube, while the rats in group 2 were started on an every-other-day dose of 10 mg/kg body weight sildenafil citrate. Rats from group 3 were not administered any drugs. Forty-two days after the nerve damage was created, functional and histopathological examination of both sciatic nerves and bone densitometric evaluation of the extremities were conducted. Results: During the rotarod test, rats from group 3 spent the least amount of time on the rod compared to the drug treatment groups at speeds of 20 rpm, 30 rpm and 40 rpm. In addition, the duration for which each animal could stay on the rod throughout the accelerod test significantly reduced in rats from group 3 compared to rats from groups 1 and 2 in the 4-min test. For the hot-plate latency time, there were no differences among the groups in either the basal level or after sciatic nerve injury. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of the static sciatic index (SSI) on the 42nd day (p=0.147). The amplitude was better evaluated in group 1 compared to the other two groups (p<0.05). Under microscopic evaluation, we observed the greatest amount of

  8. Hyperinsulinemia Potentiates Airway Responsiveness to Parasympathetic Nerve Stimulation in Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, David B.; Fryer, Allison D.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a substantial risk factor for developing asthma, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this relationship are unclear. We tested the role of insulin in airway responsiveness to nerve stimulation using rats genetically prone or resistant to diet-induced obesity. Airway response to vagus nerve stimulation and airway M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor function were measured in obese-prone and -resistant rats with high or low circulating insulin. The effects of insulin on nerve-mediated human airway smooth muscle contraction and human M2 muscarinic receptor function were tested in vitro. Our data show that increased vagally mediated bronchoconstriction in obesity is associated with hyperinsulinemia and loss of inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptor function on parasympathetic nerves. Obesity did not induce airway inflammation or increase airway wall thickness. Smooth muscle contraction to acetylcholine was not increased, indicating that hyperresponsiveness is mediated at the level of airway nerves. Reducing serum insulin with streptozotocin protected neuronal M2 receptor function and prevented airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in obese rats. Replacing insulin restored dysfunction of neuronal M2 receptors and airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in streptozotocin-treated obese rats. Treatment with insulin caused loss of M2 receptor function, resulting in airway hyperresponsiveness to vagus nerve stimulation in obese-resistant rats, and inhibited human neuronal M2 receptor function in vitro. This study shows that it is not obesity per se but hyperinsulinemia accompanying obesity that potentiates vagally induced bronchoconstriction by inhibiting neuronal M2 muscarinic receptors and increasing acetylcholine release from airway parasympathetic nerves. PMID:24605871

  9. Retrograde axonal transport of /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor in rat ileal mesenteric nerves. Effect of streptozocin diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.E.; Plurad, S.B.; Saffitz, J.E.; Grabau, G.G.; Yip, H.K.

    1985-12-01

    The retrograde axonal transport of intravenously (i.v.) administered /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor (/sup 125/I-NGF) was examined in mesenteric nerves innervating the small bowel of rats with streptozocin (STZ) diabetes using methods described in detail in the companion article. The accumulation of /sup 125/I-NGF distal to a ligature on the ileal mesenteric nerves of diabetic animals was 30-40% less than in control animals. The inhibition of accumulation of /sup 125/I-NGF in diabetic animals was greater at a ligature tied 2 h after i.v. administration than at a ligature tied after 14 h, which suggests that the diabetic animals may have a lag in initiation of NGF transport in the terminal axon or retardation of transport at some site along the axon. The /sup 125/I-NGF transport defect was observed as early as 3 days after the induction of diabetes, a time before the development of structural axonal lesions, and did not worsen at later times when dystrophic axonopathy is present. Both the ileal mesenteric nerves, which eventually develop dystrophic axonopathy in experimental diabetes, and the jejunal mesenteric nerves, which never develop comparable structural alterations, showed similar /sup 125/I-NGF transport deficits, suggesting that the existence of the transport abnormality does not predict the eventual development of dystrophic axonal lesions. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 125/I-NGF in the ileal mesenteric nerves of animals that had been diabetic for 11-13 mo demonstrated decreased amounts of /sup 125/I-NGF in transit in unligated paravascular nerve fascicles. There was, however, no evidence for focal retardation of transported /sup 125/I-NGF at the sites of dystrophic axonal lesions.

  10. Hormone release from isolated nerve endings of the rat neurohypophysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cazalis, M; Dayanithi, G; Nordmann, J J

    1987-01-01

    1. Isolated neurosecretory nerve endings were prepared from rat neurohypophyses. The amount of vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin released was measured by radioimmunoassay. 2. The amount of hormone release under resting conditions was not affected by external calcium (Ca2+o). Secretion decreased by ca. 50% when external sodium (Na+o) was replaced by choline or sucrose. 3. Ouabain did not modify the basal AVP release. 4. The Na+ ionophore monensin increased the release of AVP only in the presence of Na+o. This increase was maintained during prolonged exposure to the ionophore and occurred in the presence of Ca2+o only. 5. In the presence of Ca2+o, the amount of evoked hormone release was dependent on the external K+ concentration. Half-maximal activation was achieved with ca. 40 mM-K+. The K+-induced secretion was potentiated in Na+-free solution. 6. Prolonged 100 mM-K+-induced depolarization in the presence of Ca2+o gave rise to a large increase in hormone secretion which decreased with time (t1/2 = 2.5 min). The release could be reactivated after permeabilization of the nerve terminals in the presence of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. 7. A stepwise paradigm in which Ko+ is incrementally increased to 25, 50, 75 and then 100 mM released more AVP than a prolonged exposure to 100 mM-K+. 8. Veratridine increased the amount of AVP released. This effect was considerably reduced in the absence of Nao+ and abolished in the presence of D600. 9. The depolarization-induced AVP release was blocked by different Ca2+-antagonists. Their effectiveness was nitrendipine = nicardipine greater than Cd2+ greater than Gd3+ greater than Co2+ = Mn2+. 10. The dihydropyridine Bay K 8644 potentiated both the basal and the K+-evoked AVP release. Its maximal effect was obtained with 25-50 mM-Ko+. 11. In conclusion, the isolated neurohypophysial terminals which have both Na+ and Ca2+ channels and release AVP and oxytocin upon depolarization might be an excellent system to study further the

  11. Main trajectories of nerves that traverse and surround the tympanic cavity in the rat

    PubMed Central

    WEIJNEN, J. A. W. M.; SURINK, S.; VERSTRALEN, M. J. M.; MOERKERKEN, A.; DE BREE, G. J.; BLEYS, R. L. A. W.

    2000-01-01

    To guide surgery of nerves that traverse and surround the tympanic cavity in the rat, anatomical illustrations are required that are topographically correct. In this study, maps of this area are presented, extending from the superior cervical ganglion to the otic ganglion. They were derived from observations that were made during dissections using a ventral approach. Major blood vessels, bones, transected muscles of the tongue and neck and supra and infrahyoid muscles serve as landmarks in the illustrations. The course of the mandibular, facial, glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves with their branches, and components of the sympathetic system, are shown and discussed with reference to data available in the literature. Discrepancies in this literature can be clarified and new data are presented on the trajectories of several nerves. The course of the tympanic nerve was established. This nerve originates from the glossopharyngeal nerve, enters the tympanic cavity, crosses the promontory, passes the tensor tympani muscle dorsally, and continues its route intracranially to the otic ganglion as the lesser petrosal nerve after intersecting with the greater petrosal nerve. Auricular branches of the glossopharyngeal and of the vagus nerve were noted. We also observed a pterygopalatine branch of the internal carotid nerve, that penetrates the tympanic cavity and courses across the promontory. PMID:11005717

  12. The distribution of galanin-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat pharynx.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshihiko; Sato, Tadasu; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-08-01

    Galanin (GAL) consists of a chain of 29/30 amino acids which is widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. In this study, the distribution of GAL-immunoreactive (-IR) nerve fibers was examined in the rat pharynx and its adjacent regions. GAL-IR nerve fibers were located beneath the epithelium and taste bud-like structure of the pharynx, epiglottis, soft palate and larynx. These nerve fibers were abundant in the laryngeal part of the pharynx, and were rare in other regions. Mucous glands were mostly devoid of GAL-IR nerve fibers. In the musculature of pharyngeal constrictor muscles, many GAL-IR nerve fibers were also located around small blood vessels. However, intrinsic laryngeal muscles contained only a few GAL-IR nerve fibers. The double immunofluorescence method demonstrated that the distribution pattern of GAL-IR nerve fibers was partly similar to that of calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR nerve fibers in the pharyngeal mucosa and muscles. The present findings suggest that the pharynx is one of main targets of GAL-containing nerves in the upper digestive and respiratory systems. These nerves may have sensory and autonomic origins.

  13. Pituitary adenylatecyclase-activating polypeptide-immunoreactive nerve fibers in the rat epiglottis and pharynx.

    PubMed

    Kano, Mitsuhiro; Shimizu, Yoshinaka; Suzuki, Yujiro; Furukawa, Yusuke; Ishida, Hiroko; Oikawa, Miho; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Toshihiko

    2011-12-20

    The distribution of pituitary adenylatecyclase-activating polypeptide-immunoreactive (PACAP-IR) nerve fibers was studied in the rat epiglottis and pharynx. PACAP-IR nerve fibers were located beneath the mucous epithelium, and occasionally penetrated the epithelium. These nerve fibers were abundant on the laryngeal side of the epiglottis and in the dorsal and lateral border region between naso-oral and laryngeal parts of the pharynx. PACAP-IR nerve fibers were also detected in taste buds within the epiglottis and pharynx. In addition, many PACAP-IR nerve fibers were found around acinar cells and blood vessels. The double immunofluorescence method demonstrated that distribution of PACAP-IR nerve fibers was similar to that in CGRP-IR nerve fibers in the epithelium and taste bud. However, distributions of PACAP-IR and CGRP-IR nerve fibers innervating mucous glands and blood vessels were different. The retrograde tracing method also demonstrated that PACAP and CGRP were co-expressed by vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory neurons innervating the pharynx. These findings suggest that PACAP-IR nerve fibers in the epithelium and taste bud of the epiglottis and pharynx which originate from the vagal and glossopharyngeal sensory ganglia include nociceptors and chemoreceptors. The origin of PACAP-IR nerve fibers which innervate mucous glands and blood vessels may be the autonomic ganglion.

  14. Evidence that PGE2 in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei is involved in LPS-induced anorexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Brigitte S; Langhans, Wolfgang; Geary, Nori; Hrupka, Brian; Asarian, Lori

    2011-09-01

    Anorexia is an element of the acute-phase immune response. Its mechanisms remain poorly understood. Activation of inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in blood-brain-barrier endothelial cells and subsequent release of prostaglandins (e.g., prostaglandin E2, PGE2) may be involved. Therefore, we sought to relate the effects of prostaglandins on the anorexia following gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide treatment (LPS) to neural activity in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DRN and MnR) in rats. COX-2 antagonist (NS-398, 10mg/kg; IP) administration prior to LPS (100μg/kg; IP) prevented anorexia and reduced c-Fos expression the DRN, MnR, nucleus tractus solitarii and several related forebrain areas. These data indicate that COX-2-mediated prostaglandin synthesis is necessary for LPS anorexia and much of the initial LPS-induced neural activation. Injection of NS-398 into the DRN and MnR (1ng/site) attenuated LPS-induced anorexia to nearly the same extent as IP NS-398, suggesting that prostaglandin signaling in these areas is necessary for LPS anorexia. Because the DRN and MnR are sources of major serotonergic projections to the forebrain, these data suggest that serotonergic neurons originating in the midbrain raphe play an important role in acute-phase response anorexia.

  15. Histological Study of Bone Marrow and Umbilical Cord Stromal Cell Transplantation in Regenerating Rat Peripheral Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Zarbakhsh, Sam; Goudarzi, Nasim; Shirmohammadi, Maryam; Safari, Manouchehr

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow and umbilical cord stromal cells are multipotential stem cells that have the ability to produce growth factors that play an important role in survival and generation of axons. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of the two different mesenchymal stem cells on peripheral nerve regeneration. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, a 10 mm segment of the left sciatic nerve of male Wistar rats (250-300 g) was removed with a silicone tube interposed into this nerve gap. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and human umbilical cord stromal cells (HUCSCs) were respectively obtained from rat and human. The cells were sepa- rately cultured and transplanted into the nerve gap. The sciatic nerve regeneration was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and light and electron microscopy. Moreover, histo- morphology of the gastrocnemius muscle was observed. Results The nerve regeneration in the BMSCs and HUCSCs groups that had received the stem cells was significantly more favorable than the control group. In addition, the BM- SCs group was significantly more favorable than the HUCSCs group (P<0.05). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that both homograft BMSCs and het- erograft HUCSCs may have the potential to regenerate peripheral nerve injury and transplantation of BMSCs may be more effective than HUCSCs in rat. PMID:26862526

  16. Acrylamide administration alters protein phosphorylation and phospholipid metabolism in rat sciatic nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.; Schrama, L.; LoPachin, R.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of ACR on protein phosphorylation and phospholipid metabolism were assessed in rat sciatic nerve. After 5 days of ACR administration (50 mg/kg/day) an increase in the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate, and phosphatidylcholine was detected in proximal sciatic nerve segments. In contrast, no changes in phospholipid metabolism were observed in distal segments. After 9 days of ACR treatment when neurotoxicological symptoms were clearly apparent, a generalized increase in radiolabel uptake into phospholipids was noted exclusively in proximal nerve regions. ACR-induced increases in phospholipid metabolism were toxicologically specific since comparable administration of MBA (108 mg/kg/day X 5 or 9 days) produced only minor changes. ACR intoxication was also associated with a rise in sciatic nerve protein phosphorylation. After 9 days of ACR treatment, phosphorylation of beta-tubulin, P0, and several unidentified proteins (38 and 180 kDa) was increased in distal segments. In contrast, chronic administration of MBA caused increases in phosphorylation of beta-tubulin and the major myelin proteins of proximal nerve segments. In cell free homogenates prepared from sciatic nerves of treated and control rats, MBA caused an increase in phosphorylation of major myelin proteins similar to its effect in intact proximal nerve segments. The most striking effect observed in nerve homogenates of ACR-treated rats was a marked decrease in phosphorylation of an 80-kDa protein. Addition of ACR (1 mM) to homogenates of normal nerve had no effect on protein phosphorylation. Our results indicate that changes in the phosphorylation of phospholipids and proteins in sciatic nerve might be a component of the neurotoxic mechanism of ACR.

  17. Temperature-controlled optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Hutchens, Thomas C.; McClain, Michael A.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2013-06-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) may be useful as a diagnostic tool for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN), responsible for erectile function, during prostate cancer surgery. Successful ONS requires elevating the nerve temperature to within a narrow range (˜42 to 47°C) for nerve activation without thermal damage to the nerve. This preliminary study explores a prototype temperature-controlled optical nerve stimulation (TC-ONS) system for maintaining a constant (±1°C) nerve temperature during short-term ONS of the rat prostate CNs. A 150-mW, 1455-nm diode laser was operated in continuous-wave mode, with and without temperature control, during stimulation of the rat CNs for 15 to 30 s through a fiber optic probe with a 1-mm-diameter spot. A microcontroller opened and closed an in-line mechanical shutter in response to an infrared sensor, with a predetermined temperature set point. With TC-ONS, higher laser power settings were used to rapidly and safely elevate the CNs to a temperature necessary for a fast intracavernous pressure response, while also preventing excessive temperatures that would otherwise cause thermal damage to the nerve. With further development, TC-ONS may provide a rapid, stable, and safe method for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate CNs.

  18. Responses of nerve fibres of the rat saphenous nerve neuroma to mechanical and chemical stimulation: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Luis; Gallar, Juana; Pozo, Miguel Angel; Belmonte, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    The response of neuroma nerve endings to different stimuli was studied in a saphenous nerve neuroma preparation in vitro. Electrical activity was recorded from 141 single fibres dissected of saphenous nerve. One-third (27 %) displayed spontaneous activity. Based on their response to mechanical and chemical stimuli, neuroma nerve fibres were classified as mechanosensory fibres (47.5 %), mechanically insensitive chemosensory fibres (17.0 %), polymodal nociceptor fibres (28.4 %) and unresponsive fibres (7.1 %). Mechanosensory and polymodal neuroma endings responded to von Frey hair stimulation either with a few impulses (phasic units) or a sustained discharge (tonic units). Polymodal units were additionally activated by at least one of the following stimuli: acidic solutions; a combination of bradykinin, prostaglandin E2, serotonin, substance P and histamine (all at 1 μM) plus 7 mm KCl (inflammatory soup); 600 mm NaCl and capsaicin. Low pH solutions increased the firing discharge of polymodal endings proportionally to the proton concentration. The ‘inflammatory soup’ evoked a firing response characterized by the absence of tachyphylaxis, which appeared when its components were applied separately. Both stimuli sensitized polymodal fibres to mechanical stimulation. Hypertonic NaCl (600 mm) and capsaicin (3.3 mm) induced a prolonged discharge that outlasted the stimulus duration. Mechanically insensitive chemosensory neuroma fibres exhibited responses to chemical stimuli analogous to polymodal fibres. They became mechanically sensitive after chemical stimulation. These findings show that neuroma nerve endings in the rat saphenous nerve neuroma in vitro are functionally heterogeneous and exhibit properties reminiscent of those in intact mechanosensory, polymodal and ‘silent’ nociceptor sensory afferents, including their sensitization by algesic chemicals. PMID:10970431

  19. A simple method for reducing autotomy in rats after peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Sporel-Ozakat, R E; Edwards, P M; Hepgul, K T; Savas, A; Gispen, W H

    1991-02-01

    Experiments using peripheral nerve lesions (crush or transection) in rats to study repair processes are hampered by the tendency for the animals to attack the limb in which the peripheral nerves are damaged (autotomy). In this paper we describe a simple method which significantly reduces the incidence of autotomy after peripheral nerve lesions. The method consists of painting the hind paws of operated rats with a commercially available non-toxic lotion, which is used to discourage nail-biting and thumb-sucking in humans. Although the method is not absolute, it was extremely beneficial in our experiments, since the number of animals that had to be taken out of the experiment due to severe autotomy was greatly reduced. We believe that this method may prove to be as beneficial to other investigators who are using experimental peripheral nerve lesions to study the regenerative aspects of the nervous system.

  20. Continuous-wave vs. pulsed infrared laser stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation has recently been developed as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuouswave (CW) infrared laser radiation, for potential diagnostic applications. A Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1870 nm) was used for non-contact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, was achieved with the laser operating in either CW mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation was observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42-45 °C), not an incident fluence, as previously reported. CW optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a laser with lower power output than pulsed stimulation. CW optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intra-operative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  1. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates non-freezing cold injury of rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhiwei; Tong, Xiaoyan; Jia, Hongjuan

    2015-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury is an injury characterized by neuropathy, developing when patients expose to cold environments. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been shown as a contributing factor for the non-freezing cold nerve injury. However, the detailed connections between non-freezing cold nerve injury and ROS have not been described. In order to investigate the relationship between non-freezing cold nerve injury and reactive oxygen species, we study the effects of two cooling methods-the continuous cooling and the intermittent cooling with warming intervals-on rat sciatic nerves. Specifically, we assess the morphological changes and ROS production of the sciatic nerves underwent different cooling treatments. Our data shows both types of cooling methods cause nerve injury and ROS production. However, despite of identical cooling degree and duration, the sciatic nerves processed by intermittent cooling with warming intervals present more ROS production, severer reperfusion injury and pathological destructions than the sciatic nerves processed by continuous cooling. This result indicates reactive oxygen species, as a product of reperfusion, facilitates non-freezing cold nerve injury. PMID:26629065

  2. Analysis of H2 clearance curves used to measure blood flow in rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Day, T J; Lagerlund, T D; Low, P A

    1989-01-01

    1. By use of the H2 clearance technique, blood flow was measured in the sciatic nerve of healthy, anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats at rest, during inferior vena cava occlusion and during 5-hydroxytryptamine infusion. The purpose was to clarify the mechanisms underlying the biexponential curves which are commonly obtained using this technique. 2. An analysis of the frequency distribution of rate constants of 270 nerve and thirty-three arterial samples indicated that H2 clearance rates cluster below 20 ml min-1 100 g-1 and between 70 and 100 ml min-1 100 g-1. This suggests that at least two compartments are present. 3. The contribution of diffusion was studied by recording H2 clearance immediately following circulatory arrest. Slow clearance rates (median = 2.4 ml min-1 100 g-1) were observed, indicating that diffusion is not likely to contribute significantly to nutritive flow under most situations. 4. The contribution of arteriovenous shunts to H2 clearance was assessed by determining H2 clearance during inferior vena cava occlusion and the infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine. Both manoeuvres caused abolition of, or a significant reduction in the weight of, the fast component which indicates that this compartment is closely related to arteriovenous shunts in nerve. 5. By use of a multi-compartmental model, it was shown that H2 clearance should follow a multi-exponential course, where the weights of the components reflect the relative volumes of each compartment and the exponents represent the relative flow (i.e. flow per unit volume) in each compartment. 6. By use of other mathematical models, estimates were made for the clearance rates attributable to polarographic oxidation of H2 at the tip of the microelectrode (0.2 ml min-1 100 g-1) and to diffusion to air (2 ml min-1 100 g-1). The latter estimate is very close to the measured value of 2.4 ml min-1 100 g-1. 7. These findings indicate that it is possible to separately assess nutritive and non-nutritive flow by

  3. The pathogenesis of non-freezing cold nerve injury. Observations in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jia, J; Pollock, M

    1997-04-01

    Non-freezing cold nerve injury is uncommon in civilian practice, but may reach epidemic proportions in war zones. Studied since the time of Hippocrates, its aetiology has remained elusive. We sought to replicate experimentally, a peripheral nerve cold temperature gradient, since this has been emphasized in clinical descriptions. Our observations, in the rat, of the vasa nervorum show that cold-induced intravascular aggregation is followed by a 'no-reflow' phenomenon which culminates in endothelial damage and delayed thrombotic occlusion.

  4. Topography of Synchronization of Somatosensory Evoked Potentials Elicited by Stimulation of the Sciatic Nerve in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xuefeng; Yan, Jiaqing; Li, Xiaoli; Zhang, Peixun; Liu, Xianzeng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Traditionally, the topography of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) is generated based on amplitude and latency. However, this operation focuses on the physical morphology and field potential-power, so it suffers from difficulties in performing identification in an objective manner. In this study, measurement of the synchronization of SEPs is proposed as a method to explore brain functional networks as well as the plasticity after peripheral nerve injury. Method: SEPs elicited by unilateral sciatic nerve stimulation in twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats in the normal group were compared with SEPs evoked after unilateral sciatic nerve hemisection in four peripheral nerve injured SD rats. The characterization of synchronized networks from SEPs was conducted using equal-time correlation, correlation matrix analysis, and comparison to randomized surrogate data. Eigenvalues of the correlation matrix were used to identify the clusters of functionally synchronized neuronal activity, and the participation index (PI) was calculated to indicate the involvement of each channel in the cluster. The PI value at the knee point of the PI histogram was used as a threshold to demarcate the cortical boundary. Results: Ten out of the twelve normal rats showed only one synchronized brain network. The remaining two normal rats showed one strong and one weak network. In the peripheral nerve injured group, only one synchronized brain network was found in each rat. In the normal group, all network shapes appear regular and the network is largely contained in the posterior cortex. In the injured group, the network shapes appear irregular, the network extends anteriorly and posteriorly, and the network area is significantly larger. There are considerable individual variations in the shape and location of the network after peripheral nerve injury. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect functional brain networks. Compared to the results of the traditional SEP

  5. Effects of chronic NMDA-NR2b inhibition in the median eminence of the reproductive senescent female rat.

    PubMed

    Kermath, B A; Riha, P D; Sajjad, A; Gore, A C

    2013-10-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis drive reproductive function and undergo age-related decreases in activation during the transition to reproductive senescence. Decreased GnRH secretion from the median eminence (ME) partially arises from attenuated glutamatergic signalling via the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and may be a result of changing NMDAR stoichiometry to favour NR2b over NR2a subunit expression with ageing. We have previously shown that the systemic inhibition of NR2b-containing receptors with ifenprodil, an NR2b-specific antagonist, stimulates parameters of luteinising hormone (used as a proxy for GnRH) release in both young and middle-aged females. In the present study, we chronically administered ifenprodil, an NR2b-specific antagonist, at the site of GnRH terminals in the ME or at GnRH perikarya in the preoptic area, in reproductively senescent middle-aged female rats, aiming to determine whether NR2b antagonism could restore aspects of reproductive functionality. Effects on oestrous cyclicity, serum hormones, and protein expression of GnRH, NR2b and phosphorylated NR2b (Tyr-1472) in the ME were measured. Chronic ifenprodil treatment in the ME (but not the preoptic area) altered oestrous cyclicity by increasing the percentage of days spent in pro-oestrus. This was accompanied by increased GnRH fluorescence intensity in the external ME zone and a greater proportion of GnRH terminals that co-labelled with pNR2b with treatment. We also observed changes in the relationships between protein immunofluorescence, serum hormone levels and other aspects of reproductive physiology in acyclic females, as revealed by bionetwork analysis. Together, these data support the hypothesis that NMDAR-NR2b expression and phosphorylation state play a role in reproductive senescence and highlight the ME as a major player in reproductive ageing.

  6. Perineurial differentiation in interchange grafts of rat peripheral nerve and spinal root.

    PubMed Central

    Radek, A; Thomas, P K; King, R H

    1986-01-01

    The differentiation of the perineurium has been examined in replacement nerve grafts in which segments of the third lumbar dorsal root and the peroneal division of the sciatic nerve of rats were excised and resutured into the gaps. This was compared with perineurial differentiation in interchange grafts in which segments of peroneal nerve were grafted into the third lumbar dorsal root and vice versa. It was concluded that not only the origin of the graft but also the local tissue environment is important in determining the morphological outcome, the latter having the predominant influence. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3693073

  7. Association of overactive bladder and stress urinary incontinence in rats with pudendal nerve ligation injury.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Akira; Kita, Masafumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Egawa, Shin; Chancellor, Michael B; de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-05-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) also suffer from urgency incontinence, which is one of the major symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome. Pudendal nerve injury has been recognized as a possible cause for both SUI and OAB. Therefore, we investigated the effects of pudendal nerve ligation (PNL) on bladder function and urinary continence in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Conscious cystometry with or without capsaicin pretreatment (125 mg/kg sc), leak point pressures (LPPs), contractile responses of bladder muscle strips to carbachol or phenylephrine, and levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) protein and mRNA in the bladder were compared in sham and PNL rats 4 wk after the injury. Urinary frequency detected by a reduction in intercontraction intervals and voided volume was observed in PNL rats compared with sham rats, but it was not seen in PNL rats with capsaicin pretreatment that desensitizes C-fiber-afferent pathways. LPPs in PNL rats were significantly decreased compared with sham rats. The contractile responses of detrusor muscle strips to phenylephrine, but not to carbachol, were significantly increased in PNL rats. The levels of NGF protein and mRNA in the bladder of PNL rats were significantly increased compared with sham rats. These results suggest that pudendal nerve neuropathy induced by PNL may be one of the potential risk factors for OAB, as well as SUI. Somato-visceral cross sensitization between somatic (pudendal) and visceral (bladder) sensory pathways that increases NGF expression and alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-mediated contractility in the bladder may be involved in this pathophysiological mechanism.

  8. [Neurons with Different Neurotransmitters in Embryonic Neocortical Allografts in the Rat Sciatic Nerve].

    PubMed

    Petrova, E S

    2016-01-01

    Different subsets of interneurons in the Wistar rat neocortex and in neocortical transplants developing in a damaged nerve were identified by the following immunohistochemical markers: glutamate decarboxylase (GAD 67) for GABAergic nerve cells, NO-synthase (NOS) for NO-ergic neurons, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) for cholinergic cells, and tyrosine hydroxylase for catecholaminergic structures. Twenty-eight days after surgery, individual GAD 67-ir, NO-ir, ChAT-ir, and very rarely TH-ir cells were detected in the graft. It was shown that the number of GAD 67-ir neurons per unit area in the grafts was less than in the rat neocortex P20. PMID:27396173

  9. The Value of Median Nerve Sonography as a Predictor for Short- and Long-Term Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Prospective Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Alexander; Ficjian, Anja; Husic, Rusmir; Zauner, Dorothea; Seel, Werner; Simmet, Nicole E.; Klammer, Alexander; Heizer, Petra; Brickmann, Kerstin; Gretler, Judith; Fürst-Moazedi, Florentine C.; Thonhofer, Rene; Hermann, Josef; Graninger, Winfried B.; Quasthoff, Stefan; Dejaco, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the prognostic value of B-mode and Power Doppler (PD) ultrasound of the median nerve for the short- and long-term clinical outcomes of patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods Prospective study of 135 patients with suspected CTS seen 3 times: at baseline, then at short-term (3 months) and long-term (15–36 months) follow-up. At baseline, the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve was measured with ultrasound at 4 levels on the forearm and wrist. PD signals were graded semi-quantitatively (0–3). Clinical outcomes were evaluated at each visit with the Boston Questionnaire (BQ) and the DASH Questionnaire, as well as visual analogue scales for the patient’s assessment of pain (painVAS) and physician’s global assessment (physVAS). The predictive values of baseline CSA and PD for clinical outcomes were determined with multivariate logistic regression models. Results Short-term and long-term follow-up data were available for 111 (82.2%) and 105 (77.8%) patients, respectively. There was a final diagnosis of CTS in 84 patients (125 wrists). Regression analysis revealed that the CSA, measured at the carpal tunnel inlet, predicted short-term clinical improvement according to BQ in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel surgery (OR 1.8, p = 0.05), but not in patients treated conservatively. Neither CSA nor PD assessments predicted short-term improvement of painVAS, physVAS or DASH, nor was any of the ultrasound parameters useful for the prediction of long-term clinical outcomes. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel inlet may predict short-term clinical improvement in CTS patients undergoing carpal tunnel release, but long-term outcomes are unrelated to ultrasound findings. PMID:27662617

  10. Re-analysis results using medians of the data from the JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay.

    PubMed

    Uno, Yoshifumi; Omori, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    The data from the JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay were reported and analyzed statistically using the simple means of % tail DNA. However, OECD test guideline TG 489 recommends use of the median for data analysis due to the hierarchical nature of the data. Comparison between the simple mean approach and the median based approach for positive/negative/equivocal chemical calls was conducted using the % tail DNA data for the 40 chemicals tested in the JaCVAM-organized international validation study of the in vivo rat alkaline comet assay, using liver and stomach as target organs. In the liver, two genotoxic chemicals, o-anisidine and 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride monohydrate, were positive using the median based approach but negative using the simple mean approach, and two genotoxic chemicals, 2-acetylaminofluorene and busulfan were equivocal using the median based approach but negative using the simple mean approach. In contrast, cadmium chloride (genotoxic carcinogen) was equivocal in both organs using the median based approach, while positive and equivocal in liver and stomach, respectively, using the simple mean approach. Two data sets of sodium arsenite showed equivocal and negative results for liver using the median based approach, although both data sets were equivocal using the simple mean approach. Overall, there are no large differences in terms of the genotoxic call between both approaches. However, the median based approach recommended in OECD TG 489 has an advantage toward higher precision within the groups treated with a test chemical, whereas the approach might show the lower values for the effect.

  11. The effect of pregabalin - codeine combination on partial sciatic nerve ligation - induced peripheral mononeuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Popa, G; Mititelu Tartau, L; Stoleriu, I; Lupusoru, R V; Lupusoru, C E; Ochiuz, L

    2016-06-01

    The present study investigates the effects of pregabalin (PGB) and codeine (COD) combination on neuropathic hyperalgesia in an animal model of peripheral nerve injury represented by partial sciatic nerve ligation. Hot plate and analgesimeter tests were performed to evaluate the influence of PGB, COD and their combination on thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind paw with partial sciatic nerve ligation. Reactivity was evaluated by measuring the latency to withdrawal of the operated hind paw from the noxious heat and pressure stimulation. Nociceptive thresholds were evaluated before (baseline) and in the 1(st), 3(rd), 5(th) and 7(th) day after surgical procedure. The investigation demonstrates that the treatment with PGB attenuated partial sciatic nerve ligation development of thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in rats operated hind paw. The oral administration, during 14 consecutive days of PGB-COD combination significantly reduced the degree of both thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in the hind paw with partial sciatic nerve ligation. These results suggest that the association of PGB with COD exerted ameliorative effect on partial sciatic nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain in rats. PMID:27512007

  12. Celecoxib accelerates functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush in the rat

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The inflammatory response appears to be essential in the modulation of the degeneration and regeneration process after peripheral nerve injury. In injured nerves, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is strongly upregulated around the injury site, possibly playing a role in the regulation of the inflammatory response. In this study we investigated the effect of celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, on functional recovery after sciatic nerve crush in rats. Unilateral sciatic nerve crush injury was performed on 10 male Wistar rats. Animals on the experimental group (n = 5) received celecoxib (10 mg/kg ip) immediately before the crush injury and daily for 7 days after the injury. Control group (n = 5) received normal saline at equal regimen. A sham group (n = 5), where sciatic nerve was exposed but not crushed, was also evaluated. Functional recovery was then assessed by calculating the sciatic functional index (SFI) on days 0,1,7,14 and 21 in all groups, and registering the day of motor and walking onset. In comparison with control group, celecoxib treatment (experimental group) had significant beneficial effects on SFI, with a significantly better score on day 7. Anti-inflammatory drug celecoxib should be considered in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, but further studies are needed to explain the mechanism of its neuroprotective effects. PMID:19036161

  13. Implantation of nerve stump inside a vein and a muscle: comparing neuroma formation in rat.

    PubMed

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O H; Permatasari, Erythrina; Soetrisno, Esti

    2014-01-01

    Among many techniques independently reported to manage neuroma formation, manipulation of the nerve stump inside muscle and vein is the most advantageous technique. This study aimed to enrich the basic data of macroscopic appearance and histo-pathology regarding which technique generates less neuroma: nerve stump implantation inside vein or inside muscle. An experimental study with posttest-only control-group design was conducted in 24 rats that were randomly arranged into 3 groups. One centimeter of the lateral branch of the right ischiadic nerve was cut. Group A served as the control group, where the proximal nerve stumps were left as they were after the excision; whereas the stumps of groups B and C were implanted inside muscles and veins, respectively. The samples were assessed with histologic examination after 4 weeks to measure the morphometric changes in the nerve endings. The data were statistically analyzed with t test. All rats healed uneventfully. No thrombosis was found within group C, and the stumps were free of neuroma formation. The muscle group formed smaller neuroma than the control group. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05). The outcome of nerve stump implantation inside the lumen of a vein is superior to the implantation inside a muscle in preventing neuroma formation.

  14. Effects of 940 nm light-emitting diode (led) on sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Karla Guivernau Gaudens; Ramos, Solange de Paula; de Lima, Franciele Mendes; Carandina, Marcelo; Ferrari, Osny; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano; Toginho Filho, Dari de Oliveira; Siqueira, Cláudia Patrícia Cardoso Martins

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 940 nm wavelength light emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on nerve regeneration in rats. Forty male Wistar rats weighing approximately 300 g each were divided into four groups: control (C); control submitted to LED phototherapy (CLed); Sciatic Nerve Lesion without LED phototherapy (L); Sciatic Nerve Lesion with LED phototherapy (LLed). The lesion was caused by crushing the right sciatic nerve. A dose of 4 J/cm(2) was used for ten consecutive days beginning on the first postoperative day. Groups C and L were submitted to the same procedure as the LLed group, but the equipment was turned off. The LED phototherapy with 940 nm wavelength reduced the areas of edema, the number of mononuclear cells present in the inflammatory infiltration, and increased functional recovery scores at 7, 14 and 21 days. The results suggest that the use of phototherapy at 940 nm after nerve damage improves morphofunctional recovery and nerve regeneration. PMID:21547474

  15. Effects of 940 nm light-emitting diode (led) on sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Karla Guivernau Gaudens; Ramos, Solange de Paula; de Lima, Franciele Mendes; Carandina, Marcelo; Ferrari, Osny; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano; Toginho Filho, Dari de Oliveira; Siqueira, Cláudia Patrícia Cardoso Martins

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 940 nm wavelength light emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on nerve regeneration in rats. Forty male Wistar rats weighing approximately 300 g each were divided into four groups: control (C); control submitted to LED phototherapy (CLed); Sciatic Nerve Lesion without LED phototherapy (L); Sciatic Nerve Lesion with LED phototherapy (LLed). The lesion was caused by crushing the right sciatic nerve. A dose of 4 J/cm(2) was used for ten consecutive days beginning on the first postoperative day. Groups C and L were submitted to the same procedure as the LLed group, but the equipment was turned off. The LED phototherapy with 940 nm wavelength reduced the areas of edema, the number of mononuclear cells present in the inflammatory infiltration, and increased functional recovery scores at 7, 14 and 21 days. The results suggest that the use of phototherapy at 940 nm after nerve damage improves morphofunctional recovery and nerve regeneration.

  16. Essential fatty acids prevent slowed nerve conduction in streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Julu, P O

    1988-01-01

    Rats were given streptozotocin to induce insulin-dependent diabetes or citrate buffer alone in two experiments. Initially, the effect of 5 wks of dietary gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) plus eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on cutaneous nerve conduction velocity (CV) was examined. CV was determined by direct stimulation and recording from saphenous nerve under urethane anesthesia. Secondly, a 5 weeks study of supplementing the diet with GLA, GLA and EPA, or hydrogenated coconut oil (HC) was done. In addition, motor nerve CV was determined by directly stimulating sciatic nerve and recording from gastrocnemius muscle. The acute diabetes led to weight loss, and elevated blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels. Essential fatty acid (EFA) supplementation had no effect on any of these measures of severity of diabetes. In diabetic rats without EFA supplementation, CV of the myelinated fibers fell by 19-21%, while those receiving both GLA and EPA had normal CV. In diabetic rats receiving GLA alone, CV fell by 5-7%, which was significantly less than those without EFA supplementation (p less than 0.01 for cutaneous, and p less than 0.001 for motor nerves).

  17. N-cadherin expression in palisade nerve endings of rat vellus hairs.

    PubMed

    Kaidoh, Toshiyuki; Inoué, Takao

    2008-02-01

    Palisade nerve endings (PNs) are mechanoreceptors around vellus hairs of mammals. Each lanceolate nerve ending (LN) of the PN is characterized by a sensory nerve ending symmetrically sandwiched by two processes of type II terminal Schwann cells (tSCIIs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the structural organization of the PN are poorly understood. Electron microscopy showed that adherens junctions appeared to adhere to the sensory nerve ending and tSCII processes, so we examined the location of the N-cadherin adhesion system in PNs of rat vellus hairs by using immunoelectron microscopy. N-cadherin localized near both ends of the cell boundary between sensory nerve ending and tSCII processes, which corresponded to the sites of adherens junctions. We further found cadherin-associated proteins, alpha- and beta-catenins, at the linings of adherens junctions. Three-dimensional reconstruction of immunoelectron microscopic serial thin sections showed four linear arrays of N-cadherin arranged longitudinally along the LN beneath the four longitudinal borders of two tSCII processes. In contrast, sensory nerve fibers just proximal to the LNs formed common unmyelinated nerve fibers, in which N-cadherin was located mainly at the mesaxon of type I terminal Schwann cells (tSCIs). These results suggest that the four linear arrays of N-cadherin-mediated junctions adhere the sensory nerve ending and tSCII processes side by side to form the characteristic structure of the LN, and the structural differences between the LNs and the proximal unmyelinated nerve fibers possibly are due to the difference in the pattern of N-cadherin expression between sensory nerve endings and tSCII or tSCI processes.

  18. Ultrastructural studies on the barrier properties of the paraganglia in the rat recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Chien, C L; Chau, Y P; Lu, K S

    1991-01-01

    The permeability of blood capillaries in the paraganglia of the rat recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) was investigated by employing the ionic lanthanum tracer at ultrastructural level. Two types of blood capillaries, namely, fenestrated and nonfenestrated types, were observed in the rat RLN and its associated paraganglia (RLN paraganglia). A preferential distribution of fenestrated capillaries in the RLN paraganglia was noted. Nonfenestrated capillaries were distributed in the area of RLN devoid of paraganglia. Minute aberrant ganglia consisting of 4-8 neurons were frequently encountered in the rat RLN near the paraganglia. The capillaries in these neuronal areas were also nonfenestrated. The lanthanum tracer was limited within the vascular lumen, but not in the extravascular space, in the RLN proper and in the area of RLN paraganglia where the neurons were identified. In the RLN paraganglia, the tracer was located in the vascular lumen, extravascular space, periaxonal space of nerve fibers, and the intercellular space of the RLN paraganglionic cells. We concluded that (1) a blood-nerve barrier and a blood-ganglion (or blood-neuron) barrier exist in the area of RLN devoid of paraganglia, and (2) blood-paraganglion barrier and blood-nerve barrier were lacking in the rat RLN paraganglia.

  19. The Effect of Pulsed Radiofrequency Applied to the Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Constriction Injury Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Beom; Byun, Jeong-Hyun; Kim, Young; Lee, Ji Shin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) applied proximal to the injured peripheral nerve on the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a neuropathic pain rat model. Methods Nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the study. All rats underwent chronic constriction injury (CCI) procedure. After 7 days of CCI, withdrawal frequency of affected hind paw to mechanical stimuli and withdrawal latency of affected hind paw to heat stimulus were measured. They were randomly divided into two groups: group A, CCI group (n=9) and group B, CCI treated with PRF group (n=10). Rats of group B underwent PRF procedure on the sciatic nerve. Withdrawal frequency and withdrawal latency were measured at 12 hours, and 7 days after PRF. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis were performed using a TNF-α antibody. Results Before PRF, withdrawal frequency and withdrawal latency were not different in both groups. After PRF, withdrawal frequency decreased and withdrawal latency prolonged over time in group B. There was significant interaction between time and group for each withdrawal frequency and withdrawal latency. Group B showed decreased TNF-α immunoreactivity of the spinal cord and sciatic nerve at 7 days. Conclusion PRF applied proximal to the peripheral nerve injury is potentially helpful for the reduction of neuropathic pain by neuromodulation of inflammatory markers. PMID:26605164

  20. Changes in the frequency of swallowing during electrical stimulation of superior laryngeal nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kojun; Tsujimura, Takanori; Magara, Jin; Sakai, Shogo; Nakamura, Yuki; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the adaptation of the swallowing reflex in terms of reduced swallowing reflex initiation following continuous superior laryngeal nerve stimulation. Forty-four male Sprague Dawley rats were anesthetized with urethane. To identify swallowing, electromyographic activity of the left mylohyoid and thyrohyoid muscles was recorded. To evoke the swallowing response, the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), recurrent laryngeal nerve, or cortical swallowing area was electrically stimulated. Repetitive swallowing evoked by continuous SLN stimulation was gradually reduced, and this reduction was dependent on the resting time duration between stimulations. Prior SLN stimulation also suppressed subsequent swallowing initiation. The reduction in evoked swallows induced by recurrent laryngeal nerve or cortical swallowing area stimulation was less than that following superior laryngeal nerve stimulation. Decerebration had no effect on the reduction in evoked swallows. Prior subthreshold stimulation reduced subsequent initiation of swallowing, suggesting that there was no relationship between swallowing movement evoked by prior stimulation and the subsequent reduction in swallowing initiation. Overall, these data suggest that reduced sensory afferent nerve firing and/or trans-synaptic responses, as well as part of the brainstem central pattern generator, are involved in adaptation of the swallowing reflex following continuous stimulation of swallow-inducing peripheral nerves and cortical areas.

  1. Gabapentin attenuates neuropathic pain and improves nerve myelination after chronic sciatic constriction in rats.

    PubMed

    Câmara, Carlos C; Araújo, Celina V; de Sousa, Kalina Kelma Oliveira; Brito, Gerly A C; Vale, Mariana L; Raposo, Ramon da Silva; Mendonça, Fabiana Evaristo; Mietto, Bruno S; Martinez, Ana Maria B; Oriá, Reinaldo B

    2015-10-21

    Gabapentin (GBP) is an anti-convulsive drug often used as analgesic to control neuropathic pain. This study aimed at evaluating oral GBP treatment (30, 60, 120 mg/kg, 60 min prior to chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve (CCSN) along 15-day treatment post-injury, 12 h/12 h) by monitoring spontaneous and induced-pain behaviors in Wistar rats on 5th and 15th days post-injury during early neuropathic events. CCSN animals receiving saline were used as controls. Another aim of this study was to evaluate GBP effects on myelin basic protein (MBP) on the 5th and 15th days post-injury and nerve morphology by transmission electron microscopy to address nerve regeneration. On the 5th and 15th days, GBP (60 mg/kg) reduced neuropathic pain behaviors (scratching and biting) in the ipsilateral paw and alleviated mechanical allodynia in comparison with the neuropathic saline group. GBP significantly increased climbing and rearing behaviors in CCSN and CCSN-free animals suggesting increased motor activity rather than sedation. We found three-fold significant increase in MBP expression by western blots on the 15th day when compared to controls. In addition, GPB (60 mg/kg) improved nerve axonal, fiber and myelin area 15 days post-surgery. In conclusion, GBP alleviated mechanical and thermal allodynia and spontaneous pain-related behaviors and improved later nerve morphology. Our findings suggest that GBP improve nerve remyelination after chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve.

  2. Effect of long-term weightlessness on retina and optic nerve in tail-suspension rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Wei; Zhao, Jun; Hu, Lian-Na; Liang, Jing-Nan; Shi, Yuan-Yuan; Nie, Chuang; Qiu, Chang-Yu; Nan, Xin-Shuai; Li, Yu-Xin; Gao, Fu-Lin; Liu, Yi; Dong, Yu; Luo, Ling

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of long-term weightlessness on retina and optic nerve in tail-suspension (TS) rats. METHODS A stimulated weightlessness model was established by suspending rats' tail. After 12wk, the ultrastructure and the number of optic nerve axons were observed by transmission electron microscope. The number of survival retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was calculated by fluorescent gold retrograde labeling. Retina cells apoptosis was detected by TUNEL staining. The function of optic nerve and retina was evaluated by the visual evoked potential (VEP) and oscillatory potentials (Ops). RESULTS The optic nerve axons were swollen and sparsely aligned, and the lamellar separation and myelin disintegration occurred after 12wk in TS rats. The density of optic nerve axons was 32.23±3.92 (vs 37.43±4.13, P=0.0145), the RGCs density was 1645±46 cells/mm2 (vs 1867±54 cells/mm2 P=0.0000), the incidence rate of retinal cells apoptosis was 5.38%±0.53% (vs 4.75%±0.54%, P=0.0238), the amplitude of VEP-P100 was 15.43±2.14 µV (vs 17.67±2.17 µV, P=0.0424), the latency of VEP-P100 was 69.05±5.34ms (vs 62.43±4.87ms P=0.0143) and the sum amplitude of Ops was 81.05±8.34 µV (vs 91.67±10.21 µV, P=0.0280) in TS group and the control group, respectively. CONCLUSION Long-term weightlessness can induce the ultrastructural changes and functional depress of the optic nerve, as well as retinal cell damages in TS rats. PMID:27366682

  3. Repeated activation of delta opioid receptors counteracts nerve injury-induced TNF-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, Nunzio; Parenti, Rosalba; Aricò, Giuseppina; Turnaturi, Rita; Scoto, Giovanna Maria; Chiechio, Santina

    2016-01-01

    Despite mu opioid receptor agonists are the cornerstones of moderate-to-severe acute pain treatment, their effectiveness in chronic pain conditions is controversial. In contrast to mu opioid receptor agonists, a number of studies have reported the effectiveness of delta opioid receptor agonists on neuropathic pain strengthening the idea that delta opioid receptors gain importance when chronic pain develops. Among other effects, it has been shown that delta opioid receptor activation in optic nerve astrocytes inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inflammation in response to severe hypoxia. Considering the involvement of tumor necrosis factor-α in the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain, with this study we sought to correlate the effect of delta opioid receptor agonist on the development of mechanical allodynia to tumor necrosis factor-α expression at the site of nerve injury in rats subjected to chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. To this aim, we measured the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain after repeated injections with a delta opioid receptor agonist. Results obtained demonstrated that repeated administrations of the delta opioid receptor agonist SNC80 (10 mg/kg, i.p. for seven consecutive days) significantly inhibited the development of mechanical allodynia in rats with neuropathic pain and that the improvement of neuropathic symptom was timely related to the reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in the rat sciatic nerve. We demonstrated also that when treatment with the delta opioid receptor agonist was suspended both allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α up-regulation in the sciatic nerve of rats with neuropathic pain were restored. These results show that persistent delta opioid receptor activation significantly attenuates neuropathic pain and negatively regulates sciatic nerve tumor necrosis factor-α expression in chronic constriction injury rats. PMID:27590071

  4. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Following Crush Injury to Rat Peroneal Nerve by Aqueous Extract of Medicinal Mushroom Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr) Pers. (Aphyllophoromycetideae)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; David, Pamela; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Abdullah, Noorlidah; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2011-01-01

    Nerve crush injury is a well-established axonotmetic model in experimental regeneration studies to investigate the impact of various pharmacological treatments. Hericium erinaceus is a temperate mushroom but is now being cultivated in tropical Malaysia. In this study, we investigated the activity of aqueous extract of H. erinaceus fresh fruiting bodies in promoting functional recovery following an axonotmetic peroneal nerve injury in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats by daily oral administration. The aim was to investigate the possible use of this mushroom in the treatment of injured nerve. Functional recovery was assessed in behavioral experiment by walking track analysis. Peroneal functional index (PFI) was determined before surgery and after surgery as rats showed signs of recovery. Histological examinations were performed on peroneal nerve by immunofluorescence staining and neuromuscular junction by combined silver-cholinesterase stain. Analysis of PFI indicated that return of hind limb function occurred earlier in rats of aqueous extract or mecobalamin (positive control) group compared to negative control group. Regeneration of axons and reinnervation of motor endplates in extensor digitorum longus muscle in rats of aqueous extract or mecobalamin group developed better than in negative control group. These data suggest that daily oral administration of aqueous extract of H. erinaceus fresh fruiting bodies could promote the regeneration of injured rat peroneal nerve in the early stage of recovery. PMID:21941586

  5. Nimodipine-mediated re-myelination after facial nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yin-da; Zheng, Xue-sheng; Ying, Ting-ting; Yuan, Yan; Li, Shi-ting

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of nimodipine-mediated neural repair after facial nerve crush injury in rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: healthy controls, surgery alone, and surgery plus nimodipine. A facial nerve crush injury model was constructed. Immediately after surgery, the rats in the surgery plus nimodipine group were administered nimodipine, 6 mg/kg/day, for a variable numbers of days. The animals underwent electromyography (EMG) before surgery and at 3, 10, or 20 days after surgery. After sacrifice, nerve samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and luxol fast blue. The EMG at 20 days revealed an apparent recovery of eletroconductivity, with the surgery plus nimodipine group having a higher amplitude and shorter latency time than the surgery only group. H&E staining showed that at 20 days, the rats treated with nimodipine had an obvious recovery of myelination and reduction in the number of infiltrating cells, suggesting less inflammation, compared with the rats in the surgery only group. Luxol fast blue staining was relatively even in the surgery plus nimodipine group, indicating a protective effect against injury-induced demyelination. Staining for S100 calcium-binding protein B (S-100β) was not evident in the surgery alone group, but was evident in the surgery plus nimodipine group, indicating that nimodipine reversed the damage of the crush injury. After a facial nerve crush injury, treatment with nimodipine for 20 days reduced the nerve injury by mediating remyelination by Schwann cells. The protective effect of nimodipine may include a reduction of inflammation and an increase in calcium-binding S-100β protein. PMID:26169537

  6. Nimodipine-mediated re-myelination after facial nerve crush injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yin-da; Zheng, Xue-sheng; Ying, Ting-ting; Yuan, Yan; Li, Shi-ting

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of nimodipine-mediated neural repair after facial nerve crush injury in rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: healthy controls, surgery alone, and surgery plus nimodipine. A facial nerve crush injury model was constructed. Immediately after surgery, the rats in the surgery plus nimodipine group were administered nimodipine, 6 mg/kg/day, for a variable numbers of days. The animals underwent electromyography (EMG) before surgery and at 3, 10, or 20 days after surgery. After sacrifice, nerve samples were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and luxol fast blue. The EMG at 20 days revealed an apparent recovery of eletroconductivity, with the surgery plus nimodipine group having a higher amplitude and shorter latency time than the surgery only group. H&E staining showed that at 20 days, the rats treated with nimodipine had an obvious recovery of myelination and reduction in the number of infiltrating cells, suggesting less inflammation, compared with the rats in the surgery only group. Luxol fast blue staining was relatively even in the surgery plus nimodipine group, indicating a protective effect against injury-induced demyelination. Staining for S100 calcium-binding protein B (S-100β) was not evident in the surgery alone group, but was evident in the surgery plus nimodipine group, indicating that nimodipine reversed the damage of the crush injury. After a facial nerve crush injury, treatment with nimodipine for 20 days reduced the nerve injury by mediating remyelination by Schwann cells. The protective effect of nimodipine may include a reduction of inflammation and an increase in calcium-binding S-100β protein.

  7. Effects of anti-inflammatory vagus nerve stimulation on the cerebral microcirculation in endotoxinemic rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In sepsis syndromes the severity of the inflammation triggers microvascular dysfunction and early organ failure. We studied the effects of anti-inflammatory vagus nerve stimulation on the cerebral microcirculatory integrity in an endotoxinemic rat model. Methods In both control and endotoxinemic (5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide i.v.) rats, the effect of cervical bilateral vagotomy with or without left-sided distal vagus nerve stimulation were compared to non-vagotomized, nonstimulated group (sham). Neurovascular coupling was analyzed by electrical forepaw stimulation, EEG, and cortical laser-Doppler flow recording. Resting cerebral blood flow, evoked potentials and hemodynamic responses, were obtained over a period of 4.5 hours. Regulation of the nitric oxide system (iNOS expression and nitrite/nitrate measurements), cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10), hypoxic and apoptosis signaling molecules (HIF-2α, Bax) were measured at the end of experiments. Results In endotoxinemic rats, vagus nerve stimulation tended to increase anti-inflammatory cytokine levels and resulted in a stabile hemodynamic response (28 ± 13%; versus baseline). Vagotomized animals incurred a pro-inflammatory response (7 ± 4%; P < 0.0001 versus baseline) and produced more HIF-2α than vagotomized vagus nerve stimulated (VNS) animals. Evoked potential amplitudes were stabilized in VNS (15 ± 7 μV; n.s. versus baseline) as compared to vagotomised rats (8 ± 5 μV; P < 0.001 versus baseline). However, no effects were observed on apoptosis markers or nitric oxide levels. Conclusions Vagus nerve stimulation in endotoxinemic rats had a positive effect on neurovascular coupling and stabilized evoked potentials. PMID:22830560

  8. The trophic influence of tetrodotoxin-inactive nerves on normal and reinnervated rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, J J; Hubbard, J I; Mills, R G

    1979-01-01

    1. Nerve impulses in the rat sciatic nerve were blocked for long periods by tetrodotoxin (TTX) released from capillary implants. The TTX capillaries did not block axonal transport, nor did they cause any sign of nerve degeneration. 2. A comparison of the effects of TTX paralysis and denervation was made on both extensor digitorium longus (e.d.l.) and soleus muscles over 21 days, a time when the products of nerve degeneration were unlikely to contribute to the changes associated with denervation. The resting membrane potential of TTX-paralysed muscles was significantly different (P less than 0.005) from that of the denervated muscles at all periods and at 21 days the decrease that can be attributed to inactivity was 61% (e.d.l.) and 49% (soleus) of that which follows denervation. This disparity was even more pronounced for the ACh receptor density where the increase in receptors due to inactivity was only 34% (e.d.l.) and 21% (soleus) of that due to denervation. 3. A similar comparison was made on muscles which had been reinnervated by TTX-inactive nerves. These muscles were found to have a significantly higher resting membrane potential and lower ACh receptor density than the denervated muscles (P less than 0.05). 4. The experiments on reinnervated muscles preclude the possibility that nerve degeneration products are solely responsible for the difference between the TTX-paralysed and denervated muscles and suggest that the difference can be attributed to the trophic influence of the nerve. 5. An observed increase in the m.e.p.p. frequency of the TTX-paralysed muscles indicated that nerve action potentials play a role in regulating the spontaneous release from nerve terminals. PMID:94092

  9. Angelica injection promotes peripheral nerve structure and function recovery with increased expressions of nerve growth factor and brain derived neurotrophic factor in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilin; Zhang, Junjian; Zhang, Lei; Cui, Qin; Liu, Hui

    2010-08-01

    Several nervous system injury models, such as sciatic crush and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion have been well studied in terms of neuroprotective effect of angelica injection. However, definitive experimental studies are lacking on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This study sought to investigate the effects of angelica injection on DPN in type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). To examine whether DPN model succeeded, tail-flick latency (TFL) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) were measured at 6 weeks after diabetes induction. Then, diabetic rats were treated with high- and low-dose angelica injection for 4 weeks. TFL, MNCV, morphology of sciatic nerve, myelinated nerve fiber density and the expressions of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in soleus and sciatic nerve were measured at 10 weeks after diabetes induction. The results showed the TFL was significantly shortened (p<0.001) and the MNCV was reduced (p<0.01) in diabetic rats compared with normal control rats at 6 weeks after diabetes induction. The TFL was obviously prolonged and the MNCV was further reduced in diabetic control group at 10 weeks after diabetes induction. TFL, MNCV and morphology of sciatic nerve were remarkably ameliorated and myelinated nerve fiber density and the expressions of NGF and BDNF in soleus and sciatic nerve were increased in the angelica treatment groups. This study suggests angelica injection has potential therapeutic effects on DPN, and the mechanism might be related to direct increase in NGF expression and direct or indirect increase in BDNF expression.

  10. Exogenous Neuritin Promotes Nerve Regeneration After Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Rui; Li, Xingyi; Xi, Shaosong; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hong; Zhu, Jingling; Shan, Liya; Song, Xiaoming; Luo, Xing; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Insufficient local levels of neurotrophic factor after spinal cord injury (SCI) are the leading cause of secondary injury and limited axonal regeneration. Neuritin belongs to a family of neurotrophic factors that promote neurite outgrowth, maintain neuronal survival, and provide a favorable microenvironment for the regeneration and repair of nerve cells after injury. However, it is not known whether the exogenously applied neuritin protein has a positive effect on nerve repair after SCI. This was investigated in the present study using purified human recombinant neuritin expressed in and purified from Pichia pastoris, which was tested in a rat SCI model. A recombinant neuritin concentration of 60 μg/ml induced the recovery of hind limb motor function and stimulated nerve regeneration in rats with SCI. Continuous administration of neuritin at this dose at an early stage after SCI inhibited poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) protein degradation and decreased neuronal apoptosis. In addition, during the critical postinjury period of axonal regeneration, exogenous neuritin treatment increased the expression of neurofilament 200 and growth-associated protein 43 in the damaged tissue, which was associated with the restoration of hind limb movement. These results suggest that neuritin creates an environment that promotes nerve cell survival and neurite regeneration after SCI, which contribute to nerve regeneration and the recovery of motor function. PMID:27009445

  11. Novel TRPM8 antagonist attenuates cold hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ryan; Gonçalves, Leonor; Newman, Robert; Jiang, Feng Li; Goldby, Anne; Reeve, Jennifer; Hendrick, Alan; Teall, Martin; Hannah, Duncan; Almond, Sarah; Brice, Nicola; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2014-04-01

    Abnormal cold sensitivity is a common feature of a range of neuropathies. In the murine somatosensory system, multiple aspects of cold sensitivity are dependent on TRPM8, both short term and in response to peripheral nerve injury. The specialized nature of cold-sensitive afferents and the restricted expression of TRPM8 render it an attractive target for the treatment of cold hypersensitivity. This current study examines the effect of a novel TRPM8 antagonist (M8-An) in naive and spinal nerve-ligated rats through behavioral and in vivo electrophysiological approaches. In vitro, M8-An inhibited icilin-evoked Ca(2+) currents in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TRPM8 with an IC(50) of 10.9 nM. In vivo, systemic M8-An transiently decreased core body temperature. Deep dorsal horn recordings were made in vivo from neurons innervating the hind paw. M8-An inhibited neuronal responses to innocuous and noxious cooling of the receptive field in spinal nerve-ligated rats but not in naive rats. No effect on neuronal responses to mechanical and heat stimulation was observed. In addition, M8-An also attenuated behavioral responses to cold but not mechanical stimulation after nerve ligation without affecting the uninjured contralateral response. The data presented here support a contribution of TRPM8 to the pathophysiology of cold hypersensitivity in this model and highlight the potential of the pharmacological block of TRPM8 in alleviating the associated symptoms. PMID:24472724

  12. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell and Vein Conduit on Sciatic Nerve Repair in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Foroutan, Kamal; Khodarahmi, Ali; Alavi, Hootan; Pedram, Sepehr; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamad Reza; Bordbar, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral nerve repair with sufficient functional recovery is an important issue in reconstructive surgery. Stem cells have attracted extensive research interest in recent years. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the vein conduit technique, with and without the addition of mesenchymal stem cells in gap-less nerve injury repair in rats. Materials and Methods: In this study, 36 Wistar rats were randomly allocated to three groups: In the first group, nerve repair was performed with simple neurorrhaphy (control group), in the second group, nerve repair was done with vein conduit over site (vein conduit group) and in the third group, bone marrow stem cells were instilled into the vein conduit (stem cell group) after nerve repair with vein conduit over site. Six weeks after the intervention, the sciatic function index, electrophysiological study and histological examination were performed. Results: All animals tolerated the surgical procedures and survived well. The sciatic function index and latency were significantly improved in the vein conduit (P = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively) and stem cell group (P = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively) compared with the control group. No significant difference was observed in sciatic function and latency between the vein conduit and stem-cell groups. Moreover, histological analysis showed no significant difference in regenerative density between these two groups. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the meticulous microsurgical nerve repair, which was performed using the vein tubulization induced significantly better sciatic nerve regeneration. However, the addition of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell to vein conduit failed to promote any significant changes in regeneration outcome. PMID:25825699

  13. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  14. Cryoanalgesia. Ultrastructural study on cryolytic lesion of sciatic nerve in rat and rabbit.

    PubMed

    Fasano, V A; Peirone, S M; Zeme, S; Filippi, M; Broggi, G; de Mattei, M; Sguazzi, A

    1987-01-01

    The sciatic nerve was exposed to cryoinjury at different freezing patterns in albino rats and rabbits and the frozen nerves were serially examined with electron microscopy from the time of cryolitic lesion (--60 degrees C for 3 minutes) for up to 28 days. The cryolesion was characterized by a total degeneration of the myelin fibers, while non-myelin fibers and vessels seemed less affected. Regeneration began 8 days after cryolysis. A peculiar pattern was the absence of Schwann cells, while the basal membrane around regenerating axons remained intact. The hypothesis that the basal membrane might play a role is discussed. PMID:2823542

  15. Laser-activated solder weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Nigel J.; Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Owen, Earl R.; Walker, D. M.

    1997-05-01

    A new laser activated solder weld technique is described for the microsurgical repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats. The laser weld technique used an albumin based solder, containing indocyanine cardiogreen, plus an infrared diode laser. Seven animals had inferior alveolar nerve repairs performed using the laser weld technique and these were compared against corresponding unoperated controls plus three cases of nerve section without repair. Histochemical analysis was performed utilizing neuron counts and horseradish peroxidase tracer (HRP) uptake in the trigeminal ganglion following sacrifice and staining of frozen sections with cresyl violet and diaminobenzidene. The results of this analysis showed comparable mean neuron counts and mean HRP uptake by neurons for the unoperated control and laser weld groups with considerable reduction of mean values in cases of nerve section with no repair. Sections of the repaired inferior alveolar nerves, stained with Masson's trichrome, showed no adverse reactions by axons or epineurium to the coagulative repair with the solder and demonstrated regeneration of myelinated axons at the time of sacrifice. In summary a new technique of laser weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve is described which, on initial analysis, appears to be a reliable alternative to traditional techniques.

  16. Electrophysiological study in the infraorbital nerve of the rat: Spontaneous and evoked activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, A. L.; Farfán, F. D.; Felice, C. J.

    2007-11-01

    In this work we present some studies in the afferent nerve of the rat vibrissae. Studies on spontaneous activity (SA) in this sensorial system are of long data. Nevertheless, SA recordings in the nerve of a single vibrissa have not been made until present. In this work, we use an algorithm based on signal decomposition with Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT) to analyse the discharges of two nerves. The action potentials of both nerves were detected and the firing rates were calculated. These results suggest that the firing rate of one vibrissa innervation is low considering that this nerve contains hundred of fibers. In addition, we present preliminary studies suggesting important effects of the hair shaft length in the afferent discharge during the vibrissae movements. The experiments consisted in recording the nerve activity after the vibrissae were sectioned at two different levels. The results showed important differences in the signal energy contents. It suggests that the hair shaft length would produce a differential activation of the mechanoreceptors located in the vibrissae follicle.

  17. Effects of culture supernatant from Lactobacillus pentosus strain S-PT84 on autonomic nerve activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Yoshinori; Izumo, Takayuki; Horii, Yuko; Shen, Jiao; Fujisaki, Yoshiyuki; Nakashima, Toshihiro; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Nagai, Katsuya

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal administration of various lactobacilli has been reported to affect autonomic neurotransmission, blood pressure, blood glucose, and body weight in rats, however, the mechanisms of action of the lactobacilli remain to be clarified. Therefore, the effect of the culture supernatant of Lactobacillus pentosus strain S-PT84 on the autonomic nerve activity in urethane-anesthetized rats was investigated. Intraduodenal injection of the low-molecular-weight (LMW) fraction (molecules less than 10,000 Da) of the S-PT84 culture supernatant elevated the brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity and reduced the gastric vagal nerve activity. Moreover, intraoral administration of this LMW fraction increased the body temperature of rats above the interscapular brown adipose tissue. These results suggest that the LMW fraction of the S-PT84 culture supernatant affects the autonomic nerve activity and thermogenesis, and that the change in thermogenesis may be caused by the change in the sympathetic nerve activity of brown adipose tissue.

  18. Nerve Blockage Attenuates Postoperative Inflammation in Hippocampus of Young Rat Model with Surgical Trauma.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Li, Zhi; Zuo, Yun-Xia

    2015-01-01

    It is hypothesized that central nervous system inflammation induced by systematic inflammation due to surgical trauma plays a critical role in postoperative cognitive dysfunction. The potential inhibitory effect of nerve blockage with local anesthetics on peripheral inflammatory response has been reported. We hypothesize that nerve blockage may be effective in reducing postoperative inflammation and cognitive decline. The rats at the age of 4 weeks were subjected to general anesthesia and humeral fracture fixation, in combination with brachial plexus block, saline versus ropivacaine, respectively. The rats from control group underwent general anesthesia only. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in plasma and in hippocampus was measured. Open field test and new object recognition task were performed before surgery and on postoperative days (POD) 1, 3, and 7. Compared with control group, the level of cytokines in plasma and hippocampus revealed an obvious increase in surgery groups. The effect of brachial plexus block on decreasing cytokines was observed. The rats exposed to surgery without brachial plexus block showed behavior impairment. Our results indicated that nerve blockage could downregulate proinflammatory cytokines in hippocampus after humeral fixation surgery, which may ameliorate the postoperative cognitive dysfunction in young rats. PMID:26664150

  19. Nerve Regeneration in Rat Limb Allografts: Evaluation of Acute Rejection Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; MacEwan, Matthew R.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Farber, Scott; Newton, Piyaraj; Tung, Thomas H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Successful nerve regeneration is critical to the functional success of composite tissue allografts (CTA). The present study was designed to characterize the effect of acute rejection on nerve regeneration and functional recovery in the setting of orthotopic limb transplantation. Methods A rat orthotopic limb transplantation model was used to evaluate the effects of acute rejection on nerve regeneration and motor recovery. Continuous administration of FK506 (Full suppression), administration of FK506 for the first 8 of 12 weeks (Late rejection), or delayed administration of FK506 / dexamethasone following noticeable rejection (Early rejection) was used to preclude or induce rejection following limb transplantation. Twelve weeks postoperatively, nerve regeneration was assessed via histomorphometric analysis of explanted sciatic nerve, and motor recovery was assessed via evoked muscle force measurement in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Results A single episode of acute rejection that occurs immediately or late after reconstruction does not significantly alter the number of regenerating axonal fibers. Acute rejection occurring late after reconstruction adversely affects EDL muscle function in CTA. Conclusion Collected data reinforces that adequate immunosuppressant administration in cases of allogeneic limb transplantation ensures levels of nerve regeneration and motor functional recovery equivalent to that of syngeneic transplants. Prompt rescue following acute rejection was further demonstrated not to significantly affect nerve regeneration and functional recovery post-operatively. However, instances of acute rejection that occur late after reconstruction affect graft function. In total, the present study begins to characterize the effect of immunosuppression regimens on nerve regeneration and motor recovery in the setting of CTA. PMID:23542267

  20. Large-area irradiated low-level laser effect in a biodegradable nerve guide conduit on neural regeneration of peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2011-08-01

    This study used a biodegradable composite containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin annexed with β-tricalcium phosphate ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-tricalcium phosphate, GGT), developed in a previous study, as a nerve guide conduit. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a large-area irradiated aluminium-gallium-indium phosphide (AlGaInP) diode laser (660 nm) on the neural regeneration of the transected sciatic nerve after bridging the GGT nerve guide conduit in rats. The animals were divided into two groups: group 1 comprised sham-irradiated controls and group 2 rats underwent low-level laser (LLL) therapy. A compact multi-cluster laser system with 20 AlGaInP laser diodes (output power, 50mW) was applied transcutaneously to the injured peripheral nerve immediately after closing the wound, which was repeated daily for 5 min for 21 consecutive days. Eight weeks after implantation, walking track analysis showed a significantly higher sciatic function index (SFI) score (P<0.05) and better toe spreading development in the laser-treated group than in the sham-irradiated control group. For electrophysiological measurement, both the mean peak amplitude and nerve conduction velocity of compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were higher in the laser-treated group than in the sham-irradiated group. The two groups were found to be significantly different during the experimental period (P<0.005). Histomorphometric assessments revealed that the qualitative observation and quantitative analysis of the regenerated nerve tissue in the laser-treated group were superior to those of the sham-irradiated group. Thus, the motor functional, electrophysiologic and histomorphometric assessments demonstrate that LLL therapy can accelerate neural repair of the corresponding transected peripheral nerve after bridging the GGT nerve guide conduit in rats. PMID:21397226

  1. Changes in nerve conduction and Pi/PCr ratio during denervation-reinnervation of the gastrocsoleus muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, K. S.; Jaweed, M. M.; Seestead, R.; Herbison, G. J.; Ditunno, J. F. Jr; McCully, K.; Chance, B.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the changes in nerve conduction and phosphate metabolites of the gastrocsoleus muscles of rats during denervation-reinnervation. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral crush-denervation of the left sciatic nerves at the sciatic notch. Six rats were used for measurement of motor conduction latency and action potential amplitude of the gastrocsoleus muscle by stimulating the sciatic nerve at one, two and eight weeks after nerve crush. The other ten rats were designated for evaluation of the ratio of inorganic phosphorous (Pi) to phosphocreatine (PCr) by a 31P-phosphoenergetic spectrometer at two weeks and eight weeks after nerve crush. None of the sciatic nerves showed conduction to the gastrocsoleus at one or two weeks after nerve crush. At eight weeks postcrush, the motor conduction latency returned to within normal limits, whereas the action potential amplitude was only 55% of the normal. For the eight-week period of study, the Pi/PCr ratio of the normal control muscles ranged between 0.09 +/- 0.02 and 0.11 +/- 0.02 (mean +/- SD). The denervated muscles showed an increase of Pi/PCr ratio by 54% at two weeks postcrush, compared to the respective contralateral control sides. The ratios returned to the normal value by eight weeks postcrush. In summary, these data suggested that the metabolic recovery of the crush-denervated muscle followed the same pattern as the parameters of nerve conduction.

  2. Synaptic endfeet in the 'acoustic nerve nucleus' of the rat. An electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Bolado, G; Merchán, J

    1988-01-01

    The medial portion of the cochlear nerve of the rat contains astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons. These neurons form what has been called the 'acoustic nerve nucleus'. This nucleus has been studied here at the electron microscopic level. Its neurons are large and round, showing an eccentric nucleus, fibrillary bodies and rough endoplasmic reticulum which is not arranged in stacks. The somata and dendrites receive synaptic endfeet which can be classified into three groups according to vesicle size and shape. In general, the ultrastructural characteristics of these cells are similar to those of bushy cells as reported by other authors. The 'acoustic nerve nucleus' can be considered to be the most peripheral part of the anterior ventral cochlear nucleus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:3248967

  3. Increased efficacy of the 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the median forebrain bundle in small rats, by modification of the stereotaxic coordinates.

    PubMed

    Torres, E M; Lane, E L; Heuer, A; Smith, G A; Murphy, E; Dunnett, S B

    2011-08-30

    The 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion is the most widely used rat model of Parkinson's disease. A single unilateral injection of 6-OHDA into the median forebrain bundle (MFB) selectively destroys dopamine neurons in the ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), removing more than 95% of the dopamine innervation from target areas. The stereotaxic coordinates used to deliver 6-OHDA to the MFB have been used in our laboratory successfully for more than 25 years. However, in recent years we have observed a decline in the success rate of this lesion. Previously regular success rates of >80% of rats lesioned, have become progressively more variable, with rates as low as 20% recorded in some experiments. Having excluded variability of the neurotoxin and operator errors, we hypothesized that the change seen might be due to the use of smaller rats at the time of first surgery. An attempt to proportionally adjust the lesion coordinates base on head size did not increase lesion efficacy. However, in support of the small rat hypothesis it was observed that, using the standard coordinates, rat's heads had a "nose-up" position in the stereotaxic fame. Adjustment of the nose bar to obtain a flat head position during surgery improved lesion success, and subsequent adjustments of the lesion coordinates to account for smaller head size led to a greatly increased lesion efficacy (>90%) as assessed by amphetamine induced rotation.

  4. Electrophysiological and functional effects of shock waves on the sciatic nerve of rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Hui; Liang, Huey-Wen; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Lai, Jin-Shin; Luh, Jer-Junn; Chong, Fok-Ching

    2008-10-01

    Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) has been applied in lithotripsy and treatments of musculoskeletal disorders over the past decade, but its effects on peripheral nerves remain unclear. This study investigated the short-term effects of shockwaves on the sciatic nerve of rats. The nerves were surgically exposed and then stimulated with shockwaves at three intensities. We evaluated the motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) of treated sciatic nerves before, immediately after (day 0) and at 1, 4, 7 and 14 d after shockwave treatment. Two functional tests-the sciatic functional index and the withdrawal reflex latency-were evaluated before and at 1, 4, 7 and 14 d after shockwave application. The rats were sacrificed on days 0, 1, 4, 7 and 14 for morphologic observation. The degassed treatment group received high-intensity shockwave treatment using degassed normal saline as the contact medium, and MNCV was measured before and on days 0, 1, 4, 7 and 14. The sham group received the same procedure as the treatment groups (i.e., the surgical operation to expose the sciatic nerve) but with no shockwave treatment. The control group received no surgical operation or shockwave treatment. The results showed moderate decrease in the MNCV after shockwave treatment and damage to the myelin sheath of large-diameter myelinated fibers. The effect was largest (reduction to 60.9% of baseline MNCV) and of longest duration (7 to 14 d) in the high-intensity group. There were no significant changes in functional tests. These results indicated that direct application of shockwaves can induce reversible segmental demyelination in large-diameter fibers, with the electrophysiological changes being positively correlated with the intensity of the shockwaves.

  5. Respiratory-related discharge pattern of sympathetic nerve activity in the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed Central

    Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Trzebski, A

    1990-01-01

    1. Synchronization of spontaneous sympathetic discharge during the respiratory cycle was studied in the cervical and renal nerves of vagotomized, normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) and age-matched spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Phrenic nerve discharge was used as an index of central inspiratory activity. 2. In normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats depression of sympathetic activity appeared at the onset of inspiration reaching a minimum at mid-inspiration. Peak maximal sympathetic discharge corresponded to postinspiratory phase; a second increase sometimes appeared in late expiration. Variations of respiratory frequency over wide range of experimental conditions by hypoxia, hyperoxia, hyper- or hypocapnia and transection of carotid sinus nerves did not affect this pattern. 3. In SHRs the respiratory-phase-related timing of sympathetic discharge was variable. In normoxia, the maximal sympathetic activity occurred in late inspiration, preceded by short depression at early inspiration and followed by postinspiratory depression. A second increase in sympathetic activity was observed in mid-expiration. 4. The pattern of respiratory phase modulated sympathetic activity in SHRs was altered by hypoxic stimulation of the peripheral chemoreceptors. The early inspiratory depression of sympathetic activity was substantially prolonged and the maximal sympathetic discharge was shifted from inspiration to early expiration. This effect was abolished after carotid sinus nerves had been cut. 5. Hypercapnic stimulation of central chemoreceptors in SHRs with carotid sinus nerves cut did not influence the timing of the sympathetic activity in relation to the respiratory phase, though the magnitude of rhythmical sympathetic discharges was increased. 6. We discuss the possibility that altered synchronization between central respiratory drive and sympathetic neuronal system may contribute to the neurogenic mechanisms of arterial hypertension in SHRs. PMID:2231403

  6. Injury-induced activation of ERK 1/2 in the sciatic nerve of healthy and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Stenberg, Lena; Kanje, Martin; Mårtensson, Lisa; Dahlin, Lars B

    2011-01-26

    Phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (p-ERK 1/2) was investigated by immunohistochemistry at 30 min, 1 h, and 48 h after nerve transection in the sciatic nerve of healthy and diabetic [streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus and BioBreeding (BB; i.e. DR.lyp/lyp or BBDP)] rats. Transection injury increased the intensity of p-ERK 1/2 in nerve stumps at all time points. Staining was confined to Schwann cells with occasional faint staining in single axons. In diabetic rats, a lower intensity of p-ERK 1/2 was found at 1 and 48 h in the distal and proximal nerve stumps compared with healthy rats. STZ-induced diabetic rats were not different from BB rats. p-ERK 1/2 is activated differentially in Schwann cells after nerve injury in diabetic rats, whereas activation in STZ-induced diabetic rats did not differ from BB rats.

  7. Functional and anatomical characteristics of the nerve-brown adipose interaction in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flaim, K. E.; Horowitz, J. M.; Horwitz, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on 12 male rats to study the coupling of signals from the sympathetic nervous system to the brown adipose tissue. Analysis of electron photomicrographs revealed considerable morphological heterogeneity among the nerves entering and leaving the interscapular fat pad. In response to electrical simulation of the nerves, the temperature of the brown fat increased following a rapid but transient temperature drop. Such changes were observed only on the ipsilateral side, indicating that the innervation to the interscapular brown fat of the rat is functionally bilateral rather than diffuse. The finding that brown fat is capable of responding in a graded fashion correlates well with observations suggesting that clusters of brown adipocytes may be electrically coupled.

  8. Characterization of Endoneurial Fibroblast-like Cells from Human and Rat Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Laurence; Védrenne, Nicolas; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Endoneurial fibroblast-like cells (EFLCs) are one of the cell populations present in the peripheral nervous system. The role and immunophenotypic characteristics of EFLCs are not well known and led us to perform a histological and cytological study of EFLCs in normal human and rat peripheral nerves. We found that all EFLCs express CD34, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), and prolyl-4-hydrolase-beta. In addition, half of the EFLCs in normal peripheral nerves express platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) and some also express the intermediate filament nestin in vivo (at a lower level than Schwann cells, which express high levels of nestin). Using cell cultures of purified EFLCs, we characterized subpopulations of EFLCs expressing PDGFR-β alone or PDGFR-β and nestin. Experimental nerve lesions in rat resulted in an increase in nestin-positive EFLCs, which returned to normal levels after 8 days. This suggests that some EFLCs could have a different proliferative and/or regenerative potential than others, and these EFLCs may play a role in the initial phase of nerve repair. These “activated” EFLCs share some immunophenotypic similarities with pericytes and Interstitial cells of Cajal, which have progenitor cell potentials. This raises the questions as to whether a proportion of EFLCs have a possible role as endoneurial progenitor cells. PMID:24670794

  9. The influence of bacterial collagenase on regeneration of severed rat sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Wehling, P; Pak, M; Cleveland, S; Nieper, R

    1992-01-01

    Regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers is impeded by the formation of scar tissue at the site of injury. The possible beneficial effect of collagenase on nerve regeneration was studied using clinical, neurophysiological (evoked potentials) and histological (nerve fiber counts) methods. The sciatic nerves of rats were transected and the severed ends abutted and sewn together. In one series, the area about the lesion was covered with fibrin adhesive and infused with either isotonic saline (controls) or collagenase (treatment group). In the other series, the severed ends of the nerve were inserted into a silicone tube and separated by a collagen plug, which was infused with either saline or collagenase. Compared to the controls, the treated animals showed a significant improvement of clinical and neurophysiological parameters. After 3 months of observation, the collagen content of the transection site was reduced, and in the silicone series, the total number of myelinated axons 5 mm distal to the site of transection was increased, while the fiber diameter distribution was unchanged. PMID:1336302

  10. Three dimensional observations of the palisade-shaped nerve endings of normal hair of rat's snout.

    PubMed

    Seguchi, H; Yagyu, Y; Kobayashi, T

    1989-01-01

    The nerve endings of normal hair of the rat's snout, partially digested with trypsin and hydrochloric acid, were studied by scanning electron microscopy. Each lanceolate structure measured ca. 10 microns in length and was arranged around the hair follicle. These palisade-shaped nerve endings were situated almost beneath the sebaceous glands, ran upward, parallel to the axis of the hair follicle, and terminated in pointed shape. 2 kinds of cells, Teloglia cell Type I showing flat profile, and Teloglia cell Type II showing spherical profile and possessing numerous caveolae in its surface were observed at the basal portion of the palisade-shaped endings. The axon was enclosed by Schwann cells in its course to the hair follicle, and was covered with Type I cells at the beginning, and with Type II cells at the end, and constituted the palisade-shaped nerve endings. The palisade structure in silver impregnated tissues observed by backscattered electron microscopy and X-ray analyzer was characterized as comprising neuronal elements. Cytochemically, the nerve endings showed cholinesterase and Mg-ATPase activities. They may be involved in the reception of the mechanical stimulation of the hair. The palisade nerve endings thus possessed appropriate 3-dimensional structure as mechanoreceptor.

  11. RESOLUTION OF THREE DISTINCT POPULATIONS OF NERVE ENDINGS FROM RAT BRAIN HOMOGENATES BY ZONAL ISOPYCNIC CENTRIFUGATION

    PubMed Central

    Bretz, Ursula; Baggiolini, Marco; Hauser, Rolf; Hodel, Christian

    1974-01-01

    Conditions have been established for the fractionation of subcellular components of rat forebrain homogenates by zonal isopycnic equilibration in continuous sucrose density gradients using a B-XIV rotor. The fractions were analyzed biochemically and by ultra-structural morphometry. Starting from postnuclear supernates of forebrain homogenates, it has been possible to resolve three distinct populations of nerve endings from one another, as well as from free mitochondria and myelin fragments. The three types of nerve endings differ in their apparent specific gravity, their biochemical properties, and their ability selectively to accumulate exogenous transmitter substances in vitro. These three particle populations are likely to represent, in order of increasing modal equilibrium density, (a) cholinergic nerve endings, characterized by their high content of acetylcholine, (b) γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)-containing nerve endings with high glutamate decarboxylase activity and the ability to accumulate exogenous GABA, (c) adrenergic nerve endings that accumulate exogenous dopamine and noradrenaline and exhibit high monoamine oxidase activity. PMID:4363959

  12. Expression of ENaC subunits in sensory nerve endings in the rat larynx.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2006-07-24

    We investigated the expression of three subunits of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC, in the nodose ganglion and laryngeal mucosa of rat by RT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry. PCR products of predicted size for alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC subunits were amplified from extract of nodose ganglion. Immunohistochemically, nodose ganglion neurons of medium to large diameter were immunoreactive for alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC. In the deep region of laryngeal submucosal layer, thick nerve fibers without varicosities were immunoreactive for alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC. In the laryngeal mucosa, terminal arborizations of the nerve endings, that immunoreacted for alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC were scattered in the lamina propria just beneath the epithelia of epiglottis and laryngeal vestibule. Double immunofluorescence with calretinin revealed that they were laminar nerve endings. Some thick nerve fibers near the laryngeal taste buds were also immunoreactive for betaENaC and gammaENaC, but negative for alphaENaC. In the larynx, ENaC channels may play important roles in mechanotransduction in the laminar endings and in the mechano- and chemotransductions in the taste bud-associated nerve fibers. PMID:16725259

  13. An immunohistochemical study of the sciatic nerve in a rat knee immobilization model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shinya; Matsuzaki, Taro; Hoso, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to immunohistochemically evaluate changes in the periphery of the sciatic nerve in a rat model of knee immobilization, and to assess the effects of range of motion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one male rats were divided randomly into three groups: control (C), immobilized (I), and exercise (E group). Rats in the I and E groups had the right knee joint immobilized for 2 weeks. In the E group, range of motion exercise was also performed. After the experimental period, the periphery of the sciatic nerve was immunohistochemically observed. [Results] Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the myelin sheath and the perineurium in all groups were laminin positive. In the C and E groups, all rats showed normal staining. In contrast, 4 rats in the I group exhibited weak labeling. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that immobilization alters the perineurium at a molecular level and the range of motion exercise is essential for maintaining the environment of the perineurium. PMID:27190437

  14. A computational model for the stimulation of rat sciatic nerve using a transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode.

    PubMed

    Raspopovic, Stanisa; Capogrosso, Marco; Micera, Silvestro

    2011-08-01

    Neuroprostheses based on electrical stimulation could potentially help disabled persons. They are based on neural interface that aim at creating an intimate contact with neural cells. The efficacy of neuroprostheses can be improved by increasing the selectivity of the neural interfaces used to stimulate specific subsets of cells. Selectivity is strongly influenced by interface design. Computer models can be useful for exploring the high dimensional space of design parameters with the aim to provide guidelines for the development of more efficient electrodes, with minimal animal use and optimization of manufacturing processes. The purpose of this study was to implement a realistic model of the performance of a transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrode (TIME) implanted into the rat sciatic nerve. A realistic finite element method (FEM) model was developed taking into account the anatomical and physiological features of the rat sciatic nerve. Electric potentials were calculated and interpolated voltages were applied to the model of a rat sciatic nerve axon, based on experimental biophysical data. Results indicate that high intra-fascicular and inter-fascicular selectivity values with low current levels can be achieved with TIMEs. The selectivity of TIMEs was also compared to an extraneural electrode, showing that higher selectivity with less current can be obtained. Using this model, the robustness of electrode performances for translational and rotational displacements were evaluated.

  15. Inside-out autologous vein grafts fail to restore erectile function in a rat model of cavernous nerve crush injury after nerve-sparing prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Bessede, T; Moszkowicz, D; Alsaid, B; Zaitouna, M; Diallo, D; Peschaud, F; Benoit, G; Droupy, S

    2015-01-01

    Some autologous tissues can restore erectile function (EF) in rats after a resection of the cavernous nerve (CN). However, a cavernous nerve crush injury (CNCI) better reproduces ED occurring after a nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy (RP). The aim was to evaluate the effect on EF of an autologous vein graft after CNCI, compared with an artificial conduit. Five groups of rats were studied: those with CN exposure, exposure+vein, crush, crush+guide and crush+vein. Four weeks after surgery, the EF of rats was assessed by electrical stimulation of the CNs. The intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were monitored during stimulations at various frequencies. The main outcome, that is, the rigidity of the erections, was defined as the ICP/MAP ratio. At 10 Hz, the ICP/MAP ratios were 41.8%, 34.7%, 20.9%, 33.9% and 20.5%, respectively. The EF was significantly lower in rats if the CNCI was treated with a vein graft instead of an artificial guide. Contrary to cases of CN resection, autologous vein grafts did not improve EF after CNCI. In terms of clinical use, the study suggests to limit an eventual use of autologous vein grafts to non-nerve-sparing RPs.

  16. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  17. Gallic acid and exercise training improve motor function, nerve conduction velocity but not pain sense reflex after experimental sciatic nerve crush in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Hajimoradi, Maryam; Fazilati, Mohammad; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem; Sarkaki, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of oral administration of gallic acid (GA) for 21 days alone and in combination with exercise on nerve conduction velocity and sensory and motor functions in rats with sciatic nerve crush. Materials and Methods: Seventy adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided randomly into 7 groups with 10 in each: 1) Control (Cont), 2) Crushed + Vehicle (Cr +Veh), 3-5) Crushed + gallic acid (Cr+GA) (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/2 mL, orally), 6) Crushed + exercise (Cr+Exe), and 7) Crushed + exercise + effective dose of gallic acid (Cr+Exe +GA200) for 21 days. In order to establish an animal model of sciatic nerve crush, equivalent to 7 kg of force pressed on 2-3 mm of sciatic nerve for 30 s, three times with 30 s intervals. Pain sense reflex in hot plate, motor coordination in rotarod, and sciatic nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) in all groups were tested. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test and p<0.05 has assigned as the significant difference. Results: Pain threshold was increased significantly in untreated crushed rats while motor function and SNCV were decreased in all groups with nerve crush (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001 vs. control). Pain reflex latency was not changed in treated groups. Motor coordination and SNCV were improved in groups Cr+GA200 and Cr+Exe + GA200 (p<0.05, p<0.01 vs. Cr+Veh). Conclusion: GA, dose-dependently, may have therapeutic potential to improve the peripheral nerve degeneration, which is most likely related, at least in part, to its antioxidant and therapeutic properties. PMID:26445710

  18. Collateral sprouting of sensory axons after end-to-side nerve coaptation--a longitudinal study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Uros; Tomsic, Martin; Sketelj, Janez; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2007-02-01

    The end-to-side nerve coaptation is able to induce collateral sprouting of axons from the donor nerve and to provide functional reinnervation of the target tissue. Sensory axon sprouting and its effects on the donor nerve up to 9 months after the end-to-side nerve coaptation were studied in the rat. Peroneal, tibial and saphenous nerves were transected and ligated, and the distal stump of the transected peroneal nerve was sutured to the side of the uninjured sural nerve. The average skin area of the residual sensitivity to pinch due to the axons sprouting through the recipient peroneal nerve did not change statistically significantly between 4 and 9 months after surgery. Axon counting, measurements of compound action potentials and retrograde neuron labeling indicate that the sprouting of the myelinated sensory axons and unmyelinated axons through the recipient nerve was largely completed by 2 months and 4 months after the end-to-side nerve coaptation, respectively, and remained stable thereafter for at least 9 months. A decrease in the amplitude and area of the CAP of myelinated fibers, observed in the donor nerve up to 4 months after surgery, was probably due to mild degeneration of nerve fibers and a tendency of the diameter of myelinated axons to decline. However, no significant changes in functional, electrophysiological or morphological properties of the donor nerve could be observed at the end of the observational period, indicating that end-to-side nerve coaptation has no detrimental effect on the donor nerve on a long-term scale. PMID:17045263

  19. Neuroprotective effect of 4-(Phenylsulfanyl)butan-2-one on optic nerve crush model in rats.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jia-Ying; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Tsai, Rong-Kung; Huang, Shun-Ping

    2016-02-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of coral-related compound, 4-(phenylsulfanyl)butan-2-one (4-PSB-2) on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in a rat model subjected to ON crush. The ONs of adult male Wistar rat (150-180 g) were crushed by a standardized method. The control eyes received a sham operation. 4-PSB-2 (5 mg/kg in 0.2 mL phosphate-buffered saline) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS control) was immediately administered after ON crush once by subcutaneous injection. Rats were euthanized at 2 weeks after the crush injury. RGC density was counted by retrograde labeling with FluoroGold (FG) application to the superior colliculus, and visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP). TUNEL assay, immunoblotting analysis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) in the retinas, and immunohistochemistry of ED1 in the ON were evaluated. Two weeks after the insult, the RGC densities in the central and mid-peripheral retinas in ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated rats were significantly higher than that of the corresponding ON-crushed, PBS-treated rats FVEP measurements showed a significantly better preserved latency of the P1 wave in the ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated rats than the ON-crushed, PBS treated rats. TUNEL assays showed fewer TUNEL positive cells in the ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated rats. The number of ED1 positive cells was reduced at the lesion site of the optic nerve in the ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated group. Furthermore, administration of 4-PSB-2 significantly attenuated ON crush insult-stimulated iNOS and COX2 expression in the retinas. These results demonstrated that 4-PSB-2 protects RGCs and helps preserve the visual function in the rat model of optic nerve crush. 4-PSB-2 may work by being anti-apoptotic and by attenuation of the inflammatory responses involving less ED1 positive cells infiltration in ON as well as suppression of iNOS/COX-2 signaling pathway in the retinas to rescue RGCs

  20. Neuroprotective effect of 4-(Phenylsulfanyl)butan-2-one on optic nerve crush model in rats.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jia-Ying; Sheu, Jyh-Horng; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Tsai, Rong-Kung; Huang, Shun-Ping

    2016-02-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of coral-related compound, 4-(phenylsulfanyl)butan-2-one (4-PSB-2) on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in a rat model subjected to ON crush. The ONs of adult male Wistar rat (150-180 g) were crushed by a standardized method. The control eyes received a sham operation. 4-PSB-2 (5 mg/kg in 0.2 mL phosphate-buffered saline) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS control) was immediately administered after ON crush once by subcutaneous injection. Rats were euthanized at 2 weeks after the crush injury. RGC density was counted by retrograde labeling with FluoroGold (FG) application to the superior colliculus, and visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials (FVEP). TUNEL assay, immunoblotting analysis of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) in the retinas, and immunohistochemistry of ED1 in the ON were evaluated. Two weeks after the insult, the RGC densities in the central and mid-peripheral retinas in ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated rats were significantly higher than that of the corresponding ON-crushed, PBS-treated rats FVEP measurements showed a significantly better preserved latency of the P1 wave in the ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated rats than the ON-crushed, PBS treated rats. TUNEL assays showed fewer TUNEL positive cells in the ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated rats. The number of ED1 positive cells was reduced at the lesion site of the optic nerve in the ON-crushed, 4-PSB-2-treated group. Furthermore, administration of 4-PSB-2 significantly attenuated ON crush insult-stimulated iNOS and COX2 expression in the retinas. These results demonstrated that 4-PSB-2 protects RGCs and helps preserve the visual function in the rat model of optic nerve crush. 4-PSB-2 may work by being anti-apoptotic and by attenuation of the inflammatory responses involving less ED1 positive cells infiltration in ON as well as suppression of iNOS/COX-2 signaling pathway in the retinas to rescue RGCs

  1. Identification of binding sites for an insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) in the median eminence of the rat brain by quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bohannon, N.J.; Figlewicz, D.P.; Corp, E.S.; Wilcox, B.J.; Porte, D. Jr.; Baskin, D.G.

    1986-08-01

    The microanatomical location of IGF-I binding in the rat brain was determined by in vitro autoradiography with slide-mounted sections of frozen brain. Sections incubated in 0.1 nM (/sup 125/I)-iodo-IGF-I produced a dense grain concentration in regions of the autoradiographic image corresponding to the external palisade zone of the median eminence; other hypothalamic regions were not so heavily labeled. This reaction was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 nM IGF-I. Measurement of binding by computer digital image analysis of autoradiographic images showed that specific binding for IGF-I in the median eminence was 41.3 +/- 8 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2 (mean +/- SEM); nonspecific binding was 11.9 +/- 1.8 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2. In contrast, specific binding to other hypothalamic regions was uniformly lower. In a separate experiment, 1000 nM unlabeled insulin was added. Without insulin, specific binding was 23 +/- 0.9 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2; nonspecific binding was 8 +/- 0.5 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2. In the presence of 1000 nM unlabeled insulin, specific binding for (/sup 125/I)-iodo-IGF-I was 23 +/- 1 X 10(-3) fmol/mm2. The results suggest that a high concentration of receptors for an IGF-I-like molecule is present in the median eminence.

  2. L-Ornithine intake affects sympathetic nerve outflows and reduces body weight and food intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yuuki; Koosaka, Yasutaka; Maruyama, Ryuutaro; Imanishi, Kazuki; Kasahara, Kazuaki; Matsuda, Ai; Akiduki, Saori; Hishida, Yukihiro; Kurata, Yasutaka; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Satomi, Jun; Tanida, Mamoru

    2015-02-01

    Ingesting the amino acid l-ornithine effectively improves lipid metabolism in humans, although it is unknown whether it affects the activities of autonomic nerves that supply the peripheral organs related to lipid metabolism, such as adipose tissues. Thus, we investigated the effects of l-ornithine ingestion on autonomic nerves that innervate adipose tissues and the feeding behaviors of rats. Intragastric injection of l-ornithine (2.5%) in urethane-anesthetized rats activated sympathetic nerve activity to white adipose tissue (WAT-SNA), and stimulated sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue (BAT-SNA). In addition, WAT-SNA responses to l-ornithine were abolished in rats with ablated abdominal vagal nerves. l-ornithine ingestion for 9 weeks also significantly reduced rats' body weight, food intake, and abdominal fat weight. Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) levels in the hypothalamus and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) levels in brown adipose tissue were significantly increased in rats that ingested 2.5% l-ornithine for 9 weeks. These results suggested that ingested l-ornithine was taken up in the gastrointestinal organs and stimulated afferent vagal nerves and activated the central nervous system. Subsequently, increased hypothalamic POMC activated sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissues and accelerated energy expenditure. PMID:25526897

  3. Acetyl salicylic acid locally enhances functional recovery after sciatic nerve transection in rat.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Amini, Keyvan; Abdollahi-Pirbazari, Mehdi; Yousefi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Local effect of acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Forty-five male healthy White Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Sham-operation (SHAM), control (SIL), and ASA-treated (SIL/ASA) groups. In SHAM group after anesthesia left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis the muscle was sutured. In SIL group the left sciatic nerve was exposed the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone tube and filled with 10 μl phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/ASA group defect was bridged using a silicone tube filled with 10 μl acetyl salisylic acid (0.1 mg/ml). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and were studied 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Data were analyzed statistically by factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Bonferroni test for pair-wise comparisons. Functional study confirmed faster and better recovery of regenerated axons in SIL/ASA than in SIL group (p < 0.05). Gastrocnemius muscle mass in SIL/ASA was significantly more than in SIL group. Morphometric indices of regenerated fibers showed that the number and diameter of the myelinated fibers in SIL/ASA were significantly higher than in control group. In immuohistochemistry, location of reactions to S-100 in SIL/ASA was clearly more positive than in SIL group. Response to local treatment of ASA demonstrates that it influences and improves functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration.

  4. Histopathological Effects of Tissue Adhesives on Experimental Peripheral Nerve Transection Model in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Çıralık, Harun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to evaluate the histopathological effects of tissue adhesives on peripheral nerve regeneration after experimental sciatic nerve transection in rats and to search whether these tissue adhesives may possess a therapeutic potential in peripheral nerve injuries. Methods This experimental study was performed using 42 female Wistar-Albino rats distributed in 6 groups subsequent to transection of right sciatic nerves. Group I underwent external circumferential neurolysis; Group II received suture repair; Group III had local polymeric hydrogel based tissue adhesive administration; Group IV received suture repair and polymeric hydrogel based tissue adhesive application together; Group V had gelatin based tissue adhesive application and Group VI had suture repair and gelatin based tissue adhesive together. After a 6-week follow-up period, biopsies were obtained from site of neural injury and groups were compared with respect to histopathological scoring based on inflammatory, degenerative, necrotic and fibrotic changes. Results There were remarkable differences between control group and study groups with respect to inflammation (p=0.001), degeneration (p=0.002), necrosis (p=0.007), fibrosis (p<0.001) and vascularity (p=0.001). Histopathological scores were similar between study groups and the only noteworthy difference was that Group V displayed a lower score for necrosis and higher score in terms of vascularization. Conclusion Our results imply that tissue adhesives can be useful in repair of peripheral nerve injuries by decreasing the surgical trauma and shortening the duration of intervention. Results with gelatin based tissue adhesive are especially promising since more intense vascularity was observed in tissue after application. However, trials on larger series with longer durations of follow-up are essential for reaching more reliable conclusions. PMID:26819683

  5. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR in ovariectomized rats, but its effects were normalized with 4 days of oestrogen treatment. Bilateral nanoinjection of SHU9119 into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), to block α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) type 3 and 4 receptors, decreased LSNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus but not dioestrus rats. Unlike leptin, i.c.v. insulin infusion increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA and HR similarly in pro-oestrus and dioestrus rats; these responses did not differ from those in male rats. We conclude that, in female rats, leptin's stimulatory effects on SNA are differentially enhanced by oestrogen, at least in part via an increase in α-MSH activity in the PVN. These data further suggest that the actions of leptin and insulin to increase the activity of various sympathetic nerves occur via different neuronal pathways or cellular mechanisms. These results may explain the poor correlation in females of SNA with adiposity, or of MAP with leptin. PMID:25398524

  6. The effect of mirodenafil on the penile erection and corpus cavernosum in the rat model of cavernosal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Sohn, D W; Kim, S D; Hong, S-H; Suh, H J; Lee, C B; Kim, S W

    2010-01-01

    Impotence is one of the common complications after the radical prostatectomy. One of the main reasons of this complication is due to the dysfunction of the veins in corpus cavernosum. Recent studies have shown that the erectile function is improved after the long-term therapy of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor among patients with post-prostatectomy erectile dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated the effects of mirodenafil on the penile erection and corpus cavernosum tissues in the rat model of cavernosal nerve injury. Rats were divided into four groups: (1) control group, (2) bilateral cavernosal nerve injury group, (3) mirodenafil 10 mg therapy group after the nerve injury and (4) mirodenafil 20 mg therapy group after the nerve injury. After we identified the nerve from the pelvic nerve complex on the lateral side of the prostate, the rats in the control group were sutured without causing any nerve injury and in other groups we damaged the nerve by compressing it with a vessel clamp. Then, 10 and 20 mg kg(-1) of mirodenafil were orally administered to two experimental groups. After 8 weeks, the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) was recorded. The immunohistochemical staining and western blot were performed, and the effect of mirodenafil on the expression of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) was evaluated through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The ICP of nerve-injured group was decreased compared with the control group; however, the ICP of the mirodenafil-administered groups was improved compared with the nerve-injured group. The Masson's trichrome staining confirmed that the smooth muscle (SM) component was increased in the mirodenafil-administered groups. The nitric oxide synthase expression and cGMP of mirodenafil-administered groups was increased compared with the nerve-injured group. Long-term therapy of mirodenafil may improve the erectile function after the radical prostatectomy by preserving the SM content and inhibiting the fibrosis of the corpus

  7. Influence of age on the late retrograde effects of sciatic nerve section in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kerezoudi, E; King, R H; Muddle, J R; O'Neill, J A; Thomas, P K

    1995-01-01

    The influence of age on the late retrograde effects of unilateral sciatic nerve section was investigated in rats. Operations were performed on young rats aged 3 months and older rats aged 15 and 18 months, with survival times ranging from 6 to 15 months depending upon age at the time of operation. As in previous studies, axonal atrophy was found in myelinated fibres proximal to nerve transection. This was observed to be greater in animals operated upon at 3 months of age than in those in which the sciatic nerve was transected at 15 and 18 months. In the sciatic nerve, focal intramyelinic oedema was present at a low frequency on the operated side just proximal to the section at all survival times but not on the unoperated side except in 1 old animal. Its frequency increased with age both in the dorsal and ventral roots on both sides but it was not more common on the operated side. Retrograde axonal atrophy is therefore unlikely to contribute to its occurrence. In the dorsal root ganglia the main abnormality was the presence of vacuolated neurons on the operated side. Nuclear eccentricity was also observed on the operated side in young animals in a proportion of the neurons; its frequency increased with age on the normal side and there was no difference in the older animals between operated and control sides. The possibility is discussed that growth factor deprivation secondary to axotomy is implicated in these changes. If so, there are age differences in its effect in giving rise to axonal atrophy and neuronal vacuolation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7591983

  8. Intercellular junctions between palisade nerve endings and outer root sheath cells of rat vellus hairs.

    PubMed

    Kaidoh, T; Inoué, T

    2000-05-15

    Hair follicles have a longitudinal set of sensory nerve endings called palisade nerve endings (PN). We examined the junctional structures between the PN and outer root sheath (ORS) cells of hair follicles in the rat external ear. Transmission electron microscopy of serial thin sections showed that the processes of the ORS cells penetrated the basal lamina of the hair follicle, forming intercellular junctions with the PN (PN-ORS junctions). Two types of junctions were found: junctions between nerve endings and ORS cells (N-ORS junctions) and those between Schwann cell processes and ORS cells (S-ORS junctions). The N-ORS junctions had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was attached to the nerve ending (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the nerve ending (type II). The S-ORS junctions also had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was abutted on the Schwann cell process (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the Schwann cell process (type II). Vesicles, coated pits, coated vesicles, and endosomes were sometimes seen in nerve endings, Schwann cells, and ORS cells near the junctions. Computer-aided reconstruction of the serial thin sections displayed the three-dimensional structure of these junctions. These results suggested that the PN-ORS junctions provided direct relationships between the PN and ORS in at least four different patterns. The discovery of these junctions shows the PN-ORS relationship to be closer than previously realized. We speculate that these junctions may have roles in attachment of the PN to the ORS, contributing to increases in the sensitivity of the PN, and in chemical signaling between the PN and ORS.

  9. On the secretory activity of single varicosities in the sympathetic nerves innervating the rat tail artery.

    PubMed

    Astrand, P; Stjärne, L

    1989-02-01

    1. Nerve terminal impulses (NTIs) and spontaneous or stimulus-evoked excitatory junction currents (SEJCs or EJCs), reflecting secretion of transmitter quanta from release sites in the sympathetic nerves of rat tail artery, were recorded by extracellular electrodes. 2. The release of transmitter quanta from single varicosities was analysed on a pulse-by-pulse basis. 3. Since the SEJCs were tetrodotoxin-resistant, and hence probably caused by single quanta, they were employed to analyse the quantal content of EJCs. 4. In the majority of recordings, EJCs were large compared to SEJCs from the same attachment, and preceded by prominent NTIs. This type of activity appeared to reflect simultaneous activation of several nerve fibres and numerous varicosities. 5. By focal stimulation, it was usually possible to improve the resolution by examining spots in which a large proportion of the suprathreshold stimuli failed to cause EJCs. Here, averaged NTIs preceding large EJCs were indistinguishable from averaged NTIs not followed by EJCs. Thus, failure of invasion by the nerve impulse was not a cause of the frequent secretory failure. 6. In these attachments the amplitude distribution of nerve stimulus-evoked EJCs was similar to that of the SEJCs and many individual EJCs could be matched in amplitude and time course by SEJCs. Thus, transmitter secretion from these sympathetic nerve varicosities seems to be basically monoquantal. 7. Under conditions when all EJCs were smaller than or equal to the largest SEJCs some characteristic EJC profiles appeared only a few times in response to several hundred suprathreshold stimuli at low frequency (0.5-1 Hz). Using tentatively these EJCs as 'fingerprints' of single quanta from particular release sites, the probability for activation of individual release sites ranges from 0.002 to 0.02.

  10. Quantitative study of the development of the optic nerve in rats reared in the dark during early postnatal life.

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Y; Hayasaka, S; Bedi, K S; Ozaki, H S; Takeuchi, Y

    1991-01-01

    Male rats were placed in complete darkness from birth until 30 days of age, followed in some cases by a 35 days period of rehabilitation in control lighting conditions. Groups of control and experimental animals were killed at 30 and 65 days of age by perfusion with buffered 2.5% glutaraldehyde. The right optic nerve was dissected out from each animal and processed for embedding in Epon. Quantitative stereological procedures were used to estimate the total number of both myelinated and non-myelinated optic nerve fibres and their mean minimum diameters. There were no significant differences in the total number of optic nerve fibres between dark- and light-reared rats. However dark-reared rats had myelinated and non-myelinated fibres with significantly larger fibre diameters than those in age-matched light-reared rats. The proportion of optic nerve fibres which were myelinated increased with age in both groups of animals. However by 65 days of age the degree of myelination was slightly but significantly greater in the previously dark-reared rats than in the light-reared controls. These results indicate that rats reared in complete darkness for the first 30 days of postnatal life show morphological changes in the optic nerves. The possible significance of these changes is discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2032941

  11. Chemical Topography of Efferent Projections from the Median Preoptic Nucleus to Pontine Monoaminergic Cell Groups in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    1995-01-01

    This study examined efferent output from the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) to pontine noradrenergic and serotonergic cell groups using an anterograde tracing technique (Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, PHA-L) combined with glucose oxidase immunocytochemistry to scrotonin (5-HT) or to dopamine-(beta)-hydroxylase (DBH). Injections of PHA-L into the ventral MNPO resulted in moderate axonal labeling within the region of the B7 and B8 serotonergic groups in the dorsal raphe. PHA-L labeled fibers and punctate processes were observed in close apposition to many of the 5-HT immunoreactive neurons in these regions, In contrast, sparse terminal labeling was found within the B5 group in the raphe pontis nucleus, and only trace fiber labeling observed in the B3 and B6 groups. Efferents from the MNPO also provided moderate innervation to the A6 and A7 noradrenergic groups. PHA-L labeled punctate processes were found most frequently in close apposition to DBH-immunorcactive neurons at mid- to caudal levels of the locus coeruleus. Some labeled axons were also present within the A7 and A5 groups. Additionally, a close apposition between labeled MNPO efferents and 5-HT fibers within the lateral parabrachial nucleus was observed, The results indicate the MNPO provides a topographic innerva- tion of monoaminergic groups in the upper brainstem.

  12. Chemical Topography of Efferent Projections from the Median Preoptic Nucleus to Pontine Monoaminergic Cell Groups in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zardetto-Smith, Andrea M.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    1995-01-01

    This study examined efferent output from the median preoptic nucleus (MNPO) to pontine noradrenergic and serotonergic cell groups using an anterograde tracing technique (Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, PHA-L) combined with glucose oxidase immunocytochemistry to serotonin (5-HT) or to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH). Injections of PHA-L into the ventral MNPO resulted in moderate axonal labeling within the region of the B7 and B8 serotonergic groups in the dorsal raphe. PHA-L labeled fibers and punctate processes were observed in close apposition to many of the 5-HT immunoreactive neurons in these regions. In contrast, sparse terminal labeling was found within the B5 group in the raphe pontis nucleus, and only trace fiber labeling observed in the B3 and B6 groups. Efferents from the MNPO also provided moderate innervation to the A6 and A7 noradrenergic groups. PHA-L labeled punctate processes were found most frequently in close apposition to DBH-immunoreactive neurons at mid- to caudal levels of the locus coeruleus. Some labeled axons were also present within the A7 and A5 groups. Additionally, a close apposition between labeled MNPO efferents and 5-HT fibers within the lateral parabrachial nucleus was observed. The results indicate the MNPO provides a topographic innervation of monoaminergic groups in the upper brainstem.

  13. The role of the chorda tympani nerve in the activation of the rat hypothalamic histaminergic system by leptin.

    PubMed

    Morimoto-Ishizuka, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yamatodani, A

    2001-03-01

    A possible pathway through which leptin activates the histaminergic system was studied using in vivo microdialysis in rats. Intraperitoneal injection of leptin (1.3 mg/kg) caused a significant increase in hypothalamic histamine release, however, its intracerebroventricular injection (10 microg/rat) did not cause any significant changes in the release. Furthermore, leptin (1.3 mg/kg) had no effect on histamine release in rats whose chorda tympani nerves, a branch of the facial nerve which mediates taste information, were transected bilaterally. These findings indicate that leptin activates the histaminergic system by the peripheral signal inputs via the chorda tympani resulting in the suppression of food intake.

  14. Effect of Pulsed Radiofrequency on Rat Sciatic Nerve Chronic Constriction Injury: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duo-Yi; Meng, Lan; Ji, Nan; Luo, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the dorsal root ganglia can reduce neuropathic pain (NP) in animal models, but the effect of PRF on damaged peripheral nerves has not been examined. We investigated the effect of PRF to the rat sciatic nerve (SN) on pain-related behavior and SN ultrastructure following chronic constriction injury (CCI). Methods: The analgesic effect was measured by hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL). Twenty rats with NP induced by ligating the common SN were then randomly divided into a PRF treatment group and a sham group. The contralateral SN served as a control. The MWT and TWL were determined again 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 days after the PRF or sham treatment. On day 14, ipsilateral and contralateral common SNs were excised and examined by electron microscopy. Results: Ipsilateral MWT was significantly reduced and TWL significantly shorter compared to the contralateral side 14 days after CCI (both P = 0.000). In the PRF group, MWT was significantly higher and TWL significantly longer 14 days after the PRF treatment compared to before PRF treatment (both P = 0.000), while no such difference was observed in the sham group (P > 0.05). Electron microscopy revealed extensive demyelination and collagen fiber formation in the ipsilateral SN of sham-treated rats but sparse demyelination and some nerve fiber regrowth in the PRF treatment group. Conclusions: Hyperalgesia is relieved, and ultrastructural damage ameliorated after direct PRF treatment to the SN in the CCI rat model of NP. PMID:25673460

  15. Roles of estrogen and progesterone in modulating renal nerve function in the rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Graceli, J.B.; Cicilini, M.A.; Bissoli, N.S.; Abreu, G.R.; Moysés, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of extracellular Na+ and Cl- concentrations in mammals depends, at least in part, on renal function. It has been shown that neural and endocrine mechanisms regulate extracellular fluid volume and transport of electrolytes along nephrons. Studies of sex hormones and renal nerves suggested that sex hormones modulate renal function, although this relationship is not well understood in the kidney. To better understand the role of these hormones on the effects that renal nerves have on Na+ and Cl- reabsorption, we studied the effects of renal denervation and oophorectomy in female rats. Oophorectomized (OVX) rats received 17β-estradiol benzoate (OVE, 2.0 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc) and progesterone (OVP, 1.7 mg·kg-1·day-1, sc). We assessed Na+ and Cl- fractional excretion (FENa+ and FECl-, respectively) and renal and plasma catecholamine release concentrations. FENa+, FECl-, water intake, urinary flow, and renal and plasma catecholamine release levels increased in OVX vs control rats. These effects were reversed by 17β-estradiol benzoate but not by progesterone. Renal denervation did not alter FENa+, FECl-, water intake, or urinary flow values vs controls. However, the renal catecholamine release level was decreased in the OVP (236.6±36.1 ng/g) and denervated rat groups (D: 102.1±15.7; ODE: 108.7±23.2; ODP: 101.1±22.1 ng/g). Furthermore, combining OVX + D (OD: 111.9±25.4) decreased renal catecholamine release levels compared to either treatment alone. OVE normalized and OVP reduced renal catecholamine release levels, and the effects on plasma catecholamine release levels were reversed by ODE and ODP replacement in OD. These data suggest that progesterone may influence catecholamine release levels by renal innervation and that there are complex interactions among renal nerves, estrogen, and progesterone in the modulation of renal function. PMID:23828583

  16. Changes in the cholinergic system of rat sciatic nerve and skeletal muscle following suspension induced disuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. C.; Misulis, K. E.; Dettbarn, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle disused induced changes in the cholinergic system of sciatic nerve, slow twitch soleus (SOL) and fast twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle were studied in rats. Rats with hindlimbs suspended for 2 to 3 weeks showed marked elevation in the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in sciatic nerve (38%), in SOL (108%) and in EDL (67%). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in SOL increased by 163% without changing the molecular forms pattern of 4S, 10S, 12S, and 16S. No significant changes in activity and molecular forms pattern of AChE were seen in EDL or in AChE activity of sciatic nerve. Nicotinic receptor binding of 3H-acetylcholine was increased in both muscles. When measured after 3 weeks of hindlimb suspension the normal distribution of type 1 fibers in SOL was reduced and a corresponding increase in type IIa and IIb fibers is seen. In EDL no significant change in fiber proportion is observed. Muscle activity, such as loadbearing, appears to have a greater controlling influence on the characteristics of the slow twitch SOL muscle than upon the fast twitch EDL muscle.

  17. High voltage pulsed current stimulation of the sciatic nerve in rats: analysis by the SFI

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Anita Sofia Leite; Mazzer, Nilton; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus; Jatte, Fernanda Guadallini; Chereguini, Paulo Augusto Costa; Monte-Raso, Vanessa Vilela

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the efficiency of high voltage pulsed current (HVPC) with early application in three different sites, in the regeneration of the sciatic nerve in rats submitted to crush injury, the sciatic functional index (SFI) was used to assess the functional recovery. Methods After crushing of the nerve, 57 animals were submitted to cathodal HVPC at frequency of 50Hz and voltage of 100V, 20 minutes per day, 5 days per week. The rats were divided into five groups: control group; ganglion group; ganglion + muscle group; muscle group; and sham group. The SFI was determined weekly for seven weeks, from the preoperative period to the 6th postoperative week. Results Compared with the control group, the results showed a significantly better performance of group 2 for the first 3 weeks; group 3 showed significantly better performance in the third week; and group 4 showed a significantly negative performance during the 4th and 6th weeks. Conclusion Early application of HVPC had a positive effect in the treatment of the spinal cord region and the sciatic nerve root ganglion with a dispersive electrode on the contralateral lumbar region or on the gastrocnemius. However, HVPC had a negative effect in the treatment with an active electrode on the gastrocnemius and a dispersive electrode on the contralateral thigh. Level of evidence II, Prospective comparative study. PMID:24453588

  18. Decreased receptivity of pathway connective tissue to sympathetic nerve ingrowth in the developing rat.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, J M; Fan, Q; Smith, P G

    1997-05-20

    Sympathetic axons can form atypical pathways to denervated orbital targets in neonatal rats but not in rats aged 30 or more days. The objective of this study was to determine if connective tissue pathways that carry sympathetic nerves lose their ability to sustain axonal sprouting during the early postnatal period. Regions of periorbital sheath known to contain large numbers of sympathetic axons that travel to distal orbital targets were excised from rats (sympathectomized 3 days previously) on postnatal days 6-7, 14-15, 30-31, and 48-49 and placed in anterior chambers of adult host rats. Tissues were removed 3, 6, or 10 days post-transplant and sympathetic ingrowth was analyzed by catecholamine histofluorescence in whole-mount or cryosectioned specimens. Connective tissue transplants from 6-15-day-old donors showed significant fiber ingrowth by 3 days in oculo, and innervation was maximal by 6 days. In contrast, sprouting into 30-49-day-old tissue was significantly slower, with most transplants lacking fibers at 3 days, and with small numbers of short fibers present at 6 days. We conclude that maturational changes occur in periorbital connective tissue pathways in the early postnatal period which make them less receptive to ingrowth by sympathetic nerves. The findings that connective tissue pathways are better substrates for sympathetic sprouting in the neonatal rat supports the view that developmental changes in these tissues are likely to contribute to the impaired reinnervation of orbital targets by contralateral neurons in juvenile and adult rats. PMID:9174244

  19. A system for delivering mechanical stimulation and robot-assisted therapy to the rat whisker pad during facial nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Heaton, James T; Knox, Christopher J; Malo, Juan S; Kobler, James B; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2013-11-01

    Functional recovery is typically poor after facial nerve transection and surgical repair. In rats, whisking amplitude remains greatly diminished after facial nerve regeneration, but can recover more completely if the whiskers are periodically mechanically stimulated during recovery. Here we present a robotic "whisk assist" system for mechanically driving whisker movement after facial nerve injury. Movement patterns were either preprogrammed to reflect natural amplitudes and frequencies, or movements of the contralateral (healthy) side of the face were detected and used to control real-time mirror-like motion on the denervated side. In a pilot study, 20 rats were divided into nine groups and administered one of eight different whisk assist driving patterns (or control) for 5-20 minutes, five days per week, across eight weeks of recovery after unilateral facial nerve cut and suture repair. All rats tolerated the mechanical stimulation well. Seven of the eight treatment groups recovered average whisking amplitudes that exceeded controls, although small group sizes precluded statistical confirmation of group differences. The potential to substantially improve facial nerve recovery through mechanical stimulation has important clinical implications, and we have developed a system to control the pattern and dose of stimulation in the rat facial nerve model.

  20. Assessment of oxidative parameters in rat spinal cord after chronic constriction of the sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Goecks, Cristina S B; Horst, Andréa; Moraes, Maira S; Scheid, Taína; Kolberg, Carolina; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Partata, Wania A

    2012-09-01

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in neuropathic pain, the direct relationship between these species and chronic constriction of sciatic nerve (CCI) has not been studied in spinal cord. Thus, this study induced CCI in rats and these animals were sacrificed 3 and 10 days after the surgical procedure to determine the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, as well as ascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and lipid hydroperoxide levels in lumbosacral spinal cord. Von Frey Hair and hot plate tests were performed to assess the degree of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia at days 0, 3 and 10. The results showed that CCI significantly induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia at days 3 and 10. Parallel there was increase in spinal cord lipid hydroperoxide at days 3 and 10 in rats submitted to CCI. In Sham rats a significant increase in this parameter occurred at day 10. H(2)O(2) decreased at day 10 only in CCI group. SOD activity was decreased in Sham and CCI groups at day 3, while catalase activity was increased in CCI rats at days 3 and 10. Ascorbic acid levels were reduced only in CCI rats at day 3. Although the role of such changes is unclear, many were not specific to neuropathic pain and the differences could be related to different degrees of central sensitization in Sham and CCI rats. PMID:22674084

  1. Renal nerves affect rate of achieving sodium balance in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S G; Enders, C; Osborn, J L

    1993-07-01

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) has an elevated efferent sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that the renal handling of sodium and water may be altered. This study evaluated the renal neurogenic influence on the rate of achieving sodium balance in adult SHRs and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats after either a step increase or step decrease in fixed sodium intake. Conscious, unrestrained rats with either innervated or denervated kidneys were initially placed on a low-sodium (0.3 mEq/d) or high-sodium (5.0 mEq/d) intake by intravenous infusion. Hourly urinary sodium excretion was determined 24 hours before and 72 hours after sodium intake had been increased from low to high or decreased from high to low. After either step change in fixed sodium intake, both innervated SHRs and innervated WKY rats achieved sodium balance within 24 hours. Similarly, the time course of achieving sodium balance was nearly identical between WKY rats with innervated and denervated kidneys after either switch in sodium intake. In SHRs receiving a step increase in sodium intake, both innervated and denervated kidneys increased urinary sodium excretion equally for 9 hours; however, at this time, innervated SHRs continued to increase sodium excretion rapidly, whereas denervated rats were delayed in a further response. Thus, innervated SHRs achieved sodium balance approximately 18 hours sooner than denervated SHRs. Differences in urinary sodium excretion did not result from concomitant changes in plasma renin activity or mean arterial pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. CO2 asphyxia increases plasma norepinephrine in rats via sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Borovsky, V; Herman, M; Dunphy, G; Caplea, A; Ely, D

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the plasma norepinephrine (NE) increase in rats exposed to CO2 asphyxia was due to adrenal gland release or sympathetic nerve ending (SNS) release. Plasma NE was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in hypertensive and normotensive rats using the following protocol: control session, CO2 exposure, N2 exposure, reserpine + CO2, and adrenalectomy + CO2. Four strains of male and female rats were used: spontaneously hypertensive rats, Wistar-Kyoto rats, and two congenic strains with different Y chromosomes. The same rats were used throughout the experiment (n = 80). Blood pressure measured by aortic telemetry increased approximately 50-60 mmHg in response to CO2 in all strains. CO2 increased NE 6-10x in all strains and both genders. N2 produced a significant increase in NE (73% of CO2 response). Reserpine significantly decreased (67%) plasma NE after CO2. Adrenalectomy did not significantly reduce the NE response to CO2. In conclusion, the increase in plasma NE after CO2 was associated with SNS release and not adrenal medullary release, was mainly due to hypoxia, and was not a specific response to CO2.

  3. Initial innervation of embryonic rat tongue and developing taste papillae: nerves follow distinctive and spatially restricted pathways.

    PubMed

    Mbiene, J P; Mistretta, C M

    1997-01-01

    The rat tongue has an extensive, complex innervation from four cranial nerves. However, the precise developmental time course and spatial routes of these nerves into the embryonic tongue are not known, although this knowledge is crucial for studying mechanisms that regulate development and innervation of the lingual taste organs, gustatory papillae and resident taste buds. We determined the initial spatial course of nerves in the developing tongue and papillae, and tested the hypothesis that sensory nerves first innervate the tongue homogeneously and then retract to more densely innervate papillae and taste buds. Antibodies to GAP-43 and neurofilaments were used to label nerve fibers in rat embryo heads from gestational day 11 through 16 (E11-E16). Serial sagittal sections were traced and reconstructed to follow paths of each nerve. In E11 rat, geniculate, trigeminal and petrosal ganglia were labeled and fibers left the ganglia and extended toward respective branchial arches. At E13 when the developing tongue is still a set of tissue swellings, the combined chorda/lingual, hypoglossal and petrosal nerves approached the lingual swellings from separate positions. Only the chorda/lingual entered the tongue base at this stage. At E14 and E15, the well-developed tongue was innervated by all four cranial nerves. However, the nerves maintained distinctive entry points and relatively restricted mesenchymal territories within the tongue, and did not follow one another in common early pathways. Furthermore, the chorda/lingual and glossopharyngeal nerves did not set up an obvious prepattern for gustatory papilla development, but rather seemed attracted to developing papillae which became very densely innervated compared to surrounding epithelium at E15. To effect this dense papilla innervation, sensory nerves did not first innervate the tongue in a homogeneous manner with subsequent retraction and/or extensive redirection of fibers into the taste organs. Results contribute to

  4. Nerve growth factor alters the sensitivity of rat masseter muscle mechanoreceptors to NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hayes; Dong, Xu-Dong; Cairns, Brian E

    2014-11-01

    Intramuscular injection of nerve growth factor (NGF) into rat masseter muscle induces a local mechanical sensitization that is greater in female than in male rats. The duration of NGF-induced sensitization in male and female rats was associated with an increase in peripheral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor expression by masseter muscle afferent fibers that began 3 days postinjection. Here, we investigated the functional consequences of increased NMDA expression on the response properties of masseter muscle mechanoreceptors. In vivo extracellular single-unit electrophysiological recordings of trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the masseter muscle were performed in anesthetized rats 3 days after NGF injection (25 μg/ml, 10 μl) into the masseter muscle. Mechanical activation threshold was assessed before and after intramuscular injection of NMDA. NMDA injection induced mechanical sensitization in both sexes that was increased significantly following NGF injection in the male rats but not in the female rats. However, in female but not male rats, further examination found that preadministration of NGF induced a greater sensitization in slow Aδ-fibers (2-7 m/s) than fast Aδ-fibers (7-12 m/s). This suggests that preadministration of NGF had a different effect on slowly conducting mechanoreceptors in the female rats compared with the male rats. Although previous studies have found an association between estrogenic tone and NMDA activity, no correlation was observed between NMDA-evoked mechanical sensitization and plasma estrogen level. This study suggests NGF alters NMDA-induced mechanical sensitization in the peripheral endings of masseter mechanoreceptors in a sexually dimorphic manner.

  5. Expression of penile neuronal nitric oxide synthase variants in the rat and mouse penile nerves.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cadavid, N F; Burnett, A L; Magee, T R; Zeller, C B; Vernet, D; Smith, N; Gitter, J; Rajfer, J

    2000-09-01

    Penile erection is mediated by nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). In the rat penis, the main nNOS mRNA variant, PnNOS, differs from cerebellar nNOS (CnNOS) by a 102 base pair insert encoding a 34-amino acid sequence. In the mouse, two nNOS mRNAs have been identified: nNOSalpha, encoding a 155-kDa protein, and an exon 2-deletion variant, nNOSbeta, encoding a 135-kDa protein that lacks a domain where a protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN) binds. We wished to determine whether PnNOSalpha and beta are expressed in the rat penis and are located in the nerves and whether the beta form persists in the potent nNOS knock-out mouse (nNOS( big up tri, open big up tri, open)). A PnNOS antibody against the insert common to both PnNOSalpha and beta detected the expected 155-kDa protein in PnNOSalpha-transfected cells. This antibody, and the one common to PnNOS/CnNOS, showed (on Western blots) the 155- and 135-kDa nNOS variants in rat penile tissue during development and aging. PnNOSalpha mRNA and its subvariants were found as the main nNOS in the penile corpora, the cavernosal nerve, and the pelvic ganglia, with lower levels of PnNOSbeta mRNA. In tissue sections, PnNOS protein was immunodetected in the penile nerve endings in the rat and in the nNOS wild-type and nNOS( big up tri, open big up tri, open) mice. An antibody against the sequence encoded by exon 2 did not react (on Western blots) with the 135-kDa band, which confirms that this protein is the beta form. In conclusion, both PnNOSalpha and beta are expressed in the rat penis at all ages and are located in the nerves. The beta form may allow nitric oxide synthesis during erection to be partially insensitive to PIN. The residual expression of PnNOS, and possibly CnNOS, in the penis of the nNOS( big up tri, open big up tri, open) mouse occurs through transcription of the beta mRNA, and this may explain the retention of erectile function when the expression of nNOSalpha is disrupted. PMID

  6. Rat Optic Nerve Head Anatomy within 3D Histomorphometric Reconstructions of Normal Control Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Pazos, Marta; Yang, Hongli; Gardiner, Stuart K.; Cepurna, William O.; Johnson, Elaine C.; Morrison, John C.; Burgoyne, Claude F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to three-dimensionally (3D) characterize the principal macroscopic and microscopic relationships within the rat optic nerve head (ONH) and quantify them in normal control eyes. Perfusion-fixed, trephinated ONH from 8 normal control eyes of 8 Brown Norway Rats were 3D histomorphometrically reconstructed, visualized, delineated and parameterized. The rat ONH consists of 2 scleral openings, (a superior neurovascular and inferior arterial) separated by a thin connective tissue strip we have termed the “scleral sling”. Within the superior opening, the nerve abuts a prominent extension of Bruch's Membrane (BM) superiorly and is surrounded by a vascular plexus, as it passes through the sclera, that is a continuous from the choroid into and through the dural sheath and contains the central retinal vein (CRV), (inferiorly). The inferior scleral opening contains the central retinal artery and three long posterior ciliary arteries which obliquely pass through the sclera to obtain the choroid. Bruch's Membrane Opening (BMO) is irregular and vertically elongated, enclosing the nerve (superiorly) and CRV and CRA (inferiorly). Overall mean BMO Depth, BMO Area, Choroidal Thickness and peripapillary Scleral Thickness were 29 μm, 56.5 × 103 μm2, 57 μm and 104 μm respectively. Mean anterior scleral canal opening (ASCO) and posterior scleral canal opening (PSCO) radii were 201 ± 15 μm and 204 ± 16 μm, respectively. Mean optic nerve area at the ASCO and PSCO were 46.3 × 103 ± 4.4 × 103 μm2 and 44.1 × 103 ± 4.5 × 103 μm2 respectively. In conclusion, the 3D complexity of the rat ONH and the extent to which it differs from the primate have been under-appreciated within previous 2D studies. Properly understood, these anatomic differences may provide new insights into the relative susceptibilities of the rat and primate ONH to elevated intraocular pressure. PMID:26021973

  7. Increase of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and lysosomes in rat DRG neurons and their transportation to the central nerve terminal in dorsal horn after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Uesugi, N; Jeong, N Y; Park, B S; Konishi, H; Kiyama, H

    2016-01-28

    In the spinal dorsal horn (DH), nerve injury activates microglia and induces neuropathic pain. Several studies clarified an involvement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the microglial activation. However, the origin of ATP together with the release mechanism is unclear. Recent in vitro study revealed that an ATP marker, quinacrine, in lysosomes was released from neurite terminal of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to extracellular space via lysosomal exocytosis. Here, we demonstrate a possibility that the lysosomal ingredient including ATP released from DRG neurons by lysosomal-exocytosis is an additional source of the glial activation in DH after nerve injury. After rat L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), mRNA for transcription factor EB (TFEB), a transcription factor controlling lysosomal activation and exocytosis, was induced in the DRG. Simultaneously both lysosomal protein, LAMP1- and vesicular nuclear transporter (VNUT)-positive vesicles were increased in L5 DRG neurons and ipsilateral DH. The quinacrine staining in DH was increased and co-localized with LAMP1 immunoreactivity after nerve injury. In DH, LAMP1-positive vesicles were also co-localized with a peripheral nerve marker, Isolectin B4 (IB4) lectin. Injection of the adenovirus encoding mCherry-LAMP1 into DRG showed that mCherry-positive lysosomes are transported to the central nerve terminal in DH. These findings suggest that activation of lysosome synthesis including ATP packaging in DRG, the central transportation of the lysosome, and subsequent its exocytosis from the central nerve terminal of DRG neurons in response to nerve injury could be a partial mechanism for activation of microglia in DH. This lysosome-mediated microglia activation mechanism may provide another clue to control nociception and pain.

  8. PGC-1α Mediated Peripheral Nerve Protection of Tongxinluo in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaopei; Feng, Hua; Xu, Xia; Li, Haijun; Zhang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of Tongxinluo (Txl), a Chinese herbal compound, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods and Results. Diabetic rat model was established by peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Txl ultrafine powder treatment for 16 weeks from the baseline significantly reversed the impairment of motor nerve conductive velocity (MNCV), mechanical hyperalgesia, and nerve structure. We further proved that Tongxinluo upregulates PGC-1α and its downstream factors including COX IV and SOD, which were involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. Conclusion. Our study indicates that the protective effect of Txl in diabetic neuropathy may be attributed to the induction of PGC-1α and its downstream targets. This finding may further illustrate the pleiotropic effect of the medicine. PMID:27504136

  9. PGC-1α Mediated Peripheral Nerve Protection of Tongxinluo in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaopei; Feng, Hua; Xu, Xia; Li, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the effect of Tongxinluo (Txl), a Chinese herbal compound, on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Methods and Results. Diabetic rat model was established by peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Txl ultrafine powder treatment for 16 weeks from the baseline significantly reversed the impairment of motor nerve conductive velocity (MNCV), mechanical hyperalgesia, and nerve structure. We further proved that Tongxinluo upregulates PGC-1α and its downstream factors including COX IV and SOD, which were involved in mitochondrial biogenesis. Conclusion. Our study indicates that the protective effect of Txl in diabetic neuropathy may be attributed to the induction of PGC-1α and its downstream targets. This finding may further illustrate the pleiotropic effect of the medicine. PMID:27504136

  10. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model.

  11. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model. PMID:25674823

  12. Protective effects of cerebrolysin in a rat model of optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Sun-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Lin, Kung-Hung; Sheu, Min-Muh; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effects of cerebrolysin (Cbl) on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in a rat model of ON crush. Rats received intravitreal injection of Cbl (n = 20), intra-ON injection of Cbl (n = 20), intraperitoneal injection (IPI) of Cbl (n = 20), or phosphate buffered saline (PBS; n = 20) every day for 2 weeks after ON crush injury. At 3 weeks post-trauma, RGC density was counted by retrograde labeling with FluoroGold and visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials. Activities of microglia after insults were quantified by immunohistochemical analysis of the presence of ED1 in the optic nerve. At 3 weeks postcrush, the densities of RGCs in the Cbl-IVI group (1125 ± 166/mm(2)) and in the Cbl-IPI treatment group (1328 ± 119/mm(2)) were significantly higher than those in the PBS group (641 ± 214/mm(2)). The flash visual-evoked potential measurements showed that latency of the P1 wave was significantly shorter in the Cbl-IVI- and Cbl-IPI-treated groups (105 ± 4 ms and 118 ± 26 ms, respectively) than in the PBS-treated group (170 ± 20 ms). However, only Cbl IPI treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the number of ED1-positive cells at the lesion sites of the ON (5 ± 2 cells/vs. 30 ± 4 cells/high-power field in control eyes). Treatment with intra-ON injection of Cbl was harmful to the optic nerve in the crush model. Systemic administration of Cbl had neuroprotective effects on RGC survival and visual function in the optic nerve crush model.

  13. Protective effects of cerebrolysin in a rat model of optic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Sun-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Lin, Kung-Hung; Sheu, Min-Muh; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effects of cerebrolysin (Cbl) on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGC) in a rat model of ON crush. Rats received intravitreal injection of Cbl (n = 20), intra-ON injection of Cbl (n = 20), intraperitoneal injection (IPI) of Cbl (n = 20), or phosphate buffered saline (PBS; n = 20) every day for 2 weeks after ON crush injury. At 3 weeks post-trauma, RGC density was counted by retrograde labeling with FluoroGold and visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials. Activities of microglia after insults were quantified by immunohistochemical analysis of the presence of ED1 in the optic nerve. At 3 weeks postcrush, the densities of RGCs in the Cbl-IVI group (1125 ± 166/mm(2)) and in the Cbl-IPI treatment group (1328 ± 119/mm(2)) were significantly higher than those in the PBS group (641 ± 214/mm(2)). The flash visual-evoked potential measurements showed that latency of the P1 wave was significantly shorter in the Cbl-IVI- and Cbl-IPI-treated groups (105 ± 4 ms and 118 ± 26 ms, respectively) than in the PBS-treated group (170 ± 20 ms). However, only Cbl IPI treatment resulted in a significant decrease in the number of ED1-positive cells at the lesion sites of the ON (5 ± 2 cells/vs. 30 ± 4 cells/high-power field in control eyes). Treatment with intra-ON injection of Cbl was harmful to the optic nerve in the crush model. Systemic administration of Cbl had neuroprotective effects on RGC survival and visual function in the optic nerve crush model. PMID:24924838

  14. 2,5-hexanedione altered the degradation of low-molecular-weight neurofilament in rat nerve tissues.

    PubMed

    Song, Fuyong; Zhang, Qingguo; Kou, Ruirui; Zou, Chaoshuang; Gao, Yuan; Xie, Keqin

    2012-12-01

    Occupational exposure to n-hexane produces a central-peripheral distal axonopathy, which is characterized by giant axonal swellings filled with neurofilaments (NFs). To investigate the change of NFs degradation and their possible role in n-hexane neuropathy, adult male Wistar rats were administered intraperitoneally at a dosage of 400 mg/kg/day 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-HD) for 4 weeks. The time course of low-molecular-weight neurofilament (NF-L) degradation and autophagy-related protein in rat sciatic nerves and spinal cords was determined by Western blotting. The results demonstrated that the administration of 2,5-HD inhibited NF-L degradation to an undetectable level in sciatic nerves. Furthermore, a significant reduction of NF-L degradation in spinal cords was observed in the early stage of 2,5-HD exposure. In the meantime, 2,5-HD significantly decreased the level of Beclin-1, a key autophagy-regulated protein in sciatic nerves of rats while increased the level of P62, a selective substrate of autophagy degrading pathway, which indicated a dysfunctional autophagy in rat nerve tissues. Collectively, our findings suggested that the inhibition of autophagy by 2,5-HD might be responsible for the reduction of NF-L degradation in rat sciatic nerves, and involved in the pathogenesis of 2,5-HD-induced axonopathy.

  15. Attenuated baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity after cardiovascular deconditioning in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, J. A.; Foley, C. M.; Schadt, J. C.; Laughlin, M. H.; Hasser, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cardiovascular deconditioning on baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system was evaluated after 14 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) or the control condition. Rats were chronically instrumented with catheters and sympathetic nerve recording electrodes for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and recording of lumbar (LSNA) or renal (RSNA) sympathetic nerve activity. Experiments were conducted 24 h after surgery, with the animals in a normal posture. Baroreflex function was assessed using a logistic function that related HR and LSNA or RSNA to MAP during infusion of phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Baroreflex influence on HR was not affected by HU. Maximum baroreflex-elicited LSNA was significantly reduced in HU rats (204 +/- 11.9 vs. 342 +/- 30.6% baseline LSNA), as was maximum reflex gain (-4.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -7.8 +/- 1.3 %LSNA/mmHg). Maximum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (259 +/- 10.8 vs. 453 +/- 28.0% baseline RSNA), minimum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (-2 +/- 2.8 vs. 13 +/- 4.5% baseline RSNA), and maximum gain (-5.8 +/- 0.5 vs. -13.6 +/- 3.1 %RSNA/mmHg) were significantly decreased in HU rats. Results demonstrate that baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nervous system activity is attenuated after cardiovascular deconditioning in rodents. Data suggest that alterations in the arterial baroreflex may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after a period of bedrest or spaceflight in humans.

  16. Long-term effect of ropivacaine nanoparticles for sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi; Huang, Haizhen; Yang, Shaozhong; Huang, Shanshan; Guo, Jingxuan; Tang, Qi; Qi, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The analgesic effect of ropivacaine (Rop) for nerve block lasts only ~3–6 hours for single use. The aim of this study was to develop long-acting regional anesthetic Rop nanoparticles and investigate the effects of sciatic nerve block on postoperative pain in rats. Materials and methods Rop nanoparticles were developed using polyethylene glycol-co-polylactic acid (PELA). One hundred and twenty adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=30, each): Con (control group; 0.9% saline, 200 µL), PELA (PELA group; 10 mg), Rop (Rop group; 0.5%, 200 µL), and Rop-PELA (Rop-PELA group; 10%, 10 mg). Another 12 rats were used for the detection of Rop concentration in plasma. The mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency were measured at 2 hours, 4 hours, 8 hours, 1 day, 2 days, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after incision. The expression of c-FOS was determined by immunohistochemistry at 2 hours, 8 hours, 48 hours, and 7 days. Nerve and organ toxicities were also evaluated at 7 days. Results The duration of Rop absorption in the plasma of the Rop-PELA group was longer (>8 hours) than that of the Rop group (4 hours). Mechanical withdrawal threshold and thermal withdrawal latency in the Rop-PELA group were higher than that in other groups (4 hours–3 days). c-FOS expression in the Rop-PELA group was lower than that in the control group at 2 hours, 8 hours, and 48 hours and lower than that in the Rop group at 8 hours and 48 hours after paw incision. Slight foreign body reactions were observed surrounding the sciatic nerve at 7 days. No obvious pathophysiological change was found in the major organs after Rop-PELA administration at 7 days. Conclusion Rop-PELA provides an effective analgesia for nerve block over 3 days after single administration, and the analgesic mechanism might be mediated by the regulation of spinal c-FOS expression. However, its potential long-term tissue toxicity needs to be further investigated. PMID:27274236

  17. Effect of adjuvants on the action of local anesthetics in isolated rat sciatic nerves

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Eser; Gold, Michael S.; Hough, Karen A.; Gebhart, G.F.; Williams, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is increasing clinical use of adjuvant drugs to prolong the duration of local anesthetic-induced block of peripheral nerves. However, the mechanistic understanding regarding drug interactions between these compounds in the periphery is quite limited. Accordingly, we undertook this study to determine whether selected adjuvants are efficacious in blocking action potential propagation in peripheral nerves at concentrations used clinically, and whether these drugs influence peripheral nerve block produced by local anesthetics. Methods Isolated rat sciatic nerves were used to assess (1) the efficacy of buprenorphine, clonidine, dexamethasone, or midazolam, alone and in combination, on action potential propagation; and (2) their influence on the blocking actions of local anesthetics ropivacaine and lidocaine. Compound action potentials (CAPs) from A- and C-fibers were studied before and after drug application. Results At estimated clinical concentrations, neither buprenorphine nor dexamethasone affected either A- or C-waves of the CAP. Clonidine produced a small, but significant attenuation of the C-wave amplitude. Midazolam attenuated both A- and C-wave amplitudes, but with greater potency on the C-wave. The combination of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone had no influence on the potency or duration of local anesthetic- or midazolam-induced block of A-and C-waves of the CAP. Conclusions These results suggest that the reported clinical efficacy of clonidine, buprenorphine, and dexamethasone influence the actions of local anesthetics via indirect mechanisms. Further identification of these indirect mechanisms may enable the development of novel approaches to achieve longer duration, modality-specific peripheral nerve block. PMID:22430023

  18. The phytoestrogenic Cyclopia extract, SM6Met, increases median tumor free survival and reduces tumor mass and volume in chemically induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Visser, Koch; Zierau, Oliver; Macejová, Dana; Goerl, Florian; Muders, Michael; Baretton, Gustavo B; Vollmer, Günter; Louw, Ann

    2016-10-01

    SM6Met, a phytoestrogenic extract of Cyclopia subternata indigenous to the Western Cape province of South Africa, displays estrogenic attributes with potential for breast cancer chemoprevention. In this study, we report that SM6Met, in the presence of estradiol, induces a significant cell cycle G0/G1 phase arrest similar to the selective estrogen receptor modulator, tamoxifen. Furthermore, as a proof of concept, in the N-Methyl-N-nitrosourea induced rat mammary gland carcinogenesis model, SM6Met increases tumor latency by 7days and median tumor free survival by 42 days, while decreasing palpable tumor frequency by 32%, tumor mass by 40%, and tumor volume by 53%. Therefore, the current study provides proof of concept that SM6Met has definite potential as a chemopreventative agent against the development and progression of breast cancer. PMID:27142456

  19. [Effect of embryonic anlage allografts of the rat spinal cord on growth of regenerating fibers of the recipient nerve].

    PubMed

    Petrova, E S; Isaeva, E N

    2014-01-01

    A comparative study of the effect of tissue and suspension allografts of an embryonic spinal cord on regeneration of nerve fibers of impaired (by application of a ligature) sciatic nerve in rats was conducted. It was demonstrated that unlike tissue grafts that reach a large volume 21 and 60 days after transplantation, suspension grafts do not inhibit the growth of axons of the recipient to the periphery. It was established that introduction of a suspension of dissociated cells of the spinal cord embryonic anlages (but not fragments of these anlages) into the impaired sciatic nerve in rats results in an increase in the amount of myelinated regenerating nerve fibers of the recipient 60 days after the operation.

  20. Human mesenchymal stem cells improve the neurodegeneration of femoral nerve in a diabetic foot ulceration rats.

    PubMed

    Xia, Nan; Xu, Jin-Mei; Zhao, Nan; Zhao, Qing-Song; Li, Ming; Cheng, Zhi-Feng

    2015-06-15

    Neuropathy is observed in 50% of diabetic patients with diabetic foot. This study attempted to explore the potential role of human mesenchymal stem cells-umbilical cord blood (hMSCs-UC) in femoral nerve (FN) neuropathy. The model rats were established by one time administration of streptozotocin and empyrosis on the dorsal hind foot. At 3d, 7d, 14d after treatment with hMSCs-UC or saline through left femoral artery, the serum NGF was examined by ELISA; NF-200 expression in FN was evaluated by immunohistochemistry; the diameter and roundness of FN, the ratio of capillary and muscular fiber of gastrocnemius were calculated under light microscope; and neuronal degenerations, such as demyelization, axonal atrophy, and loose arrangement of nerve fibers, were observed by electronic microscope. The results showed that, in hMSCs-UC-treated model rats, serum NGF was increased with higher positive rate of NF-200. Although the difference in FN diameters was not established among groups, improvement of roundness of FN was confirmed with increase in the numbers of capillary in FN-innervated gastrocnemius; additionally, degenerative neuropathy was significantly improved. Importantly, the functional study of electroneurogram (ENG) showed that, slowed conduction of FN in model rats was significantly restored by hMSCs-CU treatment. These data suggested that hMSCs-UC-treatment partially reverse the neuronal degeneration and nerve function of FN, which might be contributed by the upregulation of NGF with dramatic angiogenesis in FN-innervated gastrocnemius, consequently reversing neuronal structure and function, preventing or curing foot ulceration.

  1. Transient Heat Hyperalgesia During Resolution of Ropivacaine Sciatic Nerve Block in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Kolarczyk, Lavinia M.; Williams, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Preliminary studies using perineural sciatic ropivacaine in rat demonstrated unexpected heat hyperalgesia after block resolution. To better characterize the time course relative to mechanical anesthesia-analgesia, we tested the hypothesis that ropivacaine 0.5% leads to transient heat hyperalgesia in rat independent of mechanical nociception. We also evaluated functional toxicity (e.g., long-term hyperalgesia and/or tactile allodynia 2 weeks post-injection). Methods Under surgical exposure, left sciatic nerve block was performed in 2 groups of adult male rats – ropivacaine (200 μL, 5 mg/mL, n=14) versus vehicle (n=11). The efficacy and duration of block was assessed with serial heat, mechanical (Randall-Selitto testing), and tactile (von Frey-like monofilaments) tests; motor-proprioceptive (rotarod) and sedation tests were employed 1 hr and 7 hr post-injection. The presence of nerve injury was assessed by repeating the heat, tactile, and motor tests 12–14 days post-injection. Results Ropivacaine-induced anesthesia was fully manifest at 1 hr post-injection. At 3 hr post-injection, heat hypersensitivity was present in the setting of resolved mechanical analgesia. All behavioral measures returned to baseline by 2 wk post-injection. There was no evidence of (i) behavioral sedation, (ii) persistent changes in heat or mechanical sensitivity, or (iii) persistent changes in proprioceptive-motor function at 12–14 days post-injection. Conclusions Ropivacaine 0.5% induces transient heat hyperalgesia in the setting of resolved mechanical analgesia, further suggestive of modality and/or nociceptive fiber specificity. Whether this finding partially translates to “rebound pain” after patients’ nerve blocks wear off requires further study. PMID:21451438

  2. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-01-01

    Key points Leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, which contributes to obesity-induced hypertension; however, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. We report that leptin does increase SNA and heart rate in female rats; however, for lumbar and renal SNA, this action is only evident in pro-oestrus and in oestrogen-treated ovariectomized rats, but not in ovariectomized or dioestrus rats. Leptin increases SNA and heart rate similarly in male and pro-oestrus female rats; however, leptin increases arterial pressure only in males. Blockade of MC3/4 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) with SHU9119 decreases SNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus rats, suggesting that leptin increases SNA in part by increasing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone drive of PVN presympathetic neurons. Our data establish sex differences in leptin's effects to increase SNA and arterial pressure, which emphasizes the need for enhanced recognition and investigation of sex differences in obesity-induced sympathoexcitation and hypertension. Abstract Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR

  3. Characteristics of sympathetic nerve activity in the rat sciatic nerve in response to microstimulation in a sympathetic fascicle in the contralateral side.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Shiwaku, Yutaka; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Shuntaro; Feng, Zhonggang; Kusunoki, Masataka; Nakamura, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Microneurography is used for the monitor of various peripheral nerve activities. We recently reported that the electrical stimulation of peripheral sympathetic nerve fascicle via the microelectrode, i.e., microstimulation, temporarily reduced the blood glucose level in rats in case that the stimulation intensity was set high enough to induce small muscle contraction. However, the nature of microstimulation has little been clarified yet. Therefore, in the present study, we first detected sympathetic nerve signal microneurographically in the bilateral sciatic nerves of rats, and one of the microelectrodes was used for the microstimulation (0.25 ms-width pulse train at a rate of 1 Hz) while sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) was recorded in the contralateral side as a parameter of systemic sympathetic effects. The SNA, expressed as action potential rate, was transiently increased 150 ms after each stimulation pulse in case that the stimulation intensity was set not less than -0.1 V from the contraction threshold (around 0.32 V). To confirm that the increase was not caused by the activation of low threshold, thick fibers such as motor nerves in the vicinity of the microelectrode tip, next, a bipolar hook electrode, instead of the microelectrode, was then used in the stimulation side. As a result, the above-mentioned, transient increase in SNA was not observed any more in the contralateral side. These results suggest that systemic SNA could be enhanced with lower stimulation intensity than that inducing muscle contraction, and that thicker fibers may little affect the increase in the contralateral SNA. PMID:24111188

  4. Exogenous nerve growth factor stimulates choline acetyltransferase activity in aging Fischer 344 male rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, L R

    1991-01-01

    The effect of age and exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) infusion on choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) specific activity is examined in microdissections of cerebral and hippocampal cortices, and the cholinergic nuclei of the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB), the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM), and striatum of Fischer 344 male rats. Significant, 20% losses in ChAT activity are found in the MS/DB and striatum of 24-month-old rats (n = 21) compared to 4-month-old animals, but there is no apparent loss of enzyme activity in the NBM. Loss of ChAT activity in the MS/DB is only observed in animals older than 19 months of age, while a striatal deficit is found in animals older than 7 months. Treatment for 2 weeks with NGF at 1.2 micrograms/day results in significant 70% increases of ChAT activity in the MS/DB and striatum of 24-month-old rats compared to untreated and vehicle-treated 4-month-old rats, but does not stimulate activity in the NBM. Sensitivity of ChAT activity in the MS/DB and striatum to exogenous NGF increases with age. These experiments indicate that in the MS/DB, NBM, and striatum of Fischer 344 male rat there is an age-associated, differential regulation of ChAT enzyme activity and sensitivity to exogenous NGF.

  5. Intestinal mucosal mast cells in normal and nematode-infected rat intestines are in intimate contact with peptidergic nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Stead, R H; Tomioka, M; Quinonez, G; Simon, G T; Felten, S Y; Bienenstock, J

    1987-01-01

    Inflammatory or allergic conditions, as well as situations where healing and repair processes occur, are characterized by the presence of increased numbers of mast cells. Previous work on the effect of neuropeptides on mast cell mediator release showed that only substance P caused such release from intestinal mucosal mast cells [Shanahan, F., Denburg, J. A., Fox, J., Bienenstock, J. & Befus, A. D. (1985) J. Immunol. 135, 1331-1337]. Accordingly, we investigated the microanatomical relationship between mast cells and enteric nerves in normal rat intestine and parasite-infected rat intestine, in which mucosal mast cell hyperplasia occurs. Combined immunohistochemistry for neuron-specific enolase and staining with alcian blue at pH 0.5 was employed on paraffin-embedded sections of normal and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rat jejunum. Sixty-seven percent of intestinal mucosal mast cells were touching subepithelial nerves, and an additional 20% were within 2 micron of nerves. Assessment of the proportion of the lamina propria occupied by mast cells (12.5%), the average mast cell area (121 +/- 28 microns 2), and the density of enteric nerves (one per 788 +/- 151 microns 2) suggested that the association was 5 times greater than would be expected by chance alone (P less than 0.0001). In consecutive sections, the nerves in contact with mast cells were also shown to contain substance P and/or calcitonin-gene-related peptide. Electron microscopy confirmed this association: 8% of the mast cells in infected rats exhibited membrane-membrane contact with unmyelinated axons containing 70- to 170-nm dense-core vesicles, and an additional 31% were situated less than 250 nm from nerves. Other mast cells appeared to embrace nerve bundles through the projection of lamellopodia. These data provide systematic quantitative evidence that a structural foundation for communication between the immune and nervous systems exists in the rat gastrointestinal tract. Images PMID:2437589

  6. Peripheral nerve metabolism and zinc levels in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Effect of diets high in fish and corn oil

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, J.P.; Fenton, M.R. )

    1991-03-15

    This study was designed to assess the effects of diets high in fish and corn oil on peripheral nerve metabolism in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. A type I diabetic state was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats by injection of STZ. Animals were divided into three dietary groups; normal rat chow, high corn oil diet and high fish oil diet. After 4 weeks animals were analyzed for nerve conduction velocity, bled and then sacrificed. Sciatic nerves were removed, processed and several biochemical parameters determined. Plasma zinc levels were elevated in the STZ normal chow group compared to non-diabetic controls. Both corn oil and fish oil diets tended to eliminate the rise in plasma zinc. Differences in subcellular distribution of zinc in sciatic nerves were also observed. Normal chow STZ animals displayed a 20% decrease in nerve conduction velocity compared to control. Dietary supplementation with either fish or corn oil seemed to ameliorate these effects. Biochemical analysis of Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase and protein kinase C revealed a decrease in activity in normal chow animals compared to control groups. Again, dietary intervention with either fish or corn oil seemed to return these activities back to normal. The results suggest a link between zinc metabolism and peripheral nerve metabolism which can be modified by dietary intervention.

  7. Sympathetic nerve fibers sprout into rat odontoblast layer, but not into dentinal tubules, in response to cavity preparation.

    PubMed

    Shimeno, Yoichi; Sugawara, Yumiko; Iikubo, Masahiro; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi

    2008-04-11

    This study was designed to determine if sympathetic nerve fibers exist in dentinal tubules in rat normal dental pulp, and if they sprout into the dentinal tubules in response to artificial cavity preparation in dentin. Sympathetic nerve fibers in rat molar dental pulp were labeled using an anterograde axonal transport technique involving injection of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) into the superior cervical ganglion (SCG). They were then observed using light and electron microscopes. In normal dental pulp (control), scattered WGA-HRP reaction products were observed in unmyelinated nerve endings in the odontoblast layer and subodontoblastic region. In injured pulp 3 weeks after cavity preparation, reaction products were about 1.8-times more plentiful in the above areas (versus control pulp). However, no labeled nerve fibers were observed in the dentinal tubules in either control or injured dental pulp. These results indicate that although sympathetic nerve fibers do indeed sprout in rat dental pulp in response to cavity preparation, they do not penetrate into the dentinal tubules in which postganglionic nerve endings derived from the SCG were not originally present.

  8. Local Effect of Heparin Binding Neurotrophic Factor Combined With Chitosan Entubulization on Sciatic Nerve Repair in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mehrshad, Ali; Seddighnia, Ashkan; Shadabi, Mohammadreza; Najafpour, Alireza; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of on sciatic nerve regeneration in animal model of rat. Methods: Seventy-five male Wistar rats were divided into five experimental groups randomly (each group containing 15 animals): Sham operation group (SHAM), autograft group (AUTO), transected control (TC), chitosan conduit (CHIT) and heparin binding neurotrophic factor treated group (CHIT/HBNF). In AUTO group a segment of sciatic nerve was transected and reimplanted reversely. In SHAM group sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. In transected group left sciatic nerve was transected and stumps were fixed in adjacent muscle (TC). In treatment group defect was bridged using a chitosan conduit (CHIT) filled with 10 µL HBNF (CHIT/HBNF). Each group was subdivided into four subgroups of five animals each and nerve fibers were studied in a 12-week period. Results: Behavioral, functional, biomechanical, electrophysiological and gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in treatment group than in CHIT group (P=0.001). Immunohistochemical reactions to S-100 in treatment group were more positive than that in CHIT group. Conclusion: Local administration of improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. It could be considered as an effective treatment for peripheral nerve repair in practice. PMID:27331064

  9. The effects of huwentoxin-I on the voltage-gated sodium channels of rat hippocampal and cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meichi; Rong, Mingqiang; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping

    2012-03-01

    Huwentoxin-I (HWTX-I) is a 33-residue peptide isolated from the venom of Ornithoctonus huwena and could inhibit TTX-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channels and N-type calcium channels in mammalian dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. However, the effects of HWTX-I on mammalian central neuronal and insect sodium channel subtypes remain unknown. In this study, we found that HWTX-I potently inhibited sodium channels in rat hippocampal and cockroach dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons with the IC(50) values of 66.1±5.2 and 4.80±0.58nM, respectively. Taken together with our previous work on DRG neurons (IC(50)≈55nM), the order of sodium channel sensitivity to HWTX-I inhibition was insect central DUM≫mammalian peripheral>mammalian central neurons. HWTX-I exhibited no effect on the steady-state activation and inactivation of sodium channels in rat hippocampal and cockroach DUM neurons. PMID:22094230

  10. Persistent reduction of conduction velocity and myelinated axon damage in vibrated rat tail nerves.

    PubMed

    Loffredo, Michael A; Yan, Ji-Geng; Kao, Dennis; Zhang, Lin Ling; Matloub, Hani S; Riley, Danny A

    2009-06-01

    Prolonged hand-transmitted vibration exposure in the workplace has been recognized for almost a century to cause neurodegenerative and vasospastic disease. Persistence of the diseased state for years after cessation of tool use is of grave concern. To understand persistence of vibration injury, the present study examined recovery of nerve conduction velocity and structural damage of myelinated axons in a rat tail vibration model. Both 7 and 14 days of vibration (4 h/day) decreased conduction velocity. The decrease correlated directly with the increased percentage of disrupted myelinated axons. The total number of myelinated axons was unchanged. During 2 months of recovery, conduction velocity returned to control level after 7-day vibration but remained decreased after 14-day vibration. The rat tail model provides insight into understanding the persistence of neural deficits in hand-arm vibration syndrome.

  11. Effects of adenosine receptor agonists on efferent renal nerve activity in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, S; Pieruzzi, F; Camisasca, P; Ragonesi, G; Protasoni, G; Golin, R; Zanchetti, A; Stella, A

    2000-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of A1 and A2 adenosine-receptor activation on the sympathetic nervous system. The effects on efferent renal nerve activity of selective A1 (CCPA; 2-chloro-N-6-cyclopentyladenosine) and A2 (2HE-NECA; 2-hexynyl-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) adenosine-receptor agonists were studied in anesthetized rats either with intact baroreflexes (intact rats) or with bilateral sinoaortic denervation and vagotomy (denervated rats). After a control period of 5 min, A1 or A2 agonist or vehicle were intravenously infused for 8 min in separate groups of intact or denervated rats, in which arterial pressure and heart rate were continuously recorded. CCPA (5.0 microg/kg/min) and 2HE-NECA (0.7 microg/kg/min) were selected to obtain comparable blood pressure changes over the period of observation. Arterial pressure significantly and equally decreased during the A1 (-41 +/- 8%), and A2 (-35 +/- 5%) agonist administration. Heart rate significantly decreased during A1 agonist infusion, but it did not change during A2 agonist administration. Bilateral sinoaortic denervation and vagotomy did not modify the hemodynamic responses to both drugs. The A1 and A2 administration caused a large and significant increase in efferent renal nerve activity (+66 +/- 22% and +76 +/- 15%, respectively), and this effect was entirely abolished in denervated rats. A linear relation with a significant negative slope between changes in arterial pressure and changes in neural discharge was observed for each treatment. The comparison of the regression slopes showed that the reflex increase of efferent sympathetic activity caused by the administration of both agonists was significantly smaller than the increment induced by equipotent hypotensive dose of sodium nitroprusside (10 microg/kg). These data show that the selective activation of A1 and A2 receptors elicits a reflex increase in efferent renal nerve activity. This neural activation is smaller as compared

  12. Effects of vitamin B12 on the corneal nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria Rosaria; Biagioni, Francesca; Carrizzo, Albino; Lorusso, Massimo; Spadaro, Angelo; Micelli Ferrari, Tommaso; Vecchione, Carmine; Zurria, Monia; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Mascio, Giada; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Madonna, Michele; Fornai, Francesco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Lograno, Marcello Diego

    2014-03-01

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of a new ophthalmic solution containing 0.05% vitamin B12 0.05% on corneal nerve regeneration in rats after corneal injury. Eyes of anesthetized male Wistar rats were subjected to corneal injury by removing the corneal epithelium with corneal brush (Algerbrush). After the epithelial debridement, the right eye of each animal received the instillation of one drop of the ophthalmic solution containing vitamin B12 0.05% plus taurine 0.5% and sodium hyaluronate 0.5% four time per day for 10 or 30 days. Left eyes were used as control and treated with solution containing taurine 0.5% and sodium hyaluronate 0.5% alone following the same regimen. Fluorescein staining by slit-lamp and morphological analysis was used to determine corneal wound healing. Immunohistochemistry, immunoblot and confocal microscopy were used to examine corneal re-innervation. Slit-lamp and histological analyses showed that re-epithelization of the corneas was accelerated in rats treated with vitamin B12. A clear-cut difference between the two groups of rats was seen after 10 days of treatment, whereas a near-to-complete re-epithelization was observed in both groups at 30 days. Vitamin B12 treatment had also a remarkable effect on corneal re-innervation, as shown by substantial increased in the expression of neurofilament 160 and β-III tubulin at both 10 and 30 days. The presence of SV2A-positive nerve endings suggests the presence of synapse-like specialized structures in corneal epithelium of the eye treated with vitamin B12. Our findings suggest that vitamin B12 treatment represents a powerful strategy to accelerate not only re-epithelization but also corneal re-innervation after mechanical injury. PMID:24486457

  13. Effects of vitamin B12 on the corneal nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria Rosaria; Biagioni, Francesca; Carrizzo, Albino; Lorusso, Massimo; Spadaro, Angelo; Micelli Ferrari, Tommaso; Vecchione, Carmine; Zurria, Monia; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; Mascio, Giada; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Madonna, Michele; Fornai, Francesco; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Lograno, Marcello Diego

    2014-03-01

    The study was designed to investigate the effects of a new ophthalmic solution containing 0.05% vitamin B12 0.05% on corneal nerve regeneration in rats after corneal injury. Eyes of anesthetized male Wistar rats were subjected to corneal injury by removing the corneal epithelium with corneal brush (Algerbrush). After the epithelial debridement, the right eye of each animal received the instillation of one drop of the ophthalmic solution containing vitamin B12 0.05% plus taurine 0.5% and sodium hyaluronate 0.5% four time per day for 10 or 30 days. Left eyes were used as control and treated with solution containing taurine 0.5% and sodium hyaluronate 0.5% alone following the same regimen. Fluorescein staining by slit-lamp and morphological analysis was used to determine corneal wound healing. Immunohistochemistry, immunoblot and confocal microscopy were used to examine corneal re-innervation. Slit-lamp and histological analyses showed that re-epithelization of the corneas was accelerated in rats treated with vitamin B12. A clear-cut difference between the two groups of rats was seen after 10 days of treatment, whereas a near-to-complete re-epithelization was observed in both groups at 30 days. Vitamin B12 treatment had also a remarkable effect on corneal re-innervation, as shown by substantial increased in the expression of neurofilament 160 and β-III tubulin at both 10 and 30 days. The presence of SV2A-positive nerve endings suggests the presence of synapse-like specialized structures in corneal epithelium of the eye treated with vitamin B12. Our findings suggest that vitamin B12 treatment represents a powerful strategy to accelerate not only re-epithelization but also corneal re-innervation after mechanical injury.

  14. Nerve-dependent regulation of succinate dehydrogenase in junctional and extrajunctional compartments of rat muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Jasmin, B J; Campbell, R J; Michel, R N

    1995-01-01

    1. We studied the distribution of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) within junctional and extrajunctional compartments of rat soleus muscle fibres. Using quantitative microphotometric imaging techniques, we showed that the motor endplate region of soleus fibres displays SDH activity that is two- and threefold higher than in subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IM) compartments, respectively, and that essentially all endplate SDH activity is of postsynaptic origin. 2. In addition, we examined the influence of the motor nerve on the regulation of this enzyme within these compartments using denervation and tetrodotoxin (TTX)-induced blockade of nerve impulse conduction. Both models of short-term muscle paralysis reduced SDH activity to a comparable extent (approximately 30%) in both the SS and IM compartments, suggesting that expression of this enzyme is co-ordinately regulated in these two regions. Alternatively, denervation and TTX inactivation led to distinct alterations at the level of the motor endplate. SDH activity at denervated endplates was dramatically reduced (by 60%) in comparison to controls, whereas at endplates of TTX-inactivated counterparts, this reduction was significantly less (35%). 3. These findings suggest that motor activity per se is the key factor regulating expression of SDH in non-innervated regions of muscle fibres and that accumulation of SDH activity within the postsynaptic sarcoplasm is equally subject to local mechanisms involving nerve-derived trophic factors. Images Figure 1 PMID:7602516

  15. Proteomic analysis of microdissected facial nuclei of the rat following facial nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Melle, Christian; Ernst, Günther; Grosheva, Maria; Angelov, Doychin N; Irintchev, Andrey; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand

    2009-12-15

    Recent studies using molecular and genetic techniques just have started to elucidate the complex process that drives successful peripheral nerve regeneration. Introducing proteomics to this field, we unilaterally performed a facial nerve axotomy in 13 adult Wistar rats. Seven days later, a total of 40 20-microm coronary cryostat sections of the operated and contralateral unoperated nucleus facialis were microdissected. On the one hand, microdissected areas were pooled for each side, lysed and applied to ProteinChip Arrays. On the other hand, one microdissected area from the right and left facial nucleus each was directly placed on the affinity chromatographic array. Facial motoneurons were lysed in situ and released their proteins to spatially defined points. 215 laser addressable distinct positions across the surface of the spot enabled a high spatial resolution of measured protein profiles for the analysed tissue area. Protein profiles of the single positions were plotted over the used tissue section to visualize their distribution. The comparative analysis of the protein lysates from operated and normal nuclei facialis revealed, for both approaches used, differentially expressed proteins. Although by direct application of one cryostat section only a few hundred motoneurons were analysed, results comparable to these using lysates were obtained. Additionally, the applied technique revealed differences in the intensity distribution of several proteins of unknown function in the lesioned in comparison to the contralateral normal facial nucleus. This proteomic analysis with ultra high sensitivity paired with potential for a spatial resolution is a promising methodology for peripheral nerve regeneration studies. PMID:19748522

  16. Abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis associated with vulnerability in the nerve cells from heroin-dependent rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Wang, Guangyong; Pu, Hongwei; Jing, Hualan

    2014-07-14

    The cellular mechanisms by which opiate addiction develops with repetitive use remain largely unresolved. Intercellular calcium homeostasis is one of the most critical elements to determine neuroadaptive changes and neuronal fate. Heroin, one of the most addictive opiates, may induce neurotoxicity potentially inducing brain impairment, especially for those chronic users who get an overdose. Here we examined changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after repeated exposure to heroin using cultured cerebral cortical neurons. Dynamic changes in [Ca2+]i indicated by fluo-3-AM were monitored using confocal laser scan microscopy, followed by cytotoxicity assessments. It showed that the cells dissociated from heroin-dependent rats had a smaller depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i responses, and a higher elevation in [Ca2+]i when challenged with a high concentration of heroin (500 μM). The restoration ability to remove calcium after washout of these stimulants was impaired. Calcium channel blocker verapamil inhibited the heroin-induced [Ca2+]i elevations as well as the heroin-induced cell damage. The relative [Ca2+]i of the nerve cells closely correlated with the number of damaged cells induced by heroin. These results demonstrate that nerve cells from heroin-dependent rats manifest abnormal [Ca2+]i homeostasis, as well as vulnerability to heroin overdose, suggesting involvement of [Ca2+]i regulation mechanisms in heroin addiction and neurotoxicity.

  17. Fangchinoline inhibits glutamate release from rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes).

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Tien, Lu-Tai; Chuang, Shu-Han; Wang, Yu-Ru; Chang, Wen-Hsuan; Wang, Su-Jane

    2009-07-01

    Fangchinoline, an active component of radix stephaniae tetrandrinea, has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties. It has been reported that excessive glutamate release has been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of fangchinoline on glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals and to explore the possible mechanism. Fangchinoline inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in a concentration-dependent manner, and this phenomenon resulted from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis but not from an inhibition of Ca(2+)-independent efflux via glutamate transporter. Fangchinoline did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-AP-mediated depolarization, but significantly reduced depolarization-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](C). Fangchinoline-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was significantly prevented by the N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker omega-conotoxin MVIIC, and by the PKC inhibitors, GF109203X and Ro318220. In addition, the glutamate release mediated by direct Ca(2+) entry with Ca(2+) ionophore (ionomycin) was unaffected by fangchinoline, which suggests that the inhibitory effect of fangchinoline is not due to directly interfering with the release process at some point subsequent to Ca(2+) influx. These results suggest that fangchinoline inhibits glutamate release from the rat cortical synaptosomes through the suppression of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel activity and subsequent reduces Ca(2+) entry into nerve terminals, rather than any upstream effect on nerve terminal excitability. This inhibition appears to involve the suppression of PKC signal transduction pathway. This finding may explain the neuroprotective effects of fangchinoline against neurotoxicity. PMID:19428795

  18. Haemodynamic Responses to Selective Vagal Nerve Stimulation under Enalapril Medication in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Stieglitz, Thomas; Zentner, Josef; Plachta, Dennis T. T.

    2016-01-01

    Selective vagal nerve stimulation (sVNS) has been demonstrated to lower blood pressure (BP) in rats without causing major side effects. This method might be adapted for the treatment of therapy-resistant hypertension in patients. Converting enzyme inhibitors (CEIs) are among the first drugs that are administered for arterial hypertension and prominently reduce BP primarily by interacting with the renin-angiotensin system of the kidneys. Beyond the reduction of BP, CEI have a positive effect on the survival rate after myocardial infarction; they reduce the rates of stroke and improve the neurohormonal status in heart-failure patients. If sVNS might be introduced as a therapy against resistant hypertension, patients will at least partially stay on their CEI medication. It is therefore the aim of this study to investigate the influence of the CEI enalapril on the haemodynamic and respiratory effects of sVNS. In 10 male Wistar rats, a polyimide-based multichannel-cuff-electrode was placed around the vagal nerve bundle to selectively stimulate the aortic depressor nerve fibres. Stimulation parameters were adapted to the thresholds of the individual animals and included repetition frequencies between 30 and 50 Hz, amplitudes of 0.5 to 1.5 mA and pulse widths between 0.4 ms and 1.0 ms. BP responses were detected with a microtip transducer in the left carotid artery, and electrocardiography was recorded with subcutaneous electrodes. After intravenous administration of enalapril (2 mg/kg bodyweight), the animals’ mean arterial blood pressures (MAPs) decreased significantly, while the heart rates (HRs) were not significantly influenced. The effects of sVNS on BP and HR were attenuated by enalapril but were still present. We conclude that sVNS can lower the MAP during enalapril treatment without relevant side effects. PMID:26766419

  19. Haemodynamic Responses to Selective Vagal Nerve Stimulation under Enalapril Medication in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Stieglitz, Thomas; Zentner, Josef; Plachta, Dennis T T

    2016-01-01

    Selective vagal nerve stimulation (sVNS) has been demonstrated to lower blood pressure (BP) in rats without causing major side effects. This method might be adapted for the treatment of therapy-resistant hypertension in patients. Converting enzyme inhibitors (CEIs) are among the first drugs that are administered for arterial hypertension and prominently reduce BP primarily by interacting with the renin-angiotensin system of the kidneys. Beyond the reduction of BP, CEI have a positive effect on the survival rate after myocardial infarction; they reduce the rates of stroke and improve the neurohormonal status in heart-failure patients. If sVNS might be introduced as a therapy against resistant hypertension, patients will at least partially stay on their CEI medication. It is therefore the aim of this study to investigate the influence of the CEI enalapril on the haemodynamic and respiratory effects of sVNS. In 10 male Wistar rats, a polyimide-based multichannel-cuff-electrode was placed around the vagal nerve bundle to selectively stimulate the aortic depressor nerve fibres. Stimulation parameters were adapted to the thresholds of the individual animals and included repetition frequencies between 30 and 50 Hz, amplitudes of 0.5 to 1.5 mA and pulse widths between 0.4 ms and 1.0 ms. BP responses were detected with a microtip transducer in the left carotid artery, and electrocardiography was recorded with subcutaneous electrodes. After intravenous administration of enalapril (2 mg/kg bodyweight), the animals' mean arterial blood pressures (MAPs) decreased significantly, while the heart rates (HRs) were not significantly influenced. The effects of sVNS on BP and HR were attenuated by enalapril but were still present. We conclude that sVNS can lower the MAP during enalapril treatment without relevant side effects.

  20. Repetitive Diving in Trained Rats Still Increases Fos Production in Brainstem Neurons after Bilateral Sectioning of the Anterior Ethmoidal Nerve

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Paul F.; Warren, Erik A.; DiNovo, Karyn M.

    2016-01-01

    This research was designed to investigate the role of the anterior ethmoidal nerve (AEN) during repetitive trained diving in rats, with specific attention to activation of afferent and efferent brainstem nuclei that are part of this reflexive response. The AEN innervates the nose and nasal passages and is thought to be an important component of the afferent limb of the diving response. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 24) were trained to swim and dive through a 5 m underwater maze. Some rats (N = 12) had bilateral sectioning of the AEN, others a Sham surgery (N = 12). Twelve rats (6 AEN cut and 6 Sham) had 24 post-surgical dive trials over 2 h to activate brainstem neurons to produce Fos, a neuronal activation marker. Remaining rats were non-diving controls. Diving animals had significantly more Fos-positive neurons than non-diving animals in the caudal pressor area, ventral medullary dorsal horn, ventral paratrigeminal nucleus, nucleus tractus solitarius, rostral ventrolateral medulla, Raphe nuclei, A5, Locus Coeruleus, and Kölliker-Fuse area. There were no significant differences in brainstem Fos labeling in rats diving with and without intact AENs. Thus, the AENs are not required for initiation of the diving response. Other nerve(s) that innervate the nose and nasal passages, and/or suprabulbar activation of brainstem neurons, may be responsible for the pattern of neuronal activation observed during repetitive trained diving in rats. These results help define the central neuronal circuitry of the mammalian diving response. PMID:27148082

  1. GFAP immunoreactivity within the rat nucleus ambiguus after laryngeal nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Berdugo-Vega, G; Arias-Gil, G; Rodriguez-Niedenführ, M; Davies, D C; Vázquez, T; Pascual-Font, A

    2014-01-01

    Changes that occur in astroglial populations of the nucleus ambiguus after recurrent (RLN) or superior (SLN) laryngeal nerve injury have hitherto not been fully characterised. In the present study, rat RLN and SLN were lesioned. After 3, 7, 14, 28 or 56 days of survival, the nucleus ambiguus was investigated by means of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunofluorescence or a combination of GFAP immunofluorescence and the application of retrograde tracers. GFAP immunoreactivity was significantly increased 3 days after RLN resection and it remained significantly elevated until after 28 days post injury (dpi). By 56 dpi it had returned to basal levels. In contrast, following RLN transection with repair, GFAP immunoreactivity was significantly elevated at 7 dpi and remained significantly elevated until 14 dpi. It had returned to basal levels by 28 dpi. Topographical analysis of the distribution of GFAP immunoreactivity revealed that after RLN injury, GFAP immunoreactivity was increased beyond the area of the nucleus ambiguus within which RLN motor neuron somata were located. GFAP immunoreactivity was also observed in the vicinity of neuronal somata that project into the uninjured SLN. Similarly, lesion of the SLN resulted in increased GFAP immunoreactivity around the neuronal somata projecting into it and also in the vicinity of the motor neuron somata projecting into the RLN. The increase in GFAP immunoreactivity outside of the region containing the motor neurons projecting into the injured nerve, may reflect the onset of a regenerative process attempting to compensate for impairment of one of the laryngeal nerves and may occur because of the dual innervation of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle. This dual innervation of a very specialised muscle could provide a useful model system for studying the molecular mechanisms underlying axonal regeneration process and the results of the current study could provide the basis for studies into functional regeneration

  2. Central beta-adrenergic receptors mediate renal nerve activity during stress in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Koepke, J P; DiBona, G F

    1985-01-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists (d,l-propranolol or timolol, 30 micrograms in 2 microL of isotonic saline) on the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and decreased urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) responses to stressful environmental stimulation (air jet to head) in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were examined. Before i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol, air stress increased renal activity (68% from 10.6 +/- 2.1 and 63% from 8.2 +/- 0.9 integrator resets/min respectively). In contrast, after i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol in the same conscious SHR, air stress had no effect on renal sympathetic nerve activity (+7% from 8.1 +/- 1.7 and +7% from 5.5 +/- 1.0 integrator resets/min respectively). Air stress decreased UNaV in conscious SHR given i.c.v. saline vehicle (25% from 2.8 +/- 0.5 microEq/min/100 g body weight), but had no effect on effective renal plasma flow or glomerular filtration rate. In contrast, after i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol, air stress had no effect on UNaV (0% from 2.8 +/- 0.5 and +9% from 3.3 +/- 0.3 microEq/min/100 g body weight respectively). Mean arterial pressure increased similarly during air stress with i.c.v. saline-vehicle or beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists. Intravenous administration of the same doses of d,l-propranolol or timolol did not prevent the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity or decreased UNaV responses resulting from air stress. These results suggest that central nervous system beta-adrenergic receptors mediate the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and decreased UNaV responses resulting from stressful environmental stimulation in conscious SHR.

  3. Cauda equina repair in the rat: part 1. Stimulus-evoked EMG for identifying spinal nerves innervating intrinsic tail muscles.

    PubMed

    Blaskiewicz, Don J; Smirnov, Igor; Cisu, Tudor; DeRuisseau, Lara R; Stelzner, Dennis J; Calancie, Blair

    2009-08-01

    Cauda equina injuries may produce severe leg and pelvic floor dysfunction, for which no effective treatments exist. We are developing a rat cauda equina injury model to allow nerve root identification and surgical repair. One possible difficulty in implementing any repair strategy after trauma in humans involves the correct identification of proximal and distal ends of nerve roots separated by the injury. Two series of studies were carried out. In Series 1, we electrically stimulated segmental contributors to the dorsal and ventral caudales nerves in order to characterize the recruitment patterns of muscles controlling rat tail movements. In Series 2, we attempted to identify individual nerve roots forming the cauda equina by both level of origin and function (i.e., dorsal or ventral), based solely upon the recruitment patterns in response to electrical stimulation. For Series 1 studies, electrical stimulation of the segmental contributors showed that all nerve roots-from the sixth lumbar to the first coccygeal-contributed to recruitment of muscles found at the base of the tail. Intrinsic tail muscles lying more distally in the tail showed a more root-specific pattern of innervation. For Series 2, the rate of successful identification of an unknown nerve root as being ventral was very high (>95%), and only somewhat lower (approximately 80%) for dorsal roots. Correctly identifying the level of origin of that root was more difficult, but for ventral roots this rate still exceeded 90%. Using the rat cauda equina model, we have shown that stimulus-evoked EMG can be used to identify ventral nerve roots innervating tail muscles with a high degree of accuracy. These findings support the feasibility of using this conceptual approach for identifying and repairing damaged human cauda equina nerve roots based on stimulus-evoked recruitment of muscles in the leg and pelvic floor. PMID:19203211

  4. Effect of somatic nerve stimulation on the kidney in intact, vagotomized and carotid sinus-denervated rats.

    PubMed

    Davis, G; Johns, E J

    1991-01-01

    1. The influence of cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptors on the renal nerve-dependent functional responses of the kidney to electrical stimulation of somatic afferent nerves was studied in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rats. 2. Electrical stimulation of the left brachial nerve plexus at 3 Hz, 0.2 ms and 15 V in the intact animals increased blood pressure by 22%, and while renal perfusion pressure was maintained at pre-stimulus levels, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate decreased by 14 and 22% respectively. At the same time urine flow rate and absolute and fractional sodium excretion decreased by 36, 42 and 27% respectively. In animals subjected to acute renal nerve section these renal functional responses could not be elicited. 3. Following bilateral vagotomy the systemic and renal haemodynamic responses to brachial nerve stimulation were similar to the intact group. However, urine flow rate and absolute and fractional sodium excretions decreased by 50, 59 and 47% respectively, responses which were significantly greater than in the intact group. 4. In a group of rats in which the carotid sinus nerves had been sectioned, stimulation of the brachial plexus caused reductions of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate of the same magnitude as in the intact group; however, urine flow rate and absolute and fractional sodium excretion fell by 51, 60 and 48%, respectively, which were significantly larger than in the intact group. 5. These results demonstrate that the afferent nerve information arising from muscle joints and skin and carried via the brachial plexus caused reflex renal nerve-dependent reductions in renal haemodynamics and an antidiuresis and antinatriuresis. The cardiopulmonary and carotid sinus baroreceptors exert a tonic inhibitory action on these reflex renal responses insofar as they appeared to attenuate the antidiuretic and antinatriuretic responses to somatic afferent nerve stimulation.

  5. Thermographic evaluation of hind paw skin temperature and functional recovery of locomotion after sciatic nerve crush in rats

    PubMed Central

    Z. Sacharuk, Viviane; A. Lovatel, Gisele; Ilha, Jocemar; Marcuzzo, Simone; Severo do Pinho, Alexandre; L. Xavier, Léder; A. Zaro, Milton; Achaval, Matilde

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Peripheral nerves are often damaged by direct mechanical injury, diseases, and tumors. The peripheral nerve injuries that result from these conditions can lead to a partial or complete loss of motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, which in turn are related to changes in skin temperature, in the involved segments of the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in hind paw skin temperature after sciatic nerve crush in rats in an attempt to determine whether changes in skin temperature correlate with the functional recovery of locomotion. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (n = 7), sham (n = 25), and crush (n = 25). All groups were subjected to thermographic, functional, and histological assessments. RESULTS: ΔT in the crush group was different from the control and sham groups at the 1st, 3rd and 7rd postoperative days (p<0.05). The functional recovery from the crush group returned to normal values between the 3rd and 4th week post-injury, and morphological analysis of the nerve revealed incomplete regeneration at the 4th week after injury. DISCUSSION: This study is the first demonstration that sciatic nerve crush in rats induces an increase in hind paw skin temperature and that skin temperature changes do not correlate closely with functional recovery PMID:21876984

  6. Perinatal taurine exposure programs patterns of autonomic nerve activity responses to tooth pulp stimulation in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Khimsuksri, Sawita; Wyss, J. Michael; Thaeomor, Atcharaporn; Paphangkorakit, Jarin; Jirakulsomchok, Dusit; Roysommuti, Sanya

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal taurine excess or deficit influences adult health and disease, especially relative to the autonomic nervous system. This study tests the hypothesis that perinatal taurine exposure influences adult autonomic nervous system control of arterial pressure in response to acute electrical tooth pulp stimulation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed normal rat chow with 3% β-alanine (taurine depletion, TD), 3% taurine (taurine supplementation, TS) or water alone (control, C) from conception to weaning. Their male offspring were fed normal rat chow and tap water throughout the experiment. At 8–10 weeks of age, blood chemistry, arterial pressure, heart rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity were measured in anesthetized rats. Age, body weight, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, plasma electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine and plasma cortisol were not significantly different among the three groups. Before tooth pulp stimulation, low (0.3–0.5 Hz) and high frequency (0.5–4.0 Hz) power spectral densities of arterial pressure were not significantly different among groups, while the power spectral densities of renal sympathetic nerve activity were significantly decreased in TD compared to control rats. Tooth pulp stimulation did not change arterial pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve and arterial pressure power spectral densities in the 0.3–4.0 Hz spectrum or renal sympathetic nerve firing rate in any group. In contrast, perinatal taurine imbalance disturbed very low frequency power spectral densities of both arterial pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity (below 0.1 Hz), both before and after the tooth pulp stimulation. The power densities of TS were most sensitive to ganglionic blockade and central adrenergic inhibition, while those of TD were sensitive to both central and peripheral adrenergic inhibition. The present data indicate that perinatal taurine imbalance can lead to aberrant autonomic nervous system responses in

  7. Influence of breaching the connective sheaths of the donor nerve on its myelinated sensory axons and on their sprouting into the end-to-side coapted nerve in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, Uroš; Zele, Tilen; Tomšič, Martin; Sketelj, Janez; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2012-12-10

    The influence of breaching the connective sheaths of the donor sural nerve on axonal sprouting into the end-to-side coapted peroneal nerve was examined in the rat. In parallel, the effect of these procedures on the donor nerve was assessed. The sheaths of the donor nerve at the coaptation site were either left completely intact (group A) or they were breached by epineurial sutures (group B), an epineurial window (group C), or a perineurial window (group D). In group A, the compound action potential (CAP) of sensory axons was detected in ~10% and 40% of the recipient nerves at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, which was significantly less frequently than in group D at both recovery periods. In addition, the number of myelinated axons in the recipient nerve was significantly larger in group D than in other groups at 4 weeks. At 8 weeks, the number of axons in group A was only ~15% of the axon numbers in other groups (p<0.05). Focal subepineurial degenerative changes in the donor nerves were only seen after 4 weeks, but not later. The average CAP area and the total number of myelinated axons in the donor nerves were not different among the experimental groups. In conclusion, myelinated sensory axons are able to penetrate the epiperineurium of donor nerves after end-to-side nerve coaption; however, their ingrowth into recipient nerves is significantly enhanced by breaching the epiperineurial sheets at the coaptation site. Breaching does not cause permanent injury to the donor nerve.

  8. Acute repeated intracerebroventricular injections of angiotensin II reduce agonist and antagonist radioligand binding in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and median preoptic nucleus in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Speth, Robert C; Vento, Peter J; Carrera, Eduardo J; Gonzalez-Reily, Luz; Linares, Andrea; Santos, Kira; Swindle, Jamala D; Daniels, Derek

    2014-10-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulates water and saline intakes when injected into the brain of rats. This arises from activation of the AT1 Ang II receptor subtype. Acute repeated injections, however, decrease the water intake response to Ang II without affecting saline intake. Previous studies provide evidence that Ang II-induced water intake is mediated via the classical G protein coupling pathway, whereas the saline intake caused by Ang II is mediated by an ERK 1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway. Accordingly, the different behavioral response to repeated injections of Ang II may reflect a selective effect on G protein coupling. To test this hypothesis, we examined the binding of a radiolabeled agonist ((125)I-sarcosine(1) Ang II) and a radiolabeled antagonist ((125)I-sarcosine(1), isoleucine(8) Ang II) in brain homogenates and tissue sections prepared from rats given repeated injections of Ang II or vehicle. Although no treatment-related differences were found in hypothalamic homogenates, a focus on specific brain structures using receptor autoradiography, found that the desensitization treatment reduced binding of both radioligands in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and median preoptic nucleus (MnPO), but not in the subfornical organ (SFO). Because G protein coupling is reported to have a selective effect on agonist binding without affecting antagonist binding, these findings do not support a G protein uncoupling treatment effect. This suggests that receptor number is more critical to the water intake response than the saline intake response, or that pathways downstream from the G protein mediate desensitization of the water intake response.

  9. Effect of exercise on the expression of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Yong, Min-Sik; Na, Sang-Su

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] We examined the impact of exercise on the expression pattern of nerve growth factor in the spinal cord of rats with induced osteoarthritis of the knee joint. [Subjects and Methods] To produce monosodium iodoacetate-induced arthritis, rats were administered 3 mg/50 µL monosodium iodoacetate through the interarticular space of the right knee. The animals were randomly divided into four groups: rats sacrificed 3 weeks after 0.9% saline solution injection (shame group, n = 10), rats sacrificed 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (control group, n = 10), rats with 4 weeks rest from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (no exercise group, n = 10), and rats with 4 weeks treadmill training from 3 weeks after monosodium iodoacetate injection (exercise group, n = 10). Serial coronal sections of the lumbar spine were cut and processed for immunohistochemistry. [Results] The expression of nerve growth factor was significantly increased in the EG compared with the SG, CG, and NEG. [Conclusion] Increased nerve growth factor expression in the spinal cord due to exercise-induced stimulation can be effective in treating chronic pain. Such treatment will contribute not only to improving the joint function of patients with chronic pain but also their quality of life. PMID:26357438

  10. Essential oil of Croton zehntneri and its main constituent anethole block excitability of rat peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Alves, Kerly Shamyra; Ferreira-da-Silva, Francisco Walber; Coelho-de-Souza, Andrelina Noronha; Albuquerque, Aline Alice Cavalcante; do Vale, Otoni Cardoso; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique

    2015-03-01

    Croton zehntneri is an aromatic plant native to Northeast Brazil and employed by local people to treat various diseases. The leaves of this plant have a rich content of essential oil. The essential oil of C. zehntneri samples, with anethole as the major constituent and anethole itself, have been reported to have several pharmacological activities such as antispasmodic, cardiovascular, and gastroprotective effects and inducing the blockade of neuromuscular transmission and antinociception. Since several works have demonstrated that essential oils and their constituents block cell excitability and in view of the multiple effects of C. zehntneri essential oil and anethole on biological tissues, we undertook this investigation aiming to characterize and compare the effects of this essential oil and its major constituent on nerve excitability. Sciatic nerves of Wistar rats were used. They were mounted in a moist chamber, and evoked compound action potentials were recorded. Nerves were exposed in vitro to the essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole (0.1-1 mg/mL) up to 180 min, and alterations in excitability (rheobase and chronaxie) and conductibility (peak-to-peak amplitude and conduction velocity) parameters of the compound action potentials were evaluated. The essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole blocked, in a concentration-dependent manner with similar pharmacological potencies (IC50: 0.32 ± 0.07 and 0.22 ± 0.11 mg/mL, respectively), rat sciatic nerve compound action potentials. Strength-duration curves for both agents were shifted upward and to the right compared to the control curve, and the rheobase and chronaxie were increased following essential oil and anethole exposure. The time courses of the essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole effects on peak-to-peak amplitude of compound action potentials followed an exponential decay and reached a steady state. The essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole caused a similar reduction in

  11. Essential oil of Croton zehntneri and its main constituent anethole block excitability of rat peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    da Silva-Alves, Kerly Shamyra; Ferreira-da-Silva, Francisco Walber; Coelho-de-Souza, Andrelina Noronha; Albuquerque, Aline Alice Cavalcante; do Vale, Otoni Cardoso; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique

    2015-03-01

    Croton zehntneri is an aromatic plant native to Northeast Brazil and employed by local people to treat various diseases. The leaves of this plant have a rich content of essential oil. The essential oil of C. zehntneri samples, with anethole as the major constituent and anethole itself, have been reported to have several pharmacological activities such as antispasmodic, cardiovascular, and gastroprotective effects and inducing the blockade of neuromuscular transmission and antinociception. Since several works have demonstrated that essential oils and their constituents block cell excitability and in view of the multiple effects of C. zehntneri essential oil and anethole on biological tissues, we undertook this investigation aiming to characterize and compare the effects of this essential oil and its major constituent on nerve excitability. Sciatic nerves of Wistar rats were used. They were mounted in a moist chamber, and evoked compound action potentials were recorded. Nerves were exposed in vitro to the essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole (0.1-1 mg/mL) up to 180 min, and alterations in excitability (rheobase and chronaxie) and conductibility (peak-to-peak amplitude and conduction velocity) parameters of the compound action potentials were evaluated. The essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole blocked, in a concentration-dependent manner with similar pharmacological potencies (IC50: 0.32 ± 0.07 and 0.22 ± 0.11 mg/mL, respectively), rat sciatic nerve compound action potentials. Strength-duration curves for both agents were shifted upward and to the right compared to the control curve, and the rheobase and chronaxie were increased following essential oil and anethole exposure. The time courses of the essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole effects on peak-to-peak amplitude of compound action potentials followed an exponential decay and reached a steady state. The essential oil of C. zehntneri and anethole caused a similar reduction in

  12. Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cortés, P.; Toledo-Romero, M. A.; Delgado, M.; Sánchez-González, C. E.; Martin, F.; Galindo-Moreno, P.; O'Valle, F.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Attempts have been made to improve nerve conduits in peripheral nerve reconstruction. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide with neuroprotective, trophic and developmental regulatory actions, in peripheral nerve regeneration in a severe model of nerve injury that was repaired with nerve conduits. Approach. The sciatic nerve of each male Wistar rat was transected unilaterally at 10 mm and then repaired with Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits. The rats were treated locally with saline, with the VIP, with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or with ASCs that were transduced with the VIP-expressing lentivirus. The rats with the transected nerve, with no repairs, were used as untreated controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, we assessed their limb function by measuring the ankle stance angle and the percentage of their muscle mass reduction, and we evaluated the histopathology, immunohistochemistry and morphometry of the myelinated fibers. Main results. The rats that received a single injection of VIP-expressing ASCs showed a significant functional recovery in the ankle stance angle (p = 0.049) and a higher number of myelinated fibers in the middle and distal segments of the operated nerve versus the other groups (p = 0.046). Significance. These results suggest that utilization of a cellular substrate, plus a VIP source, is a promising method for enhancing nerve regeneration using Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits and that this method represents a potential useful clinical approach to repairing peripheral nerve damage.

  13. An in vitro method for recording single unit afferent activity from mesenteric nerves innervating isolated segments of rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, K A; Cervero, F

    1986-04-01

    A technique has been developed for recording single unit afferent activity from mesenteric nerves in isolated segments of rat distal ileum in vitro. The preparation consists of a 3-cm segment of ileum, containing a single neurovascular bundle, held horizontally in an organ bath. One end of the segment is attached to a tension transducer to record changes in longitudinal tension of the gut muscle and the other is connected to a pressure transducer to record changes in intra-luminal pressure. Electromyographic activity of the smooth muscle is recorded using glass-insulated tungsten microelectrodes inserted in the wall of the gut. Afferent nerve activity is recorded with a monopolar platinum wire electrode from filaments of the mesenteric nerves that run between the artery and vein supplying the segment. This preparation permits the detailed analysis of the electrical activity of intestinal afferent nerve fibres correlated with mechanical and chemical events occurring naturally in the gut or imposed experimentally on it.

  14. The effect of exercise on the peripheral nerve in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Heung Yong; Lee, Kyung Ae; Park, Tae Sun

    2015-04-01

    The exact effectiveness of supportive care activities, such as exercise, in diabetes patients has yet to be elucidated in the diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) field. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the effect of regular exercise on the peripheral nerves of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The animals were divided as follows into six groups according to exercise combination and glucose control: Normal group, normal group with exercise (EXE), diabetic group (DM), DM group with EXE, DM+glucose control with insulin (INS), and DM+INS+EXE. Animals in the exercise groups were made to walk on a treadmill machine everyday for 30 min at a setting of 8 m/min without inclination. After 8 weeks, sensory parameters were evaluated, and after 16 weeks, biochemicals and peripheral nerves were quantified by immunohistochemistry and compared among experimental groups. The resulting data showed that fasting blood glucose levels and HbA1c levels were not influenced significantly by exercise in normal and DM groups. However, the current perception threshold and the von Frey stimulation test revealed higher thresholds in the DM+INS+EXE group than in the DM+INS group (P<0.05). Significantly lower thresholds were observed in untreated DM groups (DM or DM+EXE) compared to the normal and insulin-treated DM groups (P<0.05). Intra-epidermal nerve fiber density was reduced in a lesser degree in the DM+INS+EXE group than in the DM+INS group (9.8±0.4 vs. 9.1±0.5, P<0.05). Exercise alone was not associated with a significant protective effect on the peripheral nerve in the normal or DM groups; however, a beneficial effect from exercise was observed when hyperglycemia was controlled with insulin in the DM group. These findings suggest that exercise has a potential protective effect against DPN based on the preferential effort for glucose control, although exercise alone cannot prevent peripheral nerve damage from hyperglycemia. PMID:25253638

  15. Near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy as a novel method to detect demyelination in rat sciatic nerve in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Senapati, Arun; Peng, Yuan Bo; Kashyap, Dheerendra; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    This study was done to use near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to bring out differences in the anatomical substructures in the rat spinal cord and further to differentiate scattering between demyelinated and normal sciatic nerves in rat models, thereby exploring a new methodology to localize MS (multiple Sclerosis) lesions in vivo for animal studies. The experimental setup consisted of a tungsten light source, CCD array spectrometer, and bifurcated optical fibers for light delivery and detection of back scattered light from tissue. The measurement system was calibrated with reflectance standard. The spinal cord of 14 rats was exposed by laminectomy, and the measurements were taken on 8 points at intervals of 1 mm on the right and left lumbar-sacral regions and the central blood vessel. For measurements on the sciatic nerve, the spinal nerves of 84 rats were ligated according to the Chung Model. Measurements were taken on five points on both the ligated and the control nerve side after 1, 4, 7 and 14 days. The reduced scattering coefficient, μs', was found to be higher in the lumbar-sacral regions (34.17 +/- 2.05 cm-1) than that near the central blood vessel (19.9 +/- 3.8 cm-1). Statistically, there was significant difference in scattering between the control side and the ligated side on postoperative days 4, 7, and 14. This study shows a promising diagnostic value in the future for monitoring of demyelinated CNS (central nervous system) diseases, like Multiple Sclerosis.

  16. Assessment of Neuroprotective Effects of Local Administration of 17- Beta- Estradiol on Peripheral Nerve Regeneration in Ovariectomized Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nobakhti-Afshar, Ahmadreza; Najafpour, Alireza; Mohammadi, Rahim; Zarei, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the neuroprotective effects of local administration of 17- beta- estradiol on nerve regeneration. Methods: Sixty female Wistar rats were overiectomized and divided into four experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: In autograft group a segment of sciatic nerve was transected and re-implanted reversely. In sham-surgery group sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. In transected group left sciatic nerve was transected and stumps were fixed in adjacent muscle. In treatment group defect was bridged using a silicon conduit filled with 10 µL (0.1 mg/mL) 17- beta- estradiol. Each group was subdivided into four subgroups of five animals each and nerve fibers were studied in a 12-week period. Results: Behavioral, functional, biomechanical, electrophysiological and gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in treatment group than in other groups (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical reactions to S-100 in treatment group were more positive than that in other groups. Conclusion: Local administration of 17-beta-estradiol improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. It could have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection. PMID:27540548

  17. Patterns of Phrenic Nerve Discharge after Complete High Cervical Spinal Cord Injury in the Decerebrate Rat.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Michael George Zaki; Marchenko, Vitaliy

    2016-06-15

    Studies conducted since the second half of the 19th century have revealed spontaneous as well as pharmacologically induced phasic/rhythmic discharge in spinal respiratory motor outputs of cats, dogs, rabbits, and neonatal rats following high cervical transection (Tx). The extent to which these various studies validate the existence of a true spinal respiratory rhythm generator remains debated. In this set of studies, we seek to characterize patterns of spontaneous phasic/rhythmic, asphyxia-induced, and pharmacologically induced activity occurring in phrenic nerve (PhN) discharge after complete high cervical (C1-C2) spinal cord transection. Experiments were performed on 20 unanesthetized decerebrate Sprague-Dawley adult male rats. Patterns of spontaneous activity after spinalization included tonic, phasic, slow oscillatory, and long-lasting tonic discharges. Topical application of antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors to C1- and C2- spinal segments induced left-right synchronized phasic decrementing activity in PhN discharge that was abolished by an additional C2Tx. Asphyxia elicited increases in tonic activity and left-right synchronized gasp-like bursts in PhN discharge, demonstrating the presence of spinal circuits that may underlie a spinal gasping-like mechanism. We conclude that intrinsic slow oscillators and a phasic burst/rhythm generator exist in the spinal cord of the adult rat. If present in humans, this mechanism may be exploited to recover respiratory function in patients sustaining severe spinal cord injury. PMID:26239508

  18. Effects of gustatory nerve transection and/or ovariectomy on oral capsaicin avoidance in rats.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Yves; Simons, Christopher T; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Carstens, E

    2014-04-01

    The incidence of chronic oral pain such as burning mouth syndrome is greater in peri-menopausal females, and was postulated to be associated with gustatory nerve damage. We investigated whether bilateral transection of the chorda tympani, with or without accompanying ovariectomy, affected oral capsaicin avoidance in rats. Female rats had restricted access to 2 bottles, 1 bottle containing capsaicin (concentration range: 0.33-33 μM/L) and the other vehicle. Percent volume of capsaicin consumption and lick counts were measured. The concentration series was tested before and 0.5, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the following surgical procedures: (a) bilateral transection of the chorda tympani (CTx); (b) ovariectomy (OVx); (3) CTx plus OVx; or (4) sham CT surgery. Before surgery there was a concentration-dependent decrease in licks and volume of capsaicin consumed, with a threshold between 0.1 and 0.3 ppm. The majority of drink licks occurred during the first 9 minutes of access. Over the 12-month test period, the CTx group did not exhibit reduced capsaicin consumption, and consumed significantly more capsaicin at 6 and 9 months postsurgery. Rats in the OVx group consistently consumed significantly less capsaicin and exhibited significantly higher counts of capsaicin-evoked Fos-like immunoreactivity in the dorsomedial trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) compared to all other treatment groups. That CTx, with or without OVx, did not enhance capsaicin avoidance indicates that damage to the gustatory system does not disinhibit trigeminal nociceptive transmission.

  19. Effects of interleukin-1 beta injections into the subfornical organ and median preoptic nucleus on sodium appetite, blood pressure and body temperature of sodium-depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Diana R; Ferreira, Hilda S; Moiteiro, Andrei L B B; Fregoneze, Josmara B

    2016-09-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) appears to be the mediator of the reciprocal communication between the brain and the immune system. IL-1β has been shown to modulate homeostatic functions including fever, feeding, drinking and cardiovascular control. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of IL-1β injections directly into the subfornical organ (SFO) and the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) on salt appetite, hedonic response, locomotion, body temperature and blood pressure in sodium-depleted rats. IL-1β injections into the SFO and MnPO at the doses of 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6ng/0.2μl promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of salt intake in sodium-depleted rats. Results of the "dessert" test and the "open field" test suggested that the inhibition of salt appetite is not due to any changes in the hedonic aspect of ingestive behavior or to changes in locomotor activity. As expected, IL-1β injections into the SFO and MnPO promoted an increase in body temperature. However, the fever induced by IL-1β injected into the SFO was slower than the increase in body temperature obtained following IL-1β injection into the MnPO. Furthermore, IL-1β at a dose of 1.6ng/0.2μl directly injected into the MnPO led to a significant increase in blood pressure, while injection of the same concentration of IL-1β into the SFO caused no significant change in blood pressure or heart rate. The action of pro-inflammatory cytokines may interfere with the normal control of body temperature, blood pressure and fluid homeostasis, producing the adjustment required to cope with infection and inflammation. Further studies are required to clarify the mechanisms involved in fever, blood pressure increase and inhibition of sodium appetite induced by injections of IL-1β into the SFO and MnPO in sodium-depleted rats.

  20. Calpain 3 Expression Pattern during Gastrocnemius Muscle Atrophy and Regeneration Following Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ronghua; Yan, Yingying; Yao, Jian; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Jianmei; Liu, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Calpain 3 (CAPN3), also known as p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific member of the calpain family that is involved in muscular dystrophy; however, the roles of CAPN3 in muscular atrophy and regeneration are yet to be understood. In the present study, we attempted to explain the effect of CAPN3 in muscle atrophy by evaluating CAPN3 expression in rat gastrocnemius muscle following reversible sciatic nerve injury. After nerve injury, the wet weight ratio and cross sectional area (CSA) of gastrocnemius muscle were decreased gradually from 1–14 days and then recovery from 14–28 days. The active form of CAPN3 (~62 kDa) protein decreased slightly on day 3 and then increased from day 7 to 14 before a decrease from day 14 to 28. The result of linear correlation analysis showed that expression of the active CAPN3 protein level was negatively correlated with muscle wet weight ratio. CAPN3 knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA) injection improved muscle recovery on days 7 and 14 after injury as compared to that observed with control siRNA treatment. Depletion of CAPN3 gene expression could promote myoblast differentiation in L6 cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that the expression pattern of the active CAPN3 protein is linked to muscle atrophy and regeneration following denervation: its upregulation during early stages may promote satellite cell renewal by inhibiting differentiation, whereas in later stages, CAPN3 expression may be downregulated to stimulate myogenic differentiation and enhance recovery. These results provide a novel mechanistic insight into the role of CAPN3 protein in muscle regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26569227

  1. The Impact of Different Degrees of Injured C7 Nerve Transfer: An Experimental Rat Study

    PubMed Central

    Tzou, Chieh-Han John; Chang, Tommy Nai-Jen; Lu, Johnny Chuieng-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ipsilateral C7 nerve transfer is an available procedure in C5C6 2-root avulsion injury of the brachial plexus. However, concomitant injury of a normal-looking C7 cannot be ruled out. The efficiency of a concomitant injury of C7 transfer was investigated. Methods: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups. They all underwent a 2-stage procedure. In the first stage from dorsal spine approach, left C5 and C6 roots were avulsed and C7 was crushed with jeweler’s forceps with different degrees: group A (n = 6), C7 not injured; group B (n = 10), C7 crushed for 10 seconds; group C (n = 10), C7 crushed for 30 seconds; group D (n = 10), C7 doubly crushed for 60 seconds; and group E (n = 6), C7 transected and not repaired. Four weeks later in the second stage, the C7 was reexplored via volar approach, transected, and coapted to the musculocutaneous nerve. At 12 weeks following the nerve transfer, functional outcomes were assessed. Results: Grooming test, muscle weight, electromyography, and muscle tetanic contraction force all showed that the biceps muscles were significantly worse in group C (moderate crush) and group D (severe crush). Group B (mild crush) and group A (uninjured) showed no difference. Group E (C7 cut and not repaired) was the worst. Conclusions: An injured but grossly normal-looking ipsilateral C7 can be used as a motor source but with variable results. The result is directly proportional to the severity of injury, potentially implying that better results will be achieved when longer regeneration time is allowed. PMID:25426347

  2. Episodic phrenic-inhibitory vagus nerve stimulation paradoxically induces phrenic long-term facilitation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; McGuire, Michelle; White, David P; Ling, Liming

    2003-01-01

    All respiratory long-term facilitation (LTF) is induced by inspiratory-excitatory stimulation, suggesting that LTF needs inspiratory augmentation and is the result of a Hebbian mechanism (coincident pre- and post-synaptic activity strengthens synapses). The present study examined the long-term effects of episodic inspiratory-inhibitory vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) on phrenic nerve activity. We hypothesized that episodic VNS would induce phrenic long-term depression. The results are compared with those obtained following serotonin receptor antagonism or episodic carotid sinus nerve stimulation (CSNS). Integrated phrenic neurograms were measured before, during and after three episodes of 5 min VNS (50 Hz, 0.1 ms), each separated by a 5 min interval, at a low (˜50 μA), medium (˜200 μA) or high (˜500 μA) stimulus intensity in anaesthetized, vagotomized, neuromuscularly blocked and artificially ventilated rats. Medium- and high-intensity VNS eliminated rhythmic phrenic activity during VNS, while low-intensity VNS only reduced phrenic burst frequency. At 60 min post-VNS, phrenic amplitude was higher than baseline (35 ± 5 % above baseline, mean ± S.E.M., P < 0.05) in the high-intensity group but not in the low- (−4 ± 4 %) or medium-intensity groups (−10 ± 15 %), or in the high-intensity with methysergide group (4 mg kg−1, I.P.) (−11 ± 5 %). These data, which are inconsistent with our hypothesis, indicate that phrenic-inhibitory VNS induces a serotonin-dependent phrenic LTF similar to that induced by phrenic-excitatory CSNS (33 ± 7 %) and may require activation of high-threshold afferent fibres. These data also suggest that the synapses on phrenic motoneurons do not use the Hebbian mechanism in this LTF, as these motoneurons were suppressed during VNS. PMID:12872010

  3. Comparison of two electrophysiological methods for the assessment of progress in a rat model of nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong; Lu, Jiuzhou; Xu, Lei; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    There are 2 critical steps in neural regeneration: nerve fibres successfully crossing the suture and restoration of neuromuscular transmission. For the second step, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) is the standard electrophysiological technique used to assess regeneration, but it is difficult to detect changes in the CMAP during early regeneration after nerve repair. There is a need for better, noninvasive quantitative electrophysiological techniques to assess regeneration in an earlier stage after nerve repair. In this study, we utilized 2 measures, CMAP and single-fibre electromyography (SFEMG), in a rat model of nerve repair. The model was generated by separating the sciatic nerve of the rat hindlimb from the tibial nerve in Sprague-Dawley rats. CMAP and SFEMG were measured in each rat at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 weeks after the operation. The muscle weight was measured and both the general structure of the muscle and the changes in muscle atrophy were examined using haematoxylin and eosin staining protocols. The nerve electrophysiological data could be detected at 2 weeks after surgery initially and more data could be collected with passing time. During the period ranging from 2 to 4 weeks after surgery, parameters of SFEMG recordings changed significantly while the CMAP amplitude did not increase until 6 weeks after surgery. While the fibre density (FD) at 2 weeks after surgery was 0.27 ± 0.31, there was a significant increase at 3 weeks relative to 2 weeks (P < 0.01), and the FD increased further at 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The action potential mean consecutive difference (MCD) was significantly higher (60.50 ± 3.53 μs) in the second week relative to the third week (41.12 ± 5.08 μs) after the operation. The results indicated that SFEMG was more sensitive than CMAP amplitudes in detecting neuromuscular transmission after nerve repair. The findings of nerve electrophysiological experiments were consistent with the observed degree of muscle recovery. The

  4. Attenuation of negative pain affect produced by unilateral spinal nerve injury in the rat following anterior cingulate cortex activation.

    PubMed

    LaBuda, C J; Fuchs, P N

    2005-01-01

    The affective and the sensory dimensions of pain processing can be differentiated in humans through the use of questionnaires and verbal communication. It is difficult to dissociate these two components of pain processing in rodents, and an understanding of the underlying mechanisms for each component is unclear. The quantification of a novel behavioral response to a repeated noxious cutaneous stimulus together with a measurement of tactile allodynia in nerve-injured rats might be used to differentially explore the sensory and affective components of pain processing in the rat. The present study utilized electrical stimulation of the anterior cingulate cortex, a structure implicated in affective pain processing but not sensory processing, in nerve-injured rats (L5 spinal nerve ligation) and found that the aversive quality of noxious cutaneous hindpaw stimulation was attenuated. There were no effects on sensory processing, because anterior cingulate cortex stimulation did not produce an anti-allodynic effect in L5 spinal nerve ligation animals. Furthermore, anterior cingulate cortex stimulation in animals with bilateral ventrolateral periaqueductal gray area lesions did not affect tactile sensitivity in L5 spinal nerve ligation rats, indicating that an endogenous pain suppression system was not likely activated by anterior cingulate cortex stimulation. However, bilateral ventrolateral periaqueductal gray area lesions in L5 spinal nerve ligation rats blocked the effect produced by anterior cingulate cortex stimulation in the place escape/avoidance paradigm. Specifically, these animals avoided noxious stimulation of the allodynic paw significantly more than anterior cingulate cortex-stimulated, sham or incomplete ventrolateral periaqueductal gray area-lesioned, L5 spinal nerve ligation animals. These findings provide the first quantified report that the activation of the anterior cingulate cortex reduced the aversive quality of repeated noxious tactile stimulation in

  5. Auditory stimulation affects renal sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takuo; Tanida, Mamoru; Niijima, Akira; Hibino, Hiroshi; Shen, Jiao; Nagai, Katsuya

    2007-04-12

    Here, we examined the effects of auditory stimulation at 50 dB with white noise (WN) or music (Traeumerei [TM] by Schumann or Etude by Chopin) on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and BP in urethane-anesthetized rats. Auditory stimulation with TM, but not with WN or the Etude, significantly decreased RSNA and BP. Complete bilateral destruction of the cochleae and bilateral lesions of the auditory cortex (AuC) eliminated the effects of TM stimulation on RSNA and BP, but bilateral lesions of primary somatosensory cortex (S1C) had no effect. Bilateral lesions of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or intracerebral administration of thioperamide, a histaminergic H3 receptor antagonist, also abolished TM-induced decreases in RSNA and BP. These findings suggest that exposure to music can decrease RSNA and BP through the auditory pathway, histaminergic neurons, and the SCN.

  6. Thermal hyperalgesia after sciatic nerve block in rat is transient and clinically insignificant.

    PubMed

    Janda, Allison; Lydic, Ralph; Welch, Kathleen B; Brummett, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    Ropivacaine has been associated with transient heat hyperalgesia in sciatic nerve blocks in rat. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the hypothesized presence of transient heat hyperalgesia after perineural injection of ropivacaine with a secondary subanalysis of 2 published studies. Paw withdrawal latency was used to assess the duration of sensory blockade and presence of heat hyperalgesia at 210, 240, 270, and 300 minutes and 24 hours after injection. The analysis revealed hyperalgesia at a single time point (240 minutes after injection; mean difference, -0.60 seconds; P = 0.012) that resolved within 30 minutes, and there was no other significant hyperalgesia at other time points. Although statistically significant, the single time point measurement represented only an 11% change from baseline and was no longer present 30 minutes later. These data support the need for a reevaluation of the interpretation that pain can be worsened by perineural ropivacaine injection.

  7. Effects of nerve growth factor on X-irradiated reaggregation cultures of rat brain cells.

    PubMed

    Dimberg, Y; Aspberg, A; Tottmar, O

    1993-12-01

    The effects of exogenously added nerve growth factor (NGF) on reaggregation cultures of foetal rat brain cells after X-irradiation with 2 Gy were studied. Irradiation caused decreased protein and DNA levels, which was not prevented by NGF. The activities of the cholinergic marker enzymes choline acetyl transferase and acetylcholine esterase were increased in irradiated cultures. However, no difference in the activities of these enzymes was found between irradiated and unirradiated NGF-treated cultures. Irradiation did not affect the activity of the marker enzyme for oligodendrocytes (2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase), but caused an increase in the astrocyte marker (glutamine synthetase) activity. This effect on astrocytes was prevented by NGF. PMID:7903341

  8. PLURIVESICULAR SECRETORY PROCESSES AND NERVE ENDINGS IN THE PINEAL GLAND OF THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Eduardo; de Iraldi, Amanda Pellegrino

    1961-01-01

    The pineal body of white normal rats, 1.5 to 3 months old, was studied under the electron microscope. A single type of parenchymal cell—the pinealocyte—is recognized as the main component of the tissue, and some of the structural characteristics of the nucleus and cytoplasm are described. The main morphological characteristic of the pinealocytes is represented by club-shaped perivascular expansions connected to the cell by thin pedicles. They are found lying in a large, clear space surrounding the blood capillaries. The name plurivesicular secretory processes is proposed, to emphasize the main structural feature and the probable function of these cellular expansions. A tubulofibrillar component is mainly found in the pedicle, and within the expansion there are numerous small mitochondria and densily packed vesicles of about 425 A. Two types of vesicles, one with a homogeneous content and another with a very dense osmium deposit, are described. Between the two types there are intermediary forms. In these processes, mitochondria show profound changes which may lead to complete vacuolization. The significance of this plurivesicular secretory component is discussed in the light of recent work on the biogenic amines of the pineal body and preliminary experiments showing the release of the vesicles containing dense granules after treatment with reserpine. These vesicles are interpreted as the site of storage of some of the biogenic amines. Bundles of unmyelinated nerve fibers and endings on large blood vessels which also contain a plurivesicular content are described and tentatively interpreted as adrenergic nerve terminals. PMID:13720811

  9. Diffusion of Nerve Growth Factor in Rat Striatum as Determined by Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stroh, Mark; Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Webb, Watt W.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2003-01-01

    Neurotrophins such as nerve growth factor (NGF) may be useful for treating diseases in the central nervous system; our ability to harness the potential therapeutic benefit of NGF is directly related to our understanding of the fate of exogenously supplied factors in brain tissue. We utilized multiphoton microscopy to quantify the dynamic behavior of NGF in coronal, 400-μm thick, fresh rat brain tissue slices. We administered a solution containing bioactive rhodamine nerve growth factor conjugate via pressure injection and monitored the dispersion in the striatal region of the coronal slices. Multiphoton microscopy facilitated repeated imaging deep (∼200 μm) into tissue slices with minimal photodamage of tissue and photobleaching of label. The pressure injection paradigm approximated diffusion from a point source, and we therefore used the corresponding solution to the diffusion equation to estimate an apparent diffusion coefficient in brain tissue (Db(34°C)) of 2.75 ± 0.24 × 10−7 cm2/s (average ± SE). In contrast, we determined a corresponding free diffusion coefficient in buffered solution (Df(34°C)) of 12.6 ± 0.9 × 10−7 cm2/s using multiphoton fluorescence photobleaching recovery. The tortuosity, defined as the square root of the ratio of Df to Db, was 2.14 and moderate in magnitude. PMID:12829512

  10. Intraneural dexamethasone applied simultaneously to rat sciatic nerve constriction delays the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Leandro F S; Medeiros, Daniel C; Vieira, Rafael P; Watkins, Linda R; Coelho, Márcio M; Moraes, Márcio F D

    2012-02-21

    Although neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain sensitization in models of neuropathic pain have been widely studied, there are some aspects that require further investigation. Thus, we aimed to evaluate whether the local intraneural or perineural injections of dexamethasone, an efficacious anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drug, delays the development of both thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in an experimental model of neuropathic pain in rats. Hargreaves and electronic von Frey tests were applied. The chronic constriction injury (CCI) of right sciatic nerve was performed. Single intraneural dexamethasone administration at the moment of constriction delayed the development of sensitization for thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. However, perineural administration of dexamethasone, at the highest dose, did not delay experimental pain development. These results show that inflammation/immune response at the site of nerve lesion is an essential trigger for the pathological changes that lead to both hyperalgesia and allodynia. In conclusion, this approach opens new opportunities to study cellular and molecular neuroimmune interactions associated with the development of pain derived from peripheral neuropathies. PMID:22240103

  11. Enriched Environment Protects the Optic Nerve from Early Diabetes-Induced Damage in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Damián; Aranda, Marcos L.; Rosenstein, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of reduced visual acuity and acquired blindness. Axoglial alterations of the distal (close to the chiasm) optic nerve (ON) could be the first structural change of the visual pathway in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats. We analyzed the effect of environmental enrichment on axoglial alterations of the ON provoked by experimental diabetes. For this purpose, three days after vehicle or STZ injection, animals were housed in enriched environment (EE) or remained in a standard environment (SE) for 6 weeks. Anterograde transport, retinal morphology, optic nerve axons (toluidine blue staining and phosphorylated neurofilament heavy immunoreactivity), microglia/macrophages (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1) immunoreactivity), astrocyte reactivity (glial fibrillary acid protein-immunostaining), myelin (myelin basic protein immunoreactivity), ultrastructure, and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were assessed in non-diabetic and diabetic animals housed in SE or EE. No differences in retinal morphology or retinal ganglion cell number were observed among groups. EE housing which did not affect the STZ-induced weight loss and hyperglycemia, prevented a decrease in the anterograde transport from the retina to the superior colliculus, ON axon number, and phosphorylated neurofilament heavy immunoreactivity. Moreover, EE housing prevented an increase in Iba-1 immunoreactivity, and astrocyte reactivity, as well as ultrastructural myelin alterations in the ON distal portion at early stages of diabetes. In addition, EE housing avoided a decrease in BDNF levels induced by experimental diabetes. These results suggest that EE induced neuroprotection in the diabetic visual pathway. PMID:26312758

  12. Hyposensitivity to nerve stimulation in portal hypertensive rats: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Sieber, C C; Sumanovski, L T; Moll-Kaufmann, C; Stalder, G A

    1997-11-01

    Portal hypertension goes along with vascular hyporeactivity, partly mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Interactions between the adrenergic nervous system and NO in portal hypertension are undetermined. We tested (1) whether superior mesenteric arterial beds of portal hypertensive rats have an altered sensitivity to periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) and (2) the role of NO in modulating nerve-stimulated responses. Vasopressor responses to PNS (Hz, 2-32) were similar in preparations of partial portal vein-ligated (PVL, n = 12) and control (CON, n = 12) rats (60.0 +/- 6.7 and 47.8 +/- 6.1 CmH2O respectively) for 24 Hz (NS), but sensitivity of vessels of portal hypertensive animals displayed a significant rightward shift [Hz needed for 50% of maximal response (HZ50) being 15.5 +/- 0.4 and 12.9 +/- 0.6 for PVL and CON respectively, P < 0.001]. NO formation inhibition by N omega-nitro-L-arginine (10(-4) mol L-1) significantly increased responses to PNS (P < 0.05), the absolute values for 24 Hz being 101.4 +/- 11.7 cmH2O for PVL (n = 8) and 86.4 +/- 11.4 cmH2O for CON (n = 7) (NS). NO formation inhibition reversed the hyposensitivity in preparations of PVL, Hz50 being 13.9 +/- 0.5 and 13.2 +/- 0.2 for PVL and CON respectively (NS). Adrenergic receptor antagonism with prazosin (10(-7) mol L-1) and yohimbine (10(-6) mol L-1) inhibited PNS-mediated vasopressor reactivity (n = 6 per group, P < 0.001), confirming the nervous origin of vasoconstrictor responses. It is concluded that (1) portal hypertension goes along with a significant hyposensitivity to PNS and (2) this hyposensitivity is reversed by NO-formation inhibition PMID:9395785

  13. Hyposensitivity to nerve stimulation in portal hypertensive rats: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Sieber, C C; Sumanovski, L T; Moll-Kaufmann, C; Stalder, G A

    1997-11-01

    Portal hypertension goes along with vascular hyporeactivity, partly mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Interactions between the adrenergic nervous system and NO in portal hypertension are undetermined. We tested (1) whether superior mesenteric arterial beds of portal hypertensive rats have an altered sensitivity to periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) and (2) the role of NO in modulating nerve-stimulated responses. Vasopressor responses to PNS (Hz, 2-32) were similar in preparations of partial portal vein-ligated (PVL, n = 12) and control (CON, n = 12) rats (60.0 +/- 6.7 and 47.8 +/- 6.1 CmH2O respectively) for 24 Hz (NS), but sensitivity of vessels of portal hypertensive animals displayed a significant rightward shift [Hz needed for 50% of maximal response (HZ50) being 15.5 +/- 0.4 and 12.9 +/- 0.6 for PVL and CON respectively, P < 0.001]. NO formation inhibition by N omega-nitro-L-arginine (10(-4) mol L-1) significantly increased responses to PNS (P < 0.05), the absolute values for 24 Hz being 101.4 +/- 11.7 cmH2O for PVL (n = 8) and 86.4 +/- 11.4 cmH2O for CON (n = 7) (NS). NO formation inhibition reversed the hyposensitivity in preparations of PVL, Hz50 being 13.9 +/- 0.5 and 13.2 +/- 0.2 for PVL and CON respectively (NS). Adrenergic receptor antagonism with prazosin (10(-7) mol L-1) and yohimbine (10(-6) mol L-1) inhibited PNS-mediated vasopressor reactivity (n = 6 per group, P < 0.001), confirming the nervous origin of vasoconstrictor responses. It is concluded that (1) portal hypertension goes along with a significant hyposensitivity to PNS and (2) this hyposensitivity is reversed by NO-formation inhibition

  14. Enduring attentional deficits in rats treated with a peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Silenieks, Leo B; Van Niekerk, Annalise; Desnoyer, Jill; Patrick, Amy; Lau, Winnie; Thevarkunnel, Sandy

    2015-06-01

    The present study investigated the impact of a spared nerve injury (SNI) on the daily performance of rats tested in two instrumental conditioning procedures: the progressive ratio (PR) schedule of food reinforcement to study motivation for an appetitive stimulus, and the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), a test of attention and reaction time. Separate groups of male, Sprague-Dawley rats of age 8-10 months were trained to asymptotic performance in either task, before undergoing either SNI or sham surgery. After a recovery period of 3-4 days the animals were run 5 days/week for 3 months in either task. Tests of responsivity to evoked tactile (Von Frey) and thermal (acetone) stimuli were also conducted over this period to check integrity of the model. Post SNI surgery, rats showed equivalent responding to sham controls for food available under a PR schedule throughout the test period, implying a similar level of motivation for a food reward. In contrast, a performance deficit emerged in SNI treated rats run in the 5-CSRTT, consistent with an attentional deficit. This deficit emerged during the second month post-surgery and was characterized by slower response speed, reduced accuracy and increased trial omissions. Both SNI groups showed equivalent hypersensitivity to evoked sensory stimuli compared to controls. Since attention based deficits have been reported in individuals with clinical forms of neuropathic pain, the present studies suggest a novel approach to study this phenomena and a means to study the effect of treatments against this cognitive endpoint. PMID:25746510

  15. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG—no injury), exercise group (EG—no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG—injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG—injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons.

  16. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG-no injury), exercise group (EG-no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG-injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG-injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  17. Gene profiling in the dynamic regulation of the lifespan of the myelin sheath structure in the optic nerve of rats.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Fu, Han; Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Chen, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Aging of the nervous system leads to impairments in cognition and motor skills, and is a major risk factor for several neurological disorders. Recently, numerous nerve function deficits that appear with aging have been found to be a consequence of myelin abnormalities; however, the genetic mechanism of the age‑related alterations in the myelin sheath has not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, the morphology of the myelin sheath in the optic nerve of rats was analyzed at 10 time‑points throughout life. Marked alterations in the myelin sheath were observed in aging and aged optic nerves, and these became progressively more severe with time. To determine the biological processes affected by aging in the myelin sheath, the age‑related profiling of the myelin sheath in rat optic nerves was established using microarray hybridization at 10 time‑points throughout life, between birth and senescence. From the results, 3,826 transcripts associated with the age‑related alterations in the myelin sheath of the optic nerve were identified. It was found that the biological processes most significantly altered by aging were lipid metabolism, the immune response and transmitter transport. This suggests that the downregulation of lipid synthesis genes and the upregulation of immune and neurotransmitter transport genes in aging may be the genetic basis for the age‑related alterations observed in the myelin sheath.

  18. Nociceptive and Neuronal Evaluation of the Sciatic Nerve of Wistar Rats Subjected to Compression Injury and Treated with Resistive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Juliana Sobral; Lovison, Keli; Karvat, Jhenifer; Peretti, Ana Luiza; Vieira, Lizyana; Higuchi, Guilherme Hideaki; Ribeiro, Lucinéia de Fátima Chasko

    2016-01-01

    Background. To investigate the climb stairs resistance exercise on nociception and axonal regeneration in the sciatic nerve of rats. Methods. 24 Wistar rats were divided: control group (CG—no injury), exercise group (EG—no injury with physical exercise), lesion group (LG—injury, but without exercise), and treated group (LEG—injury and physical exercise). LG and LEG were subjected to sciatic nerve compression with hemostat. From the 3rd day after injury began treatment with exercise, and after 22 days occurs the removal of a nerve fragment for morphological analysis. Results. Regarding allodynia, CG obtained values less than EG (p = 0.012) and larger than LG and LEG (p < 0.001). Histological results showed that CG and EG had normal appearance, as LG and LEG showed up with large amounts of inflammatory infiltration, degeneration and disruption of nerve fibers, and reduction of the myelin sheath; however LEG presented some regenerated fibers. From the morphometric data there were significant differences, for nerve fiber diameter, comparing CG with LG and LEG and comparing axon diameter and the thickness of the myelin of the CG to others. Conclusion. Climb stairs resistance exercise was not effective to speed up the regenerative process of axons. PMID:27594795

  19. Effect of vitamin B12 on functional recovery and histopathologic changes of tibial nerve-crushed rats.

    PubMed

    Tamaddonfard, E; Farshid, A A; Samadi, F; Eghdami, K

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested a neuroprotective effect for vitamin B12. The present study investigated the effects of vitamin B12, diclofenac and celecoxib in separate and combined treatments on functional recovery of crushed tibial nerve in rats. In ketamine plus xylazin anesthetized rats, right tibial nerve was crushed using a small hemoatatic forceps. Footprints were recorded 1 day before and on days 7, 14 and 21 after induction of nerve injury. Tibial functional index (TFI) was used to evaluate the recovery of tibial nerve function. Histological changes of tibial nerve were investigated by light microscopy. The recovery of TFI values were significantly accelerated with 10 consecutive days treatments with 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg of vitamin B12, 5 mg/kg of diclofenac and 1 and 5 mg/kg of celecoxib. The severity of Wallerian degeneration was reduced by above-mentioned doses of vitamin B12, diclofenac and celecoxib. Documented effects were observed when 0.1 mg/kg of vitamin B12 was concurrently used with 1 mg/kg of diclofenac and or 0.2 mg/kg of celecoxib. In the present study, vitamin B12, celecoxib and diclofenac (at a high dose) showed neuroprotective effects. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 and 2 pathways may be involved in neuroprotective effect of vitamin B12.

  20. Reorganization of laryngeal motoneurons after crush injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J; Berdugo, Gabriel; Arias, Gonzalo; McHanwell, Stephen; Sañudo, José; Vázquez, Teresa; Pascual-Font, Arán

    2013-01-01

    Motoneurons innervating laryngeal muscles are located in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb), but there is no general agreement on the somatotopic representation and even less is known on how an injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) affects this pattern. This study analyzes the normal somatotopy of those motoneurons and describes its changes over time after a crush injury to the RLN. In the control group (control group 1, n = 9 rats), the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) and thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles were injected with cholera toxin-B. In the experimental groups the left RLN of each animal was crushed with a fine tip forceps and, after several survival periods (1, 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks; minimum six rats per time), the PCA and TA muscles were injected as described above. After each surgery, the motility of the vocal folds was evaluated. Additional control experiments were performed; the second control experiment (control group 2, n = 6 rats) was performed labeling the TA and PCA immediately prior to the section of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), in order to eliminate the possibility of accidental labeling of the cricothyroid (CT) muscle by spread from the injection site. The third control group (control group 3, n = 5 rats) was included to determine if there is some sprouting from the SLN into the territories of the RLN after a crush of this last nerve. One week after the crush injury of the RLN, the PCA and TA muscles were injected immediately before the section of the SLN. The results show that a single population of neurons represents each muscle with the PCA in the most rostral position followed caudalwards by the TA. One week post-RLN injury, both the somatotopy and the number of labeled motoneurons changed, where the labeled neurons were distributed randomly; in addition, an area of topographical overlap of the two populations was observed and vocal fold mobility was lost. In the rest of the survival periods, the overlapping area is larger, but the movement of

  1. Reorganization of laryngeal motoneurons after crush injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve of the rat.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Morato, Ignacio; Valderrama-Canales, Francisco J; Berdugo, Gabriel; Arias, Gonzalo; McHanwell, Stephen; Sañudo, José; Vázquez, Teresa; Pascual-Font, Arán

    2013-04-01

    Motoneurons innervating laryngeal muscles are located in the nucleus ambiguus (Amb), but there is no general agreement on the somatotopic representation and even less is known on how an injury in the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) affects this pattern. This study analyzes the normal somatotopy of those motoneurons and describes its changes over time after a crush injury to the RLN. In the control group (control group 1, n = 9 rats), the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) and thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles were injected with cholera toxin-B. In the experimental groups the left RLN of each animal was crushed with a fine tip forceps and, after several survival periods (1, 2, 4, 8, 12 weeks; minimum six rats per time), the PCA and TA muscles were injected as described above. After each surgery, the motility of the vocal folds was evaluated. Additional control experiments were performed; the second control experiment (control group 2, n = 6 rats) was performed labeling the TA and PCA immediately prior to the section of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN), in order to eliminate the possibility of accidental labeling of the cricothyroid (CT) muscle by spread from the injection site. The third control group (control group 3, n = 5 rats) was included to determine if there is some sprouting from the SLN into the territories of the RLN after a crush of this last nerve. One week after the crush injury of the RLN, the PCA and TA muscles were injected immediately before the section of the SLN. The results show that a single population of neurons represents each muscle with the PCA in the most rostral position followed caudalwards by the TA. One week post-RLN injury, both the somatotopy and the number of labeled motoneurons changed, where the labeled neurons were distributed randomly; in addition, an area of topographical overlap of the two populations was observed and vocal fold mobility was lost. In the rest of the survival periods, the overlapping area is larger, but

  2. Effects of intracavernous injection of adipose-derived stem cells on cavernous nerve regeneration in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chengcheng; Yang, Mei; Zheng, Xinmin; Hu, Wanli; Wang, Xinghuan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of intracavernous injection of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on cavernous nerve (CN) regeneration and functional status in a nerve-crush rat model. Thirty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into three equal groups: one group underwent sham operation, while two groups underwent bilateral CN crush. Crush-injury group was treated at the time of injury with intracavernous injection of ADSCs, or injured control group with no further intervention. Erectile function was assessed by CN electrostimulation after 3 months. Penile tissue and crushed nerves were collected for histology. Three months after surgery, in the group that underwent bilateral nerve crushing with no further intervention, the functional evaluation showed a lower mean maximal intracavernous pressure (ICP) and maximal ICP per mean arterial pressure (MAP) with CN stimulation than those in the sham group. In the group with an immediate intracavernous injection of ADSCs, the mean maximal ICP and maximal ICP/MAP were significantly higher than those in the injured control group. Histologically, the group with the intracavernous injection of ADSCs had more myelinated axons of CNs and more NADPH-diaphorase-positive nerve fibers than the injured control group but fewer than the sham group. Intracavernous injection of ADSCs treatment had beneficial effects on the smooth muscle/collagen ratio in the corpus cavernosum. These results show that the intracavernous injection of ADSCs to the site of CN-crush injury facilitates nerve regeneration and recovery of erectile function. Our research indicates that penile injection of ADSCs can improve recovery of erectile function in a rat model of neurogenic ED.

  3. Dynamic expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-ning; Liu, Zun-wei; Sui, Long; Zhang, Bin-fei; Zhao, Yong-lin; Ma, Xu-dong; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later. Compared with those for the rats in the sham and saline groups, neurobehavioral scores decreased significantly 12 hours and 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA is dynamically changed in the rat brain and may thus participate in neuronal survival and nerve regeneration after subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27651776

  4. Dynamic expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin-Ning; Liu, Zun-Wei; Sui, Long; Zhang, Bin-Fei; Zhao, Yong-Lin; Ma, Xu-Dong; Gu, Hua

    2016-08-01

    Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later. Compared with those for the rats in the sham and saline groups, neurobehavioral scores decreased significantly 12 hours and 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA is dynamically changed in the rat brain and may thus participate in neuronal survival and nerve regeneration after subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:27651776

  5. Dynamic expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-ning; Liu, Zun-wei; Sui, Long; Zhang, Bin-fei; Zhao, Yong-lin; Ma, Xu-dong; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ischemic neurologic deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage results from loss of neural cells. Nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA may promote regeneration of neural cells, but their expression after subarachnoid hemorrhage remains unclear. In the present study, a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage was established using two injections of autologous blood into the cistern magna. Immunohisto-chemical staining suggested that the expression of nerve growth factor and TrkA in the cerebral cortex and brainstem increased at 6 hours, peaked at 12 hours and decreased 1 day after induction of subarachnoid hemorrhage, whereas the expression in the hippocampus increased at 6 hours, peaked on day 1, and decreased 3 days later. Compared with those for the rats in the sham and saline groups, neurobehavioral scores decreased significantly 12 hours and 3 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the expression of nerve growth factor and its receptor TrkA is dynamically changed in the rat brain and may thus participate in neuronal survival and nerve regeneration after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  6. Inhibition of the NMDA receptor protects the rat sciatic nerve against ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    KE, TIE; LI, RENBIN; CHEN, WENCHANG

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by MK-801 reduces ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in the central nervous system. However, few previous studies have evaluated the neuroprotective effects of MK-801 against peripheral I/R injury. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of MK-801 pretreatment against I/R injury in the rat sciatic nerve (SN). Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a sham surgery (n=8) or to a 5-h ischemic insult by femoral artery clamping (I/R and I/R+MK-801 groups; n=48 per group). I/R+MK-801 rats were intraperitoneally injected with MK-801 (0.5 ml or 1 mg/kg) at 15 min prior to reperfusion. The rats were sacrificed at 0, 6, 12, 24, 72 h, or 7 days following reperfusion. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, and SN inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein expression levels, were measured using colorimetry. In addition, the protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured using immunohistochemistry, and histological analyses of the rat SN were conducted using light and electron microscopy. Alterations in the mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) in the rat SN were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the I/R group, plasma concentrations of NO (175.3±4.2 µmol/l) and MDA (16.2±1.9 mmol/l), and the levels of iNOS (2.5±0.3) in the SN, peaked at 24 h post-reperfusion. At 24 h, pretreatment with MK-801 significantly reduced plasma NO (107.3±3.6 µmol/l) and MDA (11.8±1.6 mmol/l), and SN iNOS (1.65±0.2) levels (all P<0.01). The mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and TACE in the SN were significantly reduced in the I/R+MK-801 group, as compared with the I/R group (P<0.05). Furthermore, MK-801 pretreatment was shown to have alleviated histological signs of I/R injury, including immune cell infiltration and axon demyelination. The results of the present study suggested that pretreatment

  7. Electrical stimulation vs. pulsed and continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-07-01

    Identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CNs) during prostate cancer surgery is critical for post-operative sexual function. Electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) mapping has previously been tested as an intraoperative tool for CN identification, but was found to be unreliable. ENS is limited by the need for electrode-tissue contact, poor spatial precision from electrical current spreading, and stimulation artifacts interfering with detection. Alternatively, optical nerve stimulation (ONS) provides noncontact stimulation, improved spatial selectivity, and elimination of stimulation artifacts. This study compares ENS to pulsed/CW ONS to explore the ONS mechanism. A total of eighty stimulations were performed in 5 rats, in vivo. ENS (4 V, 5 ms, 10 Hz) was compared to ONS using a pulsed diode laser nerve stimulator (1873 nm, 5 ms, 10 Hz) or CW diode laser nerve stimulator (1455 nm). Intracavernous pressure (ICP) response and nerve compound action potentials (nCAPs) were measured. All three stimulation modes (ENS, ONS-CW, ONS-P) produced comparable ICP magnitudes. However, ENS demonstrated more rapid ICP response times and well defined nCAPs compared to unmeasurable nCAPs for ONS. Further experiments measuring single action potentials during ENS and ONS are warranted to further understand differences in the ENS and ONS mechanisms.

  8. Effect of an Adipose-Derived Stem Cell and Nerve Growth Factor-Incorporated Hydrogel on Recovery of Erectile Function in a Rat Model of Cavernous Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Gul; Piao, Shuyu; Lee, Ji Young; Hong, Sung Hoo; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Sae Woong; Kim, Choung Soo; Ra, Jeong Chan; Noh, Insup

    2013-01-01

    Postprostatectomy erectile dysfunction (ED) is the major problem for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Recently, gene and stem cell-based therapy of the corpus cavernosum has been attempted for postprostatectomy ED, but those therapies are limited by rapid blood flow and disruption of the normal architecture of the corpus cavernosum. In this study, we attempted to regenerate the damaged cavernous nerve (CN), which is the main cause of ED. We investigated the effectiveness of human adipose-derived stem cell (hADSC) and nerve growth factor-incorporated hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel (NGF-hydrogel) application on the CN in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury. Four weeks after the operation, erectile function was assessed by detecting the intracavernous pressure (ICP)/arterial pressure level by CN electrostimulation. The ICP was significantly increased by application of hADSC with NGF-hydrogel compared to the other experimental groups. CN and penile tissue were collected for histological examination. PKH-26 labeled hADSC colocalized with beta III tubulin were shown in CN tissue sections. hADSC/NGF-hydrogel treatment prevented smooth muscle atrophy in the corpus cavernosum. In addition, the hADSC/NGF-hydrogel group showed increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression. This study suggests that application of hADSCs with NGF-hydrogel on the CN might be a promising treatment for postprostatectomy ED. PMID:22834730

  9. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals compensatory effects in the piriform cortex of VX nerve agent exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Wright, James D; Manda, Srikanth S; Zhong, Jun; Na, Chan Hyun; Meyerhoff, James; Benton, Bernard; Jabbour, Rabih; Willis, Kristen; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sekowski, Jennifer W

    2015-01-01

    To gain insights into the toxicity induced by the nerve agent VX, an MS-based phosphoproteomic analysis was carried out on the piriform cortex region of brains from VX-treated rats. Using isobaric tag based TMT labeling followed by titanium dioxide enrichment strategy, we identified 9975 unique phosphosites derived from 3287 phosphoproteins. Temporal changes in the phosphorylation status of peptides were observed over a time period of 24 h in rats exposed to a 1× LD50, intravenous (i.v.) dose with the most notable changes occurring at the 1 h postexposure time point. Five major functional classes of proteins exhibited changes in their phosphorylation status: (i) ion channels/transporters, including ATPases, (ii) kinases/phosphatases, (iii) GTPases, (iv) structural proteins, and (v) transcriptional regulatory proteins. This study is the first quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of VX toxicity in the brain. Understanding the toxicity and compensatory signaling mechanisms will improve the understanding of the complex toxicity of VX in the brain and aid in the elucidation of novel molecular targets that would be important for development of improved countermeasures. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001184 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001184).

  10. Greater Superficial Petrosal Nerve Transection in Rats does not Change Unconditioned Licking Responses to Putatively Sweet Taste Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Enshe; Blonde, Ginger; Garcea, Mircea

    2008-01-01

    The greater superficial petrosal nerve (GSP), innervating taste buds in the palate, is known to be exceptionally responsive to sucrose, especially compared with the responsiveness of the chorda tympani nerve (CT). However, whereas transection of the CT (CTX) alone has little or no effect on unconditioned licking responses to many “sweet” stimuli, the impact of GSP transection (GSPX) alone is equivocal. To further examine the role of the GSP on licking responses to putatively sweet-tasting substances, brief-access taste tests were conducted in nondeprived rats before and after sham surgery (SHAM) or CTX or GSPX. A range of concentrations of sucrose, L-alanine, glycine, and L-serine, with and without 1.0 mM inosine monophosphate (IMP) added, were used. All groups showed significant concentration-dependent increases in licking to all stimuli presurgically and postsurgically. CTX decreased licking responses relative to SHAM rats in the first sucrose test. There was also a group × concentration interaction for L-alanine, but post hoc tests did not reveal its basis. Other than this, there were no significant differences among the surgical groups. Interestingly, rats with GSPX tended to initiate fewer trials than SHAM rats. Overall, after GSPX, the remaining gustatory nerves are apparently sufficient to maintain concentration-dependent licking responses to all stimuli tested here. The disparity between our results and others in the literature where GSPX reduced licking responses to sucrose is possibly related to differences in surgical technique or test trial duration. PMID:18635557

  11. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Tanida, Mamoru; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group): (1) non-sensitized, (2) anaphylaxis, (3) anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS) and (4) anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD) groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. PMID:26998924

  12. Changes of the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the diabetic rat's alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Erzsébet; Batbayar, Bayarchimeg; Vér, Agota; Zelles, Tivadar

    2006-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, where neuropeptides and immunocells might play important roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this article we have quantified the different neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat's alimentary tract (tongue, duodenum, colon) using immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical methods. The immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers were found in all layers of the alimentary tract and their distribution pattern was similar in both control and diabetic groups. Mast cell-nerve fiber contacts were rarely found in the controls. However, after 4 weeks duration of diabetes the number of IR nerve fibers and the immunocompetent cells increased significantly (P < 0.05), and the number of mast cell-nerve fiber contacts was even more significantly increased (P < 0.001). The distance between nerve fibers and immunocells was about 1 mum or even less. Some of the mast cells were degranulated in the vicinity of nerve fibers. No immunocompetent cells were IR for any antisera in the control. However, after the streptozotocin treatment, a large number of the immunocompetent cells showed immunoreactivity for SP and NPY. Counting all immunocompetent cells in whole sections showed that 12.3% of them were IR for SP and 25.4% were IR for NPY. Increased number of SP-containing nerve fibers and immunocells in diabetes mellitus might be the reason for painful neuropathy and might amplify the inflammatory reaction in an axon reflex manner; the released histamine and leukotrienes, cytokines, and chemokines might cause inflammations and lesions of the mucosa. PMID:17151308

  13. Netrin-1 overexpression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes functional recovery in a rat model of peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xianjin; Li, Qian; Xu, Li; Zhang, Ying; Li, Dongmei; Ma, Jianhua; Mao, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has been developed as a new method of treating diseases of the peripheral nervous system. While netrin-1 is a critical molecule for axonal path finding and nerve growth, it may also affect vascular network formation. Here, we investigated the effect of transplanting BMSCs that produce netrin-1 in a rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury. We introduced a sciatic nerve crush injury, and then injected 1×106 BMSCs infected by a recombinant adenovirus expressing netrin-1 Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP or culture medium into the injured part in the next day. At day 7, 14 and 28 after injection, we measured motor nerve conduction and detected mRNA expressions of netrin-1 receptors UNC5B and Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC), and neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) by real-time PCR. We also detected protein expressions of BDNF and NGF by Western blotting assays and examined BMSCs that incorporated into myelin and vascellum. The results showed that BMSCs infected by Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP significantly improved the function of the sciatic nerve, and led to increased expression of BDNF and NGF (P<0.05). Moreover, 28 days after injury, more Schwann cells were found in BMSCs infected by Ad5-Netrin-1-EGFP compared to control BMSCs. In conclusion, transplantation of BMSCs that produce netrin-1 improved the function of the sciatic nerve after injury. This method may be a new treatment of nerve injury. PMID:26445571

  14. The inner ear is involved in the aggravation of nociceptive behavior induced by lowering barometric pressure of nerve injured rats.

    PubMed

    Funakubo, Megumi; Sato, Jun; Honda, Takashi; Mizumura, Kazue

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering from neuropathic pain often complain of pain aggravation when the weather is changing. The exact mechanism for weather change-induced pain has not been clarified. We have previously demonstrated that experimentally lowering barometric pressure (LP) intensifies pain-related behaviors in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI). In the present experiment we examined whether this pain aggravating effect of LP exposure in nerve injured rats is still present after lesioning of the inner ear. We used both CCI and spinal nerve ligation (SNL) models for this study. We injected into the middle ear sodium arsanilate solution (100mg/ml, 50microl/ear), which is known to degenerate vestibular hair cells, under anesthesia the day before surgery. Rats were exposed to LP (27hPa decrease over 8min) 7-9 days after CCI or 5-8 days after SNL surgery, and pain-related behavior (number of paw lifts induced by von Frey hair stimuli) was measured. When the inner ear lesioned SNL or CCI rats were exposed to LP, they showed no augmentation of pain-related behavior. On the other hand, the pain aggravating effect of a temperature decrease (from 24 to 17 degrees C) was maintained in both SNL and CCI rats. These results suggest that the barometric sensor/sensing system influencing nociceptive behavior during LP in rats is located in the inner ear.

  15. Persistent effects after trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation by mandibular extension on rat blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Lapi, D; Colantuoni, A; Del Seppia, C; Ghione, S; Tonlorenzi, D; Brunelli, M; Scuri, R

    2013-03-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex is a brainstem reflex known to lead to a decrement in heart rate and blood pressure, whereas few data have been collected about its effects on the cerebral hemodynamic. In this study we assess the in vivo effects of trigeminal nerve peripheral stimulation by mandibular extension on pial microcirculation and systemic arterial blood pressure in rats. Experiments were performed in male Wistar rats subjected to mandibular extension obtained inserting an ad hoc developed retractor between the dental arches. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were recorded and the pial arterioles were visualized by fluorescence microscopy to measure the vessel diameters before (15 minutes) during (5-15 minutes) and after (80 minutes) mandibular extension. While in control rats (sham-operated rats) and in rats subjected to the dissection of the trigeminal peripheral branches mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation did not change during the whole observation period (110 minutes), in rats submitted to mandibular extension, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and arteriolar diameter significantly decreased during stimulation. Afterward mean arterial blood pressure remained reduced as well as heart rate, while arteriolar diameter significantly increased evidencing a vasodilatation persisting for the whole remaining observation time. Therefore, trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation appears to trigger specific mechanisms regulating systemic arterial blood pressure and pial microcirculation.

  16. Effect of Treating Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats With Sorbinil, Myo-Inositol or Aminoguanidine on Endoneurial Blood Flow, Motor Nerve Conduction Velocity and Vascular Function of Epineurial Arterioles of the Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Coppey, Lawrence J.; Gellett, Jill S.; Davidson, Eric P.; Dunlap, Joyce A.

    2002-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that diabetes causes impairment in vascular function of epineurial vessels, which precedes the slowing of motor nerve conduction velocity. Treatment of diabetic rats with aldose reductase inhibitors, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol supplementation have been shown to improve motor nerve conduction velocity and/or decreased endoneurial blood flow. However, the effect these treatments have on vascular reactivity of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve is unknown. In these studies we examined the effect of treating streptozotocininduced rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol on motor nerve conduction velocity, endoneurial blood flow and endothelium dependent vascular relaxation of arterioles that provide circulation to the region of the sciatic nerve. Treating diabetic rats with sorbinil, aminoguanidine or myo-inositol improved the reduction of endoneurial blood flow and motor nerve conduction velocity. However, only sorbinil treatment significantly improved the diabetes-induced impairment of acetylcholinemediated vasodilation of epineurial vessels of the sciatic nerve. All three treatments were efficacious in preventing the appropriate metabolic derangements associated with either activation of the polyol pathway or increased nonenzymatic glycation. In addition, sorbinil was shown to prevent the diabetes-induced decrease in lens glutathione level. However, other markers of oxidative stress were not vividly improved by these treatments. These studies suggest that sorbinil treatment may be more effective in preventing neural dysfunction in diabetes than either aminoguanidine or myoinositol. PMID:11900277

  17. Neuroimmunophilin Ligands Protect Cavernous Nerves after Crush Injury in the Rat: New Experimental Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Heather; Chen, Yi; Guo, Hongzhi; McCormick, Jocelyn; Wu, Yong; Sezen, Sena F.; Hoke, Ahmet; Burnett, Arthur L.; Steiner, Joseph P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the effects of the orally bioavailable non-immunosuppressive immunophilin ligand GPI 1046 (GPI) on erectile function and cavernous nerve (CN) histology following unilateral or bilateral crush injury (UCI, BCI, respectively) of the CNs. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered GPI 15 mg/kg intraperitoneally (ip) or 30 mg/kg orally (po), FK506 1 mg/kg, ip, or vehicle controls for each route of administration just prior to UCI or BCI and daily up to 7 d following injury. At day 1 or 7 of treatment, erectile function induced by CN electrical stimulation was measured, and electron microscopic analysis of the injured CN was performed. Results Intraperitoneal administration of GPI to rats with injured CN protected erectile function, in a fashion similar to the prototypic immunophilin ligand FK506, compared with vehicle-treated animals (93% ± 9% vs. 70% ± 5% vs. 45% ± 1%, p < 0.01, respectively). Oral administration of GPI elicited the same level of significant protection from CN injury. GPI administered PO at 30 mg/kg/d, dosing either once daily or four times daily with 7.5 mg/kg, provided nearly complete protection of erectile function. In a more severe BCI model, PO administration of GPI maintained erectile function at 24 h after CN injury. Ultrastructural analysis of injured CNs indicated that GPI administered at the time of CN injury prevents degeneration of about 83% of the unmyelinated axons at 7 d after CN injury. Conclusions The orally administered immunophilin ligand GPI neuroprotects CNs and maintains erectile function in rats under various conditions of CN crush injury. PMID:17145129

  18. Electroacupuncture improves glucose tolerance through cholinergic nerve and nitric oxide synthase effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rong-Tsung; Chen, Ching-Yuan; Tzeng, Chung-Yuh; Lee, Yu-Chen; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Chen, Ying-I; Ho, Wai-Jane; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chang, Shih-Liang

    2011-04-25

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the effect and mechanisms of electroacupuncture (EA) at the bilateral Zusanli acupoints (ST-36) on glucose tolerance in normal rats. Intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed to examine the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on glucose tolerance in rats. The EA group underwent EA at the ST-36, with settings of 15 Hz, 10 mA, and 60 min; the control group underwent the same treatments, but without EA. Atropine, hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were injected into the rats alone or simultaneously and EA was performed to investigate differences in plasma glucose levels compared to the control group. Plasma samples were obtained for assaying plasma glucose and free fatty acid (FFA) levels. Western blot was done to determine the insulin signal protein and nNOS to exam the correlation between EA and improvement in glucose tolerance. The EA group had significantly lower plasma glucose levels compared to the control group. Plasma glucose levels differed significantly between the EA and control groups after the administration of L-NAME, atropine, or HC-3 treatments alone, but there were no significant differences in plasma glucose with combined treatment of L-NAME and atropine or L-NAME and HC-3. EA decreased FFA levels and enhanced insulin signal protein (IRS1) and nNOS activities in skeletal muscle during IVGTT. In summary, EA stimulated cholinergic nerves and nitric oxide synthase for lowering plasma FFA levels to improve glucose tolerance. PMID:21376780

  19. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Ibrahim M.; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = −0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways. PMID:26300784

  20. Sensory nerves contribute to cutaneous vasodilator response to cathodal stimulation in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Gohin, Stéphanie; Decorps, Johanna; Sigaudo-Roussel, Dominique; Fromy, Bérengère

    2015-09-01

    Cutaneous current-induced vasodilation (CIV) in response to galvanic current application is an integrative model of neurovascular interaction that relies on capsaicin-sensitive fiber activation. The upstream and downstream mechanisms related to the activation of the capsaicin-sensitive fibers involved in CIV are not elucidated. In particular, the activation of cutaneous transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels and/or acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) (activators mechanisms) and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) (effector mechanisms) have been tested. To assess cathodal CIV, we measured cutaneous blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry for 20min following cathodal current application (240s, 100μA) on the skin of the thigh in anesthetized healthy rats for 20min. CIV was studied in rats treated with capsazepine and amiloride to inhibit TRPV1 and ASIC channels, respectively; CGRP8-37 and SR140333 to antagonize CGRP and neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors, respectively; compared to their respective controls. Cathodal CIV was attenuated by capsazepine (12±2% vs 54±6%, P<0.001), amiloride (19±8% vs 61±6%, P<0.01), CGRP8-37 (15±6% vs 61±6%, P<0.001) and SR140333 (9±5% vs 54±6%, P<0.001) without changing local acidification. This is the first integrative study performed in healthy rats showing that cutaneous vasodilation in response to cathodal stimulation is initiated by activation of cutaneous TRPV1 and ASIC channels likely through local acidification. The involvement of CGRP and NK1 receptors suggests that cathodal CIV is the result of CGRP and SP released through activated capsaicin-sensitive fibers. Therefore cathodal CIV could be a valuable method to assess sensory neurovascular function in the skin, which would be particularly relevant to evaluate the presence of small nerve fiber disorders and the effectiveness of treatments.

  1. Changes of acetylcholinesterase activity in different rat brain areas following intoxication with nerve agents: biochemical and histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bajgar, Jiri; Hajek, Petr; Slizova, Dasa; Krs, Otakar; Fusek, Josef; Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Bartosova, Lucie; Blaha, Vaclav

    2007-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase activity in defined brain regions was determined using biochemical and histochemical methods 30 min after treating rats with sarin, soman or VX (0.5 x LD(50)). Enzyme inhibition was high in the pontomedullar area and frontal cortex, but was low in the basal ganglia. Histochemical and biochemical results correlated well. Determination of the activity in defined brain structures was a more sensitive parameter than determination in whole brain homogenate where the activity was a "mean" of the activities in different structures. The pontomedullar area controls respiration, so that the special sensitivity of acetylcholinesterase to inhibition by nerve agents in this area is important for understanding the mechanism of death caused by nerve agents. Thus, acetylcholinesterase activity is the main parameter investigated in studies searching for target sites following nerve agent poisoning.

  2. Suppressive effects of D-glucosamine on the 5-HT sensitive nociceptive units in the rat tooth pulpal nerve.

    PubMed

    Kaida, Kei; Yamashita, Hiromi; Toda, Kazuo; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that D-glucosamine hydrochloride (DGL) has a variety of biological activities and is regarded as a nutritional supplement effective in improving various disorders, including osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis. Although it has been reported that DGL has a significant pain relief effect in treating osteoarthritis, little is known about the characteristics of the effects of this compound on dental pain. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the applicability of DGL as a medicament to control pulpalgia. Using an in vitro rat mandible-inferior alveolar nerve preparation (jaw-nerve preparation), we evaluated the effects of DGL on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) sensitive nociceptive responses in the tooth pulpal nerve. 5-HT-induced nociceptive responses were fairly suppressed by direct application of DGL, suggesting that DGL have a pain relief effect on patients with dental pain.

  3. Median eminence nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Prevot, V; Bouret, S; Stefano, G B; Beauvillain, J

    2000-11-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that nitric oxide (NO), an active free radical formed during the conversion of arginine to citrulline by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS), is a critical neurotransmitter and biological mediator of the neuroendocrine axis. Current evidence suggests that NO modulates the activity of both the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Supporting this hypothesis is the finding that the highest expression of neuronal NOS in the brain is found within the hypothalamus in areas where the cell bodies of the neurons from the different neuroendocrine systems are located. In this regard, the influence of neuronal NO on the regulation of the neuroendocrine neural cell body activity has been well-documented whereas little is known about NO signaling that directly modulates neurohormonal release into the pituitary portal vessels from the neuroendocrine terminals within the median eminence, the common termination field of the adenohypophysiotropic systems. Studies in rat suggest that NO is an important factor controlling both gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) release at the median eminence. The recent use of amperometric NO detection from median eminence fragments coupled to the use of selective NOS inhibitors demonstrated that a major source of NO at the median eminence might be endothelial in origin rather than neuronal. The present article reviews the recent progress in identifying the origin and the role of the NO produced at the median eminence in the control of neurohormonal release. We also discuss the potential implications of the putative involvement of the median eminence endothelial cells in a neurovascular regulatory process for hypothalamic neurohormonal signaling.

  4. The relative effects of transection of the gustatory branches of the seventh and ninth cranial nerves on NaCl taste detection in rats.

    PubMed

    Blonde, Ginger D; Garcea, Mircea; Spector, Alan C

    2006-06-01

    Chorda tympani nerve (CT) transection in rats severely impairs NaCl taste detection. These rats can detect higher concentrations of NaCl, however, suggesting that remaining oral nerves maintain some salt sensibility. Rats were tested in a gustometer with a 2-response operant taste-detection task before and after sham surgery (n = 5), combined transection of the CT and the greater superficial petrosal nerves (GSP; 7x, n = 6), or transection of the glossopharyngeal nerve (GL; 9x, n = 4). Thresholds did not significantly change after sham surgery. Although the GL responds to NaCl and innervates nearly 60% of total taste buds, 9x surgery had no effect. However, 7x surgery increased NaCl detection threshold by approximately 2.5 log(10) units, greater than that reported for CT transection alone. These results suggest that the GSP contributes to NaCl sensitivity in rats and also demonstrate that the GL and perhaps the superior laryngeal and lingual nerve proper can maintain some NaCl detectability at high concentrations. These findings confirm the primacy of the 7th nerve relative to the 9th nerve in sensibility of NaCl in the rat model.

  5. Gene delivery to rat and human Schwann cells and nerve segments: a comparison of AAV 1-9 and lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, S A; De Winter, F; Gnavi, S; van Egmond, L; Attwell, C L; Tannemaat, M R; Verhaagen, J; Malessy, M J A

    2015-10-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) in an injured peripheral nerve form pathways for regenerating axons. Although these cells initially support regeneration, SCs lose their pro-regenerative properties following a prolonged period of denervation. Gene transfer to SC can enhance their therapeutic potential. In this article, we compared adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors based on serotypes 1-9 for their capability to transduce cultured primary rat and human SCs and nerve segments. AAV1 is the best serotype to transduce rat SCs, whereas AAV2 and AAV6 performed equally well in human SCs. Transduction of monolayers of cultured rat and human SCs did not accurately predict the transduction efficiency in nerve segments. Rat nerve segments could be genetically modified equally well by a set of four AAV vectors (AAV1, AAV5, AAV7, AAV9), whereas AAV2 was superior in human nerve segments. The current experiments were undertaken as a first step towards future clinical implementation of ex vivo AAV-based gene therapy in surgical nerve repair. The transduction of rat and human SCs and nerve segments by entirely different AAV serotypes, as documented here, highlights one of the challenges of translating gene therapy from experimental animals to human patients.

  6. Allopregnanolone modulates spontaneous GABA release via presynaptic Cl- permeability in rat preoptic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Haage, David; Druzin, Michael; Johansson, Staffan

    2002-12-27

    The endogenous neurosteroid 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnane-20-one (allopregnanolone) affects presynaptic nerve terminals and thereby increases the frequency of spontaneous GABA release. The present study aimed at clarifying the mechanisms underlying this presynaptic neurosteroid action, by recording the frequency of spontaneous GABA-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in neurons from the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of rat. Acutely dissociated neurons with functional adhering nerve terminals were studied by perforated-patch recording under voltage-clamp conditions. It was shown that the sIPSC frequency increased with the external K(+) concentration ([K(+)](o)). Further, the effect of allopregnanolone on the sIPSC frequency was strongly dependent on [K(+)](o). In a [K(+)](o) of 5 mM, 2.0 microM allopregnanolone caused a clear increase in sIPSC frequency. However, the effect declined rapidly with increased [K(+)](o) and at high [K(+)](o) allopregnanolone reduced the sIPSC frequency. The effect of allopregnanolone was also strongly dependent on the external Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)](o)). In a reduced [Cl(-)](o) (40 mM, but with a standard [K(+)](o) of 5 mM), the effect on sIPSC frequency was larger than that in the standard [Cl(-)](o) of 146 mM. The dependence of the effect of allopregnanolone on [K(+)](o) and on estimated presynaptic membrane potential was also altered by the reduction in [Cl(-)](o). As in standard [Cl(-)](o), the effect in low [Cl(-)](o) declined when [K(+)](o) was raised, but reversed at a higher [K(+)](o). The GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol also potentiated the sIPSC frequency. Altogether, the results suggest that allopregnanolone exerts its presynaptic effect by increasing the presynaptic Cl(-) permeability, most likely via GABA(A) receptors. PMID:12470877

  7. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from nerve terminals in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, M; Inaishi, Y; Kashihara, Y; Kuno, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The amount of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from the isolated rat soleus muscle was measured by enzyme immunoassay. 2. When the soleus muscle was exposed to a solution containing high K+ (20-100 mM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin, the amount of CGRP released into the bathing medium increased with an increase in the K+ concentration. 3. The exposure to 100 mM-K+ did not increase CGRP release from chronically denervated soleus muscles or from pieces of the soleus nerve separated from the muscle. 4. The amount of CGRP released from the isolated muscle by 100 mM-K+ depended on the external Ca2+ concentration. The slope of the relation between the amount of CGRP release and the Ca2+ concentration was less than one on double logarithmic co-ordinates. 5. Following chronic section of the lumbar ventral roots, the mean amount of CGRP released from the soleus muscle by 100 mM-K+ was reduced by 28%, compared with that observed in normal muscle. 6. Antidromic stimulation of the lumbar dorsal roots at an intensity three times the threshold for most excitable sensory fibres failed to induce CGRP release from the soleus muscle, whereas stimulation at intensities 50-100 times the threshold increased significantly the amount of CGRP release from the muscle. 7. Stimulation of the muscle nerve at an intensity sufficient to activate the alpha-motor fibres did not release CGRP from the soleus muscle or from the diaphragm. 8. It is concluded that the major source of CGRP released from skeletal muscle is A delta- and/or C sensory terminals and that the Ca2+ dependence of CGRP release is less steep than that reported for acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:2023119

  8. Nerve Protective Effect of Asiaticoside against Ischemia-Hypoxia in Cultured Rat Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; Liu, Bin; Li, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background Asiaticoside is one of the main functional components of the natural plant Centella asiatica urban. Studies have reported it has several functions such as anti-depression and nerve cell protection. Asiaticoside can reduce the cerebral infarct size in acute focal cerebral ischemia in a mouse model and asiatic acid glycosides can significantly improve neurobehavioral scores. Currently, there is a lack of understanding of asiaticoside in regard to its neural protective mechanism in cerebral ischemia. This study aimed to solve this problem by using an ischemia-hypoxia cell model in vitro. Material/Methods An in vitro ischemia hypoxia cell model was successfully established by primary cultured newborn rat cortical neurons. After being treated by asiaticoside for 24 h, cell survival rate, lactate dehydrogenase release quantity, and B-cell lymphoma gene-2 (BCL-2), Bax, and caspase-3 protein expressions was detected. Results After 10 nmol/L or 100 nmol/L of asiaticoside were given to the cells, cell survival rate increased significantly and presented concentration dependence. Asiaticoside can reduce lactate dehydrogenase release. Lactate dehydrogenase release in model cells is gradually reduced with the increase of asiaticoside concentration. The lactate dehydrogenase release in asiaticoside 10 nmol/L group, asiaticoside 100 nmol/L group and ischemia hypoxia group were 26.75±1.05, 22.36±2.87 and 52.35±5.46%, respectively (p<0.05). It was also found that asiaticoside could modulate the expression of apoptotic factors, including bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3. Conclusions Asiaticoside helps to protect in vitro ischemia hypoxia neurons. This nerve cell protection may be mediated by the BCL-2 protein. PMID:26447863

  9. Peripheral vagus nerve stimulation significantly affects lipid composition and protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain regions in rats.

    PubMed

    Surowka, Artur Dawid; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Ziomber, Agata; Thor, Piotr; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Recent immunohistochemical studies point to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve as the point of departure of initial changes which are related to the gradual pathological developments in the dopaminergic system. In the light of current investigations, it is likely that biochemical changes within the peripheral nervous system may influence the physiology of the dopaminergic system, suggesting a putative role for it in the development of neurodegenerative disorders. By using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, coupled with statistical analysis, we examined the effect of chronic, unilateral electrical vagus nerve stimulation on changes in lipid composition and in protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain structures in rats. It was found that the chronic vagal nerve stimulation strongly affects the chain length of fatty acids within the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, striatum, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and the motor cortex. In particular, the level of lipid unsaturation was found significantly increasing in the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and motor cortex as a result of vagal nerve stimulation. When it comes to changes in protein secondary structure, we could see that the mesolimbic, mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways are particularly affected by vagus nerve stimulation. This is due to the co-occurrence of statistically significant changes in the content of non-ordered structure components, alpha helices, beta sheets, and the total area of Amide I. Macromolecular changes caused by peripheral vagus nerve stimulation may highlight a potential connection between the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system in rat during the development of neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Peripheral vagus nerve stimulation significantly affects lipid composition and protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain regions in rats.

    PubMed

    Surowka, Artur Dawid; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Ziomber, Agata; Thor, Piotr; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Recent immunohistochemical studies point to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve as the point of departure of initial changes which are related to the gradual pathological developments in the dopaminergic system. In the light of current investigations, it is likely that biochemical changes within the peripheral nervous system may influence the physiology of the dopaminergic system, suggesting a putative role for it in the development of neurodegenerative disorders. By using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, coupled with statistical analysis, we examined the effect of chronic, unilateral electrical vagus nerve stimulation on changes in lipid composition and in protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain structures in rats. It was found that the chronic vagal nerve stimulation strongly affects the chain length of fatty acids within the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, striatum, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and the motor cortex. In particular, the level of lipid unsaturation was found significantly increasing in the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and motor cortex as a result of vagal nerve stimulation. When it comes to changes in protein secondary structure, we could see that the mesolimbic, mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways are particularly affected by vagus nerve stimulation. This is due to the co-occurrence of statistically significant changes in the content of non-ordered structure components, alpha helices, beta sheets, and the total area of Amide I. Macromolecular changes caused by peripheral vagus nerve stimulation may highlight a potential connection between the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system in rat during the development of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25893743

  11. LACK OF ANALGESIC EFFICACY OF SPINAL ONDANSETRON ON THERMAL AND MECHANICAL HYPERSENSITIVITY FOLLOWING SPINAL NERVE LIGATION IN THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christopher M.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Ewan, Eric E.; Nakajima, Kunie; Obata, Hideaki; Xu, Qinghao; Yaksh, Tony L.; Eisenach, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The balance between descending inhibition and facilitation is thought to be disturbed in chronic pain states. Increased facilitation by spinally released serotonin has been suggested by demonstration that mechanically evoked neuronal responses of wide dynamic range neurons are inhibited by 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in rats following spinal nerve ligation (SNL) but not sham operation. Despite these physiologic data, the effects of spinal 5-HT3 receptor blockade on behavioral hypersensitivity and neurochemical alterations in spinal serotonergic system have not been thoroughly investigated following spinal nerve ligation in the rat. To test this, we acutely injected intrathecal ondansetron in rats between 14 and 30 days after SNL and assessed effects on thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity. We also determined the density of serotonergic nerve fibers, serotonin content and the levels of 5-HT3 receptors within the spinal cord at this time point. Intrathecal ondansetron (1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 μg) produced no effect on behavioral measures of thermal or mechanical hypersensitivity whereas intrathecal morphine (1μg) and gabapentin (200 μg) partially reversed thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity following SNL. In addition, SNL did not alter the density of serotonergic fibers or 5-HT3 receptor immunoreactivity or spinal tissue content of 5-HT within the dorsal horn. These results do not support anatomic plasticity of descending serotonergic pathways or tonic 5-HT3 receptor activity in maintaining hypersensitivity after nerve injury and in contrast to previous studies fail to demonstrate an anti-hypersensitivity effect of intrathecal injection of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron following peripheral nerve injury. Importantly, behavioral measures of mechanical hypersensitivity assess threshold responses whereas physiological studies of mechanically evoked neuronal responses involve application of suprathreshold stimuli. Thus, suprathreshold or more intense

  12. Up-regulated uridine kinase gene identified by RLCS in the ventral horn after crush injury to rat sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Yuh, I; Yaoi, T; Watanabe, S; Okajima, S; Hirasawa, Y; Fushiki, S

    1999-12-01

    Rat sciatic nerve crush injury is one of the models commonly employed for studying the mechanisms of nerve regeneration. In this study, we analyzed the temporal change of gene expression after injury in this model, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in nerve regeneration. First, a cDNA analysis method, Restriction Landmark cDNA Scanning (RLCS), was applied to cells in the ventral horn of the spinal cord during a 7-day period after the crush injury. A total of 1991 cDNA species were detected as spots on gels, and 37 of these were shown to change after the injury. Temporally changed patterns were classified into three categories: the continuously up-regulated type (10 species), the transiently up-regulated type (22 species), and the down-regulated type (5 species). These complex patterns of gene expression demonstrated after the injury suggest that precise regulation in molecular pathways is required for accomplishing nerve regeneration. Secondly, the rat homologue of uridine kinase gene was identified as one of the up-regulated genes. Northern blot analysis on rat ventral horn tissue and brain revealed that the UK gene had three transcripts with different sizes (4.3, 1. 4, and 1.35 kb, respectively). All of the transcripts, especially the 4.3 kb one, were up-regulated mainly in a bimodal fashion during the 28-day period after the injury. The RLCS method that we employed in the present study shows promise as a means to fully analyze molecular changes in nerve regeneration in detail. PMID:10581173

  13. Hexamethonium- and methyllycaconitine-induced changes in acetylcholine release from rat motor nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, >Lijun; Prior, Chris; Dempster, John; Marshall, Ian G

    1997-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonists hexamethonium and methyllycaconitine (MLA) have been used to study the putative prejunctional nicotinic ACh receptors (AChRs) mediating a negative-feedback control of ACh release from motor nerve terminals in voltage-clamped rat phrenic nerve/hemidiaphragm preparations. Hexamethonium (200 μM), but not MLA (0.4–2.0 μM), decreased the time constant of decay of both endplate currents (e.p.cs) and miniature endplate currents (m.e.p.cs), indicating endplate ion channel block with hexamethonium. However, driving function analysis and reconvolution of e.p.cs and m.e.p.cs indicated that this ion channel block did not compromise the analysis of e.p.c. quantal content. At low frequencies of stimulation (0.5–2 Hz), hexamethonium (200 μM) and MLA (2.0 μM) increased e.p.c. quantal content by 30–40%. At high frequencies (50–150 Hz) neither compound affected e.p.c. quantal content. All effects on quantal content were paralleled by changes in the size of the pool of quanta available for release. The low frequency augmentation of e.p.c. quantal content by hexamethonium was absent when extracellular [Ca2+] was lowered from 2.0 to 0.5 mM. At the concentrations studied, MLA and hexamethonium produced a small (10–20%) decrease in the peak amplitude of m.e.p.cs. Neither apamin (100 nM) nor charybdotoxin (80 nM) had effects on spontaneous or nerve evoked current amplitudes at any frequency of stimulation. Thus the ability of nicotinic antagonists to augment e.p.c. quantal content is not due to inhibition of Ca2+-activated K+-channels. We suggest that hexamethonium and MLA increase evoked ACh release by blocking prejunctional nicotinic AChRs. These receptors exert a negative feedback control over evoked ACh release and are probably of the α-bungarotoxin-insensitive neuronal type. PMID:9401765

  14. Effects of exogenous neurotrophin-3 on myocyte apoptosis and Ca2+-ATP enzyme levels following nerve injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yu-Zhen; Yang, Lin; Lu, Tan; Zhao, Hong-Xing; Ma, Chao; Zhao, Yi-Lei

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the influence of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) plasmids on neuronal apoptosis and Ca2+-ATP enzyme levels in injured muscles. We also investigated the mechanism underlying the role of NT-3 in delaying muscle atrophy following a peripheral nerve injury. Sixty adult Wistar rats were used to generate the peripheral nerve injury models. The rats were randomly assigned to the saline and NT-3 groups. Related indicators, such as caspase-3 protein expression, skeletal muscle cell apoptosis, and Ca2+-ATP enzyme expression were quantified. The expression levels of caspase-3 and the histone-muscle cell apoptosis rate in the NT-3 group decreased at different post-operative times following peripheral nerve injury, whereas NT-3 expression and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATP enzyme levels increased. Statistically significant differences were observed in the NT-3 group as compared to the saline group (P < 0.05). NT-3 mitigated muscle atrophy following peripheral nerve damage by inhibiting caspase-3 gene expression and increasing Ca2+-ATP enzymatic activity, ultimately reducing muscle apoptosis. PMID:26770627

  15. Lead (Pb) alters the norepinephrine-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone from the median eminence of adult male rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, G.R.; Hiney, J.K.; Dees, W.L. )

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the authors evaluated the in vitro effects of lead (Pb) on basal and stimulated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) and Prostaglandin E[sub 2] (PGE[sub 2]) secretion. Median eminences (ME) were removed from brains of adult male rats and preincubated for 15 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate glucose buffer in an atmosphere of 95% O[sub 2]-5% CO[sub 2]. These media were discarded and all MEs were subjected to one of the following experiments. In Experiment 1, all MEs were incubated for 30 minutes in medium only. These media were collected and replaced with medium only (controls) or with medium containing Pb doses ranging from 5 to 20 [mu]M. After this 60-minute incubation, media were collected, then replaced with new medium containing 60 [mu]M norepinephrine (NE), or NE plus each dose of Pb, then incubated for a final 30-minute period. Experiment 2 was conducted as above, except PGE[sub 2] (2.8 [mu]M) replaced the NE. In both experiments, the amounts of LHRH released was measured by RIA. In experiment 3, NE was again used for the challenge; however, this time, the amount of PGE[sub 2] released was measured by RIA. Results indicate that Pb did not alter basal LHRH release, but compared with controls, significantly blocked NE-induced LHRH release in a dose-related manner. Conversely, Pb had no effect on the PGE[sub 2]-induced release of LHRH. Additionally, Pb did not alter basal PGE[sub 2] release; however, it significantly blocked the NE-induced release of PGE[sub 2]. Since NE-induced LHRH release is mediated by PGE[sub 2], these results support the hypothesis that Pb is capable of altering the hypothalamus and suggest that this effect is due, at least in part, to the diminished PGE[sub 2] synthesis/release within the ME, resulting in diminished LHRH secretion.

  16. Spinal autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging in a rat model of nerve injury-induced pain and the effect of spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jongen, Joost L M; Smits, Helwin; Pederzani, Tiziana; Bechakra, Malik; Hossaini, Mehdi; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K; Huygen, Frank J P M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Holstege, Jan C; Joosten, Elbert A J

    2014-01-01

    Nerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging (AFI) to study changes in spinal dorsal horn metabolic activity. In the Seltzer model of nerve-injury induced pain, hypersensitivity was confirmed using the von Frey and hotplate test. 14 Days after nerve-injury, rats were anesthetized, a bipolar electrode was placed around the affected sciatic nerve and the spinal cord was exposed by a laminectomy at T13. AFI recordings were obtained in neuropathic rats and a control group of naïve rats following 10 seconds of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at C-fiber strength, or following non-noxious palpation. Neuropathic rats were then treated with 30 minutes of SCS or sham stimulation and AFI recordings were obtained for up to 60 minutes after cessation of SCS/sham. Although AFI responses to noxious electrical stimulation were similar in neuropathic and naïve rats, only neuropathic rats demonstrated an AFI-response to palpation. Secondly, an immediate, short-lasting, but strong reduction in AFI intensity and area of excitation occurred following SCS, but not following sham stimulation. Our data confirm that AFI can be used to directly visualize changes in spinal metabolic activity following nerve injury and they imply that SCS acts through rapid modulation of nociceptive processing at the spinal level. PMID:25279562

  17. Berberine Inhibits the Release of Glutamate in Nerve Terminals from Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2013-01-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline plant alkaloid, protects neurons against neurotoxicity. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be one of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal damage in several neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated whether berberine could affect endogenous glutamate release in nerve terminals of rat cerebral cortex (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Berberine inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), and this phenomenon was prevented by the chelating extracellular Ca2+ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, but was insensitive to the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate. Inhibition of glutamate release by berberine was not due to it decreasing synaptosomal excitability, because berberine did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The inhibitory effect of berberine on glutamate release was associated with a reduction in the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration. Involvement of the Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels in the berberine action was confirmed by blockade of the berberine-mediated inhibition of glutamate release by the Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA. In addition, the inhibitory effect of berberine on evoked glutamate release was prevented by the mitogen-activated/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitors. Berberine decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synapsin I, the main presynaptic target of ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibition. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of berberine on evoked glutamate release was prevented in nerve terminals from mice lacking synapsin I. Together, these results indicated that berberine inhibits glutamate release from rats cortical synaptosomes, through the suppression of presynaptic Cav2.1 channels and ERK/synapsin I signaling

  18. Valproic Acid Prevents Penile Fibrosis and Erectile Dysfunction in Cavernous Nerve Injured Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Johanna L.; Kutlu, Omer; Stopak, Bernard L.; Liu, Xiaopu; Castiglione, Fabio; Hedlund, Petter; Burnett, Arthur L.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Bilateral cavernous nerve injury (BCNI) causes profound penile changes such as apoptosis and fibrosis leading to erectile dysfunction (ED). Histone deacetylase (HDAC) has been implicated in chronic fibrotic diseases. Aims This study will characterize the molecular changes in penile HDAC after BCNI and determine if HDAC inhibition can prevent BCNI-induced ED and penile fibrosis. Methods Five groups of rats (8–10 wks, n=10/group) were utilized: 1) sham, 2&3) BCNI 14 and 30 days following injury, and 4&5) BCNI treated with HDAC inhibitor valproic acid (VPA 250mg/kg; 14 and 30 days). All groups underwent cavernous nerve stimulation (CNS) to determine intracavernosal pressure (ICP). Penile HDAC3, HDAC4, fibronectin, and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) protein expression (Western blot) were assessed. Trichrome staining and the fractional area of fibrosis were determined in penes from each group. Cavernous smooth muscle content was assessed by immunofluorescence to alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) antibodies. Main Outcome Measures ICP; HDAC3, HDAC4, fibronectin and TGF-β1 protein expression; penile fibrosis; penile α-SMA content. Results There was a voltage-dependent decline (p<0.05) in ICP to CNS 14 and 30 days after BCNI. Penile HDAC3, HDAC4, and fibronectin were significantly increased (P<0.05) 14 days after BCNI. There was a slight increase in TGF-β1 protein expression after BCNI. Histological analysis showed increased (P<0.05) corporal fibrosis after BCNI at both time points. VPA treatment decreased (P<0.05) penile HDAC3, HDAC4, and fibronectin protein expression as well as corporal fibrosis. There was no change in penile α-SMA between all groups. Furthermore, VPA-treated BCNI rats had improved erectile responses to CNS (P<0.05). Conclusion HDAC-induced pathological signaling in response to BCNI contributes to penile vascular dysfunction after BCNI. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC prevents penile fibrosis, normalizes fibronectin

  19. Plasticity in rat uterine sympathetic nerves: the role of TrkA and p75 nerve growth factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Richeri, Analía; Bianchimano, Paola; Mármol, Nelson M; Viettro, Lorena; Cowen, Timothy; Brauer, M Mónica

    2005-01-01

    Uterine sympathetic innervation undergoes profound remodelling in response to physiological and experimental changes in the circulating levels of sex hormones. It is not known, however, whether this plasticity results from changes in the innervating neurons, the neuritogenic properties of the target tissue or both. Using densitometric immunohistochemistry, we analysed the effects of prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment (three subcutaneous injections of 20 µg of β-oestradiol 17-cypionate on days 25, 27 and 29 after birth), natural peripubertal transition and late pregnancy (19–20 days post coitum) on the levels of TrkA and p75 nerve growth factor receptors in uterine-projecting sympathetic neurons of the thoraco-lumbar paravertebral sympathetic chain (T7–L2) identified using the retrograde tracer Fluorogold. For comparative purposes, levels of TrkA and p75 were assessed in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) following prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment. These studies showed that the vast majority of uterine-projecting neurons expressed both TrkA and p75. Both prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment and the peripubertal transition increased the ratio p75 to TrkA in uterine-projecting neurons, whereas pregnancy elicited the opposite effect. Prepubertal chronic oestrogen treatment had no effects on levels of TrkA or p75 in sympathetic neurons of the SCG. Taken together, our data suggest that neurotrophin receptor-mediated events may contribute to regulate sex hormone-induced plasticity in uterine sympathetic nerves, and are in line with the idea that, in vivo, plasticity in uterine nerves involves changes in both the target and the innervating neurons. PMID:16050899

  20. Effects of free fatty acids, ethanol and development on gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate fluxes in rat nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Hitzemann, R; Mark, C; Panini, A

    1982-12-15

    The effects of type A (cis-unsaturated) and type B (trans-unsaturated and saturated) fatty acids, 1% and 3% ethanol (v/v), and development (7 days) on the thermodynamics of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport into cortical rat brain nerve endings were examined. The effects of the various manipulations, which are known to affect membrane fluidity, may be summarized. Three percent ethanol and oleic acid increased delta S degrees and delta S+ for glutamate transport and decreased delta H degrees and delta H+. Type B fatty acids had the opposite effects. In comparison to glutamate transport, GABA transport was less affected by the various manipulations and showed less specificity in terms of the fatty acid effects. Similarly, the effects of development on the thermodynamic parameters for glutamate and GABA transport were not consistent. Glutamate transport into 7-day nerve endings showed thermodynamic behavior similar to that seen when type A fatty acids were incorporated into adult nerve endings. In contrast, GABA transport into 7-day nerve endings had the character of adult nerve endings into which type B fatty acids were incorporated.

  1. Study of tibial nerve regeneration in Wistar rats in primary neurorrhaphy with and without gap, wrapped in vein segments

    PubMed Central

    Bastos dos Santos, Ewerton; Fernandes, Marcela; Gomes dos Santos, João Baptista; Mattioli Leite, Vilnei; Valente, Sandra Gomes; Faloppa, Flávio

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study compared nerve regeneration in Wistar rats, using epineural neurorrhaphy with a gap of 1.0 mm and without a gap, both wrapped with jugular vein tubes. Motor neurons in the spinal cord between L3 and S1 were used for the count, marked by exposure of the tibial nerve to Fluoro-Gold (FG). Method The tibial nerves on both sides were cut and sutured, with a gap on one side and no gap in the other. The sutures were wrapped with a jugular vein. Four months after surgery the tibial nerves were exposed to Fluoro-Gold and the motor neuron count performed in the spinal cord. Results The results were statistically analyzed by the paired Wilcoxon test. There was a statistical difference between the groups with and without gap in relation to the motor neuron count (p=0.013). Conclusion The epineural neurorraphy without gap wrapped with jugular vein showed better results for nerve regeneration than the same procedure with gap. Level of Evidence: Experimental Study. PMID:24453597

  2. Electron microscopic studies of macrophages in Wallerian degeneration of rat optic nerve after intravenous injection of colloidal carbon.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, E A

    1978-01-01

    The origin of macrophages in the degenerating optic nerve of rats after eye enucleation was investigated electron microscopically following intravenous labelling of mononuclear leucoytes with colloidal carbon. In the various post-operative periods studied carbon-labelled macrophages were seen at the site of lesion. At 4 and 7 days after enucleation carbon-labelled cells were seen at the site of Wallerian degeneration of the optic nerve over 4 mm distal to the site of the lesion. In the electron microscope these cells showed a flattened nucleus bearing coarse chromatin clumps, their cytoplasm contained a prominent Golgi complex and long isolate profiles of rough endoplasmic reticulum. Clusters of carbon particles in the cytoplasms were membrane-bound. Lysosomal bodies embedded with carbon particles were also observed. In relation to the blood vessels of the optic nerve, endothelial cells and pericytes with ingested carbon were seen. Macrophages in the meninges covering the optic nerve were also labelled. The results suggest that some macrophages in the region of Wallerian degeneration in the optic nerve, as well as those at the actual site of the lesion, were transformed blood leucocytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:649492

  3. A New Preparation Method for Anisotropic Silk Fibroin Nerve Guidance Conduits and Its Evaluation In Vitro and in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Teuschl, Andreas Herbert; Schuh, Christina; Halbweis, Robert; Pajer, Krisztián; Márton, Gábor; Hopf, Rudolf; Mosia, Shorena; Rünzler, Dominik; Redl, Heinz; Nógrádi, Antal; Hausner, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade, silk fibroin (SF) has been emergently used in peripheral nerve tissue engineering. Current approaches aiming at producing SF-based nerve guidance conduits (SF-NGCs) used dissolved silk based on either aqueous solutions or organic solvents. In this study, we describe a novel procedure to produce SF-NGCs: A braided tubular structure of raw Bombyx mori silk is subsequently processed with the ternary solvent CaCl2/H2O/ethanol, formic acid, and methanol to improve its mechanical and topographical characteristics. Topographically, the combination of the treatments results in a fusion of the outer single silk fibers to a closed layer with a thickness ranging from about 40 to 75 μm. In contrast to the outer wall, the inner lumen (not treated with processing solvents) still represents the braided structure of single fibers. Mechanical stability, elasticity, and kink characteristics were evaluated with a custom-made test system. The modification procedure described here drastically improved the elastic properties of our tubular raw scaffold, favoring its use as a NGC. A cell migration assay with NIH/3T3-fibroblasts revealed the impermeability of the SF-NGC wall for possible invading and scar-forming cells. Moreover, the potential of the SF-NGC to serve as a substratum for Schwann cells has been demonstrated by cytotoxicity tests and live-dead stainings of Schwann cells grown on the inner surface of the SF-NGC. In vivo, the SF-NGC was tested in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. In short-term in vivo studies, it was proved that SF-NGCs are not triggering host inflammatory reactions. After 12 weeks, we could demonstrate morphological and functional reinnervation of the distal targets. Filled with collagen, a higher number of axons could be found in the distal to the graft (1678±303), compared with the empty SF-NGC (1274±146). The novel SF-NGC presented here shows promising results for the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. The modification of

  4. A New Preparation Method for Anisotropic Silk Fibroin Nerve Guidance Conduits and Its Evaluation In Vitro and in a Rat Sciatic Nerve Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Christina; Halbweis, Robert; Pajer, Krisztián; Márton, Gábor; Hopf, Rudolf; Mosia, Shorena; Rünzler, Dominik; Redl, Heinz; Nógrádi, Antal; Hausner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, silk fibroin (SF) has been emergently used in peripheral nerve tissue engineering. Current approaches aiming at producing SF-based nerve guidance conduits (SF-NGCs) used dissolved silk based on either aqueous solutions or organic solvents. In this study, we describe a novel procedure to produce SF-NGCs: A braided tubular structure of raw Bombyx mori silk is subsequently processed with the ternary solvent CaCl2/H2O/ethanol, formic acid, and methanol to improve its mechanical and topographical characteristics. Topographically, the combination of the treatments results in a fusion of the outer single silk fibers to a closed layer with a thickness ranging from about 40 to 75 μm. In contrast to the outer wall, the inner lumen (not treated with processing solvents) still represents the braided structure of single fibers. Mechanical stability, elasticity, and kink characteristics were evaluated with a custom-made test system. The modification procedure described here drastically improved the elastic properties of our tubular raw scaffold, favoring its use as a NGC. A cell migration assay with NIH/3T3-fibroblasts revealed the impermeability of the SF-NGC wall for possible invading and scar-forming cells. Moreover, the potential of the SF-NGC to serve as a substratum for Schwann cells has been demonstrated by cytotoxicity tests and live-dead stainings of Schwann cells grown on the inner surface of the SF-NGC. In vivo, the SF-NGC was tested in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. In short-term in vivo studies, it was proved that SF-NGCs are not triggering host inflammatory reactions. After 12 weeks, we could demonstrate morphological and functional reinnervation of the distal targets. Filled with collagen, a higher number of axons could be found in the distal to the graft (1678±303), compared with the empty SF-NGC (1274±146). The novel SF-NGC presented here shows promising results for the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. The modification of

  5. The Effect of Low Omega-3/Omega-6 Ratio on Auditory Nerve Conduction in Rat Pups.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Saeid; Motasaddi Zarandy, Masoud; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Shidfar, Farzad; Jalaie, Shohreh; Rahimi, Vida

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are determined by their mutual interactions. This interaction extremely affects various functions. Lower consumption of omega-3 during gestation leads to various disorders, even in hearing. We aimed to assess the effect of low omega-3/omega-6 ratios on auditory nerve conduction. In this experimental study, the auditory brainstem response test was performed on 24-day-old rat (n=14). The rats were divided into case (low omega-3/omega-6 ratio during gestation and lactation) and control groups. Variables such as P1, P3, and P4 absolute latency period, interpeaks (P3-P4, P1-P3, and P1-P4), and P4/P1 amplitude ratio were measured. We found an increased P4 omega-3/omega-6 ratio in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.01). No significant difference was observed in the P1 and P3 absolute latency period between the studied groups  (P>0.05).  Also, no significant difference was observed between the groups with respect to the P1-P3 interpeak latency (IPL) periods (P>0.05); while the P1-P4 and P3-P4 IPLs were significantly increased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05). The P4/P1 amplitude ratio significantly decreased in the group with a low omega-3/omega-6 ratio (P<0.05). Results confirmed the negative effects of low omega-3/omega-6 ratio on the auditory system and hearing.

  6. Sildenafil promotes neuroprotection of the pelvic ganglia neurones after bilateral cavernosal nerve resection in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Hlaing, Su M.; Garcia, Leah A.; Kovanecz, Istvan; Martinez, Ramon A.; Shah, Sanjana; Artaza, Jorge N.; Ferrini, Monica G.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the gene expression profile of pelvic ganglia neurones after bilateral cavernosal nerve resection (BCNR) and subsequent treatment with sildenafil in relation to neurotrophic-related pathways. Materials and methods Fisher rats aged 5 months were subjected to BCNR or sham operation and treated with or without sildenafil (20 mg/kg body-weight in drinking water) for 7 days. Total RNA isolated from pelvic ganglia was subjected to reverse transcription and then to quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the RAT-neurotrophic array. Results were corroborated by real-time PCR and western blotting. Another set of animals were injected with a fluorescent tracer at the base of the penis, 7 days before BCNR or sham operation, and were sacrificed 7 days after surgery. Sections of pelvic ganglia were used for immunohistochemistry with antibodies against neurturin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, tyrosine hydroxylase and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor α2. Results A down-regulation of the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase accompanied by changes in the level of cholinergic neurotrophic factors, such as neurturin and its receptor glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor receptor α2, artemin, neurotrophin-4 and cilliary neurotrophic factor, was observed 7 days after BCNR in pelvic ganglia neurones. Treatment with sildenafil, starting immediately after surgery, reversed all these changes at a level similar to that in sham-operated animals. Conclusions Sildenafil treatment promotes changes in the neurotrophic phenotype, leading to a regenerative state of pelvic ganglia neurones. The present study provides a justification for the use of phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors as a neuroprotective agent after BCNR. PMID:22672418

  7. Modulation of innate immune response by the vagus nerve in experimental hepatic amebiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jaimes, Mercedes D; García-Lorenzana, Mario; Muñoz-Ortega, Martin H; Quintanar-Stephano, Andrés; Ávila-Blanco, Manuel E; García-Agueda, Carlos E; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system has a crucial role in immunomodulation of the vagus nerve, its structure provides a pathogen detection system, and a negative feedback to the immune system after the pathogenic agent has been eliminated. Amebiasis is a disease caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, considered the third leading cause of death in the world. The rats are used as a natural resistance model to amoebic liver infection. The aim of this study is to analyze the interaction of Entamoeba histolytica with neutrophils, macrophages, and NK cells in livers of intact and vagotomized rats. Six groups were studied (n = 4): Intact (I), Intact + amoeba (IA), Sham (S), Sham + amoeba (SA), Vagotomized (V) and Vagotomized + amoeba (VA). Animals were sacrificed at 8 h post-inoculation of E. histolytica. Then, livers were obtained and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. Tissue liver slides were stained with H-E, PAS and Masson. The best development time for E. histolytica infection was at 8 h. Amoeba was identified with a monoclonal anti-220 kDa E. histolytica lectin. Neutrophils (N) were identified with rabbit anti-human neutrophil myeloperoxidase, macrophages (Mɸ) with anti-CD68 antibody and NK cells (NK) with anti-NK. Stomachs weight and liver glycogen were higher in V. Collagen increased in VA, whereas vascular and neutrophilic areas were decreased. There were fewer N, Mɸ, NK around the amoeba in the following order IA > SA > VA (p < 0.05 between IA and VA). In conclusion, these results suggest that the absence of parasympathetic innervation affects the participation of neutrophils, macrophages and NK cells in the innate immune response, apparently by parasympathetic inhibition on the cellular functions and probably for participation in sympathetic activity. PMID:27466057

  8. Modulation of innate immune response by the vagus nerve in experimental hepatic amebiasis in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jaimes, Mercedes D; García-Lorenzana, Mario; Muñoz-Ortega, Martin H; Quintanar-Stephano, Andrés; Ávila-Blanco, Manuel E; García-Agueda, Carlos E; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2016-10-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system has a crucial role in immunomodulation of the vagus nerve, its structure provides a pathogen detection system, and a negative feedback to the immune system after the pathogenic agent has been eliminated. Amebiasis is a disease caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica, considered the third leading cause of death in the world. The rats are used as a natural resistance model to amoebic liver infection. The aim of this study is to analyze the interaction of Entamoeba histolytica with neutrophils, macrophages, and NK cells in livers of intact and vagotomized rats. Six groups were studied (n = 4): Intact (I), Intact + amoeba (IA), Sham (S), Sham + amoeba (SA), Vagotomized (V) and Vagotomized + amoeba (VA). Animals were sacrificed at 8 h post-inoculation of E. histolytica. Then, livers were obtained and fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde. Tissue liver slides were stained with H-E, PAS and Masson. The best development time for E. histolytica infection was at 8 h. Amoeba was identified with a monoclonal anti-220 kDa E. histolytica lectin. Neutrophils (N) were identified with rabbit anti-human neutrophil myeloperoxidase, macrophages (Mɸ) with anti-CD68 antibody and NK cells (NK) with anti-NK. Stomachs weight and liver glycogen were higher in V. Collagen increased in VA, whereas vascular and neutrophilic areas were decreased. There were fewer N, Mɸ, NK around the amoeba in the following order IA > SA > VA (p < 0.05 between IA and VA). In conclusion, these results suggest that the absence of parasympathetic innervation affects the participation of neutrophils, macrophages and NK cells in the innate immune response, apparently by parasympathetic inhibition on the cellular functions and probably for participation in sympathetic activity.

  9. Development of a model for nerve agent inhalation in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Wong, Benjamin; Perkins, Michael W; Santos, Mariton D; Rodriguez, Ashley M; Murphy, Gleeson; Sciuto, Alfred M

    2013-09-01

    This study characterizes the development of a head-out inhalation exposure system for assessing respiratory toxicity of vaporized chemical agents in untreated, non-anesthetized rats. The organophosphate diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) induces classical cholinergic toxicity following inhalation exposure and was utilized to validate the effectiveness of this newly designed inhalation exposure system. A saturator cell apparatus was used to generate DFP vapor at 9750, 10,950, 12,200, 14,625 and 19,500 mg × min/m³ which was carried by filtered nitrogen into a glass mixing tube, where it combined with ambient air before being introduced to the custom-made glass exposure chamber. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) were restrained in individual head-out plethysmography chambers, which acquired respiratory parameters before, during and after agent exposure. All animals were acclimated to the exposure system prior to exposure to reduce novel environment-induced stress. The LCt₅₀, as determined by probit analysis, was 12,014 mg × min/m³. Weight loss in exposed animals was dose-dependent and ranged from 8 to 28% of their body weight 24 h after exposure. Increased salivation, lacrimation, urination, defecation (SLUD) and mild muscular fasciculation were observed in all DFP-exposed animals during and immediately following exposure. In all exposed animals, DFP vapor produced significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in cardiac blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), whole brain and lung tissue as well as alterations in tidal volume and minute volume. These studies have provided valuable information leading to the initiation of studies evaluating inhalational toxicity and treatments following exposure to the more lethal and potent chemical warfare nerve agents. PMID:23581557

  10. Evaluation of Fluoro-Jade C as a marker of degenerating neurons in the rat retina and optic nerve.

    PubMed

    Chidlow, Glyn; Wood, John P M; Sarvestani, Ghafar; Manavis, Jim; Casson, Robert J

    2009-03-01

    Detection of neuronal death is an essential requirement for researchers investigating retinal degeneration. Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) is a novel, fluorescent dye that has been successfully used to label degenerating neurons in the brain, but its effectiveness in the eye has not been ascertained. In the current study, we determined the efficacy of FJC for detection of neuronal degeneration in the retina and optic nerve in various paradigms of injury. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity, optic nerve transection, and bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (BCCAO) were performed using standard techniques. Rats were killed at various time points and the retinas with optic nerves attached were removed for tissue processing prior to labelling for FJC, for DNA fragmentation by TUNEL or for immunohistochemical analysis. Retinas from RCS rats of different ages were also analysed. After excitotoxicity-induced injury, cell bodies and dendrites within the ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers were specifically labelled by FJC within 6h, a time point comparable to the appearance of TUNEL-positive nuclei and to reductions in mRNA levels of retinal ganglion cell-specific proteins, but in advance of alterations in some immunohistochemical markers. The number of FJC-labelled cell bodies in the retina declined over time as cell loss proceeded, although dendritic staining remained prominent. Colocalisation of FJC with TUNEL and with immunohistochemical neuronal markers was achieved. FJC was successful at identifying somato-dendritic degeneration following ischemia induced by BCCAO, but surprisingly, not after optic nerve transection. FJC visualised photoreceptor degeneration in the RCS rat, albeit less effectively than with the TUNEL assay, and was also effective for imaging and quantifying degenerating axons in the optic nerve after multiple injuries. In addition to labelling degenerating neurons, however, FJC also bound non-specifically to

  11. Nerve growth induces 5-HT sub 3 recognition sites in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J.C.; Rowland, H.C. )

    1990-01-01

    In rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, nerve growth factor (7S NGF) induced the expression of recognition sites that bind the specific 5-HT{sub 3} antagonist (S-) ({sup 3}H) zacopride. Culturing PC12 cells for 8-12 days in the presence of 50 ng/ml NGF increased the density (B{sub max}) of (S-) ({sup 3}H) zacopride binding sites in cell membranes (0-100,000 x g fraction) from 0 to 105 fmoles/mg protein. This binding exhibited high affinity for (S-) ({sup 3}H) zacopride (K{sub d}=0.8 nM), was specific (>95%), and was inhibited by 5-HT{sub 3} compounds with a rank of potency (quipazine>ICS 205-930 > GR38032F > BRL 24924{approx}MDL 72222 > phenylbiguanide {le} seroton-in > 2-methyl-serotonin > metoclopramide) which was distinct from neuroblastoma cells. Thus, NGF-differentiated PC12 cells possess a 5-HT{sub 3} receptor and should be useful to investigate its regulation and biochemical mechanism of action.

  12. Effects of different kinds of acute stress on nerve growth factor content in rat brain.

    PubMed

    von Richthofen, Sita; Lang, Undine E; Hellweg, Rainer

    2003-10-17

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has several effects on the central nervous system; on the one hand NGF fosters survival and function of cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain, on the other hand this protein is implicated in the stress response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA). In this study we tested the influence of threatening and painful stress treatments in three different intensities as well as forced motoric activity on NGF content in different brain areas in adult rats. We found that threatening treatment with or without painful stimuli was followed by a significant decrease of NGF concentration in the amygdala (44.5%; P=0.03) and the frontal cortex (-45.5%; P=0.02). We also observed that after stress of forced motoric activity NGF content in the frontal cortex (-32%; P=0.01) and the hippocampus (-32%; P=0.006) was significantly reduced. Thus, NGF content in distinct brain regions is decreased, following different forms of acute stress. This might be relevant for the pathophysiological understanding of psychiatric diseases, such as depression, which are associated with stress.

  13. Essential Oil of Ocimum basilicum L. and (-)-Linalool Blocks the Excitability of Rat Sciatic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Medeiros Venancio, Antonio; Ferreira-da-Silva, Francisco Walber; da Silva-Alves, Kerly Shamyra; de Carvalho Pimentel, Hugo; Macêdo Lima, Matheus; Fraga de Santana, Michele; Barreto Alves, Péricles; Batista da Silva, Givanildo; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique; Marchioro, Murilo

    2016-01-01

    The racemate linalool and its levogyrus enantiomer [(-)-LIN] are present in many essential oils and possess several pharmacological activities, such as antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory. In this work, the effects of essential oil obtained from the cultivation of the Ocimum basilicum L. (EOOb) derived from Germplasm Bank rich in (-)-LIN content in the excitability of peripheral nervous system were studied. We used rat sciatic nerve to investigate the EOOb and (-)-LIN effects on neuron excitability and the extracellular recording technique was used to register the compound action potential (CAP). EOOb and (-)-LIN blocked the CAP in a concentration-dependent way and these effects were reversible after washout. EOOb blocked positive amplitude of 1st and 2nd CAP components with IC50 of 0.38 ± 0.2 and 0.17 ± 0.0 mg/mL, respectively. For (-)-LIN, these values were 0.23 ± 0.0 and 0.13 ± 0.0 mg/mL. Both components reduced the conduction velocity of CAP and the 2nd component seems to be more affected than the 1st component. In conclusion EOOb and (-)-LIN inhibited the excitability of peripheral nervous system in a similar way and potency, revealing that the effects of EOOb on excitability are due to the presence of (-)-LIN in the essential oil.

  14. Thyroid hormone promotes transient nerve growth factor synthesis in rat cerebellar neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Charrasse, S; Jehan, F; Confort, C; Brachet, P; Clos, J

    1992-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellum from 5-day-old rats indicated that proliferating neuroblasts synthesize and release nerve growth factor (NGF). Since NGF promotes DNA synthesis in these cells, our findings demonstrate that the early developing cerebellum is a suitable physiological model for studying the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. Thyroid deficiency led to a greater reduction in the NGF content of the cerebellum than of the olfactory bulbs or hippocampus. Cerebellar NGF mRNA was also very sensitive to hormone deprivation. Physiological amounts of thyroid hormone stimulated both the mitotic activity and NGF production of cultured cerebellar neuroblasts. A lack of thyroid hormone is known to markedly alter cell formation in the cerebellum where postnatal neurogenesis is highly significant, in contrast to the olfactory bulbs and hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that the hormonal control of cell formation in the cerebellum is, at least partly, mediated by the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. The thyroid hormone could temporally regulate the transient NGF synthesis by cerebellar neuroblasts directly and/or through its ontogenetic action, and hence all the NGF-dependent trophic effects.

  15. Antiparkinson drugs used as prophylactics for nerve agents: studies of cognitive side effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Myhrer, Trond; Enger, Siri; Aas, Pål

    2008-06-01

    Antiparkinson agents possess excellent anticonvulsant properties against nerve agent-induced seizures by exerting both cholinergic and glutamatergic antagonisms. It is important, however, that drugs used as prophylactics not by themselves cause impairment of cognitive capability. The purpose of the present study was to make a comparative assessment of potential cognitive effects of benactyzine (0.3 mg/kg), biperiden (0.11 mg/kg), caramiphen (10 mg/kg), procyclidine (3 mg/kg), and trihexyphenidyl (0.12 mg/kg) separately and each in combination with physostigmine (0.1 mg/kg). The results showed that benactyzine, caramiphen, and trihexyphenidyl reduced rats' innate preference for novelty, whereas biperiden and procyclidine did not. When benactyzine, caramiphen, and trihexyphenidyl were combined with physostigmine the cognitive impairment disappeared. This counteracting effect, however, caused changes in locomotor and rearing activities not seen by each drug alone. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and anticholinergics used as prophylactics can offset each other, but exceptions are observed in a previous study when a very potent anticholinergic (scopolamine) or a high dose of procyclidine still results in cognitive deficits in spite of coadministration with physostigmine. Among the present drugs tested, procyclidine appears to be a robust anticonvulsant with few cognitive side effects.

  16. Thyroid hormone promotes transient nerve growth factor synthesis in rat cerebellar neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Charrasse, S; Jehan, F; Confort, C; Brachet, P; Clos, J

    1992-01-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellum from 5-day-old rats indicated that proliferating neuroblasts synthesize and release nerve growth factor (NGF). Since NGF promotes DNA synthesis in these cells, our findings demonstrate that the early developing cerebellum is a suitable physiological model for studying the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. Thyroid deficiency led to a greater reduction in the NGF content of the cerebellum than of the olfactory bulbs or hippocampus. Cerebellar NGF mRNA was also very sensitive to hormone deprivation. Physiological amounts of thyroid hormone stimulated both the mitotic activity and NGF production of cultured cerebellar neuroblasts. A lack of thyroid hormone is known to markedly alter cell formation in the cerebellum where postnatal neurogenesis is highly significant, in contrast to the olfactory bulbs and hippocampus. Taken together, these results suggest that the hormonal control of cell formation in the cerebellum is, at least partly, mediated by the autocrine mitogenic action of NGF. The thyroid hormone could temporally regulate the transient NGF synthesis by cerebellar neuroblasts directly and/or through its ontogenetic action, and hence all the NGF-dependent trophic effects. PMID:1295750

  17. Hyperalgesia induced in the rat by the amino-terminal octapeptide of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Y O; Levine, J D; Burch, R M; Woo, J E; Mobley, W C

    1991-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) in the mouse submandibular gland undergoes cleavage of its amino-terminal octapeptide when salivation is induced by epinephrine. The significance of this event is uncertain; cleaved NGF demonstrates bioactivity and no function has been attributed to the octapeptide produced (NGF-OP; Ser-Ser-Thr-His-Pro-Val-Phe-His). Enzyme inhibition studies indicating structural relatedness of NGF-OP and bradykinin (BK) prompted us to determine whether NGF-OP would elicit BK-like actions. We found that like BK, NGF-OP induced a decrease in mechanical nociceptive threshold (i.e., produced hyperalgesia) in the hairy skin of the rat. This effect was dose-dependent and sequence-specific; like BK it was attenuated by sympathectomy and indomethacin pretreatment. However, NGF-OP actions appeared to be distinct from those for BK in that tissue injury was required for NGF-OP to induce hyperalgesia. Furthermore, we found no evidence that NGF-OP bound to or activated BK receptors. Our data indicate that NGF-OP is a distinct mediator of hyperalgesia. We suggest that NGF-OP alters pain threshold in the injured target regions of NGF-responsive neurons. PMID:1647026

  18. Essential Oil of Ocimum basilicum L. and (-)-Linalool Blocks the Excitability of Rat Sciatic Nerve.

    PubMed

    Medeiros Venancio, Antonio; Ferreira-da-Silva, Francisco Walber; da Silva-Alves, Kerly Shamyra; de Carvalho Pimentel, Hugo; Macêdo Lima, Matheus; Fraga de Santana, Michele; Barreto Alves, Péricles; Batista da Silva, Givanildo; Leal-Cardoso, José Henrique; Marchioro, Murilo

    2016-01-01

    The racemate linalool and its levogyrus enantiomer [(-)-LIN] are present in many essential oils and possess several pharmacological activities, such as antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory. In this work, the effects of essential oil obtained from the cultivation of the Ocimum basilicum L. (EOOb) derived from Germplasm Bank rich in (-)-LIN content in the excitability of peripheral nervous system were studied. We used rat sciatic nerve to investigate the EOOb and (-)-LIN effects on neuron excitability and the extracellular recording technique was used to register the compound action potential (CAP). EOOb and (-)-LIN blocked the CAP in a concentration-dependent way and these effects were reversible after washout. EOOb blocked positive amplitude of 1st and 2nd CAP components with IC50 of 0.38 ± 0.2 and 0.17 ± 0.0 mg/mL, respectively. For (-)-LIN, these values were 0.23 ± 0.0 and 0.13 ± 0.0 mg/mL. Both components reduced the conduction velocity of CAP and the 2nd component seems to be more affected than the 1st component. In conclusion EOOb and (-)-LIN inhibited the excitability of peripheral nervous system in a similar way and potency, revealing that the effects of EOOb on excitability are due to the presence of (-)-LIN in the essential oil. PMID:27446227

  19. Synapsin I-like immunoreactivity in nerve fibers associated with lingual taste buds of the rat.

    PubMed

    Finger, T E; Womble, M; Kinnamon, J C; Ueda, T

    1990-02-01

    Immunoreactivity to synapsin I, a neuronal phosphoprotein, was localized in free-floating tissue sections prepared from lingual tissue of rats. Many nerve fibers within the tissue exhibited clear immunoreactivity including motor endplates on striated muscle, autonomic fibers innervating blood vessels or glands, and sensory fibers innervating muscles or the lingual epithelium including taste buds. Numerous immunoreactive fibers occurred within each taste bud, with fewer, fine fibers being dispersed in the epithelium between taste buds. The majority of the intragemmal immunoreactive fibers extended throughout the taste buds most of the distance outward from the basal lamina toward the surface of the epithelium. Fine, perigemmal fibers reached nearly to the epithelial surface. Ultrastructural analysis of the immunoreactive sensory fibers revealed that synapsin I-immunoreactivity occurred diffusely throughout the cytoplasm, and heavily in association with microvesicles. The synaptic vesicles at the taste receptor cell-to-afferent fiber synapse were, however, not immunoreactive for synapsin I, although these vesicles fall into the size class shown to be immunoreactive in other systems. This absence of synapsin I may be a common property of vesicles in axonless short receptor cells. PMID:2108194

  20. Differential regulation of glucocorticoid receptor expression in distinct columns of periaqueductal grey in rats with behavioural disability following nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Mor, David; Keay, Kevin A

    2013-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is diagnosed primarily by sensory dysfunction, which includes both spontaneous, and stimulus-evoked pain. Clinical evaluation highlights the disabilities which characterise this condition for most patients. Chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve (CCI) evokes sensory dysfunction characteristic of neuropathic pain. Approximately, 30 % of CCI rats show disabilities similar to those identified in clinical evaluation of neuropathic pain patients, these include: altered social behaviours; sleep disturbances; and endocrine dysfunction. The periaqueductal grey (PAG) is a nodal point in the brain circuits which regulate these functions, and undergoes a distinct set of neural and glial adaptations following CCI, in rats with disabilities. CCI increases corticosterone, which through its actions at the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), can trigger cellular adaptation. GR expression in PAG was quantified using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses and nerve-injured rats, with and without disabilities, were compared. Our data showed that the PAG of disabled rats has significantly increased expression of GR mRNA and protein. Further, this increased protein expression reflects contrasting patterns of change in GR expression in PAG subregions. The dorsolateral PAG had significant increases in the number of GR-immunoreactive (GR-IR) cells and the caudal lateral and ventrolateral PAG each had significant reductions in the number of GR-IR cells. These regional increases and decreases correlated with the degree of disability, as indicated by the degree of change in social behaviours. Our results suggest a role for altered PAG, GR-corticosterone interactions and their resultant cellular consequences in the expression of disabilities in a subpopulation of nerve-injured rats.

  1. Hybrid electro-optical stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve induces force generation in the plantarflexor muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Austin R.; Peterson, Erik; Mackanos, Mark A.; Atkinson, James; Tyler, Dustin; Jansen, E. Duco

    2012-12-01

    Objective. Optical methods of neural activation are becoming important tools for the study and treatment of neurological disorders. Infrared nerve stimulation (INS) is an optical technique exhibiting spatially precise activation in the native neural system. While this technique shows great promise, the risk of thermal damage may limit some applications. Combining INS with traditional electrical stimulation, a method known as hybrid electro-optical stimulation, reduces the laser power requirements and mitigates the risk of thermal damage while maintaining spatial selectivity. Here we investigate the capability of inducing force generation in the rat hind limb through hybrid stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Approach. Hybrid stimulation was achieved by combining an optically transparent nerve cuff for electrical stimulation and a diode laser coupled to an optical fiber for infrared stimulation. Force generation in the rat plantarflexor muscles was measured in response to hybrid stimulation with 1 s bursts of pulses at 15 and 20 Hz and with a burst frequency of 0.5 Hz. Main results. Forces were found to increase with successive stimulus trains, ultimately reaching a plateau by the 20th train. Hybrid evoked forces decayed at a rate similar to the rate of thermal diffusion in tissue. Preconditioning the nerve with an optical stimulus resulted in an increase in the force response to both electrical and hybrid stimulation. Histological evaluation showed no signs of thermally induced morphological changes following hybrid stimulation. Our results indicate that an increase in baseline temperature is a likely contributor to hybrid force generation. Significance. Extraneural INS of peripheral nerves at physiologically relevant repetition rates is possible using hybrid electro-optical stimulation.

  2. Hypertrophy of Neurons Within Cardiac Ganglia in Human, Canine, and Rat Heart Failure: The Potential Role of Nerve Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay; Sayers, Scott; Walter, James S.; Thomas, Donald; Dieter, Robert S.; Nee, Lisa M.; Wurster, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Autonomic imbalances including parasympathetic withdrawal and sympathetic overactivity are cardinal features of heart failure regardless of etiology; however, mechanisms underlying these imbalances remain unknown. Animal model studies of heart and visceral organ hypertrophy predict that nerve growth factor levels should be elevated in heart failure; whether this is so in human heart failure, though, remains unclear. We tested the hypotheses that neurons in cardiac ganglia are hypertrophied in human, canine, and rat heart failure and that nerve growth factor, which we hypothesize is elevated in the failing heart, contributes to this neuronal hypertrophy. Methods and Results Somal morphology of neurons from human (579.54±14.34 versus 327.45±9.17 μm2; P<0.01) and canine hearts (767.80±18.37 versus 650.23±9.84 μm2; P<0.01) failing secondary to ischemia and neurons from spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts (327.98±3.15 versus 271.29±2.79 μm2; P<0.01) failing secondary to hypertension reveal significant hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia compared with controls. Western blot analysis shows that nerve growth factor levels in the explanted, failing human heart are 250% greater than levels in healthy donor hearts. Neurons from cardiac ganglia cultured with nerve growth factor are significantly larger and have greater dendritic arborization than neurons in control cultures. Conclusions Hypertrophied neurons are significantly less excitable than smaller ones; thus, hypertrophy of vagal postganglionic neurons in cardiac ganglia would help to explain the parasympathetic withdrawal that accompanies heart failure. Furthermore, our observations suggest that nerve growth factor, which is elevated in the failing human heart, causes hypertrophy of neurons in cardiac ganglia. PMID:23959444

  3. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  4. Engrafted Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Anterior Specified Neural Progenitors Protect the Rat Crushed Optic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Satarian, Leila; Javan, Mohammad; Kiani, Sahar; Hajikaram, Maryam; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Baharvand, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background Degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is a common occurrence in several eye diseases. This study examined the functional improvement and protection of host RGCs in addition to the survival, integration and neuronal differentiation capabilities of anterior specified neural progenitors (NPs) following intravitreal transplantation. Methodology/Principal Findings NPs were produced under defined conditions from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and transplanted into rats whose optic nerves have been crushed (ONC). hiPSCs were induced to differentiate into anterior specified NPs by the use of Noggin and retinoic acid. The hiPSC-NPs were labeled by green fluorescent protein or a fluorescent tracer 1,1′ -dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) and injected two days after induction of ONC in hooded rats. Functional analysis according to visual evoked potential recordings showed significant amplitude recovery in animals transplanted with hiPSC-NPs. Retrograde labeling by an intra-collicular DiI injection showed significantly higher numbers of RGCs and spared axons in ONC rats treated with hiPSC-NPs or their conditioned medium (CM). The analysis of CM of hiPSC-NPs showed the secretion of ciliary neurotrophic factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor. Optic nerve of cell transplanted groups also had increased GAP43 immunoreactivity and myelin staining by FluoroMyelin™ which imply for protection of axons and myelin. At 60 days post-transplantation hiPSC-NPs were integrated into the ganglion cell layer of the retina and expressed neuronal markers. Conclusions/Significance The transplantation of anterior specified NPs may improve optic nerve injury through neuroprotection and differentiation into neuronal lineages. These NPs possibly provide a promising new therapeutic approach for traumatic optic nerve injuries and loss of RGCs caused by other diseases. PMID:23977164

  5. Effect of inferior alveolar nerve axotomy on periodontal and pulpal blood flow subsequent to experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Vandevska-Radunovic, V; Kvinnsland, I H; Kvinnsland, S

    1998-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) axotomy on periodontal (PDL) and pulpal blood flow incident to experimental tooth movement and to investigate whether nerve fiber regeneration coincides with blood flow changes. The first right mandibular molar was moved mesially for 3, 7, and 14 days after ipsilateral IAN axotomy in 29 rats. Four rats served as unoperated controls. At the end of each experimental period fluorescent microspheres (FM) were injected into the left ventricle and thereafter counted in serial sections in the PDL and pulp of the right and left first mandibular molars. The number of FM per tissue volume was taken as a measure of blood flow. Re-innervation of nerve fibers was mapped immunohistochemically 7, 14, and 21 days after IAN axotomy in 9 rats that had no orthodontic appliance. The statistical analysis showed no significant differences in the number of FM/mm3 PDL between the denervated and the contralateral side at 3 and 7 days. At 14 days the PDL on the denervated side showed a significant increase in the number of FM/mm3, coinciding with the initial periodontal nerve fiber re-innervation. In the pulp no significant differences were found between the denervated and the contralateral, innervated side in any experimental period. It can be concluded that IAN axotomy postpones an increase in periodontal blood flow until a sensory tissue re-innervation is established, thus indicating that neurogenic mechanisms play an important role in the development of the inflammatory reaction induced by experimental tooth movement.

  6. Behavioral and cellular consequences of high-electrode count Utah Arrays chronically implanted in rat sciatic nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, H. A. C.; Mathews, K. S.; Normann, R. A.; Fernandez, E.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Before peripheral nerve electrodes can be used for the restoration of sensory and motor functions in patients with neurological disorders, the behavioral and histological consequences of these devices must be investigated. These indices of biocompatibility can be defined in terms of desired functional outcomes; for example, a device may be considered for use as a therapeutic intervention if the implanted subject retains functional neurons post-implantation even in the presence of a foreign body response. The consequences of an indwelling device may remain localized to cellular responses at the device-tissue interface, such as fibrotic encapsulation of the device, or they may affect the animal more globally, such as impacting behavioral or sensorimotor functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the overall consequences of implantation of high-electrode count intrafascicular peripheral nerve arrays, High Density Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (HD-USEAs; 25 electrodes mm-2). Approach. HD-USEAs were implanted in rat sciatic nerves for one and two month periods. We monitored wheel running, noxious sensory paw withdrawal reflexes, footprints, nerve morphology and macrophage presence at the tissue-device interface. In addition, we used a novel approach to contain the arrays in actively behaving animals that consisted of an organic nerve wrap. A total of 500 electrodes were implanted across all ten animals. Main results. The results demonstrated that chronic implantation (⩽8 weeks) of HD-USEAs into peripheral nerves can evoke behavioral deficits that recover over time. Morphology of the nerve distal to the implantation site showed variable signs of nerve fiber degeneration and regeneration. Cytology adjacent to the device-tissue interface also showed a variable response, with some electrodes having many macrophages surrounding the electrodes, while other electrodes had few or no macrophages present. This variability was also seen along the length

  7. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Alters Phase Synchrony of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Facilitates Decision Making in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bing; Wang, Jun; Shahed, Mahadi; Jelfs, Beth; Chan, Rosa H. M.; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) can enhance memory and cognitive functions in both rats and humans. Studies have shown that VNS influenced decision-making in epileptic patients. However, the sites of action involved in the cognitive-enhancement are poorly understood. By employing a conscious rat model equipped with vagus nerve cuff electrode, we assess the role of chronic VNS on decision-making in rat gambling task (RGT). Simultaneous multichannel-recordings offer an ideal setup to test the hypothesis that VNS may induce alterations of in both spike-field-coherence and synchronization of theta oscillations across brain areas in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Daily VNS, administered immediately following training sessions of RGT, caused an increase in ‘good decision-maker’ rats. Neural spikes in the ACC became synchronized with the ongoing theta oscillations of local field potential (LFP) in BLA following VNS. Moreover, cross-correlation analysis revealed synchronization between the ACC and BLA. Our results provide specific evidence that VNS facilitates decision-making and unveils several important roles for VNS in regulating LFP and spike phases, as well as enhancing spike-phase coherence between key brain areas involved in cognitive performance. These data may serve to provide fundamental notions regarding neurophysiological biomarkers for therapeutic VNS in cognitive impairment. PMID:27731403

  8. Subsurface optical stimulation of the rat prostate nerves using continuous-wave near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-02-01

    Successful identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CN), which are responsible for sexual function, during prostate cancer surgery, will require subsurface detection of the CN beneath a thin fascia layer. This study explores optical nerve stimulation (ONS) in the rat with a fascia layer placed over the CN. Two near-IR diode lasers (1455 nm and 1550 nm lasers) were used to stimulate the CN in CW mode with a 1-mm-diameter spot in 8 rats. The 1455 nm wavelength provides an optical penetration depth (OPD) of ~350 μm, while 1550 nm provides an OPD of ~1000 μm (~3 times deeper than 1455 nm and 1870 nm wavelengths previously tested). Fascia layers with thicknesses of 85 - 600 μm were placed over the CN. Successful ONS was confirmed by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the rat penis at 1455 nm through fascia 110 μm thick and at 1550 nm through fascia 450 μm thick. Higher incident laser power was necessary and weaker and slower ICP responses were observed as fascia thickness was increased. Subsurface ONS of the rat CN at a depth of 450 μm using a 1550 nm laser is feasible.

  9. Optimal Effect of Phenol Block in the Sciatic Nerve of Rats: Standardization of Minimized Dosage and Duration of Application.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuan-Chao; Chang, Chein-Wei; Tsai, Su-Ju

    2015-08-31

    The phenol nerve block has been widely used in clinical practice for spasticity reduction, but the correlation between the dosage of phenol and its effectiveness has seldom been discussed. The objective was to determine the optimal duration of phenol in contact with the nervous tissue and to investigate the dose-response relationship of 5% aqueous phenol solution by percutaneous nerve block in rats. Group I (n = 8) received sciatic nerve block by bathing the nerves in phenol solution, and group II (n = 40) by injecting phenol percutaneously. Group IIa to IId received different volumes (0.80, 0.16, 0.08 and 0.04 ml) and group IIe received normal saline. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) was measured pre-injection and at 90 and 270 sec after injection and after surgical exposure of the nerves. The duration of CMAP reduced by 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% after phenol injection was also recorded. The mean latency for the evoked response to subside in direct phenol application (group I) and percutaneous nerve block (group IIa) were 73.5 ± 5.9 and 62.4 ± 7.6 sec, respectively. There was no statistical difference for the time periods in the blocking effect elicited by phenol solution between these two methods. Ninety sec was set as the optimal duration for phenol to produce complete conduction blockage. Higher volume of phenol produced more significant blocking effect at 90 and 270 sec after injection. Percutaneous injection with 0.16 ml of phenol solution had the same blocking effect as 0.8 ml. The continuous injection model for percutaneous phenol block indeed used significantly more phenol than actually needed. Clinically, the progressive injection model can be used to minimize injection volume.

  10. Optimal Effect of Phenol Block in the Sciatic Nerve of Rats: Standardization of Minimized Dosage and Duration of Application.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chuan-Chao; Chang, Chein-Wei; Tsai, Su-Ju

    2015-08-31

    The phenol nerve block has been widely used in clinical practice for spasticity reduction, but the correlation between the dosage of phenol and its effectiveness has seldom been discussed. The objective was to determine the optimal duration of phenol in contact with the nervous tissue and to investigate the dose-response relationship of 5% aqueous phenol solution by percutaneous nerve block in rats. Group I (n = 8) received sciatic nerve block by bathing the nerves in phenol solution, and group II (n = 40) by injecting phenol percutaneously. Group IIa to IId received different volumes (0.80, 0.16, 0.08 and 0.04 ml) and group IIe received normal saline. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) was measured pre-injection and at 90 and 270 sec after injection and after surgical exposure of the nerves. The duration of CMAP reduced by 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% after phenol injection was also recorded. The mean latency for the evoked response to subside in direct phenol application (group I) and percutaneous nerve block (group IIa) were 73.5 ± 5.9 and 62.4 ± 7.6 sec, respectively. There was no statistical difference for the time periods in the blocking effect elicited by phenol solution between these two methods. Ninety sec was set as the optimal duration for phenol to produce complete conduction blockage. Higher volume of phenol produced more significant blocking effect at 90 and 270 sec after injection. Percutaneous injection with 0.16 ml of phenol solution had the same blocking effect as 0.8 ml. The continuous injection model for percutaneous phenol block indeed used significantly more phenol than actually needed. Clinically, the progressive injection model can be used to minimize injection volume. PMID:26211647

  11. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, K; Storey, M; Peterson, K; Nutter, P

    1988-01-01

    In brief: Nerve injuries in athletes may be serious and may delay or prevent an athlete's return to his or her sport. Over a two-year period, the authors evaluated the condition of 65 patients who had entrapments of a nerve or nerve root, documented with electromyography. They describe four case histories: Two patients had radial nerve entrapments, one caused by baseball pitching and the other by kayaking; one football player had combined suprascapular neuropathy and upper trunk brachial plexopathy; and one patient had carpal tunnel syndrome of a median nerve secondary to rowing. Sports-related peripheral nerve lesions of the lower extremity were not seen during the study period. Based on a literature review, the nerve injuries discussed represent the spectrum of nerve entrapments likely to be seen in US clinics. The authors conclude that peripheral nerve lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sports injuries, particularly at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

  12. Cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine administration prevents peripheral neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve crush injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Emril, Dessy R; Wibowo, Samekto; Meliala, Lucas; Susilowati, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytidine 5′-diphosphocholine (citicoline) has been shown to have beneficial effects in central nervous system injury as well as in motoric functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury. This study aimed to examine the effect of citicoline on prevention of neuropathic pain in a rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury. Methods Forty experimental rats were divided into four groups. In three groups, the right sciatic nerves were crushed in the mid-thigh region, and a gelatin sponge moistened with 0.4 or 0.8 mL of 100 µmol/L citicoline, or saline 0.4 mL in the control group, was applied. The fourth group of rats was sham-operated, ie the sciatic nerve was exposed with no crush. Functional assessments were performed 4 weeks after crush injury. von Frey filaments (100 g threshold) were used to assess neuropathic pain. In addition, the sciatic functional index and extensor postural thrust (EPT) tests were used to assess motoric function. Results The crush/citicoline 0.4 mL group had a lower percentage of pain (23.53%, n=17) compared with the crush/saline group (53.33%, n=15, P<0.005). The crush/citicoline 0.4 mL group also showed better motoric recovery, as seen in stronger EPT results (P<0.001). However, the sciatic functional index analysis did not show significant differences between groups (P=0.35). The crush/citicoline 0.8 mL group showed a higher percentage of pain (66.67%, n=18) and less EPT recovery. These results may be explained by more severe nerve injury due to compression with a larger administered volume. Conclusion In situ administration of 0.4 mL of 100 µmol/L citicoline prevents the occurrence of neuropathic pain and induces motoric recovery, evaluated by EPT test, 4 weeks after sciatic nerve injury. PMID:27284264

  13. Systemic administration of vitamins C and E attenuates nociception induced by chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve in rats.

    PubMed

    Riffel, Ana Paula K; de Souza, Jéssica A; Santos, Maria do Carmo Q; Horst, Andréa; Scheid, Taína; Kolberg, Carolina; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Partata, Wania A

    2016-03-01

    Antioxidants have been tested to treat neuropathic pain, and α-Tocopherol (vitamin E--vit. E) and ascorbic acid (vitamin C--vit. C) are potent antioxidants. We assessed the effect of intraperitoneal administration of vit. C (30 mg/kg/day) and vit. E (15 mg/kg/day), given alone or in combination, on the mechanical and thermal thresholds and the sciatic functional index (SFI) in rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. We also determined the lipid hydroperoxides and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in the injured sciatic nerve. Further, we assessed the effects of oral administration of vit. C+vit. E (vit. C+E) and of a combination of vit. C+E and gabapentin (100mg/kg/day, i.p.) on the mechanical and thermal thresholds of CCI rats. The vitamins, whether administered orally or i.p., attenuated the reductions in the mechanical and thermal thresholds induced by CCI. The antinociceptive effect was greater with a combination of vit. C+E than with each vitamin given alone. The SFI was also improved in vitamin-treated CCI rats. Co-administration of vit. C+E and gabapentin induced a greater antinociceptive effect than gabapentin alone. No significant change occurred in TAC and lipid hydroperoxide levels, but TAC increased (45%) while lipid hydroperoxides decreased (38%) in the sciatic nerve from vit. C+E-treated CCI rats. Thus, treatment with a combination of vit. C+E was more effective to treat CCI-induced neuropathic pain than vitamins alone, and the antinociceptive effect was greater with co-administration of vit. C+E and gabapentin than with gabapentin alone. PMID:26855326

  14. Wire mesh as a post-operative physiotherapy assistive device following peripheral nerve graft repair in the rat.

    PubMed

    Strasberg, S R; Watanabe, O; Mackinnon, S E; Tarasidis, G; Hertl, M C; Wells, M R

    1996-01-01

    Traditional methods of assessing nerve recovery following injury, including histomorphometry and electrophysiology, do not necessarily correlate with return of motor and sensory function. Accordingly, many investigators have used walking track analysis as an assessment of global functional recovery following sciatic, peroneal or tibial nerve injury. However, walking track reliability may be compromised by the development of flexion contractures secondary to neurologic loss. To prevent this, regular manual physiotherapy is recommended which is a time-consuming and often frustrating process for both the animal and investigator. We report the use of a wire mesh as a simple post-operative assistive device to provide constant physiotherapy. Twelve Lewis rats were randomized to one of two experimental groups. Each rat received a 2 cm posterior tibial nerve autograft. Postoperatively, animals in group 1 received manual physiotherapy, consisting of repeated flexion and extension exercises of the ankle, knee and hip every two weeks. Group 2 rats were permitted to climb freely on a 30 x 18 cm piece of wire mesh placed at a 45 degree angle within their cage. Group 2 rats received no manual physiotherapy throughout the course of the study. Serial walking tracks were performed every four weeks until sacrifice at sixteen weeks. There was no development of flexion contractures in the injured hind limbs of either group. There was no morbidity such as blisters associated with the use of the wire mesh. There was no statistical difference in walking track recovery between groups at any time period. However, a trend towards better functional recovery was seen in the group receiving constant physiotherapy via the wire mesh. The use of a wire mesh as a post-operative assistive device is an inexpensive, simple and reliable method to provide continuous physiotherapy to animals following denervation.

  15. Respective pharmacological features of neuropathic-like pain evoked by intrathecal BDNF versus sciatic nerve ligation in rats.

    PubMed

    M'Dahoma, Saïd; Barthélemy, Sandrine; Tromilin, Claire; Jeanson, Tiffany; Viguier, Florent; Michot, Benoit; Pezet, Sophie; Hamon, Michel; Bourgoin, Sylvie

    2015-11-01

    Numerous reported data support the idea that Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is critically involved in both depression and comorbid pain. The possible direct effect of BDNF on pain mechanisms was assessed here and compared with behavioral/neurobiological features of neuropathic pain caused by chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve (CCI-SN). Sprague-Dawley male rats were either injected intrathecally with BDNF (3.0 ng i.t.) or subjected to unilateral CCI-SN. Their respective responses to anti-hyperalgesic drugs were assessed using the Randall-Selitto test and both immunohistochemical and RT-qPCR approaches were used to investigate molecular/cellular mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia in both models. Long lasting hyperalgesia and allodynia were induced by i.t. BDNF in intact healthy rats like those found after CCI-SN. Acute treatment with the BDNF-TrkB receptor antagonist cyclotraxin B completely prevented i.t. BDNF-induced hyperalgesia and partially reversed this symptom in both BDNF-pretreated and CCI-SN lesioned rats. Acute administration of the anticonvulsant pregabalin, the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, the opioid analgesics morphine and tapentadol or the antidepressant agomelatine also transiently reversed hyperalgesia in both i.t. BDNF injected- and CCI-SN lesioned-rats. Marked induction of microglia activation markers (OX42, Iba1, P-p38), proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, NMDA receptor subunit NR2B and BDNF was found in spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglia of CCI-SN rats. A long lasting spinal BDNF overexpression was also observed in BDNF i.t. rats, indicating an autocrine self-induction, with downstream long lasting TrkB-mediated neuropathic-like pain. Accordingly, TrkB blockade appeared as a relevant approach to alleviate not only i.t. BDNF- but also nerve lesion-evoked neuropathic pain. PMID:26343858

  16. Intermittent hypoxia-induced sensitization of central chemoreceptors contributes to sympathetic nerve activity during late expiration in rats.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B; Moraes, Davi J A; Paton, Julian F R; Machado, Benedito H; Rybak, Ilya A

    2011-06-01

    Hypertension elicited by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is associated with elevated activity of the thoracic sympathetic nerve (tSN) that exhibits an enhanced respiratory modulation reflecting a strengthened interaction between respiratory and sympathetic networks within the brain stem. Expiration is a passive process except for special metabolic conditions such as hypercapnia, when it becomes active through phasic excitation of abdominal motor nerves (AbN) in late expiration. An increase in CO(2) evokes late-expiratory (late-E) discharges phase-locked to phrenic bursts with the frequency increasing quantally as hypercapnia increases. In rats exposed to CIH, the late-E discharges synchronized in AbN and tSN emerge in normocapnia. To elucidate the possible neural mechanisms underlying these phenomena, we extended our computational model of the brain stem respiratory network by incorporating a population of presympathetic neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla that received inputs from the pons, medullary respiratory compartments, and retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG). Our simulations proposed that CIH conditioning increases the CO(2) sensitivity of RTN/pFRG neurons, causing a reduction in both the CO(2) threshold for emerging the late-E activity in AbN and tSN and the hypocapnic threshold for apnea. Using the in situ rat preparation, we have confirmed that CIH-conditioned rats under normal conditions exhibit synchronized late-E discharges in AbN and tSN similar to those observed in control rats during hypercapnia. Moreover, the hypocapnic threshold for apnea was significantly lowered in CIH-conditioned rats relative to that in control rats. We conclude that CIH may sensitize central chemoreception and that this significantly contributes to the neural impetus for generation of sympathetic activity and hypertension.

  17. Enhanced sympathetic nerve activity induced by neonatal colon inflammation induces gastric hypersensitivity and anxiety-like behavior in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Winston, John H; Sarna, Sushil K

    2016-07-01

    Gastric hypersensitivity (GHS) and anxiety are prevalent in functional dyspepsia patients; their underlying mechanisms remain unknown largely because of lack of availability of live visceral tissues from human subjects. Recently, we demonstrated in a preclinical model that rats subjected to neonatal colon inflammation show increased basal plasma norepinephrine (NE), which contributes to GHS through the upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the gastric fundus. We tested the hypothesis that neonatal colon inflammation increases anxiety-like behavior and sympathetic nervous system activity, which upregulates the expression of NGF to induce GHS in adult life. Chemical sympathectomy, but not adrenalectomy, suppressed the elevated NGF expression in the fundus muscularis externa and GHS. The measurement of heart rate variability showed a significant increase in the low frequency-to-high frequency ratio in GHS vs. the control rats. Stimulus-evoked release of NE from the fundus muscularis externa strips was significantly greater in GHS than in the control rats. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased in the celiac ganglia of the GHS vs. the control rats. We found an increase in trait but not stress-induced anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats in an elevated plus maze. We concluded that neonatal programming triggered by colon inflammation upregulates tyrosine hydroxylase in the celiac ganglia, which upregulates the release of NE in the gastric fundus muscularis externa. The increase of NE release from the sympathetic nerve terminals concentration dependently upregulates NGF, which proportionately increases the visceromotor response to gastric distention. Neonatal programming concurrently increases anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats. PMID:27151940

  18. Macrophage depletion lowers blood pressure and restores sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic receptor function in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Thang, Loc V; Demel, Stacie L; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E; Swain, Greg M; Van Rooijen, Nico; Galligan, James J

    2015-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vascular macrophage infiltration and O2 (-) release impairs sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic autoreceptor (α2AR) function in mesenteric arteries (MAs) of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Male rats were uninephrectomized or sham operated (sham). DOCA pellets were implanted subcutaneously in uninephrectomized rats who were provided high-salt drinking water or high-salt water with apocynin. Sham rats received tap water. Blood pressure was measured using radiotelemetry. Treatment of sham and DOCA-salt rats with liposome-encapsulated clodronate was used to deplete macrophages. After 3-5, 10-13, and 18-21 days of DOCA-salt treatment, MAs and peritoneal fluid were harvested from euthanized rats. Norepinephrine (NE) release from periarterial sympathetic nerves was measured in vitro using amperometry with microelectrodes. Macrophage infiltration into MAs as well as TNF-α and p22(phox) were measured using immunohistochemistry. Peritoneal macrophage activation was measured by flow cytometry. O2 (-) was measured using dihydroethidium staining. Hypertension developed over 28 days, and apocynin reduced blood pressure on days 18-21. O2 (-) and macrophage infiltration were greater in DOCA-salt MAs compared with sham MAs after day 10. Peritoneal macrophage activation occurred after day 10 in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophages expressing TNF-α and p22(phox) were localized near sympathetic nerves. Impaired α2AR function and increased NE release from sympathetic nerves occurred in MAs from DOCA-salt rats after day 18. Macrophage depletion reduced blood pressure and vascular O2 (-) while restoring α2AR function in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophage infiltration into the vascular adventitia contributes to increased blood pressure in DOCA-salt rats by releasing O2 (-), which disrupts α2AR function, causing enhanced NE release from sympathetic nerves.

  19. The rate and magnitude of atmospheric pressure change that aggravate pain-related behavior of nerve injured rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funakubo, Megumi; Sato, Jun; Obata, Kouei; Mizumura, Kazue

    2011-05-01

    Complaints of patients with chronic pain may increase when the weather changes. The exact mechanism for weather change-induced pain has not been clarified. We have previously demonstrated that artificially lowering barometric pressure (LP) intensifies pain-related behaviors in rats with neuropathic pain [chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spinal nerve ligation (SNL)]. In the present study, we examined the rate and magnitude of LP that aggravates neuropathic pain. We measured pain-related behaviors [number of paw lifts to von Frey hair (VFH) stimulation] in awake rats after SNL or CCI surgery, and found that rates of decompression ≥5 hPa/h and ≥10 hPa/h and magnitudes of decompression ≥5 hPa and ≥10 hPa augmented pain-related behaviors in SNL and CCI rats, respectively. These results indicate that LP within the range of natural weather patterns augments neuropathic pain in rats, and that SNL rats are more sensitive to LP than CCI rats.

  20. Effect of acute and chronic administration of L-tyrosine on nerve growth factor levels in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Jeremias, Isabela C; Scaini, Giselli; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Most inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism produce hypertyrosinemia. Neurological manifestations are variable and some patients are developmentally normal, while others show different degrees of developmental retardation. Considering that current data do not eliminate the possibility that elevated levels of tyrosine and/or its derivatives may have noxious effects on central nervous system development in some patients, the present study evaluated nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in hippocampus, striatum and posterior cortex of young rats. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (10 and 30 days old) were killed 1 h after a single intraperitoneal administration of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline. Chronic administration consisted of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline injections 12 h apart for 24 days in Wistar rats (7 days old); the rats were killed 12 h after the last injection. NGF levels were then evaluated. Our findings showed that acute administration of L-tyrosine decreased NGF levels in striatum of 10-day-old rats. In the 30-day-old rats, NGF levels were decreased in hippocampus and posterior cortex. On the other hand, chronic administration of L-tyrosine increased NGF levels in posterior cortex. Decreased NGF may impair growth, differentiation, survival and maintenance of neurons. PMID:23690230

  1. The rate and magnitude of atmospheric pressure change that aggravate pain-related behavior of nerve injured rats.

    PubMed

    Funakubo, Megumi; Sato, Jun; Obata, Kouei; Mizumura, Kazue

    2011-05-01

    Complaints of patients with chronic pain may increase when the weather changes. The exact mechanism for weather change-induced pain has not been clarified. We have previously demonstrated that artificially lowering barometric pressure (LP) intensifies pain-related behaviors in rats with neuropathic pain [chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spinal nerve ligation (SNL)]. In the present study, we examined the rate and magnitude of LP that aggravates neuropathic pain. We measured pain-related behaviors [number of paw lifts to von Frey hair (VFH) stimulation] in awake rats after SNL or CCI surgery, and found that rates of decompression ≥5 hPa/h and ≥10 hPa/h and magnitudes of decompression ≥5 hPa and ≥10 hPa augmented pain-related behaviors in SNL and CCI rats, respectively. These results indicate that LP within the range of natural weather patterns augments neuropathic pain in rats, and that SNL rats are more sensitive to LP than CCI rats.

  2. Jinmaitong decreases sciatic nerve DNA oxidative damage and apoptosis in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model

    PubMed Central

    YIN, DE-HAI; LIANG, XIAO-CHUN; ZHAO, LI; ZHANG, HONG; SUN, QING; WANG, PU-YAN; SUN, LIAN-QING

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a common chronic complication of diabetes. Jinmaitong (JMT), a Traditional Chinese Medicine, improves certain symptoms of DPN, such as limb pain and numbness. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of JMT on DNA oxidative damage and apoptosis in the sciatic nerve of diabetic rats. The rats were divided into a normal and a diabetic group. Diabetes was induced using streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). The diabetic model (DM) rats received vitamin C (0.05 g/kg/day) or JMT [low-dosage (L), 0.44 g/kg/day; medium-dosage (M), 0.88 g/kg/day or high-dosage (H), 1.75 g/kg/day]. After 16 weeks, the mechanical pain threshold of the rats was evaluated. The expression of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase p22phox, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), caspase 3 and cleaved-poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) in the sciatic nerve tissues was measured using the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and western blotting. JMT had no effect on body weight and fasting blood glucose levels. Following treatment, the rats in the JMT groups had an improved pain threshold compared with the DM controls (JMT-L, 52.9±6.5 g; JMT-M, 74.7±9.3 g; and JMT-H, 61.7±2.0 g vs. DM control, 35.32±12.06 g; all P<0.01), while the threshold in the JMT-M rats was similar to that of normal controls (P>0.05). 8-OHdG and NADPH oxidase p22phox expression was significantly decreased in the three JMT groups compared with that in the DM controls (all P<0.05). Following JMT treatment, Bcl-2 levels were increased, while caspase 3 and cleaved-PARP-1 levels were decreased compared with those in the DM controls (all P<0.01). In conclusion, JMT may reduce DNA oxidative damage to the sciatic nerve in diabetic rats, as well as regulate genes involved in peripheral neuronal cell apoptosis, suggesting that JMT could be used to prevent or treat DPN in diabetic patients. PMID

  3. Differential role of P-glycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein in drug distribution into brain, CSF and peripheral nerve tissues in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liyue; Li, Xingwen; Roberts, Jonathan; Janosky, Brett; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    1. This study was designed to evaluate how the absence of P-glycoprotein (Pgp, Mdr1a), breast cancer-resistance protein (Bcrp, Abcg2) or both affects drug distribution into sciatic nerves, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in rats. 2. Pgp substrate (loperamide), BCRP substrates (dantrolene and proprietary compound X) and dual substrates (imatinib and proprietary compound Y) were well distributed into sciatic nerves with comparable nerve to plasma concentration ratios between wild-type and knockout (KO) rats. 3. Brain exposure increased substantially in Mdr1a(-/-) rats for loperamide and in Mdr1a(-/-)/Abcg2(-/-) rats for imatinib and compound Y, but minimally to modestly in Abcg2(-/-) rats for dantrolene and compound X. The deletion of Mdr1a or Abcg2 alone had little effect on brain distribution of compound Y. 4. While CSF to unbound brain concentration ratio remained ≥3 in the KO animals for dantrolene, compounds X and Y, it was reduced to 1 in the Mdr1a(-/-)/Abcg2(-/-) rats for imatinib. 5. The data indicate that Pgp and Bcrp do not play significant roles in drug distribution into peripheral nerve tissues in rats, while working in concert to regulate brain penetration. Our results further support that CSF concentration may not be a good surrogate for unbound brain concentration of efflux substrates.

  4. Uptake and metabolism of fructose by rat neocortical cells in vivo and by isolated nerve terminals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Elsais, Ahmed; Frøland, Anne-Sofie; Taubøll, Erik; Gjerstad, Leif; Quan, Yi; Dingledine, Raymond; Rise, Frode

    2015-05-01

    Fructose reacts spontaneously with proteins in the brain to form advanced glycation end products (AGE) that may elicit neuroinflammation and cause brain pathology, including Alzheimer's disease. We investigated whether fructose is eliminated by oxidative metabolism in neocortex. Injection of [(14) C]fructose or its AGE-prone metabolite [(14) C]glyceraldehyde into rat neocortex in vivo led to formation of (14) C-labeled alanine, glutamate, aspartate, GABA, and glutamine. In isolated neocortical nerve terminals, [(14) C]fructose-labeled glutamate, GABA, and aspartate, indicating uptake of fructose into nerve terminals and oxidative fructose metabolism in these structures. This was supported by high expression of hexokinase 1, which channels fructose into glycolysis, and whose activity was similar with fructose or glucose as substrates. By contrast, the fructose-specific ketohexokinase was weakly expressed. The fructose transporter Glut5 was expressed at only 4% of the level of neuronal glucose transporter Glut3, suggesting transport across plasma membranes of brain cells as the limiting factor in removal of extracellular fructose. The genes encoding aldose reductase and sorbitol dehydrogenase, enzymes of the polyol pathway that forms glucose from fructose, were expressed in rat neocortex. These results point to fructose being transported into neocortical cells, including nerve terminals, and that it is metabolized and thereby detoxified primarily through hexokinase activity. We asked how the brain handles fructose, which may react spontaneously with proteins to form 'advanced glycation end products' and trigger inflammation. Neocortical cells took up and metabolized extracellular fructose oxidatively in vivo, and isolated nerve terminals did so in vitro. The low expression of fructose transporter Glut5 limited uptake of extracellular fructose. Hexokinase was a main pathway for fructose metabolism, but ketohexokinase (which leads to glyceraldehyde formation) was

  5. Gabapentin loses efficacy over time after nerve injury in rats: role of glutamate transporter-1 in the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masafumi; Eisenach, James C; Hayashida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Despite being one of the first-choice analgesics for chronic neuropathic pain, gabapentin sometimes fails to provide analgesia, but the mechanisms for this lack of efficacy is unclear. Rats with nerve injury including L5-L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) respond uniformly and well to gabapentin, but many of these studies are performed within just a few weeks of injury, questioning their relevance to chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, intraperitoneal gabapentin showed a time-dependently reduction in antihypersensitivity after SNL, associated with downregulation of astroglial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) in the locus coeruleus (LC). Consistently, SNL also time-dependently increased basal but masked gabapentin-induced noradrenergic neuronal activity in the LC. In rats 2 weeks after SNL, knock-down of GLT-1 in the LC reduced the antihypersensitivity effect of gabapentin. In rats 8 weeks after SNL, increasing GLT-1 expression by histone deacetylase inhibitor valproate restored the antihypersensitivity effect of gabapentin, associated with restored gabapentin-induced noradrenergic neuronal activity in the LC and subsequent spinal noradrenaline release. Knock-down of GLT-1 in the LC reversed the effect of valproate to restore gabapentin-induced antihypersensitivity. In addition, the antihypersensitivity effect of the intrathecal α2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine also decreased with time after SNL injury. These results suggest that downregulation of GLT-1 in the LC and reduced spinal noradrenergic inhibition contribute to impaired analgesic efficacy from gabapentin in chronic neuropathic pain and that valproate can rescue this impaired efficacy.

  6. Neuroprotective effect of docosahexaenoic acid nanoemulsion on erectile function in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Wu, Yi-No; Chen, Bin-Huei; Lin, Ying-Hung; Ho, Hsiu-O; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for treatment of erectile dysfunction resulting from radical prostatectomy and cavernous nerve (CN) injury. Given the neuroprotective properties of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), we investigated its effect on penile functional and structural recovery in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury. Rats were subject to CN injury and received intraperitoneal administration of either vehicle or a DHA nanoemulsion (nano-DHA) at 10, 50, or 250 μg/kg. Functional testing and histological analyses were performed at 28 days post-injury. The maximum intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and other measures of erectile function were significantly higher in the nano-DHA groups than in the vehicle group (p < 0.05). The ratio of area of expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/β-III tubulin, numbers of axon and smooth muscle cell content were significantly higher in the 50 μg/kg nano-DHA group than in the vehicle group (p < 0.05). A qualitative increase in the smooth muscle cells/collagen ratio and decrease in apoptosis was observed in the nano-DHA groups relative to the vehicle group: however, these differences were not statistically significant. Our data demonstrate that nano-DHA, particularly the 50 μg/kg regimen, improves erectile function after bilateral CN injury in rats by neuroprotection and other anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:27625175

  7. Neuroprotective effect of docosahexaenoic acid nanoemulsion on erectile function in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Wu, Yi-No; Chen, Bin-Huei; Lin, Ying-Hung; Ho, Hsiu-O; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for treatment of erectile dysfunction resulting from radical prostatectomy and cavernous nerve (CN) injury. Given the neuroprotective properties of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), we investigated its effect on penile functional and structural recovery in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury. Rats were subject to CN injury and received intraperitoneal administration of either vehicle or a DHA nanoemulsion (nano-DHA) at 10, 50, or 250 μg/kg. Functional testing and histological analyses were performed at 28 days post-injury. The maximum intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and other measures of erectile function were significantly higher in the nano-DHA groups than in the vehicle group (p < 0.05). The ratio of area of expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/β-III tubulin, numbers of axon and smooth muscle cell content were significantly higher in the 50 μg/kg nano-DHA group than in the vehicle group (p < 0.05). A qualitative increase in the smooth muscle cells/collagen ratio and decrease in apoptosis was observed in the nano-DHA groups relative to the vehicle group: however, these differences were not statistically significant. Our data demonstrate that nano-DHA, particularly the 50 μg/kg regimen, improves erectile function after bilateral CN injury in rats by neuroprotection and other anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:27625175

  8. Neuroprotective effect of docosahexaenoic acid nanoemulsion on erectile function in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Wu, Yi-No; Chen, Bin-Huei; Lin, Ying-Hung; Ho, Hsiu-O; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2016-01-01

    There is an unmet need for treatment of erectile dysfunction resulting from radical prostatectomy and cavernous nerve (CN) injury. Given the neuroprotective properties of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), we investigated its effect on penile functional and structural recovery in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury. Rats were subject to CN injury and received intraperitoneal administration of either vehicle or a DHA nanoemulsion (nano-DHA) at 10, 50, or 250 μg/kg. Functional testing and histological analyses were performed at 28 days post-injury. The maximum intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and other measures of erectile function were significantly higher in the nano-DHA groups than in the vehicle group (p < 0.05). The ratio of area of expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)/β-III tubulin, numbers of axon and smooth muscle cell content were significantly higher in the 50 μg/kg nano-DHA group than in the vehicle group (p < 0.05). A qualitative increase in the smooth muscle cells/collagen ratio and decrease in apoptosis was observed in the nano-DHA groups relative to the vehicle group: however, these differences were not statistically significant. Our data demonstrate that nano-DHA, particularly the 50 μg/kg regimen, improves erectile function after bilateral CN injury in rats by neuroprotection and other anti-fibrotic and anti-apoptotic mechanisms.

  9. Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Arcuate Nuclei Contribute to Elevated Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Pregnant Rats: Roles of Neuropeptide Y and α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Gotthardt, Laura C; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the contributions of the hypothalamic paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in α-chloralose-anesthetized pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Baseline arterial pressure (AP) was lower, and heart rate (HR), lumbar sympathetic activity, and splanchnic SNA were higher in pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus via bilateral muscimol nanoinjections decreased AP and HR more in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats and decreased lumbar SNA only in pregnant rats. Similarly, after arcuate muscimol nanoninjections, the decreases in AP, HR, and lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activities were greater in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats. Major arcuate neuronal groups that project to the paraventricular nucleus express inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) and excitatory α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Inhibition of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 also decreased AP, HR, and lumbar SNA in pregnant rats but not in nonpregnant rats. Conversely, paraventricular nucleus NPY expression was reduced in pregnant animals, and although blockade of paraventricular NPY Y1 receptors increased AP, HR, and lumbar sympathetic activity in nonpregnant rats, it had no effects in pregnant rats. Yet, the sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic effects of paraventricular NPY nanoinjections were similar between groups. In conclusion, the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei contribute to increased basal SNA during pregnancy, likely due in part to decreased tonic NPY inhibition and increased tonic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone excitation of presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus.

  10. Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Arcuate Nuclei Contribute to Elevated Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Pregnant Rats: Roles of Neuropeptide Y and α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Gotthardt, Laura C; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the contributions of the hypothalamic paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in α-chloralose-anesthetized pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Baseline arterial pressure (AP) was lower, and heart rate (HR), lumbar sympathetic activity, and splanchnic SNA were higher in pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus via bilateral muscimol nanoinjections decreased AP and HR more in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats and decreased lumbar SNA only in pregnant rats. Similarly, after arcuate muscimol nanoninjections, the decreases in AP, HR, and lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activities were greater in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats. Major arcuate neuronal groups that project to the paraventricular nucleus express inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) and excitatory α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Inhibition of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 also decreased AP, HR, and lumbar SNA in pregnant rats but not in nonpregnant rats. Conversely, paraventricular nucleus NPY expression was reduced in pregnant animals, and although blockade of paraventricular NPY Y1 receptors increased AP, HR, and lumbar sympathetic activity in nonpregnant rats, it had no effects in pregnant rats. Yet, the sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic effects of paraventricular NPY nanoinjections were similar between groups. In conclusion, the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei contribute to increased basal SNA during pregnancy, likely due in part to decreased tonic NPY inhibition and increased tonic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone excitation of presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus. PMID:26483343

  11. A new type of Schwann cell graft transplantation to promote optic nerve regeneration in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Mo, Xiaofen; Guo, Wenyi; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Peihua; Wang, Yan; Rong, Xianfang; Tian, Jie; Sun, Xinghuai

    2010-12-01

    Like other parts of the central nervous system, the adult mammalian optic nerve is difficult to regenerate after injury. Transplantation of the peripheral nerve or a Schwann cell (SC) graft can promote injured axonal regrowth. We tried to develop a new type of tissue-engineered SC graft that consisted of SCs seeded onto a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/chitosan conduit. Meanwhile, SCs were transfected along the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene in vitro by electroporation to increase their neurotrophic effect. Four weeks after transplantation, GAP-43 labelled regenerating axons were found in the SC grafts, and axons in the CNTF-SC graft were longer than those in the SC graft. Tissue-engineered SC grafts can provide a feasible environment for optic nerve regeneration and may become an alternative for bridging damaged nerves and repairing nerve defects in the future.

  12. Injury-Dependent and Disability-Specific Lumbar Spinal Gene Regulation following Sciatic Nerve Injury in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Austin, Paul J; Bembrick, Alison L; Denyer, Gareth S; Keay, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    Allodynia, hyperalgesia and spontaneous pain are cardinal sensory signs of neuropathic pain. Clinically, many neuropathic pain patients experience affective-motivational state changes, including reduced familial and social interactions, decreased motivation, anhedonia and depression which are severely debilitating. In earlier studies we have shown that sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) disrupts social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle and endocrine function in one third of rats, a subgroup reliably identified six days after injury. CCI consistently produces allodynia and hyperalgesia, the intensity of which was unrelated either to the altered social interactions, sleep-wake-cycle or endocrine changes. This decoupling of the sensory consequences of nerve injury from the affective-motivational changes is reported in both animal experiments and human clinical data. The sensory changes triggered by CCI are mediated