Science.gov

Sample records for rat muscle abnormal

  1. Branched-chain amino acid metabolism in rat muscle: abnormal regulation in acidosis

    SciTech Connect

    May, R.C.; Hara, Y.; Kelly, R.A.; Block, K.P.; Buse, M.G.; Mitch, W.E.

    1987-06-01

    Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism is frequently abnormal in pathological conditions accompanied by chronic metabolic acidosis. To study how metabolic acidosis affects BCAA metabolism in muscle, rats were gavage fed a 14% protein diet with or without 4 mmol NH/sub 4/Cl x 100 g body wt/sup -1/ x day/sup -1/. Epitrochlearis muscles were incubated with L-(1-/sup 14/C)-valine and L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine, and rates of decarboxylation, net transamination, and incorporation into muscle protein were measured. Plasma and muscle BCAA levels were lower in acidotic rats. Rates of valine and leucine decarboxylation and net transamination were higher in muscles from acidotic rats; these differences were associated with a 79% increase in the total activity of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase and a 146% increase in the activated form of the enzyme. They conclude that acidosis affects the regulation of BCAA metabolism by enhancing flux through the transaminase and by directly stimulating oxidative catabolism through activation of branched-chain ..cap alpha..-keto acid dehydrogenase.

  2. Muscle tone abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Habel, M

    1997-01-01

    Rehabilitation nurses frequently encounter clients with neurological disorders that adversely affect muscle tone. By understanding the physiological etiology of abnormal muscle tone, individual practitioners can design nursing interventions for various care settings that appropriately protect clients from injury and that can help clients and caregivers learn effective techniques for managing muscle tone problems. This article explains muscle tone abnormalities in detail and offers insight into how rehabilitation nurses can play a key role in managing clients' alterations in muscle tone.

  3. Current source imaging for high spatial resolution magnetocardiography in normal and abnormal rat cardiac muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, S.; Iramina, K.; Goto, K.; Ueno, S.

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify the current source produced by acute ischemia and infarction. We measured magnetocardiograms (MCG) and electrocardiograms (ECG) of five male rats using a high-resolution dc superconducting quantum interference device gradiometer in a magnetically shielded room after performing coronary artery occlusion. The spatial resolution of the detecting magnetic field of our system is higher than the typical system, thus permitting the measurement of magnetic fields in small animals. Distribution of the magnetic fields B(t) and distribution of |rot B(t)|, which corresponded to the distribution of the current source, were imaged by 12-channel MCGs. As a result, the distribution of current source changes in the affected area of the myocardium during the ST segment, and amplitude of the peak significantly increased after occlusion. Our system can be used to help clarify the mechanism of the ST shift related to severe heart disease.

  4. Abnormalities in three-dimensional capillary architecture and imbalance between vascular endothelial growth factor-A and thrombospondin-1 in soleus muscle of ovariectomized rat.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Kanazashi, Miho; Maezawa, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Hiroyo; Fujino, Hidemi

    2015-09-01

    Reduced ovarian hormone levels associated with menopause or ovariectomy (OVX) not only result in vascular dysfunction but also lead to structural abnormalities in capillaries. Therefore, the effect of OVX on the three-dimensional (3-D) architecture of capillary networks and the underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated in rat soleus muscle. Seven-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into the OVX and sham-treated (Sham) groups. The OVX group exhibited lower endurance exercise capacity compared to the sham group and resulted in decreased capillary diameter, number of anastomoses and capillary/anastomosis volume in soleus muscle, indicating 3-D structural abnormalities of capillary networks. Furthermore, OVX led to increased concentrations of thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) protein and a decreased VEGF-A/TSP-1 ratio, an indicator of angio-adaptations, in soleus muscle compared with the Sham group. These results indicate OVX may induce 3-D capillary regression in soleus muscle through an imbalance between VEGF-A and TSP-1 expression, possibly associated with decreased exercise tolerance in ovariectomized rats.

  5. Dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid causes skeletal muscle metabolic abnormalities in Zucker fatty rats through specific modification of fatty acid composition

    PubMed Central

    Ohminami, Hirokazu; Amo, Kikuko; Taketani, Yutaka; Sato, Kazusa; Fukaya, Makiko; Uebanso, Takashi; Arai, Hidekazu; Koganei, Megumi; Sasaki, Hajime; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Takeda, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    A dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid strongly contributes to the development of metabolic disorders in Zucker fatty rats. However, the underlying mechanisms of the metabolic disorders are poorly understood. We hypothesized that the metabolic disorders were triggered at a stage earlier than the 8 weeks we had previously reported. In this study, we investigated early molecular events induced by the sucrose and linoleic acid diet in Zucker fatty rats by comparison with other combinations of carbohydrate (sucrose or palatinose) and fat (linoleic acid or oleic acid). Skeletal muscle arachidonic acid levels were significantly increased in the sucrose and linoleic acid group compared to the other dietary groups at 4 weeks, while there were no obvious differences in the metabolic phenotype between the groups. Expression of genes related to arachidonic acid synthesis was induced in skeletal muscle but not in liver and adipose tissue in sucrose and linoleic acid group rats. In addition, the sucrose and linoleic acid group exhibited a rapid induction in endoplasmic reticulum stress and abnormal lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. We concluded that the dietary combination of sucrose and linoleic acid primarily induces metabolic disorders in skeletal muscle through increases in arachidonic acid and endoplasmic reticulum stress, in advance of systemic metabolic disorders. PMID:25147427

  6. Skeletal muscle abnormalities and genetic factors related to vertical talus.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Laura J; Gurnett, Christina A; Connolly, Anne M; Pestronk, Alan; Dobbs, Matthew B

    2011-04-01

    Congenital vertical talus is a fixed dorsal dislocation of the talonavicular joint and fixed equinus contracture of the hindfoot, causing a rigid deformity recognizable at birth. The etiology and epidemiology of this condition are largely unknown, but some evidence suggests it relates to aberrations of skeletal muscle. Identifying the tissue abnormalities and genetic causes responsible for vertical talus has the potential to lead to improved treatment and preventive strategies. We therefore (1) determined whether skeletal muscle abnormalities are present in patients with vertical talus and (2) identified associated congenital anomalies and genetic abnormalities in these patients. We identified associated congenital anomalies and genetic abnormalities present in 61 patients affected with vertical talus. We obtained abductor hallucis muscle biopsy specimens from the affected limbs of 11 of the 61 patients and compared the histopathologic characteristics with those of age-matched control subjects. All muscle biopsy specimens (n = 11) had abnormalities compared with those from control subjects including combinations of abnormal variation in muscle fiber size (n = 7), type I muscle fiber smallness (n = 6), and abnormal fiber type predominance (n = 5). Isolated vertical talus occurred in 23 of the 61 patients (38%), whereas the remaining 38 patients had associated nervous system, musculoskeletal system, and/or genetic and genomic abnormalities. Ten of the 61 patients (16%) had vertical talus in one foot and clubfoot in the other. Chromosomal abnormalities, all complete or partial trisomies, were identified in three patients with vertical talus who had additional congenital abnormalities. Vertical talus is a heterogeneous birth defect resulting from many diverse etiologies. Abnormal skeletal muscle biopsies are common in patients with vertical talus although it is unclear whether this is primary or secondary to the joint deformity. Associated anomalies are present in 62

  7. Histological patterns of muscle in infants with developmental brain abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Curless, R G; Nelson, M B; Brimmer, F

    1978-04-01

    The histology of muscle obtained from 23 hypotonic infants without neuromuscular disease is presented. Long-term follow-up neurological examinations were carried out to determine the site of the lesion. 18 cases have strong evidence of cerebral dysfunction, 12 of whom have histologial abnormalities of fiber-type distribution and diameter. Of the remaining five patients without obvious cerebral abnormality, four also had histological changes, but individual circumstances partially explain the cause of the abnormal histological patterns in these four. No single histological abnormality could be identified, but the results indicate that histological abnormalities of muscle in hypotonic infants without clinical or microscopic evidence of neuromuscular disease may be useful in predicting a cerebral cause for the hypotonia.

  8. Cerebral and Muscle MRI Abnormalities in Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Franc, Daniel T.; Muetzel, Ryan L.; Robinson, Paul R.; Rodriguez, Craig P.; Dalton, Joline C.; Naughton, Cameron E.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Wozniak, Jeffrey R.; Lim, Kelvin O.; Day, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the clinically devastating CNS features of myotonic dystrophy (DM) remain more enigmatic and controversial than do the muscle abnormalities of this common form of muscular dystrophy. To better define CNS and cranial muscle changes in DM, we used quantitative volumetric and diffusion tensor MRI methods to measure cerebral and masticatory muscle differences between controls (n=5) and adults with either congenital (n=5) or adult onset (n=5) myotonic dystrophy type 1, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (n=5). Muscle volumes were diminished in DM1 and strongly correlated with reduced white matter integrity and gray matter volume. Moreover, correlation of reduced fractional anisotropy (white matter integrity) and gray matter volume in both DM1 and DM2 suggests that these abnormalities may share a common underlying pathophysiological mechanism. Further quantitative temporal and spatial characterization of these features will help delineate developmental and progressive neurological components of DM, and help determine the causative molecular and cellular mechanisms. PMID:22290140

  9. Verapamil reverses PTH- or CRF-induced abnormal fatty acid oxidation in muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, A.F.; Smogorzewski, M.; Massry, S.G.

    1988-12-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with impaired long chain fatty acids (LCFA) oxidation by skeletal muscle mitochondria. This is due to reduced activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT). These derangements were attributed to the secondary hyperparathyroidism of CRF, since prior parathyroidectomy in CRF rats reversed these abnormalities and PTH administration to normal rats reproduced them. It was proposed that these effects of PTH are mediated by its ionophoric property leading to increased entry of calcium into skeletal muscle. A calcium channel blocker may, therefore, correct these derangements. The present study examined the effects of verapamil on LCFA oxidation, CPT activity by skeletal muscle mitochondria, and /sup 45/Ca uptake by skeletal muscle obtained from CRF rats and normal animals treated with PTH with and without verapamil. Both four days of PTH administration and 21 days of CRF produced significant (P less than 0.01) reduction in LCFA oxidation and CPT activity of skeletal muscle mitochondria, and significant (P less than 0.01) increment in /sup 45/Ca uptake by skeletal muscle. Simultaneous treatment with verapamil corrected all these derangements. Administration of verapamil alone to normal rats did not cause a significant change in any of these parameters. The data are consistent with the proposition that the alterations in LCFA in CRF or after PTH treatment are related to the ionophoric action of the hormone and could be reversed by a calcium channel blocker.

  10. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    PubMed

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Abnormal vibration induced illusion of movement in essential tremor: evidence for abnormal muscle spindle afferent function

    PubMed Central

    Frima, N; Grunewald, R

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Vibration induced illusion of movement (VIIM) is abnormal in patients with idiopathic focal dystonia, an abnormality which corrects with fatigue of the vibrated muscle. Since dystonia and essential tremor sometimes coexist in families, we investigated the perception of VIIM and the effect of fatigue on VIIM in patients with essential tremor. Methods: VIIM in 18 patients with essential tremor was compared with VIIM in 18 healthy control participants before and after volitional fatigue of the vibrated muscles. Results: Vibration of the immobilised biceps produced a subnormal VIIM in patients with essential tremor (12.81° (SEM 2.15)) compared with healthy control subjects (28.55° (1.66)). The perception increased following volitional fatigue of the vibrated arm in patients with essential tremor (16.23° (2.50)) but not in healthy controls (27.55° (1.66)). No difference was observed in patients with alcohol or non-alcohol responsive tremor. Conclusions: The VIIM decreased with increasing age in healthy control subjects. Abnormal VIIM implies abnormal sensorimotor processing in patients with essential tremor, similar to that found in idiopathic focal dystonia, and the change of the perception with age could explain the age related onset of the disorder. PMID:15607995

  12. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Muscle growth, protein metabolism, and amino acid metabolism were studied in various groups of rats. Certain groups were adrenaliectomized; some rats were suspended while others (the controls) were weight bearing. Results show that: (1) metabolic changes in the extensor digitorum longus muscle of suspended rats are due primarily to increased circulating glucocorticoids; (2) metabolic changes in the soleus muscle due to higher steroid levels are probably potentiated by greater numbers of steroid receptors; and (3) not all metabolic responses of the soleus muscle to unloading are due to the elevated levels of glucocorticoids or the increased sensitivity of this muscle to these hormones.

  13. Abnormal muscle mechanosignaling triggers cardiomyopathy in mice with Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason R.; Carta, Luca; Bénard, Ludovic; Chemaly, Elie R.; Chiu, Emily; Rao, Satish K.; Hampton, Thomas G.; Yurchenco, Peter; Costa, Kevin D.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Ramirez, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS), a multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin 1, are unusually vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dysfunction. The prevailing view is that MFS-associated cardiac dysfunction is the result of aortic and/or valvular disease. Here, we determined that dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in fibrillin 1–deficient mice is a primary manifestation resulting from ECM-induced abnormal mechanosignaling by cardiomyocytes. MFS mice displayed spontaneous emergence of an enlarged and dysfunctional heart, altered physical properties of myocardial tissue, and biochemical evidence of chronic mechanical stress, including increased angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) signaling and abated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity. Partial fibrillin 1 gene inactivation in cardiomyocytes was sufficient to precipitate DCM in otherwise phenotypically normal mice. Consistent with abnormal mechanosignaling, normal cardiac size and function were restored in MFS mice treated with an AT1R antagonist and in MFS mice lacking AT1R or β-arrestin 2, but not in MFS mice treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or lacking angiotensinogen. Conversely, DCM associated with abnormal AT1R and FAK signaling was the sole abnormality in mice that were haploinsufficient for both fibrillin 1 and β1 integrin. Collectively, these findings implicate fibrillin 1 in the physiological adaptation of cardiac muscle to elevated workload. PMID:24531548

  14. Relaxation abnormalities in single cardiac myocytes from renovascular hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Yelamarty, R V; Moore, R L; Yu, F T; Elensky, M; Semanchick, A M; Cheung, J Y

    1992-04-01

    In myocardial hypertrophy secondary to renovascular hypertension, the rate of intracellular Ca2+ concentration decline during relaxation in paced left ventricular (LV) myocytes isolated from hypertensive (Hyp) rats is much slower compared with that from normotensive (Sham) rats. By use of a novel liquid-crystal television-based optical-digital processor capable of performing on-line real-time Fourier transformation and the striated pattern (similar to 1-dimensional diffraction grating) of cardiac muscle cells, sarcomere shortening and relaxation velocities were measured in single Hyp and Sham myocytes 18 h after isolation. There were no differences in resting sarcomere length, percent of maximal shortening, time to peak shortening, and average sarcomere shortening velocity between Sham and Hyp cardiac cells. In contrast, average sarcomere relaxation velocity and half-relaxation time were significantly prolonged in Hyp myocytes. Contractile differences between Sham and Hyp myocytes detected by the optical-digital processor are confirmed by an independent method of video tracking of whole cell length changes during excitation-contraction. Despite the fact that freshly isolated myocytes contract more rigorously than 18-h-old myocytes, the relaxation abnormality was still observed in freshly isolated Hyp myocytes, suggesting impaired relaxation is an intrinsic property of Hyp myocytes rather than changes brought about by short-term culture. We postulate that reduced sarcomere relaxation velocity is a direct consequence of impaired Ca2+ sequestration-extrusion during relaxation in Hyp myocytes and may be responsible for diastolic dysfunction in hypertensive hypertrophic myocardium at the cellular level.

  15. Abnormal reciprocal inhibition between antagonist muscles in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Meunier, S; Pol, S; Houeto, J L; Vidailhet, M

    2000-05-01

    Disynaptic Ia reciprocal inhibition acts, at the spinal level, by actively inhibiting antagonist motor neurons and reducing the inhibition of agonist motor neurons. The deactivation of this pathway in Parkinson's disease is still debated. Disynaptic reciprocal inhibition of H reflexes in the forearm flexor muscles was examined in 15 control subjects and 16 treated parkinsonian patients at rest and at the onset of a voluntary wrist flexion. Two patients were reassessed 18 h after withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication. At rest, the level of Ia reciprocal inhibition between the wrist antagonist muscles was not significantly different between patients and controls. In contrast, clear abnormalities of this inhibition were revealed by voluntary movements in the patients. In normal subjects, at the onset of a wrist flexion, Ia reciprocal inhibition showed a large decrease, and we argue that this decrease is supraspinal in origin. On the less affected sides of the patients the descending modulation was still present but lower than in controls; on the more affected sides this modulation had vanished almost completely. These movement-induced abnormalities of disynaptic Ia reciprocal inhibition were closely associated with Parkinson's disease but were probably not dependent on L-dopa. They could play a role in the disturbances of precise voluntary movements observed in Parkinson's disease.

  16. A muscle spindle abnormity in one laryngeal muscle would be sufficient to cause stuttering.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Steffen H; Schuster, Frank M

    2012-07-01

    Muscle spindles are increasingly recognized as playing a pivotal role in the cause of dystonia. This development and own laryngeal observations that support the idea of causally "well-intentioned" stuttering motivated us to present the following hypothesis: stuttering events compensate for a sensory problem that arises when the abductor/adductor ratio of afferent impulse rates from the posterior cricoarytenoid and lateral cricoarytenoid muscle spindles is abnormally reduced and processed for the occasional determination of the vocal fold position. This hypothesis implies that functional and structural brain abnormalities might be interpreted as secondary compensatory reactions. Verification of this hypothesis (using technologies such as microneurography, dissection and muscle afferent block) is important because its confirmation could relink dystonia and stuttering research, change the direction of stuttering therapy and destigmatize stuttering radically.

  17. Midventricular Obstruction Caused by Abnormal Intra-Left Ventricular Septum and Papillary Muscles.

    PubMed

    Samura, Takaaki; Toda, Koichi; Saito, Shunsuke; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Domae, Keitaro; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-09-01

    Abnormal papillary muscle is a rare cause of midventricular obstruction. In this case report, hypertrophied abnormal papillary muscles and abnormal tissue growth from the septal wall formed an intra-left ventricular septum with a small hole and resulted in severe midventricular obstruction. Radical resection of both papillary muscles and the intra-left ventricular septum was performed along with mitral valve replacement to relieve the obstruction. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gentics of urogenital abnormalities in ACI inbread rats.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D V; Gill, T J

    1975-08-01

    The frequency of urogenital abnormalities in adult ACI rats was 18.8%. These abnormalities consisted of a spectrum of defects ranging from focal aplasia of the ureter to the complete absence of the ureter, kidney, and tubular genital tract on the affected side. When ACI rats with normal urogenital tracts tracts were crossed with F344 rats the frequency of the defects decreased to a constant level in the F1, F2, and F3 generations. There was no clearly significant decrease in the frequency of the defects in the backcross offspring of (ACI times F344)F1 times ACI matings, but there was a significant and dramatic decrease in the backcross to F344 rats. Attempts to select against these defects by brother-sister matings among normal ACI rats were not successful: 5 generations of inbreeding did not alter the frequency of the urogenital abnormalities. The frequency of the abnormalities was the same in the offspring of affected parents as in the offspring of normal parents, indicating homozygosity of the factors responsible for the defects. The results suggest that the transmission of these defects is polygenic.

  19. Abnormal Cortex-Muscle Interactions in Subjects with X-linked Kallmann's Syndrome and Mirror Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, S. F.; Harrison, L. M.; Mayston, M. J.; Parekh, A.; James, L. M.; Stephens, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    X-linked Kallmann's (XKS) subjects, who display mirror movements, have abnormal corticospinal tracts which innervate motoneurons of the left and right distal muscles of the upper limb. The size of the abnormal ipsilateral projection is variable. We have used coherence and cumulant analysis between EEG and first dorsal interosseous muscle (1DI) EMG…

  20. Abnormal Cortex-Muscle Interactions in Subjects with X-linked Kallmann's Syndrome and Mirror Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, S. F.; Harrison, L. M.; Mayston, M. J.; Parekh, A.; James, L. M.; Stephens, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    X-linked Kallmann's (XKS) subjects, who display mirror movements, have abnormal corticospinal tracts which innervate motoneurons of the left and right distal muscles of the upper limb. The size of the abnormal ipsilateral projection is variable. We have used coherence and cumulant analysis between EEG and first dorsal interosseous muscle (1DI) EMG…

  1. Muscle Contractile Properties in Severely Burned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaowu; Wolf, Steven E.; Walters, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Burn induces a sustained catabolic response which causes massive loss of muscle mass after injury. A better understanding of the dynamics of muscle wasting and its impact on muscle function is necessary for the development of effective treatments. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either a 40% total body surface area (TBSA) scald burn or sham burn, and were further assigned to subgroups at four time points after injury (days 3, 7, 14 and 21). In situ isometric contractile properties were measured including twitch tension (Pt), tetanic tension (Po) and fatigue properties. Body weight decreased in burn and sham groups through day 3, however, body weight in the sham groups recovered and increased over time compared to burned groups, which progressively decreased until day 21 after injury. Significant differences in muscle wet weight and protein weight were found between sham and burn. Significant differences in muscle contractile properties were found at day 14 with lower absolute Po as well as specific Po in burned rats compared to sham. After burn, the muscle twitch tension was significantly higher than the sham at day 21. No significant difference in fatigue properties was found between the groups. This study demonstrates dynamics of muscle atrophy and muscle contractile properties after severe burn; this understanding will aid in the development of approaches designed to reduce the rate and extent of burn induced muscle loss and function. PMID:20381255

  2. Botulinum neurotoxin effects on masseter muscle fibre in WNIN obese rats-Scanning electron microscope analysis.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Shivaram; Putchha, Uday K; Periketi, Madhusudhanachary; Pothana, Sailaja; Nappanveettil, Giridharan; Nemani, Harishankar

    2016-09-01

    WNIN/Ob obese mutant rats are unique in comparison to similar rodent models of obesity established in the West. The present study is aimed to evaluate the masticatory function and histological changes in masseter muscle fibres treated with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) in WNIN/Ob rats. Twelve WNIN/Ob obese rats and 12 lean rats at 35 days of age were taken and divided into four groups (6 rats in each group): Group-I (WNIN/Ob) and Group-II (lean) rats were injected with BoNT/A (1 unit) into right side of masseter muscle. For control left masseter of both phenotypes was injected with saline. Group-III (WNIN/Ob) and Group-IV (lean) rats were without any treatment. Growth and food intake was monitored daily for 45 days. Rats were euthanized and gross necropsy was carried out to check any abnormalities. Masseter muscles were dissected and mean muscle mass was recorded. Small portion of muscle was stored in 10% formalin for hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and remaining tissue stored in gluteraldehyde for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There is a significant decrease in the body weights and food intake of BoNT/A treated obese rats. The H&E staining of the masseter muscle in both groups showed normal morphology and orientation. The SEM analysis showed that, fibre size in BoNT/A treated masseter muscle of obese rats increased more than the saline treated side and in control rats. The increase in the muscle fibre size and transition of muscle fibre subtypes may be due to the reduced masticatory function of the masseter muscle. SCANNING 38:396-402, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Reincarnation in cultured muscle of mitochondrial abnormalities. Two patients with epilepsy and lactic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Askanas, V; Engel, W K; Britton, D E; Adornato, B T; Eiben, R M

    1978-12-01

    Two unrelated 9-year-old boys failed to thrive from ages 5 and 4 years, and had focal cerebral seizures followed by transcent hemipareses. Histochemistry of their muscle biopsies showed "ragged-red" fibers, which ultrastructurally contained clusters of mitochondria having loss of crisp delineation of crista membranes and contained amorphous inclusion material and parallel-packed cristae and sometimes paracrystalline inclusions. In the patients' cultured muscles, similar mitochondrial abnormalities were present. 2,4-Dinitrophenol, introduced to the medium of cultures of normal human muscle, produced mitochondrial abnormalities similar to those of the patients', and the medium of the patients' muscle cultures worsened the mitochondrial abnormalities. This study, in demonstrating a mitochondrial defect reproducible in the cultured muscle fibers and, therefore, intrinsic to the ragged-red muscle fibers themselves, raises the possibility of a collateral mitochondrial defect in CNS cells as part of a multicellular mitochondriopathy.

  4. Contour abnormalities of the abdomen after breast reconstruction with abdominal flaps: the role of muscle preservation.

    PubMed

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y; Dooley, William; Singh, Navin; Manson, Paul N

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether contour abnormalities of the abdomen after breast reconstruction with abdominal flaps are related to the harvest of the rectus abdominis muscle. Abdominal contour was analyzed in 155 women who had breast reconstruction with abdominal flaps; 108 women had free transverse rectus abdominis muscle (TRAM) flaps, 37 had pedicled TRAM flaps, and 10 had deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps. The reconstruction was unilateral in 110 women and bilateral in 45 women. Three methods of muscle-sparing were used; they are classified as preservation of the lateral muscle, preservation of the medial and lateral muscle, or preservation of the entire muscle. One of these three methods of muscle-sparing was used in 91 women (59 percent) and no muscle-sparing was used in 64 women (41 percent). Postoperative contour abnormalities occurred in 15 woman and included epigastric fullness in five, upper bulge in three, and lower bulge in 10. One woman experienced two abnormalities, one woman experienced three, and no woman developed a hernia. Of these abnormalities, 11 occurred after the free TRAM flap, seven after the pedicled TRAM flap, and none after the DIEP flap. Bilateral reconstruction resulted in 11 abnormalities in nine women, and unilateral reconstruction resulted in seven abnormalities in six women. chi2 analysis of the free and pedicled TRAM flaps demonstrates that muscle-sparing explains the observed differences in upper bulge and upper fullness (p = 0.02), with a trend toward significance for lower bulge (p = 0.06). chi2 analysis of the free TRAM and DIEP flaps does not explain the observed difference in abnormal abdominal contour. Analysis of muscle-sparing and non-muscle-sparing methods demonstrates that the observed difference between the techniques is only explained for a lower bulge after the bilateral free TRAM flap (p = 0.04).

  5. Influence of spaceflight on rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Thomas P.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a 7-day spaceflight (aboard NASA's SL-3) on the size and the metabolism of single fibers from several rat muscles was investigated along with the specificity of these responses as related to the muscle type and the size of fibers. It was found that the loss of mass after flight was varied from 36 percent in the soleus to 15 percent in the extensor digitorum longus. Results of histochemical analyses showed that the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity in muscles of flight-exposed rats was maintained at the control levels, whereas the alpha-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) activity was either maintained or increased. The analyses of the metabolic profiles of ATPase, SDH, and GPD indicated that, in some muscles, there was an increase in the poportion of fast oxidative-glycolytic fibers.

  6. Chronic Paraspinal Muscle Injury Model in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Tack Geun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to establish an animal model of chronic paraspinal muscle injury in rat. Methods Fifty four Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into experimental group (n=30), sham (n=15), and normal group (n=9). Incision was done from T7 to L2 and paraspinal muscles were detached from spine and tied at each level. The paraspinal muscles were exposed and untied at 2 weeks after surgery. Sham operation was done by paraspinal muscles dissection at the same levels and wound closure was done without tying. Kyphotic index and thoracolumbar Cobb's angle were measured at preoperative, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the first surgery for all groups. The rats were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the first surgery, and performed histological examinations. Results At 4 weeks after surgery, the kyphotic index decreased, but, Cobb's angle increased significantly in the experimental group (p<0.05), and then that were maintained until the end of the experiment. However, there were no significant differences of the kyphotic index and Cobb's angle between sham and normal groups. In histological examinations, necrosis and fibrosis were observed definitely and persisted until 12 weeks after surgery. There were also presences of regenerated muscle cells which nucleus is at the center of cytoplasm, centronucleated myofibers. Conclusion Our chronic injury model of paraspinal muscles in rats shows necrosis and fibrosis in the muscles for 12 weeks after surgery, which might be useful to study the pathophysiology of the degenerative thoracolumbar kyphosis or degeneration of paraspinal muscles. PMID:27651859

  7. THE HISTOGENESIS OF RAT INTERCOSTAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, A. M.; Zacks, S. I.

    1969-01-01

    Intercostal muscle from fetal and newborn rats was examined with the electron microscope. At 16 days' gestation, the developing muscle was composed of primary generations of myotubes, many of which were clustered together in groups. Within these groups, the membranes of neighboring myotubes were interconnected by specialized junctions, including tight junctions. Morphologically undifferentiated cells surrounded the muscle groups, frequently extended pseudopodia along the interspace between adjacent myotubes, and appeared to separate neighboring myotubes from one another. At 18 and 20 days' gestation, the muscle was also composed of groups of cells but the structure of the groups differed from that of the groups observed at 16 days. Single, well differentiated myotubes containing much central glycogen and peripheral myofibrils dominated each group. These large cells were interpreted as primary myotubes. Small, less differentiated muscle cells and undifferentiated cells clustered around their walls. Each cluster was ensheated by a basal lamina. The small cells were interpreted as primordia of new generations of muscle cells which differentiated by appositional growth along the walls of the large primary myotubes. All generations of rat intercostal muscle cells matured to myofibers between 20 days' gestation and birth. Coincidentally, large and small myofibers diverged from each other, leading to disintegration of the groups of muscle cells. Undifferentiated cells frequently occurred in the interspaces between neighboring muscle cells at the time of separation. Myofibers arising at different stages of muscle histogenesis intermingled in a checkerboard fashion as a result of this asynchronous mode of development. The possibility of fusion between neighboring muscle cells in this developing system is discussed. PMID:5786979

  8. Experimental evaluation of the effects of pravastatin on electrophysiological parameters of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Pierno, S; De Luca, A; Tricarico, D; Ferrannini, E; Conte, T; D'Alò, G; Camerino, D C

    1992-11-01

    The effects of daily chronic treatment for 6 months with pravastatin was evaluated on the performance of the skeletal muscle system of different rat groups. At all doses (0.1 mg/kg-20 mg/kg) the righting reflex and the electromyographic signals observed in vivo did not show any abnormality. At the end of the treatment the Extensor digitorum longus muscles were dissected from treated and control rats and their passive and active electrical parameters were analyzed in vitro by standard microelectrodes technique. Pravastatin did not modify the chloride conductance nor the excitability characteristics of the fibers. Chronic treatment with pravastatin does not produce any alteration of skeletal muscle function.

  9. Effects of microgravity on rat muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    It is well known that humans exposed to long term spaceflight experience undesirable progressive muscle weakness and increased fatigability. This problem has prompted the implementation of inflight exercise programs because most investigators believe that the major cause of diminished muscle performance is a combination of disuse and decreased workload. Inflight exercise has improved muscle health, but deficits have persisted, indicating that either the regimens utilized were suboptimal or there existed additional debilitating factors which were not remedied by exercise. Clarification of this question requires an improved understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of spaceflight-induced muscle deterioration. To this end, multiple investigations have been performed on the muscles from rats orbited 5 to 22 days in Cosmos biosatellites and Spacelab-3 (2,4,5,8,10 to 14,16,18,19,21 to 23,25,27,28). The eight Cosmos 1887 investigations examined the structural and biochemical changes in skeletal and cardiac muscles of rats exposed to microgravity for 12.5 days and returned to terrestrial gravity 2.3 days before tissues were collected. Even though interpretation of these results was complicated by the combination of inflight and postflight induced alterations, the consensus is that there is marked heterogeneity in both degree and type of responses from the whole muscle level down to the molecular level. Collectively, the muscle investigations of Cosmos 1887 clearly illustrate the wide diversity of muscle tissue responses to spaceflight. Judging from the summary report of this mission, heterogeneity of responses is not unique to muscle tissue. Elucidating the mechanism underlying this heterogeneity holds the key to explaining adaptation of the organism to prolonged spaceflight.

  10. Pentoxifylline attenuates iminodipropionitrile-induced behavioral abnormalities in rats.

    PubMed

    Al Kadasah, Saeed; Al Mutairy, Ahmad; Siddiquei, Mairaj; Khan, Haseeb Ahmad; Abdulwahid Arif, Ibrahim; Al Moutaery, Khalaf; Tariq, Mohammad

    2009-07-01

    This investigation was undertaken to study the effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced behavioral abnormalities [excitation with choreiform and circling movements (ECC) syndrome] in rats. The animals were intraperitoneally injected with IDPN (100 mg/kg) daily for 7 days. PTX was administered daily 30 min before IDPN in the doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg for 9 days. The animals were observed for neurobehavioral abnormalities including dyskinetic head movements, circling, tail hanging, air righting reflex, and contact inhibition of the righting reflex. The onset of ECC syndrome was observed on day 8 in the group treated with IDPN alone; all animals in this group became dyskinetic on day 10. Co-treatment with PTX dose dependently delayed the onset time and significantly reduced the incidence and severity of IDPN-induced ECC syndrome; high dose of PTX completely inhibited the abnormal behavioral signs in IDPN-treated rats. Administration of IDPN caused significant depletions in cerebral glutathione and vitamin E levels. Treatment with PTX dose dependently attenuated IDPN-induced oxidative stress in rats. The beneficial effects of PTX against IDPN toxicity may be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

  11. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G. )

    1990-10-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white (extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius) muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding.

  12. Cardiac Muscle Studies with Rat Ventricular Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Bert K.; Faleschini, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    Details undergraduate physiology laboratory experiments that demonstrate mechanical properties of cardiac muscle, using strips from the ventricle of a rat heart. Includes procedures for obtaining length-tension curves, demonstrating the role of calcium in excitation-contraction coupling, and showing effects of several cardiovascular drugs…

  13. Cardiac Muscle Studies with Rat Ventricular Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Bert K.; Faleschini, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    Details undergraduate physiology laboratory experiments that demonstrate mechanical properties of cardiac muscle, using strips from the ventricle of a rat heart. Includes procedures for obtaining length-tension curves, demonstrating the role of calcium in excitation-contraction coupling, and showing effects of several cardiovascular drugs…

  14. Muscle bioenergetics in obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, M; Kaminsky, P; Walker, P M; Straczek, J; Barbe, F; Duc, M; Burlet, C

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the energetic metabolism in obese Zucker rats, using phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at rest and during a 2-Hz muscle stimulation and subsequent recovery. Animals were anesthetized with ketamine (150 mg/kg ip). Fed obese rats and 2-day-fasted obese rats were compared with their normally fed and 2-day-fasted lean litter mates. No differences were found between the two groups for ATP, total creatine, phosphocreatine (PCr), and intracellular pH. Starvation in lean rats resulted in a significant fall in inorganic phosphate (Pi), increased resting ADP level, and decreased PCr and ADP recovery after stimulation. The obese rats exhibited a decreased PCr/Pi and increased ADP at rest and a decreased PCr resynthesis and ADP metabolization rate after stimulation. Muscle stimulation in fasted obese rats induced higher PCr depletion and more pronounced acidosis. These results suggest an in vivo mitochondrial metabolism dysfunction in fasted lean as well as in fed and fasted obese rats.

  15. Segmental fibre type composition of the rat iliopsoas muscle.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Hrvoje; Bazdaric, Ksenija; Marijancic, Verner; Soic-Vranic, Tamara; Malnar, Daniela; Arbanas, Juraj

    2017-01-18

    The iliopsoas of the rat is composed of two muscles - the psoas major muscle and the iliacus muscle. The psoas major muscle arises from all the lumbar vertebrae and the iliacus muscle from the fifth and sixth lumbar vertebrae and ilium. Their common insertion point is the lesser trochanter of the femur, and their common action is the lateral rotation of the femur and flexion of the hip joint. Unlike humans, the rat is a quadruped and only occasionally rises up on its hind legs. Therefore, it is expected that the fibre type composition of the rat iliopsoas muscle will be different than that of humans. The iliopsoas muscle of the rat is generally considered to be a fast muscle. However, previous studies of the fibre type composition of the rat psoas muscle showed different results. Moreover, very little is known about the composition of the rat iliacus muscle. The aim of our study was to examine the fibre type composition of the rat iliopsoas muscle in order to better understand the complex function of the listed muscle. The psoas major muscle was examined segmentally at four different levels of its origin. Type I, IIA, IIB and IIX muscle fibres were typed using monoclonal antibodies for myosin heavy chain identification. The percentage of muscle fibre types and muscle fibre cross-sectional areas were calculated. In our study we showed that in the rat iliopsoas muscle both the iliacus and the psoas major muscles had a predominance of fast muscle fibre types, with the highest percentage of the fastest IIB muscle fibres. Also, the IIB muscle fibres showed the largest cross-sectional area (CSA) in both muscles. As well, the psoas major muscle showed segmental differences of fibre type composition. Our results showed changes in percentages, as well as the CSAs of muscle fibre types in cranio-caudal direction. The most significant changes were visible in type IIB muscle fibres, where there was a decrease of percentages and the CSAs from the cranial towards the caudal part

  16. Testosterone and muscle hypertrophy in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, F. E.; Max, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) on compensatory muscle hypertropy in female rats are examined. The 48 female rats were placed in one of four test groups: (1) no overload (synergist removal), no TP, (2) overload, no TP, (3) no overload + TP, and (4) overload + TP. The technique used to administer the TP is described. The preparation of the plantaris muscle, the analysis of pyruvate oxidation and the determination of malate and lactate dehydrogenases and the noncollogen protein are explained. The results which reveal the effect of overload and TP on body weight, noncollogen protein concentration, lactate and malate dehydrogenase activities, and pyruvate oxidation are presented and discussed. It is concluded that in terms of body weight, protein content, pyruvate, glycolysis, and oxidative metabolisms chronic TP treatments do not change compensatory muscle hypertropy.

  17. Testosterone and muscle hypertrophy in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, F. E.; Max, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) on compensatory muscle hypertropy in female rats are examined. The 48 female rats were placed in one of four test groups: (1) no overload (synergist removal), no TP, (2) overload, no TP, (3) no overload + TP, and (4) overload + TP. The technique used to administer the TP is described. The preparation of the plantaris muscle, the analysis of pyruvate oxidation and the determination of malate and lactate dehydrogenases and the noncollogen protein are explained. The results which reveal the effect of overload and TP on body weight, noncollogen protein concentration, lactate and malate dehydrogenase activities, and pyruvate oxidation are presented and discussed. It is concluded that in terms of body weight, protein content, pyruvate, glycolysis, and oxidative metabolisms chronic TP treatments do not change compensatory muscle hypertropy.

  18. Distribution of slow muscle fiber of muscle spindle in postnatal rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Sato, Iwao; Imura, Kosuke; Miwa, Yoko; Ide, Yoshiaki; Murata, Megumi; Sunohara, Masataka

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the properties of the muscle spindle in the masseter muscle at an immunohistochemical level in rats fed for 6 weeks. Slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were measured and intrafusal fibers in the muscle spindle were studied to determine the relationship between the superficial and deep regions of rat masseter muscle after alternated feeding pattern. However, muscle spindles were found in both regions, mainly in the deep region of the posterior superficial region of masseter muscle. The total number of the slow fiber in the intrafusal fiber and number of muscle spindle in the deep region were high from 5 to 8 weeks old in spite of various dimensions of data such as diameter and the compositions of the intrafusal fiber. The relationship of the protein expression of slow MyHC in the two regions at 5 weeks old reversed five weeks later (10 weeks old). This period is an important stage because the mastication system in masseter muscle with muscle spindle may be changed during the alternated feeding pattern of suckling to mastication. The changes may be a marker of the feeding system and of the control by the tension receptor of muscle spindle in this stage of masseter muscle after postnatal development.

  19. Microdialysis of triamcinolone acetonide in rat muscle.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Cioli; Nagaraja, Nelamangala V; Webb, Alistair I; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare plasma and muscle concentrations of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) in the rat by microdialysis. Microdialysis experiments were carried out at steady state in rats after an initial I.V. bolus 50 mg/kg of the phosphate ester of TA (TAP) followed by 23 mg/kg/h infusion. In vivo recovery was calculated by retrodialysis. The concentration determined at steady state in microdialysate, corrected for recovery, was 2.73 +/- 0.42 microg/mL compared to 21.9 +/- 2.3 microg/mL in plasma. The pharmacokinetics of TA in plasma was described by an open two-compartment model with a terminal half-life of 2.7 h. The clearance of TA in rats determined by compartmental analysis was 0.94 L/h/kg. The measured microdialysate levels of TA in muscle, corrected for recovery, were comparable to the predicted free drug levels in the peripheral compartment. Protein binding in rat plasma, measured by ultrafiltration, was 90.1%. The microdialysis in vivo recovery in muscle was similar to the in vitro recovery under stirred conditions. The results show the applicability of microdialysis to measure free tissue concentrations of TA in rats.

  20. Regenerated rat skeletal muscle after periodic contusions.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, V B; Bunho, S R; Salvini, T F

    2001-11-01

    In the present study we evaluated the morphological aspect and changes in the area and incidence of muscle fiber types of long-term regenerated rat tibialis anterior (TA) muscle previously submitted to periodic contusions. Animals received eight consecutive traumas: one trauma per week, for eight weeks, and were evaluated one (N = 8) and four (N = 9) months after the last contusion. Serial cross-sections were evaluated by toluidine blue staining, acid phosphatase and myosin ATPase reactions. The weight of injured muscles was decreased compared to the contralateral intact one (one month: 0.77 +/- 0.15 vs 0.91 +/- 0.09 g, P = 0.03; four months: 0.79 +/- 0.14 vs 1.02 +/- 0.07 g, P = 0.0007, respectively) and showed abundant presence of split fibers and fibers with centralized nuclei, mainly in the deep portion. Damaged muscles presented a higher incidence of undifferentiated fibers when compared to the intact one (one month: 3.4 +/- 2.1 vs 0.5 +/- 0.3%, P = 0.006; four months: 2.3 +/- 1.6 vs 0.3 +/- 0.3%, P = 0.007, respectively). Injured TA evaluated one month later showed a decreased area of muscle fibers when compared to the intact one (P = 0.003). Thus, we conclude that: a) muscle fibers were damaged mainly in the deep portion, probably because they were compressed against the tibia; b) periodic contusions in the TA muscle did not change the percentage of type I and II muscle fibers; c) periodically injured TA muscles took four months to reach a muscle fiber area similar to that of the intact muscle.

  1. Peripheral muscle abnormalities in cystic fibrosis: Etiology, clinical implications and response to therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Gruet, Mathieu; Troosters, Thierry; Verges, Samuel

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral muscle dysfunction is an important systemic consequence of cystic fibrosis (CF) with major clinical implications, such as exercise intolerance and reduced quality of life. Evidence is now accumulating that lack of physical activity is unlikely to be the sole explanation for peripheral muscle dysfunction of patients with CF. Particularly, the demonstration of CFTR expression in both murine and human skeletal muscle suggests the potential implication of intrinsic CF-related factors. By combining data from both human and animal models, this review describes CF peripheral muscle abnormalities and critically reviews the advances in understanding the impact of the underlying mechanisms. We also describe how peripheral muscles respond to intervention in this population. Methodological concerns and directions for future research are also considered. Peripheral muscle atrophy and weakness is prevalent in patients with CF and associated with reduced aerobic and anaerobic performances. Further investigations are however needed to confirm alterations in peripheral muscle endurance and fatigability. Physical inactivity is probably the major contributor of peripheral muscle abnormalities in patients with CF with mild-to-moderate phenotypes. However, the relative influence of additional factors (e.g. inflammation, metabolic abnormalities) probably increases with disease severity making specific and individualized interventions necessary in severe patients. Exercise training is the most effective intervention to address peripheral muscle dysfunction but other strategies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation and nutritional or hormonal supplementation may be of interest in some patients. Investigations are needed to determine whether pharmacological interventions such as CFTR modulators are effective to address this condition. To better elucidate the etiology of peripheral muscle dysfunction in CF, future studies should combine measurements at the cellular level

  2. Muscle fibre types in the suprahyoid muscles of the rat

    PubMed Central

    COBOS, A. R.; SEGADE, L. A. G.; FUENTES, I.

    2001-01-01

    Five muscle fibre types (I, IIc, IIa, IIx and IIb) were found in the suprahyoid muscles (mylohyoid, geniohyoid, and the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric) of the rat using immuno and enzyme histochemical techniques. More than 90% of fibres in the muscles examined were fast contracting fibres (types IIa, IIx and IIb). The geniohyoid and the anterior belly of the digastric had the greatest number of IIb fibres, whilst the mylohyoid was almost exclusively formed by aerobic fibres. The posterior belly of the digastric contained a greater percentage of aerobic fibres (83.4%) than the anterior belly (67.8%). With the exception of the geniohyoid, the percentage of type I and IIc fibres, which have slow myosin heavy chain (MHCβ), was relatively high and greater than has been previously reported in the jaw-closing muscles of the rat, such as the superficial masseter. The geniohyoid and mylohyoid exhibited a mosaic fibre type distribution, without any apparent regionalisation, although in the later MHCβ-containing fibres (types I and IIc) were primarily located in the rostral 2/3 region. In contrast, the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric revealed a clear regionalisation. In the anterior belly of the digastric 2 regions were observed: both a central region, which was almost exclusively formed by aerobic fibres and where all of the type I and IIc fibres were located, and a peripheral region, where type IIb fibres predominated. The posterior belly of the digastric showed a deep aerobic region which was greater in size and where type I and IIc fibres were confined, and a superficial region, where primarily type IIx and IIb fibres were observed. PMID:11322721

  3. Functional abnormalities of the motor tract in the rat after portocaval anastomosis and after carbon tetrachloride induction of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Oria, Marc; Raguer, Nuria; Chatauret, Nicolas; Bartolí, Ramón; Odena, Gemma; Planas, Ramón; Córdoba, Juan

    2006-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neurologic syndrome secondary to liver failure that causes cognitive and motor abnormalities. Impairment in the function of the first neuron of the motor tract (corticospinal tract) has been demonstrated in patients with cirrhosis and minimal hepatic encephalopathy. Investigate the function of the first neuron of the motor tract in experimental models of minimal hepatic encephalopathy. Rats with portocaval anastomosis (n = 8) and rats with carbon tetrachloride induced cirrhosis (n = 11) underwent neurophysiological recording under light anesthesia with propofol. Motor evoked potentials were elicited applying a transcranial electric pulse and were recorded in the tibialis anterior muscle. The effect of the dose of anesthesia was assessed in a group of normal rats (n = 10). Rats with portocaval anastomosis exhibited a decrease in motor evoked potentials amplitude following surgery (67 +/- 11 to 41 +/- 16%, P < 0.001). Cirrhotic rats exhibited an increase in motor evoked potentials latency after the appearance of ascites (4.65 +/- 0.43 to 5.15 +/- 0.67 ms., P = 0.04). Increasing doses of propofol produced a decrease in the amplitude and an increase in the latency of motor evoked potentials. It is possible to reproduce functional abnormalities of the central motor tract in rats with portocaval anastomosis and carbon tetrachloride induced cirrhosis. The development of motor abnormalities in experimental models of minimal hepatic encephalopathy offers the possibility to investigate the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and test therapeutic strategies.

  4. Ciguatera fish poisoning with elevated muscle enzymes and abnormal spinal MRI.

    PubMed

    Wasay, Mohammad; Sarangzai, Amanullah; Siddiqi, Ather; Nizami, Qamaruddin

    2008-03-01

    We report three cases of ciguatera fish poisoning. One patient died secondary to respiratory failure. Two patients showed elevated muscle enzymes and one patients had an abnormal cervical spinal MRI. MRI findings have not been previously described. MRI findings explain the mechanism of the L'hermitte phenomenon (a common complaint) among these patients. Respiratory failure is rare in ciguatera fish poisoning. Our findings suggest this could be related to respiratory muscles involvement.

  5. Improved identification of dystonic cervical muscles via abnormal muscle activity during isometric contractions.

    PubMed

    De Bruijn, E; Nijmeijer, S W R; Forbes, P A; Koelman, J H T M; van der Helm, F C T; Tijssen, M A J; Happee, R

    2015-07-15

    The preferred treatment for cervical dystonia (CD) is injection of botulinum toxin in the dystonic muscles. Unfortunately, in the absence of reliable diagnostic methods it can be difficult to discriminate dystonic muscles from healthy muscles acting in compensation. We investigated if dystonic muscle activation patterns could be identified in cervical dystonia patients during a harmonized isometric contraction task. Furthermore, we investigated whether dystonia worsens at higher levels of voluntary contraction, which might further improve the identification of dystonic muscle activity. An isometric device was used to investigate muscle activation during voluntary contraction tasks in 10 controls and 10 CD patients. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the sternocleidomastoidus, splenius capitis, and semispinalis capitis muscles was evaluated during a rest task and when performing submaximal (20%) and maximal voluntary contractions for eight head transversal force directions and for head twist. Two measures were developed to identify dystonic activation: 1) Muscle activity in the contraction direction in which the contribution of the muscle was lowest (Minimum EMG), and 2) the average muscle activity over all contraction directions (Total Mean EMG). Patients showed increased dystonic activity in the rest task and during submaximal contractions relative to controls, but not during maximal contractions. Increases in Minimum EMG indicated an inability of patients to deactivate dystonic muscles counteracting the task. Increases in Total Mean EMG indicated dystonic activity in all task directions. During maximal contractions these effects were absent in dystonic muscles. Dystonia is therefore found not to worsen at higher levels of isometric voluntary contraction. The activity of dystonic muscles modulated with different loading directions similar to controls. Using Minimum EMG 54% of the muscles clinically diagnosed as dystonic and 91% of non-dystonic muscles were

  6. Skeletal muscle abnormalities and exercise capacity in adults with a Fontan circulation.

    PubMed

    Cordina, Rachael; O'Meagher, Shamus; Gould, Haslinda; Rae, Caroline; Kemp, Graham; Pasco, Julie A; Celermajer, David S; Singh, Nalin

    2013-10-01

    The peripheral muscle pump is key in promoting cardiac filling during exercise, especially in subjects who lack a subpulmonary ventricle (the Fontan circulation). A muscle-wasting syndrome exists in acquired heart failure but has not been assessed in Fontan subjects. We sought to investigate whether adults with the Fontan circulation exhibit reduced skeletal muscle mass and/or metabolic abnormalities. Sixteen New York Heart Association Class I/II Fontan adults (30±2 years) underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and lean mass quantification with dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA); eight had calf muscle (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy as did eight healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls. DXA results were compared with Australian reference data. Single tertiary referral centre. Peak VO2 was 1.9±0.1 L/min (66±3% of predicted values). Skeletal muscle mass assessed by relative appendicular lean mass index was significantly reduced compared with age-matched and sex-matched reference values (Z-score -1.46±0.22, p<0.0001). Low skeletal muscle mass correlated with poorer VO2 max (r=0.67, p=0.004). Overall, skeletal muscle mass T-score (derived from comparison with young normal reference mean) was -1.47±0.21; 4/16 Fontan subjects had sarcopenic range muscle wasting (T-score <-2.0) and 9/16 had less marked, but clinically significant wasting (T-score <-1.0 but ≥-2.0). Muscle aerobic capacity, measured by the rate constant (k) of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis, was significantly impaired in Fontan adults versus controls (1.48±0.13 vs 2.40±0.33 min(-1), p=0.02). Fontan adults have reduced skeletal muscle mass and intrinsic muscle metabolic abnormalities.

  7. Sporadic inclusion-body myositis: A degenerative muscle disease associated with aging, impaired muscle protein homeostasis and abnormal mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King; Nogalska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) is the most common degenerative muscle disease in which aging appears to be a key risk factor. In this review we focus on several cellular molecular mechanisms responsible for multiprotein aggregation and accumulations within s-IBM muscle fibers, and their possible consequences. Those include mechanisms leading to: a) accumulation in the form of aggregates within the muscle fibers, of several proteins, including amyloid-β42 and its oligomers, and phosphorylated tau in the form of paired helical filaments, and we consider their putative detrimental influence; and b) protein misfolding and aggregation, including evidence of abnormal myoproteostasis, such as increased protein transcription, inadequate protein disposal, and abnormal posttranslational modifications of proteins. Pathogenic importance of our recently demonstrated abnormal mitophagy is also discussed. The intriguing phenotypic similarities between s-IBM muscle fibers and the brains of Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease patients, the two most common neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging, are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  8. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in human muscle: Dysfunction causes abnormal metabolic recovery in exercise.

    PubMed

    Lamhonwah, Anne-Marie; Bear, Christine E; Huan, Ling Jun; Kim Chiaw, Patrick; Ackerley, Cameron A; Tein, Ingrid

    2010-06-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have exercise intolerance and skeletal muscle weakness not solely attributable to physical inactivity or pulmonary function abnormalities. CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has been demonstrated in human bronchial smooth and cardiac muscle. Using (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle, we showed CF patients to have lower resting muscle adenosine triphosphate and delayed phosphocreatine recovery times after high-intensity exercise, suggesting abnormal muscle aerobic metabolism; and higher end-exercise pH values, suggesting altered bicarbonate transport. Our objective was to study CFTR expression in human skeletal muscle. We studied CFTR expression in human skeletal muscle by Western blot with anti-CFTR antibody (Ab) L12B4 and demonstrated a single band with expected molecular weight of 168kDa. We isolated the cDNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced a 975bp segment (c. 3,600-4,575) that was identical to the human CFTR sequence. We showed punctate staining of CFTR in sarcoplasm and sarcolemma by immunofluorescence microscopy with L12B4 Ab and secondary Alexa 488-labeled Ab. We confirmed CFTR expression in the sarcotubular network and sarcolemma by electron microscopy, using immunogold-labeled anti-CFTR Ab. We observed activation of CFTR Cl(-) channels with iodide efflux, on addition of forskolin, 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine, and 8-chlorphenylthio-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, in wild-type C57BL/6J isolated muscle fibers in contrast to no efflux from mutant F508del-CFTR muscle. We speculate that a defect in sarcoplasmic reticulum CFTR Cl(-) channels could alter the electrochemical gradient, causing dysregulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, for example, ryanodine receptor or sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+) adenosine triphosphatases essential to excitation-contraction coupling leading to exercise intolerance and muscle weakness in CF.

  9. Relation between abnormal patterns of muscle activation and response to common peroneal nerve stimulation in hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Burridge, J; McLellan, D

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the relation between response to common peroneal nerve stimulation, timed to the swing phase of walking, and abnormal ankle movement and muscle activation patterns.
METHOD—Eighteen patients who took part had a drop foot and had had a stroke at least 6 months before the study Twelve age matched normal subjects were also studied. Response to stimulation was measured by changes in the speed and effort of walking when the stimulator was used. Speed was measured over 10 m and effort by the physiological cost index. Abnormal ankle movement and muscle activation were measured in a rig by ability to follow a tracking signal moving sinusoidally at either 1 or 2 Hz, resistance to passive movement, and EMG activity during both passive and active movements. Indices were derived to define EMG response to passive stretch, coactivation, and ability to activate muscles appropriately during active movement
RESULTS—Different mechanisms underlying the drop foot were seen. Results showed that patients who had poor control of ankle movement and spasticity, demonstrated by stretch reflex and coactivation, were more likely to respond well to stimulation. Those with mechanical resistance to passive movement and with normal muscle activation responded less well.
CONCLUSIONS—The results support the hypothesis that stimulation of the common peroneal nerve to elicit a contraction of the anterior tibial muscles also inhibits the antagonist calf muscles. The technique used may be useful in directing physiotherapy by indicating the underlying cause of the drop foot.

 PMID:10945810

  10. Muscle fiber types composition and type identified endplate morphology of forepaw intrinsic muscles in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pan, Feng; Mi, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Yan; Pan, Xiao-Yun; Rui, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    The failure to accept reinnervation is considered to be one of the reasons for the poor motor functional recovery of intrinsic hand muscles (IHMs) after nerve injury. Rat could be a suitable model to be used in simulating motor function recovery of the IHMs after nerve injury as to the similarities in function and anatomy of the muscles between human and rat. However, few studies have reported the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphologic characteristics of intrinsic forepaw muscles (IFMs) in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain isoforms and acetylcholine receptors were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and endplates on type-identified fibers of the lumbrical muscles (LMs), interosseus muscles (IMs), abductor digiti minimi (AM) and flexor pollicis brevis (FM) in rat forepaw. The majority of IFMs fibers were labeled positively for fast-switch fiber. However, the IMs were composed of only slow-switch fiber. With the exception of the IMs, the other IFMs had a part of hybrid fibers. Two-dimensional morphological characteristics of endplates on I and IIa muscle fiber had no significant differences among the IFMs. The LMs is the most suitable IFMs of rat to stimulate reinnervation of the IHMs after nerve injury. Gaining greater insight into the muscle fiber types composition and endplate morphology in the IFMs of rat may help understand the pathological and functional changes of IFMs in rat model stimulating reinnervation of IHMs after peripheral nerve injury.

  11. Quantifying skeletal muscle recovery in a rat injury model using ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Leineweber, Matt; Gao, Yingxin; Stouffer, James R

    2015-01-21

    Monitoring skeletal muscle health during recovery or degeneration is of great interest both clinically and in research settings. This type of monitoring requires health measurements be taken at multiple time points. Contraction strength is a commonly used metric for quantifying muscle health, but it requires invasive in vitro or in situ procedures that may further damage the tissue. Ultrasound imaging can be used to visualize muscle damage, and semi-quantitative grading scales have been shown to be effective at characterizing abnormalities. Using an established functional testing procedure in a rat model as a baseline measurement of muscle strength, we show that ultrasound imaging combined with a semi-quantitative grading scale can be used to monitor recovery after contusion injury. Although additional work is needed to refine the imaging and grading procedures, ultrasound promises a fast and non-invasive alternative to functional testing for characterizing skeletal muscle health.

  12. Distraction of skeletal muscle: evolution of a rat model.

    PubMed

    Green, Stuart A; Horton, Eric; Baker, Michael; Utkan, Ali; Caiozzo, Vincent

    2002-10-01

    To better study the effects of limb lengthening on skeletal muscle, the authors developed a rat model that uses a miniature external skeletal fixator applied to the tibia of an adult Sprague-Dawley rat. The mounting and lengthening protocols follow the principles developed by Ilizarov. With the initial version of the fixator, the rats had progressive equinus contractures develop because the calf muscles resisted elongation. By incorporating a footplate in the distraction apparatus, tibial lengthening can be achieved without concomitant equinus.

  13. Age-related changes in rat intrinsic laryngeal muscles: analysis of muscle fibers, muscle fiber proteins, and subneural apparatuses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoya; Taguchi, Aki; Motoyoshi, Kazumi; Hyodo, Masamitsu; Gyo, Kiyofumi; Desaki, Junzo

    2013-03-01

    We compared age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles of aged and young adult rats by determining the number and diameter of muscle fibers, contractile muscle protein (myosin heavy chain isoforms, MHC) composition, and the morphology of the subneural apparatuses. In aged rats, both the numbers and the diameters of muscle fibers decreased in the cricothyroid (CT) muscle. The number of fibers, but not diameter, decreased in the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. In the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle, neither the number nor the diameter of fibers changed significantly. Aging was associated with a decrease in type IIB and an increase in type IIA MHC isoform levels in CT muscle, but no such changes were observed in the TA or PCA muscles. Morphological examination of primary synaptic clefts of the subneural apparatus revealed that aging resulted in decreased labyrinthine and increased depression types in only the CT muscle. In the aged group, morphologically immature subneural apparatuses were found infrequently in the CT muscle, indicating continued tissue remodeling. We suggest, therefore, that age-related changes in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles primarily involve the CT muscle, whereas the structures of the TA and PCA muscles may better resist aging processes and therefore are less vulnerable to functional impairment. This may reflect differences in their roles; the CT muscle controls the tone of the vocal folds, while the TA and PCA muscles play an essential role in vital activities such as respiration and swallowing.

  14. Cyclic muscle twitch contraction inhibits immobilization-induced muscle contracture and fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ayana; Sakamoto, Junya; Honda, Yuichiro; Kataoka, Hideki; Nakano, Jiro; Okita, Minoru

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the effects of cyclic muscle twitch contraction caused by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on immobilization-induced muscle contracture and fibrosis in rats. Twenty-nine rats were divided into control, immobilization, and immobilization with muscle contraction groups. The ankle joints of the immobilization and muscle contraction rats were fixed in full plantar flexion with a plaster cast for 4 weeks. In the muscle contraction group, cyclic muscle twitch contraction of the soleus muscle was induced using a commercial device (1 Hz, 4 ± 2 mA, 60 min/day, 5 times/week) with the ankle joint immobilized. The dorsiflexion range of ankle joint motion in the muscle contraction group was significantly greater than that in the immobilization group. The expressions of fibrosis-related genes (i.e., hypoxia inducible factor-1α, transforming growth factor-β1, α-smooth muscle actin, and types I and III collagen) were significantly decreased in the muscle contraction group compared to the immobilization group. The fluorescence intensities of type I and type III collagen in the perimysium and endomysium in the muscle contraction group were significantly decreased compared to the immobilization group. These results suggest that cyclic muscle twitch contraction induced by NMES might alleviate skeletal muscle fibrosis, reducing immobilization-induced muscle contracture.

  15. Muscles involved in naris dilation and nose motion in rat

    PubMed Central

    Deschênes, Martin; Haidarliu, Sebastian; Demers, Maxime; Moore, Jeffrey; Kleinfeld, David; Ahissar, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    In a number of mammals muscle dilator nasi (naris) is known as a muscle that reduces nasal airflow resistance by dilating the nostrils. Here we show that in rats the tendon of this muscle inserts into the aponeurosis above the nasal cartilage. Electrical stimulation of this muscle lifts the nose and deflects it sideway towards the side of stimulation, but does not change the size of the nares. In the head-fixed alert rat, electromyographic activity of muscle dilator nasi is tightly coupled to nose motion, not to opening of the nares. Yet, contraction of muscle dilator nasi occurs during the pre-inspiratory phase of the respiratory cycle, suggesting a role in sniffing and sampling odorants. We also show that opening of the nares results from contraction of pars maxillaris profunda of the muscle nasolabialis profundus. This muscle attaches to the outer wall of the nasal cartilage and to the plate of the mystacial pad. Contraction of this muscle exerts a dual action: it pulls the lateral nasal cartilage outwardly, thus dilating the naris, and it drags the plate of the mystacial pad rostralward, provoking a slight retraction of the whiskers. On the basis of these results, we propose that muscle dilator nasi of the rat be renamed muscle deflector nasi, and that pars maxillaris profunda of the muscle nasolabialis profundus be named muscle dilator nasi. PMID:25257748

  16. Abnormal splicing switch of DMD's penultimate exon compromises muscle fibre maintenance in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Frédérique; Lainé, Jeanne; Ramanoudjame, Laetitita; Ferry, Arnaud; Arandel, Ludovic; Delalande, Olivier; Jollet, Arnaud; Dingli, Florent; Lee, Kuang-Yung; Peccate, Cécile; Lorain, Stéphanie; Kabashi, Edor; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Koo, Taeyoung; Loew, Damarys; Swanson, Maurice S.; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Dickson, George; Allamand, Valérie; Marie, Joëlle; Furling, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a dominant neuromuscular disease caused by nuclear-retained RNAs containing expanded CUG repeats. These toxic RNAs alter the activities of RNA splicing factors resulting in alternative splicing misregulation and muscular dysfunction. Here we show that the abnormal splicing of DMD exon 78 found in dystrophic muscles of DM1 patients is due to the functional loss of MBNL1 and leads to the re-expression of an embryonic dystrophin in place of the adult isoform. Forced expression of embryonic dystrophin in zebrafish using an exon-skipping approach severely impairs the mobility and muscle architecture. Moreover, reproducing Dmd exon 78 missplicing switch in mice induces muscle fibre remodelling and ultrastructural abnormalities including ringed fibres, sarcoplasmic masses or Z-band disorganization, which are characteristic features of dystrophic DM1 skeletal muscles. Thus, we propose that splicing misregulation of DMD exon 78 compromises muscle fibre maintenance and contributes to the progressive dystrophic process in DM1. PMID:26018658

  17. REM sleep deprivation impairs muscle regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Mônico-Neto, Marcos; Dáttilo, Murilo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Lee, Kil Sun; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Tufik, Sergio; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira

    2017-02-01

    The aim was observe the influence of sleep deprivation (SD) and sleep recovery on muscle regeneration process in rats submitted to cryolesion. Thirty-two Wistar rats were randomly allocated in four groups: control (CTL), SD for 96 h (SD96), control plus sleep recovery period (CTL + R) and SD96h plus 96 h of sleep recovery (SD96 + R). The animals were submitted to muscle injury by cryolesioning, after to SD and sleep recovery. The major outcomes of this study were the reduction of muscular IGF-1 in both legs (injured and uninjured) and a delay in muscle regeneration process of animals submitted to SD compared to animals that slept, with increase connective tissue, inflammatory infiltrate and minor muscle fibers. SD impairs muscle regeneration in rats, moreover reduces muscular IGF-1 and sleep recovery was able to restore it to basal levels, but it was not enough to normalize the muscle regeneration.

  18. Skeletal muscle metabolism in hypokinetic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    1993-01-01

    This grant focused on the mechanisms of metabolic changes associated with unweighting atrophy and reduced growth of hind limb muscles of juvenile rats. Metabolic studies included a number of different areas. Amino acid metabolic studies placed particular emphasis on glutamine and branched-chain amino acid metabolism. These studies were an outgrowth of understanding stress effects and the role of glucocorticoids in these animals. Investigations on protein metabolism were largely concerned with selective loss of myofibrillar proteins and the role of muscle proteolysis. These investigations lead to finding important differences from denervation and atrophy and to define the roles of cytosolic versus lysosomal proteolysis in these atrophy models. A major outgrowth of these studies was demonstrating an ability to prevent atrophy of the unweighted muscle for at least 24 hours. A large amount of work concentrated on carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation by insulin and catecholamines. Measurements focused on glucose transport, glycogen metabolism, and glucose oxidation. The grant was used to develop an important new in situ approach for studying protein metabolism, glucose transport, and hormonal effects which involves intramuscular injection of various agents for up to 24 hours. Another important consequence of this project was the development and flight of Physiological-Anatomical Rodent Experiment-1 (PARE-1), which was launched aboard Space Shuttle Discovery in September 1991. Detailed descriptions of these studies can be found in the 30 peer-reviewed publications, 15 non-reviewed publications, 4 reviews and 33 abstracts (total 82 publications) which were or are scheduled to be published as a result of this project. A listing of these publications grouped by area (i.e. amino acid metabolism, protein metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, and space flight studies) are included.

  19. MRI abnormalities of peripheral nerve and muscle are common in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and share features with multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Nathan P.; Amrami, Kimberly K.; Howe, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction MRI of peripheral nerve and muscle in patients with ALS may be performed to investigate alternative diagnoses including multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). MRI findings of peripheral nerve and muscle are not well described in these conditions, making interpretation of results difficult. Methods We examined systematically the peripheral nerve and muscle MRI findings in patients with ALS (n=60) and MMN (n=8). Results In patients with ALS and MMN, abnormal MRIs were common (85% and 75%, respectively) but did not correlate with disease severity. Peripheral nerve MRI abnormalities were similar in frequency (ALS: 58% vs. MMN: 63%) with most changes being of mild-to-moderate severity. Muscle MRI changes were more common in ALS (57% vs. 33%), and no muscle atrophy was seen in patients with MMN. Discussion MRI abnormalities of peripheral nerve and muscle in ALS and MMN are common and share some features. PMID:25736373

  20. Mangiferin protects against adverse skeletal muscle changes and enhances muscle oxidative capacity in obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Luz M.; Raya, Ana I.; Martínez-Moreno, Julio M.

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-related skeletal muscle changes include muscle atrophy, slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation, and impaired mitochondrial oxidative capacity. These changes relate with increased risk of insulin resistance. Mangiferin, the major component of the plant Mangifera indica, is a well-known anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and antihyperlipidemic agent. This study tested the hypothesis that mangiferin treatment counteracts obesity-induced fiber atrophy and slow-to-fast fiber transition, and favors an oxidative phenotype in skeletal muscle of obese rats. Obese Zucker rats were fed gelatin pellets with (15 mg/kg BW/day) or without (placebo group) mangiferin for 8 weeks. Lean Zucker rats received the same gelatin pellets without mangiferin and served as non-obese and non-diabetic controls. Lesser diameter, fiber composition, and histochemical succinic dehydrogenase activity (an oxidative marker) of myosin-based fiber-types were assessed in soleus and tibialis cranialis muscles. A multivariate discriminant analysis encompassing all fiber-type features indicated that obese rats treated with mangiferin displayed skeletal muscle phenotypes significantly different compared with both lean and obese control rats. Mangiferin significantly decreased inflammatory cytokines, preserved skeletal muscle mass, fiber cross-sectional size, and fiber-type composition, and enhanced muscle fiber oxidative capacity. These data demonstrate that mangiferin attenuated adverse skeletal muscle changes in obese rats. PMID:28253314

  1. Mangiferin protects against adverse skeletal muscle changes and enhances muscle oxidative capacity in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; Raya, Ana I; Martínez-Moreno, Julio M; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2017-01-01

    Obesity-related skeletal muscle changes include muscle atrophy, slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation, and impaired mitochondrial oxidative capacity. These changes relate with increased risk of insulin resistance. Mangiferin, the major component of the plant Mangifera indica, is a well-known anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and antihyperlipidemic agent. This study tested the hypothesis that mangiferin treatment counteracts obesity-induced fiber atrophy and slow-to-fast fiber transition, and favors an oxidative phenotype in skeletal muscle of obese rats. Obese Zucker rats were fed gelatin pellets with (15 mg/kg BW/day) or without (placebo group) mangiferin for 8 weeks. Lean Zucker rats received the same gelatin pellets without mangiferin and served as non-obese and non-diabetic controls. Lesser diameter, fiber composition, and histochemical succinic dehydrogenase activity (an oxidative marker) of myosin-based fiber-types were assessed in soleus and tibialis cranialis muscles. A multivariate discriminant analysis encompassing all fiber-type features indicated that obese rats treated with mangiferin displayed skeletal muscle phenotypes significantly different compared with both lean and obese control rats. Mangiferin significantly decreased inflammatory cytokines, preserved skeletal muscle mass, fiber cross-sectional size, and fiber-type composition, and enhanced muscle fiber oxidative capacity. These data demonstrate that mangiferin attenuated adverse skeletal muscle changes in obese rats.

  2. Abnormal cortical mechanisms in voluntary muscle relaxation in de novo parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Labyt, Etienne; Cassim, François; Devos, David; Bourriez, Jean-Louis; Destée, Alain; Guieu, Jean-Daiel; Defebvre, Luc; Derambure, Philippe

    2005-06-01

    This study aimed at elucidating how the cortical mechanism underlying the preparation and the postmovement phase of voluntary hand muscle relaxation is affected in Parkinson's disease. Event-related mu and beta (de)synchronization (ERD/S) related to voluntary muscle contraction and relaxation were recorded in 16 untreated, akineto-rigid, predominantly hemiparkinsonian patients. The results were compared with data from 10 age-matched, healthy subjects. In the muscle relaxation task, the subject held the wrist in an extended position and then let the hand drop by voluntarily relaxing wrist extensor contraction, i.e., without any overt, associated muscle contraction. In the muscle contraction task, subjects performed a self-initiated brief wrist extension. A same pattern of ERD/S was observed in control subjects and parkinsonian patients performing the motor tasks with their less affected limb. In contrast, related to voluntary relaxation performed with the more affected limb, a delayed mu and beta ERD and a disappearance of beta ERS were revealed. These results demonstrate that the pattern of cortical oscillatory activity in a relaxation task is abnormal in parkinsonian patients. The authors suggest that this may be due to anomalous activity in inhibitory motor cortical systems and impaired sensorimotor integration of afferent inputs from muscle and joint receptors.

  3. Cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormality in taurine transporter-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Oishi, Shohei; Takai, Mika; Kimura, Yasushi; Uozumi, Yoriko; Fujio, Yasushi; Schaffer, Stephen W; Azuma, Junichi

    2010-08-24

    Taurine, a sulfur-containing beta-amino acid, is highly contained in heart and skeletal muscle. Taurine has a variety of biological actions, such as ion movement, calcium handling and cytoprotection in the cardiac and skeletal muscles. Meanwhile, taurine deficiency leads various pathologies, including dilated cardiomyopathy, in cat and fox. However, the essential role of taurine depletion on pathogenesis has not been fully clarified. To address the physiological role of taurine in mammalian tissues, taurine transporter-(TauT-) knockout models were recently generated. TauTKO mice exhibited loss of body weight, abnormal cardiac function and the reduced exercise capacity with tissue taurine depletion. In this chapter, we summarize pathological profile and histological feature of heart and skeletal muscle in TauTKO mice.

  4. Muscle Contractile Properties in Severely Burned Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    the groups. This study demonstrates dynamics of muscle atrophy and muscle contractile properties after severe burn; this understanding will aid in the...muscle loss on muscle function, as well as the ability to develop strategies to reduce early muscle wasting following burn would be aided by a...G, Ward PS. Changes in rodent muscle fibre types during post-natal growth, undernutrition and exercise. J Physiol 1979;296(November):453–69. [25

  5. Temporal changes in sarcomere lesions of rat adductor longus muscles during hindlimb reloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krippendorf, B. B.; Riley, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    Focal sarcomere disruptions were previously observed in adductor longus muscles of rats flown approximately two weeks aboard the Cosmos 1887 and 2044 biosatellite flights. These lesions, characterized by breakage and loss of myofilaments and Z-line streaming, resembled damage induced by unaccustomed exercise that includes eccentric contractions in which muscles lengthen as they develop tension. We hypothesized that sarcomere lesions in atrophied muscles of space flow rats were not produced in microgravity by muscle unloading but resulted from muscle reloading upon re-exposure to terrestrial gravity. To test this hypothesis, we examined temporal changes in sarcomere integrity of adductor longus muscles from rats subjected to 12.5 days of hindlimb suspension unloading and subsequent reloading by return to vivarium cages for 0, 6, 12, or 48 hours of normal weightbearing. Our ultrastructural observations suggested that muscle unloading (0 h reloading) induced myofibril misalignment associated with myofiber atrophy. Muscle reloading for 6 hours induced focal sarcomere lesions in which cross striations were abnormally widened. Such lesions were electron lucent due to extensive myofilament loss. Lesions in reloaded muscles showed rapid restructuring. By 12 hours of reloading, lesions were moderately stained foci and by 48 hours darkly stained foci in which the pattern of cross striations was indistinct at the light and electron microscopic levels. These lesions were spanned by Z-line-like electron dense filamentous material. Our findings suggest a new role for Z-line streaming in lesion restructuring: rather than an antecedent to damage, this type of Z-line streaming may be indicative of rapid, early sarcomere repair.

  6. Myofascial force transmission between transferred rat flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and former synergistic palmaris longus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Huub; Huijing, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We investigated the extent of mechanical interaction between rat flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL) muscles following transfer of FCU to the distal tendons of extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus (ECRB/L) muscles. Five weeks after recovery from surgery, isometric forces exerted at the distal tendons of FCU and PL were quantified at various FCU lengths. PL was kept at a constant length. Changing the muscle-tendon complex length of transferred FCU (by maximally 3.5 mm) decreased PL force significantly (by 7%). A linear relationship was found between changes in FCU muscle belly length, being a measure of muscle relative positions, and PL force. These results indicate that despite transfer of FCU muscle to the extensor side of the forearm, changing FCU length still affects force transmission of its, now, antagonistic PL muscle. We conclude that a transferred muscle may still be mechanically linked to its former synergistic muscles. PMID:23738260

  7. The Impact of Muscle Disuse on Muscle Atrophy in Severely Burned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaowu; Baer, Lisa A; Wolf, Steven E.; Wade, Charles E; Walters, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Severe burn induces a sustained hypermetabolic response, which causes long-term loss of muscle mass and decrease in muscle strength. In this study, we sought to determine whether muscle disuse has additional impact on muscle atrophy after severe burn using a rat model combining severe cutaneous burn and hindlimb unloading. Methods Forty Sprague-Dawley rats (≈300g) were randomly assigned to sham ambulatory (S/A), sham hindlimb unloading (S/HLU), burn ambulatory (B/A) or burn hindlimb unloading (B/HLU) groups. Rats received a 40% total body surface (TBSA) full thickness scald burn, and rats with hindlimb unloading were placed in a tail traction system. At day 14, lean body mass (LBM) was determined using DEXA scan, followed by measurement of the isometric mechanical properties in the predominantly fast-twitch plantaris muscle (PL) and the predominantly slow-twitch soleus muscle (SL). Muscle weight (wt), protein wt, and wet/dry wt were determined. Results At day 14, body weight had decreased significantly in all treatment groups; B/HLU resulted in significantly greater loss compared to the B/A, S/HLU and S/A. The losses could be attributed to loss of LBM. PL muscle wt and Po were lowest in the B/HLU group (<0.05 vs. S/A, S/HLU or B/A). SL muscle wt and Po were significantly less in both S/HLU and B/HLU compared that of S/A and B/A; no significant difference was found between S/HLU and B/HLU. Conclusions Cutaneous burn and hindlimb unloading have an additive effect on muscle atrophy, characterized by loss of muscle mass and decrease in muscle strength in both fast (PL) and slow (SL) twitch muscles. Of the two, disuse appeared to be the dominant factor for continuous muscle wasting after acute burn in this model. PMID:20888588

  8. Tongue muscle plasticity following hypoglossal nerve stimulation in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Nadine P.; Russell, John A.; Jackson, Michelle A.; Kletzien, Heidi; Wang, Hao; Schaser, Allison J.; Leverson, Glen E.; Zealear, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Age-related decreases in tongue muscle mass and strength have been reported. It may be possible to prevent age-related tongue muscle changes using neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Our hypothesis was that alterations in muscle contractile properties and myosin heavy chain composition would be found following NMES. Methods Fifty-four young, middle-aged and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats were included. Twenty-four rats underwent bilateral electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves for 8 weeks and were compared with control or sham rats. Muscle contractile properties and myosin heavy chain (MHC) in the genioglossus (GG), styloglossus (SG) and hyoglossus (HG) muscles were examined. Results In comparison with unstimulated control rats, we found reduced muscle fatigue, increased contraction and half decay times and increased twitch and tetanic tension. Increased Type I MHC was found, except for GG in old and middle-aged rats. Discussion Transitions in tongue muscle contractile properties and phenotype were found following NMES. PMID:23169566

  9. Rat muscle blood flows during high-speed locomotion

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.B.; Laughlin, M.H.

    1985-10-01

    We previously studied blood flow distribution within and among rat muscles as a function of speed from walking (15 m/min) through galloping (75 m/min) on a motor-driven treadmill. The results showed that muscle blood flows continued to increase as a function of speed through 75 m/min. The purpose of the present study was to have rats run up to maximal treadmill speeds to determine if blood flows in the muscles reach a plateau as a function of running speed over the animals normal range of locomotory speeds. Muscle blood flows were measured with radiolabeled microspheres at 1 min of running at 75, 90, and 105 m/min in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The data indicate that even at these relatively high treadmill speeds there was still no clear evidence of a plateau in blood flow in most of the hindlimb muscles. Flows in most muscles continued to increase as a function of speed. These observed patterns of blood flow vs. running speed may have resulted from the rigorous selection of rats that were capable of performing the high-intensity exercise and thus only be representative of a highly specific population of animals. On the other hand, the data could be interpreted to indicate that the cardiovascular potential during exercise is considerably higher in laboratory rats than has normally been assumed and that inadequate blood flow delivery to the muscles does not serve as a major limitation to their locomotory performance.

  10. Reinnervation of muscles after transection of the sciatic nerve in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ijkema-Paassen, Jos; Meek, Marcel F; Gramsbergen, Albert

    2002-06-01

    Functional recovery after transection of the sciatic nerve in adult rats is poor, probably because of abnormalities in reinnervation. Denervation and reinnervation patterns were studied morphologically in the lateral gastrocnemius (LGC), tibialis anterior (TA), and soleus (SOL) muscles for 21 weeks after nerve transection (motor endplates by acetylcholinesterase staining; nerves by silver impregnation). Motor endplates in the TA showed improving morphology with age, and, at 21 weeks, three-quarters of these were normal. Poorest recovery was observed in the SOL, as, at 21 weeks, only one-third of the motor endplates had a normal morphology. Polyneuronal innervation initially was more pronounced in the SOL, but, at 21 weeks, 10% of the motor endplates in all three muscles were still polyneuronally innervated. Our results indicate important differences in the reinnervation of these three hindleg muscles, and, even at 5 months, abnormalities were still present. These factors may in part explain the abnormal locomotion in rats as well as the limited recovery of function observed clinically in humans after nerve transection. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  11. Metabolomic profiling reveals severe skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of metabolism in aged FBN rats.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Sean M; Dugle, Janis E; Kennedy, Adam D; McDunn, Jonathan E; Kline, William; Guo, Lining; Guttridge, Denis C; Pereira, Suzette L; Edens, Neile K

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles exhibit age-related adaptive and pathological remodeling. Several muscles in particular undergo progressive atrophy and degeneration beyond median lifespan. To better understand myocellular responses to aging, we used semi-quantitative global metabolomic profiling to characterize trends in metabolic changes between 15-month-old adult and 32-month-old aged Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (FBN) male rats. The FBN rat gastrocnemius muscle exhibits age-dependent atrophy, whereas the soleus muscle, up until 32 months, exhibits markedly fewer signs of atrophy. Both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed, as well as plasma and urine. Compared to adult gastrocnemius, aged gastrocnemius showed evidence of reduced glycolytic metabolism, including accumulation of glycolytic, glycogenolytic, and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates. Pyruvate was elevated with age, yet levels of citrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide were reduced, consistent with mitochondrial abnormalities. Indicative of muscle atrophy, 3-methylhistidine and free amino acids were elevated in aged gastrocnemius. The monounsaturated fatty acids oleate, cis-vaccenate, and palmitoleate also increased in aged gastrocnemius, suggesting altered lipid metabolism. Compared to gastrocnemius, aged soleus exhibited far fewer changes in carbohydrate metabolism, but did show reductions in several glycolytic intermediates, fumarate, malate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide. Plasma biochemicals showing the largest age-related increases included glycocholate, heme, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, 1-palmitoleoyl-glycerophosphocholine, palmitoleate, and creatine. These changes suggest reduced insulin sensitivity in aged FBN rats. Altogether, these data highlight skeletal muscle group-specific perturbations of glucose and lipid metabolism consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction in aged FBN rats.

  12. Leucine supplementation improves regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; da Cunha, Fernanda M; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2015-12-01

    The decreased regenerative capacity of old skeletal muscles involves disrupted turnover of proteins. This study investigated whether leucine supplementation in old rats could improve muscle regenerative capacity. Young and old male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine; then, the muscles were cryolesioned and examined after 3 and 10 days. Leucine supplementation attenuated the decrease in the expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in young and old muscles on day 3 post-injury and promoted an increase in the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers from both young and old soleus muscles on day 10 post-injury. This supplementation decreased the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and increased the proteasome activity in young regenerating muscles, but the opposite effect was observed in old regenerating muscles. Moreover, leucine decreased the inflammation area and induced an increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells in both young and old muscles. Our results suggest that leucine supplementation improves the regeneration of skeletal muscles from old rats, through the preservation of certain biological responses upon leucine supplementation. Such responses comprise the decrease in the inflammation area, increase in the number of proliferating satellite cells and size of regenerating myofibers, combined with the modulation of components of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/Akt/mTOR) pathway and ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  13. Regeneration of reinnervated rat soleus muscle is accompanied by fiber transition toward a faster phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mendler, Luca; Pintér, Sándor; Kiricsi, Mónika; Baka, Zsuzsanna; Dux, László

    2008-02-01

    The functional recovery of skeletal muscles after peripheral nerve transection and microsurgical repair is generally incomplete. Several reinnervation abnormalities have been described even after nerve reconstruction surgery. Less is known, however, about the regenerative capacity of reinnervated muscles. Previously, we detected remarkable morphological and motor endplate alterations after inducing muscle necrosis and subsequent regeneration in the reinnervated rat soleus muscle. In the present study, we comparatively analyzed the morphometric properties of different fiber populations, as well as the expression pattern of myosin heavy chain isoforms at both immunohistochemical and mRNA levels in reinnervated versus reinnervated-regenerated muscles. A dramatic slow-to-fast fiber type transition was found in reinnervated soleus, and a further change toward the fast phenotype was observed in reinnervated-regenerated muscles. These findings suggest that the (fast) pattern of reinnervation plays a dominant role in the specification of fiber phenotype during regeneration, which can contribute to the long-lasting functional impairment of the reinnervated muscle. Moreover, because the fast II fibers (and selectively, a certain population of the fast IIB fibers) showed better recovery than did the slow type I fibers, the faster phenotype of the reinnervated-regenerated muscle seems to be actively maintained by selective yet undefined cues.

  14. Atrophy of rat skeletal muscles in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Ginoza, H. S.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A hypokinetic rat model was used for elucidation of the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting which occurs in weightlessness. Rats were suspended from a back-harness with the head tilted downward and the hind limbs totally unloaded. A progressive decrease in the size of the soleus muscle from suspended rats was observed as a function of time. The rate of protein degradation of the homogenates from the soleus muscles of suspended and control animals was not significantly different. The rate of cell-free protein synthesis was severely repressed in the atrophied muscle. An initial rise in the levels of plasma glucose and corticosterone was observed on the second day of suspension, but they subsequently returned to normal values.

  15. Atrophy of rat skeletal muscles in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Ginoza, H. S.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A hypokinetic rat model was used for elucidation of the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting which occurs in weightlessness. Rats were suspended from a back-harness with the head tilted downward and the hind limbs totally unloaded. A progressive decrease in the size of the soleus muscle from suspended rats was observed as a function of time. The rate of protein degradation of the homogenates from the soleus muscles of suspended and control animals was not significantly different. The rate of cell-free protein synthesis was severely repressed in the atrophied muscle. An initial rise in the levels of plasma glucose and corticosterone was observed on the second day of suspension, but they subsequently returned to normal values.

  16. [Electrophysiological characteristics of the isolated muscle spindle in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue-Hong; Fan, Xiao-Li; Song, Xin-Ai; Shi, Lei

    2011-06-25

    The aim of this study was to observe the electrophysiological characteristics of the isolated rat muscle spindle. The muscle spindle was isolated from rat soleus and the afferent discharge of the isolated muscle spindle was recorded by air-gap technique. In the basic physiological salt solution, the spontaneous impulses of muscle spindle were at a lower level with irregular intervals. The mean frequency of afferents was (51.78 ± 25.63) impulses/1 000 s (n = 13). The muscle spindle afferents were significantly increased and maintained over time by the addition of certain amino acids during the observation. The number of the action potential recorded per 1 000 s was 200-1 000 [mean: (687.62 ± 312.56) impulses/1 000 s, n = 17]. In addition to the typical propagated action potential, a large number of abortive spikes were observed. The results indicate that the activities of isolated muscle spindles in rats can be well maintained by the addition of certain amino acids. The results initially establish and provide the possibility for further research conducted in isolated rat muscle spindles.

  17. Myosin heavy chain expression in respiratory muscles of the rat.

    PubMed

    LaFramboise, W A; Watchko, J F; Brozanski, B S; Daood, M J; Guthrie, R D

    1992-03-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms of hind limb adult rat muscles and muscles with a range of respiratory activities were analyzed by a sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis technique that allowed electrophoretic separation of the three fast and one slow MHC isoform found in typical rat muscle. Costal and crural diaphragm muscle samples expressed a mixture of MHC beta/slow, MHC2A, and MHC2X but little MHC2B. In contrast, MHC2B was the dominant MHC isoform in the genioglossus, intercostal, and three abdominal muscles, all of which exhibited minimal expression of MHC beta/slow. The amount of MHC2X (relative to total MHC composition) was similar in the diaphragm, genioglossus, and transversus abdominis muscles, while considerably less was detected in the rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles. These results indicate that MHC2X is broadly and variably distributed among respiratory muscles. Furthermore, these data suggest that a large portion of 2X fibers (containing MHC2X), which cannot be detected by standard histochemical analysis, may be present in the genioglossus and transversus abdominis muscles as has been demonstrated for the diaphragm muscle. We speculate that an association exists between the level of MHC2X expression and frequency of respiratory recruitment.

  18. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smajilovic, Sanela; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Christoffersen, Tue E.H.

    2006-10-06

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

  19. Rapid Morphological Brain Abnormalities during Acute Methamphetamine Intoxication in the Rat. An Experimental study using Light and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hari S.; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2009-01-01

    This study describes morphological abnormalities of brain cells during acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication in the rat and demonstrates the role of hyperthermia, disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and edema in their development. Rats with chronically implanted brain, muscle and skin temperature probes and an intravenous (iv) catheter were exposed to METH (9 mg/kg) at standard (23°C) and warm (29°C) ambient temperatures, allowing for the observation of hyperthermia ranging from mild to pathological levels (38–42°C). When brain temperature peaked or reached a level suggestive of possible lethality (>41.5°C), rats were injected with Evans blue (EB), rapidly anesthetized, perfused, and their brains were taken for further analyses. Four brain areas (cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus) were analyzed for EB extravasation, water and electrolyte (Na+, K+, Cl−) contents, immunostained for albumin and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and examined for neuronal, glial and axonal alterations using standard light and electron microscopy. These examinations revealed profound abnormalities in neuronal, glial, and endothelial cells, which were stronger with METH administered at 29°C than 23°C and tightly correlated with brain and body hyperthermia. These changes had some structural specificity, but in each structure they tightly correlated with increases in EB levels, the numbers of albumin-positive cells, and water and ion contents, suggesting leakage of the BBB, acutely developing brain edema, and serious shifts in brain ion homeostasis as leading factors underlying brain abnormalities. While most of these acute structural and functional abnormalities appear to be reversible, they could trigger subsequent cellular alterations in the brain and accelerate neurodegeneration—the most dangerous complication of chronic amphetamine-like drug abuse. PMID:18773954

  20. The effect of age on rat rotator cuff muscle architecture.

    PubMed

    Swan, Malcolm A; Sato, Eugene; Galatz, Leesa M; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-12-01

    Understanding rotator cuff muscle function during disease development and after repair is necessary for preventing degeneration and improving postsurgical outcomes, respectively. The rat is a commonly used rotator cuff animal model; however, unlike humans, rats continue to grow throughout their lifespan, so age-related changes in muscle structure may complicate an understanding of muscle adaptations to injury. Infraspinatus and supraspinatus muscle mass, fiber length, pennation angle, sarcomere length, and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) were measured in Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30) with a body mass ranging from 51 to 814 g (approximately 3 weeks to approximately 18 months). Both the supraspinatus and infraspinatus showed a striking conservation of sarcomere length throughout growth. There was linear growth in muscle mass and PCSA, nonlinear growth in muscle length and fiber bundle length, and a linear relationship between humeral head diameter and fiber bundle length, suggesting that muscle fiber length (serial sarcomere number) adjusted according to skeletal dimensions. These muscle growth trajectories allowed sarcomere length to remain nearly constant. During the typical rat rotator cuff experimental period (animal mass, 400-600 g), muscle mass will increase by 30%, fiber length will increase by 7%, and PCSA will increase by 27%, but sarcomere lengths are nearly constant. Therefore, these normal growth-induced changes in architecture must be considered when muscle atrophy or fiber shortening is measured after rotator cuff tears in this model. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Skeletal muscle abnormalities and exercise intolerance in older patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, Barbara; Kraus, William E.; Lyles, Mary F.; Eggebeen, Joel; Morgan, Timothy M.; Haykowsky, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is the most common form of HF in older persons. The primary chronic symptom in HFPEF is severe exercise intolerance, and its pathophysiology is poorly understood. To determine whether skeletal muscle abnormalities contribute to their severely reduced peak exercise O2 consumption (V̇o2), we examined 22 older HFPEF patients (70 ± 7 yr) compared with 43 age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects using needle biopsy of the vastus lateralis muscle and cardiopulmonary exercise testing to assess muscle fiber type distribution and capillarity and peak V̇o2. In HFPEF versus HC patients, peak V̇o2 (14.7 ± 2.1 vs. 22.9 ± 6.6 ml·kg−1·min−1, P < 0.001) and 6-min walk distance (454 ± 72 vs. 573 ± 71 m, P < 0.001) were reduced. In HFPEF versus HC patients, the percentage of type I fibers (39.0 ± 11.4% vs. 53.7 ± 12.4%, P < 0.001), type I-to-type II fiber ratio (0.72 ± 0.39 vs. 1.36 ± 0.85, P = 0.001), and capillary-to-fiber ratio (1.35 ± 0.32 vs. 2.53 ± 1.37, P = 0.006) were reduced, whereas the percentage of type II fibers was greater (61 ± 11.4% vs. 46.3 ± 12.4%, P < 0.001). In univariate analyses, the percentage of type I fibers (r = 0.39, P = 0.003), type I-to-type II fiber ratio (r = 0.33, P = 0.02), and capillary-to-fiber ratio (r = 0.59, P < 0.0001) were positively related to peak V̇o2. In multivariate analyses, type I fibers and the capillary-to-fiber ratio remained significantly related to peak V̇o2. We conclude that older HFPEF patients have significant abnormalities in skeletal muscle, characterized by a shift in muscle fiber type distribution with reduced type I oxidative muscle fibers and a reduced capillary-to-fiber ratio, and these may contribute to their severe exercise intolerance. This suggests potential new therapeutic targets in this difficult to treat disorder. PMID:24658015

  2. Three Intermittent Sessions of Cryotherapy Reduce the Secondary Muscle Injury in Skeletal Muscle of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Nuno M. L.; Rainero, Elaine P.; Salvini, Tania F.

    2006-01-01

    Although cryotherapy associated to compression is recommended as immediate treatment after muscle injury, the effect of intermittent sessions of these procedures in the area of secondary muscle injury is not established. This study examined the effect of three sessions of cryotherapy (30 min of ice pack each 2h) and muscle compression (sand pack) in the muscle-injured area. Twenty-four Wistar rats (312 ± 20g) were evaluated. In three groups, the middle belly of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was injured by a frozen iron bar and received one of the following treatments: a) three sessions of cryotherapy; b) three sessions of compression; c) not treated. An uninjured group received sessions of cryotherapy. Frozen muscles were cross- sectioned (10 µm) and stained for the measurement of injured and uninjured muscle area. Injured muscles submitted to cryotherapy showed the smallest injured area (29.83 ± 6.6%), compared to compressed (39.2 ± 2.8%, p= 0.003) and untreated muscles (41.74 ± 4.0%, p = 0.0008). No difference was found between injured compressed and injured untreated muscles. In conclusion, three intermittent sessions of cryotherapy applied immediately after muscle damage was able to reduce the secondary muscle injury, while only the muscle compression did not provide the same effectiveness. Key Points Three sessions of cryotherapy (30 min each 2 hours) applied immediately after muscle damage reduce the secondary muscle injury. Sessions of compression applied after muscle damage are not able to reduce the secondary muscle injury. PMID:24259995

  3. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410–450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  4. Functional characteristics of the rat jaw muscles: daily muscle activity and fiber type composition.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Sano, Ryota; Korfage, Joannes A M; Nakamura, Saika; Tanaka, Eiji; van Wessel, Tim; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Tanne, Kazuo

    2009-12-01

    Skeletal muscles have a heterogeneous fiber type composition, which reflects their functional demand. The daily muscle use and the percentage of slow-type fibers have been shown to be positively correlated in skeletal muscles of larger animals but for smaller animals there is no information. The examination of this relationship in adult rats was the purpose of this study. We hypothesized a positive relationship between the percentage of fatigue-resistant fibers in each muscle and its total duration of use per day. Fourteen Wistar strain male rats (410-450 g) were used. A radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter, deep masseter, anterior belly of digastric and anterior temporalis muscles. The degree of daily muscle use was quantified by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time) exceeding specified levels of the peak activity (2, 5, 20 and 50%). The fiber type composition of the muscles was examined by the myosin heavy chain content of the fibers by means of immunohistochemical staining. At lower activity levels (exceeding 2 and 5% of the peak activity), the duty time of the anterior belly of digastric muscle was significantly (P < 0.01) longer than those of the other muscles. The anterior belly of digastric muscle also contained the highest percentage of slow-type fibers (type I fiber and hybrid fiber co-expressing myosin heavy chain I + IIA) (ca. 11%; P < 0.05). By regression analysis for all four muscles, an inter-muscular comparison showed a positive relationship between the duty time (exceeding 50% of the peak activity) and the percentage of type IIX fibers (P < 0.05), which demonstrate intermediate physiological properties relative to type IIA and IIB fibers. For the jaw muscles of adult male rats, the variations of fiber type composition and muscle use suggest that the muscle containing the largest amounts of slow-type fibers (the anterior belly of digastric muscle) is mainly

  5. Histology, composition, and quality traits of chicken Pectoralis major muscle affected by wooden breast abnormality.

    PubMed

    Soglia, F; Mudalal, S; Babini, E; Di Nunzio, M; Mazzoni, M; Sirri, F; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2016-03-01

    Only a few years ago, the poultry industry began to face a recent abnormality in breast meat, known as wooden breast, which frequently overlaps with white striping. This study aimed to assess the impact of wooden breast abnormality on quality traits of meat. For this purpose, 32 normal (NRM), 32 wooden (WB), and 32 wooden and white-striped (WB/WS) Pectoralis major muscles were selected from the same flock of heavy broilers (males, Ross 708, weighing around 3.7 kg) in the deboning area of a commercial processing plant at 3 h postmortem and used to assess histology, proximate (moisture, protein, fat, ash, and collagen) and mineral composition (Mg, K, P, Na and Ca), sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein patterns, and technological traits of breast meat. Compared to the normal group, WB/WS fillets showed more severe histological lesions characterized by fiber degeneration, fibrosis, and lipidosis, coupled with a significantly harder texture. With regard to proximate and mineral composition, abnormal samples exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher moisture, fat, and collagen contents coupled with lower (P < 0.001) amounts of protein and ash. Furthermore, increased calcium (131 vs. 84 mg kg(-1); P < 0.05) and sodium (741 vs. 393 mg kg(-1); P < 0.001) levels were found in WB/WS meat samples. The SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a significantly lower amount of calcium-ATPase (SERCA, 114 kDa), responsible for the translocation of Ca ions across the membrane, in normal breasts compared to abnormal ones. As for meat quality traits, fillets affected by wooden abnormality exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher ultimate pH and lower water-holding/water-binding capacity. In particular, compared to normal, abnormal samples showed reduced marinade uptake coupled with increased drip loss and cooking losses as well. In conclusion, this study revealed that meat affected by wooden breast or both wooden breast and white striping abnormalities exhibit poorer nutritional value, harder

  6. Muscle contractile activity regulates Sirt3 protein expression in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Hokari, Fumi; Kawasaki, Emi; Sakai, Atsushi; Koshinaka, Keiichi; Sakuma, Kunihiro; Kawanaka, Kentaro

    2010-08-01

    Sirt3, a member of the sirtuin family, is known to control cellular mitochondrial function. Furthermore, because sirtuins require NAD for their deacetylase activity, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt), which is a rate-limiting enzyme in the intracellular NAD biosynthetic pathway, influences their activity. We examined the effects of exercise training and normal postural contractile activity on Sirt3 and Nampt protein expression in rat skeletal muscles. Male rats were trained by treadmill running at 20 m/min, 60 min/day, 7 days/wk for 4 wk. This treadmill training program increased the Sirt3 protein expression in the soleus and plantaris muscles by 49% and 41%, respectively (P < 0.05). Moreover, a 4-wk voluntary wheel-running program also induced 66% and 95% increases in Sirt3 protein in the plantaris and triceps muscles of rats, respectively (P < 0.05). Treadmill-running and voluntary running training induced no significant changes in Nampt protein expression in skeletal muscles. In resting rats, the soleus muscle, which is recruited during normal postural activity, possessed the greatest expression levels of the Sirt3 and Nampt proteins, followed by the plantaris and triceps muscles. Furthermore, the Sirt3, but not Nampt, protein level was reduced in the soleus muscles from immobilized hindlimbs compared with that shown in the contralateral control muscle. These results demonstrated that 1) Sirt3 protein expression is upregulated by exercise training in skeletal muscles and 2) local postural contractile activity plays an important role in maintaining a high level of Sirt3 protein expression in postural muscle.

  7. Effects of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on blink abnormalities of 6-OHDA lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Jaime; Thakur, Pratibha; Evinger, Craig

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat model share blink abnormalities. In view of the evolutionarily conserved organization of blinking, characterization of blink reflex circuits in rodents may elucidate the neural mechanisms of PD reflex abnormalities. We examine the extent of this shared pattern of blink abnormalities by measuring blink reflex excitability, blink reflex plasticity, and spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. We also investigate whether 130-Hz subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) affects blink abnormalities, as it does in PD patients. Like PD patients, 6-OHDA-lesioned rats exhibit reflex blink hyperexcitability, impaired blink plasticity, and a reduced spontaneous blink rate. At 130 Hz, but not 16 Hz, STN DBS eliminates reflex blink hyperexcitability and restores both short- and long-term blink plasticity. Replicating its lack of effect in PD patients, 130-Hz STN DBS does not reinstate a normal temporal pattern or rate to spontaneous blinking in 6-OHDA lesioned rats. These data show that the 6-OHDA lesioned rat is an ideal model system for investigating the neural bases of reflex abnormalities in PD and highlight the complexity of PD's effects on motor control, by showing that dopamine depletion does not affect all blink systems via the same neural mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Protein turnover in skeletal muscle of suckling rats.

    PubMed

    Davis, T A; Fiorotto, M L; Nguyen, H V; Reeds, P J

    1989-11-01

    To determine the normal changes in protein turnover of skeletal muscle in vivo during the suckling period of rats, protein synthesis was measured in soleus, plantaris, anterior tibialis, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of 1- to 28-day-old rats using a flooding dose of L-[4-3H]phenylalanine. Protein mass of hind-limb muscles increased nearly 100-fold, and RNA increased approximately 20-fold between 1 and 28 days of age. The total amount of protein synthesized per day increased 34-fold. Fractional protein synthesis rates (Ks) decreased two- to threefold between 1 and 28 days postpartum as a result of a decrease in protein synthetic capacity (RNA/protein). Protein synthetic efficiency (total protein synthesized/RNA) increased during this period. Ks were similar among the four muscles at 1-10 days. At 16 days, Ks increased in soleus and plantaris as a result of increases in protein synthetic efficiency; Ks did not increase in anterior tibialis and EDL. These data suggest that, during the suckling period, protein synthetic capacity in skeletal muscles of rats declines, while protein synthetic efficiency increases. The increase in translational efficiency occurred earlier in weight-bearing muscles (soleus, plantaris) than in non-weight-bearing muscles (anterior tibialis and EDL) and was associated with the appearance of mobility.

  9. Calcium overload increases oxidative stress in old rat gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Capel, F; Demaison, L; Maskouri, F; Diot, A; Buffiere, C; Patureau Mirand, P; Mosoni, L

    2005-09-01

    In order to challenge in vivo muscle Ca2+ homeostasis and analyze consequences on mitochondrial H2O2 release (MHR) and sarcopenia, we injected Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (200 microg/kg, ip) in adult and old rats and measured gastrocnemius mass and mitochondrial Ca2+ content (MCC) using radioactive Ca2+ 48 h after injection. In a second experiment performed in old rats, we measured isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) activity as an index of MCC, MHR, mitochondrial respiration, citrate synthase, COX and antioxydant enzyme activities 24 h after a 150 microg/kg injection. In adult rats, muscle mass and MCC were unchanged by A23187. In old rats, MCC increased 24 h after injection as reflected by a significant increase in ICDH activity; measured MCC tended to increase at 48 h. MHR and Mn-SOD activity were significantly increased at 24 h, and GPX activity was reduced. Muscle mass was unchanged but was negatively correlated with MCC in control and treated old rats. In conclusion, in old rats, A23187 probably induced a mitochondrial Ca2+ overload responsible for the observed increase in MHR without leading to muscle atrophy on a short term basis.

  10. Intrinsic connective tissue abnormalities in the heart muscle of cardiomyopathic Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Gould, L.; Robinson, T. F.; Factor, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    Significant connective tissue abnormalities occurring in hearts of cardiomyopathic Syrian hamsters are reported. These abnormalities include a pronounced loss of the intrinsic connective tissue skeletal framework around foci of myocytolytic necrosis within the non-necrotic myocardium. These changes were demonstrated by a silver impregnation technique, and they were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Quantitation demonstrated more than a twofold increase in the area of ventricular wall affected by pathologic changes, when the connective tissue alterations were included with the myocardial necrosis. In addition, the authors also observed focal, thick "tethering" connective tissue fibers at the termini of necrotic lesions, seemingly connecting them to normal muscle. These connective tissue abnormalities may contribute to the progressive loss of ventricular function that occurs in this model of cardiomyopathy. They may permit greater wall thinning than would occur with focal necrosis alone, and they may increase focal mural stiffness in the tethered regions. Further investigation of the pathogenesis of these changes and their mechanical significance is indicated. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3578490

  11. Correcting of pronated feet reduce skeletal muscle injury in young women with biomechanical abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Maria Regina; Tulaar, Angela B M; Immanuel, Suzana; Purba, A; Mansyur, Muchtaruddin; Haryadi, Ratna Darjanti; Hadisoebroto, Ismail; Husni, Amin; Ibrahim, Nurhadi

    2016-03-01

    Biomechanical abnormalities of pronated feet accompanied by functional leg length disparity may increase the risk of skeletal muscle injury. Objective of the study is to prove that correction of pronated feet by the foot orthoses will reduce the creatine kinase-MM (CK-MM) concentrations as the muscle injury indicator. The design study was double blind randomized clinical trials with control. Research subjects were divided into two groups, group 1 used the foot orthoses while group 2 did not used the foot orthoses. The whole subject examined the concentrations of the CK-MM enzyme before, and 24-72 hours after the walking test. The walking test was conducted 15 minutes with maximum speed. The concentration of the CK-MM enzyme before walking test on treatment group was 70.07±15.33 International Unit (IU), similar with the control group was 69.85±17.03 IU (P=0.971). The increased in CK-MM enzyme concentrations 45 hours after the walking test was lower in the treatment group (7.8±9 IU) than the control group (22.0±11.5 IU) (P=0.001). The CK-MM enzyme concentrations continued to decline in the treatment group after the second walking test (77.21±17.47 IU), and after the third walking test (69.86±11.88 IU) (P=0.018). The foot orthoses for correcting the pronated feet on the young women with biomechanical abnormalities is able to reduce the degree of the skeletal muscle injury after walking activity.

  12. Correcting of pronated feet reduce skeletal muscle injury in young women with biomechanical abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Tulaar, Angela B. M.; Immanuel, Suzana; Purba, A.; Mansyur, Muchtaruddin; Haryadi, Ratna Darjanti; Hadisoebroto, Ismail; Husni, Amin; Ibrahim, Nurhadi

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical abnormalities of pronated feet accompanied by functional leg length disparity may increase the risk of skeletal muscle injury. Objective of the study is to prove that correction of pronated feet by the foot orthoses will reduce the creatine kinase-MM (CK-MM) concentrations as the muscle injury indicator. The design study was double blind randomized clinical trials with control. Research subjects were divided into two groups, group 1 used the foot orthoses while group 2 did not used the foot orthoses. The whole subject examined the concentrations of the CK-MM enzyme before, and 24–72 hours after the walking test. The walking test was conducted 15 minutes with maximum speed. The concentration of the CK-MM enzyme before walking test on treatment group was 70.07±15.33 International Unit (IU), similar with the control group was 69.85±17.03 IU (P=0.971). The increased in CK-MM enzyme concentrations 45 hours after the walking test was lower in the treatment group (7.8±9 IU) than the control group (22.0±11.5 IU) (P=0.001). The CK-MM enzyme concentrations continued to decline in the treatment group after the second walking test (77.21±17.47 IU), and after the third walking test (69.86±11.88 IU) (P=0.018). The foot orthoses for correcting the pronated feet on the young women with biomechanical abnormalities is able to reduce the degree of the skeletal muscle injury after walking activity. PMID:27051564

  13. Autophagy Signaling in Skeletal Muscle of Infarcted Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jannig, Paulo R.; Moreira, Jose B. N.; Bechara, Luiz R. G.; Bozi, Luiz H. M.; Bacurau, Aline V.; Monteiro, Alex W. A.; Dourado, Paulo M.; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brum, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF)-induced skeletal muscle atrophy is often associated to exercise intolerance and poor prognosis. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HF-induced muscle atrophy may contribute to the development of pharmacological strategies to prevent or treat such condition. It has been shown that autophagy-lysosome system is an important mechanism for maintenance of muscle mass. However, its role in HF-induced myopathy has not been addressed yet. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate autophagy signaling in myocardial infarction (MI)-induced muscle atrophy in rats. Methods/Principal Findings Wistar rats underwent MI or Sham surgeries, and after 12 weeks were submitted to echocardiography, exercise tolerance and histology evaluations. Cathepsin L activity and expression of autophagy-related genes and proteins were assessed in soleus and plantaris muscles by fluorimetric assay, qRT-PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. MI rats displayed exercise intolerance, left ventricular dysfunction and dilation, thereby suggesting the presence of HF. The key findings of the present study were: a) upregulation of autophagy-related genes (GABARAPL1, ATG7, BNIP3, CTSL1 and LAMP2) was observed only in plantaris while muscle atrophy was observed in both soleus and plantaris muscles, and b) Cathepsin L activity, Bnip3 and Fis1 protein levels, and levels of lipid hydroperoxides were increased specifically in plantaris muscle of MI rats. Conclusions Altogether our results provide evidence for autophagy signaling regulation in HF-induced plantaris atrophy but not soleus atrophy. Therefore, autophagy-lysosome system is differentially regulated in atrophic muscles comprising different fiber-types and metabolic characteristics. PMID:24427319

  14. [Respondence to electricity in the muscles of rat's jaw].

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengshi; Li, Liang; Song, Yiping; Lai, Shengxiang

    2002-12-01

    15 male Wistar rats of 8 weeks old were used in this experment. After deeply anesthesia, the masseter muscles, digastric muscles, lateral pterygoid muscles were stimulated in the apartment that was made by us. The curves that express the relations of force-electronic stimulates were recorded and the constitutive equations of these muscles were given. When a single electronic signal stimulates the muscle, the respondence of the muscles can be expressed as F = A(e-alpha t - e-beta t) and the constant A, alpha, beta were determined. When the frequency of the electronic stimulation was higher than 3 Hz, the respondence was expressed as F = Ce-gamma/t + Dsin omega t and the constants C, D and gamma were determined. When the frequency of the electronic stimulation was thirty or higher, the tetanic convulsion occurred.

  15. Abnormal reflex activation of hamstring muscles in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Graham M; Granger, Nicolas; Langley-Hobbs, Sorrel J; Jeffery, Nick D

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms underlying cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs are poorly understood. In this study hamstring muscle reflexes in response to cranial tibial translation were analysed to determine whether these active stabilisers of the stifle joint are differently activated in dogs with CCLR compared to control dogs. In a prospective clinical study reflex muscle activity from the lateral and medial hamstring muscles (biceps femoris and semimembranosus) was recorded using surface electrodes in control dogs (n=21) and dogs with CCLR (n=22). These electromyographic recordings were analysed using an algorithm previously validated in humans. The hamstring reflex was reliably and reproducibly recorded in normal dogs. Both a short latency response (SLR, 17.6±2.1ms) and a medium latency response (MLR, 37.7±2.7ms) could be identified. In dogs with unilateral CCLR, the SLR and MLR were not significantly different between the affected and the unaffected limbs, but the MLR latency of both affected and unaffected limbs in CCLR dogs were significantly prolonged compared to controls. In conclusion, the hamstring reflex can be recorded in dogs and the MLR is prolonged in dogs with CCLR. Since both affected and unaffected limbs exhibit prolonged MLR, it is possible that abnormal hamstring reflex activation is a mechanism by which progressive CCL damage may occur. The methodology allows for further investigation of the relationship between neuromuscular imbalance and CCLR or limitations in functional recovery following surgical intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sumoylated α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscle of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Uda, Munehiro; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Shigenaga, Ayako; Baba, Takeshi; Naito, Hisashi; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Yamakura, Fumiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Skeletal muscles are composed of two major muscle fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic fibers. The proteins in these muscle fibers are known to differ in their expression, relative abundance, and post-translational modifications. In this study, we report a previously unreported post-translational modification of α-skeletal muscle actin in the skeletal muscles of adult male F344 rats in vivo. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), we first examined the differences in the protein expression profiles between the soleus and plantaris muscles. We found higher intensity protein spots at approximately 60 kDa and pH 9 on 2D-PAGE for the soleus muscle compared with the plantaris muscle. These spots were identified as α-skeletal muscle actin by liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry and western blot analyses. In addition, we found that the 60 kDa α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 1, using 2D-PAGE and western blot analyses. Furthermore, we found that α-skeletal muscle actin with larger molecular weight was localized in the nuclear and cytosol of the skeletal muscle, but not in the myofibrillar fraction by the combination of subcellular fractionation and western blot analyses. These results suggest that α-skeletal muscle actin is modified by SUMO-1 in the skeletal muscles, localized in nuclear and cytosolic fractions, and the extent of this modification is much higher in the slow muscles than in the fast muscles. This is the first study to show the presence of SUMOylated actin in animal tissues.

  17. Reduction-oxidation state and protein degradation in skeletal muscle of fasted and refed rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    Redox state and protein degradation were measured in isolated muscles of fasted (up to 10 d) and refed (up to 4 d) 7- to 14-wk-old rats. Protein degradation in the extensor digitorum longus muscle, but not in the soleus muscle, was greater in the fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. The NAD couple was more oxidized in incubated and fresh extensor digitorum longus muscles and in some incubated soleus muscles of fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. In the extensor digitorum longus muscle of refed or prolonged fasted rats, protein degradation was slower and the NAD couple was more reduced than in the fed state. Therefore, oxidation of the NAD couple was associated with increased muscle breakdown during fasting, whereas reduction of the NAD couple was associated with muscle conservation and deposition.

  18. Reduction-oxidation state and protein degradation in skeletal muscle of fasted and refed rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    Redox state and protein degradation were measured in isolated muscles of fasted (up to 10 d) and refed (up to 4 d) 7- to 14-wk-old rats. Protein degradation in the extensor digitorum longus muscle, but not in the soleus muscle, was greater in the fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. The NAD couple was more oxidized in incubated and fresh extensor digitorum longus muscles and in some incubated soleus muscles of fasted rats than in weight-matched muscle from fed rats. In the extensor digitorum longus muscle of refed or prolonged fasted rats, protein degradation was slower and the NAD couple was more reduced than in the fed state. Therefore, oxidation of the NAD couple was associated with increased muscle breakdown during fasting, whereas reduction of the NAD couple was associated with muscle conservation and deposition.

  19. Taurine prevents collagen abnormalities in high fructose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Nandhini, A T Anitha; Thirunavukkarasu, V; Anuradha, C V

    2005-08-01

    Accumulation of collagen and changes in its physiochemical properties contribute to the development of secondary complications of diabetes. We undertook this study to see the effects of taurine on the content and characteristics of collagen from tail tendon of rats fed with high fructose diet. The rats were divided into four groups of six each: control group (CON), taurine-supplemented control group (CON+TAU), taurine supplemented (FRU+TAU) and not supplemented fructose-fed group (FRU). The physico-chemical properties of collagen isolated from the tail tendon were studied. Fructose administration caused accumulation of collagen in tail tendon. Enhanced glycation and advanced glycation end products (AGE)-linked fluorescence together with alterations in aldehyde content, solubility pattern, susceptibility to denaturing agents and shrinkage temperature were observed in fructose-fed rats. Elevated b component of type I collagen was evidenced from the SDS gel pattern of collagen from the fructose-fed rats. Simultaneous administration of taurine alleviated these changes. Taurine administration to fructose-rats had a positive influence on both quantitative and qualitative properties of collagen. The results of the present study suggested a role for the action of taurine in delaying diabetic complications and the possible use of taurine as an adjuvant therapeutic measure in the management of diabetes and its complications.

  20. Ultrastructural organization of muscle fiber types and their distribution in the rat superior rectus extraocular muscle.

    PubMed

    Rashed, Rashed M; El-Alfy, Sherif H

    2012-05-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) are unique as they show greater variation in anatomical and physiological properties than any other skeletal muscles. To investigate the muscle fiber types and to understand better the structure-function correlation of the extraocular muscles, the present study examined the ultrastructural characteristics of the superior rectus muscle of rat. The superior rectus muscle is organized into two layers: a central global layer of mainly large-diameter fibers and an outer C-shaped orbital layer of principally small-diameter fibers. Six morphologically distinct fiber types were identified within the superior rectus muscle. Four muscle fiber types, three single innervated fibers (SIFs) and one multiple innervated fiber (MIF), were recognized in the global layer. The single innervated fibers included red, white and intermediate fibers. They differed from one another with respect to diameter, mitochondrial size and distribution, sarcoplasmic reticulum and myofibrillar size. The orbital layer contained two distinct MIFs in addition to the red and intermediate SIFs. The orbital MIFs were categorized into low oxidative and high oxidative types according to their mitochondrial content and distribution. The highly specialized function of the superior rectus extraocular muscle is reflected in the multiplicity of its fiber types, which exhibit unique structural features. The unique ultrastructural features of the extraocular muscles and their possible relation to muscle function are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. [Effect of prednisolon on trachea smooth muscle of normal rats and rats with fibrosing alveolitis].

    PubMed

    Fedin, A N; Nekrasova, E A; Frolova, S A; Danilov, L N; Lebedeva, E S; Il'kovich, M M

    2007-01-01

    Effect of prednisolone on isolated preparations of trachea of normal rats and rats with fibrosing alveolitis was studied. Prednisolone at a concentration of 0.4 microg/l decreased responses of smooth muscle on stimulation of preganglionar nerve fibers at trachea areas with intramural ganglia in rats with acute alveolitis by 48%, while in normal rats--by 19% of control. In trachea preparations without ganglia, prednisolone at a dose of 10 microg/l decreased responses of muscle to the nerve fiber stimulation by 21.3%. The higher prednisolone doses were less efficient: 0.1-10 microg/l glucocorticoid practically did not affect the smooth muscle responses produced by stimulation of muscle cells. In rats with fibrosing alveolitis, 10 microg/l prednisolone restored the smooth muscle responses to control values in preparations of trachea with intramural ganglia. After the prednisolone treatment, amplitude of the rat trachea muscle contraction in response to the nerve fiber electric stimulation did not differ statistically significantly from control and 0.1-10 microg/l prednisolone did not change the response value. The conclusion is made that prednisolone affected the diseased rats more efficiently than the healthy animals. The character of the glucocorticoid effect depends on the presence of intramural ganglia in the trachea wall.

  2. Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers of rats after exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akuzawa, M.; Hataya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural alterations in skeletal muscle fibers were electron microscopically studied in rats forced to run on the treadmill until all-out. When they were mild and limited to relatively small areas, the reconstruction of filaments ensued within 10 days without infiltration of cells. When they were severe and extensive, phagocytes infiltrated in the lesions and removed degenerative sacroplasmic debris from muscle fibers. A little later, myoblasts appeared and regeneration was accomplished in 30 days in much the same manner as in myogenesis.

  3. Treatment with Riluzole Restores Normal Control of Soleus and Extensor Digitorum Longus Muscles during Locomotion in Adult Rats after Sciatic Nerve Crush at Birth

    PubMed Central

    Cabaj, Anna M.; Sławińska, Urszula

    2017-01-01

    The effects of sciatic nerve crush (SNC) and treatment with Riluzole on muscle activity during unrestrained locomotion were identified in an animal model by analysis of the EMG activity recorded from soleus (Sol) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of both hindlimbs; in intact rats (IN) and in groups of rats treated for 14 days with saline (S) or Riluzole (R) after right limb nerve crush at the 1st (1S and 1R) or 2nd (2S and 2R) day after birth. Changes in the locomotor pattern of EMG activity were correlated with the numbers of survived motor units (MUs) identified in investigated muscles. S rats with 2–8 and 10–28 MUs that survived in Sol and EDL muscles respectively showed increases in the duration and duty factor of muscle EMG activity and a loss of correlation between the duty factors of muscle activity, and abnormal flexor-extensor co-activation 3 months after SNC. R rats with 5, 6 (Sol) and 15–29 MUs (EDL) developed almost normal EMG activity of both Sol and control EDL muscles, whereas EDL muscles with SNC showed a lack of recovery. R rats with 8 (Sol) and 23–33 (EDL) MUs developed almost normal EMG activities of all four muscles. A subgroup of S rats with a lack of recovery and R rats with almost complete recovery that had similar number of MUs (8 and 24–28 vs 8 and 23–26), showed that the number of MUs was not the only determinant of treatment effectiveness. The results demonstrated that rats with SNC failed to develop normal muscle activity due to malfunction of neuronal circuits attenuating EDL muscle activity during the stance phase, whereas treatment with Riluzole enabled almost normal EMG activity of Sol and EDL muscles during locomotor movement. PMID:28095499

  4. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yali; Su, Dan; Zhang, Ling; Wei, Shaofeng; Liu, Kuangyi; Peng, Mi; Li, Hanyun; Song, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL−1 for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL−1. The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle. PMID:27190533

  5. Abdominal expiratory muscle activity in anesthetized vagotomized neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Makito

    2009-05-01

    The pattern of respiratory activity in abdominal muscles was studied in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing, vagotomized neonatal rats at postnatal days 0-3. Anesthesia (2.0% isoflurane, 50% O(2)) depressed breathing and resulted in hypercapnia. Under this condition, abdominal muscles showed discharge late in the expiratory phase (E2 activity) in most rats. As the depth of anesthesia decreased, the amplitude of discharges in the diaphragm and abdominal muscles increased. A small additional burst frequently occurred in abdominal muscles just after the termination of diaphragmatic inspiratory activity (E1 or postinspiratory activity). Since this E1 activity is not often observed in adult rats, the abdominal respiratory pattern likely changes during postnatal development. Anoxia-induced gasping after periodic expiratory activity without inspiratory activity, and in most rats, abdominal expiratory activity disappeared before terminal apnea. These results suggest that a biphasic abdominal motor pattern (a combination of E2 and E1 activity) is a characteristic of vagotomized neonatal rats during normal respiration.

  6. Endogenous L-Carnosine Level in Diabetes Rat Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yali; Su, Dan; Zhang, Ling; Wei, Shaofeng; Liu, Kuangyi; Peng, Mi; Li, Hanyun; Song, Yonggui

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for quantitation of cardiac muscle carnosine levels using HPLC-UV is described. In this simple and reliable method, carnosine from the rat cardiac muscle and the internal standard, thymopentin, were extracted by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. The method was linear up to 60.96 μg·mL(-1) for L-carnosine. The calibration curve was linear in concentration ranges from 0.5 to 60.96 μg·mL(-1). The relative standard deviations obtained for intra- and interday precision were lower than 12% and the recoveries were higher than 90% for both carnosine and internal standard. We successfully applied this method to the analysis of endogenous carnosine in cardiac muscle of the diabetes rats and healthy control rats. The concentration of carnosine was significantly lower in the diabetes rats group, compared to that in the healthy control rats. These results support the usefulness of this method as a means of quantitating carnosine and illustrate the important role of L-carnosine in cardiac muscle.

  7. Can a dermoid cyst lead to an abnormal origin of an extraocular muscle?

    PubMed

    Afghani, Tayyab; Mansoor, Hassan

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with a large 5 cm × 5 cm cyst covering the left eye completely since birth. The cyst was excised in toto and was sent for histopathological examination. During the surgery, the inferior oblique (IO) muscle was seen originating from medial orbital wall, 10-12 mm behind the medial orbital margin, just posterior to the lacrimal bone and moving laterally, downward, and posteriorly from its origin making a more acute angle - around 20° to its site of origin. The insertion of the IO to sclera was at its normal site. The abnormal origin of IO was confirmed later by magnetic resonance imaging. The ocular movements of the left eye were tested 2 weeks after the surgery and were found to be normal in all directions. However, the child was hypertrophic and amblyopic. The histopathological findings showed the orbital cyst to contain dermal elements, respiratory, and intestinal epithelium.

  8. Endurance training facilitates myoglobin desaturation during muscle contraction in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Hisashi; Furuichi, Yasuro; Yamada, Tatsuya; Jue, Thomas; Ojino, Minoru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Iwase, Satoshi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Izawa, Tetsuya; Masuda, Kazumi

    2015-03-24

    At onset of muscle contraction, myoglobin (Mb) immediately releases its bound O2 to the mitochondria. Accordingly, intracellular O2 tension (PmbO2) markedly declines in order to increase muscle O2 uptake (mVO2). However, whether the change in PmbO2 during muscle contraction modulates mVO2 and whether the O2 release rate from Mb increases in endurance-trained muscles remain unclear. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine the effect of endurance training on O2 saturation of Mb (SmbO2) and PmbO2 kinetics during muscle contraction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a 4-week swimming training (Tr group; 6 days per week, 30 min × 4 sets per day) with a weight load of 2% body mass. After the training period, deoxygenated Mb kinetics during muscle contraction were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy under hemoglobin-free medium perfusion. In the Tr group, the VmO2peak significantly increased by 32%. Although the PmbO2 during muscle contraction did not affect the increased mVO2 in endurance-trained muscle, the O2 release rate from Mb increased because of the increased Mb concentration and faster decremental rate in SmbO2 at the maximal twitch tension. These results suggest that the Mb dynamics during muscle contraction are contributing factors to faster VO2 kinetics in endurance-trained muscle.

  9. The ischiourethralis muscle of the rat: anatomy, innervation, and function.

    PubMed

    Dail, W G; Sachs, B D

    1991-02-01

    The ischiourethralis (IU), a striated perineal muscle presumed to be involved in sexual reflexes, was studied in the rat. The paired muscle arises from the penile crus and the penile bulb and unites in a raphe over the deep dorsal vein of the penis. Retrograde tracing studies show that the muscle is innervated by neurons in the dorsolateral nucleus of the lumbar spinal cord, a pudendal nerve motor nucleus which also innervates the ischiocavernosus muscle. Excision of the IU muscle did not interfere with the ability of males to display normal copulatory behavior, nor did it affect significantly the number and intensity of reflexive erections. It nevertheless remains possible that the IU may contribute to intense glans erection by compressing the deep dorsal vein.

  10. Astaxanthin intake attenuates muscle atrophy caused by immobilization in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Yamaguchi, Yusuke; Miyaji, Nobuyuki; Yoshihara, Toshinori; Naito, Hisashi; Goto, Katsumasa; Ohmori, Daijiro; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Sugiura, Takao

    2016-08-01

    Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment and has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of oxidative damage. We tested the hypothesis that astaxanthin intake would attenuate immobilization-induced muscle atrophy in rats. Male Wistar rats (14-week old) were fed for 24 days with either astaxanthin or placebo diet. After 14 days of each experimental diet intake, the hindlimb muscles of one leg were immobilized in plantar flexion position using a plaster cast. Following 10 days of immobilization, both the atrophic and the contralateral plantaris muscles were removed and analyzed to determine the level of muscle atrophy along with measurement of the protein levels of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and selected proteases. Compared with placebo diet animals, the degree of muscle atrophy in response to immobilization was significantly reduced in astaxanthin diet animals. Further, astaxanthin supplementation significantly prevented the immobilization-induced increase in the expression of CuZn-SOD, cathepsin L, calpain, and ubiquitin in the atrophied muscle. These results support the postulate that dietary astaxanthin intake attenuates the rate of disuse muscle atrophy by inhibiting oxidative stress and proteolysis via three major proteolytic pathways. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  11. Electrical stimulation delays reinnervation in denervated rat muscle.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro-Dardis, Clara M; Erbereli, Bruna T; Gigo-Benato, Davilene; Castro, Paula A T S; Russo, Thiago L

    2017-01-24

    It is not clear if electrical stimulation (ES) can affect muscle reinnervation. This study aimed to verify if ES affects neuromuscular recovery after nerve crush injury in rats. Denervated muscles were electrically stimulated daily for 6 or 14 days. Neuromuscular performance and excitability, and muscle morphology were determined. Muscle trophism markers (atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and myoD), as well as neuromuscular junction (NMJ) organization (muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase [MuSK], cytoplasmic protein downstream of kinase-7 [Dok-7], nicotinic ACh receptor [nAChR], and neural cell adhesion molecule [N-CAM]) were assessed. ES impaired neuromuscular recovery at day 14 postdenervation. Muscle hypoexcitability was accentuated by ES at 6 and 14 days postdenervation. Although ES reduced the accumulation of atrogin-1, MuRF1, and myoD mRNAs, it increased muscle atrophy. Gene expression of MuSK, Dok-7, nAChR, and the content of N-CAM protein were altered by ES. ES can delay the reinnervation process by modulating factors related to NMJ stability and organization, and inducing dysfunction, hypoexcitability, and muscle atrophy. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Leucine Supplementation Improves Skeletal Muscle Regeneration after Cryolesion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Marcelo G.; Baptista, Igor L.; Carlassara, Eduardo O. C.; Moriscot, Anselmo S.; Aoki, Marcelo S.; Miyabara, Elen H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to provide further insight into the role of leucine supplementation in the skeletal muscle regeneration process, focusing on myofiber size and strength recovery. Young (2-month-old) rats were subjected or not to leucine supplementation (1.35 g/kg per day) started 3 days prior to cryolesion. Then, soleus muscles were cryolesioned and continued receiving leucine supplementation until 1, 3 and 10 days later. Soleus muscles from leucine-supplemented animals displayed an increase in myofiber size and a reduction in collagen type III expression on post-cryolesion day 10. Leucine was also effective in reducing FOXO3a activation and ubiquitinated protein accumulation in muscles at post-cryolesion days 3 and 10. In addition, leucine supplementation minimized the cryolesion-induced decrease in tetanic strength and increase in fatigue in regenerating muscles at post-cryolesion day 10. These beneficial effects of leucine were not accompanied by activation of any elements of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin signalling pathway in the regenerating muscles. Our results show that leucine improves myofiber size gain and strength recovery in regenerating soleus muscles through attenuation of protein ubiquitination. In addition, leucine might have therapeutic effects for muscle recovery following injury and in some muscle diseases. PMID:24416379

  13. A Rat Model for Muscle Regeneration in the Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal Monroy, Paola L.; Grefte, Sander; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M.; Helmich, Maria P. A. C.; Ulrich, Dietmar J. O.; Von den Hoff, Johannes W.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Children with a cleft in the soft palate have difficulties with speech, swallowing, and sucking. Despite successful surgical repositioning of the muscles, optimal function is often not achieved. Scar formation and defective regeneration may hamper the functional recovery of the muscles after cleft palate repair. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate in rats, and to establish an in vivo model for muscle regeneration after surgical injury. Methods Fourteen adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Groups 1 (n = 4) and 2 (n = 2) were used to investigate the anatomy and histology of the soft palate, respectively. Group 3 (n = 6) was used for surgical wounding of the soft palate, and group 4 (n = 2) was used as unwounded control group. The wounds (1 mm) were evaluated by (immuno)histochemistry (AZAN staining, Pax7, MyoD, MyoG, MyHC, and ASMA) after 7 days. Results The present study shows that the anatomy and histology of the soft palate muscles of the rat is largely comparable with that in humans. All wounds showed clinical evidence of healing after 7 days. AZAN staining demonstrated extensive collagen deposition in the wound area, and initial regeneration of muscle fibers and salivary glands. Proliferating and differentiating satellite cells were identified in the wound area by antibody staining. Conclusions This model is the first, suitable for studying muscle regeneration in the rat soft palate, and allows the development of novel adjuvant strategies to promote muscle regeneration after cleft palate surgery. PMID:23554995

  14. Insulin resistance in SHR/NDmc-cp rats correlates with enlarged perivascular adipocytes and endothelial cell dysfunction in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hariya, Natsuyo; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Inoue, Seiya; Morioka, Kosuke; Shimada, Masaya; Okuda, Tohru; Goda, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic adipose tissue in skeletal muscle is implicated in the development of insulin resistance, which is frequently induced by abnormal dietary habits such as excessive eating and a high-fat diet. However, the characteristics of ectopic adipocytes are unknown. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of ectopic adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive corpulent congenic (SHR/NDmc-cp) rats as a model of insulin resistance from excessive eating. SHR/NDmc-cp rats displayed overt insulin resistance with high plasma glucose, insulin, and triacylglycerol concentrations relative to control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. In contrast, streptozotocin (STZ)-treated WKY rats had high glucose but low insulin concentrations. Ectopic adipocytes were found around blood vessels in the gastrocnemius in SHR/NDmc-cp rats. Areas of perivascular adipocytes and protein expression of resistin were greater in SHR/NDmc-cp rats than in control and STZ-treated WKY rats. The level of the phosphorylated (active) form of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the gastrocnemius was lower in SHR/NDmc-cp rats than in the other groups. Insulin-resistant SHR/NDmc-cp rats showed enlarged perivascular adipocytes and greater endothelial cell dysfunction in the gastrocnemius.

  15. Reference values of respiratory and peripheral muscle function in rats.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, E; Marín-Corral, J; Sanchez, F; Mielgo, V; Alvarez, F J; Gáldiz, J B; Gea, J

    2010-12-01

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction is a common systemic manifestation in several prevalent diseases. Predictive values are useful tools for the diagnosis and prognosis of diseases. In experimental animals, no reference values of muscle function evaluation have been so far reported. The objective was to obtain predictive values of maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and grip strength measurements in healthy rats. In 70 healthy rats, MIP and grip strength were measured in vivo weekly for five consecutive weeks using non-invasive methodologies. Three ranges of rat body weights (250-299, 300-349 and 350-399 g) and lengths (37.0-41.0, 41.1-42.0 and 42.1-44.0 cm) were established. MIP and grip strength measurements falling within the ranges of weight 350-399 and 300-349 g and length 42.1-44.0 cm were significantly greater than values falling within 250-299 g and 37.0-41.0 cm ranges respectively. Specific weight- and length-percentile distributions for MIP and grip strength measurements were calculated. As significant direct correlations were observed between rat weights and lengths and either MIP or grip strength measurements, regression equations relating all these variables were also determined. Skeletal muscle dysfunction is frequently associated with highly prevalent conditions. The significant predictive equations described for both MIP and grip strength measurements will enable scientists to better estimate the respiratory and peripheral muscle dysfunctions of laboratory animals, especially when conducting follow-up and/or intervention investigations.

  16. Rat rotator cuff muscle responds differently from hindlimb muscle to a combined tendon-nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael R; Ravishankar, Bharat; Laron, Dominique; Kim, Hubert T; Liu, Xuhui; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen by orthopaedic surgeons. Clinically, massive cuff tears lead to unique pathophysiological changes in rotator cuff muscle, including atrophy, and massive fatty infiltration, which are rarely seen in other skeletal muscles. Studies in a rodent model for RCT have demonstrated that these histologic findings are accompanied by activation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways following combined tendon-nerve injury. The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic and molecular features of rotator cuff muscle and gastrocnemius muscle--a major hindlimb muscle, following combined tendon-nerve injury. Six weeks after injury, the rat gastrocnemius did not exhibit notable fatty infiltration compared to the rotator cuff. Likewise, the adipogenic markers SREBP-1 and PPARγ as well as the TGF-β canonical pathway were upregulated in the rotator cuff, but not the gastrocnemius. Our study suggests that the rat rotator cuff and hindlimb muscles differ significantly in their response to a combined tendon-nerve injury. Clinically, these findings highlight the unique response of the rotator cuff to injury, and may begin to explain the poor outcomes of massive RCTs compared to other muscle-tendon injuries.

  17. Abnormalities of NBR1, a novel autophagy-associated protein, in muscle fibers of sporadic inclusion-body myositis.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, Carla; Nogalska, Anna; Cacciottolo, Mafalda; Engel, W King; Askanas, Valerie

    2011-11-01

    Intra-muscle fiber accumulation of ubiquitinated protein aggregates containing several conformationally modified proteins, including amyloid-β and phosphorylated tau, is characteristic of the pathologic phenotype of sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM), the most common progressive degenerative myopathy of older persons. Abnormalities of protein-degradation, involving both the 26S proteasome and autophagic-lysosomal pathways, were previously demonstrated in s-IBM muscle. NBR1 is a ubiquitin-binding scaffold protein importantly participating in autophagic degradation of ubiquitinated proteins. Whereas abnormalities of p62, a ubiquitin-binding protein, were previously described in s-IBM, abnormalities of NBR1 have not been reported in s-IBM. We have now identified in s-IBM muscle biopsies that NBR1, by: (a) immunohistochemistry, was strongly accumulated within s-IBM muscle-fiber aggregates, where it closely co-localized with p62, ubiquitin, and phosphorylated tau; (b) immunoblots, was increased threefold (p < 0.001); and (c) immunoprecipitation, was associated with p62 and LC3. By real-time PCR, NBR1 mRNA was increased twofold (p < 0.01). None of the various disease- and normal-control muscle biopsies had any NBR1 abnormality. In cultured human muscle fibers, NBR1 also physically associated with both p62 and LC3, and experimental inhibition of either the 26S proteasome or the lysosomal activity resulted in NBR1 increase. Our demonstration of NBR1 abnormalities in s-IBM provides further evidence that altered protein degradation pathways may be critically involved in the s-IBM pathogenesis. Accordingly, attempts to unblock defective protein degradation might be a therapeutic strategy for s-IBM patients.

  18. Bone and muscle atrophy with suspension of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Marsh, C.; Evans, H.; Johnson, P.; Schneider, V.; Jhingran, S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to identify a suitable model for the study of muscle atrophy due to suspension in space, a modified version of the Morey tail suspension model was used to measure the atrophic responses of rat bone and muscle to 14-30 days of unloading of the hindlimbs. The progress of atrophy was measured by increases in methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake. It is found that bone uptake of methylene diphosphonate followed a phasic pattern similar to changes in the bone formation rate of immobilized dogs and cats. Increased MDP uptake after a period of 60 days indicated an accelerated bone metabolism. Maximum muscle atrophy in the suspended rats was distinctly different from immobilization atrophy. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that the tail suspension model is an adequate simulation of bone atrophy due to suspension.

  19. Bone and muscle atrophy with suspension of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Marsh, C.; Evans, H.; Johnson, P.; Schneider, V.; Jhingran, S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to identify a suitable model for the study of muscle atrophy due to suspension in space, a modified version of the Morey tail suspension model was used to measure the atrophic responses of rat bone and muscle to 14-30 days of unloading of the hindlimbs. The progress of atrophy was measured by increases in methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake. It is found that bone uptake of methylene diphosphonate followed a phasic pattern similar to changes in the bone formation rate of immobilized dogs and cats. Increased MDP uptake after a period of 60 days indicated an accelerated bone metabolism. Maximum muscle atrophy in the suspended rats was distinctly different from immobilization atrophy. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that the tail suspension model is an adequate simulation of bone atrophy due to suspension.

  20. Establishment of bipotent progenitor cell clone from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Yada, Erica; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hosoyama, Tohru; Matsuwaki, Takashi; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2011-12-01

    The present study describes the isolation, cloning and characterization of adipogenic progenitor cells from rat skeletal muscle. Among the obtained 10 clones, the most highly adipogenic progenitor, 2G11 cells, were further characterized. In addition to their adipogenicity, 2G11 cells retain myogenic potential as revealed by formation of multinucleated myotubes when co-cultured with myoblasts. 2G11 cells were resistant to an inhibitory effect of basic fibroblast growth factor on adipogenesis, while adipogenesis of widely used preadipogenic cell line, 3T3-L1 cells, was suppressed almost completely by the same treatment. In vivo transplantation experiments revealed that 2G11 cells are able to possess both adipogenicity and myogenicity in vivo. These results indicate the presence of bipotent progenitor cells in rat skeletal muscle, and suggest that such cells may contribute to ectopic fat formation in skeletal muscle. © 2011 The Authors. Animal Science Journal © 2011 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Compensatory effects of chronic electrostimulation on unweighted rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Leterme, D; Falempin, M

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of electrostimulation in counteracting the transformation of the unweighted rat soleus muscle. The stimulation resembled the firing patterns of normal slow motor units and was imposed during hindlimb suspension. For the 10-day hindlimb suspended rats, the transformation of the slow soleus muscle towards a faster type was characterized by a decrease in the time to peak tension and the half-relaxation time of the twitch, a reduction in the P20/P0 index, i.e. the ratio of the subtetanic tension at 20 Hz relative to the tetanic tension, and a decrease in the percentage distributions of type I fibres accompanied by an increase of type IIa and IIc fibres. These changes were prevented by electrostimulation since, for the parameters mentioned above, no significant difference was observed in the soleus of the suspended rats that received electrostimulation when compared with the control rats. Nevertheless, neither the loss of mass nor the decrease in force output in the suspended rats were prevented by electrostimulation. The present results suggest a positive compensation of the suspension-induced alterations in the contractile and histochemical properties of the soleus muscle by means of chronic electrostimulation, which, however, do not prevent atrophy or the loss of contractile force.

  2. X-linked recessive congenital muscle fiber hypotrophy with central nuclei: abnormalities of growth and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Askanas, V; Engel, W K; Reddy, N B; Barth, P G; Bethlem, J; Krauss, D R; Hibberd, M E; Lawrence, J V; Carter, L S

    1979-10-01

    Muscle cells in cultures established from biopsy specimens of two children with an infantile-fatal form of X-linked recessive muscle fiber smallness with central nuclei showed an unusual ability to proliferate through numerous passages. Ultrastructurally, the cultured muscle fibers appeared very immature even after several weeks. The nuclei were large, the number of ribosomes was greatly increased, the myofibrils remained unstriated, and glycogen was accumulated in large lakes. The plasmalemma bound concanavalin A, alpha-bungarotoxin, and ruthenium red normally, but with tannic acid it did not show the dark binding of mature fibers. Biochemically, in the cultured muscle fibers, beta-adrenergic receptors were quantitatively normal. The level of adenylate cyclase in membranes was less than in cultured normal muscle; this defect could be responsible for impaired control mechanisms resulting in the other abnormalities observed.

  3. Dexamethasone regulates glutamine synthetase expression in rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, Stephen R.; Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa

    1986-01-01

    The regulation of glutamine synthetase by glucocorticoids in rat skeletal muscles was studied. Administration of dexamethasone strikingly enhanced glutamine synthetase activity in plantaris and soleus muscles. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked to a significant extent by orally administered RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves dramatically increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. The induction of glutamine synthetase was selective in that glutaminase activity of soleus and plantaris muscles was not increased by dexamethasone. Furthermore, dexamethasone treatment resulted in only a small increase in glutamine synthetase activity in the heart. Accordingly, there was only a slight change in glutamine synthetase mRNA level in this tissue. Thus, glucocorticoids regulate glutamine synthetase gene expression in rat muscles at the transcriptional level via interaction with intracellular glutamine production by muscle and to mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  4. Effects of prolonged space flight on rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, V P; Zheludkova, Z P; Kuznetsova, L A

    1979-10-01

    The effect of a 20-day space flight on water, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and glycogen contents as well as on activities of glycogen metabolism enzymes--glycogen synthetase and glycogen phosphorylase--of rat skeletal muscles was studied. This data is regarded as an integral test characterizing the state of contractile tissue of the animals at the final stage of flight aboard biosatellites. The measurements indicate that there were no significant changes of cations and glycogen contents nor of the enzymic activities in fast-twitch muscles during the 20-day spaceflight. At the same time dehydration in these muscles was observed, which disappeared on the 25th postflight day. In slow-twitch antigravitational skeletal muscle (m. soleus) there was a decrease of K+ and increase of Na+ in the tissue contents. The changes disappeared at the end of the on-earth readaptation period. From the pattern of these observations, we can conclude that the 20-day space flight leads to some reversible biochemical changes of the rat skeletal muscles. A conclusion can be drawn about necessity of creating, aboard the spaceship, an artificial load on antigravitational skeletal muscles.

  5. Angiotensin II induces differential insulin action in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Surapongchai, Juthamard; Prasannarong, Mujalin; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Saengsirisuwan, Vitoon

    2017-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANGII) is reportedly involved in the development of skeletal muscle insulin resistance. The present investigation evaluated the effects of two ANGII doses on the phenotypic characteristics of insulin resistance syndrome and insulin action and signaling in rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused with either saline (SHAM) or ANGII at a commonly used pressor dose (100 ng/kg/min; ANGII-100) or a higher pressor dose (500 ng/kg/min; ANGII-500) via osmotic minipumps for 14 days. We demonstrated that ANGII-100-infused rats exhibited the phenotypic features of non-obese insulin resistance syndrome, including hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance of glucose uptake in the soleus muscle, whereas ANGII-500-treated rats exhibited diabetes-like symptoms, such as post-prandial hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion and hypertriglyceridemia. At the cellular level, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the soleus muscle of the ANGII-100 group was 33% lower (P < 0.05) than that in the SHAM group and was associated with increased insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Ser(307) and decreased Akt Ser(473) and AS160 Thr(642) phosphorylation and GLUT-4 expression. However, ANGII-500 infusion did not induce skeletal muscle insulin resistance or impair insulin signaling elements as initially anticipated. Moreover, we found that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in the ANGII-500 group was accompanied by the enhanced expression of ACE2 and MasR proteins, which are the key elements in the non-classical pathway of the renin-angiotensin system. Collectively, this study demonstrates for the first time that chronic infusion with these two pressor doses of ANGII induced differential metabolic responses at both the systemic and skeletal muscle levels. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Brainstem cholinergic modulation of muscle tone in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Gall, Andrew J; Poremba, Amy; Blumberg, Mark S

    2007-06-01

    In week-old rats, lesions of the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DLPT) and nucleus pontis oralis (PnO) have opposing effects on nuchal muscle tone. Specifically, pups with DLPT lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of nuchal muscle atonia (indicative of sleep) and pups with PnO lesions exhibit prolonged bouts of high nuchal muscle tone (indicative of wakefulness). Here we test the hypothesis that nuchal muscle tone is modulated, at least in part, by cholinergically mediated interactions between these two regions. First, in unanesthetized pups, we found that chemical infusion of the cholinergic agonist carbachol (22 mm, 0.1 microL) within the DLPT produced high muscle tone. Next, chemical lesions of the PnO were used to produce a chronic state of high nuchal muscle tone, at which time the cholinergic antagonist scopolamine (10 mm, 0.1 microL) was infused into the DLPT. Scopolamine effectively decreased nuchal muscle tone, thus suggesting that lesions of the PnO increase muscle tone via cholinergic activation of the DLPT. Using 2-deoxyglucose autoradiography, metabolic activation throughout the DLPT was observed after PnO lesions. Finally, consistent with the hypothesis that PnO inactivation produces high muscle tone, infusion of the sodium channel blocker lidocaine (2%) into the PnO of unanesthetized pups produced rapid increases in muscle tone. We conclude that, even early in infancy, the DLPT is critically involved in the regulation of muscle tone and behavioral state, and that its activity is modulated by a cholinergic mechanism that is directly or indirectly controlled by the PnO.

  7. Abnormal sympathetic overactivity evoked by insulin in the skeletal muscle of patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Lembo, G; Napoli, R; Capaldo, B; Rendina, V; Iaccarino, G; Volpe, M; Trimarco, B; Saccà, L

    1992-01-01

    The reason why hyperinsulinemia is associated with essential hypertension is not known. To test the hypothesis of a pathophysiologic link mediated by the sympathetic nervous system, we measured the changes in forearm norepinephrine release, by using the forearm perfusion technique in conjunction with the infusion of tritiated NE, in patients with essential hypertension and in normal subjects receiving insulin intravenously (1 mU/kg per min) while maintaining euglycemia. Hyperinsulinemia (50-60 microU/ml in the deep forearm vein) evoked a significant increase in forearm NE release in both groups of subjects. However, the response of hypertensives was threefold greater compared to that of normotensives (2.28 +/- 45 ng.liter-1.min-1 in hypertensives and 0.80 +/- 0.27 ng.liter-1 in normals; P less than 0.01). Forearm glucose uptake rose to 5.1 +/- .7 mg.liter-1.min-1 in response to insulin in hypertensives and to 7.9 +/- 1.3 mg.liter-1.min-1 in normotensives (P less than 0.05). To clarify whether insulin action was due to a direct effect on muscle NE metabolism, in another set of experiments insulin was infused locally into the brachial artery to expose only the forearm tissues to the same insulin levels as in the systemic studies. During local hyperinsulinemia, forearm NE release remained virtually unchanged both in hypertensive and in normal subjects. Furthermore, forearm glucose disposal was activated to a similar extent in both groups (5.0 +/- 0.6 and 5.2 +/- 1.1 mg.liter-1.min-1 in hypertensives and in normals, respectively). These data demonstrate that: (a) insulin evokes an abnormal muscle sympathetic overactivity in essential hypertension which is mediated by mechanisms involving the central nervous system; and (b) insulin resistance associated with hypertension is demonstrable in the skeletal muscle tissue only with systemic insulin administration which produces muscle sympathetic overactivity. The data fit the hypothesis that the sympathetic system mediates

  8. Accumulation of organotins in seafood leads to reproductive tract abnormalities in female rats.

    PubMed

    Podratz, Priscila L; Merlo, Eduardo; Sena, Gabriela C; Morozesk, Mariana; Bonomo, Marina M; Matsumoto, Silvia T; da Costa, Mércia B; Zamprogno, Gabriela C; Brandão, Poliane A A; Carneiro, Maria T W D; Miguel, Emilio de C; Miranda-Alves, Leandro; Silva, Ian V; Graceli, Jones B

    2015-11-01

    Organotins (OTs) are environmental contaminants used as biocides in antifouling paints that have been shown to be endocrine disrupters. However, studies evaluating the effects of OTs accumulated in seafood (LNI) on reproductive health are particularly sparse. This study demonstrates that LNI leads to impairment in the reproductive tract of female rats, as the estrous cycle development, as well as for ovary and uterus morphology. Rats were treated with LNI, and their reproductive morphophysiology was assessed. Morphophysiological abnormalities, such as irregular estrous cycles, abnormal ovarian follicular development and ovarian collagen deposition, were observed in LNI rats. An increase in luminal epithelia and ERα expression was observed in the LNI uteri. Together, these data provide in vivo evidence that LNI are toxic for reproductive morphophysiology, which may be associated with risks to reproductive function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanisms mediating cholinergic antral circular smooth muscle contraction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Wrzos, Helena F; Tandon, Tarun; Ouyang, Ann

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the pathway (s) mediating rat antral circular smooth muscle contractile responses to the cholinomimetic agent, bethanechol and the subtypes of muscarinic receptors mediating the cholinergic contraction. METHODS: Circular smooth muscle strips from the antrum of Sprague-Dawley rats were mounted in muscle baths in Krebs buffer. Isometric tension was recorded. Cumulative concentration-response curves were obtained for (+)-cis-dioxolane (cD), a nonspecific muscarinic agonist, at 10-8-10-4 mol/L, in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10-7 mol/L). Results were normalized to cross sectional area. A repeat concentration-response curve was obtained after incubation of the muscle for 90 min with antagonists for M1 (pirenzepine), M2 (methoctramine) and M3 (darifenacin) muscarinic receptor subtypes. The sensitivity to PTX was tested by the ip injection of 100 mg/kg of PTX 5 d before the experiment. The antral circular smooth muscles were removed from PTX-treated and non-treated rats as strips and dispersed smooth muscle cells to identify whether PTX-linked pathway mediated the contractility to bethanechol. RESULTS: A dose-dependent contractile response observed with bethanechol, was not affected by TTX. The pretreatment of rats with pertussis toxin decreased the contraction induced by bethanechol. Lack of calcium as well as the presence of the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, also inhibited the cholinergic contraction, with a reduction in response from 2.5 ± 0.4 g/mm2 to 1.2 ± 0.4 g/mm2 (P < 0.05). The dose-response curves were shifted to the right by muscarinic antagonists in the following order of affinity: darifenacin (M3) > methocramine (M2) > pirenzepine (M1). CONCLUSION: The muscarinic receptors-dependent contraction of rat antral circular smooth muscles was linked to the signal transduction pathway(s) involving pertussis-toxin sensitive GTP-binding proteins and to extracellular calcium via L-type voltage gated calcium channels. The

  10. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  11. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Rat Thyroarytenoid Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Marriott, Gerard; Bless, Diane M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Proteomic methodologies offer promise in elucidating the systemwide cellular and molecular processes that characterize normal and diseased thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. This study examined methodological issues central to the application of 2-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) to the study of…

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Rat Thyroarytenoid Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Marriott, Gerard; Bless, Diane M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Proteomic methodologies offer promise in elucidating the systemwide cellular and molecular processes that characterize normal and diseased thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. This study examined methodological issues central to the application of 2-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) to the study of…

  14. Classification of muscle spindle afferents innervating the masseter muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Masri, Radi; Ro, Jin Y; Dessem, Dean; Capra, Norman

    2006-09-01

    Taylor et al. [Taylor, A., Durbaba, R., Rodgers, J.F., 1992a. The classification of afferents from muscle spindles of the jaw-closing muscles of the cat. J Physiol 456, 609-628] developed a method to classify muscle spindle afferents using succinylcholine (Sch) and ramp and hold stretches. They demonstrated that cat jaw muscle spindle afferents show high proportion of intermediate responses to ramp and hold jaw stretch. Together with observations on the responses to Sch their data suggests that the majority of jaw muscle spindle afferents are influenced by a combination of nuclear bag(2) and nuclear chain fibres. Relatively few are influenced solely by nuclear bag(1) fibres. The purpose of this study was to categorize jaw muscle spindle afferent in rodents in response to ramp and hold stretches. Several measures were used to classify spindle afferents including (1) conduction velocity, (2) coefficient of variation (C.V.) of the interspike interval during jaw opening, and (3) the dynamic sensitivity and the initial discharge of spindle afferents before and after succinylcholine infusion (Sch, 100mg/kg, i.v.). Consistent with observations in the cat jaw muscles, the distribution of the conduction velocity and the C.V. of Vmes masseter afferents were unimodal. Therefore, these parameters were of little value in functional classification of spindle innervation. Succinylcholine injection either markedly increased the dynamic sensitivity or produced no change in Vmes afferents. Unlike cat jaw muscle spindle afferents, the effect of Sch on the initial discharge was not clearly separable from those responding or not responding to Sch. These results suggest that rat jaw muscle spindle afferents, have physiological properties that are primarily intermediate in nature and are likely to reflect a predominance of influence from nuclear bag(2) and chain fibres. However, the distinction between bag(2) and chain fibres influences is not as clearly defined in the rat compared to

  15. Cervical neuro-muscular syndrome: discovery of a new disease group caused by abnormalities in the cervical muscles.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takayoshi; Ii, Kunio; Hojo, Shuntaro; Sano, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Our previous study of whiplash injury found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause autonomic dystonia. Further research has found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause headache, chronic fatigue syndrome, vertigo, and dizziness. We named this group of diseases cervical neuro-muscular syndrome. Patients treated within a 2-year period from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2004 reported good outcomes in 83.8% for headache, 88.4% for vertigo and dizziness, 84.5% for chronic fatigue syndrome, 88.0% for autonomic dystonia, and 83.7% for whiplash-associated disorder. A large number of outpatients present with general malaise, including many general physical complaints without identifiable cause. We propose that treatment of the cervical muscle is effective for general malaise.

  16. Influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury to skeletal muscles in rats.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Ryo; Fujita, Naoto; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kawada, Shigeo; Ishii, Naokata; Miki, Akinori

    2011-02-01

    The influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury was examined in the rat extensor digitorum longus. After the injury, animals were randomly divided into nonicing and icing groups. In the latter, ice packs were applied for 20 min. Due to the icing, degeneration of the necrotic muscle fibers and differentiation of satellite cells at early stages of regeneration were retarded by ∼1 day. In the icing group, the ratio of regenerating fibers showing central nucleus at 14 days after the injury was higher, and cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers at 28 days was evidently smaller than in the nonicing group. Besides, the ratio of collagen fibers area at 14 and 28 days after the injury in the icing group was higher than in the nonicing group. These findings suggest that icing applied soon after the injury not only considerably retarded muscle regeneration but also induced impairment of muscle regeneration along with excessive collagen deposition. Macrophages were immunohistochemically demonstrated at the injury site during degeneration and early stages of regeneration. Due to icing, chronological changes in the number of macrophages and immunohistochemical expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IGF-I were also retarded by 1 to 2 days. Since it has been said that macrophages play important roles not only for degeneration, but also for muscle regeneration, the influence of icing on macrophage activities might be closely related to a delay in muscle regeneration, impairment of muscle regeneration, and redundant collagen synthesis.

  17. Sex steroids do not affect muscle weight, oxidative metabolism or cytosolic androgen reception binding of functionally overloaded rat Plantaris muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of sex steroids on muscle weight and oxidative capacity of rat planaris muscles subjected to functional overload by removal of synergistic muscles were investigated. Ten weeks after bilateral synergist removal, plantaris muscles were significantly hypertrophic compared with unoperated controls. After this period, the ability of the muscles to oxide three substrates of oxidative metabolism was assessed. Experimental procedures are discussed and results are presented herein. Results suggest a lack of beneficial effect of sex hormone status on the process of hypertrophy and on biochemical changes in overloaded muscle. Such findings are not consistent with the idea of synergistic effects of sex steroids and muscle usage.

  18. Effects of taurine administration in rat skeletal muscles on exercise.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, Yoshihisa; Miyakawa, Shumpei; Miyazaki, Teruo; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the effects of taurine administration on exercise, we studied taurine concentrations in rat skeletal muscles after endurance running and the duration of running time to exhaustion, with and without taurine administration. For study 1 we divided 40 male SD rats into two groups: endurance exercise group ( n = 20) and sedentary control group ( n = 20). Each was further divided into two groups; one received distilled water ( n = 10) and the other taurine solution in water 0.5 g/kg/day orally ( n = 10) for 2 weeks. The exercise group performed treadmill running (60 min) once only after their nursing period. For study 2, we divided 10 male SD rats into two groups; one ( n = 5) received taurine 0.5 g/kg/day, and the other ( n = 5) received no taurine for 2 weeks; the two groups then performed treadmill running to exhaustion. In study 1, taurine administration increased taurine concentrations in leg skeletal muscles, whereas the concentrations were significantly lower in the exercised groups without taurine administration. Taurine administration reduced the decrease in taurine concentration in skeletal muscles on exercise. In study 2, the duration of running time to exhaustion was significantly increased by taurine administration. We concluded that peroral administration of taurine maintains the taurine concentration in skeletal muscle on exercise and up-regulates physical endurance.

  19. Mitochondria-associated apoptotic signalling in denervated rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Parco M; Alway, Stephen E

    2005-01-01

    Apoptosis has been implicated in the regulation of denervation-induced muscle atrophy. However, the activation of apoptotic signal transduction during muscle denervation has not been fully elucidated. The present study examined the apoptotic responses to denervation in rat gastrocnemius muscle. Following 14 days of denervation, the extent of apoptotic DNA fragmentation as determined by a cytosolic nucleosome ELISA was increased by 100% in the gastrocnemius muscle. RT-PCR and immunoblot analyses indicated that Bax was dramatically upregulated while Bcl-2 was modestly increased; however, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was significantly increased in denervated muscles relative to control muscles. Analyses of ELISA and immunoblots from mitochondria-free cytosol extracts showed a significant increase in mitochondria-associated apoptotic factors, including cytochrome c, Smac/DIABLO and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). In addition to the upregulation of caspase-3 and -9 mRNA, pro-/cleaved caspase protein and proteolytic activity levels, the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) protein level was downregulated. The cleaved product of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was detected in muscle samples following denervation. Although we did not find a difference in the inhibitor of DNA binding/ differentiation-2 (Id2) and c-Myc protein contents between the denervated and control muscles, the protein content of tumour suppressor p53 was significantly increased in both the nuclear and the cytosolic fractions with denervation. Moreover, denervation increased the protein content of HSP70, whereas the MnSOD (a mitochondrial isoform of superoxide dismutase) protein content was diminished, which indicated that denervation might have induced cellular and/or oxidative stress. Our data show that mitochondria-associated apoptotic signalling is upregulated during muscle denervation. We interpret these findings to indicate that apoptosis has a physiologically important role in regulating denervation

  20. Dissemination of Walker 256 carcinoma cells to rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ueoka, H.; Hayashi, K.; Namba, T.; Grob, D.

    1986-03-05

    After injection of 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells labelled with /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine into the tail vein, peak concentration in skeletal muscle was 46 cells/g at 60 minutes, which was lower than 169202, 1665, 555, 198 and 133 cells/g, respectively, at 30 or 60 minutes in lung, liver, spleen, kidney and heart. Because skeletal muscle constitutes 37.4% of body weight, the total number of tumor cells was 2323 cells, which was much greater than in spleen, kidney and heart with 238, 271, and 85 cells, respectively, and only less than in lung and liver, at 222857 and 11700 cells, respectively. The total number in skeletal muscle became greater than in liver at 4 hours and than in lung at 24 hours. Ten minutes after injection of 7.5 x 10/sup 6/ Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the abdominal aorta of rats, a mean of 31 colony-forming cells were recovered from the gastrocnemius, while 106 cells were recovered from the lung after injection into the tail vein. These results indicate that a large number of viable tumor cells can be arrested in skeletal muscle through circulation. The rare remote metastasis of malignancies into skeletal muscle despite constantly circulating tumor cells does not appear to be due to poor dissemination of tumor cells into muscle but due to unhospitable environment of skeletal muscle.

  1. An evaluation of the reliability of muscle fiber cross-sectional area and fiber number measurements in rat skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: The reliability of estimating muscle fiber cross-sectional area (measure of muscle fiber size) and fiber number from only a subset of fibers in rat hindlimb muscle cross-sections has not been systematically evaluated. This study examined the variability in mean estimates of fiber cross-s...

  2. Rat hindlimb muscle responses to suspension hypokinesia/hypodynamia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Deavers, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Hypokinetic/hyupodynamic (H/H) whole body suspension of rats eliminates hindlimb load bearing functions while permitting continued use of the forelimbs. Responses of hindlimb muscles were assessed in terms of absolute and relative weights during 1 and 2 weeks of H/H suspension. Muscle mass loss was in the order soleus greater than gastrocnemius equal to plantaris greater than extensor digitorum longus (EDL). The soleus, a postural antigravity muscle composed mainly of slow twitch fibers, was most sensitive, losing 35 and 45 percent of its weight during the first and second weeks, respectively. The gastrocnemius and plantaris showed losses during the first week but no significant loss during the second wee. The EDL showed little or no weight loss. During post suspension recovery all muscles showed a weight gain. H/H suspended rats failed to grow; following removal from suspension they gained weight linearly, comparable to controls. Products of muscle metabolism including urea, ammonia, and 3-methylhistidine increased in the urine during H/H suspension and were significantly reduced approaching control levels during recovery. This suspension model offers considerable promise for comparison with H/H responses during weightlessness.

  3. Alterations in contractile properties of tongue muscles in old rats.

    PubMed

    Ota, Fumikazu; Connor, Nadine P; Konopacki, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Fatigue and weakness are well-known signs of aging that are related to sarcopenia, or loss of skeletal muscle mass, organization, and strength. Sarcopenia may affect swallowing. The tongue plays a vital role in swallowing, but there is limited knowledge regarding age-related changes in lingual muscle contractile properties. Our purpose was to determine whether alterations in tongue force, temporal features of tongue muscle contraction, and fatigability are manifested as a function of aging in old rats. We evaluated tongue muscle contractile properties in young and old Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats. Contractions were elicited via bilateral electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves. Maximum tongue forces and fatigability were not significantly altered in old animals, but aging was associated with significantly longer twitch contraction time and longer half-decay recovery time intervals (p < .01). The results indicated that old animals generated sufficient maximum tongue forces, but were slower in achieving these forces than young animals. These findings are consistent with reports of altered temporal parameters of tongue actions during swallowing in humans, and suggest that a disruption in the timing of muscle contraction onset and recovery may contribute to the altered tongue kinetics observed with aging.

  4. Acceleration of muscle regeneration by local injection of muscle-specific microRNAs in rat skeletal muscle injury model.

    PubMed

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Shi, Ming; Shibuya, Hayatoshi; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2010-10-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA)s are a class of non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Muscle-specific miRNA, miRNA (miR)-1, miR-133 and miR-206 play a crucial role in the regulation of muscle development and homeostasis. Muscle injuries are a common musculoskeletal disorder, and the most effective treatment has not been established yet. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a local injection of double-stranded (ds) miR-1, miR-133 and 206 can accelerate muscle regeneration in a rat skeletal muscle injury model. After the laceration of the rat tibialis anterior muscle, ds miR-1, 133 and 206 mixture mediated atelocollagen was injected into the injured site. The control group was injected with control siRNA. At 1 week after injury, an injection of miRNAs could enhance muscle regeneration morphologically and physiologically, and prevent fibrosis effectively compared to the control siRNA. Administration of exogenous miR-1, 133 and 206 can induce expression of myogenic markers, MyoD1, myogenin and Pax7 in mRNA and expression in the protein level at 3 and 7 days after injury. The combination of miR-1, 133 and 206 can promote myotube differentiation, and the expression of MyoD1, myogenin and Pax7 were up-regulated in C2C12 cells in vitro. Local injection of miR-1, 133 and 206 could be a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of skeletal muscle injury. © 2009 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Multimodal Highlighting of Structural Abnormalities in Diabetic Rat and Human Corneas.

    PubMed

    Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Savoldelli, Michèle; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Plamann, Karsten; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to highlight structural corneal changes in a model of type 2 diabetes, using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (CCM). The abnormalities were also characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in rat and human corneas. Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were observed at age 12 weeks (n = 3) and 1 year (n = 6), and compared to age-matched controls. After in vivo CCM examination, TEM and SHG microscopy were used to characterize the ultrastructure and the three-dimensional organization of the abnormalities. Human corneas from diabetic (n = 3) and nondiabetic (n = 3) patients were also included in the study. In the basal epithelium of GK rats, CCM revealed focal hyper-reflective areas, and histology showed proliferative cells with irregular basement membrane. In the anterior stroma, extracellular matrix modifications were detected by CCM and confirmed in histology. In the Descemet's membrane periphery of all the diabetic corneas, hyper-reflective deposits were highlighted using CCM and characterized as long-spacing collagen fibrils by TEM. SHG microscopy revealed these deposits with high contrast, allowing specific detection in diabetic human and rat corneas without preparation and characterization of their three-dimensional organization. Pathologic findings were observed early in the development of diabetes in GK rats. Similar abnormalities have been found in corneas from diabetic patients. This multidisciplinary study highlights diabetes-induced corneal abnormalities in an animal model, but also in diabetic donors. This could constitute a potential early marker for diagnosis of hyperglycemia-induced tissue changes.

  6. Multimodal Highlighting of Structural Abnormalities in Diabetic Rat and Human Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczuk, Laura; Latour, Gaël; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Savoldelli, Michèle; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Plamann, Karsten; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to highlight structural corneal changes in a model of type 2 diabetes, using in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (CCM). The abnormalities were also characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy in rat and human corneas. Methods Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were observed at age 12 weeks (n = 3) and 1 year (n = 6), and compared to age-matched controls. After in vivo CCM examination, TEM and SHG microscopy were used to characterize the ultrastructure and the three-dimensional organization of the abnormalities. Human corneas from diabetic (n = 3) and nondiabetic (n = 3) patients were also included in the study. Results In the basal epithelium of GK rats, CCM revealed focal hyper-reflective areas, and histology showed proliferative cells with irregular basement membrane. In the anterior stroma, extracellular matrix modifications were detected by CCM and confirmed in histology. In the Descemet's membrane periphery of all the diabetic corneas, hyper-reflective deposits were highlighted using CCM and characterized as long-spacing collagen fibrils by TEM. SHG microscopy revealed these deposits with high contrast, allowing specific detection in diabetic human and rat corneas without preparation and characterization of their three-dimensional organization. Conclusion Pathologic findings were observed early in the development of diabetes in GK rats. Similar abnormalities have been found in corneas from diabetic patients. Translational Relevance This multidisciplinary study highlights diabetes-induced corneal abnormalities in an animal model, but also in diabetic donors. This could constitute a potential early marker for diagnosis of hyperglycemia-induced tissue changes. PMID:24049714

  7. Relationship between Immunological Abnormalities in Rat Models of Diabetes Mellitus and the Amplification Circuits for Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yuji; Shimomura, Tomoko; Asao, Hironobu; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms is required in order to treat diseases. However, the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications are extremely complex. Immune reactions are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications, while diabetes influences immune reactions. Furthermore, both diabetes and immune reactions are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To address these issues, animal models are useful tools. So far, various animal models of diabetes have been developed in rats, which have advantages over mice models in terms of the larger volume of tissue samples and the variety of type 2 diabetes models. In this review, we introduce rat models of diabetes and summarize the immune reactions in diabetic rat models. Finally, we speculate on the relationship between immune reactions and diabetic episodes. For example, diabetes-prone Biobreeding rats, type 1 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased autoreactive cellular and inflammatory immune reactions, while Goto-Kakizaki rats, type 2 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased Th2 reactions and attenuation of phagocytic activity. Investigation of immunological abnormalities in various diabetic rat models is useful for elucidating complicated mechanisms in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Studying immunological alterations, such as predominance of Th1/17 or Th2 cells, humoral immunity, and innate immune reactions, may improve understanding the structure of amplification circuits for diabetes in future studies.

  8. Relationship between Immunological Abnormalities in Rat Models of Diabetes Mellitus and the Amplification Circuits for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Tomoko; Asao, Hironobu; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    A better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms is required in order to treat diseases. However, the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus and diabetic complications are extremely complex. Immune reactions are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications, while diabetes influences immune reactions. Furthermore, both diabetes and immune reactions are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To address these issues, animal models are useful tools. So far, various animal models of diabetes have been developed in rats, which have advantages over mice models in terms of the larger volume of tissue samples and the variety of type 2 diabetes models. In this review, we introduce rat models of diabetes and summarize the immune reactions in diabetic rat models. Finally, we speculate on the relationship between immune reactions and diabetic episodes. For example, diabetes-prone Biobreeding rats, type 1 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased autoreactive cellular and inflammatory immune reactions, while Goto-Kakizaki rats, type 2 diabetes model rats, exhibit increased Th2 reactions and attenuation of phagocytic activity. Investigation of immunological abnormalities in various diabetic rat models is useful for elucidating complicated mechanisms in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Studying immunological alterations, such as predominance of Th1/17 or Th2 cells, humoral immunity, and innate immune reactions, may improve understanding the structure of amplification circuits for diabetes in future studies. PMID:28299342

  9. [Central nervous system abnormalities related to congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles].

    PubMed

    Moguel-Ancheita, Silvia; Rodríguez-Garcidueñas, Wendolyn

    2009-01-01

    We undertook this study to describe central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities associated with congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD). This was a retrospective, observational, transversal and descriptive study including patients with congenital fibrotic strabismus. We analyzed clinical files of patients from 2001 to 2006. Neurological lesions were reported. Restrictive strabismus was demonstrated in all cases. Sixteen patients were included: nine males and seven females. Different neurological lesions were reported: corpus callosum anomalies, severe cortipathy, epilepsy, cavum vergae, nystagmus, occipital subarachnoid cyst, and hydrocephalus. Mental retardation was reported in 56% of patients. Different malformations were reported: genital malformations, trigonocephalus, camptodactyly, mild facial hypoplasia, low set ears, and agenesis of left ear. Blepharoptosis was present in 81% of patients. The most frequent form of strabismus was exotropia (56%), hypotropia in 37.5%, hypertropia 18.7%, "A" pattern 18.7%, and esotropia in 6.25%. Affection was cranial nerve III, 93.75%; cranial nerve VI, 6.25%; cranial nerve VII, 6.25%; and lesion to cranial nerve II in eight cases (50%). We have suggested that failure in early stages of embryology of the CNS can lead to the development of paralytic strabismus and generate secondary fibrotic changes, not only in muscle structures but also in other orbital tissues. That is the reason why we have used the term "congenital fibrotic strabismus" to report cases included in CCDD. We have demonstrated the strong association of mental retardation and neurological alterations. Multidisciplinary rehabilitation is relevant for these patients.

  10. Occlusal abnormalities, pericranial muscle and joint tenderness and tooth wear in a group of migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Steele, J G; Lamey, P J; Sharkey, S W; Smith, G M

    1991-09-01

    Seventy-two migraine sufferers, whose attacks normally begin during or soon after waking from sleep, were compared with 37 age- and sex-matched controls to establish whether signs of mandibular dysfunction, occlusal discrepancies and known clenching or grinding habits were any more frequent among the former group. Temporomandibular joint tenderness or pain history, masticatory muscle tenderness and known clenching or grinding habits were found to occur at significantly increased levels in the migraine sufferers, with two-thirds of these patients reporting a parafunctional habit. Occlusal abnormalities, including non-working side or protrusive interferences and slides of greater than 1 mm to the intercuspal position, were found to occur at similar frequencies in the two groups. Assessment of wear of the occlusal surfaces also showed no difference, suggesting that any nocturnal habit with a role in migraine is more likely to be clenching in nature. In conclusion, evidence was found to support an aetiological role for nocturnal tooth clenching or grinding in migraine characterized by attacks that start predominantly during sleep or soon after waking, but no evidence of a link with occlusal factors was found in these patients.

  11. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-02-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2-4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration.

  12. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats

    PubMed Central

    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2–4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25713324

  13. Abnormal Skeletal Muscle Regeneration plus Mild Alterations in Mature Fiber Type Specification in Fktn-Deficient Dystroglycanopathy Muscular Dystrophy Mice

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Steven J.; Modi, Jill N.; Melick, Garrett A.; Abousaud, Marin I.; Luan, Junna; Fortunato, Marisa J.; Beedle, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylated α-dystroglycan provides an essential link between extracellular matrix proteins, like laminin, and the cellular cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. In secondary dystroglycanopathy muscular dystrophy, glycosylation abnormalities disrupt a complex O-mannose glycan necessary for muscle structural integrity and signaling. Fktn-deficient dystroglycanopathy mice develop moderate to severe muscular dystrophy with skeletal muscle developmental and/or regeneration defects. To gain insight into the role of glycosylated α-dystroglycan in these processes, we performed muscle fiber typing in young (2, 4 and 8 week old) and regenerated muscle. In mice with Fktn disruption during skeletal muscle specification (Myf5/Fktn KO), newly regenerated fibers (embryonic myosin heavy chain positive) peaked at 4 weeks old, while total regenerated fibers (centrally nucleated) were highest at 8 weeks old in tibialis anterior (TA) and iliopsoas, indicating peak degeneration/regeneration activity around 4 weeks of age. In contrast, mature fiber type specification at 2, 4 and 8 weeks old was relatively unchanged. Fourteen days after necrotic toxin-induced injury, there was a divergence in muscle fiber types between Myf5/Fktn KO (skeletal-muscle specific) and whole animal knockout induced with tamoxifen post-development (Tam/Fktn KO) despite equivalent time after gene deletion. Notably, Tam/Fktn KO retained higher levels of embryonic myosin heavy chain expression after injury, suggesting a delay or abnormality in differentiation programs. In mature fiber type specification post-injury, there were significant interactions between genotype and toxin parameters for type 1, 2a, and 2x fibers, and a difference between Myf5/Fktn and Tam/Fktn study groups in type 2b fibers. These data suggest that functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan has a unique role in muscle regeneration and may influence fiber type specification post-injury. PMID:26751696

  14. Abnormally Small Neuromuscular Junctions in the Extraocular Muscles From Subjects With Idiopathic Nystagmus and Nystagmus Associated With Albinism.

    PubMed

    McLoon, Linda K; Willoughby, Christy L; Anderson, Jill S; Bothun, Erick D; Stager, David; Felius, Joost; Lee, Helena; Gottlob, Irene

    2016-04-01

    Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) is often associated with abnormalities of axonal outgrowth and connectivity. To determine if this manifests in extraocular muscle innervation, specimens from children with idiopathic INS or INS and albinism were examined and compared to normal age-matched control extraocular muscles. Extraocular muscles removed during normal surgery on children with idiopathic INS or INS and albinism were immunostained for neuromuscular junctions, myofiber type, the immature form of the acetylcholine receptor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and compared to age-matched controls. Muscles from both the idiopathic INS and INS and albinism groups had neuromuscular junctions that were 35% to 71% smaller based on myofiber area and myofiber perimeter than found in age-matched controls, and this was seen on both fast and slow myosin heavy chain isoform-expressing myofibers (all P < 0.015). Muscles from subjects with INS and albinism showed a 7-fold increase in neuromuscular junction numbers on fast myofibers expressing the immature gamma subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. The extraocular muscles from both INS subgroups showed a significant increase in the number and size of slow myofibers compared to age-matched controls. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was expressed in control muscle but was virtually absent in the INS muscles. These studies suggest that, relative to the final common pathway, INS is not the same between different patient etiologies. It should be possible to modulate these final common pathway abnormalities, via exogenous application of appropriate drugs, with the hope that this type of treatment may reduce the involuntary oscillatory movements in these children.

  15. Abnormally Small Neuromuscular Junctions in the Extraocular Muscles From Subjects With Idiopathic Nystagmus and Nystagmus Associated With Albinism

    PubMed Central

    McLoon, Linda K.; Willoughby, Christy L.; Anderson, Jill S.; Bothun, Erick D.; Stager, David; Felius, Joost; Lee, Helena; Gottlob, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) is often associated with abnormalities of axonal outgrowth and connectivity. To determine if this manifests in extraocular muscle innervation, specimens from children with idiopathic INS or INS and albinism were examined and compared to normal age-matched control extraocular muscles. Methods Extraocular muscles removed during normal surgery on children with idiopathic INS or INS and albinism were immunostained for neuromuscular junctions, myofiber type, the immature form of the acetylcholine receptor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and compared to age-matched controls. Results Muscles from both the idiopathic INS and INS and albinism groups had neuromuscular junctions that were 35% to 71% smaller based on myofiber area and myofiber perimeter than found in age-matched controls, and this was seen on both fast and slow myosin heavy chain isoform–expressing myofibers (all P < 0.015). Muscles from subjects with INS and albinism showed a 7-fold increase in neuromuscular junction numbers on fast myofibers expressing the immature gamma subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. The extraocular muscles from both INS subgroups showed a significant increase in the number and size of slow myofibers compared to age-matched controls. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor was expressed in control muscle but was virtually absent in the INS muscles. Conclusions These studies suggest that, relative to the final common pathway, INS is not the same between different patient etiologies. It should be possible to modulate these final common pathway abnormalities, via exogenous application of appropriate drugs, with the hope that this type of treatment may reduce the involuntary oscillatory movements in these children. PMID:27092717

  16. Hypoglossal nucleus projections to the rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Mameli, O; Stanzani, S; Russo, A; Pellitteri, R; Spatuzza, M; Caria, M A; Mulliri, G; De Riu, P L

    2009-08-04

    We investigated in the rat whether hypoglossal innervation extended to facial muscles other than the extrinsic musculature of the mystacial pad. Results showed that hypoglossal neurons also innervate the masseter muscle. Dil injected into the XII nucleus showed hypoglossal axons in the ipsilateral main trunk of the trigeminal nerve. After Gasser's ganglion crossing, the axons entered into the infraorbital division of the trigeminal nerve and targeted the extrinsic muscles of the mystacial pad. They also spread into the masseter branch of the trigeminal nerve to target the polar portions of the masseter muscle spindles. Retrograde double labelling, performed by injecting Dil into the pad and True Blue into the ipsilateral masseter muscle, showed labelled hypoglossal neurons in the medio-dorsal portion of the XII nucleus. The majority of these neurons were small (15-20 microm diameter), showed fluorescence for Dil and projected to the mystacial pad. Other medium-size neurons (25 microm diameter) were instead labelled with True Blue and projected to the masseter muscle. Finally, in the same area, other small hypoglossal neurons showed double labelling and projected to both structures. Functional hypotheses on the role of these hypoglossal projections have been discussed.

  17. Low intensity laser therapy accelerates muscle regeneration in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Rodrigues, Natalia C.; Assis, Livia L.; Peviani, Sabrina S.; Durigan, Joao L.; Moreira, Fernando M.A.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Parizotto, Nivaldo A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elderly people suffer from skeletal muscle disorders that undermine their daily activity and quality of life; some of these problems can be listed as but not limited to: sarcopenia, changes in central and peripheral nervous system, blood hypoperfusion, regenerative changes contributing to atrophy, and muscle weakness. Determination, proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in the regenerative process are regulated by specific transcription factors, known as myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). In the elderly, the activation of MRFs is inefficient which hampers the regenerative process. Recent studies found that low intensity laser therapy (LILT) has a stimulatory effect in the muscle regeneration process. However, the effects of this therapy when associated with aging are still unknown. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of LILT (λ=830 nm) on the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of aged rats. Subjects and methods The total of 56 male Wistar rats formed two population sets: old and young, with 28 animals in each set. Each of these sets were randomly divided into four groups of young rats (3 months of age) with n=7 per group and four groups of aged rats (10 months of age) with n=7 per group. These groups were submitted to cryoinjury + laser irradiation, cryoinjury only, laser irradiation only and the control group (no cryoinjury/no laser irradiation). The laser treatment was performed for 5 consecutive days. The first laser application was done 24 h after the injury (on day 2) and on the seventh day, the TA muscle was dissected and removed under anesthesia. After this the animals were euthanized. Histological analyses with toluidine blue as well as hematoxylin-eosin staining (for counting the blood capillaries) were performed for the lesion areas. In addition, MyoD and VEGF mRNA was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results The results showed significant elevation (p<0.05) in MyoD and VEGF genes expression levels

  18. The protective effect of vitamin E against prenatal and early postnatal ethanol treatment-induced heart abnormality in rats: a 3-month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Nemati, Samira; Ansari, Mohammad Hasan Khadem; Ilkhanizadeh, Behrouz

    2015-05-01

    Ethanol consumption during pregnancy is associated with fetal heart malformation. However, the underlying mechanism of prenatal ethanol exposure causing heart malfunction is not well known. The current study examined the effect of prenatal and early postnatal ethanol consumption on heart abnormality resulting from oxidative and inflammatory stress. It was also intended to find out whether vitamin E inhibits the abnormality induced by ethanol in rats' heart tissue. Pregnant Wistar rats received ethanol with/without vitamin E from the seventh day of gestation (GD7) throughout lactation. The proliferation in heart muscle cells and coronary smooth muscle cells, protein carbonyl, IL-6, TNF-α, homocysteine levels, also lipid profile in heart and plasma of male pups were measured at the end of lactation (PN 21) and 90 days after birth (PN 90). The results indicated proliferation of heart muscle and coronary smooth muscle cells along with heart structural alteration, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, inflammatory reaction, and hyperhomocysteinemia in offspring after 21 and 90 days of birth compared with the controls. Vitamin E treatment significantly decreased cell proliferation and heart structural alteration, compared with the group treated by ethanol alone. Furthermore, it reduced the elevation of protein carbonyl, lipid peroxidation, and increased inflammatory proteins to levels as those of the controls. These findings strongly support the idea that ethanol intake by dams during pregnancy and early postnatal days induces heart abnormality mediated by oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions, and that these effects can be alleviated by using vitamin E as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of nerve and muscle factors in the development of rat muscle spindles.

    PubMed

    Kucera, J; Walro, J M; Reichler, J

    1989-10-01

    The soleus muscles of fetal rats were examined by electron microscopy to determine whether the early differentiation of muscle spindles is dependent upon sensory innervation, motor innervation, or both. Simple unencapsulated afferent-muscle contacts were observed on the primary myotubes at 17 and 18 days of gestation. Spindles, encapsulations of muscle fibers innervated by afferents, could be recognized early on day 18 of gestation. The full complement of spindles in the soleus muscle was present at day 19, in the region of the neuromuscular hilum. More afferents innervated spindles at days 18 and 19 of gestation than at subsequent developmental stages, or in adult rats; hence, competition for available myotubes may exist among afferents early in development. Some of the myotubes that gave rise to the first intrafusal (bag2) fiber had been innervated by skeletomotor (alpha) axons prior to their incorporation into spindles. However, encapsulated intrafusal fibers received no motor innervation until fusimotor (gamma) axons innervated spindles 3 days after the arrival of afferents and formation of spindles, at day 20. The second (bag1) intrafusal fiber was already formed when gamma axons arrived. Thus, the assembly of bag1 and bag2 intrafusal fibers occurs in the presence of sensory but not gamma motor innervation. However, transient innervation of future bag2 fibers by alpha axons suggests that both sensory and alpha motor neurons may influence the initial stages of bag2 fiber assembly. The confinement of nascent spindles to a localized region of the developing muscle and the limited number of spindles in developing muscles in spite of an abundance of afferents raise the possibility that afferents interact with a special population of undifferentiated myotubes to form intrafusal fibers.

  20. Influence of suspension hypokinesia on rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Manton, J.; Glasberg, M.; Silver, C. J.; Silver, P.; Demartino, G.; Leconey, T.; Klug, G.; Hagler, H.

    1984-01-01

    Hindlimb hypokinesia was induced in rats by the Morey method to characterize the response of the soleus muscle. Rats suspended for 1-4 wk exhibited continuous and significant declines in soleus mass, function, and contractile duration. Soleus speeding was in part explained by an alteration in fiber type. The normal incidence of 70-90 percent type I fibers in the soleus muscle was reduced after 4 wk of suspension to 50 percent or less in 9 of 11 rats. A significant decline in type I myosin isozyme content occurred without a change in that of type II. Other observed histochemical changes were characteristic of denervation. Consistent with soleus atrophy, there was a significant increase in lysosomal (acid) protease activity. One week of recovery after a 2-wk suspension was characterized by a return to values not significantly different from control for muscle wet weights, peak contraction force, one-half relaxation time, and type I myosin. Persistent differences from control were observed in maximal rate of tension development, contraction time, and denervation-like changes.

  1. Influence of suspension hypokinesia on rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Manton, J.; Glasberg, M.; Silver, C. J.; Silver, P.; Demartino, G.; Leconey, T.; Klug, G.; Hagler, H.

    1984-01-01

    Hindlimb hypokinesia was induced in rats by the Morey method to characterize the response of the soleus muscle. Rats suspended for 1-4 wk exhibited continuous and significant declines in soleus mass, function, and contractile duration. Soleus speeding was in part explained by an alteration in fiber type. The normal incidence of 70-90 percent type I fibers in the soleus muscle was reduced after 4 wk of suspension to 50 percent or less in 9 of 11 rats. A significant decline in type I myosin isozyme content occurred without a change in that of type II. Other observed histochemical changes were characteristic of denervation. Consistent with soleus atrophy, there was a significant increase in lysosomal (acid) protease activity. One week of recovery after a 2-wk suspension was characterized by a return to values not significantly different from control for muscle wet weights, peak contraction force, one-half relaxation time, and type I myosin. Persistent differences from control were observed in maximal rate of tension development, contraction time, and denervation-like changes.

  2. Age effects on rat hindlimb muscle atrophy during suspension unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Joseph M.; Fell, Ronald D.; Geoghegan, Thomas E.; Ringel, Lisa C.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of hindlimb unloading on muscle mass and biochemical responses were examined and compared in adult (450-g) and juvenile (200-g) rats after 1, 7, or 14 days of whole-body suspension. Quantitatively and qualitatively the soleus, gastrocnemius, plantaris, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of the hindlimb exhibited a differential sensitivity to suspension and weightlessness unloading in both adults and juveniles. The red slow-twitch soleus exhibited the most pronounced atrophy under both conditions, with juvenile responses being greater than adult. In contrast, the fast-twitch EDL hypertrophied during suspension and atrophied during weightlessness, with no significant difference between adults and juveniles. Determination of biochemical parameters (total protein, RNA, and DNA) indicates a less rapid rate of response in adult muscles.

  3. Low level laser therapy on injured rat muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantineo, M.; Pinheiro, J. P.; Morgado, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    Although studies show the clinical effectiveness of low level laser therapy (LLLT) in facilitating the muscle healing process, scientific evidence is still required to prove the effectiveness of LLLT and to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms triggered by irradiation. Here we evaluate the effect of different LLLT doses, using continuous illumination (830 nm), in the treatment of inflammation induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats, through the quantification of cytokines in systemic blood and histological analysis of muscle tissue. We verified that all applied doses produce an effect on reducing the number of inflammatory cells and the concentration of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines. The best results were obtained for 40 mW. The results may suggest a biphasic dose response curve.

  4. Temperature-dependent transitions in isometric contractions of rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Ranatunga, K W; Wylie, S R

    1983-01-01

    The effect of temperature on tetanic tension development was examined in extensor digitorum longus (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles of the rat, in vitro and with direct stimulation. The temperature range was from 35 to 10 degrees C. 2. The maximum tetanic tension decreased slightly on cooling from 35 to 25 degrees C. Cooling below 20 degrees C resulted in a marked depression of tetanic tension. The results were similar in the two muscles. 3. Analysis (in the form of Arrhenius plots) of the rate of tetanic tension development and relaxation clearly showed the occurrence of two phases in their temperature dependence, due to an increased temperature sensitivity below about 25 degrees C. Arrhenius activation energy estimates for temperatures lower than 21 degrees C were around twice as high as those for temperatures higher than 24 degrees C in both muscles. PMID:6887040

  5. Age effects on rat hindlimb muscle atrophy during suspension unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Joseph M.; Fell, Ronald D.; Geoghegan, Thomas E.; Ringel, Lisa C.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of hindlimb unloading on muscle mass and biochemical responses were examined and compared in adult (450-g) and juvenile (200-g) rats after 1, 7, or 14 days of whole-body suspension. Quantitatively and qualitatively the soleus, gastrocnemius, plantaris, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of the hindlimb exhibited a differential sensitivity to suspension and weightlessness unloading in both adults and juveniles. The red slow-twitch soleus exhibited the most pronounced atrophy under both conditions, with juvenile responses being greater than adult. In contrast, the fast-twitch EDL hypertrophied during suspension and atrophied during weightlessness, with no significant difference between adults and juveniles. Determination of biochemical parameters (total protein, RNA, and DNA) indicates a less rapid rate of response in adult muscles.

  6. Removal of Abnormal Myofilament O-GlcNAcylation Restores Ca2+ Sensitivity in Diabetic Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junfeng; Slawson, Chad; Zeidan, Quira; Lugo-Fagundo, Nahyr S.; Xu, Mingguo; Shen, Xiaoxu; Gao, Wei Dong; Caceres, Viviane; Chakir, Khalid; DeVine, Lauren; Cole, Robert N.; Marchionni, Luigi; Paolocci, Nazareno; Hart, Gerald W.; Murphy, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Contractile dysfunction and increased deposition of O-linked β-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in cardiac proteins are a hallmark of the diabetic heart. However, whether and how this posttranslational alteration contributes to lower cardiac function remains unclear. Using a refined β-elimination/Michael addition with tandem mass tags (TMT)–labeling proteomic technique, we show that CpOGA, a bacterial analog of O-GlcNAcase (OGA) that cleaves O-GlcNAc in vivo, removes site-specific O-GlcNAcylation from myofilaments, restoring Ca2+ sensitivity in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic cardiac muscles. We report that in control rat hearts, O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) are mainly localized at the Z-line, whereas OGA is at the A-band. Conversely, in diabetic hearts O-GlcNAc levels are increased and OGT and OGA delocalized. Consistent changes were found in human diabetic hearts. STZ diabetic hearts display increased physical interactions of OGA with α-actin, tropomyosin, and myosin light chain 1, along with reduced OGT and increased OGA activities. Our study is the first to reveal that specific removal of O-GlcNAcylation restores myofilament response to Ca2+ in diabetic hearts and that altered O-GlcNAcylation is due to the subcellular redistribution of OGT and OGA rather than to changes in their overall activities. Thus, preventing sarcomeric OGT and OGA displacement represents a new possible strategy for treating diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26109417

  7. Assessments of Motor Abnormalities on the Grid-Walking and Foot-Fault Tests From Undernutrition in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Horiquini Barbosa, Everton; Vallim, José Henrique; Lachat, João-José; de Castro, Vera Lucia S S

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to verify whether different lactation conditions influenced nervous system development. The authors used motor tasks to verify changes in exploratory activity and muscle strength of weaned rats from different litter sizes and evaluated the applicability of the grid-walking test for assessing motor abnormalities caused by undernutrition. Alterations in litter size during the suckling period perturbed the nutritional status of pups, which exhibited body weight differences between the groups. Large-litter (L) pups showed significant delays in achieving developmental milestones and neurological reflexes compared to the small-litter (S) and medium-litter (M) pups. The S, M, and L group pups exhibited similar exploratory responses and muscle strength. In the grid-walking and foot-fault tests, the L group pups traveled shorter distances and, consequently, had less footsteps. However, the percentages of foot faults in the L group were higher than S and M groups. These results reflect delayed maturation of structures responsible for sensorimotor responses, such as the cerebellum, because much cerebellar maturation takes place postnatally. This is the first study to report that early undernutrition in pups resulted in suboptimal performances on the grid-walking and foot-fault tests and that the former test was sensitive to alterations caused by nutritional deficiency.

  8. Procedures for Rat in situ Skeletal Muscle Contractile Properties

    PubMed Central

    MacIntosh, Brian R.; Esau, Shane P.; Holash, R. John; Fletcher, Jared R.

    2011-01-01

    There are many circumstances where it is desirable to obtain the contractile response of skeletal muscle under physiological circumstances: normal circulation, intact whole muscle, at body temperature. This includes the study of contractile responses like posttetanic potentiation, staircase and fatigue. Furthermore, the consequences of disease, disuse, injury, training and drug treatment can be of interest. This video demonstrates appropriate procedures to set up and use this valuable muscle preparation. To set up this preparation, the animal must be anesthetized, and the medial gastrocnemius muscle is surgically isolated, with the origin intact. Care must be taken to maintain the blood and nerve supplies. A long section of the sciatic nerve is cleared of connective tissue, and severed proximally. All branches of the distal stump that do not innervate the medial gastrocnemius muscle are severed. The distal nerve stump is inserted into a cuff lined with stainless steel stimulating wires. The calcaneus is severed, leaving a small piece of bone still attached to the Achilles tendon. Sonometric crystals and/or electrodes for electromyography can be inserted. Immobilization by metal probes in the femur and tibia prevents movement of the muscle origin. The Achilles tendon is attached to the force transducer and the loosened skin is pulled up at the sides to form a container that is filled with warmed paraffin oil. The oil distributes heat evenly and minimizes evaporative heat loss. A heat lamp is directed on the muscle, and the muscle and rat are allowed to warm up to 37°C. While it is warming, maximal voltage and optimal length can be determined. These are important initial conditions for any experiment on intact whole muscle. The experiment may include determination of standard contractile properties, like the force-frequency relationship, force-length relationship, and force-velocity relationship. With care in surgical isolation, immobilization of the origin of the

  9. Procedures for rat in situ skeletal muscle contractile properties.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Brian R; Esau, Shane P; Holash, R John; Fletcher, Jared R

    2011-10-15

    There are many circumstances where it is desirable to obtain the contractile response of skeletal muscle under physiological circumstances: normal circulation, intact whole muscle, at body temperature. This includes the study of contractile responses like posttetanic potentiation, staircase and fatigue. Furthermore, the consequences of disease, disuse, injury, training and drug treatment can be of interest. This video demonstrates appropriate procedures to set up and use this valuable muscle preparation. To set up this preparation, the animal must be anesthetized, and the medial gastrocnemius muscle is surgically isolated, with the origin intact. Care must be taken to maintain the blood and nerve supplies. A long section of the sciatic nerve is cleared of connective tissue, and severed proximally. All branches of the distal stump that do not innervate the medial gastrocnemius muscle are severed. The distal nerve stump is inserted into a cuff lined with stainless steel stimulating wires. The calcaneus is severed, leaving a small piece of bone still attached to the Achilles tendon. Sonometric crystals and/or electrodes for electromyography can be inserted. Immobilization by metal probes in the femur and tibia prevents movement of the muscle origin. The Achilles tendon is attached to the force transducer and the loosened skin is pulled up at the sides to form a container that is filled with warmed paraffin oil. The oil distributes heat evenly and minimizes evaporative heat loss. A heat lamp is directed on the muscle, and the muscle and rat are allowed to warm up to 37°C. While it is warming, maximal voltage and optimal length can be determined. These are important initial conditions for any experiment on intact whole muscle. The experiment may include determination of standard contractile properties, like the force-frequency relationship, force-length relationship, and force-velocity relationship. With care in surgical isolation, immobilization of the origin of the

  10. Quercetin protects rat skeletal muscle from ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Ekinci Akdemir, Fazile Nur; Gülçin, İlhami; Karagöz, Berna; Soslu, Recep

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential beneficial effects of quercetin on skeletal muscle ischemia reperfusion injury. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley type rats were randomly divided into four groups. In the sham group, only gastrocnemius muscle were removed and given no quercetin. In ischemia group, all the femoral artery, vein and collaterals were occluded in the left hindlimb by applying tourniquate under general anaesthesia for three hours but reperfusion was not done. In the Quercetin + Ischemia reperfusion group, quercetin (200 mg kg(-1) dose orally) was given during one-week reoperation and later ischemia reperfusion model was done. Finally, gastrocnemius muscle samples were removed to measure biochemical parameters. The biomarkers, MDA levels, SOD, CAT and GPx activities, were evaluated related to skeletal muscle ischemia reperfusion injury. MDA levels reduced and SOD, CAT and GPx activities increased significantly in Quercetin + Ischemia reperfusion group. Results clearly showed that Quercetin have a protective role against oxidative damage induced by ischemia reperfusion in rats.

  11. Endurance training increases the efficiency of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Koziel, Agnieszka; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Celichowski, Jan; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-10-01

    Endurance training enhances mitochondrial oxidative capacity, but its effect on mitochondria functioning is poorly understood. In the present study, the influence of an 8-week endurance training on the bioenergetic functioning of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria under different assay temperatures (25, 35, and 42 °C) was investigated. The study was performed on 24 adult 4-month-old male Wistar rats, which were randomly assigned to either a treadmill training group (n = 12) or a sedentary control group (n = 12). In skeletal muscles, endurance training stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity. In isolated mitochondria, endurance training increased the phosphorylation rate and elevated levels of coenzyme Q. Moreover, a decrease in mitochondrial uncoupling, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed after training, which could explain the increased reactive oxygen species production (in nonphosphorylating mitochondria) and enhanced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency. At all studied temperatures, endurance training significantly augmented H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in nonphosphorylating mitochondria and decreased H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in phosphorylating mitochondria. Endurance training magnified the hyperthermia-induced increase in oxidative capacity and attenuated the hyperthermia-induced decline in oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species formation of nonphosphorylating mitochondria via proton leak enhancement. Thus, endurance training induces both quantitative and qualitative changes in muscle mitochondria that are important for cell signaling as well as for maintaining muscle energy homeostasis, especially at high temperatures.

  12. Activation of two types of fibres in rat extraocular muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Chiarandini, D J

    1976-01-01

    1. The contractile responses of the inferior rectus, one of the extraocular muscles of the rat, to a depolarization induced by an elevation of the potassium concentration in the external medium ([K]O) have been studied 'in vitro'. 2. The elevation of [K]O to 20 and 30 mM-K produced contractures that consisted of a sustained or tonic tension. When [K]O was increased to 50 mM or more a well-defined transient or phasic tension appeared before the tonic response. The increment of [K]O above 50 mM enhanced the phasic component and depressed the tonic tension. The maximal tonic tension, usually evoked by 50 mM-K, is about 50% of the tetanic tension, shows a gradual decline with time and lasts for hours. Control experiments performed in diaphragm showed that this muscle only responds with phasic tensions. 3. The difference in the repriming of the phasic and tonic responses when tensions were induced with salines containing low or normal [Cl] suggests that the muscle fibres responsible for the tonic tension are poorly permeable to Cl-. 4. The amplitude of the tonic tension was reduced by Ca deprivation and by an elevation of [Ca] in the saline to 10 mM. 5. It is concluded that in rat extraocular muscles, an increase in [K]O activates two types of muscle fibres: singly and multiply innervated. These appear to be functionally equivalent to the twitch and slow fibres of amphibian and avian muscle and would give rise to the phasic and tonic components of the contracture, respectively. PMID:957210

  13. Basal and insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle sugar transport in endotoxic and bacteremic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, M.V.; Sayeed, M.M.

    1988-04-01

    Membrane glucose transport with and without insulin was studied in soleus muscle from 5-h endotoxic rats (40 mg/kg Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide), and in soleus and epitrochlearis muscles from 12-h bacteremic (Escherichia coli, 4 X 10(10) CFU/kg) rats. Glucose transport was measured in muscles by evaluating the fractional efflux of /sup 14/C-labeled 3-O-methylglucose (/sup 14/C-3-MG) after loading muscles with /sup 14/C-3-MG. Basal 3-MG transport was elevated in soleus muscles from endotoxic as well as in soleus and epitrochlearis muscles from bacteremic rats compared with time-matched controls. Low insulin concentrations stimulated /sup 14/C-3-MG transport more in bacteremic and endotoxic rat muscles than in controls. However, sugar transport in the presence of high insulin dose was attenuated in soleus and epitrochlearis muscles from bacteremic rats and soleus muscles from endotoxic rats compared with controls. Analysis of the dose-response relationship with ALLFIT revealed that the maximal transport response to insulin was significantly decreased in both models of septic shock. Sensitivity to insulin (EC50) was increased in endotoxic rat muscles, and a somewhat similar tendency was observed in bacteremic rat soleus muscles. Neural and humoral influences and/or changes in cellular metabolic energy may contribute to the increase in basal transport. Shifts in insulin-mediated transport may be due to alterations in insulin-receptor-effector coupling and/or the number of available glucose transporters.

  14. Myogenic regulatory factors during regeneration of skeletal muscle in young, adult, and old rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, D. R.; Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Myogenic factor mRNA expression was examined during muscle regeneration after bupivacaine injection in Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats aged 3, 18, and 31 mo of age (young, adult, and old, respectively). Mass of the tibialis anterior muscle in the young rats had recovered to control values by 21 days postbupivacaine injection but in adult and old rats remained 40% less than that of contralateral controls at 21 and 28 days of recovery. During muscle regeneration, myogenin mRNA was significantly increased in muscles of young, adult, and old rats 5 days after bupivacaine injection. Subsequently, myogenin mRNA levels in young rat muscle decreased to postinjection control values by day 21 but did not return to control values in 28-day regenerating muscles of adult and old rats. The expression of MyoD mRNA was also increased in muscles at day 5 of regeneration in young, adult, and old rats, decreased to control levels by day 14 in young and adult rats, and remained elevated in the old rats for 28 days. In summary, either a diminished ability to downregulate myogenin and MyoD mRNAs in regenerating muscle occurs in old rat muscles, or the continuing myogenic effort includes elevated expression of these mRNAs.

  15. Myogenic regulatory factors during regeneration of skeletal muscle in young, adult, and old rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, D. R.; Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Myogenic factor mRNA expression was examined during muscle regeneration after bupivacaine injection in Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats aged 3, 18, and 31 mo of age (young, adult, and old, respectively). Mass of the tibialis anterior muscle in the young rats had recovered to control values by 21 days postbupivacaine injection but in adult and old rats remained 40% less than that of contralateral controls at 21 and 28 days of recovery. During muscle regeneration, myogenin mRNA was significantly increased in muscles of young, adult, and old rats 5 days after bupivacaine injection. Subsequently, myogenin mRNA levels in young rat muscle decreased to postinjection control values by day 21 but did not return to control values in 28-day regenerating muscles of adult and old rats. The expression of MyoD mRNA was also increased in muscles at day 5 of regeneration in young, adult, and old rats, decreased to control levels by day 14 in young and adult rats, and remained elevated in the old rats for 28 days. In summary, either a diminished ability to downregulate myogenin and MyoD mRNAs in regenerating muscle occurs in old rat muscles, or the continuing myogenic effort includes elevated expression of these mRNAs.

  16. Zinc supplementation alleviates hyperglycemia and associated metabolic abnormalities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Barman, Susmita; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2016-12-01

    The cause and effect relationship between diabetes and zinc is complex and unclear. This animal study has examined the potential of zinc supplementation in beneficial modulating hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, and metabolic abnormalities associated with diabetes. The study was conducted in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Groups of hyperglycemic rats were subjected to dietary interventions for 6 weeks with zinc supplementation (5 times and 10 times the normal level). Supplemental-zinc-fed diabetic groups showed significant control on hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. There was a significant reduction in protein glycosylation, glucosuria, and urinary excretion of proteins and urea in diabetic animals maintained on a zinc-supplemented diet. Diabetic rats showed significantly higher plasma albumin and lower plasma urea and creatinine levels upon zinc supplementation. Significant alterations in insulin sensitivity indices HOMA-IR, HOMA-B, and QUICKI were also indicated by zinc supplementation. The pathological abnormalities in pancreatic islets of diabetic animals were significantly alleviated by dietary zinc intervention. This study provides the first evidence that zinc supplementation can partially ameliorate the severity of diabetic hyperglycemia and associated metabolic abnormalities, hypoinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and altered pancreatic morphology. Thus, zinc supplementation may offer a significant potential for clinical application in managing diabetic hyperglycemia and related metabolic complications.

  17. Bisphenol A exposure at an environmentally relevant dose induces meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Duan, Weixia; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Shangcheng; Li, Renyan; Chen, Chunhai; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Wu, Hongjuan; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Whether environmental exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) may induce reproductive disorders is still controversial but certain studies have reported that BPA may cause meiotic abnormalities in C. elegans and female mice. However, little is known about the effect of BPA on meiosis in adult males. To determine whether BPA exposure at an environmentally relevant dose could induce meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats, we exposed 9-week-old male Wistar rats to BPA by gavage at 20 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 60 consecutive days. We found that BPA significantly increased the proportion of stage VII seminiferous epithelium and decreased the proportion of stage VIII. Consequently, spermiation was inhibited and spermatogenesis was disrupted. Further investigation revealed that BPA exposure delayed meiosis initiation in the early meiotic stage and induced the accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities and meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the late meiotic stage. The latter event subsequently activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (ATM). Our results suggest that long-term exposure to BPA may lead to continuous meiotic abnormalities and ultimately put mammalian reproductive health at risk.

  18. Implantation of muscle satellite cells overexpressing myogenin improves denervated muscle atrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, H; Lv, Y; Shen, X Q; Xu, J H; Lu, H; Fu, L C; Duan, T

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) overexpressing myogenin (MyoG) on denervated muscle atrophy. Rat MSCs were isolated and transfected with the MyoG-EGFP plasmid vector GV143. MyoG-transfected MSCs (MTMs) were transplanted into rat gastrocnemius muscles at 1 week after surgical denervation. Controls included injections of untransfected MSCs or the vehicle only. Muscles were harvested and analyzed at 2, 4, and 24 weeks post-transplantation. Immunofluorescence confirmed MyoG overexpression in MTMs. The muscle wet weight ratio was significantly reduced at 2 weeks after MTM injection (67.17±6.79) compared with muscles injected with MSCs (58.83±5.31) or the vehicle (53.00±7.67; t=2.37, P=0.04 and t=3.39, P=0.007, respectively). The muscle fiber cross-sectional area was also larger at 2 weeks after MTM injection (2.63×10³±0.39×10³) compared with MSC injection (1.99×10³±0.58×10³) or the vehicle only (1.57×10³±0.47×10³; t=2.24, P=0.049 and t=4.22, P=0.002, respectively). At 4 and 24 weeks post-injection, the muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area were similar across all three experimental groups. Immunohistochemistry showed that the MTM group had larger MyoG-positive fibers. The MTM group (3.18±1.13) also had higher expression of MyoG mRNA than other groups (1.41±0.65 and 1.03±0.19) at 2 weeks after injection (t=2.72, P=0.04). Transplanted MTMs delayed short-term atrophy of denervated muscles. This approach can be optimized as a novel stand-alone therapy or as a bridge to surgical re-innervation of damaged muscles.

  19. Alleviation of metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats by Spirulina maxima.

    PubMed

    Jarouliya, Urmila; Zacharia, J Anish; Kumar, Pravin; Bisen, P S; Prasad, G B K S

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycaemia. Several natural products have been isolated and identified to restore the complications of diabetes. Spirulina maxima is naturally occurring fresh water cyanobacterium, enriched with proteins and essential nutrients. The aim of the study was to determine whether S. maxima could serve as a therapeutic agent to correct metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats. Oral administration of 10 per cent fructose solution to Wistar rats (n = 5 in each group) for 30 days resulted in hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia. Aqueous suspension of S. maxima (5 or 10%) was also administered orally once daily for 30 days. The therapeutic potential of the preparation with reference to metformin (500 mg/kg) was assessed by monitoring various biochemical parameters at 10 day intervals during the course of therapy and at the end of 30 days S. maxima administration. Significant (P<0.001) reductions in blood glucose, lipid profile (triglycerides, cholesterol and LDL, VLDL) and liver function markers (SGPT and SGOT) were recorded along with elevated level of HDL-C at the end of 30 days therapy of 5 or 10 per cent S. maxima aquous extract. Co-administration of S. maxima extract (5 or 10% aqueous) with 10 per cent fructose solution offered a significant protection against fructose induced metabolic abnormalities in Wistar rats. The present findings showed that S. maxima exhibited anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-hyperlipidaemic and hepatoprotective activity in rats fed with fructose. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms.

  20. Immunomodulatory effects of massage on nonperturbed skeletal muscle in rats

    PubMed Central

    Waters-Banker, Christine; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2013-01-01

    Massage is an ancient manual therapy widely utilized by individuals seeking relief from various musculoskeletal maladies. Despite its popularity, the majority of evidence associated with massage benefits is anecdotal. Recent investigations have uncovered physiological evidence supporting its beneficial use following muscle injury; however, the effects of massage on healthy, unperturbed skeletal muscle are unknown. Utilizing a custom-fabricated massage mimetic device, the purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the effects of various loading magnitudes on healthy skeletal muscle with particular interest in the gene expression profile and modulation of key immune cells involved in the inflammatory response. Twenty-four male Wistar rats (200 g) were subjected to cyclic compressive loading (CCL) over the right tibialis anterior muscle for 30 min, once a day, for 4 consecutive days using four loading conditions: control (0N), low load (1.4N), moderate load (4.5N), and high load (11N). Microarray analysis showed that genes involved with the immune response were the most significantly affected by application of CCL. Load-dependent changes in cellular abundance were seen in the CCL limb for CD68+ cells, CD163+ cells, and CD43+cells. Surprisingly, load-independent changes were also discovered in the non-CCL contralateral limb, suggesting a systemic response. These results show that massage in the form of CCL exerts an immunomodulatory response to uninjured skeletal muscle, which is dependent upon the applied load. PMID:24201707

  1. Developmental changes in adipose and muscle lipoprotein lipase activity in the atherosclerosis-prone JCR:LA-corpulent rat.

    PubMed

    Mantha, L; Russell, J C; Brindley, D N; Deshaies, Y

    2002-03-01

    To characterize the developmental changes in adipose and muscle lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in the atherosclerosis-prone JCR:LA-corpulent rat, and to test the hypothesis that tissue-specific abnormalities in LPL activity precede the establishment of obesity. Lean (+/?) and obese cp/cp male JCR:LA rats were studied at 4, 5 and 8 weeks of age, that is at the onset of obesity, and at a time when obesity is well established. Assessment was made of plasma variables related to glucose and lipid metabolism and of LPL activity in several adipose depots, skeletal muscles and the heart. At week 4, body weights were identical in both genotypes and began to diverge at week 5. Eight-week-old cp/cp rats weighed 35% more than their lean counterparts. Perirenal and epididymal adipose depot weights were also identical in both genotypes at week 4 and began to increase in cp/cp rats at week 5, whereas the subcutaneous depot of 4-week-old cp/cp rats was slightly enlarged. At week 4, the cp/cp rats were hyperinsulinemic (5-fold), hyperleptinemic (30-fold) and hypertriglyceridemic (3-fold) compared to their lean counterparts, and their liver contained twice as much triglyceride. The 4-week-old cp/cp rats displayed 2-7-fold higher LPL specific activity in the various adipose depots compared to lean rats, and enzyme activity remained higher in obese than in lean rats at all subsequent ages. In contrast, LPL activity in the vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius and heart muscles of 4-week-old obese rats was approximately half that observed in lean animals. Profound, persistent alterations in the tissue-specific modulation of LPL activity are established in the JCR:LA cp/cp rat prior to the development of frank obesity. The increase in adipose tissue LPL activity and its decrease in muscle tissues are likely to be related to the concomitant alterations in insulinemia and triglyceridemia, respectively. The pre-obesity, tissue-specific alterations in LPL activity may be considered as an

  2. Protective effects of Ca2+ handling drugs against abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis and cell damage in myopathic skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Yuko; Katanosaka, Yuki; Shijun, Zhu; Kobayashi, Yuko; Hanada, Hironori; Shigekawa, Munekazu; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2005-09-01

    Deficiency of delta-sarcoglycan (delta-SG), a component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), causes skeletal muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy in BIO14.6 hamsters. Here, we studied the involvement of abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in muscle degeneration and the protective effect of drugs against Ca2+ handling proteins in vivo as well as in vitro. First, we characterized the properties of cultured myotubes from muscles of normal and BIO14.6 hamsters (30-60 days old). While there were no apparent differences in the levels of expression of various Ca2+ handling proteins (L-type Ca2+ channel, ryanodine receptor, SR-Ca2+ ATPase, and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger), muscle-specific proteins (contractile actin and acetylcholine receptor), or DGC member proteins except SGs, BIO14.6 myotubes showed a high degree of susceptibility to mechanical stressors, such as cyclic stretching and hypo-osmotic stress as compared to normal myotubes, as evidenced by marked increases in creatine phosphokinase (CK) release and bleb formation. BIO14.6 myotubes showed abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis characterized by elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, frequent Ca2+ oscillation, and increased 45Ca2+ uptake. These abnormal Ca2+ events and CK release were significantly prevented by Ca2+ handling drugs, tranilast, diltiazem, and FK506. The calpain inhibitor E64 prevented CK release, but not 45Ca2+ uptake. Some of these drugs (tranilast, diltiazem, and FK506) also exerted a significant protective effect for muscle degeneration in BIO14.6 hamsters and mdx mice in vivo. These observations suggest that elevated Ca2+ entry through sarcolemmal Ca2+ channels predominantly contributes to muscle degeneration and that the drugs tested here may have novel therapeutic potential against muscular dystrophy.

  3. Twitch tension, muscle weight, and fiber area of exercised reinnervating rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hie, H B; van Nie, C J; Vermeulen-van der Zee, E

    1982-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dynamic exercise on weight and isometric twitch tension of the reinnervating rat gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle complex as well as on histology of the reinnervating plantaris muscle. Two groups of 6-week-old female Wistar rats, 1 control (n = 17) and 1 experimental (n = 17), were denervated unilaterally by cutting and resecting the sciatic nerve. To effect reinnervation a skin grafting operation was carried out on the nerve so that the gap caused by resection was bridged. The experimental group began exercising on a motor-driven treadmill 18 days following the graft. A progressive training program of 18 weeks of treadmill running, 5 days/week, was carried out by the animals. Training intensity was gradually increased until during the final 3 weeks they were running up a 25% grade at a speed of 720m/hour for 2 hours a day. Exercise did not damage the reinnervating muscle. Absolute wet weight and maximum isometric twitch tension of the reinnervating gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle complex were increased significantly, by 15 1/2% and 30% respectively, after exercise. Training resulted in a significant increase in fiber and muscle cross-sectional areas of the reinnervating plantaris, by 28% and 23% respectively. Exercise brought about no change in total relative amount of connective tissue in the reinnervating plantaris. This study indicates that dynamic exercise has a significant positive effect on the weight, twitch tension and histologic appearance of the reinnervating gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle and thus may enhance their functional recovery. It is likely that this type of training is also effective in the treatment of patients recovering from peripheral nerve injuries.

  4. Ranolazine recruits muscle microvasculature and enhances insulin action in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhuo; Zhao, Lina; Chai, Weidong; Dong, Zhenhua; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2013-01-01

    Ranolazine, an anti-anginal compound, has been shown to significantly improve glycaemic control in large-scale clinical trials, and short-term ranolazine treatment is associated with an improvement in myocardial blood flow. As microvascular perfusion plays critical roles in insulin delivery and action, we aimed to determine if ranolazine could improve muscle microvascular blood flow, thereby increasing muscle insulin delivery and glucose use. Overnight-fasted, anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were used to determine the effects of ranolazine on microvascular recruitment using contrast-enhanced ultrasound, insulin action with euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp, and muscle insulin uptake using 125I-insulin. Ranolazine's effects on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation, cAMP generation and endothelial insulin uptake were determined in cultured endothelial cells. Ranolazine-induced myographical changes in tension were determined in isolated distal saphenous artery. Ranolazine at therapeutically effective dose significantly recruited muscle microvasculature by increasing muscle microvascular blood volume (∼2-fold, P < 0.05) and increased insulin-mediated whole body glucose disposal (∼30%, P= 0.02). These were associated with an increased insulin delivery into the muscle (P < 0.04). In cultured endothelial cells, ranolazine increased eNOS phosphorylation and cAMP production without affecting endothelial insulin uptake. In ex vivo studies, ranolazine exerted a potent vasodilatatory effect on phenylephrine pre-constricted arterial rings, which was partially abolished by endothelium denudement. In conclusion, ranolazine treatment vasodilatates pre-capillary arterioles and increases microvascular perfusion, which are partially mediated by endothelium, leading to expanded microvascular endothelial surface area available for nutrient and hormone exchanges and resulting in increased muscle delivery and action of insulin. Whether these actions contribute

  5. Diaphragm Muscle Sarcopenia in Fischer 344 and Brown Norway Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan E.; Omar, Tanya S.; Mantilla, Carlos B.; Sieck, Gary C.

    2016-01-01

    The risk for respiratory diseases increases in adults >65 years of age, which may be partially due to ageing-related weakening and atrophy (i.e., sarcopenia) of the diaphragm muscle (DIAm). However, mechanisms underlying DIAm sarcopenia remain unknown. Based on existing evidence, we hypothesized that sarcopenia is most evident in type IIx and/or IIb DIAm fibres comprising more fatigable motor units. Currently, the USA National Institute on Aging supports Fischer 344 (F344) and Brown Norway (BN) rat strains for ageing related research, yet DIAm sarcopenia has not been comprehensively evaluated in either strain. Thus, the current study examined DIAm sarcopenia in older adult (24 month, 50% survival) F344 and (32 month, 50% survival) BN rats, compared to young adult (6 month) F344 and BN rats. Measurements of contractility, contractile protein concentration, fibre type distribution and fibre cross-sectional area were obtained from midcostal DIAm strips. Maximal specific force was reduced by ∼24% and ∼13% in older F344 and BN rats, respectively. Additionally, although cross-sectional area of type I and IIa DIAm fibres was unchanged in both F344 and BN rats, cross-sectional area of type IIx and/or IIb DIAm fibres was reduced by ∼20% and ∼15% in F344 and BN rats, respectively. Thus, although there was ageing-related DIAm weakness and atrophy, selective to type IIx and/or IIb DIAm fibres in both F344 and BN rats, the sarcopenic phenotype was more pronounced in F344 rats. PMID:27126607

  6. Cardiac, skeletal muscle and serum irisin responses to with or without water exercise in young and old male rats: cardiac muscle produces more irisin than skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suna; Kuloglu, Tuncay; Aydin, Suleyman; Eren, Mehmet Nesimi; Celik, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Musa; Kalayci, Mehmet; Sahin, İbrahim; Gungor, Orhan; Gurel, Ali; Ogeturk, Murat; Dabak, Ozlem

    2014-02-01

    Irisin converts white adipose tissue (WAT) into brown adipose tissue (BAT), as regulated by energy expenditure. The relationship between irisin concentrations after exercise in rats compared humans after exercise remains controversial. We therefore: (1) measured irisin expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, peripheral nerve sheath and skin tissues, as also serum irisin level in 10 week-old rats without exercise, and (2) measured tissue supernatant irisin levels in cardiac and skeletal muscle, and in response to exercise in young and old rats to establishing which tissues produced most irisin. Young (12 months) and old rats (24 months) with or without 10min exercise (water floating) and healthy 10 week-old Sprague-Dawley rats without exercise were used. Irisin was absent from sections of skeletal muscle of unexercised rats, the only part being stained being the perimysium. In contrast, cardiac muscle tissue, peripheral myelin sheath, liver, kidneys, and skin dermis and hypodermis were strongly immunoreactivity. No irisin was seen in skeletal muscle of unexercised young and old rats, but a slight amount was detected after exercise. Strong immunoreactivity occurred in cardiac muscle of young and old rats with or without exercise, notably in pericardial connective tissue. Serum irisin increased after exercise, being higher in younger than older rats. Irisin in tissue supernatants (cardiac and skeletal muscle) was high with or without exercise. High supernatant irisin could come from connective tissues around skeletal muscle, especially nerve sheaths located within it. Skeletal muscle is probably not a main irisin source. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Early changes in muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion after spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosaku; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suganuma, Katsuyoshi; Yukata, Kiminori; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Yasui, Natsuo

    2013-05-20

    Spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection cause muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion. It is still unknown how spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection each affect the differentiation of muscle fiber type conversion mechanism and muscle atrophy. The aim of our study was to evaluate the difference of muscle weight change, muscle fiber type conversion, and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivatior-1α (PGC-1α) expression brought about by spinal cord transection and by peripheral nerve transection. Twenty-four Wistar rats underwent surgery, the control rats underwent a laminectomy; the spinal cord injury group underwent a spinal cord transection; the denervation group underwent a sciatic nerve transection. The rats were harvested of the soleus muscle and the TA muscle at 0 week, 1 week and 2 weeks after surgery. Histological examination was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunofluorescent staing. Western blot was performed with 3 groups. Both sciatic nerve transection and spinal cord transection caused muscle atrophy with the effect being more severe after sciatic nerve transection. Spinal cord transection caused a reduction in the expression of both sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection produced an increase in expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. The results of the expression of PGC-1α were expected in other words muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection is less than after spinal cord transection, however muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection was more severe than after spinal cord transection. In the conclusion, spinal cord transection diminished the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection enhanced the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle.

  8. Early changes in muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion after spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection cause muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion. It is still unknown how spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection each affect the differentiation of muscle fiber type conversion mechanism and muscle atrophy. The aim of our study was to evaluate the difference of muscle weight change, muscle fiber type conversion, and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivatior-1α (PGC-1α) expression brought about by spinal cord transection and by peripheral nerve transection. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats underwent surgery, the control rats underwent a laminectomy; the spinal cord injury group underwent a spinal cord transection; the denervation group underwent a sciatic nerve transection. The rats were harvested of the soleus muscle and the TA muscle at 0 week, 1 week and 2 weeks after surgery. Histological examination was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunofluorescent staing. Western blot was performed with 3 groups. Results Both sciatic nerve transection and spinal cord transection caused muscle atrophy with the effect being more severe after sciatic nerve transection. Spinal cord transection caused a reduction in the expression of both sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection produced an increase in expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. The results of the expression of PGC-1α were expected in other words muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection is less than after spinal cord transection, however muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection was more severe than after spinal cord transection. Conclusion In the conclusion, spinal cord transection diminished the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection enhanced the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus

  9. 2-D protein maps of rat gastrocnemius and soleus muscles: a tool for muscle plasticity assessment.

    PubMed

    Gelfi, Cecilia; Viganò, Agnese; De Palma, Sara; Ripamonti, Marilena; Begum, Shajna; Cerretelli, Paolo; Wait, Robin

    2006-01-01

    Functional characterization of muscle fibers relies on ATPase activity and on differential measurements of metabolic proteins, including mitochondrial and glycolytic enzymes, glucose, lactate and lactic acid transporters, calcium cycling proteins and components of the contractile machinery. The recent introduction of microarray technology has enabled detailed gene expression studies under different physiological and pathological conditions, thus generating novel hypotheses on muscle function. However, microarray approaches are limited by the incomplete genome coverage of currently available chips, and by poor correlation between mRNA concentration and protein expression level. We have used 2-DE and MS to build a reference map of proteins from rat mixed gastrocnemius and soleus muscle, and to assess qualitative and quantitative differences in protein distribution between these two functionally dissimilar muscles. More than 800 spots on each gel were detected by silver staining, of which 167 were excised, digested in-gel with trypsin and analyzed by ESI-MS/MS. One hundred and twenty eight distinct gene products were identified, including metabolic, transport and contractile proteins. Forty one spots displayed differences in relative expression level between mixed gastrocnemius and soleus samples. These data not only enable differentiation of functionally distinct slow-twitch and fast-twitch fiber types, but also provide tools for investigating muscle plasticity in response to physiological and environmental conditions such as aging or hypoxia.

  10. Toxicity of statins on rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, P; Török, M; Zahno, A; Waldhauser, K M; Brecht, K; Krähenbühl, S

    2006-10-01

    We investigated mitochondrial toxicity of four lipophilic stains (cerivastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, simvastatin) and one hydrophilic statin (pravastatin). In L6 cells (rat skeletal muscle cell line), the four lipophilic statins (100 micromol/l) induced death in 27-49% of the cells. Pravastatin was not toxic up to 1 mmol/l. Cerivastatin, fluvastatin and atorvastatin (100 micromol/l) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential by 49-65%, whereas simvastatin and pravastatin were less toxic. In isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria, all statins, except pravastatin, decreased glutamate-driven state 3 respiration and respiratory control ratio. Beta-oxidation was decreased by 88-96% in the presence of 100 micromol/l of the lipophilic statins, but only at higher concentrations by pravastatin. Mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c release and DNA fragmentation was induced in L6 cells by the four lipophilic statins, but not by pravastatin. Lipophilic statins impair the function of skeletal muscle mitochondria, whereas the hydrophilic pravastatin is significantly less toxic.

  11. Effects of insulin and exercise on rat hindlimb muscles after simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Balon, Thomas W.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of simulated microgravity on the insulin- and exercise-stimulated glucose uptake and metabolism in the hindlimb muscles of rats was investigated using three groups of rats suspended at 45 head-down tilt (SUS) for 14 days: (1) cage control, (2) exercising (treadmill running) control, and (3) rats subjected to suspension followed by exercise (SUS-E). It was found that the suspension of rats with hindlimbs non-weight bearing led to enhanced muscle responses to insulin and exercise, when these stimuli were applied separately. However, the insulin affect appeared to be impaired after exercise for the SUS-E rats, especially for the soleus muscle.

  12. Effects of insulin and exercise on rat hindlimb muscles after simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Balon, Thomas W.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of simulated microgravity on the insulin- and exercise-stimulated glucose uptake and metabolism in the hindlimb muscles of rats was investigated using three groups of rats suspended at 45 head-down tilt (SUS) for 14 days: (1) cage control, (2) exercising (treadmill running) control, and (3) rats subjected to suspension followed by exercise (SUS-E). It was found that the suspension of rats with hindlimbs non-weight bearing led to enhanced muscle responses to insulin and exercise, when these stimuli were applied separately. However, the insulin affect appeared to be impaired after exercise for the SUS-E rats, especially for the soleus muscle.

  13. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-11-01

    Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification.

  14. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results: The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Conclusion: Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification. PMID:25263336

  15. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; Martos, F; Bellido, I; Marquez, E; Garcia, A J; Pavia, J; Sanchez de la Cuesta, F

    1992-06-09

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle homogenates were characterized with [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) by ligand binding studies. [3H]NMS saturation experiments show the existence of a homogeneous population of non-interacting binding sites with similar affinity (KD values of 1.38 +/- 0.20 nM in human colon smooth muscle and 1.48 +/- 0.47 nM in rat colon smooth muscle) and with Hill slopes close to unity in both samples of tissue. However, a significant (P less than 0.01) increase in muscarinic receptor density (Bmax) is found in human colon (29.9 +/- 2.9 fmol/mg protein) compared with rat colon (17.2 +/- 1.5 fmol/mg protein). Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by non-labelled compounds shows the following order in human colon: atropine greater than AF-DX 116 greater than pirenzepine. Whereas in rat colon the rank order obtained is atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Atropine and pirenzepine bind to a homogeneous population of binding sites, although pirenzepine shows higher affinity to bind to the sites present in rat colon (Ki = 1.08 +/- 0.08 microM) than those in human colon (Ki = 1.74 +/- 0.02 microM) (P less than 0.05). Similarly, IC50 values obtained in AF-DX 116 competition experiments were significantly different (P less than 0.01) in human colon (IC50 = 1.69 +/- 0.37 microM) than in rat colon (IC50 = 3.78 +/- 0.75 microM). Unlike atropine and pirenzepine, the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by AF-DX 116 did not yield a simple mass-action binding curve (nH less than 1, P less than 0.01) suggesting the presence of more than one subtype of muscarinic receptor in both species. Computer analysis of these curves with a two binding site model suggests the presence of two populations of receptor. The apparent Ki1 value for the high affinity binding site is 0.49 +/- 0.07 microM for human colon smooth muscle and 0.33 +/- 0.05 microM for rat colon smooth muscle. The apparent Ki2 for the low affinity binding site is 8

  16. Cremaster muscle myogenesis in the tip of the rat gubernaculum supports active gubernacular elongation during inguinoscrotal testicular descent.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Nicholas; Buraundi, Silverton; Balic, Adam; Southwell, Bridget R; Hutson, John M

    2011-10-01

    Cryptorchidism is a common abnormality and normal testicular descent is controlled by the gubernaculum. The cremaster may originate from abdominal muscles during gubernacular eversion or alternatively it may develop inside the gubernaculum. We studied cremaster myogenesis to determine how it develops. Coronal sections of the pelvis were prepared from male Sprague-Dawley® rats and from males treated prenatally with the antiandrogen flutamide at embryonic day 19, and postnatal days 10, 19 and 35 after receiving ethical approval. Immunohistochemical stains were prepared for Ki67, Pax-7, myogenin, myosin heavy chain 7, Myh1, Myh2, Myh4, embryonic myosin, and slow and cardiac troponin T. Cell counts of the 1) gubernacular tip, 2) proximal gubernaculum/cremaster muscle and 3) adjacent abdominal wall are shown as a percent of positive fibers or positive cells per area. Throughout embryonic day 19, and postnatal days 10 and 19 proliferation (Ki67) was maximal at the gubernacular tip (p <0.001), as were muscle stem cells markers (Pax-7 p <0.05), early myogenesis (myogenin p <0.001) and immature muscle (Myh7, and slow and cardiac troponin T p <0.0001). In contrast, secondary (fast twitch, Myh1, 2 and 4) fibers were more common in abdominal muscles (p <0.0001). Differences in muscle maturity and composition decreased with time. Flutamide treated rats showed more cellular proliferation than controls postnatally on postnatal day 10 (p <0.001) as well as persistent immature embryonic myosin at the tip from postnatal day 19 (p <0.05). Results show that the rat cremaster muscle is more immature at the gubernacular tip, consistent with myogenesis occurring in the gubernaculum during migration to the scrotum, as proposed in humans. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of acidification and increased extracellular potassium on dynamic muscle contractions in isolated rat muscles.

    PubMed

    Overgaard, Kristian; Højfeldt, Grith Westergaard; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2010-12-15

    Since accumulation of both H(+) and extracellular K(+) have been implicated in the reduction in dynamic contractile function during intense exercise, we investigated the effects of acidification and high K(+) on muscle power and the force-velocity relation in non-fatigued rat soleus muscles. Contractions were elicited by supramaximal electrical stimulation at 60 Hz. Force-velocity (FV) curves were obtained by fitting data on force and shortening velocity at different loads to the Hill equation. Acidification of the muscles by incubation with up to 24 mm lactic acid produced no significant changes in maximal power (P(max)) at 30 °C. More pronounced acidification, obtained by increasing CO(2) levels in the equilibration gas from 5% to 53%, markedly decreased P(max) and maximal isometric force (F(max)), increased the curvature of the FV relation, but left maximal shortening velocity (V(max)) unchanged. Increase of extracellular K(+) from 4 to 10 mm caused a depression of 58% in P(max) and 52% in F(max), but had no significant effect on V(max) or curvature of the FV curve. When muscles at 10 mM K(+) were acidified by 20 mm lactic acid, P(max) and F(max) recovered completely to the initial control level at 4 mm K(+). CO(2) acidification also induced significant recovery of dynamic contractions, but not entirely to control levels. These results demonstrate that in non-fatigued muscles severe acidification can be detrimental to dynamic contractile function, but in muscles depolarised by exposure to high extracellular [K(+)], approaching the [K(+)] level seen during intense fatiguing exercise, acidification can have positive protective effects on dynamic muscle function.

  18. Effects of prolonged voluntary wheel-running on muscle structure and function in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kariya, Fumihiko; Yamauchi, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keizo; Narusawa, Mistuo; Nakahara, Yoshibumi

    2004-06-01

    We examined the effects of prolonged voluntary wheel-running on skeletal muscle functional and/or structural characteristics in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (5 weeks old) were divided into five groups: (1) 15W-SC, sedentary controls housed in normal plastic cages until age 15 weeks; (2) 15W-VE, housed in a voluntary-exercise (running-wheel) device equipped with housing space until age 15 weeks; (3) 35W-SC, housed in normal plastic cages until age 35 weeks; (4) 35W-VE, housed in the voluntary-exercise device until age 35 weeks, and (5) 35W-MVE, housed in normal plastic cages until age 15 weeks, then in the voluntary-exercise device from age 16 weeks to 35 weeks ("middle age"). At the end of each rat's experimental period, the plantaris muscle was dissected from each hindlimb for analysis of the muscle's functional and/or structural characteristics. Total running distance was similar in 15W-VE and 35W-VE, both being significantly greater than in 35-MVE. The percentage of type IIb myosin heavy chain isoform was significantly lower in each VE group than in the corresponding SC group. This shift from type IIb was significantly greater for 35W-VE than for the other VE groups, which were similar to each other. The cross-sectional area of type IIx fibers was significantly greater in 35W-VE than in 35W-SC, but this was not true for 15W-VE versus 15W-SC or for 35W-MVE versus 35W-SC. No significant difference in citrate synthase activity was detected between any VE group and the corresponding SC group. These results suggest that a prolongation of voluntary wheel-running leads to some advantageous enhancements of functional and/or structural characteristics in rat plantaris.

  19. PGC-1α Deficiency Causes Multi-System Energy Metabolic Derangements: Muscle Dysfunction, Abnormal Weight Control and Hepatic Steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Teresa C; Lehman, John J; Finck, Brian N; Schaeffer, Paul J; Wende, Adam R; Boudina, Sihem; Courtois, Michael; Wozniak, David F; Sambandam, Nandakumar; Bernal-Mizrachi, Carlos; Chen, Zhouji; O. Holloszy, John; Medeiros, Denis M; Schmidt, Robert E; Saffitz, Jeffrey E; Abel, E. Dale; Semenkovich, Clay F

    2005-01-01

    The gene encoding the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) was targeted in mice. PGC-1α null (PGC-1α−/−) mice were viable. However, extensive phenotyping revealed multi-system abnormalities indicative of an abnormal energy metabolic phenotype. The postnatal growth of heart and slow-twitch skeletal muscle, organs with high mitochondrial energy demands, is blunted in PGC-1α−/− mice. With age, the PGC-1α−/− mice develop abnormally increased body fat, a phenotype that is more severe in females. Mitochondrial number and respiratory capacity is diminished in slow-twitch skeletal muscle of PGC-1α−/− mice, leading to reduced muscle performance and exercise capacity. PGC-1α−/− mice exhibit a modest diminution in cardiac function related largely to abnormal control of heart rate. The PGC-1α−/− mice were unable to maintain core body temperature following exposure to cold, consistent with an altered thermogenic response. Following short-term starvation, PGC-1α−/− mice develop hepatic steatosis due to a combination of reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity and an increased expression of lipogenic genes. Surprisingly, PGC-1α−/− mice were less susceptible to diet-induced insulin resistance than wild-type controls. Lastly, vacuolar lesions were detected in the central nervous system of PGC-1α−/− mice. These results demonstrate that PGC-1α is necessary for appropriate adaptation to the metabolic and physiologic stressors of postnatal life. PMID:15760270

  20. Effects of methylmercury on the motor and sensory innervation of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, R.K.; Riley, D.A.

    1987-06-01

    The histochemical study examined the effects of chronic methylmercury (MeHg) intoxication on the motor and sensory innervation of extensor digitorum longus muscles. Light microscopic examination of silver-stained axons in the intramuscular nerve bundles of MeHg-treated rats showed Wallerian-like degeneration and a reduction in the number of nerve fibers. Disrupted axons were predominantly sensory because 22.2% of spindle afferents (I/sub a/) and 90.0% of Golgi tendon organ (I/sub b/) sensory fibers were completely degenerated whereas less than 1% of motor ending were totally destroyed. Partial disruption occurred in the cholinesterase and motor terminals of 13.7% of endplates. Their results demonstrated greater vulnerability of sensory nerves than of motor nerves to MeHg-induced degeneration. Thus, the abnormal reflexes, ataxia, and muscle weakness following MeHg poisoning appear related to reduction of proprioceptive feedback from muscles and tendons irradiation to the documented lesions in the central nervous system.

  1. Characteristics of locomotion, muscle strength, and muscle tissue in regenerating rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Akira; Fuchioka, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Masuhara, Mitsuhiko; Kami, Katsuya

    2010-05-01

    Although numerous studies have aimed to elucidate the mechanisms used to repair the structure and function of injured skeletal muscles, it remains unclear how and when movement recovers following damage. We performed a temporal analysis to characterize the changes in movement, muscle function, and muscle structure after muscle injury induced by the drop-mass technique. At each time-point, movement recovery was determined by ankle kinematic analysis of locomotion, and functional recovery was represented by isometric force. As a histological analysis, the cross-sectional area of myotubes was measured to examine structural regeneration. The dorsiflexion angle of the ankle, as assessed by kinematic analysis of locomotion, increased after injury and then returned to control levels by day 14 post-injury. The isometric force returned to normal levels by day 21 post-injury. However, the size of the myotubes did not reach normal levels, even at day 21 post-injury. These results indicate that recovery of locomotion occurs prior to recovery of isometric force and that functional recovery occurs earlier than structural regeneration. Thus, it is suggested that recovery of the movement and function of injured skeletal muscles might be insufficient as markers for estimating the degree of neuromuscular system reconstitution.

  2. Estimation of pyruvate decarboxylation in perfused rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Schadewaldt, P; Münch, U; Prengel, M; Staib, W

    1983-10-31

    By the determination of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in tissue homogenates only limited information is gained on the actual metabolic flux. We therefore determined pyruvate decarboxylation in isolated rat hindlimbs non recirculating perfused with physiological (1-14C)pyruvate levels. On the basis of perfusate pyruvate specific activity a 14CO2 production of 15.8 +/- 0.5 nmol/min per g muscle was measured. However, by this method the actual pyruvate flux through the enzyme complex is underestimated by a factor of 7 due to the intracellular dilution of label.

  3. Altered Muscle Metabolism in Rats After Thermal Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    by Herndon et a-ketoglutarate. 600 mM L -alanine, 0.18 mM NADH. 1.2 U/ml al." Briefly, this procedure consists of anesthetizing the rat (50 mg lactate...whole homogenates of the gastrocnemius muscle 9 sec and the abdomen for 3 sec in 980C water. Saline (20 ml) was to oxidize pyruvate- l -"C to "CO, was...the same time Econofluor (New England Nuclear, Boston. Mass.) and 10% metha- of day. nol. Oleate- l -’C oxidation rates by whole gastrocnemius homoge

  4. Impaired isotonic contractility and structural abnormalities in the diaphragm of congestive heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    van Hees, Hieronymus W H; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; Hafmans, Theo; Ennen, Leo; Heunks, Leo M A; Verheugt, Freek W A; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard

    2008-08-29

    Metabolic alterations and decreased isometric force generation have been demonstrated in different animal models for congestive heart failure (CHF). However, as few morphological examinations have been performed on the CHF diaphragm, it is unknown if structural abnormalities comprise a substrate for diaphragm dysfunction in CHF. Therefore, we investigated CHF diaphragm isometric and isotonic contractility together with the presence of structural abnormalities. Isometric twitch (P(t)) and maximal (P(o)) force, shortening velocity and power generation were determined in diaphragm bundles from rats with CHF, induced by myocardial infarction, and sham-operated rats. Immunofluorescence staining of myosin and sarcolemmal components fibronectin, laminin and dystrophin was performed on diaphragm cryosections. Electron microscopy was used to study the ultrastructure of diaphragm fibres. P(t) and P(o) were respectively approximately 30% and approximately 20% lower in CHF diaphragm bundles than sham. Maximal shortening velocity was reduced by approximately 20% and maximal power generation by approximately 35%. Structural abnormalities were frequently observed in CHF diaphragm fibres and were mainly marked by focal degradation of sarcomeric constituents and expansion of intermyofibrillar spaces with swollen and degenerated mitochondria. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed reduced staining intensities of myosin in CHF diaphragm fibres compared to sham. No differences were found regarding the distribution of fibronectin, laminin and dystrophin, indicating an intact sarcolemma in both groups. This study demonstrates impaired isometric and isotonic contractility together with structural abnormalities in the CHF diaphragm. The sarcolemma of CHF diaphragm fibres appeared to be intact, excluding a role for sarcolemmal injuries in the development of CHF diaphragm dysfunction.

  5. Direct observations of muscle arterioles and venules following contraction of skeletal muscle fibres in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, J M; Tandon, H C

    1984-01-01

    Direct observations have been made of responses of individual arterioles and venules of rat spinotrapezius muscle to contraction of the skeletal muscle fibres. Stimuli of 4-6 V intensity, 0.1 ms duration, delivered via a micro-electrode inserted into the spinotrapezius, evoked contraction of a small bundle of skeletal muscle fibres, followed by vasodilatation which was limited to all those arterioles and venules which crossed or ran alongside activated muscle fibres. Since venules outside the region of contraction, but supplied by dilating arterioles, were not passively distended by the attendant rise in intravascular pressure, it is concluded that both the arterioles and venules dilated actively in response to muscle contraction. All arterioles responded to a single twitch contraction, the terminal arterioles (7-13 micron i.d.) showing the largest increase in diameter. Collecting venules (9-18 micron i.d.) responded to just two twitches in 1 s and larger venules to five twitches in 1 s. When twitch contractions were continuously evoked for 10 s, the responses in individual arterioles and venules were graded with twitch frequency, the fastest and largest response occurring at 6-8 Hz. Tetanic contraction, at 40 Hz for 1 s, produced faster responses in all vessels, a maximum 55% increase from resting internal diameter being attained in only 8 s in some terminal arterioles. In all vessels the responses to tetanic contraction were equal to the maximal dilatation induced by papaverine. These results, in contrast with conclusions drawn from indirect estimates of venous responses, show that venules, like arterioles, dilate actively in response to muscle contraction. Venule dilatation may reduce the rise in capillary hydrostatic pressure, thereby limiting the outward filtration of fluid. PMID:6747856

  6. Regulatory Mechanism of Muscle Disuse Atrophy in Adult Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    During the last phase of NAG 2-386 we completed three studies. The effects of 14 days of weightlessness; the vastus medialis (VM) from flight rats in COSMOS 2044 was compared with the VM from tail suspended rats and other controls. The type I and II fibers in the mixed fiber portion of the VM were significantly reduced in flight rats and capillary densities paralleled the fiber density changes. The results of this project compared favorably with those in the extensor digitorum longus following seven days of flight in SL 3. The cardiovascular projects focused on the blood pressure changes in head down tilted rats (HDT) and non-head down tilted (N-HDT) rats. Blood pressures (MAP, SP and DP) were significantly elevated through seven days of HDT and rapidly returned to control levels within one day after removal from the HDT position. The N-HDT showed some slight rise in blood pressure but these were not as great and they were not as rapid. The HDT rats were characterized as exhibiting transient hypertension. These results led to some of the microvascular and vascular graduate student projects of Dr. Bernhard Stepke. Also our results refute or, at least, do not agree with previous reports from other laboratories. Each animal, in our blood pressure projects, served as its own control thereby providing more accurate results. Also, our experiments focused on recovery studies which can, in and of themselves, provide guidelines for flight experiments concerned with blood pressure changes. Another experiment was conducted to examine the role of testicular atrophy in whole body suspended (WBS) and tail suspended (TS) rats. We worked in conjunction with Dr. D.R. Deaver's laboratory at Pennsylvania State University and Dr. R. P. Amann at Colorado State University. In the TS rats the testes are retracted into the abdominal cavity, unless a ligature is placed to maintain them in the external scrotal sac. The cryptorchid condition in TS rats results in atrophy of the testes and

  7. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  8. Differences in Age-Related Alterations in Muscle Contraction Properties in Rat Tongue and Hindlimb

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Nadine P.; Ota, Fumikazu; Nagai, Hiromi; Russell, John A.; Leverson, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Because of differences in muscle architecture and biomechanics, the purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle contractile properties of rat hindlimb and tongue were differentially affected by aging. Method: Deep peroneal and hypoglossal nerves were stimulated in 6 young and 7 old Fischer 344-Brown Norway rats to allow…

  9. Abnormal endogenous amino acid release in brain slices from vitamin B-6 restricted neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, T R

    1991-01-02

    The basal and potassium-evoked efflux of glutamate, glycine, taurine, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was measured in brain slices from vitamin B-6 restricted and sufficient 14-day-old rats. The results indicate a reduced level of basal glutamate, taurine, and GABA efflux in hippocampal slices and taurine and GABA in cortical slices from vitamin B-6 restricted animals. In the presence of depolarizing potassium concentrations, there was a reduced level of GABA efflux in hippocampal and cortical slices, and a marked reduction in the release of glutamate in cortical slices from B-6 restricted rats. The abnormalities in the secretion process of these neuroactive amino acids may be related to the neurological sequelae associated with neonatal vitamin B-6 restriction.

  10. Electrical stimulation using sine waveform prevents unloading-induced muscle atrophy in the deep calf muscles of rat.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Minoru; Hirayama, Yusuke; Fujita, Naoto; Fujino, Hidemi

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of electrical stimulation by using rectangular and sine waveforms in the prevention of deep muscle atrophy in rat calf muscles. Rats were randomly divided into the following groups: control, hindlimb unloading (HU), and HU plus electrical stimulation (ES). The animals in the ES group were electrically stimulated using rectangular waveform (RS) on the left calves and sine waveform (SS) on the right calves, twice a day, for 2 weeks during unloading. HU for 2 weeks resulted in a loss of the muscle mass, a decrease in the cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers, and overexpression of ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. In contrast, electrical stimulation with RS attenuated the HU-induced reduction in the cross-sectional area of muscle fibers and the increase of ubiquitinated proteins in the gastrocnemius muscle. However, electrical stimulation with RS failed to prevent muscle atrophy in the deep portion of the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles. Nevertheless, electrical stimulation with SS attenuated the HU-induced muscle atrophy and the up-regulation of ubiquitinated proteins in both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. This indicates that SS was more effective in the prevention of deep muscle atrophy than RS. Since the skin muscle layers act like the plates of a capacitor, separated by the subcutaneous adipose layer, the SS can pass through this capacitor more easily than the RS. Hence, SS can prevent the progressive loss of muscle fibers in the deep portion of the calf muscles.

  11. Satellite cell activity in muscle regeneration after contusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Pholpramool, Chumpol; Kitiyanant, Yindee; Yimlamai, Tossaporn

    2010-11-01

    1. The role of satellite cells in muscle growth during development is well documented, but the involvement of these cells in muscle repair after contusion is less well known. In the present study, we investigated the time-course of satellite cell activity (from 3h to 7days) after contusion of rat gastrocnemius muscle using specific molecular markers for immunofluorescence and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 2. Inflammation of the injured muscle occurred within 6h, followed by disintegration of the damaged myofibres within 12h. Newly formed myofibres appeared by Day 7. 3. The number of MyoD-positive nuclei (activated satellite cells) in the injured muscle was significantly increased by 6h, reaching a maximum by 12h after contusion. However, the number of MyoD-positive nuclei decreased towards control levels by Day 7. Changes in the number of bromodeoxyuridine-labelled nuclei (proliferating satellite cells) paralleled the changes seen in the number of MyoD-positive nuclei. Conversely, expression of myogenin protein was not apparent until Day 3 and increased further by Day 7. Colabelling of MyoD and myogenin was seen in only a few cells. 4. The time-course of MyoD mRNA expression corresponded with MyoD protein expression. However, there were two peaks in myogenin mRNA expression: 6h and Day 7 after contusion. The second peak coincided with upregulation of myostatin mRNA levels. 5. The results of the present study suggest that contusion activates a homogeneous population of satellite cells to proliferate within 3days, followed by differentiation to form new myofibres. The latter may be regulated, in part, by myostatin.

  12. Oxygen exchange profile in rat muscles of contrasting fibre types

    PubMed Central

    Behnke, Brad J; McDonough, Paul; Padilla, Danielle J; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether fibre type affects the O2 exchange characteristics of skeletal muscle at the microcirculatory level we tested the hypothesis that, following the onset of contractions, muscle comprising predominately type I fibres (soleus, Sol, 86 % type I) would, based on demonstrated blood flow responses, exhibit a blunted microvascular PO2 (PO2,m, which is determined by the O2 delivery () to O2 uptake () ratio) profile (assessed via phosphorescence quenching) compared to muscle of primarily type II fibres (peroneal, Per, 84 % type II). PO2,m was measured at rest, and following the rest-contractions (twitch, 1 Hz, 2–4 V for 120 s) transition in Sol (n = 6) and Per (n = 6) muscles of Sprague-Dawley rats. Both muscles exhibited a delay followed by a mono-exponential decrease in PO2,m to the steady state. However, compared with Sol, Per demonstrated (1) a larger change in baseline minus steady state contracting PO2,m (ΔPO2,m) (Per, 13.4 ± 1.7 mmHg; Sol, 8.6 ± 0.9 mmHg, P < 0.05); (2) a faster mean response time (i.e. time delay (TD) plus time constant (τ); Per, 23.8 ± 1.5 s; Sol, 39.6 ± 4.3 s, P < 0.05); and therefore (3) a greater rate of PO2,m decline (ΔPO2,m/τ; Per, 0.92 ± 0.08 mmHg s−1; Sol, 0.42 ± 0.05 mmHg s−1, P < 0.05). These data demonstrate an increased microvascular pressure head of O2 at any given point after the initial time delay for Sol versus Per following the onset of contractions that is probably due to faster dynamics relative to those of . PMID:12692174

  13. Effect of swimming on myostatin expression in white and red gastrocnemius muscle and in cardiac muscle of rats.

    PubMed

    Matsakas, Antonios; Bozzo, Cyrille; Cacciani, Nicola; Caliaro, Francesca; Reggiani, Carlo; Mascarello, Francesco; Patruno, Marco

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that swimming training might impact differentially myostatin expression in skeletal muscles, depending on fibre type composition, and in cardiac muscle of rats. Myostatin expression was analysed by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunohistochemistry of the red deep portion (mainly composed of slow and type II A fibres) and in the superficial, white portion (composed of fast type II X and II B fibres) of the gastrocnemius muscle in adult male Wistar rats: (i) subjected to two consecutive swimming bouts for 3 h; (ii) subjected to intensive swimming training for 4 weeks; and (iii) sedentary control rats. Myostatin mRNA content was in all cases higher in white than in red muscles. Two bouts of swimming did not alter myostatin expression, whereas swimming training for 4 weeks resulted in a significant reduction of myostatin mRNA contents, significant both in white and red muscles but more pronounced in white muscles. Western blot did not detect any change in the amount of myostatin protein. Immunohistochemistry showed that, in control rats, myostatin was localized in presumptive satellite cells of a few muscle fibres. After training, the number of myostatin-positive spots decreased significantly. Myostatin mRNA content in cardiac muscle was lower than in skeletal muscle and was significantly increased by swimming training. In conclusion, the results obtained showed that intense training caused a decreased expression of myostatin mRNA in white and red skeletal muscles but an increase in cardiac muscle.

  14. Alleviation of metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats by Spirulina maxima

    PubMed Central

    Jarouliya, Urmila; Anish, Zacharia J.; Kumar, Pravin; Bisen, P.S.; Prasad, G.B.K.S.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycaemia. Several natural products have been isolated and identified to restore the complications of diabetes. Spirulina maxima is naturally occurring fresh water cyanobacterium, enriched with proteins and essential nutrients. The aim of the study was to determine whether S. maxima could serve as a therapeutic agent to correct metabolic abnormalities induced by excessive fructose administration in Wistar rats. Methods: Oral administration of 10 per cent fructose solution to Wistar rats (n=5 in each group) for 30 days resulted in hyperglycaemia and hyperlipidaemia. Aqueous suspension of S. maxima (5 or 10%) was also administered orally once daily for 30 days. The therapeutic potential of the preparation with reference to metformin (500 mg/kg) was assessed by monitoring various biochemical parameters at 10 day intervals during the course of therapy and at the end of 30 days S. maxima administration. Results: Significant (P<0.001) reductions in blood glucose, lipid profile (triglycerides, cholesterol and LDL, VLDL) and liver function markers (SGPT and SGOT) were recorded along with elevated level of HDL-C at the end of 30 days therapy of 5 or 10 per cent S. maxima aquous extract. Co-administration of S. maxima extract (5 or 10% aqueous) with 10 per cent fructose solution offered a significant protection against fructose induced metabolic abnormalities in Wistar rats. Interpretation & Conclusions: The present findings showed that S. maxima exhibited anti-hyperglycaemic, anti-hyperlipidaemic and hepatoprotective activity in rats fed with fructose. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms. PMID:22561632

  15. Effects of strenuous maternal exercise on fetal organ weights and skeletal muscle development in rats.

    PubMed

    Mottola, M F; Bagnall, K M; Belcastro, A N

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to observe the effects of strenuous maternal aerobic exercise throughout gestation on fetal outcome in the rat. The strenuous exercise intensity consisted of a treadmill speed of 30 m.min-1 on a 10 degrees incline, for 120 min.day-1, 5 days.week-1. The rats were conditioned to run on a motor-driven treadmill by following a progressive two-week exercise program, so that by the end of the two weeks the rats were capable of running comfortably at this strenuous intensity in the non-pregnant state. Following the two-week running programme, the rats were paired by weight and randomly assigned to either a pregnant group that continued the running program throughout gestation (pregnant runner), or a pregnant group that did not continue the running program throughout pregnancy (pregnant control). At birth the neonates born to the pregnant running group did not differ in average neonatal body weight values, number per litter or total litter weight values when compared to controls, nor were superficial gross abnormalities observed in neonates born to the pregnant control or pregnant running groups. The strenuous maternal exercise intensity did not alter neonatal organ weight values (brain, heart, liver, lung, kidney), nor neonatal skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius, sternomastoid, diaphragm) when compared to control values. It is suggested that maternal exercise of this intensity throughout gestation does not affect fetal outcome in the rat, and may be due to the animals accustomization to the strenuous exercise protocol prior to pregnancy.

  16. Abnormal response to calmodulin in vitro of dystrophic chicken muscle membrane Ca2+-ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Galindo, J; Hudecki, M S; Davis, F B; Davis, P J; Thacore, H R; Pollina, C M; Blas, S D; Schoenl, M

    1988-09-20

    A skeletal muscle membrane fraction enriched in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) contained Ca2+-ATPase activity which was stimulated in vitro in normal chickens (line 412) by 6 nM purified bovine calmodulin (33% increase over control, P less than 0.001). In contrast, striated muscle from chickens (line 413) affected with an inherited form of muscular dystrophy, but otherwise genetically similar to line 412, contained SR-enriched Ca2+-ATPase activity which was resistant to stimulation in vitro by calmodulin. Basal levels of Ca2+-ATPase activity (no added calmodulin) were comparable in muscles of unaffected and affected animals, and the Ca2+ optima of the enzymes in normal and dystrophic muscle were identical. Purified SR vesicles, obtained by calcium phosphate loading and sucrose density gradient centrifugation, showed the same resistance of dystrophic Ca2+-ATPase to exogenous calmodulin as the SR-enriched muscle membrane fraction. Dystrophic muscle had increased Ca2+ content compared to that of normal animals (P less than 0.04) and has been previously shown to contain increased levels of immuno- and bioactive calmodulin and of calmodulin mRNA. The calmodulin resistance of the Ca2+-ATPase in dystrophic muscle reflects a defect in regulation of cell Ca2+ metabolism associated with elevated cellular Ca2+ and calmodulin concentrations.

  17. Neural mechanisms of predatory aggression in rats-implications for abnormal intraspecific aggression.

    PubMed

    Tulogdi, Aron; Biro, Laszlo; Barsvari, Beata; Stankovic, Mona; Haller, Jozsef; Toth, Mate

    2015-04-15

    Our recent studies showed that brain areas that are activated in a model of escalated aggression overlap with those that promote predatory aggression in cats. This finding raised the interesting possibility that the brain mechanisms that control certain types of abnormal aggression include those involved in predation. However, the mechanisms of predatory aggression are poorly known in rats, a species that is in many respects different from cats. To get more insights into such mechanisms, here we studied the brain activation patterns associated with spontaneous muricide in rats. Subjects not exposed to mice, and those which did not show muricide were used as controls. We found that muricide increased the activation of the central and basolateral amygdala, and lateral hypothalamus as compared to both controls; in addition, a ventral shift in periaqueductal gray activation was observed. Interestingly, these are the brain regions from where predatory aggression can be elicited, or enhanced by electrical stimulation in cats. The analysis of more than 10 other brain regions showed that brain areas that inhibited (or were neutral to) cat predatory aggression were not affected by muricide. Brain activation patterns partly overlapped with those seen earlier in the cockroach hunting model of rat predatory aggression, and were highly similar with those observed in the glucocorticoid dysfunction model of escalated aggression. These findings show that the brain mechanisms underlying predation are evolutionarily conservative, and indirectly support our earlier assumption regarding the involvement of predation-related brain mechanisms in certain forms of escalated social aggression in rats.

  18. Abnormal associative encoding in orbitofrontal neurons in cocaine-experienced rats during decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Stalnaker, Thomas A.; Roesch, Matthew R.; Franz, Theresa M.; Burke, Kathryn A.; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence has linked exposure to addictive drugs to an inability to employ information about adverse consequences, or outcomes, to control behavior. For instance, addicts and drug-experienced animals fail to adapt their behavior to avoid adverse outcomes in gambling and reversal tasks or after changes in the value of expected rewards. These deficits are similar to those caused by damage to the orbitofrontal cortex, suggesting that addictive drugs may cause long-lasting changes in the representation of outcome associations in a circuit that includes the orbitofrontal cortex. Here we test this hypothesis by recording from orbitofrontal neurons in a discrimination task in rats previously exposed to cocaine (30 mg/kg i.p. for 14 days). We found that orbitofrontal neurons recorded in cocaine-experienced rats failed to signal the adverse outcome at the time a decision was made in the task. The loss of this signal was associated with abnormal changes in response latencies on aversive trials. Furthermore, upon reversal of the cue–outcome associations, orbitofrontal neurons in cocaine-treated rats with enduring reversal impairments failed to reverse their cue-selectivity, while orbitofrontal neurons in cocaine-treated rats with normal performance showed an increase in the plasticity of cue-selective firing after reversal. These results provide direct neurophysiological evidence that exposure to cocaine can cause behaviorally relevant changes in the processing of associative information in a circuit that includes the orbitofrontal cortex. PMID:17100852

  19. Abnormal DNA methylation in the lumbar spinal cord following chronic constriction injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lin, Zhi-Ping; Zheng, Hui-Zhe; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Zong-Luan; Chen, Yan; You, Yi-Sheng; Yang, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of neuropathic pain is complex and not clearly understood. Glutamate decarboxylase 67 (GAD 67) is a key synthetic enzyme for the main inhibitory transmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and diminishes in the spinal dorsal horn in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI). GAD 67 is coded by gene GAD 1. DNA methylation can regulate the expression of GAD 67 by regulating the methylation of GAD 1 promoter in the psychotic brain. DNA methylation is primarily mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and methyl-DNA binding domain proteins (MBDs). In this study, in order to discover whether DNA methylation regulates GAD 67 expression in the spinal cord in CCI rats and is involved in neuropathic pain, we examined mRNA levels of DNMTs, MBDs and GAD 67 with real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and methylation of GAD 1 promoter with Pyromark CpG Assays in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. Our results showed that DNMT3a, DNMT3b and methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) expression increased, MBD2 expression decreased, and DNMT1, MBD1 and MBD3 expression hardly changed in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. GAD 67 expression decreased, and methylation of GAD 1 promoter increased in the lumbar spinal cord in CCI rats on day 14 after surgery. These results indicate that decreased GAD 67 may be associated with increased GAD 1 promoter methylation, which may be mediated by DNMT3a, DNMT3b, MeCP2 and MBD2 in CCI rats. These indicate that abnormal DNA methylation may be highly involved in CCI-induced neuropathic pain.

  20. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J.; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on–1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on–3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased “voluntary activation.” In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT. PMID:27445844

  1. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles.

    PubMed

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on-1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on-3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased "voluntary activation." In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT.

  2. [Amino acid composition of the rat quadriceps femoris muscle after a flight on the Kosmos-936 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, T F; Miroshnikova, E B; Poliakov, V V; Murugova, T P

    1982-01-01

    The amino acid composition of the quadriceps muscle of rats flown onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-936 and exposed to the ground-based synchronous control experiment was studied. The weightless rats showed changes in the amino acid concentration in the quadriceps muscle. The centrifuged flight and synchronous rats displayed an accumulation of free amino acids in the above muscle.

  3. Muscle glucose uptake in the rat after suspension with single hindlimb weight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Fregosi, Ralph F.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    An examination is conducted of the effect of nonweight-bearing conditions, and the systemic influences of simulated microgravity on rat hindlimb muscles. The results obtained suggest that the increases in hindlimb muscle glucose uptake and extracellular space associated with simulated microgravity persist with hindlimb weightbearing, despite the prevention of muscle atrophy. The mechanism (or mechanisms) responsible for these effects are currently unknown.

  4. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-12-01

    Botulinum toxin is used with the intention of diminishing spasticity and reducing the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in muscle stiffness caused by reflex activity or elastic muscle properties following botulinum toxin injection in the triceps surae muscle in rats. Forty-four rats received injection of botulinum toxin in the left triceps surae muscle. Control measurements were performed on the noninjected contralateral side in all rats. Acute experiments were performed, 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk following injection. The triceps surae muscle was dissected free, and the Achilles tendon was cut and attached to a muscle puller. The resistance of the muscle to stretches of different amplitudes and velocities was systematically investigated. Reflex-mediated torque was normalized to the maximal muscle force evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve. Botulinum toxin injection caused severe atrophy of the triceps surae muscle at all time points. The force generated by stretch reflex activity was also strongly diminished but not to the same extent as the maximal muscle force at 2 and 4 wk, signifying a relative reflex hyperexcitability. Passive muscle stiffness was unaltered at 1 wk but increased at 2, 4, and 8 wk (P < 0.01). These data demonstrate that botulinum toxin causes a relative increase in reflex stiffness, which is likely caused by compensatory neuroplastic changes. The stiffness of elastic elements in the muscles also increased. The data are not consistent with the ideas that botulinum toxin is an efficient antispastic medication or that it may prevent development of contractures.

  5. The influence of rat suspension-hypokinesia on the gastrocnemius muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Manton, J.; Leconey, T.; Hagler, H.; Glasberg, M.

    1984-01-01

    Hind-limb hypokinesia was induced in rats by the Morey method to characterize the response of the gastrocnemius muscle. A comparison of rats suspended for 2 weeks with weight, sex, and litter-matched control rats indicate no difference in gastrocnemius wet weight, contraction, or one-half relaxation times, but less contractile function as indicated by lowered dP/dt. Myosin ATPase staining identified uniform Type I (slow-twitch) and II (fast-twitch) atrophy in the muscles from 4 of 10 rats suspended for 2 weeks and 1 of 12 rats suspended for 4 weeks; muscles from three other rats of the 4-week group displayed greater Type I atrophy. Other histochemical changes were characteristic of a neuropathy. These data together with recently acquired soleus data (29) indicate the Morey model, like space flight, evokes greater changes in the Type I or slow twitch fibers of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles.

  6. Alterations in Skeletal Muscle Microcirculation of Head-Down Tilted Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Stepke, Bernhard; Fleming, John T.; Joshua, Irving G.

    1992-01-01

    In this study we assessed the function of microscopic blood vessels in skeletal muscle (cremaster muscle) for alterations which may contribute to the observed elevation of blood pressure associated with head-down tilted whole body suspension (HDT/WBS), a model of weightlessness. Arteriolar baseline diameters, vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine (NE) and vasodilation to nitroprusside (NP) were assessed in control rats, rats suspended for 7 or 14 day HDT/WBS rats, and rats allowed to recover for 1 day after 7 days HDT/WBS. Neither baseline diameters nor ability to dilate were influenced by HDT/WBS. Maximum vasoconstriction to norepinephrine was significantly greater in arterioles of hypertensive 14 day HDT/WBS rats. This first study of the intact microvasculature in skeletal muscle indicates that an elevated contractility of arterioles to norepinephrine in suspended rats, and suggests an elevated peripheral resistance in striated muscle may contribute to the increase in blood pressures among animals subjected to HDT/WBS.

  7. The influence of rat suspension-hypokinesia on the gastrocnemius muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templeton, G. H.; Padalino, M.; Manton, J.; Leconey, T.; Hagler, H.; Glasberg, M.

    1984-01-01

    Hind-limb hypokinesia was induced in rats by the Morey method to characterize the response of the gastrocnemius muscle. A comparison of rats suspended for 2 weeks with weight, sex, and litter-matched control rats indicate no difference in gastrocnemius wet weight, contraction, or one-half relaxation times, but less contractile function as indicated by lowered dP/dt. Myosin ATPase staining identified uniform Type I (slow-twitch) and II (fast-twitch) atrophy in the muscles from 4 of 10 rats suspended for 2 weeks and 1 of 12 rats suspended for 4 weeks; muscles from three other rats of the 4-week group displayed greater Type I atrophy. Other histochemical changes were characteristic of a neuropathy. These data together with recently acquired soleus data (29) indicate the Morey model, like space flight, evokes greater changes in the Type I or slow twitch fibers of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles.

  8. Expression of nestin, desmin and vimentin in intact and regenerating muscle spindles of rat hind limb skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Cízková, Dana; Soukup, Tomás; Mokrý, Jaroslav

    2009-02-01

    We describe the expression and distribution patterns of nestin, desmin and vimentin in intact and regenerating muscle spindles of the rat hind limb skeletal muscles. Regeneration was induced by intramuscular isotransplantation of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) or soleus muscles from 15-day-old rats into the EDL muscle of adult female inbred Lewis rats. The host muscles with grafts were excised after 7-, 16-, 21- and 29-day survival and immunohistochemically stained. Nestin expression in intact spindles in host muscles was restricted to Schwann cells of sensory and motor nerves. In transplanted muscles, however, nestin expression was also found in regenerating "spindle fibers", 7 and 16 days after grafting. From the 21st day onwards, the regenerated spindle fibers were devoid of nestin immunoreactivity. Desmin was detected in spindle fibers at all developmental stages in regenerating as well as in intact spindles. Vimentin was expressed in cells of the outer and inner capsules of all muscle spindles and in newly formed myoblasts and myotubes of regenerating spindles 7 days after grafting. Our results show that the expression pattern of these intermediate filaments in regenerating spindle fibers corresponds to that found in regenerating extrafusal fibers, which supports our earlier suggestion that they resemble small-diameter extrafusal fibers.

  9. Functional Effects of Hyperthyroidism on Cardiac Papillary Muscle in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Fabricio Furtado; Olivoto, Robson Ruiz; da Silva, Priscyla Oliveira; Francisco, Julio Cesar; Fogaça, Rosalvo Tadeu Hochmuller

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism is currently recognized to affect the cardiovascular system, leading to a series of molecular and functional changes. However, little is known about the functional influence of hyperthyroidism in the regulation of cytoplasmic calcium and on the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) in the cardiac muscle. Objectives To evaluate the functional changes in papillary muscles isolated from animals with induced hyperthyroidism. Methods We divided 36 Wistar rats into a group of controls and another of animals with hyperthyroidism induced by intraperitoneal T3 injection. We measured in the animals' papillary muscles the maximum contraction force, speed of contraction (+df/dt) and relaxation (-df/dt), contraction and relaxation time, contraction force at different concentrations of extracellular sodium, post-rest potentiation (PRP), and contraction force induced by caffeine. Results In hyperthyroid animals, we observed decreased PRP at all rest times (p < 0.05), increased +df/dt and -df/dt (p < 0.001), low positive inotropic response to decreased concentration of extracellular sodium (p < 0.001), reduction of the maximum force in caffeine-induced contraction (p < 0.003), and decreased total contraction time (p < 0.001). The maximal contraction force did not differ significantly between groups (p = 0.973). Conclusion We hypothesize that the changes observed are likely due to a decrease in calcium content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, caused by calcium leakage, decreased expression of NCX, and increased expression of a-MHC and SERCA2.

  10. Entry of decamethonium in rat muscle studied by autoradiography

    PubMed Central

    Creese, R.; Maclagan, Jennifer

    1970-01-01

    1. When a steady plasma level of decamethonium was maintained by infusion in rats, the labelled compound became concentrated in the region of the end-plate of skeletal muscle, as shown by scintillation counting. 2. The distribution of tritium-labelled decamethonium in single muscle fibres was studied by autoradiography of frozen sections, with resolution less than 1 μ. 3. After intravenous injection of a dose of decamethonium which produced partial paralysis it was shown that the labelled compound had entered muscle fibres in the region of the end-plate, and for several hundred microns on either side of the end-plate. 4. Entry of decamethonium could be demonstrated as early as 30 sec after intra-arterial injection. There was no evidence of any redistribution of labelled drug for a period of 2 hr after the initial entry. 5. Previous administration of tubocurarine markedly reduced the entry of labelled decamethonium. ImagesabPlate 5Plate 6Plate 7Plate 1Plate 2Plate 3 PMID:5509874

  11. Functional Effects of Hyperthyroidism on Cardiac Papillary Muscle in Rats.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Fabricio Furtado; Olivoto, Robson Ruiz; Silva, Priscyla Oliveira da; Francisco, Julio Cesar; Fogaça, Rosalvo Tadeu Hochmuller

    2016-12-01

    Hyperthyroidism is currently recognized to affect the cardiovascular system, leading to a series of molecular and functional changes. However, little is known about the functional influence of hyperthyroidism in the regulation of cytoplasmic calcium and on the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) in the cardiac muscle. To evaluate the functional changes in papillary muscles isolated from animals with induced hyperthyroidism. We divided 36 Wistar rats into a group of controls and another of animals with hyperthyroidism induced by intraperitoneal T3 injection. We measured in the animals' papillary muscles the maximum contraction force, speed of contraction (+df/dt) and relaxation (-df/dt), contraction and relaxation time, contraction force at different concentrations of extracellular sodium, post-rest potentiation (PRP), and contraction force induced by caffeine. In hyperthyroid animals, we observed decreased PRP at all rest times (p < 0.05), increased +df/dt and -df/dt (p < 0.001), low positive inotropic response to decreased concentration of extracellular sodium (p < 0.001), reduction of the maximum force in caffeine-induced contraction (p < 0.003), and decreased total contraction time (p < 0.001). The maximal contraction force did not differ significantly between groups (p = 0.973). We hypothesize that the changes observed are likely due to a decrease in calcium content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, caused by calcium leakage, decreased expression of NCX, and increased expression of a-MHC and SERCA2.

  12. Enhanced noradrenergic transmission in the spontaneously hypertensive rat anococcygeus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Giraldo, Jesús; McGrath, John C; Vila, Elisabet

    2003-01-01

    There is a long-known hyper-responsiveness of vascular adrenergic transmission in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) that is uncovered specifically in the presence of cocaine and attributed to blockade of the neuronal monoamine transporter. We have now used the rat anococcygeus muscle to investigate whether this phenomenon is generic to sympathetic transmission to smooth muscle rather than a purely vascular phenomenon. We sought the origin of the effect by successively blocking the buffering effects of the neuronal monoamine transporter, prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors and NO from nitrergic nerves with desipramine (0.1 μM), rauwolscine (0.01 μM) and L-NG-nitro-arginine (100 μM). In the presence of desipramine, contractile responses to electrical field stimulation but not to noradrenaline (1 nM–100 μM) were greater in SHR than in Wistar–Kyoto (WKY). Neither inhibition of prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors nor the blockade of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) accounted for the differential enhancement of response in SHR. The enhanced effectiveness of motor neurotransmission in SHR becomes most apparent when all known major buffering mechanisms are removed. When nitrergic responses were isolated pharmacologically (phentolamine 1 μM and guanethidine 30 μM; tone raised with carbachol 50 μM), they were not different between SHR and WKY. Western blots showed that both nNOS and tyrosine hydroxylase are expressed to a similar extent in anococcygeus muscle from SHR and WKY, suggesting similar adrenergic and nitrergic innervations in the two strains. This suggests that enhanced motor transmission is due to increased transmitter release per varicosity rather than there being normal transmission from a greater number of sites. We conclude that there is a generic enhancement of sympathetic transmission in SHR rather than this being a vascular phenomenon. PMID:14504140

  13. Pioglitazone treatment restores in vivo muscle oxidative capacity in a rat model of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wessels, B; Ciapaite, J; van den Broek, N M A; Houten, S M; Nicolay, K; Prompers, J J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of pioglitazone treatment on in vivo and ex vivo muscle mitochondrial function in a rat model of diabetes. Both the lean, healthy rats and the obese, diabetic rats are Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats. The homozygous fa/fa ZDF rats are obese and diabetic. The heterozygous fa/+ ZDF rats are lean and healthy. Diabetic Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats were treated with either pioglitazone (30 mg/kg/day) or water as a control (n = 6 per group), for 2 weeks. In vivo ¹H and ³¹P magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed on skeletal muscle to assess intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content and muscle oxidative capacity, respectively. Ex vivo muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity was evaluated using high-resolution respirometry. In addition, several markers of mitochondrial content were determined. IMCL content was 14-fold higher and in vivo muscle oxidative capacity was 26% lower in diabetic rats compared with lean rats, which was, however, not caused by impairments of ex vivo mitochondrial respiratory capacity or a lower mitochondrial content. Pioglitazone treatment restored in vivo muscle oxidative capacity in diabetic rats to the level of lean controls. This amelioration was not accompanied by an increase in mitochondrial content or ex vivo mitochondrial respiratory capacity, but rather was paralleled by an improvement in lipid homeostasis, that is lowering of plasma triglycerides and muscle lipid and long-chain acylcarnitine content. Diminished in vivo muscle oxidative capacity in diabetic rats results from mitochondrial lipid overload and can be alleviated by redirecting the lipids from the muscle into adipose tissue using pioglitazone treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Abnormal Sonic hedgehog signaling in the lung of rats with esophageal atresia induced by adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Ana Catarina; Martinez, Leopoldo; Estevão-Costa, José; Tovar, Juan A

    2014-10-01

    Abnormal lung development was recently described in the rat model of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA-TEF). Since in this condition the ventral-to-dorsal switch of Shh expression in the foregut is disturbed, the present study tested the hypothesis that this abnormal expression at the emergence of the tracheobronchial bud might be translated into the developing lung. Pregnant rats received either 1.75 mg/kg i.p. adriamycin or vehicle from E7 to E9. Three groups were studied: control and adriamycin-exposed with and without EA-TEF. Embryos were recovered and the lungs were harvested and processed for reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence analysis of the Shh signaling cascade. Shh signaling was downregulated at the late embryonic stage of lung development (E13) in embryos with EA-TEF. Throughout the subsequent stages of development, the expression of both Shh and its downstream components increased significantly and remained upregulated throughout gestation. Immunofluorescent localization was consistent with these findings. Defective Shh signaling environment in the foregut is present beyond the emergence of lung buds and probably impairs lung development. Later in gestation, lungs exhibited a remarkable ability to upregulate the Shh cascade, suggesting a compensatory response. These findings may be relevant to understand pulmonary disease suffered by children with EA-TEF.

  15. The anatomy of the cremaster muscle during inguinoscrotal testicular descent in the rat.

    PubMed

    Harnaen, Efrant J; Na, Angelika F; Shenker, Natalie S; Sourial, Magdy; Farmer, Pamela J; Southwell, Bridget R; Hutson, John M

    2007-12-01

    Extrapolation of rat testicular descent studies to humans has been criticized because of anatomical differences of the cremaster muscle. Human cremaster is described as a thin strip rather than a large, complete sac as in rats, which is proposed to be more important in propelling the testis during descent. This study investigated cremaster muscle anatomy and ontogeny in both normal and cryptorchid rat models. Gubernacula from 4 groups of neonatal rats were sectioned longitudinally and transversely: normal Sprague-Dawley, capsaicin pretreated, flutamide pretreated, and congenital cryptorchid rats. Gubernacula were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Masson trichrome, and desmin immunohistochemistry to study muscle development. Myoblasts are more numerous at the gubernacular tip, whereas the most differentiated muscle is proximal. Rat cremaster develops as an elongated strip rather than a complete sac derived from abdominal wall muscles. Flutamide and capsaicin pretreatment disrupts development. Rat cremaster muscle develops as a strip, bearing close resemblance to human cremaster muscle, permitting extrapolation of cremaster function to human testicular descent. The cremaster muscle appears to differentiate from the gubernacular tip during elongation to the scrotum, and requires intact sensory innervation and androgen.

  16. Mitochondrial Biogenesis Drives a Vicious Cycle of Metabolic Insufficiency and Mitochondrial DNA Deletion Mutation Accumulation in Aged Rat Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Allen; Johnson, Chad J.; Hynes, Kayla; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd M.

    2013-01-01

    Aged muscles possess dysfunctional fibers that contain intracellular expansions of somatically derived mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations. At high abundance, these mutations disrupt the expression of mitochondrially-encoded protein subunits of the electron transport chain resulting in aerobic respiration deficient muscle fiber segments. These fiber segments atrophy and break contributing to the loss of muscle mass and function that occurs with age. By combining micro-dissection of individual muscle fibers with microarray analysis, we observed the response induced within these abnormal muscle fibers and detected an increase in many genes affecting metabolism and metabolic regulation. The transcriptional profile and subsequent protein validation suggested that a non-compensatory program of mitochondrial biogenesis was initiated. We hypothesized that this non-adaptive program of mitochondrial biogenesis was driving mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation. We tested this hypothesis by treating aged rats with β-Guanidinopropionic acid, a compound that stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis. β-Guanidinopropionic acid treatment increased muscle mitochondrial genome copy number and resulted in a 3.7 fold increase in the abundance of electron transport chain negative muscle fiber segments. We conclude that in electron transport system abnormal muscle fiber segments, a vicious cycle of metabolic insufficiency and non-compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis drive mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation. PMID:23516592

  17. Mitochondrial biogenesis drives a vicious cycle of metabolic insufficiency and mitochondrial DNA deletion mutation accumulation in aged rat skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Allen; Johnson, Chad J; Hynes, Kayla; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd M

    2013-01-01

    Aged muscles possess dysfunctional fibers that contain intracellular expansions of somatically derived mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations. At high abundance, these mutations disrupt the expression of mitochondrially-encoded protein subunits of the electron transport chain resulting in aerobic respiration deficient muscle fiber segments. These fiber segments atrophy and break contributing to the loss of muscle mass and function that occurs with age. By combining micro-dissection of individual muscle fibers with microarray analysis, we observed the response induced within these abnormal muscle fibers and detected an increase in many genes affecting metabolism and metabolic regulation. The transcriptional profile and subsequent protein validation suggested that a non-compensatory program of mitochondrial biogenesis was initiated. We hypothesized that this non-adaptive program of mitochondrial biogenesis was driving mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation. We tested this hypothesis by treating aged rats with β-Guanidinopropionic acid, a compound that stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis. β-Guanidinopropionic acid treatment increased muscle mitochondrial genome copy number and resulted in a 3.7 fold increase in the abundance of electron transport chain negative muscle fiber segments. We conclude that in electron transport system abnormal muscle fiber segments, a vicious cycle of metabolic insufficiency and non-compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis drive mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation.

  18. Low-level laser irradiation promotes the recovery of atrophied gastrocnemius skeletal muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Jiro; Kataoka, Hideki; Sakamoto, Jyunya; Origuchi, Tomoki; Okita, Minoru; Yoshimura, Toshiro

    2009-09-01

    Low-level laser (LLL) irradiation promotes proliferation of muscle satellite cells, angiogenesis and expression of growth factors. Satellite cells, angiogenesis and growth factors play important roles in the regeneration of muscle. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of LLL irradiation on rat gastrocnemius muscle recovering from disuse muscle atrophy. Eight-week-old rats were subjected to hindlimb suspension for 2 weeks, after which they were released and recovered. During the recovery period, rats underwent daily LLL irradiation (Ga-Al-As laser; 830 nm; 60 mW; total, 180 s) to the right gastrocnemius muscle through the skin. The untreated left gastrocnemius muscle served as the control. In conjunction with LLL irradiation, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected subcutaneously to label the nuclei of proliferating cells. After 2 weeks, myofibre diameters of irradiated muscle increased in comparison with those of untreated muscle, but did not recover back to normal levels. Additionally, in the superficial region of the irradiated muscle, the number of capillaries and fibroblast growth factor levels exhibited significant elevation relative to those of untreated muscle. In the deep region of irradiated muscle, BrdU-positive nuclei of satellite cells and/or myofibres increased significantly relative to those of the untreated muscle. The results of this study suggest that LLL irradiation can promote recovery from disuse muscle atrophy in association with proliferation of satellite cells and angiogenesis.

  19. Opportunities to Target Specific Contractile Abnormalities with Smooth Muscle Protein Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ulke-Lemée, Annegret; MacDonald, Justin A.

    2010-01-01

    Smooth muscle is a major component of most hollow organ systems (e.g., airways, vasculature, bladder and gut/gastrointestine); therefore, the coordinated regulation of contraction is a key property of smooth muscle. When smooth muscle functions normally, it contributes to general health and wellness, but its dysfunction is associated with morbidity and mortality. Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) is central to calcium-independent, actomyosin-mediated contractile force generation in the vasculature, thereby playing a role in smooth muscle contraction, cell motility and adhesion. Recent evidence supports an important role for ROCK in the increased vasoconstriction and remodeling observed in various models of hypertension. This review will provide a commentary on the development of specific ROCK inhibitors and their clinical application. Fasudil will be discussed as an example of bench-to-bedside development of a clinical therapeutic that is used to treat conditions of vascular hypercontractility. Due to the wide spectrum of biological processes regulated by ROCK, many additional clinical indications might also benefit from ROCK inhibition. Apart from the importance of ROCK in smooth muscle contraction, a variety of other protein kinases are known to play similar roles in regulating contractile force. The zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) and integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are two well-described regulators of contraction. The relative contribution of each kinase to contraction depends on the muscle bed as well as hormonal and neuronal stimulation. Unfortunately, specific inhibitors for ZIPK and ILK are still in the development phase, but the success of fasudil suggests that inhibitors for these other kinases may also have valuable clinical applications. Notably, the directed inhibition of ZIPK with a pseudosubstrate molecule shows unexpected effects on the contractility of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. PMID:27713327

  20. Effect of one stretch a week applied to the immobilized soleus muscle on rat muscle fiber morphology.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A R S; Coutinho, E L; França, C N; Polonio, J; Salvini, T F

    2004-10-01

    We determined the effect of stretching applied once a week to the soleus muscle immobilized in the shortened position on muscle fiber morphology. Twenty-six male Wistar rats weighing 269 +/- 26 g were divided into three groups. Group I, the left soleus was immobilized in the shortened position for 3 weeks; group II, the soleus was immobilized in the shortened position and stretched once a week for 3 weeks; group III, the soleus was submitted only to stretching once a week for 3 weeks. The medial part of the soleus muscle was frozen for histology and muscle fiber area evaluation and the lateral part was used for the determination of number and length of serial sarcomeres. Soleus muscle submitted only to immobilization showed a reduction in weight (44 +/- 6%, P = 0.002), in serial sarcomere number (23 +/- 15%) and in cross-sectional area of the fibers (37 +/- 31%, P < 0.001) compared to the contralateral muscles. The muscle that was immobilized and stretched showed less muscle fiber atrophy than the muscles only immobilized (P < 0.05). Surprisingly, in the muscles submitted only to stretching, fiber area was decreased compared to the contralateral muscle (2548 +/- 659 vs 2961 +/- 806 microm(2), respectively, P < 0.05). In conclusion, stretching applied once a week for 40 min to the soleus muscle immobilized in the shortened position was not sufficient to prevent the reduction of muscle weight and of serial sarcomere number, but provided significant protection against muscle fiber atrophy. In contrast, stretching normal muscles once a week caused a reduction in muscle fiber area.

  1. Potassium, Na+,K+-pumps and fatigue in rat muscle.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Torben; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2007-10-01

    During contractile activity, skeletal muscles undergo a net loss of cytoplasmic K(+) to the interstitial space. During intense exercise, plasma K(+) in human arterial blood may reach 8 mm, and interstitial K(+) 10-12 mm. This leads to depolarization, loss of excitability and contractile force. However, little is known about the effects of these physiological increases in extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)) on contractile endurance. Soleus muscles from 4-week-old rats were mounted on transducers for isometric contractions in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing 4-10 mm K(+), and endurance assessed by recording the rate of force decline during continuous stimulation at 60 Hz. Increasing [K(+)](o) from 4 to 8 or 10 mm and equilibrating the muscles for 40 or 20 min augmented the rate of force decline 2.4-fold and 7.2-fold, respectively (P < 0.001). The marked loss of endurance elicited by exposure to 8 or 10 mm K(+) was alleviated or significantly reduced by stimulating the Na(+),K(+)-pumps by intracellular Na(+) loading, the beta(2)-agonist salbutamol, adrenaline, calcitonin gene related peptide, insulin or repeated excitation. In conclusion, excitation-induced increase in [K(+)](o) is an important cause of high-frequency fatigue, and the Na(+),K(+)-pumps are essential for the maintenance of contractile force in the physiological range of [K(+)](o). Recordings of contractile force during continuous stimulation at 8-10 mm K(+) may be used to analyse the effects of agents or conditions influencing the excitability of working isolated muscles.

  2. Neuroprotective role of GABAB receptor modulation against streptozotocin-induced behavioral and biochemical abnormalities in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kushal; Kaur, Harmanpreet; Deshmukh, Rahul

    2017-08-15

    Stimulation as well as inhibition of GABAB (Gamma amino butyric acid) receptors has been reported to show beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental evidences suggest that the use of GABAergic agents could influence learning and memory. The present study was designed to investigate the possible role of GABAB receptors in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced behavioral and biochemical abnormalities in rats. Herein STZ was infused (3mg/kg) bilaterally on alternate days (day 1 and day 3) to produce experimental dementia in rats. STZ-infused rats were then treated with baclofen (GABABR agonist) 5 and 10mg/kg i.p. and CGP35348 (GABABR antagonist) 25 and 50mg/kg i.p. one week following STZ infusion for 15days. Cognitive functions were assessed by using Morris water maze (MWM) and object recognition task (ORT). Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA.), reduced glutathione (GSH), andacetylcholinesterase (AChE) were determined to evaluate oxidative stress and cholinergic function. STZ-infused rats showed decreased memory retention, elevated levels of MDA, increased AChE activity, reduced GSH levels. The combination of STZ with increasing doses of Baclofen further induced a higher decrease in memory retention and increase in oxidative stress. CGP35348 restored cognitive functions and AChE activity in STZ-infused rats. The cognitive enhancement following CGP35348 may be due to its ability to restore cholinergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic function, and its antioxidant activity. Therefore, it would be safe to conclude that the pharmacological blockade of GABAB receptors would be therapeutic in the management of cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Glucose uptake and transport in contracting, perfused rat muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Hespel, P; Richter, E A

    1990-01-01

    1. Glucose uptake and transport, muscle glycogen, free glucose and glucose-6-phosphate concentrations were studied in perfused resting and contracting rat skeletal muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations. Rats were pre-conditioned by a combination of swimming exercise and diet, resulting in either low (glycogen-depleted rats), normal (control rats) or high (supercompensated rats) muscle glycogen concentrations at the time their hindlimbs were perfused. 2. Compared with control rats, pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration was approximately 40% lower in glycogen-depleted rats, whereas it was 40% higher in supercompensated rats. Muscle glycogen break-down correlated positively (r = 0.76; P less than 0.001) with pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration. 3. Glucose uptake during contractions was approximately 50% higher in glycogen-depleted hindquarters than in control hindquarters; in supercompensated hindquarters it was 30% lower. When rats with similar muscle glycogen concentrations were compared, glucose uptake in hindquarters from rats that had exercised on the preceding day was approximately 20% higher than in hindquarters from rats that had not exercised on the preceding day. 4. Muscle membrane glucose transport, as measured by the rate of accumulation of 14C-3-O-methylglucose in the contracting muscles, was 25% lower in supercompensated than in glycogen-depleted muscles at the onset as well as at the end of the 15 min contraction period. 5. Intracellular concentrations of free glucose and glucose-6-phosphate were higher at rest and during the entire 15-min stimulation period in supercompensated muscles than in glycogen-depleted muscles, and glucose uptake during contractions correlated negatively with free glucose (r = -0.52; P less than 0.01) as well as with glucose-6-phosphate (r = -0.49; P less than 0.01) concentrations. 6. It is concluded that: (a) The rate of glucose uptake in contracting skeletal muscle is dependent on the

  4. Tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, abnormal myocardial architecture and anomalies of the aortic arch system induced by bis-diamine in rat fetuses.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, T; Roberts, W C

    1993-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relation between anomalies of the heart and aortic arch arteries in near-term rat fetuses exposed to the chemical bis-diamine. Bis-diamine is known to induce cardiovascular anomalies. Bis-diamine was given orally to normal pregnant rats, and the 65 fetuses were examined under a dissecting microscope after formalin fixation. There were 26 rat fetuses (40%) with a ventricular septal defect in the perimembranous portion, of which 14 (22%) had tetralogy of Fallot, 4 (6%) had truncus arteriosus and 8 (12%) had a relatively small defect with no other major anomalies. In 44 fetuses (68%) the middle latitudinal muscle bundle of the ventricular septum was continuous with the right ventricular free wall. There were, isolated or in association, a double- or right aortic arch in 6 fetuses (9%), aberrant subclavian arteries in 9 (14%), right ductus arteriosus in 12 (18%) and agenetic ductus in 4 (6%). The cross-sectional area of the ductus, as corrected by that of the aortic isthmus, was abnormally small in 47 rats (72%). The rat fetuses with a septal defect or abnormal myocardial architecture, or both, usually had a small ductus; it was very small or absent in those fetuses with tetralogy of Fallot. Of the four fetuses with truncus arteriosus, two had a vestigial vasculature on the truncus root and three had a rudimentary infundibulum. The cardinal defect may be the anomalous and reduced development of the sixth arch arteries, which by imposing pressure overload on the fetal right ventricle, may have led to either or both the persistence of ventricular septal defect as a vent or the formation of myocardial architecture favorable for the generation of pressure in the right ventricle.

  5. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate inflammation in rat muscle and enhance muscle repair after eccentric contraction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Miura, Kyoko; Nakano, Sayako; Suzuki, Katsuya; Bannai, Makoto; Inoue, Yoshiko

    2016-09-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle damage that may lead to muscle dysfunction. Although inflammation is essential to recover from muscle damage, excessive inflammation may also induce secondary damage, and should thus be suppressed. In this study, we investigated the effect of leucine-enriched essential amino acids on muscle inflammation and recovery after eccentric contraction. These amino acids are known to stimulate muscle protein synthesis via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which, is also considered to alleviate inflammation. Five sets of 10 eccentric contractions were induced by electrical stimulation in the tibialis anterior muscle of male SpragueDawley rats (8-9 weeks old) under anesthesia. Animals received a 1 g/kg dose of a mixture containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids or distilled water once a day throughout the experiment. Muscle dysfunction was assessed based on isometric dorsiflexion torque, while inflammation was evaluated by histochemistry. Gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and myogenic regulatory factors was also measured. We found that leucine-enriched essential amino acids restored full muscle function within 14 days, at which point rats treated with distilled water had not fully recovered. Indeed, muscle function was stronger 3 days after eccentric contraction in rats treated with amino acids than in those treated with distilled water. The amino acid mix also alleviated expression of interleukin-6 and impeded infiltration of inflammatory cells into muscle, but did not suppress expression of myogenic regulatory factors. These results suggest that leucine-enriched amino acids accelerate recovery from muscle damage by preventing excessive inflammation.

  6. Effects of Resveratrol on the Recovery of Muscle Mass Following Disuse in the Plantaris Muscle of Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian T.; Mohamed, Junaith S.; Alway, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    Aging is associated with poor skeletal muscle regenerative ability following extended periods of hospitalization and other forms of muscular disuse. Resveratrol (3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene) is a natural phytoalexin which has been shown in skeletal muscle to improve oxidative stress levels in muscles of aged rats. As muscle disuse and reloading after disuse increases oxidative stress, we hypothesized that resveratrol supplementation would improve muscle regeneration after disuse. A total of thirty-six male Fisher 344 × Brown Norway rats (32 mo.) were treated with either a water vehicle or resveratrol via oral gavage. The animals received hindlimb suspension for 14 days. Thereafter, they were either sacrificed or allowed an additional 14 day period of cage ambulation during reloading. A total of six rats from the vehicle and the resveratrol treated groups were used for the hindlimb suspension and recovery protocols. Furthermore, two groups of 6 vehicle treated animals maintained normal ambulation throughout the experiment, and were used as control animals for the hindlimb suspension and reloading groups. The data show that resveratrol supplementation was unable to attenuate the decreases in plantaris muscle wet weight during hindlimb suspension but it improved muscle mass during reloading after hindlimb suspension. Although resveratrol did not prevent fiber atrophy during the period of disuse, it increased the fiber cross sectional area of type IIA and IIB fibers in response to reloading after hindlimb suspension. There was a modest enhancement of myogenic precursor cell proliferation in resveratrol-treated muscles after reloading, but this failed to reach statistical significance. The resveratrol-associated improvement in type II fiber size and muscle mass recovery after disuse may have been due to decreases in the abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax, cleaved caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 9 in reloaded muscles. Resveratrol appears to have modest therapeutic

  7. Enhancement of oscillatory activity in the endopiriform nucleus of rats raised under abnormal oral conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Hasumoto-Honjo, Miho; Sugai, Tokio; Segami, Natsuki; Kato, Nobuo

    2014-02-21

    Endopiriform nucleus (EPN) is located deep to the piriform cortex, and has neural connections with not only neighboring sensory areas but also subcortical areas where emotional and nociceptive information is processed. Well-balanced oral condition might play an important role in stability of brain activities. When the oral condition is impaired, several areas in the brain might be affected. In the present study, we investigated whether abnormal conditions of oral region influence neural activities in the EPN. Orthodontic appliance that generates continuous force and chronic pain-related stress was fixed to maxillary incisors of rats, and raised. Field potential recordings were made from the EPN of brain slices. We previously reported that the EPN has an ability to generate membrane potential oscillation. In the present study, we have applied the same methods to assess activities of neuron clusters in the EPN. In the case of normal rats, stable field potential oscillations were induced in the EPN by application of low-frequency electrical stimulation under the medium with caffeine. In the case of rats with the orthodontic appliance, stable field potential oscillations were also induced, but both duration of oscillatory activities and wavelet number were increased. The enhanced oscillations were depressed by blockade of NMDA receptors. Thus, impairment of oral health under application of continuous orthodontic force and chronic pain-related stress enhanced neural activities in the EPN, in which up-regulation of NMDA receptors may be concerned. These findings suggest that the EPN might be involved in information processing with regard to abnormal conditions of oral region.

  8. Lateral transmission of force is impaired in skeletal muscles of dystrophic mice and very old rats.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Krishnan S; Palmer, Mark L; van der Meulen, Jack H; Renoux, Abigail; Kostrominova, Tatiana Y; Michele, Daniel E; Faulkner, John A

    2011-03-01

    The dystrophin–glycoprotein complex (DGC) provides an essential link from the muscle fibre cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. In dystrophic humans and mdx mice, mutations in the dystrophin gene disrupt the structure of the DGC causing severe damage to muscle fibres. In frog muscles, transmission of force laterally from an activated fibre to the muscle surface occurs without attenuation, but lateral transmission of force has not been demonstrated in mammalian muscles. A unique ‘yoke' apparatus was developed that attached to the epimysium of muscles midway between the tendons and enabled the measurement of lateral force. We now report that in muscles of young wild-type (WT) mice and rats, compared over a wide range of longitudinal forces, forces transmitted laterally showed little or no decrement. In contrast, for muscles of mdx mice and very old rats, forces transmitted laterally were impaired severely. Muscles of both mdx mice and very old rats showed major reductions in the expression of dystrophin. We conclude that during contractions, forces developed by skeletal muscles of young WT mice and rats are transmitted laterally from fibre to fibre through the DGC without decrement. In contrast, in muscles of dystrophic or very old animals, disruptions in DGC structure and function impair lateral transmission of force causing instability and increased susceptibility of fibres to contraction-induced injury.

  9. Lateral transmission of force is impaired in skeletal muscles of dystrophic mice and very old rats

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Krishnan S; Palmer, Mark L; van der Meulen, Jack H; Renoux, Abigail; Kostrominova, Tatiana Y; Michele, Daniel E; Faulkner, John A

    2011-01-01

    The dystrophin–glycoprotein complex (DGC) provides an essential link from the muscle fibre cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. In dystrophic humans and mdx mice, mutations in the dystrophin gene disrupt the structure of the DGC causing severe damage to muscle fibres. In frog muscles, transmission of force laterally from an activated fibre to the muscle surface occurs without attenuation, but lateral transmission of force has not been demonstrated in mammalian muscles. A unique ‘yoke’ apparatus was developed that attached to the epimysium of muscles midway between the tendons and enabled the measurement of lateral force. We now report that in muscles of young wild-type (WT) mice and rats, compared over a wide range of longitudinal forces, forces transmitted laterally showed little or no decrement. In contrast, for muscles of mdx mice and very old rats, forces transmitted laterally were impaired severely. Muscles of both mdx mice and very old rats showed major reductions in the expression of dystrophin. We conclude that during contractions, forces developed by skeletal muscles of young WT mice and rats are transmitted laterally from fibre to fibre through the DGC without decrement. In contrast, in muscles of dystrophic or very old animals, disruptions in DGC structure and function impair lateral transmission of force causing instability and increased susceptibility of fibres to contraction-induced injury. PMID:21224224

  10. The Fine Structure of Muscle Spindles in the Lumbrical Muscles of the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Merrillees, Neil C. R.

    1960-01-01

    Lumbrical muscles of young rats were fixed with OsO4 and embedded in methacrylate for electron microscopy. The spindle capsule was found to be continuous with and similar in structure to the sheath of Henle surrounding the nerves supplying the spindle. The capsule consists of several closely applied concentric cytoplasmic sheets. Each sheet is about 1,000 A thick and has no fenestrations. Many caveolae and vesicles in the cytoplasm suggest active transport through the sheets. The periaxial space fluid contains much solid material. It is suggested that the capsule and periaxial space regulate internal chemical environment. The interfibrillar structures are less evident in the polar regions of intrafusal fibres than in extrafusal fibres. Simple motor end-plates occur on the polar regions of intrafusal fibres. In the myotube region of the intrafusal fibre a peripheral zone of myofibrils surrounds a cytoplasmic core containing nuclei, mitochondria, Golgi bodies, reticulum, and a few lipid-like granules. Naked sensory endings lie on the myotube "in parallel" with the underlying myofilaments. Naked processes of the primary sensory ending deeply indent the muscle plasma membrane and the underlying wisps of myofilament in the nuclear bag region. The plasma membranes of sensory nerve ending and intrafusal muscle fibre are about 200 A apart. PMID:13856156

  11. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-01

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling. PMID:26725948

  12. Cryotherapy Reduces Inflammatory Response Without Altering Muscle Regeneration Process and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling of Rat Muscle.

    PubMed

    Vieira Ramos, Gracielle; Pinheiro, Clara Maria; Messa, Sabrina Peviani; Delfino, Gabriel Borges; Marqueti, Rita de Cássia; Salvini, Tania de Fátima; Durigan, Joao Luiz Quagliotti

    2016-01-04

    The application of cryotherapy is widely used in sports medicine today. Cooling could minimize secondary hypoxic injury through the reduction of cellular metabolism and injury area. Conflicting results have also suggested cryotherapy could delay and impair the regeneration process. There are no definitive findings about the effects of cryotherapy on the process of muscle regeneration. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a clinical-like cryotherapy on inflammation, regeneration and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling on the Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle of rats 3, 7 and 14 days post-injury. It was observed that the intermittent application of cryotherapy (three 30-minute sessions, every 2 h) in the first 48 h post-injury decreased inflammatory processes (mRNA levels of TNF-α, NF-κB, TGF-β and MMP-9 and macrophage percentage). Cryotherapy did not alter regeneration markers such as injury area, desmin and Myod expression. Despite regulating Collagen I and III and their growth factors, cryotherapy did not alter collagen deposition. In summary, clinical-like cryotherapy reduces the inflammatory process through the decrease of macrophage infiltration and the accumulation of the inflammatory key markers without influencing muscle injury area and ECM remodeling.

  13. Abnormal fetal muscle forces result in defects in spinal curvature and alterations in vertebral segmentation and shape.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Rebecca A; Bezer, James H; Kim, Tyler; Zaidon, Ahmed Z; Oyen, Michelle L; Iatridis, James C; Nowlan, Niamh C

    2017-01-12

    The incidence of congenital spine deformities, including congenital scoliosis, kyphosis, and lordosis, may be influenced by the in utero mechanical environment, and particularly by fetal movements at critical time-points. There is a limited understanding of the influence of fetal movements on spinal development, despite the fact that mechanical forces have been shown to play an essential role in skeletal development of the limb. This study investigates the effects of muscle forces on spinal curvature, vertebral segmentation, and vertebral shape by inducing rigid or flaccid paralysis in the embryonic chick. The critical time-points for the influence of fetal movements on spinal development were identified by varying the time of onset of paralysis. Prolonged rigid paralysis induced severe defects in the spine, including curvature abnormalities, posterior and anterior vertebral fusions, and altered vertebral shape, while flaccid paralysis did not affect spinal curvature or vertebral segmentation. Early rigid paralysis resulted in more severe abnormalities in the spine than later rigid paralysis. The findings of this study support the hypothesis that the timing and nature of fetal muscle activity are critical influences on the normal development of the spine, with implications for the understanding of congenital spine deformities. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Multiple stimulations for muscle-nerve-blood vessel unit in compensatory hypertrophied skeletal muscle of rat surgical ablation model.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Okada, Yoshinori; Tono, Kayoko; Nitta, Masahiro; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2009-07-01

    Tissue inflammation and multiple cellular responses in the compensatory enlarged plantaris (OP Plt) muscle induced by surgical ablation of synergistic muscles (soleus and gastrocnemius) were followed over 10 weeks after surgery. Contralateral surgery was performed in adult Wistar male rats. Cellular responses in muscle fibers, blood vessels and nerve fibers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Severe muscle fiber damage and disappearance of capillaries associated with apparent tissue edema were observed in the peripheral portion of OP Plt muscles during the first week, whereas central portions were relatively preserved. Marked cell activation/proliferation was also mainly observed in peripheral portions. Similarly, activated myogenic cells were seen not only inside but also outside of muscle fibers. The former were likely satellite cells and the latter may be interstitial myogenic cells. One week after surgery, small muscle fibers, small arteries and capillaries and several branched-muscle fibers were evident in the periphery, thus indicating new muscle fiber and blood vessel formation. Proliferating cells were also detected in the nerve bundles in the Schwann cell position. These results indicate that the compensatory stimulated/enlarged muscle is a suitable model for analyzing multiple physiological cellular responses in muscle-nerve-blood vessel units under continuous stretch stimulation.

  15. Inhibitory pathways in the circular muscle of rat jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, Gwen; Robberecht, Patrick; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2004-01-01

    Conflicting data have been reported on the contribution of nitric oxide (NO) to inhibitory neurotransmission in rat jejunum. Therefore, the mechanism of relaxation and contribution to inhibitory neurotransmission of NO, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) was examined in the circular muscle of Wistar–Han rat jejunum. Mucosa-free circular muscle strips were precontracted with methacholine in the presence of guanethidine and exposed to electrical field stimulation (EFS) and exogenous NO, ATP, VIP and PACAP. All stimuli induced reduction of tone and inhibition of phasic motility. Only electrically induced responses were sensitive to tetrodotoxin (3 × 10−6 M). NO (10−6–10−4 M)-induced concentration-dependent relaxations that were inhibited by the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 10−5 M) and the small conductance Ca2+-activated K+-channel blocker apamin (APA; 3 × 10−8 M). Relaxations elicited by exogenous ATP (10−4–10−3 M) were inhibited by the P2Y purinoceptor antagonist reactive blue 2 (RB2; 3 × 10−4 M), but not by APA and ODQ. The inhibitory responses evoked by 10−7 M VIP and 3 × 10−8 M PACAP were decreased by the selective PAC1 receptor antagonist PACAP6–38 (3 × 10−6 M) and APA. The VPAC2 receptor antagonist PG99-465 (3 × 10−7 M) reduced relaxations caused by VIP, but not those by PACAP, while the VPAC1 receptor antagonist PG97-269 (3 × 10−7 M) had no influence. EFS-induced relaxations were inhibited by the NO-synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (3 × 10−4 M), ODQ and APA, but not by RB2, PG97-269, PG99-465 and PACAP6–38. These results suggest that NO is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the circular muscle of Wistar–Han rat jejunum acting through a rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels and activation of small conductance Ca2+-dependent K

  16. Sensory Protection of Rat Muscle Spindles following Peripheral Nerve Injury and Reinnervation

    PubMed Central

    Elsohemy, Amal; Butler, Richard; Bain, James R.; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle structure and function are dependent on intact Richard Butler, Ph.D. innervation. Prolonged muscle denervation results in irreversible muscle fiber James R. Bain, M.D. atrophy, connective tissue hyperplasia, and deterioration of muscle spindles, Margaret Fahnestock, Ph.D. specialized sensory receptors necessary for proper skeletal muscle function. The protective effect of temporary sensory innervation on denervated muscle, before motor nerve repair, has been shown in the rat. Sensory-protected muscles exhibit less fiber atrophy and connective tissue hyperplasia and maintain greater functional capacity than denervated muscles. The purpose of this study was to determine whether temporary sensory innervation also protects muscle spindles from degeneration. Methods Rat tibial nerve was transected and repaired with either the saphenous or the original transected nerve. Negative controls remained denervated. After 3 to 6 months, the electrophysiologic response of the nerve to stretch in the rat gastrocnemius muscle was measured (n = 3 per group). After the animals were euthanized, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed, sectioned, stained, and examined for spindle number (n = 3 per group) and morphology (one rat per group). Immunohistochemical assessment of muscle spindle innervation was examined in four additional animals. Results Significant deterioration of muscle spindles was seen in denervated muscle, whereas in muscle reinnervated with the tibial or the saphenous nerve, spindle number and morphology were improved. Histologic and functional evidence of spindle reinnervation by the sensory nerve was obtained. Conclusion These findings add to the known means by which motor or sensory nerves exert protective effects on denervated muscle, and further promote the use of sensory protection for improving the outcome after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:19952642

  17. Rat hippocampal alterations could underlie behavioral abnormalities induced by exposure to moderate noise levels.

    PubMed

    Uran, S L; Aon-Bertolino, M L; Caceres, L G; Capani, F; Guelman, L R

    2012-08-30

    Noise exposure is known to affect auditory structures in living organisms. However, it should not be ignored that many of the effects of noise are extra-auditory. Previous findings of our laboratory demonstrated that noise was able to induce behavioral alterations that are mainly related to the cerebellum (CE) and the hippocampus (HC). Therefore, the aim of this work was to reveal new data about the vulnerability of developing rat HC to moderate noise levels through the assessment of potential histological changes and hippocampal-related behavioral alterations. Male Wistar rats were exposed to noise (95-97 dB SPL, 2h daily) either for 1 day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or between postnatal days 15 and 30 (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal histological evaluation as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) habituation and recognition memory assessments were performed. Results showed a mild disruption in the different hippocampal regions after ANE and SANE schemes, along with significant behavioral abnormalities. These data suggest that exposure of developing rats to noise levels of moderate intensity is able to trigger changes in the HC, an extra-auditory structure of the Central Nervous System (CNS), that could underlie the observed behavioral effects.

  18. (-) Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) Prevents Lipid Changes and Collagen Abnormalities in Chronic Ethanol-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Kaviarasan, S; Viswanathan, P; Ravichandran, M K; Anuradha, C V

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of the study is to examine the influence of (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea component, on lipid and collagen abnormalities in chronic ethanol-fed rats. Solubility properties, aldehyde content, fluorescence, and peroxidation were analyzed in collagen samples isolated from liver. Chronic alcoholism (6 g/kg/day x 60 days) was associated with fatty liver and collagen accumulation. Significant alterations in the levels of lipids (cholesterol, phospholipids, free fatty acids, and triglycerides) and total collagen were observed in liver. Collagen obtained from ethanol-fed rats showed alterations in solubility properties, increased fluorescence, peroxidation, and aldehyde content. Coadministration of EGCG along with ethanol significantly reduced the levels of liver lipids and collagen, improved the solubility properties of collagen, and caused a reduction in cross-linking as evidenced by a decrease in fluorescence, peroxidation, and aldehyde content. Histology of liver sections of ethanol-fed rats showed accumulation of fat and collagen, which were largely prevented by EGCG administration. The possible mechanisms in the protective action of EGCG in alcoholic liver disease are suggested and discussed.

  19. Transcriptional abnormalities of hamstring muscle contractures in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lucas R; Chambers, Henry G; Subramaniam, Shankar; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a spectrum of movement disorders. Secondary to the neurological lesion, muscles from patients with CP are often spastic and form debilitating contractures that limit range of motion and joint function. With no genetic component, the pathology of skeletal muscle in CP is a response to aberrant complex neurological input in ways that are not fully understood. This study was designed to gain further understanding of the skeletal muscle response in CP using transcriptional profiling correlated with functional measures to broadly investigate muscle adaptations leading to mechanical deficits.Biopsies were obtained from both the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles from a cohort of patients with CP (n = 10) and typically developing patients (n = 10) undergoing surgery. Biopsies were obtained to define the unique expression profile of the contractures and passive mechanical testing was conducted to determine stiffness values in previously published work. Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 chips (n = 40) generated expression data, which was validated for selected transcripts using quantitative real-time PCR. Chips were clustered based on their expression and those from patients with CP clustered separately. Significant genes were determined conservatively based on the overlap of three summarization algorithms (n = 1,398). Significantly altered genes were analyzed for over-representation among gene ontologies and muscle specific networks.The majority of altered transcripts were related to increased extracellular matrix expression in CP and a decrease in metabolism and ubiquitin ligase activity. The increase in extracellular matrix products was correlated with mechanical measures demonstrating the importance in disability. These data lay a framework for further studies and development of novel therapies.

  20. Transcriptional Abnormalities of Hamstring Muscle Contractures in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lucas R.; Chambers, Henry G.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Lieber, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is an upper motor neuron disease that results in a spectrum of movement disorders. Secondary to the neurological lesion, muscles from patients with CP are often spastic and form debilitating contractures that limit range of motion and joint function. With no genetic component, the pathology of skeletal muscle in CP is a response to aberrant complex neurological input in ways that are not fully understood. This study was designed to gain further understanding of the skeletal muscle response in CP using transcriptional profiling correlated with functional measures to broadly investigate muscle adaptations leading to mechanical deficits. Biospsies were obtained from both the gracilis and semitendinosus muscles from a cohort of patients with CP (n = 10) and typically developing patients (n = 10) undergoing surgery. Biopsies were obtained to define the unique expression profile of the contractures and passive mechanical testing was conducted to determine stiffness values in previously published work. Affymetrix HG-U133A 2.0 chips (n = 40) generated expression data, which was validated for selected transcripts using quantitative real-time PCR. Chips were clustered based on their expression and those from patients with CP clustered separately. Significant genes were determined conservatively based on the overlap of three summarization algorithms (n = 1,398). Significantly altered genes were analyzed for over-representation among gene ontologies and muscle specific networks. The majority of altered transcripts were related to increased extracellular matrix expression in CP and a decrease in metabolism and ubiquitin ligase activity. The increase in extracellular matrix products was correlated with mechanical measures demonstrating the importance in disability. These data lay a framework for further studies and development of novel therapies. PMID:22956992

  1. The Relation of Respiratory Muscle Strength to Disease Severity and Abnormal Ventilation During Exercise in Chronic Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yusuke; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Satoshi; Osada, Naohiko; Omiya, Kazuto

    2015-11-01

    Breathlessness is a common problem in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients, and respiratory muscle strength has been proposed to play an important role in causing breathlessness in these patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between respiratory muscle strength and the severity of CHF, and the influence of respiratory muscle strength on abnormal ventilation during exercise in CHF patients. In this case series study, we assessed clinically stable CHF outpatients (N = 66, age: 57.7 ± 14.6 years). The peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2), the slope relating minute ventilation to carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2 slope), and the slope relating tidal volume to respiratory rate (TV/RR slope) were measured during cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Respiratory muscle strength was assessed by measuring the maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP). The MIP and MEP decreased significantly as the New York Heart Association functional class increased (MIP, P = 0.021; MEP, P < 0.01). The MIP correlated with the TV/RR slope (r = 0.57, P < 0.001) and the VE/VCO2 slope (r = -0.44, P < 0.001), and the MEP also correlated with the TV/RR slope (r = 0.53, P < 0.001) and the VE/VCO2 slope (r = -0.25, P < 0.040). Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that age and MIP were statistically significant predictors of the TV/RR and VE/VCO2 slopes (both P < 0.05). Respiratory muscle strength is related to the severity of CHF, and associated with rapid and shallow ventilation or excessive ventilation during exercise.

  2. The impact of abnormal muscle tone from hemiplegia on reclining wheelchair positioning: a sliding and pressure evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, H C; Lin, Y S; Chen, J M; Yeh, C H; Chung, K C

    2013-10-01

    Little is known about the influence of existing muscle tone abnormality on the sitting posture of stroke patients in reclining wheelchairs. To investigate the impact of muscle tone abnormality from hemiplegia on the forward sliding and pressure of stroke patients while sitting in reclining wheelchairs. Experimental study. The Assistive Devices/Technology Center at the Rehabilitation Department of hospital. 14 able-bodied elders and nonambulatory elderly stroke patients with flaccid (N.=12) or spastic hemiplegia (N.=13) participated in this study. Of the 12 patients with flaccid hemiplegia, 8 suffered from left-sided hemiplegia and 4 from right-sided hemiplegia. Of the 13 patients with spastic hemiplegia, 6 suffered from left-sided hemiplegia and 7 from right-sided hemiplegia. We performed 3 reclining cycles in wheelchairs with conventional seats and V-shaped seats for each participant. The sliding along the backrest (BS) plane and the seat (SS) plane, mean sitting pressure (MP), and sacral peak pressure (SPP) of the participants were recorded. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the difference in BS, SS, MP, and SPP between able-bodied elders and stroke patients. The BS, SS, and SPP during repetitive reclining were generally greatest in flaccid hemiplegic participants, followed by spastic hemiplegic participants, and finally by able-bodied participants. There was no significant difference in MP among three subject groups on both conventional seats and V-shaped seats in most comparisons. Able-bodied participants' buttocks tended to slide forward on conventional seats but backward on V-shaped seats, whereas hemiplegic participants' buttocks slid forward on both seat types. Stroke patients with flaccid hemiplegia are the most vulnerable to sacral sitting and higher sacral pressure in reclining wheelchairs, followed by patients with spastic hemiplegia. There is a difference in the displacement pattern between participants with normal muscle tone and those with

  3. Reduction-oxidation state and protein degradation in skeletal muscles of growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between the NAD redox state and protein degradation during growth was studied in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles of 4- to 14-week-old rats. As muscle size increased with age, protein breakdown slowed and the muscles became progressively more reduced as shown by higher ratios of lactate/pyruvate in incubated and fresh-frozen muscle. Correlations were strong between redox state of protein degradation, and muscle mass, and between redox state and protein degradation. This relationship may be important in the slowing of muscle breakdown that occurs with age.

  4. Reduction-oxidation state and protein degradation in skeletal muscles of growing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between the NAD redox state and protein degradation during growth was studied in isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles of 4- to 14-week-old rats. As muscle size increased with age, protein breakdown slowed and the muscles became progressively more reduced as shown by higher ratios of lactate/pyruvate in incubated and fresh-frozen muscle. Correlations were strong between redox state of protein degradation, and muscle mass, and between redox state and protein degradation. This relationship may be important in the slowing of muscle breakdown that occurs with age.

  5. Epimuscular myofascial force transmission occurs in the rat between the deep flexor muscles and their antagonistic muscles.

    PubMed

    Yucesoy, Can A; Baan, Guus; Huijing, Peter A

    2010-02-01

    The goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis that epimuscular myofascial force transmission occurs between deep flexor muscles of the rat and their antagonists: previously unstudied mechanical effects of length changes of deep flexors on the anterior crural muscles (i.e., extensor digitorum longus (EDL), as well as tibialis anterior and extensor hallucis longus muscle complex (TA+EHL) and peroneal (PER) muscles were assessed experimentally. These muscles or muscle groups were kept at constant length, whereas, distal length changes were imposed on deep flexor (DF) muscles before performing isometric contractions. Distal forces of all muscle-tendon complexes were measured simultaneously, in addition to EDL proximal force. Distal lengthening of DF caused substantial significant effects on its antagonistic muscles: (1) increase in proximal EDL total force (maximally 19.2%), (2) decrease in distal EDL total (maximally 8.4%) and passive (maximally 49%) forces, (3) variable proximo-distal total force differences indicating net proximally directed epimuscular myofascial loads acting on EDL at lower DF lengths and net distally directed loads at higher DF lengths, (4) decrease in TA+EHL total (maximally 50%) and passive (maximally 66.5%) forces and (5) decrease in PER total force (maximally 51.3%). It is concluded that substantial inter-antagonistic epimuscular myofascial force transmission occurs between deep flexor, anterior crural and peroneal muscles. In the light of our present results and recently reported evidence on inter-antagonistic interaction between anterior crural, peroneal and triceps surae muscles, we concluded that epimuscular myofascial force transmission is capable of causing major effects within the entire lower leg of the rat. Implications of such large scale myofascial force transmission are discussed and expected to be crucial to muscle function in healthy, as well as pathological conditions.

  6. Stimulation of post-traumatic regeneration of skeletal muscles of old rats after x-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bulyakova, N.V.; Popova, M.F.

    1987-09-01

    The authors seek a method of stimulating restorative processes in irradiated muscles of old animals. Rats were used in the experiments. Different series of experiments were performed, including complete transverse section of the gastrocnemius muscle after local x-ray irradiation, and laser therapy of the transversly divided gastrocnemius muscle. Post-traumatic regeneration of the gastrocnemius muscle of old rats is illustrated schematically. The experimental data showed that pulsed laser therapy or grafting of minced unirradiated muscle tissue can largely restore the regenerative capacity of the gastrocnemius muscle of old rats when depressed by x-ray irradiation, but the method of grafting minced unirradiated muscle tissue was more effective.

  7. Decreased ATP synthesis and lower pH may lead to abnormal muscle contraction and skin sensitivity in human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Jung Yun; Lee, Min Jung; Choi, Won Woo; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2014-12-01

    Sensitive skin represents hyperactive sensory symptoms showing exaggerated reactions in response to internal stimulants or external irritants. Although sensitive skin is a very common condition affecting an estimated 50% of the population, its pathophysiology remains largely elusive, particularly with regard to its metabolic aspects. The objective of our study was to investigate the pathogenesis of sensitive skin. We recruited healthy participants with 'sensitive' or 'non-sensitive' skin based on standardized questionnaires and 10% lactic acid stinging test, and obtained skin samples for microarray analysis and subsequent experiments. Microarray transcriptome profiling revealed that genes involved in muscle contraction, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ion transport and balance were significantly decreased in sensitive skin. These altered genes could account for the abnormal muscle contraction, decreased ATP amount in sensitive skin. In addition, pain-related transcripts such as TRPV1, ASIC3 and CGRP were significantly up-regulated in sensitive skin, compared with non-sensitive skin. Our findings suggest that sensitive skin is closely associated with the dysfunction of muscle contraction and metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Abnormal neuronal morphology and neurochemistry in the auditory brainstem of Fmr1 knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Ruby, K; Falvey, K; Kulesza, R J

    2015-09-10

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an inherited neurodevelopmental disorder affecting nearly one in 5000 newborn males and is a leading genetic cause of autism spectrum disorder. In addition to developmental delays and intellectual impairment, FXS is characterized by seizures, attention deficit, and hypersensitivity to visual, tactile and auditory stimuli. The Fmr1 gene encodes Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which is abundant in neurons, binds select mRNAs and functions as a negative regulator of mRNA translation. A deficiency in FMRP, as in FXS and Fmr1 knockout (KO) animals, results in neuronal dysmorphology and altered synaptic function. Additionally, there is evidence for disruption of GABAergic circuits in subjects lacking FMRP. Our previous studies demonstrated widespread expression of FMRP in human auditory brainstem neurons. Given this observation, we hypothesized that FMRP is highly expressed in rat auditory brainstem neurons and that the auditory hypersensitivity characteristic of FXS results from dysfunction of brainstem networks secondary to decreased expression of FMRP. In our investigation of postnatal day 50 (P50) control rats, we found that FMRP was widely expressed in neurons of the superior olivary complex (SOC). In P50 Fmr1 KO rats, many SOC neurons had a smaller soma when compared to controls, indicative of abnormal neuronal morphology. Additionally, neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO) were more round in Fmr1 KO rats. There was also reduced expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) in neurons of the superior paraolivary nucleus (SPON) and a reduction in the number of calretinin-immunoreactive terminals associated with neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). Together, these findings support the conclusion that the auditory dysfunction characteristic of FXS arises, at least in part, from defective brainstem networks. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effects of Altitude Training on the AMPK-Related Glucose Transport Pathway in the Red Skeletal Muscle of Both Lean and Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ching; Lee, Shin-Da; Kuo, Cha-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Chen, Yu-Ching, Shin-Da Lee, Cha-Hua Kuo, and Low-Tone Ho. The effects of altitude training on the AMPK-related glucose transport pathway in the red skeletal muscle of both lean and obese Zucker rats. High Alt. Med. Biol. 12:371–378.—Introduction: The skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-related glucose transport pathway is involved in glucose homeostasis. Aim: In this study, we examined whether obese control Zucker rats had abnormal expression of proteins in the LKB1-AMPK-AS160-GLUT4 pathway in red gastrocnemius muscle compared to that in lean (normal) control Zucker rats. We also compared the chronic training effects of exercise, hypoxia, and altitude training on this pathway in lean and obese rats. Methods: At sea level, lean and obese rats were divided into 4 groups for 6 weeks training as follows: 1) control; 2) exercise (progressive daily swimming-exercise training with comparable exercise signals between the two groups); 3) hypoxia (8 hours of daily 14% O2 exposure); and 4) exercise plus hypoxia (also called altitude training). Seven animals were used for each group. Results: The obese rats in the control group had higher body weights, elevated fasting insulin and glucose levels, and higher baseline levels of muscle AMPK and AS160 phosphorylation compared with those of lean control rats. For obese Zucker rats in the exercise or hypoxia groups, the muscle AMPK phosphorylation level was significantly decreased compared with that of the control group. For obese Zucker rats in the altitude training group, the levels of AMPK, AS160 phosphorylation, fasting insulin, and fasting glucose were decreased concomitant with an approximate 50% increase in the muscle GLUT4 protein level compared with those of the control group. In lean rats, the altitude training efficiently lowered fasting glucose and insulin levels and increased muscle AMPK and AS160 phosphorylation as well as GLUT4 protein levels. Conclusion: Our results provide evidence that

  10. Supplementing healthy rats with a high-niacin dose has no effect on muscle fiber distribution and muscle metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Kristen; Kynast, Anna Marie; Couturier, Aline; Mooren, Frank-Christoph; Krüger, Karsten; Most, Erika; Eder, Klaus; Ringseis, Robert

    2014-08-01

    It was recently shown that niacin prevents the obesity-induced type I to type II fiber switching in skeletal muscle of obese rats and favors the development of a more oxidative metabolic phenotype and thereby increases whole body utilization of fatty acids. Whether niacin also causes type II to type I fiber switching in skeletal muscle of healthy rats has not been investigated yet. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate whether niacin supplementation influences fiber distribution and metabolic phenotype of different skeletal muscles with a distinct type I-to-type II fiber ratio in healthy rats. Twenty-four male, 10-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into two groups of 12 rats each and fed either a control diet with 30 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet (control group) or a high-niacin diet with 780 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet (high-niacin group). After 27 days of treatment, the percentage number of type I fibers in rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles was 5-10% greater in the niacin group than in the control group, but did not differ between groups in soleus and vastus intermedius muscles. Transcript levels of genes encoding transcription factors regulating fiber switching, fiber-specific myosin heavy chain isoforms, and proteins involved in fatty acid utilization, oxidative phosphorylation, and angiogenesis did not differ between groups. The results show that niacin has only negligible effects on fiber distribution and its regulation as well as the metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle in healthy rats.

  11. Evidence for increased peroxidative activity in muscles from streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lammi-Keefe, C.J.; Swan, P.B.; Hegarty, P.V.J.

    1984-05-01

    The ability of cardiac and skeletal muscles from diabetic rats to metabolize superoxide and hydrogen peroxide was determined by the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, respectively. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats, 43 days old, were made diabetic with a single intravenous injection of streptozotocin (70 mg/kg body weight). On the 80th day after injection the blood glucose concentration of these rats was increased fourfold, and the plasma insulin concentration was decreased four- to fivefold compared to controls. Body weights of male diabetic rats were 61% and those of female diabetic rats were 66% of their ad libitum-fed controls. The seven different skeletal muscles examined weighed less in the diabetic rats than in controls of the same age and body weight. Comparison to the body weight controls allowed the distinction of specific effects due to lack of insulin from effects due to retardation in muscle growth. Increased catalase activity in all muscles examined from diabetic rats (plantaris, gastrocnemius, and heart) suggested a response in catalase activity similar to that of starved rats. SOD activity was not altered in the diabetic rat skeletal muscles and erythrocytes, but was somewhat decreased in the heart.

  12. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids attenuate muscle soreness and improve muscle protein synthesis after eccentric contractions in rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromi; Mimura, Masako; Inoue, Yoshiko; Sugita, Mayu; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hisamine

    2015-06-01

    Eccentric exercise results in prolonged muscle weakness and muscle soreness, which are typical symptoms of muscle damage. Recovery from muscle damage is related to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity. Leucine-enriched essential amino acids (LEAAs) stimulate muscle protein synthesis via activation of the mTOR pathway. Therefore, we investigated the effect of LEAAs on muscle protein synthesis and muscle soreness after eccentric contractions (EC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (9-11 weeks old) were administered an LEAA solution (AminoL40; containing 40 % leucine and 60 % other essential amino acids) at 1 g/kg body weight or distilled water (control) 30 min before and 10 min after EC. Tibialis anterior (TA) muscle was exposed to 500 EC by electrical stimulation under anesthesia. The fractional synthesis rate (FSR; %/h) in the TA muscle was measured by incorporating L-[ring-(2)H5] phenylalanine into skeletal muscle protein. Muscle soreness was evaluated by the paw withdrawal threshold using the Randal-Selitto test with some modifications from 1 to 3 days after EC. The FSR in the EC-control group (0.147 ± 0.016 %/h) was significantly lower than in the sedentary group (0.188 ± 0.016 %/h, p < 0.05). AminoL40 administration significantly mitigated the EC-induced impairment of the FSR (0.172 ± 0.018 %/h). EC decreased the paw withdrawal threshold at 1 and 2 days after EC, which indicated that EC induced muscle soreness. Furthermore, AminoL40 administration alleviated the decreased paw withdrawal threshold. These findings suggest that LEAA supplementation improves the rate of muscle protein synthesis and ameliorates muscle soreness after eccentric exercise.

  13. Ontogenetic, gravity-dependent development of rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Kawano, F.; Nomura, T.; Nonaka, I.; Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that rat soleus muscle fiber growth and changes in myosin phenotype during the postnatal, preweaning period would be largely independent of weight bearing. The hindlimbs of one group of pups were unloaded intermittently from postnatal day 4 to day 21: the pups were isolated from the dam for 5 h during unloading and returned for nursing for 1 h. Control pups were either maintained with the dam as normal or put on an alternating feeding schedule as described above. The enlargement of mass (approximately 3 times), increase in myonuclear number (approximately 1.6 times) and myonuclear domain (approximately 2.6 times), and transformation toward a slow fiber phenotype (from 56 to 70% fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain) observed in controls were inhibited by hindlimb unloading. These properties were normalized to control levels or higher within 1 mo of reambulation beginning immediately after the unloading period. Therefore, chronic unloading essentially stopped the ontogenetic developmental processes of 1) net increase in DNA available for transcription, 2) increase in amount of cytoplasm sustained by that DNA pool, and 3) normal transition of myosin isoforms that occur in some fibers from birth to weaning. It is concluded that normal ontogenetic development of a postural muscle is highly dependent on the gravitational environment even during the early postnatal period, when full weight-bearing activity is not routine.

  14. Ontogenetic, gravity-dependent development of rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohira, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshinaga, T.; Kawano, F.; Nomura, T.; Nonaka, I.; Allen, D. L.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that rat soleus muscle fiber growth and changes in myosin phenotype during the postnatal, preweaning period would be largely independent of weight bearing. The hindlimbs of one group of pups were unloaded intermittently from postnatal day 4 to day 21: the pups were isolated from the dam for 5 h during unloading and returned for nursing for 1 h. Control pups were either maintained with the dam as normal or put on an alternating feeding schedule as described above. The enlargement of mass (approximately 3 times), increase in myonuclear number (approximately 1.6 times) and myonuclear domain (approximately 2.6 times), and transformation toward a slow fiber phenotype (from 56 to 70% fibers expressing type I myosin heavy chain) observed in controls were inhibited by hindlimb unloading. These properties were normalized to control levels or higher within 1 mo of reambulation beginning immediately after the unloading period. Therefore, chronic unloading essentially stopped the ontogenetic developmental processes of 1) net increase in DNA available for transcription, 2) increase in amount of cytoplasm sustained by that DNA pool, and 3) normal transition of myosin isoforms that occur in some fibers from birth to weaning. It is concluded that normal ontogenetic development of a postural muscle is highly dependent on the gravitational environment even during the early postnatal period, when full weight-bearing activity is not routine.

  15. Muscle-specific changes in length-force characteristics of the calf muscles in the spastic Han-Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Annesofie T; Jensen, Bente R; Uhlendorf, Toni L; Cohen, Randy W; Baan, Guus C; Maas, Huub

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate muscle mechanical properties and mechanical interaction between muscles in the lower hindlimb of the spastic mutant rat. Length-force characteristics of gastrocnemius (GA), soleus (SO), and plantaris (PL) were assessed in anesthetized spastic and normally developed Han-Wistar rats. In addition, the extent of epimuscular myofascial force transmission between synergistic GA, SO, and PL, as well as between the calf muscles and antagonistic tibialis anterior (TA), was investigated. Active length-force curves of spastic GA and PL were narrower with a reduced maximal active force. In contrast, active length-force characteristics of spastic SO were similar to those of controls. In reference position (90° ankle and knee angle), higher resistance to ankle dorsiflexion and increased passive stiffness was found for the spastic calf muscle group. At optimum length, passive stiffness and passive force of spastic GA were decreased, whereas those of spastic SO were increased. No mechanical interaction between the calf muscles and TA was found. As GA was lengthened, force from SO and PL declined despite a constant muscle-tendon unit length of SO and PL. However, the extent of this interaction was not different in spastic rats. In conclusion, the effects of spasticity on length-force characteristics were muscle specific. The changes observed for GA and PL muscles are consistent with the changes in limb mechanics reported for human patients. Our results indicate that altered mechanics in spastic rats cannot be attributed to differences in mechanical interaction, but originate from individual muscular structures.

  16. Insulin effect on amino acid uptake by unloaded rat hindlimb muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Tischler, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of insulin on the uptake of alpha-amino-isobutyric acid (AIB) by unloaded rat hindlimb muscles was investigated using soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from intact and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats that were tail-casted for six days. It was found that, at insulin levels above 0.00001 units/ml, the in vitro rate of AIB uptake by muscles from intact animals was stimulated more in the weight bearing muscles than in unloaded ones. In ADX animals, this differential response to insulin was abolished.

  17. Hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in rat and human corneas: the potential of second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Latour, Gaël; Kowalczuk, Laura; Savoldelli, Michèle; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Plamann, Karsten; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-01-01

    Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy recently appeared as an efficient optical imaging technique to probe unstained collagen-rich tissues like cornea. Moreover, corneal remodeling occurs in many diseases and precise characterization requires overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques. In this work, we focus on diabetes, which affects hundreds of million people worldwide and most often leads to diabetic retinopathy, with no early diagnostic tool. This study then aims to establish the potential of SHG microscopy for in situ detection and characterization of hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in the Descemet's membrane, in the posterior cornea. We studied corneas from age-matched control and Goto-Kakizaki rats, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes, and corneas from human donors with type 2 diabetes and without any diabetes. SHG imaging was compared to confocal microscopy, to histology characterization using conventional staining and transmitted light microscopy and to transmission electron microscopy. SHG imaging revealed collagen deposits in the Descemet's membrane of unstained corneas in a unique way compared to these gold standard techniques in ophthalmology. It provided background-free images of the three-dimensional interwoven distribution of the collagen deposits, with improved contrast compared to confocal microscopy. It also provided structural capability in intact corneas because of its high specificity to fibrillar collagen, with substantially larger field of view than transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, in vivo SHG imaging was demonstrated in Goto-Kakizaki rats. Our study shows unambiguously the high potential of SHG microscopy for three-dimensional characterization of structural abnormalities in unstained corneas. Furthermore, our demonstration of in vivo SHG imaging opens the way to long-term dynamical studies. This method should be easily generalized to other structural remodeling of the cornea and SHG microscopy should prove

  18. Hyperglycemia-Induced Abnormalities in Rat and Human Corneas: The Potential of Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Latour, Gaël; Kowalczuk, Laura; Savoldelli, Michèle; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Plamann, Karsten; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire

    2012-01-01

    Background Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy recently appeared as an efficient optical imaging technique to probe unstained collagen-rich tissues like cornea. Moreover, corneal remodeling occurs in many diseases and precise characterization requires overcoming the limitations of conventional techniques. In this work, we focus on diabetes, which affects hundreds of million people worldwide and most often leads to diabetic retinopathy, with no early diagnostic tool. This study then aims to establish the potential of SHG microscopy for in situ detection and characterization of hyperglycemia-induced abnormalities in the Descemet’s membrane, in the posterior cornea. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied corneas from age-matched control and Goto-Kakizaki rats, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes, and corneas from human donors with type 2 diabetes and without any diabetes. SHG imaging was compared to confocal microscopy, to histology characterization using conventional staining and transmitted light microscopy and to transmission electron microscopy. SHG imaging revealed collagen deposits in the Descemet’s membrane of unstained corneas in a unique way compared to these gold standard techniques in ophthalmology. It provided background-free images of the three-dimensional interwoven distribution of the collagen deposits, with improved contrast compared to confocal microscopy. It also provided structural capability in intact corneas because of its high specificity to fibrillar collagen, with substantially larger field of view than transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, in vivo SHG imaging was demonstrated in Goto-Kakizaki rats. Conclusions/Significance Our study shows unambiguously the high potential of SHG microscopy for three-dimensional characterization of structural abnormalities in unstained corneas. Furthermore, our demonstration of in vivo SHG imaging opens the way to long-term dynamical studies. This method should be easily generalized to

  19. Endocrine and neurobehavioral abnormalities induced by propofol administered to neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sijie; Xu, Changqing; Zhu, Wanting; Willis, Jesse; Seubert, Christoph N.; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Sumners, Colin; Martynyuk, Anatoly E.

    2014-01-01

    Background We studied whether neonatal propofol anesthesia affects development of the endocrine and neural systems. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized using intraperitoneal propofol for 5 h on postnatal days (P) 4, 5, or 6. Pups that received either saline or intralipid, but not those in the negative control groups, were also maternally separated for 5 h. Serum levels of corticosterone were measured immediately after anesthesia and in adulthood after prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle testing (≥P80), followed by measurement of hippocampal neuronal activity. Results Propofol acutely increased corticosterone levels to 146.6 ± 23.5 ng/ml (n=6) vs 16.4 ± 3.5 ng/ml (n=6) and 18.4 ± 3.2 ng/ml (n=6) in saline- and intralipd-treated pups, respectively. In adulthood, the propofol group exhibited exacerbated endocrine responses to stress in a form of increased corticosterone levels (1171.58 ± 149.17 ng/ml (n=15) vs 370.02 ± 36.01 ng/ml (n=10) in the saline group). The propofol group had increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in CA1 neurons of male and female rats, but reduced PPI of startle was detected only in males. The Na+–K+–2Cl− co-transporter inhibitor bumetanide, administered to pups prior to propofol, alleviated long-term endocrine and PPI abnormalities. Exogenous corticosterone, administered to naïve pups, induced synaptic and endocrine, but not PPI effects, similar to those of propofol. Conclusions Propofol-caused acute increases in corticosterone levels and gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor-mediated excitation at the time of anesthesia may play mechanistic roles in development of exacerbated endocrine responses to stress and neurobehavioral abnormalities. PMID:24992523

  20. Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat Do Not Correspond to Neuronal Hypometabolism on 18F-FDG-PET

    PubMed Central

    Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Muthusamy, Siva; Lee, Dianne E.; Ibrahim, Wael G.; Nair, Anand; Koziol, Deloris; Maric, Dragan; Hammoud, Dima A.

    2016-01-01

    Motor and behavioral abnormalities are common presentations among individuals with HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). We investigated whether longitudinal motor and behavioral performance in the HIV-1 transgenic rat (Tg), a commonly used neuro-HIV model, corresponded to in vivo neuronal death/dysfunction, by using rotarod and open field testing in parallel to [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). We demonstrated that age-matched non-Tg wild type (WT) rats outperformed the HIV-1 Tg rats at most time points on rotarod testing. Habituation to rotarod occurred at 8 weeks of age (fifth weekly testing session) in the WT rats but it never occurred in the Tg rats, suggesting deficits in motor learning. Similarly, in open field testing, WT rats outperformed the Tg rats at most time points, suggesting defective exploratory/motor behavior and increased emotionality in the Tg rat. Despite the neurobehavioral abnormalities, there were no concomitant deficits in 18F-FDG uptake in Tg rats on PET compared to age-matched WT rats and no significant longitudinal loss of FDG uptake in either group. The negative PET findings were confirmed using 14C- Deoxy-D-glucose autoradiography in 32 week-old Tg and WT rats. We believe that the neuropathology in the HIV-1 Tg rat is more likely a consequence of neuronal dysfunction rather than overt neurodegeneration/neuronal cell death, similar to what is seen in HIV-positive patients in the post-ART era. PMID:27010205

  1. Changes in antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in extensor digitorum longus muscles of streptozotocin-diabetic rats may contribute to muscle atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Koji; Une, S; Tatsuta, N; Ito, K; Akiyama, J

    2014-12-01

    We investigated muscle atrophy, major antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL, predominantly fast fibers) and soleus (predominantly slow fibers) muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into a control (n = 5) and streptozotocin-induced diabetic group (n = 5). Eight weeks after diabetes induction the EDL and soleus muscles were removed and catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels measured. The CAT activity increased in both the EDL and soleus muscles of the diabetic rats (p < 0.01), whereas the GPX and SOD activities were increased only in the EDL muscle (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). The TBARS levels were only increased in the EDL muscle of the diabetic rats (p < 0.01). Both muscles showed significant atrophy but the EDL muscle elicited the greatest atrophy. In conclusion, it appears that adaptive responses to oxidative stress were adequate in the soleus muscle, but not in the EDL muscle, of diabetic rats. Thus fast twitch muscle fibers may be more susceptible to oxidative stress than slow twitch muscle fibers and this may contribute to muscle atrophy under diabetic conditions.

  2. Quantitative analysis of motor neurons of the levator ani muscle in fetal rats with spina bifida occulta.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Hou, Xiang-Yu; Yuan, Zheng-Wei; Wang, Wei-Lin

    2009-12-01

    less than that of normal spinal cord, and the motor neurons were scattered around the space between the dorsomedial and dorsolateral corners. The number of FG-labeled motor neurons was 244 +/- 41 in group 3, 426 +/- 36 in group 1, and 397 +/- 20 in group 2. The data were statistically significant if P < .05. The motor neurons that innervate the levator ani muscle in fetal rats with spina bifida occulta are fewer than the normal fetal rats, and they are arranged in abnormal distribution. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Presynaptic Inhibitory Terminals Are Functionally Abnormal in a Rat Model of Posttraumatic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Leonardo C.

    2010-01-01

    Partially isolated “undercut” neocortex with intact pial circulation is a well-established model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. Results of previous experiments showed a decreased frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in layer V pyramidal (Pyr) neurons of undercuts. We further examined possible functional abnormalities in GABAergic inhibition in rat epileptogenic neocortical slices in vitro by recording whole cell monosynaptic IPSCs in layer V Pyr cells and fast-spiking (FS) GABAergic interneurons using a paired pulse paradigm. Compared with controls, IPSCs in Pyr neurons of injured slices showed increased threshold and decreased peak amplitude at threshold, decreased input/output slopes, increased failure rates, and a shift from paired pulse depression toward paired pulse facilitation (increased paired pulse ratio or PPR). Increasing [Ca2+]o from 2 to 4 mM partially reversed these abnormalities in Pyr cells of the epileptogenic tissue. IPSCs onto FS cells also had an increased PPR and failures. Blockade of GABAB receptors did not affect the paired results. These findings suggest that there are functional alterations in GABAergic presynaptic terminals onto both Pyr and FS cells in this model of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. PMID:20484536

  4. Age-related physiological and morphological changes of muscle spindles in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gee Hee; Suzuki, Shuji; Kanda, Kenro

    2007-07-15

    Age-related physiological and morphological changes of muscle spindles were examined in rats (male Fischer 344/DuCrj: young, 4-13 months; middle-aged, 20-22 months; old, 28-31 months). Single afferent discharges of the muscle spindles in gastrocnemius muscles were recorded from a finely split dorsal root during ramp-and-hold (amplitude, 2.0 mm; velocity, 2-20 mm s(-1)) or sinusoidal stretch (amplitude, 0.05-1.0 mm; frequency, 0.5-2 Hz). Respective conduction velocities (CVs) were then measured. After electrophysiological experimentation, the muscles were dissected. The silver-impregnated muscle spindles were teased and then analysed using a light microscope. The CV and dynamic response to ramp-and-hold stretch of many endings were widely overlapped in old rats because of the decreased CV and dynamic response of primary endings. Many units in old rats showed slowing of discharge during the release phase under ramp-and-hold stretch and continuous discharge under sinusoidal stretch, similarly to secondary endings in young and middle-aged rats. Morphological studies revealed that primary endings of aged rat muscle spindles were less spiral or non-spiral in appearance, but secondary endings appeared unchanged. These results suggest first that primary muscle spindles in old rats are indistinguishable from secondary endings when determined solely by previously used physiological criteria. Secondly, these physiological results reflect drastic age-related morphological changes in spindle primary endings.

  5. Age-related physiological and morphological changes of muscle spindles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gee Hee; Suzuki, Shuji; Kanda, Kenro

    2007-01-01

    Age-related physiological and morphological changes of muscle spindles were examined in rats (male Fischer 344/DuCrj: young, 4–13 months; middle-aged, 20–22 months; old, 28–31 months). Single afferent discharges of the muscle spindles in gastrocnemius muscles were recorded from a finely split dorsal root during ramp-and-hold (amplitude, 2.0 mm; velocity, 2–20 mm s−1) or sinusoidal stretch (amplitude, 0.05–1.0 mm; frequency, 0.5–2 Hz). Respective conduction velocities (CVs) were then measured. After electrophysiological experimentation, the muscles were dissected. The silver-impregnated muscle spindles were teased and then analysed using a light microscope. The CV and dynamic response to ramp-and-hold stretch of many endings were widely overlapped in old rats because of the decreased CV and dynamic response of primary endings. Many units in old rats showed slowing of discharge during the release phase under ramp-and-hold stretch and continuous discharge under sinusoidal stretch, similarly to secondary endings in young and middle-aged rats. Morphological studies revealed that primary endings of aged rat muscle spindles were less spiral or non-spiral in appearance, but secondary endings appeared unchanged. These results suggest first that primary muscle spindles in old rats are indistinguishable from secondary endings when determined solely by previously used physiological criteria. Secondly, these physiological results reflect drastic age-related morphological changes in spindle primary endings. PMID:17495047

  6. Contractile function and energy metabolism of skeletal muscle in rats with secondary carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Paul A; Bouitbir, Jamal; Bonifacio, Annalisa; Singh, François; Kaufmann, Priska; Urwyler, Albert; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    The consequences of carnitine depletion upon metabolic and contractile characteristics of skeletal muscle remain largely unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP) administration, a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal reabsorption of carnitine, on skeletal muscle function and energy metabolism. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a standard rat chow in the absence (CON; n = 8) or presence of THP (n = 8) for 3 wk. Following treatment, rats were fasted for 24 h prior to excision of their soleus and EDL muscles for biochemical characterization at rest and following 5 min of contraction in vitro. THP treatment reduced the carnitine pool by ∼80% in both soleus and EDL muscles compared with CON. Carnitine depletion was associated with a 30% decrease soleus muscle weight, whereas contractile function (expressed per gram of muscle), free coenzyme A, and water content remained unaltered from CON. Muscle fiber distribution and fiber area remained unaffected, whereas markers of apoptosis were increased in soleus muscle of THP-treated rats. In EDL muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with reduced free coenzyme A availability (-25%, P < 0.05), impaired peak tension development (-44%, P < 0.05), and increased glycogen hydrolysis (52%, P < 0.05) during muscle contraction, whereas PDC activation, muscle weight, and water content remained unaltered from CON. In conclusion, myopathy associated with carnitine deficiency can have different causes. Although muscle atrophy, most likely due to increased apoptosis, is predominant in muscle composed predominantly of type I fibers (soleus), disturbance of energy metabolism appears to be the major cause in muscle composed of type II fibers (EDL).

  7. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types in a rat model of critical illness myopathy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Benjamin T; Confides, Amy L; Rich, Mark M; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E

    2015-06-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40-60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and -8 activities, but not caspase-9 and -12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, -27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types.

  8. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types a rat model of critical illness myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Benjamin T.; Confides, Amy L.; Rich, Mark M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40–60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and −8 activities, but not caspase-9 and −12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, −27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types. PMID:25740800

  9. Abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis associated with vulnerability in the nerve cells from heroin-dependent rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoshan; Wang, Guangyong; Pu, Hongwei; Jing, Hualan

    2014-07-14

    The cellular mechanisms by which opiate addiction develops with repetitive use remain largely unresolved. Intercellular calcium homeostasis is one of the most critical elements to determine neuroadaptive changes and neuronal fate. Heroin, one of the most addictive opiates, may induce neurotoxicity potentially inducing brain impairment, especially for those chronic users who get an overdose. Here we examined changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) after repeated exposure to heroin using cultured cerebral cortical neurons. Dynamic changes in [Ca2+]i indicated by fluo-3-AM were monitored using confocal laser scan microscopy, followed by cytotoxicity assessments. It showed that the cells dissociated from heroin-dependent rats had a smaller depolarization-induced [Ca2+]i responses, and a higher elevation in [Ca2+]i when challenged with a high concentration of heroin (500 μM). The restoration ability to remove calcium after washout of these stimulants was impaired. Calcium channel blocker verapamil inhibited the heroin-induced [Ca2+]i elevations as well as the heroin-induced cell damage. The relative [Ca2+]i of the nerve cells closely correlated with the number of damaged cells induced by heroin. These results demonstrate that nerve cells from heroin-dependent rats manifest abnormal [Ca2+]i homeostasis, as well as vulnerability to heroin overdose, suggesting involvement of [Ca2+]i regulation mechanisms in heroin addiction and neurotoxicity.

  10. Altered anxiety-related and abnormal social behaviors in rats exposed to early life seizures

    PubMed Central

    Castelhano, Adelisandra Silva Santos; Cassane, Gustavo dos Santos Teada; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Cysneiros, Roberta Monterazzo

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are the most common manifestation of neurological dysfunction in the neonate. The prognosis of neonatal seizures is highly variable, and the controversy remains whether the severity, duration, or frequency of seizures may contribute to brain damage independently of its etiology. Animal data indicates that seizures during development are associated with a high probability of long-term adverse effects such as learning and memory impairment, behavioral changes and even epilepsy, which is strongly age dependent, as well as the severity, duration, and frequency of seizures. In preliminary studies, we demonstrated that adolescent male rats exposed to one-single neonatal status epilepticus (SE) episode showed social behavior impairment, and we proposed the model as relevant for studies of developmental disorders. Based on these facts, the goal of this study was to verify the existence of a persistent deficit and if the anxiety-related behavior could be associated with that impairment. To do so, male Wistar rats at 9 days postnatal were submitted to a single episode of SE by pilocarpine injection (380 mg/kg, i.p.) and control animals received saline (0.9%, 0.1 mL/10 g). It was possible to demonstrate that in adulthood, animals exposed to neonatal SE displayed low preference for social novelty, anxiety-related behavior, and increased stereotyped behavior in anxiogenic environment with no locomotor activity changes. On the balance, these data suggests that neonatal SE in rodents leads to altered anxiety-related and abnormal social behaviors. PMID:23675329

  11. Abnormal Motor Activity and Thermoregulation in a Schizophrenia Rat Model for Translational Science.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gyongyi; Kekesi, Gabriella; Petrovszki, Zita; Benedek, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is accompanied by altered motor activity and abnormal thermoregulation; therefore, the presence of these symptoms can enhance the face validity of a schizophrenia animal model. The goal was to characterize these parameters in freely moving condition of a new substrain of rats showing several schizophrenia-related alterations. Male Wistar rats were used: the new substrain housed individually (for four weeks) and treated subchronically with ketamine, and naive animals without any manipulations. Adult animals were implanted with E-Mitter transponders intraabdominally to record body temperature and locomotor activity continuously. The circadian rhythm of these parameters and the acute effects of changes in light conditions were analyzed under undisturbed circumstances, and the effects of different interventions (handling, bed changing or intraperitoneal vehicle injection) were also determined. Decreased motor activity with fragmented pattern was observed in the new substrain. However, these animals had higher body temperature during the active phase, and they showed wider range of its alterations, too. The changes in light conditions and different interventions produced blunted hyperactivity and altered body temperature responses in the new substrain. Poincaré plot analysis of body temperature revealed enhanced short- and long-term variabilities during the active phase compared to the inactive phase in both groups. Furthermore, the new substrain showed increased short- and long-term variabilities with lower degree of asymmetry suggesting autonomic dysregulation. In summary, the new substrain with schizophrenia-related phenomena showed disturbed motor activity and thermoregulation suggesting that these objectively determined parameters can be biomarkers in translational research.

  12. Normal and Abnormal Development of Motor Behavior: Lessons From Experiments in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gramsbergen, Albert

    2001-01-01

    In this essay a few relevant aspects of the neural and behavioral development of the brain in the human and in the rat are reviewed and related to the consequences of lesions in the central and peripheral nervous system at early and later age. Movements initially are generated by local circuits in the spinal cord and without the involvement of descending projections. After birth, both in humans and in rats it seems that the devlopment of postural control is the limiting factor for several motor behaviors to mature. Strong indications exist that the cerebellum is significantly involved in this control. Lesions in the CNS at early stages interfere with fundamental processes of neural development, such as the establishment of fiber connections and cell death patterns. Consequently, the functional effects are strongly dependent on the stage of development. The young and undisturbed CNS, on the other hand, has a much greater capacity than the adult nervous system for compensating abnormal reinnervation in the peripheral nervous system. Animal experiments indicated that the cerebellar cortex might play an important part in this compensation. This possibility should be investigated further as it might offer important perspectives for treatment in the human. PMID:11530886

  13. Soya protein attenuates abnormalities of the renin-angiotensin system in adipose tissue from obese rats.

    PubMed

    Frigolet, María E; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R

    2012-01-01

    Several metabolic disturbances during obesity are associated with adipose tissue-altered functions. Adipocytes contain the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates signalling pathways that control angiogenesis via Akt in an autocrine fashion. Soya protein (Soy) consumption modifies the gene expression pattern in adipose tissue, resulting in an improved adipocyte function. Therefore, the aim of the present work is to study whether dietary Soy regulates the expression of RAS and angiogenesis-related genes and its association with the phosphorylated state of Akt in the adipose tissue of obese rats. Animals were fed a 30 % Soy or casein (Cas) diet containing 5 or 25 % fat for 160 d. mRNA abundance was studied in the adipose tissue, and Akt phosphorylation and hormone release were measured in the primary adipocyte culture. The present results show that Soy treatment in comparison with Cas consumption induces lower angiotensin release and increased insulin-stimulated Akt activation in adipocytes. Furthermore, Soy consumption varies the expression of RAS and angiogenesis-related genes, which maintain cell size and vascularity in the adipose tissue of rats fed a high-fat diet. Thus, adipocyte hypertrophy and impaired angiogenesis, which are frequently observed in dysfunctional adipose tissue, were avoided by consuming dietary Soy. Taken together, these findings suggest that Soy can be used as a dietary strategy to preserve adipocyte functionality and to prevent obesity abnormalities.

  14. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  15. Inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases with prinomastat produces abnormalities in fetal growth and development in rats.

    PubMed

    Younis, Husam S; Jessen, Bart A; Wu, Ellen Y; Stevens, Gregory J

    2006-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play key roles in remodeling of the extracellular matrix during embryogenesis and fetal development. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of prinomastat, a potent selective MMP inhibitor, on fetal growth and development. Prinomastat (25, 100, 250 mg/kg/day, p.o.) was administered to pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats on gestational days (GD) 6-17. A Cesarian section was carried out on GD 20 and the fetuses were evaluated for viability and skeletal and soft tissue abnormalities. Prinomastat treatment at the 250 mg/kg/day dose produced a decrease in body weight and food consumption in the dams. A dose-dependent increase in post-implantation loss was observed in the 100 and 250 mg/kg/day-dose groups, resulting in only 22% of the dams having viable litters for evaluation at the 250 mg/kg/day dose. Fetal skeletal tissue variations and malformations were present in all prinomastat treated groups and their frequency increased with dose. Variations and malformation in fetal soft tissue were also increased at the 100 and 250 mg/kg/day doses. Prinomastat also interfered with fetal growth of rat embryo cultures in vitro. These data confirm that MMP inhibition has a profound effect on fetal growth and development in vivo and in vitro. Birth Defects Research (Part B) 77:95-103, 2006. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Muscle fatigue examined at different temperatures in experiments on intact mammalian (rat) muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Roots, H.; Ball, G.; Talbot-Ponsonby, J.; King, M.; McBeath, K.; Ranatunga, K. W.

    2009-01-01

    In experiments on small bundles of intact fibers from a rat fast muscle, in vitro, we examined the decline in force in repeated tetanic contractions; the aim was to characterize the effect of shortening and of temperature on the initial phase of muscle fatigue. Short tetanic contractions were elicited at a control repetition rate of 1/60 s, and fatigue was induced by raising the rate to 1/5 s for 2–3 min, both in isometric mode (no shortening) and in shortening mode, in which each tetanic contraction included a ramp shortening at a standard velocity. In experiments at 20°C (n = 12), the force decline during a fatigue run was 25% in the isometric mode but was significantly higher (35%) in the shortening mode. In experiments at different temperatures (10–30°C, n = 11), the tetanic frequency and duration were adjusted as appropriate, and for shortening mode, the velocity was adjusted for maximum power output. In isometric mode, fatigue of force was significantly less at 30°C (∼20%) than at 10°C (∼30%); the power output (force × velocity) was >10× higher at 30°C than at 10°C, and power decline during a fatigue run was less at 30°C (∼20–30%) than at 10°C (∼50%). The finding that the extent of fatigue is increased with shortening contractions and is lower at higher temperatures is consistent with the view that force depression by inorganic phosphate, which accumulates within fibers during activity, may be a primary cause of initial muscle fatigue. PMID:19057001

  17. Muscle respiration in rats is influenced by the type and level of dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Early, R J; Spielman, S P

    1995-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the role of muscle in the enhanced thermogenic response found in rats fed diets enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids. Isolated soleus muscle respiration and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were determined in rats (approximately 128 g wt, 5 wk age) fed diets (minimum 3 wk) containing coconut oil, beef tallow or safflower oil at 20, 40 or 60% of the total dietary energy in a 3 x 3 factorial design (5-6 rats per treatment). Diet type did not affect plasma cholesterol concentrations but plasma triglycerides were lower (P < 0.01) in rats fed safflower oil-based diets. Greater levels of fat in the diet resulted in higher (P < 0.01) plasma cholesterol concentrations and lower (P < 0.01) plasma triglyceride concentrations. Rats fed coconut oil had lower (P < 0.05) rats of soleus muscle respiration compared with rats fed the other two diets. This lower respiration rate was not related to changes in protein synthesis (cycloheximide-sensitive respiration). However, this change may partially be related to enhanced Na+,K+ transport (ouabain-sensitive respiration). The results indicate that muscle is partially responsible for the enhanced thermogenic response found in rats fed diets enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids and that enhanced ion transport contributes to this response in muscle.

  18. The comparative effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics and muscle relaxants on electrical field stimulation response in rat bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Min, Chang Ho; Min, Young Sil; Lee, Sang Joon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-06-01

    It has been reported that several aminoglycoside antibiotics have a potential of prolonging the action of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants by drug interactions acting pre-synaptically to inhibit acetylcholine release, but antibiotics itself also have a strong effect on relaxing the smooth muscle. In this study, four antibiotics of aminoglycosides such as gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin and neomycin were compared with skeletal muscle relaxants baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine, and a smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine. The muscle strips isolated from the rat bladder were stimulated with pulse trains of 40 V in amplitude and 10 s in duration, with pulse duration of 1 ms at the frequency of 1-8 Hz, at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 Hz respectively. To test the effect of four antibiotics on bladder smooth muscle relaxation, each of them was treated cumulatively from 1 μM to 0.1 mM with an interval of 5 min. Among the four antibiotics, gentamicin and neomycin inhibited the EFS response. The skeletal muscle relaxants (baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine) and inhibitory neurotransmitters (GABA and glycine) did not show any significant effect. However, papaverine, had a significant effect in the relaxation of the smooth muscle. It was suggested that the aminoglycoside antibiotics have inhibitory effect on the bladder smooth muscle.

  19. Volitional Weight-Lifting in Rats Promotes Adaptation via Performance and Muscle Morphology prior to Gains in Muscle Mass

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Erik P; Miller, G Roger; Chetlin, Robert D; Wirth, Oliver; Baker, Brent A

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of volitional animal models of resistance training has been instrumental in our understanding of adaptive training. However, these studies have lacked reactive force measurements, a precise performance measure, and morphological analysis at a distinct phase of training – when initial strength gains precede muscle hypertrophy. Our aim was to expose rats to one month of training (70 or 700 g load) on a custom-designed weight-lifting apparatus for analysis of reactive forces and muscle morphology prior to muscle hypertrophy. Exclusively following 700 g load training, forces increased by 21% whereas muscle masses remained unaltered. For soleus (SOL) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles, 700 g load training increased muscle fiber number per unit area by ∼20% and decreased muscle fiber area by ∼20%. Additionally, number of muscle fibers per section increased by 18% for SOL muscles. These results establish that distinct morphological alterations accompany early strength gains in a volitional animal model of load-dependent adaptive resistance training. PMID:25392697

  20. Abnormal oxygen homeostasis in the nucleus tractus solitarii of the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    PubMed Central

    Hosford, Patrick S.; Millar, Julian; Ramage, Andrew G.

    2017-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Arterial hypertension is associated with impaired neurovascular coupling in the somatosensory cortex. Abnormalities in activity‐dependent oxygen consumption in brainstem regions involved in the control of cardiovascular reflexes have not been explored previously. What is the main finding and its importance? Using fast‐cyclic voltammetry, we found that changes in local tissue PO2 in the nucleus tractus solitarii induced by electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve are significantly impaired in spontaneously hypertensive rats. This is consistent with previous observations showing that brainstem hypoxia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. The effects of arterial hypertension on cerebral blood flow remain poorly understood. Haemodynamic responses within the somatosensory cortex have been shown to be impaired in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model. However, it is unknown whether arterial hypertension affects oxygen homeostasis in vital brainstem areas that control cardiovascular reflexes. In this study, we assessed vagus nerve stimulation‐induced changes in local tissue PO2 (PtO2) in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarii (cNTS) of SHRs and normotensive Wistar rats. Measurements of PtO2 were performed using a novel application of fast‐cyclic voltammetry, which allows higher temporal resolution of O2 changes than traditional optical fluorescence techniques. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the vagus nerve (ESVN) caused profound reductions in arterial blood pressure along with biphasic changes in PtO2 in the cNTS, characterized by a rapid decrease in PtO2 (‘initial dip’) followed by a post‐stimulus overshoot above baseline. The initial dip was found to be significantly smaller in SHRs compared with normotensive Wistar rats even after ganglionic blockade. The post‐ESVN overshoot was similar in both groups but was reduced in Wistar rats after

  1. Abnormal oxygen homeostasis in the nucleus tractus solitarii of the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Hosford, Patrick S; Millar, Julian; Ramage, Andrew G; Marina, Nephtali

    2017-04-01

    What is the central question of this study? Arterial hypertension is associated with impaired neurovascular coupling in the somatosensory cortex. Abnormalities in activity-dependent oxygen consumption in brainstem regions involved in the control of cardiovascular reflexes have not been explored previously. What is the main finding and its importance? Using fast-cyclic voltammetry, we found that changes in local tissue PO2 in the nucleus tractus solitarii induced by electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve are significantly impaired in spontaneously hypertensive rats. This is consistent with previous observations showing that brainstem hypoxia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. The effects of arterial hypertension on cerebral blood flow remain poorly understood. Haemodynamic responses within the somatosensory cortex have been shown to be impaired in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model. However, it is unknown whether arterial hypertension affects oxygen homeostasis in vital brainstem areas that control cardiovascular reflexes. In this study, we assessed vagus nerve stimulation-induced changes in local tissue PO2 (PtO2) in the caudal nucleus tractus solitarii (cNTS) of SHRs and normotensive Wistar rats. Measurements of PtO2 were performed using a novel application of fast-cyclic voltammetry, which allows higher temporal resolution of O2 changes than traditional optical fluorescence techniques. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the vagus nerve (ESVN) caused profound reductions in arterial blood pressure along with biphasic changes in PtO2 in the cNTS, characterized by a rapid decrease in PtO2 ('initial dip') followed by a post-stimulus overshoot above baseline. The initial dip was found to be significantly smaller in SHRs compared with normotensive Wistar rats even after ganglionic blockade. The post-ESVN overshoot was similar in both groups but was reduced in Wistar rats after ganglionic blockade. In

  2. Contribution of abnormal muscle and liver glucose metabolism to postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrakou, A.; Kelley, D.; Veneman, T.; Jenssen, T.; Pangburn, T.; Reilly, J.; Gerich, J. )

    1990-11-01

    To assess the role of muscle and liver in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), we administered an oral glucose load enriched with (14C)glucose to 10 NIDDM subjects and 10 age- and weight-matched nondiabetic volunteers and compared muscle glucose disposal by measuring forearm balance of glucose, lactate, alanine, O2, and CO2. In addition, we used the dual-lable isotope method to compare overall rates of glucose appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd), suppression of endogenous glucose output, and splanchnic glucose sequestration. During the initial 1-1.5 h after glucose ingestion, plasma glucose increased by approximately 8 mM in NIDDM vs. approximately 3 mM in nondiabetic subjects (P less than 0.01); overall glucose Ra was nearly 11 g greater in NIDDM than nondiabetic subjects, but glucose Rd was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects. The greater overall glucose Ra of NIDDM subjects was due to 6.8 g greater endogenous glucose output (13.7 +/- 1.1 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.0 g, P less than 0.01) and 3.8 g less oral glucose splanchnic sequestration of the oral load (31.4 +/- 1.5 vs. 27.5 +/- 0.9 g, P less than 0.05). Although glucose taken up by muscle was not significantly different in NIDDM and nondiabetic subjects (39.3 +/- 3.5 vs. 41.0 +/- 2.5 g/5 h), a greater amount of the glucose taken up by muscle in NIDDM was released as lactate and alanine (11.7 +/- 1.0 vs. 5.2 +/- 0.3 g in nondiabetic subjects, P less than 0.01), and less was stored (11.7 +/- 1.3 vs. 16.9 +/- 1.5 g, P less than 0.05). We conclude that increased systemic glucose delivery, due primarily to reduced suppression of endogenous hepatic glucose output and, to a lesser extent, reduced splanchnic glucose sequestration, is the predominant factor responsible for postprandial hyperglycemia in NIDDM.

  3. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  4. Effect of seven days of spaceflight on hindlimb muscle protein, RNA and DNA in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of seven days of spaceflight on skeletal muscle (soleus, gastrocnemius, EDL) content of protein, RNA and DNA were determined in adult rats. Whereas total protein contents were reduced in parallel with muscle weights, myofibrillar protein appeared to be more affected. There were no significant changes in absolute DNA contents, but a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in DNA concentration (microgram/milligram) in soleus muscles from flight rats. Absolute RNA contents were significantly (P less than 0.025) decreased in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of flight rats, with RNA concentrations reduced 15-30 percent. These results agree with previous ground-based observations on the suspended rat with unloaded hindlimbs and support continued use of this model.

  5. Functional abnormalities of sinusoidal endothelial cells in rats with acute liver rejection.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Y; Nakamura, S; Muro, H; Baba, S

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) function in acute liver rejection with respect to receptor-mediated endocytosis. Orthotopic rat liver transplantation was performed in Lewis rats grafted with DA livers and in Lewis rats grafted with Lewis livers as rejectors and controls, respectively. Animals were killed at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 days after the operation. Fc receptors (FcRs) were histochemically stained on frozen liver sections by applying peroxidase-antiperoxidase IgG complex as a ligand, and the FcR activity, i.e., capacity of binding the ligands represented by the FcR staining intensity, was semiquantitatively analyzed as an indicator of SEC function. The serum level of hyaluronic acid, which is specifically cleared from the circulation by receptor-mediated SEC endocytosis, was also assayed, along with the total serum bilirubin. Three days after the operation, the SECs of rejectors showed a significantly weaker FcR staining intensity of about half the value of that seen in the controls (P < 0.05), and staining disappeared after 5 days (P < 0.01). The decrease of FcR staining intensity, i.e., FcR activity, showed a correlation with elevation of the serum hyaluronic acid level (r = -0.77; P < 0.001). Histological evidence of endothelialitis and a significant elevation of total serum bilirubin (P < 0.01) were also present at 3 and 5 days, respectively. These results suggest that impairment of the endocytic function of SECs occurs at an earlier phase of acute liver rejection when compared with development of abnormalities of traditional indicators. Determination of receptor-mediated SEC endocytic functions may thus provide useful information for the early diagnosis of acute rejection.

  6. Skeletal muscle response to spaceflight, whole body suspension, and recovery in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.; Steffen, J. M.; Fell, R. D.; Dombrowski, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of a 7-day spaceflight (SF), 7- and 14-day-long whole body suspension (WBS), and 7-day-long recovery on the muscle weight and the morphology of the soleus and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats were investigated. It was found that the effect of 7-day-long SF and WBS were highly comparable for both the soleus and the EDL, although the soleus muscle from SF rats showed greater cross-sectional area reduction than that from WBS rats. With a longer duration of WBS, there was a continued reduction in cross-sectional fast-twitch fiber area. Muscle plasticity, in terms of fiber and capillary responses, showed differences in responses of the two types of muscles, indicating that antigravity posture muscles are highly susceptible to unloading.

  7. Motor Unit Changes Seen With Skeletal Muscle Sarcopenia in Oldest Old Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Theodore A.; van der Meulen, Jack H.; Urbanchek, Melanie G.; Kuzon, William M.; Faulkner, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia leads to many changes in skeletal muscle that contribute to atrophy, force deficits, and subsequent frailty. The purpose of this study was to characterize motor unit remodeling related to sarcopenia seen in extreme old age. Whole extensor digitorum longus muscle and motor unit contractile properties were measured in 19 adult (11–13 months) and 12 oldest old (36–37 months) Brown-Norway rats. Compared with adults, oldest old rats had significantly fewer motor units per muscle, smaller muscle cross-sectional area, and lower muscle specific force. However, mean motor unit force generation was similar between the two groups due to an increase in innervation ratio by the oldest old rats. These findings suggest that even in extreme old age both fast- and slow-twitch motor units maintain the ability to undergo motor unit remodeling that offsets some effects of sarcopenia. PMID:24077596

  8. A New Surgical Model of Skeletal Muscle Injuries in Rats Reproduces Human Sports Lesions.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Muñoz, P; Fernández-Martín, A; Torrella, R; Serres, X; De la Varga, M; Viscor, G; Järvinen, T A H; Martínez-Ibáñez, V; Peiró, J L; Rodas, G; Marotta, M

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries are the most common sports-related injuries in sports medicine. In this work, we have generated a new surgically-induced skeletal muscle injury in rats, by using a biopsy needle, which could be easily reproduced and highly mimics skeletal muscle lesions detected in human athletes. By means of histology, immunofluorescence and MRI imaging, we corroborated that our model reproduced the necrosis, inflammation and regeneration processes observed in dystrophic mdx-mice, a model of spontaneous muscle injury, and realistically mimicked the muscle lesions observed in professional athletes. Surgically-injured rat skeletal muscles demonstrated the longitudinal process of muscle regeneration and fibrogenesis as stated by Myosin Heavy Chain developmental (MHCd) and collagen-I protein expression. MRI imaging analysis demonstrated that our muscle injury model reproduces the grade I-II type lesions detected in professional soccer players, including edema around the central tendon and the typically high signal feather shape along muscle fibers. A significant reduction of 30% in maximum tetanus force was also registered after 2 weeks of muscle injury. This new model represents an excellent approach to the study of the mechanisms of muscle injury and repair, and could open new avenues for developing innovative therapeutic approaches to skeletal muscle regeneration in sports medicine.

  9. Contractile properties of esophageal striated muscle: comparison with cardiac and skeletal muscles in rats.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Takahiko; Shima, Takeshi; Masuda, Kazuaki; Hirayama, Haruko; Iwami, Momoe; Takewaki, Tadashi; Kuramoto, Hirofumi; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2010-01-01

    The external muscle layer of the mammalian esophagus consists of striated muscles. We investigated the contractile properties of esophageal striated muscle by comparison with those of skeletal and cardiac muscles. Electrical field stimulation with single pulses evoked twitch-like contractile responses in esophageal muscle, similar to those in skeletal muscle in duration and similar to those in cardiac muscle in amplitude. The contractions of esophageal muscle were not affected by an inhibitor of gap junctions. Contractile responses induced by high potassium or caffeine in esophageal muscle were analogous to those in skeletal muscle. High-frequency stimulation induced a transient summation of contractions followed by sustained contractions with amplitudes similar to those of twitch-like contractions, although a large summation was observed in skeletal muscle. The results demonstrate that esophageal muscle has properties similar but not identical to those of skeletal muscle and that some specific properties may be beneficial for esophageal peristalsis.

  10. Early permanent disappearance of abnormal muscle response during microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm: a retrospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chengrong; Xu, Wu; Dai, Yuxiang; Lu, Tianyu; Jin, Wei; Liang, Weibang

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this study is to explore the cause of early abnormal muscle response (AMR) disappearance during microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm and the clinical outcomes of these patients. Three hundred seventy-two patients received microvascular decompression (MVD) under intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital in 2014; the characteristic AMR of HFS was observed in 359 patients during the operation. And the 359 patients were divided into two groups based on whether AMR had remained before the beginning of the decompression procedure for offending vessels. Thirty-three patients who showed a permanent disappearance of AMR before the beginning of decompression were regarded as group I. Dural opening and the succeeding CSF drainage produced a permanent disappearance of AMR in 13. During the dissection of lateral cerebellomedullary cistern, a permanent disappearance of AMR was found in 20 patients. Thirty-two patients were cured immediately; delayed resolution (7 days after surgery) was found in one patient. No complications were observed and no recurrence was found during the follow-up period in the 33 patients. In the other 326 patients (group II), AMR disappeared temporarily before the beginning of the decompression procedure for offending vessels in 42 patients. After decompression, AMR disappeared completely in 305 patients. Two hundred sixty-seven patients were cured immediately and 57 patients got a delayed resolution (2 days to 45 weeks after surgery). The two left did not get a complete abolition of spasm. Three cases of hearing loss, one hoarseness, and nine delayed facial paralysis were observed. The reason of early abnormal muscle response disappearance may be that the degree of neurovascular compression was not serious; these patients were more likely to get an immediate cure. Continuous intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring of AMR is necessary.

  11. Identification and characterization of a tissue kallikrein in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Shimojo, N; Chao, J; Chao, L; Margolius, H S; Mayfield, R K

    1987-01-01

    A tissue kallikrein was purified from rat skeletal muscle. Characterization of the enzyme showed that it has alpha-N-tosyl-L-arginine methylesterase activity and releases kinin from purified bovine low-Mr kininogen substrate. The pH optimum (9.0) of its esterase activity and the profile of inhibition by serine-proteinase inhibitors are identical with those of purified RUK (rat urinary kallikrein). Skeletal-muscle kallikrein also behaved identically with urinary kallikrein in a radioimmunoassay using a polyclonal anti-RUK antiserum. On Western-blot analysis, rat muscle kallikrein was recognized by affinity-purified monoclonal anti-kallikrein antibody at a position similar to that of RUK (Mr 38,000). Immunoreactive-kallikrein levels were measured in skeletal muscles which have different fibre types. The soleus, a slow-contracting muscle with high mitochondrial oxidative-enzyme activity, had higher kallikrein content than did the extensor digitorum longus or gastrocnemius, both fast-contracting muscles with low oxidative-enzyme activity. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes reduced muscle weights, but did not alter the level of kallikrein (pg/mg of protein) in skeletal muscle, suggesting that insulin is not a regulator of kallikrein in this tissue. Although the role of kallikrein in skeletal muscle is unknown, its localization and activity in relation to muscle functions and disease can now be studied. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3311022

  12. Changes of contractile responses due to simulated weightlessness in rat soleus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhammari, A.; Noireaud, J.; Léoty, C.

    1994-08-01

    Some contractile and electrophysiological properties of muscle fibers isolated from the slow-twitch soleus (SOL) and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of rats were compared with those measured in SOL muscles from suspended rats. In suspendede SOL (21 days of tail-suspension) membrane potential (Em), intracellular sodium activity (aiNa) and the slope of the relationship between Em and log [K]o were typical of fast-twitch muscles. The relation between the maximal amplitude of K-contractures vs Em was steeper for control SOL than for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. After suspension, in SOL muscles the contractile threshold and the inactivation curves for K-contractures were shifted to more positive Em. Repriming of K-contractures was unaffected by suspencion. The exposure of isolated fibers to perchlorate (ClO4-)-containing (6-40 mM) solutions resulted ina similar concentration-dependent shift to more negative Em of activation curves for EDL and suspended SOL muscles. On exposure to a Na-free TEA solution, SOL from control and suspended rats, in contrast to EDL muscles, generated slow contractile responses. Suspended SOL showed a reduced sensitivity to the contracture-producing effect of caffeine compared to control muscles. These results suggested that the modification observed due to suspension could be encounted by changes in the characteristics of muscle fibers from slow to fast-twitch type.

  13. Fatigue and contraction of slow and fast muscles in hypokinetic/hypodynamic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fell, R. D.; Gladden, L. B.; Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hypokinesia/hypodynamia (H/H) on the fatigability and contractile properties of the rat soleus (S) and gastrocnemius (G) muscles have been investigated experimentally. Whole body suspension for one week was used to induce H/H, and fatigue was brought on by train stimulation for periods of 45 and 16 minutes. Following stimulation, rapid rates of fatigue were observed in the G-muscles of the suspended rats, while minimal fatigue was observed in the S-muscles. The twitch and tetanic contractile properties of the muscles were measured before and after train stimulation. It is found that H/H suspension increased twitch tension in the G-muscles, but did not change any contractile properties in the S-muscles. The peak twitch, train, tetanic tensions and time to peak were unchanged in the S-muscles of the suspended rats. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that 1 wk of muscle atropy induced by H/H significantly increases fatigability in G-muscles, but does not affect the contractile properties of fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles.

  14. Synthesis of Essential Amino Acids from Their α-Keto Analogues by Perfused Rat Liver and Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Walser, Mackenzie; Lund, Patricia; Ruderman, Neil B.; Coulter, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Most essential amino acids can be replaced by their α-keto-analogues in the diet. These ketoacids have therefore been proposed as substitutes for dietary protein. In order to determine their fate in tissues of normal animals, isolated rat liver and hindquarter (muscle) preparations were perfused with keto-analogues of valine, leucine, isoleucine, methionine, or phenylalanine. When perfused at 1.5-2.0 mM, all five compounds were utilized rapidly by the liver of 48-h starved rats, at rates varying from 49 to 155 μmol/h per 200g rat. The corresponding amino acids appeared in the medium in significantly increased concentrations. Perfusion with phenylpyruvate also led to the appearance of tyrosine. Urea release was unaltered. Measurement of metabolite concentrations in freeze-clamped liver revealed two abnormalities, particularly at ketoacid concentrations of 5 mM or above: a large increase in α-ketoglutarate, and a moderate to marked decrease in tissue glutamine. This decrease was quantitatively sufficient to account for nitrogen appearing in newly synthesized amino acids. Isolated hindquarters of fed rats were perfused with the same ketoacids at concentrations of 1.3-8.0 mM. All were utilized at rates varying from 1.4 to 7.0 μmol/h per g muscle perfused. The corresponding amino acids were released at greatly increased rates. Alanine and glutamate levels fell in some perfusions, but the principal nitrogen donor in muscle was not identified; the content of glutamine in tissue, and its rate of release into the perfusate remained constant. PMID:4748513

  15. Effect of diltiazem on skeletal muscle 3-O-methylglucose transport in bacteremic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, M.V.; Sayeed, M.M.

    1989-03-01

    This study examined whether alterations in cellular Ca2+ regulation contribute to previously observed changes in skeletal muscle sugar transport during bacteremia. Fasted male rats received saline (control) or bacteria (4 X 10(10) Escherichia coli/kg) intraperitoneally. Twelve hours later, basal and insulin-mediated 3-O-methylglucose (3MG) transport was measured in isolated soleus muscles. Measurements of 3MG transport in the presence of cytochalasin b or at a low temperature (0.5 degree C) indicated that altered sugar transport in bacteremic rat muscles was not due to nonspecific membrane permeability changes. To determine the role of Ca2+ in the pathogenesis of altered sugar transport during bacteremia, rats were treated with the Ca2+ antagonist diltiazem (DZ, 0.6-2.4 mg/kg) at various times (0, 0 + 7.5, 10 h) after saline or bacterial injection. In bacteremic rats given 2.4 mg/kg DZ at 10 h, basal and insulin-mediated transport were similar to control values. This dose of DZ had little effect on control muscles. The addition of 20 microM DZ to the incubation media did not affect basal or insulin-mediated 3MG transport in bacteremic rat muscles. Addition of the Ca2+ agonist BAY K 8644 to the incubation media had no effect on sugar transport in bacteremic rat muscles but caused alterations in control rat muscles that were comparable to those observed in bacteremia. These results suggest that alterations in Ca2+ regulation could contribute to the previously observed changes in sugar transport in skeletal muscles from bacteremic rats.

  16. Gated /sup 31/P NMR study of tetanic contraction in rat muscle depleted of phosphocreatine

    SciTech Connect

    Shoubridge, E.A.; Radda, G.K.

    1987-05-01

    Rats were fed a diet containing 1% ..beta..-guanidino-propionic acid (GPA) for 6-12 wk to deplete their muscles of phosphocreatine (PCr). Gated /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained from the gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle at various time points during either a 1- or 3-s isometric tetanic contraction using a surface coil. The energy cost of a 1-s tetanus in unfatigued control rat muscle was 48.4 ..mu..mol ATP x g dry wt/sup -1/ x s/sup -1/ and was largely supplied by PCr; anaerobic glycogenolysis was negligible. In GPA-fed rats PCr was undetectable after 400 ms. This had no effect on initial force generated per gram, which was not significantly different from controls. Developed tension in a 3-s tetanus in GPA-fed rats could be divided into a peak phase (duration 0.8-0.9 s) and a plateau phase (65% peak tension) in which PCr was undetectable and the (ATP) was < 20% of that in control muscle. Energy from glycogenolysis was sufficient to maintain force generation at this submaximal level. Mean net glycogen utilization per 3-s tetanus was 78% greater than in control muscle. However, the observed decrease in intracellular pH was less than that expected from energy budget calculations, suggesting either increased buffering capacity or modulation of ATP hydrolysis in the muscles of GPA-fed rats. The results demonstrate that the transport role of PCr is not essential in contracting muscle in GPA-fed rats. PCr is probably important in this regard in the larger fibers of control muscle. Although fast-twitch muscles depleted of PCr have nearly twice the glycogen reserves of control muscle, glycogenolysis is limited in its capacity to fill the role of PCr as an energy buffer under conditions of maximum ATP turnover.

  17. Demonstration of abnormal notochord development by three-dimensional reconstructive imaging in the rat model of esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Williams, A K; Qi, B Q; Beasley, S W

    2001-01-01

    The notochord (Nt) is believed to have a role in the development of axial organs. This study was undertaken to reconstruct in three dimensions (3D) the relationship of the Nt to abnormal development of the foregut (Fg) in the adriamycin-induced rat model of esophageal atresia (EA). Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given 1.75 mg/kg adriamycin intraperitoneally on gestational days 6 9 inclusive; control rats received i.p. saline of equal volume, or no injection. Rats were killed between days 11 and 14 and their embryos harvested, histologically sectioned serially, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Digitized photographs were taken of serial transverse sections; these photos were traced and used as the basis for 3D reconstruction. From day 11 the normal Nt is no longer in contact with the respiratory or Fg mesenchyme. In adriamycin-treated embryos the Nt branches abnormally as it enters the Fg mesenchyme. Adherence of the Nt to the mesenchyme of the Fg exerts mechanical traction pulling the upper Fg dorsally. The severity of the Fg abnormalities correlates with the length of the ventral extension of the Nt within the Fg mesenchyme: the embryo develops atresia of the esophagus or trachea when the Nt is grossly abnormal. The Nt undergoes reactive thickening in the absence of Fg structures ventral to it. Thus, structural lesions of the Fg (e.g., atresias) are associated with abnormalities of the Nt. The relationship of the Nt to the Fg mesenchyme determines the severity of the abnormality induced by adriamycin: extensive adherence produces tracheal agenesis and EA.

  18. Effects of hypokinesia and hypodynamia upon protein turnover in hindlimb muscles of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughna, Paul T.; Goldspink, David F.; Goldspink, Geoffrey

    1987-01-01

    Hypokinesia/hypodynamia was induced in the hindlimb muscles of the rat, using a suspension technique. This caused differing degrees of atrophy in different muscles. However, this atrophy was reduced in muscles held in a lenghthened position. The greatest degree of wasting was observed in the unstretched soleus, a slow postural muscle, where both Type 1 and Type 2a fibers atrophied to the same degree. However, wasting of the gastrocnemius muscle was associated with a reduction in the size of the Type 2b fibers. In both slow-postural and fast-phasic hindlimb muscles, atrophy was brought about by a reduction in the rate of protein synthesis in conjunction with an elevation in the rate of protein degradation. When inactive muscles were passively stretched, both protein synthesis and degradation were dramatically elevated. Even periods of stretch of as little as 0.5 h/d were found to significantly decrease atrophy in inactive muscles.

  19. Effect of collagen digestion on the passive elastic properties of diaphragm muscle in rat.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Justin; Chen, Qingshan; Domire, Zachary J; McCullough, Matthew B; Sieck, Gary; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; An, Kai-Nan

    2010-01-01

    Effects of collagen digestion have been defined up to the fibril level. However, the question remains as to whether the alteration of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) affects a muscle's passive elastic response. Various elastography methods have been applied as tools for evaluating the mechanical properties and ECM content of skeletal muscle. In an effort to develop an ECM altered skeletal muscle model, this study determined the effect of collagen digestion on the passive elastic properties of skeletal muscle. Passive mechanical properties of rat diaphragms were evaluated in various degrees of collagen digestion. Between cyclic loading tests, muscle strips were immersed in various concentrations of clostridium histolyticum derived bacterial collagenase. All samples were later viewed via light microscopy. Cyclic testing revealed linear relationships between passive muscle stiffness and digestion time at multiple concentrations. These results demonstrate that collagenase digestion of the ECM in skeletal muscle could be used as a simple and reliable model of mechanically altered in vitro tissue samples.

  20. Effects of hypokinesia and hypodynamia upon protein turnover in hindlimb muscles of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughna, Paul T.; Goldspink, David F.; Goldspink, Geoffrey

    1987-01-01

    Hypokinesia/hypodynamia was induced in the hindlimb muscles of the rat, using a suspension technique. This caused differing degrees of atrophy in different muscles. However, this atrophy was reduced in muscles held in a lenghthened position. The greatest degree of wasting was observed in the unstretched soleus, a slow postural muscle, where both Type 1 and Type 2a fibers atrophied to the same degree. However, wasting of the gastrocnemius muscle was associated with a reduction in the size of the Type 2b fibers. In both slow-postural and fast-phasic hindlimb muscles, atrophy was brought about by a reduction in the rate of protein synthesis in conjunction with an elevation in the rate of protein degradation. When inactive muscles were passively stretched, both protein synthesis and degradation were dramatically elevated. Even periods of stretch of as little as 0.5 h/d were found to significantly decrease atrophy in inactive muscles.

  1. Mitochondrial respiration in muscle and liver from cold-acclimated hypothyroid rats.

    PubMed

    Zaninovich, Angel A; Rebagliati, Ines; Raices, Marcela; Ricci, Conrado; Hagmuller, Karl

    2003-10-01

    The effects of long-term cold exposure on muscle and liver mitochondrial oxygen consumption in hypothyroid and normal rats were examined. Thyroid ablation was performed after 8-wk acclimation to 4 degrees C. Hypothyroid and normal controls remained in the cold for an additional 8 wk. At the end of 16-wk cold exposure, all hypothyroid rats were alive and normothermic and had normal body weight. At ambient temperature (24 degrees C), thyroid ablation induced a 65% fall in muscle mitochondrial oxygen consumption, which was reversed by thyroxine but not by norepinephrine administration. After cold acclimation was reached, suppression of thyroid function reduced muscle mitochondrial respiration by 30%, but the hypothyroid values remained about threefold higher than those in hypothyroid muscle in the warm. Blockade of beta- and alpha1-adrenergic receptors in both hypothyroid and normal rats produced hypothermia in vivo and a fall in muscle, liver, and brown adipose tissue mitochondria respiration in vitro. In normal rats, cold acclimation enhanced muscle respiration by 35%, in liver 18%, and in brown adipose tissue 450% over values in the warm. The results demonstrate that thyroid hormones, in the presence of norepinephrine, are major determinants of thermogenic activity in muscle and liver of cold-acclimated rats. After thyroid ablation, cold-induced nonshivering thermogenesis replaced 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine-induced thermogenesis, and normal body temperature was maintained.

  2. Metabolic adaptations of skeletal muscle to voluntary wheel running exercise in hypertensive heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R L; Kullman, E L; Waters, R P; Huang, H; Kirwan, J P; Gerdes, A M; Swallow, J G

    2013-01-01

    The Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure (SHHF) rat mimics the human progression of hypertension from hypertrophy to heart failure. However, it is unknown whether SHHF animals can exercise at sufficient levels to observe beneficial biochemical adaptations in skeletal muscle. Thirty-seven female SHHF and Wistar-Furth (WF) rats were randomized to sedentary (SHHFsed and WFsed) and exercise groups (SHHFex and WFex). The exercise groups had access to running wheels from 6-22 months of age. Hindlimb muscles were obtained for metabolic measures that included mitochondrial enzyme function and expression, and glycogen utilization. The SHHFex rats ran a greater distance and duration as compared to the WFex rats (P<0.05), but the WFex rats ran at a faster speed (P<0.05). Skeletal muscle citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase enzyme activity was not altered in the SHHFex group, but was increased (P<0.05) in the WFex animals. Citrate synthase protein and gene expression were unchanged in SHHFex animals, but were increased in WFex rats (P<0.05). In the WFex animals muscle glycogen was significantly depleted after exercise (P<0.05), but not in the SHHFex group. We conclude that despite robust amounts of aerobic activity, voluntary wheel running exercise was not sufficiently intense to improve the oxidative capacity of skeletal muscle in adult SHHF animals, indicating an inability to compensate for declining heart function by improving peripheral oxidative adaptations in the skeletal muscle.

  3. Isolation and characterization of primary skeletal muscle satellite cells from rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Sifan; Li, Wenxue; Du, Hongyan; Zhu, Wei

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize skeletal muscle satellite cells from rats using tissue block culture method. Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) level Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used to isolate skeletal muscle satellite cells. Morphology, expression and distribution of α-actin and Desmin within the cytoplasm of skeletal muscle satellite cells were compared with those of C2C12 myoblasts. The results showed that tissue block culturing method achieved robust proliferation and excellent differentiation of skeletal muscle satellite cells. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry results showed that α-actin and Desmin proteins were expressed in the cytoplasm of both skeletal muscle satellite cells and myoblasts. We concluded that tissue block culturing method can obtain highly purified skeletal muscle satellite cells with robust proliferation and excellent differentiation capabilities.

  4. [Morphohistochemical study of skeletal muscles in rats after experimental flight on "Kosmos-1887"].

    PubMed

    Il'ina-Kakueva, E I

    1990-01-01

    Morphometric and histochemical methods were used to examine the soleus, gastrocnemius (medial portion), quadriceps femoris (central portion) and biceps brachii muscles of Wistar SPF rats two days after the 13-day flight on Cosmos-1887. It was found that significant atrophy developed only in the soleus muscle. The space flight did not change the percentage content of slow (type I) and fast (type II) fibers in fast twitch muscles. During two days at 1 g the slow soleus muscle developed substantial circulation disorders, which led to interstitial edema and necrotic changes. The gastrocnemius muscle showed small foci containing necrotic myofibers. Two days after recovery no glycogen aggregates were seen in myofibers, which were previously observed in other rats examined 4--8 hours after flight. An initial stage of muscle readaptation to 1 g occurred, when NAD.H2-dehydrogenase activity was decreased.

  5. Green tea extract attenuates muscle loss and improves muscle function during disuse, but fails to improve muscle recovery following unloading in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Alway, Stephen E; Bennett, Brian T; Wilson, Joseph C; Sperringer, Justin; Mohamed, Junaith S; Edens, Neile K; Pereira, Suzette L

    2015-02-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that green tea extract (GTE) would improve muscle recovery after reloading following disuse. Aged (32 mo) Fischer 344 Brown Norway rats were randomly assigned to receive either 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HLS) or 14 days of HLS followed by normal ambulatory function for 14 days (recovery). Additional animals served as cage controls. The rats were given GTE (50 mg/kg body wt) or water (vehicle) by gavage 7 days before and throughout the experimental periods. Compared with vehicle treatment, GTE significantly attenuated the loss of hindlimb plantaris muscle mass (-24.8% vs. -10.7%, P < 0.05) and tetanic force (-43.7% vs. -25.9%, P <0.05) during HLS. Although GTE failed to further improve recovery of muscle function or mass compared with vehicle treatment, animals given green tea via gavage maintained the lower losses of muscle mass that were found during HLS (-25.2% vs. -16.0%, P < 0.05) and force (-45.7 vs. -34.4%, P < 0.05) after the reloading periods. In addition, compared with vehicle treatment, GTE attenuated muscle fiber cross-sectional area loss in both plantaris (-39.9% vs. -23.9%, P < 0.05) and soleus (-37.2% vs. -17.6%) muscles after HLS. This green tea-induced difference was not transient but was maintained over the reloading period for plantaris (-45.6% vs. -21.5%, P <0.05) and soleus muscle fiber cross-sectional area (-38.7% vs. -10.9%, P <0.05). GTE increased satellite cell proliferation and differentiation in plantaris and soleus muscles during recovery from HLS compared with vehicle-treated muscles and decreased oxidative stress and abundance of the Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), yet this did not further improve muscle recovery in reloaded muscles. These data suggest that muscle recovery following disuse in aging is complex. Although satellite cell proliferation and differentiation are critical for muscle repair to occur, green tea-induced changes in satellite cell number is by itself insufficient to

  6. Green tea extract attenuates muscle loss and improves muscle function during disuse, but fails to improve muscle recovery following unloading in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian T.; Wilson, Joseph C.; Sperringer, Justin; Mohamed, Junaith S.; Edens, Neile K.; Pereira, Suzette L.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that green tea extract (GTE) would improve muscle recovery after reloading following disuse. Aged (32 mo) Fischer 344 Brown Norway rats were randomly assigned to receive either 14 days of hindlimb suspension (HLS) or 14 days of HLS followed by normal ambulatory function for 14 days (recovery). Additional animals served as cage controls. The rats were given GTE (50 mg/kg body wt) or water (vehicle) by gavage 7 days before and throughout the experimental periods. Compared with vehicle treatment, GTE significantly attenuated the loss of hindlimb plantaris muscle mass (−24.8% vs. −10.7%, P < 0.05) and tetanic force (−43.7% vs. −25.9%, P <0.05) during HLS. Although GTE failed to further improve recovery of muscle function or mass compared with vehicle treatment, animals given green tea via gavage maintained the lower losses of muscle mass that were found during HLS (−25.2% vs. −16.0%, P < 0.05) and force (−45.7 vs. −34.4%, P < 0.05) after the reloading periods. In addition, compared with vehicle treatment, GTE attenuated muscle fiber cross-sectional area loss in both plantaris (−39.9% vs. −23.9%, P < 0.05) and soleus (−37.2% vs. −17.6%) muscles after HLS. This green tea-induced difference was not transient but was maintained over the reloading period for plantaris (−45.6% vs. −21.5%, P <0.05) and soleus muscle fiber cross-sectional area (−38.7% vs. −10.9%, P <0.05). GTE increased satellite cell proliferation and differentiation in plantaris and soleus muscles during recovery from HLS compared with vehicle-treated muscles and decreased oxidative stress and abundance of the Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), yet this did not further improve muscle recovery in reloaded muscles. These data suggest that muscle recovery following disuse in aging is complex. Although satellite cell proliferation and differentiation are critical for muscle repair to occur, green tea-induced changes in satellite cell number is

  7. Is regulation of proteolysis associated with redox-state changes in rat skeletal muscle?

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, M E

    1980-01-01

    In isolated rat diaphragms, only those substrates that increased the tissue NADH/NAD+ ratio lowered the rate of proteolysis. However, direct inhibition of proteinase activity by leupeptin promoted oxidation of the NAD couple of the muscles. These results suggest that changes in muscle reduction-oxidation state may be important in the regulation of proteolysis. PMID:7236250

  8. The bile duct ligated rat: A relevant model to study muscle mass loss in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Bosoi, Cristina R; Oliveira, Mariana M; Ochoa-Sanchez, Rafael; Tremblay, Mélanie; Ten Have, Gabriella A; Deutz, Nicolaas E; Rose, Christopher F; Bemeur, Chantal

    2017-04-01

    Muscle mass loss and hepatic encephalopathy (complex neuropsychiatric disorder) are serious complications of chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) which impact negatively on clinical outcome and quality of life and increase mortality. Liver disease leads to hyperammonemia and ammonia toxicity is believed to play a major role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. However, the effects of ammonia are not brain-specific and therefore may also affect other organs and tissues including muscle. The precise pathophysiological mechanisms underlying muscle wasting in chronic liver disease remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we characterized body composition as well as muscle protein synthesis in cirrhotic rats with hepatic encephalopathy using the 6-week bile duct ligation (BDL) model which recapitulates the main features of cirrhosis. Compared to sham-operated control animals, BDL rats display significant decreased gain in body weight, altered body composition, decreased gastrocnemius muscle mass and circumference as well as altered muscle morphology. Muscle protein synthesis was also significantly reduced in BDL rats compared to control animals. These findings demonstrate that the 6-week BDL experimental rat is a relevant model to study liver disease-induced muscle mass loss.

  9. The effect of creatine supplementation on mass and performance of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert E; Young, John C

    2007-08-09

    This study investigated the effect of dietary creatine supplementation on hypertrophy and performance of rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either tibialis anterior ablation or partial ablation of the plantaris/gastrocnemius to induce compensatory hypertrophy of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) or soleus respectively, or sham surgery. Creatine (300 mg/kg) was administered to one half of each group for 5 weeks, after which force production was measured. With the leg fixed at the knee and ankle, the distal tendon of the EDL or soleus was attached to a force transducer and the muscle was electrically stimulated via the sciatic nerve. Synergist ablation resulted in a significant increase in EDL mass and in soleus mass relative to control muscles. However, no effect of creatine supplementation on muscle mass or performance was found between control and either group of creatine-treated rats. Despite an apparent increase in muscle creatine content, creatine supplementation did not augment muscle hypertrophy or force production in rat EDL or soleus muscle, providing evidence that the potential benefits of creatine supplementation are not due to a direct effect on muscle but rather to an enhanced ability to train.

  10. Electrophysiological, histochemical, and hormonal adaptation of rat muscle after prolonged hindlimb suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Kyparos, Antonios; Albani, Maria; Frossinis, Athanasios; Papadelis, Christos L.; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Vivas, Ana; Guiba-Tziampiri, Olympia

    2004-05-01

    The perspective of long-duration flights for future exploration, imply more research in the field of human adaptation. Previous studies in rat muscles hindlimb suspension (HLS), indicated muscle atrophy and a change of fibre composition from slow-to-fast twitch types. However, the contractile responses to long-term unloading is still unclear. Fifteen adult Wistar rats were studied in 45 and 70 days of muscle unweighting and soleus (SOL) muscle as well as extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were prepared for electrophysiological recordings (single, twitch, tetanic contraction and fatigue) and histochemical stainings. The loss of muscle mass observed was greater in the soleus muscle. The analysis of electrophysiological properties of both EDL and SOL showed significant main effects of group, of number of unweighting days and fatigue properties. Single contraction for soleus muscle remained unchanged but there was statistically significant difference for tetanic contraction and fatigue. Fatigue index showed a decrease for the control rats, but increase for the HLS rats. According to the histochemical findings there was a shift from oxidative to glycolytic metabolism during HLS. The data suggested that muscles atrophied, but they presented an adaptation pattern, while their endurance in fatigue was decreased.

  11. Changes in rat soleus muscle phenotype consecutive to a growth in hypergravity followed by normogravity.

    PubMed

    Picquet, F; Bouet, V; Cochon, L; Lacour, M; Falempin, M

    2005-07-01

    It has been demonstrated that a long-term stay in hypergravity (HG: 2G) modified the phenotype and the contractile properties of rat soleus muscle. The ability of this muscle to contract was drastically reduced, which is a sign of anticipated aging. Consequently, our aim was to determine whether rats conceived, born, and reared in hypergravity showed adaptative capacities in normogravity (NG: 1G). This study was performed on rats divided into two series: the first was reared in HG until 100 days and was submitted to normogravity until 115 to 220 postnatal days (HG-NG rats); the second was made up of age paired groups reared in normogravity (NG rats). The contractile, morphological, and phenotypical properties of soleus muscle were studied. Our results showed that the NG rats were characterized by coexpressions of slow and fast myosin, respectively, 76.5 and 23.5% at 115 days. During their postnatal maturation, the fast isoform was gradually replaced by slow myosin. At 220 days, the relative proportions were respectively 91.05% and 8.95%. From 115 to 220 days, the HG-NG rats expressed 100% of slow myosin isoform and they presented a slower contractile behavior compared with their age-matched groups; at 115 days, the whole muscle contraction time was increased by 35%, and by 15%, at 220 days. Our study underlined the importance of gravity in the muscular development and suggested the existence of critical periods in muscle phenotype installation.

  12. Length-tension relationships are altered in regenerating muscles of the rat after bupivacaine injection.

    PubMed

    Plant, David R; Beitzel, Felice; Lynch, Gordon S

    2005-06-01

    Intramuscular injection of bupivacaine causes complete degeneration of fibers in extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of rats, followed by complete regeneration within 60 days. Previous studies have shown that regenerated EDL muscles are protected from contraction-induced injury 60 days after bupivacaine injection. It is possible that these regenerated muscles have altered length-tension relations because of fiber remodeling. We tested the hypothesis that length-tension relations are different in bupivacaine-injected and noninjected control muscles. EDL and soleus muscles of the right hindlimb of deeply anesthetized rats were injected with bupivacaine and then allowed to recover for 7, 14, 21, or 60 days (7D, 14D, 21D, 60D), and isometric contractile properties were assessed. Muscles of the contralateral limb were not injected and served as control. EDL muscles recovered from bupivacaine injection more rapidly than soleus muscles, with mass restored to control levels at 21D, and isometric tetanic force (P(o)) restored to control at 60D. In contrast, mass and P(o) of injected soleus muscles was not restored to control even at 60D. In 7D EDL muscles, length-tension curves were shifted leftward compared with control, but in 21D and 60D EDL muscles length-tension curves were right shifted significantly (treatment x muscle length: P < 0.001). Although no clear shift in the position of the length-tension curve was observed in regenerating soleus muscles, force production was enhanced on the descending limb of the curve in 60D soleus muscles (treatment x relative muscle length: P < 0.01). The rightward shift in the length-tension curve of EDL muscles 60 days after bupivacaine injection is likely to contribute to the mechanism for their previously observed protection from contraction-induced injury.

  13. Identification of motoneurons supplying multiply- or singly-innervated extraocular muscle fibers in the rat.

    PubMed

    Eberhorn, A C; Büttner-Ennever, J A; Horn, A K E

    2006-02-01

    In mammals, the extraocular muscle fibers can be categorized in singly-innervated and multiply-innervated muscle fibers. In the monkey oculomotor, trochlear and abducens nucleus the motoneurons of multiply-innervated muscle fibers lie separated from those innervating singly-innervated muscle fibers and show different histochemical properties. In order to discover, if this organization is a general feature of the oculomotor system, we investigated the location of singly-innervated muscle fiber and multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons in the rat using combined tract-tracing and immunohistochemical techniques. The singly-innervated muscle fiber and multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons of the medial and lateral rectus muscle were identified by retrograde tracer injections into the muscle belly or the distal myotendinous junction. The belly injections labeled the medial rectus muscle subgroup of the oculomotor nucleus or the greatest part of abducens nucleus, including some cells outside the medial border of abducens nucleus. In contrast, the distal injections labeled only a subset of the medial rectus muscle motoneurons and exclusively cells outside the medial border of abducens nucleus. The tracer detection was combined with immunolabeling using antibodies for perineuronal nets (chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan) and non-phosphorylated neurofilaments. In monkeys both antibodies permit a distinction between singly-innervated muscle fiber and multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons. The experiments revealed that neurons labeled from a distal injection lack both markers and are assumed to represent multiply-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons, whereas those labeled from a belly injection are chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan- and non-phosphorylated neurofilament-immunopositive and assumed to represent singly-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons. The overall identification of multiply-innervated muscle fiber and singly-innervated muscle fiber motoneurons

  14. Coexistence of twitch potentiation and tetanic force decline in rat hindlimb muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Lucinda L.; Enoka, Roger M.; Volz, Kathryn A.; Stuart, Douglas G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of whole-muscle fatigue on the isometric twitch was investigated in various hindlimb muscles of anesthetized rats, using an experimental protocol designed to assess the levels of fatigability in motor units. The results of EMG and force measurements revealed the existence of a linear relationship between fatigability and the magnitude of the twitch force following the fatigue test in both soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles.

  15. Prostacyclin and pathogenesis of hemodynamic abnormalities of diabetic ketoacidosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Quyyumi, A A; Iaffaldano, R; Guerrero, J L; Ryan, C A; Powell, W J; Axelrod, L

    1989-12-01

    The pathogenesis of the hemodynamic abnormalities of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is not well understood. Previous studies suggest that prostacyclin (PGI2) production by adipose tissue is increased in DKA. We investigated the role of PGI2 in the pathogenesis of the reduced vascular resistance in DKA. Rats with streptozocin-induced DKA were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, and flow was measured with an electromagnetic probe on the infradiaphragmatic aorta. The plasma level of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (stable derivative of PGI2) was higher (mean +/- SE 0.91 +/- 0.05 ng/ml) and vascular resistance lower (4.9 +/- 0.2 mmHg.ml-1.min-1.100 g-1 [resistance units, RU]) in 67 rats with DKA than in 21 normal rats (0.34 +/- 0.03 ng/ml, P less than .01, and 9.0 +/- 0.7 RU, P less than .01, respectively). Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity with either indomethacin or meclofenamic acid reduced the plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha level but failed to raise vascular resistance. Infusions of PGI2 in rats with DKA demonstrated that the vasculature was responsive to PGI2. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity not only reduced PGI2 production but also suppressed renin release. When the effects of the renin-angiotensin system were excluded by bilateral nephrectomy, indomethacin caused a significant increase (P less than .05) in vascular resistance. Thus, the failure of cyclooxygenase inhibitors to raise vascular resistance in DKA was a result of concurrent suppression of vasodilator (PGI2) and vasoconstrictor (renin-angiotensin system) mechanisms that are activated in DKA. Insulin administration increased vascular resistance (P less than .01) and decreased the level of plasma 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (P less than .01). Combined administration of PGI2 and insulin did not alter vascular resistance, suggesting that the increase in vascular resistance with insulin was predominantly due to the reduction of circulating PGI2. Thus, vascular resistance is decreased in DKA primarily as a result of the

  16. Leucine Protects Against Skeletal Muscle Atrophy in Lipopolysaccharide-Challenged Rats.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jin; Chen, Daiwen; Yu, Bing; Luo, Yuheng; Mao, Xiangbing; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jie; Luo, Junqiu; He, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a decrease in muscle mass that occurs when protein degradation exceeds protein synthesis. Leucine (Leu), an essential branched-chain amino acid in animal nutrition, regulates skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate whether Leu could alleviate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced skeletal muscle wasting by modulating skeletal muscle protein synthesis and degradation. A total of 24 rats were randomly allocated into three groups (n = 8): (1) non-challenged control; (2) LPS-challenged control; and (3) LPS +3.0% Leu. Rats were fed with control or Leu-supplemented (part of the casein was replaced with 3.0% Leu) diets throughout the trial and were injected intraperitoneally with sterile saline or LPS at days 6, 11, 16, and 21. On the morning of day 22, serum samples were collected and rats were then sacrificed for liver and muscle analysis. In vitro protein degradation, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity, and proteolytic enzyme activities of the muscles from immune-challenged rats were also measured. Our results showed that the LPS challenge resulted in not only enhanced serum interleukin-1 and liver C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations but also decreased the average daily body weight gain and muscle fiber diameter. However, dietary Leu inclusion attenuated the increase in CRP level and the decrease in muscle fiber diameter. Importantly, the LPS challenge caused a significant elevation in the muscle proteolysis rate, but dietary Leu supplementation significantly blocked the muscle proteolysis. The mRNA expression of NF-κB, muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), and muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1) was upregulated by the LPS challenge in gastrocnemius muscles, but was downregulated by Leu supplementation. Interestingly, when muscles from the LPS-challenged rats were incubated with Leu in vitro, proteasome-, calpain-, and cathepsin-L-dependent muscle proteolysis and NF-κB activity were decreased. Collectively, the

  17. Regional variations in intramyocellular lipid concentration correlate with muscle fiber type distribution in rat tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    De Feyter, Henk M M L; Schaart, Gert; Hesselink, Matthijs K; Schrauwen, Patrick; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J

    2006-07-01

    1H MR spectroscopy (MRS) has proved to be a valuable noninvasive tool to measure intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) in research focused on insulin resistance and type II diabetes in both humans and rodents. An important determinant of IMCL is the muscle fiber type, since oxidative type I fibers can contain up to three times more IMCL than glycolytic type II muscle fibers. Because these different muscle fiber types are inhomogeneously distributed in rodent muscle, in the present study we investigated the distribution of IMCL within the rat tibialis anterior muscle (TA) in vivo using single-voxel 1H MRS along with the muscle fiber distribution in the TA ex vivo determined from immunohistological assays. IMCL levels in the TA differed by up to a factor of 3 depending on the position of the voxel. The distribution of IMCL over the TA cross section was not random, but emerged in a pattern similar to the distribution of the predominantly oxidative muscle fiber types. Dietary interventions, such as high-fat feeding and 15 hr of fasting, did not significantly change this typical fiber type-dependent pattern of IMCL content. These results stress the importance of voxel positioning when single-voxel 1H MRS is used to study IMCL in rodent muscle. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Effects of oxygen deprivation on incubated rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated soleus muscle deprived of oxygen produces more lactate and alanine than oxygen-supplied muscle. Oxygenated muscle synthesized glutamine, while anoxic muscle used this amino acid. Oxygen deprivation decreased adenine nucleotides leading to the efflux of nucleosides. Protein synthesis and degradation responded differently to anoxia. Synthesis almost completely ceased, while proteolysis increased. Therefore, protein degradation in soleus muscle is enhanced when energy supplies and oxygen tension are low.

  19. Effects of oxygen deprivation on incubated rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Julie M.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated soleus muscle deprived of oxygen produces more lactate and alanine than oxygen-supplied muscle. Oxygenated muscle synthesized glutamine, while anoxic muscle used this amino acid. Oxygen deprivation decreased adenine nucleotides leading to the efflux of nucleosides. Protein synthesis and degradation responded differently to anoxia. Synthesis almost completely ceased, while proteolysis increased. Therefore, protein degradation in soleus muscle is enhanced when energy supplies and oxygen tension are low.

  20. Differential RNA Expression Profile of Skeletal Muscle Induced by Experimental Autoimmune Myasthenia Gravis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Henry J.; Himuro, Keiichi; Alshaikh, Jumana; Gong, Bendi; Cheng, Georgiana; Kusner, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    The differential susceptibility of skeletal muscle by myasthenia gravis (MG) is not well understood. We utilized RNA expression profiling of extraocular muscle (EOM), diaphragm (DIA), and extensor digitorum (EDL) of rats with experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) to evaluate the hypothesis that muscles respond differentially to injury produced by EAMG. EAMG was induced in female Lewis rats by immunization with acetylcholine receptor purified from the electric organ of the Torpedo. Six weeks later after rats had developed weakness and serum antibodies directed against the AChR, animals underwent euthanasia and RNA profiling performed on DIA, EDL, and EOM. Profiling results were validated by qPCR. Across the three muscles between the experiment and control groups, 359 probes (1.16%) with greater than 2-fold changes in expression in 7 of 9 series pairwise comparisons from 31,090 probes were identified with approximately two-thirds being increased. The three muscles shared 16 genes with increased expression and 6 reduced expression. Functional annotation demonstrated that these common expression changes fell predominantly into categories of metabolism, stress response, and signaling. Evaluation of specific gene function indicated that EAMG led to a change to oxidative metabolism. Genes related to muscle regeneration and suppression of immune response were activated. Evidence of a differential immune response among muscles was not evident. Each muscle had a distinct RNA profile but with commonality in gene categories expressed that are focused on muscle repair, moderation of inflammation, and oxidative metabolism. PMID:27891095

  1. Effect of endurance training on glucose transport capacity and glucose transporter expression in rat skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ploug, T.; Stallknecht, B.M.; Pedersen, O.; Kahn, B.B.; Ohkuwa, T.; Vinten, J.; Galbo, H. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of 10 wk endurance swim training on 3-O-methylglucose (3-MG) uptake (at 40 mM 3-MG) in skeletal muscle was studied in the perfused rat hindquarter. Training resulted in an increase of approximately 33% for maximum insulin-stimulated 3-MG transport in fast-twitch red fibers and an increase of approximately 33% for contraction-stimulated transport in slow-twitch red fibers compared with nonexercised sedentary muscle. A fully additive effect of insulin and contractions was observed both in trained and untrained muscle. Compared with transport in control rats subjected to an almost exhaustive single exercise session the day before experiment both maximum insulin- and contraction-stimulated transport rates were increased in all muscle types in trained rats. Accordingly, the increased glucose transport capacity in trained muscle was not due to a residual effect of the last training session. Half-times for reversal of contraction-induced glucose transport were similar in trained and untrained muscles. The concentrations of mRNA for GLUT-1 (the erythrocyte-brain-Hep G2 glucose transporter) and GLUT-4 (the adipocyte-muscle glucose transporter) were increased approximately twofold by training in fast-twitch red muscle fibers. In parallel to this, Western blot demonstrated a approximately 47% increase in GLUT-1 protein and a approximately 31% increase in GLUT-4 protein. This indicates that the increases in maximum velocity for 3-MG transport in trained muscle is due to an increased number of glucose transporters.

  2. Changes in activity and structure of jaw muscles in Parkinson's disease model rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S; Kawai, N; Ohnuki, Y; Saeki, Y; Korfage, J A M; Langenbach, G E J; Kitayama, T; Watanabe, M; Sano, R; Tanne, K; Tanaka, E

    2013-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), a major neurological disease, is characterised by a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Patients with PD frequently show chewing and swallowing dysfunctions, but little is known about the characteristics of their stomatognathic functions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of PD on jaw muscle fibre and functions. PD model rats were made by means of the injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum of 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats. Five weeks after the injection, a radio-telemetric device was implanted to record muscle activity continuously from the superficial masseter and anterior belly of digastric muscles. Muscle activity was recorded for 3 days and was evaluated by the total duration of muscle activity per day (duty time). After recording the muscle activities, jaw muscles were isolated for immunohistochemical and PCR analyses. In PD model rats, the following findings of the digastrics muscles verify that compared to the control group: (i) the higher duty time exceeding 5% of the peak activity level, (ii) the higher expression of the mRNA of myosin heavy chain type I, and (iii) the tendency for fast to slow fibre-type transition. With respect to the masseter muscle, there were no significant differences in all analyses. In conclusion, PD leads to the changes in the jaw behaviours, resulting in a PD-specific chewing and swallowing dysfunctions.

  3. Periurethral muscle-derived mononuclear cell injection improves urethral sphincter restoration in rats.

    PubMed

    Turco, Marcelo Pitelli; de Souza, Alex Balduino; de Campos Sousa, Isida; Fratini, Paula; Veras, Mariana Matera; Rodrigues, Marcio Nogueira; de Bessa, José; Brolio, Marina Pandolphi; Leite, Katia Ramos Moreira; Bruschini, Homero; Srougi, Miguel; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes

    2017-03-27

    Investigate the effect of a novel cell-based therapy with skeletal muscle-derived mononuclear cells (SMDMCs) in a rat model of stress urinary incontinence. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats' hind limb muscles were enzymatically dissociated, and SMDMCs were isolated without needing expansion. The cell population was characterized. Twenty female rats underwent urethrolysis. One week later, 10 rats received periurethral injection of 10(6) cells (SMDMC group), and 10 rats received saline injections (Saline group). Ten rats underwent sham surgery (Sham group). Four weeks after injection, animals were euthanized and the urethra was removed. The incorporation of SMDMCs in the female urethra was evaluated with fluorescence in situ hybridization for the detection of Y-chromosomes. Hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome staining, and immunohistochemistry for actin and myosin were performed. The muscle/connective tissue, actin and myosin ratios were calculated. Morphological evaluation of the urethral diameters and fractional areas of the lumen, mucosa, and muscular layer was performed. SMDMCs population was consistent with the presence of muscle cells, muscle satellite cells, perivascular cells, muscle progenitor cells, and endothelial cells. SMDMCs were incorporated into the urethra. A significant decrease in the muscle/connective tissue ratio was observed in the Saline group compared with the SMDMC and Sham groups. The proportions of actin and myosin were significantly decreased in the Saline group. No differences were observed in the morphometric parameters. SDMSC were incorporated into the rat urethra and promoted histological recovery of the damaged urethral sphincter, resulting in decreased connective tissue deposition and increased muscle content. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A dysmorphology score system for assessing embryo abnormalities in rat whole embryo culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cindy X; Danberry, Tracy; Jacobs, Mary Ann; Augustine-Rauch, Karen

    2010-12-01

    The rodent whole embryo culture (WEC) system is a well-established model for characterizing developmental toxicity of test compounds and conducting mechanistic studies. Laboratories have taken various approaches in describing type and severity of developmental findings of organogenesis-stage rodent embryos, but the Brown and Fabro morphological score system is commonly used as a quantitative approach. The associated score criteria is based upon developmental stage and growth parameters, where a series of embryonic structures are assessed and assigned respective scores relative to their gestational stage, with a Total Morphological Score (TMS) assigned to the embryo. This score system is beneficial because it assesses a series of stage-specific anatomical landmarks, facilitating harmonized evaluation across laboratories. Although the TMS provides a quantitative approach to assess growth and determine developmental delay, it is limited to its ability to identify and/or delineate subtle or structure-specific abnormalities. Because of this, the TMS may not be sufficiently sensitive for identifying compounds that induce structure or organ-selective effects. This study describes a distinct morphological score system called the "Dysmorphology Score System (DMS system)" that has been developed for assessing gestation day 11 (approximately 20-26 somite stage) rat embryos using numerical scores to differentiate normal from abnormal morphology and define the respective severity of dysmorphology of specific embryonic structures and organ systems. This method can also be used in scoring mouse embryos of the equivalent developmental stage. The DMS system enhances capabilities to rank-order compounds based upon teratogenic potency, conduct structure- relationships of chemicals, and develop statistical prediction models to support abbreviated developmental toxicity screens. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Titin isoform size is not correlated with thin filament length in rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Greaser, Marion L.; Pleitner, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling thin filament length (TFL) in muscle remain controversial. It was recently reported that TFL was related to titin size, and that the latter might be involved in TFL determination. Titin plays several crucial roles in the sarcomere, but its function as it pertains to the thin filament has not been explored. We tested this relationship using several muscles from wild type rats and from a mutant rat model (Greaser et al., 2008) which results in increased titin size. Myofibrils were isolated from skeletal muscles [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), external oblique (EO), gastrocnemius (GAS), longissimus dorsi (LD), psoas major (PM), and tibialis anterior(TA)] using both adult wild type (WT) and homozygous mutant (HM) rats (n = 6 each). Phalloidin and antibodies against tropomodulin-4 (Tmod-4) and nebulin's N-terminus were used to determine TFL. The WT rats studied express skeletal muscle titin sizes ranging from 3.2 to 3.7 MDa, while the HM rats express a giant titin isoform sized at 3.8 MDa. No differences in phalloidin based TFL, nebulin distance, or Tmod distance were observed across genotypes. However, the HM rats demonstrated a significantly increased (p < 0.01) rest sarcomere length relative to the WT phenotype. It appears that the increased titin size, predominantly observed in HM rats' middle Ig domain, allows for increased extensibility. The data indicates that, although titin performs many sarcomeric functions, its correlation with TFL and structure could not be demonstrated in the rat. PMID:24550844

  6. Intercostal muscle motor behavior during tracheal occlusion conditioning in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Poonam B.

    2016-01-01

    A respiratory load compensation response is characterized by increases in activation of primary respiratory muscles and/or recruitment of accessory respiratory muscles. The contribution of the external intercostal (EI) muscles, which are a primary respiratory muscle group, during normal and loaded breathing remains poorly understood in conscious animals. Consciousness has a significant role on modulation of respiratory activity, as it is required for the integration of behavioral respiratory responses and voluntary control of breathing. Studies of respiratory load compensation have been predominantly focused in anesthetized animals, which make their comparison to conscious load compensation responses challenging. Using our established model of intrinsic transient tracheal occlusions (ITTO), our aim was to evaluate the motor behavior of EI muscles during normal and loaded breathing in conscious rats. We hypothesized that 1) conscious rats exposed to ITTO will recruit the EI muscles with an increased electromyogram (EMG) activation and 2) repeated ITTO for 10 days would potentiate the baseline EMG activity of this muscle in conscious rats. Our results demonstrate that conscious rats exposed to ITTO respond by recruiting the EI muscle with a significantly increased EMG activation. This response to occlusion remained consistent over the 10-day experimental period with little or no effect of repeated ITTO exposure on the baseline ∫EI EMG amplitude activity. The pattern of activation of the EI muscle in response to an ITTO is discussed in detail. The results from the present study demonstrate the importance of EI muscles during unloaded breathing and respiratory load compensation in conscious rats. PMID:26823339

  7. Response of muscle protein synthesis to fasting in suckling and weaned rats.

    PubMed

    Davis, T A; Fiorotto, M L; Nguyen, H V; Burrin, D G; Reeds, P J

    1991-12-01

    Protein synthetic efficiency (KRNA) is low in immature skeletal muscle of suckling rats and increases toward the end of the suckling period. To determine whether immature skeletal muscle is able to further reduce KRNA in response to fasting, suckling (5, 10, and 16 days of age) and weaned (28 days of age) rats were fed, fasted for 10 h, or fasted for 18 h and injected with a flooding dose of L-[4-3H]phenylalanine for measurement of muscle protein synthesis in vivo. In fed rats, fractional rates of protein synthesis (KS) and protein synthetic capacity decreased during the suckling period. KRNA increased toward the end of the suckling period. In 5-day-old rats, fasting for 10 h produced a 50% decline in KS of extensor digitorum longus and plantaris muscles, but KS did not change further after 18 h of fasting. In older suckled and weaned rats, 10 h of fasting decreased KS of extensor digitorum longus and plantaris muscles 30%; after 18 h of fasting, values had declined to 50% of those in fed animals. The reductions in KS in soleus muscles with 10 and 18 h of fasting were similar to those in other muscles at 5 and 10 days but were less than those in other muscles at 16 and 28 days. Changes in KRNA were similar to those for KS in all muscles from all age groups fasted for 10 and 18 h. Protein synthetic capacity decreased approximately 12% after 18 h of fasting, but this effect did not differ between age groups or muscle types.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Hippocampal cell loss and propagation of abnormal discharges accompanied with the expression of tonic convulsion in the spontaneously epileptic rat.

    PubMed

    Hanaya, Ryosuke; Sasa, Masashi; Sugata, Sei; Tokudome, Mai; Serikawa, Tadao; Kurisu, Kaoru; Arita, Kazunori

    2010-04-30

    Spontaneously epileptic rats (SER) are double mutants with both tonic convulsion and absence-like seizures from the age of 8 weeks. Hippocampal CA3 neurons in SER display a long-lasting depolarizing shift accompanied by repetitive firing (attributed to abnormalities of the Ca(2+) channels) with a single stimulation of the mossy fibers. In the present investigation, we examined if the seizure discharges of SER were correlated with the hippocampal abnormality of SER using electrophysiological and histological methods. In CA1 neurons of seizure-susceptible mature SER, higher-voltage (<8-11 V) stimulations induced a long depolarization shift (in 25% of neurons) with repetitive firing (in 12.5% of neurons). However, the tremor rat, one of the parent strains of SER, did not exhibit such abnormal firing in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The number of CA3 neurons in SER was significantly (p<0.01) lower than that in tremor rats and Wistar rats, although no significant difference was established in the hilus. Sprouting of mossy fiber was observed in the dentate of mature SER; however, negligible staining was spotted in the dentate of both mature tremor and Wistar rats. Interestingly, expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor was higher in the hilus, CA3, and granular cell layer of dentate gyrus in SER than normal Wistar rats. The expression levels of TUNEL, bax, and Caspase-3 did not show significant changes between the SER and Wistar rats. SER exhibited hippocampal sclerosis-like changes which did not have enough potential for epileptogenesis. Repetitive tonic seizures and vulnerable CA3 neurons of SER could be involved in the induction of sclerosis-like changes in the hippocampus.

  9. Purinergic Effects on Na,K-ATPase Activity Differ in Rat and Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Juel, Carsten; Nordsborg, Nikolai B.; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background P2Y receptor activation may link the effect of purines to increased maximal in vitro activity of the Na,K-ATPase in rat muscle. The hypothesis that a similar mechanism is present in human skeletal muscle was investigated with membranes from rat and human skeletal muscle. Results Membranes purified from rat and human muscles were used in the Na,K-ATPase assay. Incubation with ADP, the stable ADP analogue MeS-ADP and UDP increased the Na+ dependent Na,K-ATPase activity in rat muscle membranes, whereas similar treatments of human muscle membranes lowered the Na,K-ATPase activity. UTP incubation resulted in unchanged Na,K-ATPase activity in humans, but pre-incubation with the antagonist suramin resulted in inhibition with UTP, suggesting that P2Y receptors are involved. The Na,K-ATPase in membranes from both rat and human could be stimulated by protein kinase A and C activation. Thus, protein kinase A and C activation can increase Na,K-ATPase activity in human muscle but not via P2Y receptor stimulation. Conclusion The inhibitory effects of most purines (with the exception of UTP) in human muscle membranes are probably due to mass law inhibition of ATP hydrolysis. This inhibition could be blurred in rat due to receptor mediated activation of the Na,K-ATPase. The different effects could be related to a high density of ADP sensitive P2Y1 and P2Y13 receptors in rat, whereas the UTP sensitive P2Y11 could be more abundant in human. Alternatively, rat could possesses a mechanism for protein-protein interaction between P2Y receptors and the Na,K-ATPase, and this mechanism could be absent in human skeletal muscle (perhaps with the exception of the UTP sensitive P2Y11 receptor). Perspective Rat muscle is not a reliable model for purinergic effects on Na,K-ATPase in human skeletal muscle. PMID:24614174

  10. Regrowth after skeletal muscle atrophy is impaired in aged rats, despite similar responses in signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    White, Jena R.; Confides, Amy L.; Moore-Reed, Stephanie; Hoch, Johanna M.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regrowth after atrophy is impaired in the aged and in this study we hypothesized that this can be explained by a blunted response of signaling pathways and cellular processes during reloading after hind limb suspension in muscles from old rats. Male Brown Norway Fisher 344 rats at 6 (young) and 32 (old) months of age were subjected to normal ambulatory conditions (amb), hind limb suspension for 14 days (HS), and HS followed by reloading through normal ambulation for 14 days (RE); soleus muscles were used for analysis of intracellular signaling pathways and cellular processes. Soleus muscle regrowth was blunted in old compared to young rats which coincided with a recovery of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in young but not old. However, the response to reloading for p-Akt, p-p70s6k and p-GSK3β protein abundance was similar between muscles from young and old rats, even though main effects for age indicate an increase in activation of this protein synthesis pathway in the aged. Similarly, MAFbx mRNA levels in soleus muscle from old rats recovered to the same extent as in the young, while Murf-1 was unchanged. mRNA abundance of autophagy markers Atg5 and Atg7 showed an identical response in muscle from old compared to young rats, but beclin did not. Autophagic flux was not changed at either age at the measured time point. Apoptosis was elevated in soleus muscle from old rats particularly with HS, but recovered in HSRE and these changes were not associated with differences in caspase-3, -8 or-9 activity in any group. Protein abundance of apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruitment domain (ARC), cytosolic EndoG, as well as cytosolic and nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were lower in muscle from old rats, and there was no age-related difference in the response to atrophy or regrowth. Soleus muscles from old rats had a higher number of ED2 positive macrophages in all groups and these decreased with HS, but recovered in HSRE in the old, while no

  11. Regrowth after skeletal muscle atrophy is impaired in aged rats, despite similar responses in signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    White, Jena R; Confides, Amy L; Moore-Reed, Stephanie; Hoch, Johanna M; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E

    2015-04-01

    Skeletal muscle regrowth after atrophy is impaired in the aged and in this study we hypothesized that this can be explained by a blunted response of signaling pathways and cellular processes during reloading after hind limb suspension in muscles from old rats. Male Brown Norway Fisher 344 rats at 6 (young) and 32 (old) months of age were subjected to normal ambulatory conditions (amb), hind limb suspension for 14 days (HS), and HS followed by reloading through normal ambulation for 14 days (RE); soleus muscles were used for analysis of intracellular signaling pathways and cellular processes. Soleus muscle regrowth was blunted in old compared to young rats which coincided with a recovery of serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels in young but not old. However, the response to reloading for p-Akt, p-p70s6k and p-GSK3β protein abundance was similar between muscles from young and old rats, even though main effects for age indicate an increase in activation of this protein synthesis pathway in the aged. Similarly, MAFbx mRNA levels in soleus muscle from old rats recovered to the same extent as in the young, while Murf-1 was unchanged. mRNA abundance of autophagy markers Atg5 and Atg7 showed an identical response in muscle from old compared to young rats, but beclin did not. Autophagic flux was not changed at either age at the measured time point. Apoptosis was elevated in soleus muscle from old rats particularly with HS, but recovered in HSRE and these changes were not associated with differences in caspase-3, -8 or -9 activity in any group. Protein abundance of apoptosis repressor with caspase-recruitment domain (ARC), cytosolic EndoG, as well as cytosolic and nuclear apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were lower in muscle from old rats, and there was no age-related difference in the response to atrophy or regrowth. Soleus muscles from old rats had a higher number of ED2 positive macrophages in all groups and these decreased with HS, but recovered in HSRE in the old, while no

  12. Rat diaphragm muscle contraction with and without oxygen enrichment.

    PubMed

    Gölgeli, A; Coşkun, A; Ozesmi, C

    1995-10-01

    We investigated the effect of deprivation of oxygen circulation in the organ bath on the tension generation of the diaphragm in vitro. Adult male Swiss Albino rats were quickly killed and the left hemidiaphragms removed. Isolated phrenic nerve-diaphragmatic strip preparations were placed in an individual organ chamber containing Krebs solution and were connected to a force displacement transducer. The solution was maintained at 32 degrees C and bubbled with 95% O2-5% CO2. For the measurement of isometric twitch characteristics, supramaximal voltage was delivered via phrenic nerve electrodes. After turning off the gas circulation, isometric twitch characteristics were determined at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes. Then the muscle was allowed to recover under aerobic conditions (i.e., while bathed in a fresh solution, gassed with 95% O2-5% CO2). The isometric contractile properties were determined at the same intervals. In spite of no change in contraction time (CT) and relaxation time (1/2 RT), twitch amplitude (Pt) decreased following the termination of oxygen circulation (p < 0.05). The twitch tension improved in the recovery period but the decrease of tension developed more rapidly than the increase of tension development. We suggest that the decrease in the twitch tension was possibly due to a direct effect of intracellular acidosis. This study shows that no important change occurred in Ca+2 release and/or in the uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, because of the finding of the CT and 1/2 RT values.

  13. Mitochondrial nitric oxide metabolism in rat muscle during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Silvia; Boveris, Alberto

    2004-11-01

    In this study, heart and diaphragm mitochondria produced 0.69 and 0.77 nmol nitric oxide (NO)/min mg protein, rates that account for 67 and 24% of maximal cellular NO production, respectively. Endotoxemia and septic shock occur with an exacerbated inflammatory response that damages tissue mitochondria. Skeletal muscle seems to be one of the main target organs in septic shock, showing an increased NO production and early oxidative stress. The kinetic properties of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS) of heart and diaphragm were determined. For diaphragm, the KM values for O2 and L-Arg were 4.6 and 37 microM and for heart were 3.3 and 36 microM. The optimal pH for mtNOS activity was 6.5 for diaphragm and 7.0 for heart. A marked increase in mtNOS activity was observed in endotoxemic rats, 90% in diaphragm and 30% in heart. Diaphragm and heart mitochondrial O2*- and H2O2 production were 2- to 3-fold increased during endotoxemia and Mn-SOD activity showed a 2-fold increase in treated animals, whereas catalase activity was unchanged. One of the current hypotheses for the molecular mechanisms underlying the complex condition of septic shock is that the enhanced NO production by mtNOS leads to excessive peroxynitrite production and protein nitration in the mitochondrial matrix, causing mitochondrial dysfunction and contractile failure.

  14. Enhancement of Skeletal Muscle in Aged Rats Following High-Intensity Stretch-Shortening Contraction Training.

    PubMed

    Rader, Erik P; Naimo, Marshall A; Layner, Kayla N; Triscuit, Alyssa M; Chetlin, Robert D; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2017-04-01

    Exercise is the most accessible, efficacious, and multifactorial intervention to improve health and treat chronic disease. High-intensity resistance exercise, in particular, also maximizes skeletal muscle size and strength-outcomes crucial at advanced age. However, such training is capable of inducing muscle maladaptation when misapplied at old age. Therefore, characterization of parameters (e.g., mode and frequency) that foster adaptation is an active research area. To address this issue, we utilized a rodent model that allowed training at maximal intensity in terms of muscle activation and tested the hypothesis that muscles of old rats adapt to stretch-shortening contraction (SSC) training, provided the training frequency is sufficiently low. At termination of training, normalized muscle mass (i.e., muscle mass divided by tibia length) and muscle quality (isometric force divided by normalized muscle mass) were determined. For young rats, normalized muscle mass increased by ∼20% regardless of training frequency. No difference was observed for muscle quality values after 2 days versus 3 days per week training (0.65 ± 0.09 N/mg/mm vs. 0.59 ± 0.05 N/mg/mm, respectively). For old rats following 3 days per week training, normalized muscle mass was unaltered and muscle quality was 30% lower than young levels. Following 2 days per week training at old age, normalized muscle mass increased by 17% and muscle quality was restored to young levels. To investigate this enhanced response, oxidative stress was assessed by lipid peroxidation quantification. For young rats, lipid peroxidation levels were unaltered by training. With aging, baseline levels of lipid peroxidation increased by 1.5-fold. For old rats, only 2 days per week training decreased lipid peroxidation to levels indistinguishable from young values. These results imply that, appropriately scheduled high-intensity SSC training at old age is capable of restoring muscle to a younger phenotype in terms

  15. [Skeletal muscle mixed fiber tissue metabolism in rats after a flight on the Kosmos-690 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Gaevskaia, M S; Belitskaia, R A; Kolganova, N S; Kolchina, E V; Kurkina, L M

    1979-01-01

    On the R+O day the quadriceps muscle of rats showed a decrease in the content of T protein and an inhibition of LDH activity of sacroplasmatic proteins. These changes resulted from the combined affect of space flight factors and gamma-irradiation, and may be considered as a decline of compensatory synthetic processes responsible for the recovery of muscle proteins in weightlessness. Inhibition of the age-associated shift of the M:H ratio of LDH found on the R+25 day can be attributed to the inhibitory effect of gamma-irradiation. No change in the content of glycogen in the gastrocnemius muscle of flight rats was noted.

  16. Effect of denervation or unweighting on GLUT-4 protein in rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Mondon, Carl E.; James, David E.; Holloszy, John O.

    1991-01-01

    The study is intended to test the hypothesis that the decreased capacity for glucose transport in the denervated rat soleus and the increased capacity for glucose transport in the unweighted rat soleus are related to changes in the expression of the regulatable glucose transporter protein in skeletal muscle (GLUT-4). Results obtained indicate that altered GLUT-4 expression may be a major contributor to the changes in insulin-stimulated glucose transport that are observed with denervation and unweighting. It is concluded that muscle activity is an important factor in the regulation of the GLUT-4 expression in skeletal muscle.

  17. Fatigue resistance of rat extraocular muscles does not depend on creatine kinase activity.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Colleen A; Hayess, Katrin; Andrade, Francisco H

    2005-08-17

    Creatine kinase (CK) links phosphocreatine, an energy storage system, to cellular ATPases. CK activity serves as a temporal and spatial buffer for ATP content, particularly in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. The extraocular muscles are notoriously fast and active, suggesting the need for efficient ATP buffering. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) CK isoform expression and activity in rat extraocular muscles would be higher, and (2) the resistance of these muscles to fatigue would depend on CK activity. We found that mRNA and protein levels for cytosolic and mitochondrial CK isoforms were lower in the extraocular muscles than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Total CK activity was correspondingly decreased in the extraocular muscles. Moreover, cytoskeletal components of the sarcomeric M line, where a fraction of CK activity is found, were downregulated in the extraocular muscles as was shown by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. CK inhibition significantly accelerated the development of fatigue in EDL muscle bundles, but had no major effect on the extraocular muscles. Searching for alternative ATP buffers that could compensate for the relative lack of CK in extraocular muscles, we determined that mRNAs for two adenylate kinase (AK) isoforms were expressed at higher levels in these muscles. Total AK activity was similar in EDL and extraocular muscles. These data indicate that the characteristic fatigue resistance of the extraocular muscles does not depend on CK activity.

  18. Morphological changes in hind limb muscles elicited by adjuvant-induced arthritis of the rat knee.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, J; Kurose, T; Kawamata, S; Yamaoka, K

    2010-02-01

    We investigated qualitative and quantitative changes in rat hind limb muscles caused by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced knee joint pain. One week after CFA injection, muscle atrophy was induced only on the CFA-injected side. Wet weight of the rectus femoris (RF) and soleus (SOL) muscles were significantly decreased by 20% and 19%, respectively. The reduction in cross-sectional areas by CFA was similar for fast and slow muscle fibers in the RF (10% vs 15%, respectively) and SOL muscles (16% vs 16%, respectively). At the light microscopic level, pathological changes were not found in the RF muscles on both sides, although the infiltration of mononuclear cells and muscle regeneration were found in the SOL muscles on CFA-injected and contralateral control sides. On the other hand, electron microscopy revealed degenerative changes in the RF and SOL muscles on the CFA-injected side. Interestingly, sarcomere hypercontraction, indicating overexercise, was observed to a limited extent in the SOL muscles on the control side. In conclusions, knee joint pain can trigger the rapid development of muscle atrophy with degenerative changes not only in thigh but also calf muscles. This indicates that early interventions to inhibit joint pain or inflammation may prevent muscle atrophy.

  19. Assessment of the Potential Role of Muscle Spindle Mechanoreceptor Afferents in Chronic Muscle Pain in the Rat Masseter Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Somayeh; Athanassiadis, Tuija; Caram Salas, Nadia; Auclair, François; Thivierge, Benoît; Arsenault, Isabel; Rompré, Pierre; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar; Kolta, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background The phenotype of large diameter sensory afferent neurons changes in several models of neuropathic pain. We asked if similar changes also occur in “functional” pain syndromes. Methodology/Principal Findings Acidic saline (AS, pH 4.0) injections into the masseter muscle were used to induce persistent myalgia. Controls received saline at pH 7.2. Nocifensive responses of Experimental rats to applications of Von Frey Filaments to the masseters were above control levels 1–38 days post-injection. This effect was bilateral. Expression of c-Fos in the Trigeminal Mesencephalic Nucleus (NVmes), which contains the somata of masseter muscle spindle afferents (MSA), was above baseline levels 1 and 4 days after AS. The resting membrane potentials of neurons exposed to AS (n = 167) were hyperpolarized when compared to their control counterparts (n = 141), as were their thresholds for firing, high frequency membrane oscillations (HFMO), bursting, inward and outward rectification. The amplitude of HFMO was increased and spontaneous ectopic firing occurred in 10% of acid-exposed neurons, but never in Controls. These changes appeared within the same time frame as the observed nocifensive behaviour. Ectopic action potentials can travel centrally, but also antidromically to the peripheral terminals of MSA where they could cause neurotransmitter release and activation of adjacent fibre terminals. Using immunohistochemistry, we confirmed that annulospiral endings of masseter MSA express the glutamate vesicular transporter VGLUT1, indicating that they can release glutamate. Many capsules also contained fine fibers that were labelled by markers associated with nociceptors (calcitonin gene-related peptide, Substance P, P2X3 receptors and TRPV1 receptors) and that expressed the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5. Antagonists of glutamatergic receptors given together with the 2nd injection of AS prevented the hypersensitivity observed bilaterally but were

  20. Muscle pain induced by static contraction in rats is modulated by peripheral inflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Santos, Diogo Francisco da Silva Dos; Melo Aquino, Bruna de; Jorge, Carolina Ocanha; Azambuja, Graciana de; Schiavuzzo, Jalile Garcia; Krimon, Suzy; Neves, Juliana Dos Santos; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Oliveira-Fusaro, Maria Claudia Gonçalves

    2017-09-01

    Muscle pain is an important health issue and frequently related to static force exertion. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether peripheral inflammatory mechanisms are involved with static contraction-induced muscle pain in rats. To this end, we developed a model of muscle pain induced by static contraction performed by applying electrical pulses through electrodes inserted into muscle. We also evaluated the involvement of neutrophil migration, bradykinin, sympathetic amines and prostanoids. A single session of sustained static contraction of gastrocnemius muscle induced acute mechanical muscle hyperalgesia without affecting locomotor activity and with no evidence of structural damage in muscle tissue. Static contraction increased levels of creatine kinase but not lactate dehydrogenase, and induced neutrophil migration. Dexamethasone (glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory agent), DALBK (bradykinin B1 antagonist), Atenolol (β1 adrenoceptor antagonist), ICI 118,551 (β2 adrenoceptor antagonist), indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), and fucoidan (non-specific selectin inhibitor) all reduced static contraction-induced muscle hyperalgesia; however, the bradykinin B2 antagonist, bradyzide, did not have an effect on static contraction-induced muscle hyperalgesia. Furthermore, an increased hyperalgesic response was observed when the selective bradykinin B1 agonist des-Arg(9)-bradykinin was injected into the previously stimulated muscle. Together, these findings demonstrate that static contraction induced mechanical muscle hyperalgesia in gastrocnemius muscle of rats is modulated through peripheral inflammatory mechanisms that are dependent on neutrophil migration, bradykinin, sympathetic amines and prostanoids. Considering the clinical relevance of muscle pain, we propose the present model of static contraction-induced mechanical muscle hyperalgesia as a useful tool for the study of mechanisms underlying static contraction-induced muscle pain. Copyright © 2017 IBRO

  1. Abnormal Motor Activity and Thermoregulation in a Schizophrenia Rat Model for Translational Science

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is accompanied by altered motor activity and abnormal thermoregulation; therefore, the presence of these symptoms can enhance the face validity of a schizophrenia animal model. The goal was to characterize these parameters in freely moving condition of a new substrain of rats showing several schizophrenia-related alterations. Methods Male Wistar rats were used: the new substrain housed individually (for four weeks) and treated subchronically with ketamine, and naive animals without any manipulations. Adult animals were implanted with E-Mitter transponders intraabdominally to record body temperature and locomotor activity continuously. The circadian rhythm of these parameters and the acute effects of changes in light conditions were analyzed under undisturbed circumstances, and the effects of different interventions (handling, bed changing or intraperitoneal vehicle injection) were also determined. Results Decreased motor activity with fragmented pattern was observed in the new substrain. However, these animals had higher body temperature during the active phase, and they showed wider range of its alterations, too. The changes in light conditions and different interventions produced blunted hyperactivity and altered body temperature responses in the new substrain. Poincaré plot analysis of body temperature revealed enhanced short- and long-term variabilities during the active phase compared to the inactive phase in both groups. Furthermore, the new substrain showed increased short- and long-term variabilities with lower degree of asymmetry suggesting autonomic dysregulation. Conclusions In summary, the new substrain with schizophrenia-related phenomena showed disturbed motor activity and thermoregulation suggesting that these objectively determined parameters can be biomarkers in translational research. PMID:26629908

  2. Abnormal Expression of Urea Transporter Protein in a Rat Model of Hepatorenal Syndrome Induced by Succinylated Gelatin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Weiping; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Wenhui; Zhao, C Yingying; Cao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is a serious complication of advanced chronic liver disease. Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) occurs with dysfunction of multiple organs when abdominal pressure increases. Here, we report on a novel model of ACS with ascites and a model of HRS in rats to observe the urea transporter protein (UT) expression in the 2 models. Material/Methods A liver cirrhosis model was induced by CCl4. After changes of liver histopathology were observed, rats were injected intraperitoneally with succinylated gelatin to establish a model of ACS and HRS. Then, changes in BUN, Cr, and renal histopathology were detected. Moreover, the UT in ACS and HRS were also quantified. Results The surfaces of liver in the cirrhotic group became coarse, with visible small nodules and became yellow and greasy. The normal structure of the hepatic lobules were destroyed, and hyperplasia of fibrotic tissue and pseudo-lobe was observed. The levels of BUN and Cr were significantly increased in rats suffering from ACS and HRS, respectively, compared to their control groups. In addition, the mRNA levels of UT-A2 and UT-A3 decreased in rats with HRS compared to cirrhotic rats. However, there was no significant difference between the mRNA levels of UT-A2, UT-A3, and UT-B in rats with ACS vs. normal rats. Conclusions It is feasible to model ACS in rats by injecting succinylated gelatin into the abdominal cavity. Increasing the intra-abdominal pressure by succinylated gelatin is also a novel approach for modeling HRS in cirrhotic rats. Compared with control rats, there is an abnormal mRNA expression of UT in ACS rats and HRS rats. PMID:26414230

  3. Resistance training increases heat shock protein levels in skeletal muscle of young and old rats.

    PubMed

    Murlasits, Zsolt; Cutlip, Robert G; Geronilla, Kenneth B; Rao, K Murali K; Wonderlin, William F; Alway, Stephen E

    2006-04-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) HSP72, HSC70 and HSP25 protein levels and mRNA levels of HSP72 genes (Hsp72-1, Hsp72-2, Hsp72-3) and HSC70 were examined in tibialis anterior muscles from young and old rats following 4.5 weeks of heavy resistance exercise. Young (3 months) (n=10) and old (30 months) (n=9) rats were subjected to 14 sessions of electrically evoked resistance training using stretch-shortening contractions of the left limb that activated the dorsiflexor muscle group, including the tibialis anterior muscle, while the right side served as the intra-animal control. Muscle wet weight of the left tibialis anterior increased by 15.6% in young animals compared to the untrained right side, while the aged rats demonstrated no significant hypertrophy based on muscle wet weight. There were no differences in mRNA expression between the control and experimental muscles in either the old or the young animals for any of the four genes examined. On the other hand, HSP72 levels as determined by Western blots were significantly (p<0.01) higher (968.8 and 409.1%) in the trained as compared to the contralateral control muscle in young and old animals, respectively. HSP25 expression was increased significantly (p<0.01) by training in muscles of young rats (943.1%) and old rats (420.3%). Moreover, there was no training by age interaction for HSP72, while a significant age and training by age effects were found in muscles for HSP25. There was no change in HSC70 protein expression in response to the training intervention in either age group. SOD-1 enzyme level increased by 66.6% in the trained muscles of the young rats, while this enzyme was 33% lower in trained muscles compared to the untrained control side in old rats. Moreover, a significant (p<0.05) training by age interaction was found for SOD-1 enzyme levels. This study suggests that fast contracting muscles in young and old animals are capable of increasing HSP expression in response to high intensity contractile stress

  4. Rubidium influx into rat skeletal muscles in relation to electrical activity

    PubMed Central

    Kernan, R. P.; McDermott, Mary

    1973-01-01

    1. Rates of 86Rb influx were compared in vivo over 2, 4 and 6 hr periods in various tonic and phasic muscles of rat following its I.P. injection. During the 2 hr period its influx rate into soleus was about 4 times that of the vastus with the EDL muscles at an intermediate rate. Uptake by diaphragm was fastest reaching equilibrium within 2 hr. 2. Unilateral section of the sciatic nerve 48 hr before 86Rb injection reduced isotope uptake into soleus to about 50% of its contralateral control muscle over a 4 hr period. In EDL muscles on the other hand nerve section increased influx by about 75% of control in conscious rats and more than doubled influx in anaesthetized rats. 3. Tenotomy of soleus reduced 86Rb influx to 40% of control, but tenotomy in EDL was without effect in influx. 4. Uptake of urea into muscles within 5 min of its I.V. injection was used to determine the possibility of muscle blood flow determining 86Rb influx. Accumulation of urea was not significantly different in control and denervated EDL muscles nor between soleus and vastus muscles in anaesthetized rats, so it seems unlikely that blood flow is important here. 5. Membrane depolarization in response to addition of 30 mM rubidium to external bathing fluid was greater in the case of denervated than in control EDL muscles which was in keeping with the greater 86Rb influx seen in the former muscles. The ouabain sensitivity of rubidium-induced depolarization in the denervated EDL muscles would suggest, however, that rubidium enters the fibres actively. PMID:4747232

  5. beta-adrenergic effects on carbohydrate metabolism in the unweighted rat soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of unweighting on the response of the soleus-muscle carbohydrate metabolism to a beta-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol) was investigated in rats that were subjected to three days of tail-cast suspension. It was found that isoproterenol promoted glycogen degradation in soleus from suspended rats to a higher degree than in weighted soleus from control rats, and had no effect in unweighted digitorum longus. However, isoproterenol did not have a greater inhibitory effect on the net uptake of tritium-labeled 2-deoxy-glucose by the unweighted soleus and that isoproterenol inhibited hexose phosphorylation less in the unweighted than in the control muscle.

  6. [Contractile properties of skeletal muscles of rats after flight on "Kosmos-1887"].

    PubMed

    Oganov, V S; Skuratova, S A; Murashko, L M

    1991-01-01

    Contractile properties of skeletal muscles of rats were investigated using glycerinated muscle preparations that were obtained from Cosmos-1887 animals flown for 13 days (plus 2 days on the ground) and from rats that remained hypokinetic for 13 days on the ground. In the flow rats, the absolute mass of postural muscles remained unchanged while their relative mass increased; this may be attributed to their enhanced hydration which developed during the first 2 days after landing. Strength losses of the postural muscles were less significant than after previous flights. Comparison of the Cosmos-1887 and hypokinesia control data has shown that even 2-day exposure to 1 G after 13-day flight can modify drastically flight-induced changes.

  7. Morphometric analysis of rat muscle fibers following space flight and hypogravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, L. A.; Castleman, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hypogravity on striate muscles, containing both fast twitch glycolytic and slow twitch oxidative fibers, was studied in rats aboard two Cosmos biosatellites. Results of a computer-assisted image analysis of extensor digitorum muscles from five rats, exposed to 18.5 days of hypogravity and processed for the alkaline ATPase reaction, showed a reduction of the mean fiber diameter (41.32 + or - 0.55 microns), compared to synchronous (46.32 + or - 0.55 microns) and vivarium (49 + or - 0.5 microns) controls. A further experiment studied the ratio of fast to slow twitch fibers in 25 rats exposed to 18.5 days of hypogravity and analyzed at four different periods of recovery following the space flight. Using the previous techniques, the gastrocnemius muscle showed a reduction of the total muscle fiber area in square microns and a reduction in the percentage of slow fibers of flight animals compared to the control animals.

  8. Lithium Visibility in Rat Brain and Muscle in Vivoby 7Li NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoroski, Richard A.; Pearce, John M.; Newton, Joseph E. O.

    1998-07-01

    The apparent concentration of lithium (Li)in vivowas determined for several regions in the brain and muscle of rats by7Li NMR imaging at 4.7 T with inclusion of an external standard of known concentration and visibility. The average apparent concentrations were 10.1 mM for muscle, and 4.2-5.3 mM for various brain regions under the dosing conditions used. The results were compared to concentrations determinedin vitroby high-resolution7Li NMR spectroscopy of extracts of brain and muscle tissue from the same rats. The comparison provided estimates of the7Li NMR visibility of the Li cation in each tissue region. Although there was considerable scatter of the calculated visibilities among the five rats studied, the results suggested essentially full visibility (96%) for Li in muscle, and somewhat reduced visibility (74-93%) in the various brain regions.

  9. Effect of exercise on glutamine synthesis and transport in skeletal muscle from rats.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Ronaldo V T; Caperuto, Erico C; de Mello, Marco T; Batista, Miguel L; Rosa, Luis F B P C

    2009-08-01

    1. Reductions in plasma glutamine are observed after prolonged exercise. Three hypotheses can explain such a decrease: (i) high demand by the liver and kidney; (ii) impaired release from muscles; and (iii) decreased synthesis in skeletal muscle. The present study investigated the effects of exercise on glutamine synthesis and transport in rat skeletal muscle. 2. Rats were divided into three groups: (i) sedentary (SED; n = 12); (ii) rats killed 1 h after the last exercise bout (EX-1; n = 15); and (iii) rats killed 24 h after the last exercise bout (EX-24; n = 15). Rats in the trained groups swam 1 h/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks with a load equivalent to 5.5% of their bodyweight. 3. Plasma glutamine and insulin were lower and corticosterone was higher in EX-1 compared with SED rats (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Twenty-four hours after exercise (EX-24), plasma glutamine was restored to levels seen in SED rats, whereas insulin levels were higher (P < 0.001) and corticosterone levels were lower (P < 0.01) than in EX-1. In the soleus, ammonia levels were lower in EX-1 than in SED rats (P < 0.001). After 24 h, glutamine, glutamate and ammonia levels were lower in EX-24 than in SED and EX-1 rats (P < 0.001). Soleus glutamine synthetase (GS) activity was increased in EX-1 and was decreased in EX-24 compared with SED rats (both P < 0.001). 4. The decrease in plasma glutamine concentration in EX-1 is not mediated by GS or glutamine transport in skeletal muscle. However, 24 h after exercise, lower GS may contribute to the decrease in glutamine concentration in muscle.

  10. Transcriptional profiling of rat skeletal muscle hypertrophy under restriction of blood flow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shouyu; Liu, Xueyun; Chen, Zhenhuang; Li, Gaoquan; Chen, Qin; Zhou, Guoqing; Ma, Ruijie; Yao, Xinmiao; Huang, Xiao

    2016-12-15

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) under low-intensity resistance training (LIRT) can produce similar effects upon muscles to that of high-intensity resistance training (HIRT) while overcoming many of the restrictions to HIRT that occurs in a clinical setting. However, the potential molecular mechanisms of BFR induced muscle hypertrophy remain largely unknown. Here, using a BFR rat model, we aim to better elucidate the mechanisms regulating muscle hypertrophy as induced by BFR and reveal possible clinical therapeutic targets for atrophy cases. We performed genome wide screening with microarray analysis to identify unique differentially expressed genes during rat muscle hypertrophy. We then successfully separated the differentially expressed genes from BRF treated soleus samples by comparing the Affymetrix rat Genome U34 2.0 array with the control. Using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) we also analyzed other related differentially expressed genes. Results suggested that muscle hypertrophy induced by BFR is essentially regulated by the rate of protein turnover. Specifically, PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways act as positive regulators in controlling protein synthesis where ubiquitin-proteasome acts as a negative regulator. This represents the first general genome wide level investigation of the gene expression profile in the rat soleus after BFR treatment. This may aid our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating and controlling muscle hypertrophy and provide support to the BFR strategies aiming to prevent muscle atrophy in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lack of Effect of Experimental Hypovolemia on Imipenem Muscle Distribution in Rats Assessed by Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Sandrine; Dahyot, Claire; Lamarche, Isabelle; Plan, Elodie; Mimoz, Olivier; Couet, William

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hypovolemia on the distribution of imipenem in muscle extracellular fluid determined by microdialysis in awake rats. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the jugular vein and hind leg muscle. Imipenem recoveries in muscle and blood were determined in each rat by retrodialysis by drug before drug administration. Hypovolemia was induced by removing 40% of the initial blood volume over 30 min. Imipenem was infused intravenously at a dose of 70 mg · kg−1 over 30 min, and microdialysis samples were collected for 120 min from hypovolemic (n = 8) and control (n = 8) rats. The decay of the free concentrations in blood and muscle with time were monoexponential, and the concentration profiles in muscle and blood were virtually superimposed in both groups. Accordingly, the ratios of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) for tissue (muscle) to the AUC for blood were always virtually equal to 1. Hypovolemia induced a 23% decrease in the clearance (P < 0.05) of imipenem, with no statistically significant alteration of its volume of distribution. This study showed that imipenem elimination was altered in hypovolemic rats, probably due to decreased renal blood flow, but its distribution characteristics were not. In particular, free imipenem concentrations in blood and muscle were always virtually identical. PMID:16304160

  12. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  13. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  14. Statin-induced myopathy in the rat: relationship between systemic exposure, muscle exposure and myopathy.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, J; Wang, Y; Marsden, A M; Orton, T C; Westwood, F R; Azuma, C T; Scott, R C

    2009-01-01

    Rare instances of myopathy are associated with all statins, but cerivastatin was withdrawn from clinical use due to a greater incidence of myopathy. The mechanism of statin-induced myopathy with respect to tissue disposition was investigated by measuring the systemic, hepatic, and skeletal muscle exposure of cerivastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin in rats before and after muscle damage. The development of myopathy was not associated with the accumulation of statins in skeletal muscle. For each statin exposure was equivalent in muscles irrespective of their fibre-type sensitivity to myopathy. The low amount of each statin in skeletal muscle relative to the liver does not support a significant role for transporters in the disposition of statins in skeletal muscle. Finally, the concentration of cerivastatin necessary to cause necrosis in skeletal muscle was considerably lower than rosuvastatin or simvastatin, supporting the concept cerivastatin is intrinsically more myotoxic than other statins.

  15. Abnormal expression of ENaC and SGK1 mRNA induced by dietary sodium in Dahl salt-sensitively hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Wataru; Niisato, Naomi; Sawabe, Yukinori; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Tokuda, Shinsaku; Nishio, Kyosuke; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2007-10-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) plays a crucial role in controlling sodium reabsorption in the kidney keeping the normal blood pressure. We previously reported that the expression of ENaC mRNA in the kidney of Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats was abnormally regulated by aldosterone, however it is unknown if dietary sodium affects the expression of ENaC and serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1), which plays an important role in ENaC activation, in DS rats. In the present study, we investigated whether dietary sodium abnormally affects the expression of ENaC and SGK1 mRNA in DS rats. DS and Dahl salt-resistant (DR) rats (8 weeks old) were divided into three different groups, respectively: (1) low sodium diet (0.005% NaCl), (2) normal sodium diet (0.3% NaCl), and (3) high sodium diet (8% NaCl). The high sodium diet for 4 weeks in DS rats elevated the systolic blood pressure, but did not in any other groups. The expression of alpha-ENaC mRNA in DS rats was abnormally increased by high sodium diet in contrast to DR rats, while it was normally increased by low sodium diet in DS rats similar to DR rats. The expression of beta- and gamma-ENaC mRNA in DS rats was also abnormally increased by high sodium diet unlike DR rats. The expression of SGK1 mRNA was elevated by high sodium diet in DS rats, but it was decreased in DR rats. These observations indicate that the expression of ENaC and SGK1 mRNA is abnormally regulated by dietary sodium in salt-sensitively hypertensive rats, and that this abnormal expression would be one of the factors causing salt-sensitive hypertension.

  16. Abnormal Expression of FBXL20 in Refractory Epilepsy Patients and a Pilocarpine-Induced Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Fu, Pengfei; Wen, YueTao; Xiong, Yan; Zhang, Yanke; Zhang, Haiyang; Xie, Yanfeng; Shi, Quanhong

    2016-11-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are important protein-modifying enzymes involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 20 (FBXL20), an E3 ubiquitin ligase widely expressed in the central nervous system, plays an important role in the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of regulating synaptic membrane exocytosis 1 (RIM1), which is an important factor in the release of synaptic vesicles. FBXL20 has been associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases; thus, we hypothesized that FBXL20 is involved in the development of epilepsy. Herein, we used immunofluorescence staining, immunohistochemistry and western blotting to determine the expression pattern of FBXL20 in temporal lobe epilepsy patients and pilocarpine-induced epilepsy animal models. We also injected SD rats with lentivirus-vector mediated overexpression of FBXL20. The results showed that FBXL20 is expressed in the membrane and the cytoplasm of cortical neurons, and overexpression of FBXL20 decreased the onset level of spontaneous seizure, the frequency and duration of seizures. Additionally, FBXL20 protein level was decreased but RIM1 protein level was increased in the epileptic group compared with the LV-FBXL20 and LV-GFP group. These findings in humans were consistent with the results from a pilocarpine-induced animal model of chronic epilepsy. Thus, abnormal expression of FBXL20 might play an important role in the development of epilepsy.

  17. Electrical Stimulation of Denervated Rat Skeletal Muscle Ameliorates Bone Fragility and Muscle Loss in Early-Stage Disuse Musculoskeletal Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Yotani, Kengo; Ogita, Futoshi; Hayao, Keishi; Nakagawa, Kouki; Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Kirimoto, Hikari; Onishi, Hideaki; Kasuga, Norikatsu; Yamamoto, Noriaki

    2017-04-01

    We tested whether daily muscle electrical stimulation (ES) can ameliorate the decrease in cortical bone strength as well as muscle and bone geometric and material properties in the early stages of disuse musculoskeletal atrophy. 7-week-old male F344 rats were randomly divided into three groups: age-matched control group (Cont); a sciatic denervation group (DN); and a DN + direct electrical stimulation group (DN + ES). Denervated tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in the DN + ES group received ES with 16 mA at 10 Hz for 30 min/day, 6 days/week. Micro CT, the three-point bending test, and immunohistochemistry were used to characterize cortical bone mechanical, structural, and material properties of tibiae. TA muscle in the DN + ES group showed significant improvement in muscle mass and myofiber cross-sectional area relative to the DN group. Maximal load and stiffness of tibiae, bone mineral density estimated by micro CT, and immunoreactivity of DMP1 in the cortical bone tissue were also significantly greater in the DN + ES group than in the DN group. These results suggest that daily ES-induced muscle contraction treatment reduced the decrease in muscle mass and cortical bone strength in early-stage disuse musculoskeletal atrophy and is associated with a beneficial effect on material properties such as mineralization of cortical bone tissue.

  18. Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Diaphragm Citrate Synthase Activity and Hemodynamic Function in Rats with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Lago, Pedro Dal

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure positively alters the clinical trajectory of heart failure. In an experimental model, respiratory muscle training in rats with heart failure has been shown to improve cardiopulmonary function through mechanisms yet to be entirely elucidated. The present report aimed to evaluate the respiratory muscle training effects in diaphragm citrate synthase activity and hemodynamic function in rats with heart failure. Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: sedentary sham (Sed-Sham, n=8), trained sham (RMT-Sham, n=8), sedentary heart failure (Sed-HF, n=7) and trained heart failure (RMT-HF, n=7). The animals were submitted to a RMT protocol performed 30 minutes a day, 5 days/week, for 6 weeks. In rats with heart failure, respiratory muscle training decreased pulmonary congestion and right ventricular hypertrophy. Deleterious alterations in left ventricular pressures, as well as left ventricular contractility and relaxation, were assuaged by respiratory muscle training in heart failure rats. Citrate synthase activity, which was significantly reduced in heart failure rats, was preserved by respiratory muscle training. Additionally, a negative correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular end diastolic pressure and positive correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular systolic pressure. Respiratory muscle training produces beneficial adaptations in the diaphragmatic musculature, which is linked to improvements in left ventricular hemodynamics and blood pressure in heart failure rats. The RMT-induced improvements in cardiac architecture and the oxidative capacity of the diaphragm may improve the clinical trajectory of patients with heart failure.

  19. Induction of Muscle Hypertrophy in Rats through Low Intensity Eccentric Contraction.

    PubMed

    Tsumiyama, Wakako; Oki, Sadaaki; Takamiya, Naomi; Umei, Namiko; Shimizu, Michele Eisemann; Ono, Takeya; Otsuka, Akira

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether a low intensity exercise using an eccentric contraction would result in skeletal muscle hypertrophy in rats. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen female Wistar rats were used in this study. The rats were randomly divided into three groups. The control group performed no exercise. The level group ran on a treadmill on a 0° incline. The downhill group ran on a treadmill on a -16° incline. The two exercise groups ran on a treadmill at 16 m/min for 90 minutes, once every three days for a total of twenty sessions. [Results] The muscle wet weights, the relative weight ratios, and the muscle fiber cross-section minor axes of the downhill group were significantly larger than those of the control and level groups. There were no differences in the muscle wet weights, the relative weight ratios, and the muscle fiber cross-section minor axes between the control group and the level group. [Conclusion] The stimulation from the low intensity eccentric contraction may have produced enough mechanical stress to induce muscle hypertrophy without the over-stressing that might have produced muscle fiber damage. These results indicate that this technique may be an effective method of inducing hypertrophy in skeletal muscle.

  20. Effects of aging on the lateral transmission of force in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Gao, Yingxin

    2014-03-21

    The age-related reduction in muscle force cannot be fully explained by the loss of muscle fiber mass or degeneration of myofibers. Our previous study showed that changes in lateral transmission of force could affect the total force transmitted to the tendon. The extracellular matrix (ECM) of skeletal muscle plays an important role in lateral transmission of force. The objective of this study was to define the effects of aging on lateral transmission of force in skeletal muscles, and explore possible underlying mechanisms. In vitro contractile tests were performed on extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of young and old rats with series of tenotomy and myotomy. We concluded that lateral transmission of force was impaired in the old rats, and this deficit could be partly due to increased thickness of the ECM induced by aging.

  1. Increased myogenic repressor Id mRNA and protein levels in hindlimb muscles of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Alway, Stephen E; Degens, Hans; Lowe, Dawn A; Krishnamurthy, Gururaj

    2002-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if levels of repressors to myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) differ between muscles from young adult and aged animals. Total RNA from plantaris, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles of Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats aged 9 mo (young adult, n = 10) and 37 mo (aged, n = 10) was reverse transcribed and then amplified by PCR. To obtain a semiquantitative measure of the mRNA levels, PCR signals were normalized to cyclophilin or 18S signals from the corresponding reverse transcription product. Normalization to cyclophilin and 18S gave similar results. The mRNA levels of MyoD and myogenin were approximately 275-650% (P < 0.001) and approximately 500-1,100% (P < 0.001) greater, respectively, in muscles from aged compared with young adults. In contrast, the protein levels were lower in plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles and similar in the soleus muscle of aged vs. young adult rats. Id repressor mRNA levels were approximately 300-900% greater in fast and slow muscles of aged animals (P < or = 0.02), and Mist 1 mRNA was approximately 50% greater in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles (P < 0.01). The mRNA level of Twist mRNA was not significantly affected by aging. Id-1, Id-2, and Id-3 protein levels were approximately 17-740% greater (P < 0.05) in hindlimb muscles of aged rats compared with young adult rats. The elevated levels of Id mRNA and protein suggest that MRF repressors may play a role in gene regulation of fast and slow muscles in aged rats.

  2. Architectural and morphological assessment of rat abdominal wall muscles: comparison for use as a human model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stephen H M; Banuelos, Karina; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    The abdominal wall is a composite of muscles that are important for the mechanical stability of the spine and pelvis. Tremendous clinical attention is given to these muscles, yet little is known about how they function in isolation or how they interact with one another. Given the morphological, vascular, and innervation complexities associated with these muscles and their proximity to the internal organs, an appropriate animal model is important for understanding their physiological and mechanical significance during function. To determine the extent to which the rat abdominal wall resembles that of human, 10 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and formalin-fixed for architectural and morphological analyses of the four abdominal wall muscles (rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis). Physiological cross-sectional areas and optimal fascicle lengths demonstrated a pattern that was similar to human abdominal wall muscles. In addition, sarcomere lengths measured in the neutral spine posture were similar to human in their relation to optimal sarcomere length. These data indicate that the force-generating and length change capabilities of these muscles, relative to one another, are similar in rat and human. Finally, the fiber lines of action of each abdominal muscle were similar to human over most of the abdominal wall. The main exception was in the lower abdominal region (inferior to the pelvic crest), where the external oblique becomes aponeurotic in human but continues as muscle fibers into its pelvic insertion in the rat. We conclude that, based on the morphology and architecture of the abdominal wall muscles, the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat is a good candidate for a model representation of human, particularly in the middle and upper abdominal wall regions. PMID:20646108

  3. Architectural and morphological assessment of rat abdominal wall muscles: comparison for use as a human model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen H M; Banuelos, Karina; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2010-09-01

    The abdominal wall is a composite of muscles that are important for the mechanical stability of the spine and pelvis. Tremendous clinical attention is given to these muscles, yet little is known about how they function in isolation or how they interact with one another. Given the morphological, vascular, and innervation complexities associated with these muscles and their proximity to the internal organs, an appropriate animal model is important for understanding their physiological and mechanical significance during function. To determine the extent to which the rat abdominal wall resembles that of human, 10 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and formalin-fixed for architectural and morphological analyses of the four abdominal wall muscles (rectus abdominis, external oblique, internal oblique, and transversus abdominis). Physiological cross-sectional areas and optimal fascicle lengths demonstrated a pattern that was similar to human abdominal wall muscles. In addition, sarcomere lengths measured in the neutral spine posture were similar to human in their relation to optimal sarcomere length. These data indicate that the force-generating and length change capabilities of these muscles, relative to one another, are similar in rat and human. Finally, the fiber lines of action of each abdominal muscle were similar to human over most of the abdominal wall. The main exception was in the lower abdominal region (inferior to the pelvic crest), where the external oblique becomes aponeurotic in human but continues as muscle fibers into its pelvic insertion in the rat. We conclude that, based on the morphology and architecture of the abdominal wall muscles, the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat is a good candidate for a model representation of human, particularly in the middle and upper abdominal wall regions.

  4. Kinetics of GLUT4 Trafficking in Rat and Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Håkan K.R.; Chibalin, Alexander V.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Yang, Jing; Koumanov, Francoise; Wallberg-Henriksson, Harriet; Zierath, Juleen R.; Holman, Geoffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In skeletal muscle, insulin stimulates glucose transport activity three- to fourfold, and a large part of this stimulation is associated with a net translocation of GLUT4 from an intracellular compartment to the cell surface. We examined the extent to which insulin or the AMP-activated protein kinase activator AICAR can lead to a stimulation of the exocytosis limb of the GLUT4 translocation pathway and thereby account for the net increase in glucose transport activity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using a biotinylated photoaffinity label, we tagged endogenous GLUT4 and studied the kinetics of exocytosis of the tagged protein in rat and human skeletal muscle in response to insulin or AICAR. Isolated epitrochlearis muscles were obtained from male Wistar rats. Vastus lateralis skeletal muscle strips were prepared from open muscle biopsies obtained from six healthy men (age 39 ± 11 years and BMI 25.8 ± 0.8 kg/m2). RESULTS In rat epitrochlearis muscle, insulin exposure leads to a sixfold stimulation of the GLUT4 exocytosis rate (with basal and insulin-stimulated rate constants of 0.010 and 0.067 min−1, respectively). In human vastus lateralis muscle, insulin stimulates GLUT4 translocation by a similar sixfold increase in the exocytosis rate constant (with basal and insulin-stimulated rate constants of 0.011 and 0.075 min−1, respectively). In contrast, AICAR treatment does not markedly increase exocytosis in either rat or human muscle. CONCLUSIONS Insulin stimulation of the GLUT4 exocytosis rate constant is sufficient to account for most of the observed increase in glucose transport activity in rat and human muscle. PMID:19188436

  5. Levosimendan improves calcium sensitivity of diaphragm muscle fibres from a rat model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    van Hees, H W H; Andrade Acuña, Gl; Linkels, M; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Heunks, L M A

    2011-02-01

    Diaphragm muscle weakness occurs in patients with heart failure (HF) and is associated with exercise intolerance and increased mortality. Reduced sensitivity of diaphragm fibres to calcium contributes to diaphragm weakness in HF. Here we have investigated the ability of the calcium sensitizer levosimendan to restore the reduced calcium sensitivity of diaphragm fibres from rats with HF. Coronary artery ligation in rats was used as an animal model for HF. Sham-operated rats served as controls. Fifteen weeks after induction of HF or sham operations animals were killed and muscle fibres were isolated from the diaphragm. Diaphragm fibres were skinned and activated with solutions containing incremental calcium concentrations and 10 µM levosimendan or vehicle (0.02% DMSO). Developed force was measured at each calcium concentration, and force-calcium concentration relationships were plotted. Calcium sensitivity of force generation was reduced in diaphragm muscle fibres from HF rats, compared with fibres from control rats (P < 0.01). Maximal force generation was ∼25% lower in HF diaphragm fibres than in control fibres (P < 0.05). Levosimendan significantly increased calcium sensitivity of force generation in diaphragm fibres from HF and control rats, without affecting maximal force generation. Levosimendan enhanced the force generating capacity of diaphragm fibres from HF rats by increasing the sensitivity of force generation to calcium concentration. These results provide strong support for testing the effect of calcium sensitizers on diaphragm muscle weakness in patients with HF. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Relationship between abnormal sperm morphology induced by dietary zinc deficiency and lipid composition in testes of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Merrells, Krystal J; Blewett, Heather; Jamieson, Jennifer A; Taylor, Carla G; Suh, Miyoung

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated the effect of dietary Zn deficiency during sexual maturation on sperm integrity and testis phospholipid fatty acid composition. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into four dietary groups for 3 weeks: Zn control (ZC; 30 mg Zn/kg); Zn marginally deficient (ZMD; 9 mg Zn/kg); Zn deficient (ZD; < 1 mg Zn/kg); pair fed (PF; 30 mg Zn/kg) to the ZD group. Morphology of cauda epididymal sperm and lipid profiles of testis phospholipids were analysed. The rats fed the ZD diet had a lower testis weight (P < 0.02). Seminal vesicles and prostate weight were also lower in the ZD and PF groups. Rats fed the ZD diet, but not the ZMD diet, had 34-35 % more abnormal spermatozoa and 24 % shorter sperm tail length than the ZC and PF rats (P < 0.001). Testis cholesterol concentration was higher in the ZD rats compared with the ZC and PF rats (P < 0.04). Testes were highly enriched with n-6 fatty acids by showing n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratios of 27:1 in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and 23:1 in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The dominant fatty acid in testes was docosapentaenoic acid (22 : 5n-6), comprising 15 and 24 % of PC and PE, respectively. This fatty acid was significantly lower in the ZD rats, whereas 18 : 2n-6 was higher compared with the rats in the other diet groups. These results demonstrate that severe Zn deficiency adversely affects sperm integrity and modulates testis fatty acid composition by interrupting essential fatty acid metabolism. This suggests that Zn deficiency-associated abnormal testicular function is perhaps preceded by altered membrane fatty acid composition, especially of a major fatty acid, 22 : 5n-6.

  7. Morphological and molecular aspects of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy in rats at different stages of postnatal development: the role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Foresto, Camila Silva; Paula-Gomes, Sílvia; Silveira, Wilian Assis; Graça, Flávia Aparecida; Kettelhut, Isis do Carmo; Gonçalves, Dawit Albieiro Pinheiro; Mattiello-Sverzut, Ana Claudia

    2016-09-01

    Muscle loss occurs following injury and immobilization in adulthood and childhood, which impairs the rehabilitation process; however, far fewer studies have been conducted analyzing atrophic response in infants. This work investigated first the morphological and molecular mechanisms involved in immobilization-induced atrophy in soleus muscles from rats at different stages of postnatal development [i.e., weanling (WR) and adult (AR) rats] and, second, the role of autophagy in regulating muscle plasticity during immobilization. Hindlimb immobilization for 10 days reduced muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area, with more pronounced atrophy in WR, and induced slow-to-fast fiber switching. These effects were accompanied by a decrease in markers of protein synthesis and an increase in autophagy. The ubiquitin (Ub)-ligase MuRF1 and the ubiquitinated proteins were upregulated by immobilization in AR while the autolyzed form of μ-calpain was increased in WR. To further explore the role of autophagy in muscle abnormalities, AR were concomitantly immobilized and treated with colchicine, which blocks autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Colchicine-treated immobilized muscles had exacerbated atrophy and presented degenerative features. Despite Igf1/Akt signaling was downregulated in immobilized muscles from both age groups, Foxo1 and 4 phosphorylation was increased in WR. In the same group of animals, Foxo1 acetylation and Foxo1 and 4 content was increased and decreased, respectively. Our data show that muscle disorders induced by 10-day-immobilization occur in both age-dependent and -independent manners, an understanding that may optimize treatment outcomes in infants. We also provide further evidence that the strong inhibition of autophagy may be ineffective for treating muscle atrophy.

  8. Anesthesia with sevoflurane in neonatal rats: developmental neuroendocrine abnormalities and alleviating effects of the corticosteroid and Cl− importer antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Changqing; Tan, Sijie; Zhang, Jiaqiang; Seubert, Christoph N.; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Sumners, Colin; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Martynyuk, Anatoly E.

    2015-01-01

    Background 1.5 million children under 12 months of age are exposed to general anesthesia annually in the United States alone. Human and especially animal studies provide evidence that exposure to general anesthesia during the early postnatal period may lead to long-term neurocognitive abnormalities via poorly understood mechanisms. We investigated whether an immature stress response system and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor activities are involved in mediating these abnormalities. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats at postnatal days 4, 5 or 6 were anesthetized with 2.1% sevoflurane for 6 hrs; maternally separated and house reared rats served as controls. Results Sevoflurane anesthesia markedly increased corticosterone levels in rat pups of both genders. In adulthood, these rats responded to stress with heightened secretion of corticosterone and a greater increase in corticosterone levels in males versus females. Only male rats, previously exposed to neonatal sevoflurane, had a higher frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in CA1 neurons, spent a shorter time in open arms of the elevated plus maze (EPM) and exhibited impaired prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle. Pretreatment of male rats prior to sevoflurane with the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter inhibitor, bumetanide, or the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU28318, normalized endocrine responses to stress and the EPM behavior in adulthood, while only those pretreated with bumetanide exhibited normalized PPI of startle responses. Neither bumetanide nor RU28318 altered the effect of sevoflurane on synaptic activity. Conclusions Sevoflurane-enhanced neuronal excitation and elevated corticosteroid levels at the time of anesthesia contribute to the mechanisms initiating neonatal sevoflurane-induced long-term endocrine and neurobehavioral abnormalities. PMID:26150359

  9. Using wavelet analysis to reveal the muscle functional recovery following nerve reinnervation in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Liangqing; Wu, Fengxia; Huang, Jianping; Li, Guanglin

    2014-01-01

    Targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) technique has been successful in many amputees for providing sufficient electromyography (EMG) signal to control advanced prosthetics. However, it seems to lack further understanding of the recovery progress of muscle functions after targeted muscle reinneveration surgery. In this study, a rat TMR model was developed to investigate intramuscular EMG activity changes after reinnervation. Using the discrete wavelet decomposition and average rectified algorithm, the recorded EMG showed a gradual improvement in the reinnervated muscle within four weeks. Future work will be performed to further assess the efficiency of reinnveration therapy after the surgery.

  10. Modulatory effects of Caralluma fimbriata extract against high-fat diet induced abnormalities in carbohydrate metabolism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Gujjala, Sudhakara; Putakala, Mallaiah; Nukala, Srinivasulu; Bangeppagari, Manjunatha; Rajendran, Ramaswamy; Desireddy, Saralakumari

    2017-08-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the modulatory effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Caralluma fimbriata (CFE) by assaying the activities of key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism and changes in glycogen content (liver and muscle) in high-fat (HF) diet-induced diabetic rats. In vitro glucose uptake studies were carried out in both psoas muscle and adipose tissue. The inhibitory effect of the extract on α-amylase was determined in in vitro studies. Male Wistar rats of body weight around 180g were divided into five groups (n=8), two of these groups were fed with standard pellet diet and the other three groups were fed with HF- (60%) diet. CFE (200mg/kg body weight/day) was administered through oral route to each group of standard pellet diet rats and HF-fed rats and Metformin (Met) (20mg/kg body weight/day) was administered through oral route to HFD+Met group for 90 days. At the end of the experimental period, biochemical parameters related to glycogen content in liver and muscle, and intestinal disaccharidases like maltase, sucrase and lactase were assayed. Alterations in the activities of enzymes of glucose metabolism (hexokinase, phosphorfructoki nase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), intestinal disaccharidases and glycogen content as observed in the high fat diet-fed rats were prevented with CFE/Met administration. From this study, we observed that CFE/Met could significantly restore the levels of glycogen in liver and muscle and key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism to near normal in groups-HFD+CFE and HFD+Met. The skeletal muscle of HF-diet fed rats showed degenerative changes of muscle myofibers with fat deposition. These changes were attenuated in the HFD group treated with CFE/Met and retained their normal structure appearance. It can be concluded from these results that CFE might be of value in reducing the alterations related to carbohydrate metabolism under high calorie

  11. Influence of exercise training on the oxidative capacity of rat abdominal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uribe, J. M.; Stump, C. S.; Tipton, C. M.; Fregosi, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine if endurance exercise training would increase the oxidative capacity of the abdominal expiratory muscles of the rat. Accordingly, 9 male rats were subjected to an endurance training protocol (1 h/day, 6 days/week, 9 weeks) and 9 litter-mates served as controls. Citrate synthase (CS) activity was used as an index of oxidative capacity, and was determined in the following muscles: soleus, plantaris, costal diaphragm, crural diaphragm, and in all four abdominal muscles: rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique. Compared to their non-trained litter-mates, the trained rats had higher peak whole body oxygen consumption rates (+ 16%) and CS activities in plantaris (+34%) and soleus (+36%) muscles. Thus, the training program caused substantial systemic and locomotor muscle adaptations. The CS activity of costal diaphragm was 20% greater in the trained animals, but no difference was observed in crural diaphragm. The CS activity in the abdominal muscles was less than one-half of that in locomotor and diaphragm muscles, and there were no significant changes with training except in the rectus abdominis where a 26% increase was observed. The increase in rectus abdominis CS activity may reflect its role in postural support and/or locomotion, as none of the primary expiratory pumping muscles adapted to the training protocol. The relatively low levels of CS activity in the abdominal muscles suggests that they are not recruited frequently at rest, and the lack of an increase with training indicates that these muscles do not contribute significantly to the increased ventilatory activity accompanying exercise in the rat.

  12. Influence of exercise training on the oxidative capacity of rat abdominal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uribe, J. M.; Stump, C. S.; Tipton, C. M.; Fregosi, R. F.

    1992-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine if endurance exercise training would increase the oxidative capacity of the abdominal expiratory muscles of the rat. Accordingly, 9 male rats were subjected to an endurance training protocol (1 h/day, 6 days/week, 9 weeks) and 9 litter-mates served as controls. Citrate synthase (CS) activity was used as an index of oxidative capacity, and was determined in the following muscles: soleus, plantaris, costal diaphragm, crural diaphragm, and in all four abdominal muscles: rectus abdominis, transversus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique. Compared to their non-trained litter-mates, the trained rats had higher peak whole body oxygen consumption rates (+ 16%) and CS activities in plantaris (+34%) and soleus (+36%) muscles. Thus, the training program caused substantial systemic and locomotor muscle adaptations. The CS activity of costal diaphragm was 20% greater in the trained animals, but no difference was observed in crural diaphragm. The CS activity in the abdominal muscles was less than one-half of that in locomotor and diaphragm muscles, and there were no significant changes with training except in the rectus abdominis where a 26% increase was observed. The increase in rectus abdominis CS activity may reflect its role in postural support and/or locomotion, as none of the primary expiratory pumping muscles adapted to the training protocol. The relatively low levels of CS activity in the abdominal muscles suggests that they are not recruited frequently at rest, and the lack of an increase with training indicates that these muscles do not contribute significantly to the increased ventilatory activity accompanying exercise in the rat.

  13. Vitamin E levels in soleus muscles of experimentally induced hyperthyroid rats differ consequent to feeding of edible oils.

    PubMed

    Merican, Z; Suboh, B; Marzuki, A; Khalid, B A

    1999-12-01

    It has been shown that lipid peroxidation product levels in the soleus muscles of rats fed palm olein were lower than in the soleus muscles of rats fed soya bean oil. A study was carried out to test our hypothesis that the lower level of lipid peroxidation products in the soleus muscle of palm olein-fed rats is due, at least partly, to the higher amount of vitamin E in their soleus muscles. Experimentally induced hyperthyroid rats were fed either ground rat chow or ground rat chow mixed with palm olein oil or soya bean oil for a period of 8 weeks. Euthyroid rats fed ground rat chow for a similar period served as controls. At the end of the 8-week period, the rats were sacrificed and the α-tocopherol and tocotrienol levels in their soleus muscles were measured using high pressure liquid chromatography. It was found that the levels of α-tocopherol (23.682 ± 0.363), α-tocotrienol (1.974 ± 0.040) and γ-tocotrienol (1.418 ± 0.054) in μg/g tissue wet weight in the soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats fed palm olein oil were statistically significantly higher than those found in the soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats fed soya bean oil, which were 14.299 ± 0.378, 0.053 ± 0.053 and 0.184 ± 0.120μg/g tissue wet weight, respectively. The result shows that the increased level of a-tocopherol and tocotrienols found in the soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats fed palm olein oil is responsible, at least partly, for the lower amount of lipid peroxidation products in these muscles compared with the soleus muscles of hyperthyroid rats fed soya bean oil in our earlier study.

  14. Growth-associated protein-43 immunohistochemical and ultrastructural changes in jaw muscle spindles of the rat following loss of occlusion.

    PubMed

    Santiwong, Peerapong; Muramoto, Takeshi; Soma, Kunimichi; Takano, Yoshiro

    2002-03-01

    The effects of complete loss of occlusion on the structural and functional status of these muscle spindles were investigated by immunohistochemistry either for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) or growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) by light and electron microscopy. All the upper molars of 4-week-old Wistar rats were extracted and the erupted portions of the upper and lower incisors of the same animals were cut-off at the level of the interdental papilla every other day. In a control group, immunoreactivity for GAP-43 was positive in the developing annulospiral endings of 2-week-old rats, but was not detected in any of the muscle spindles after 3 weeks of age. At 4 weeks of age, the PGP 9.5 immunostained spindles had well-differentiated annulospiral endings. Ultrastructurally, these afferent endings showed lenticular or circular profiles in cross-sections, and were differentially indented into the intrafusal-fibres. The inner surfaces of the terminals formed rather smooth myoneural junctions, while the outer surfaces were covered only by basal lamina continuous with that of the underlying intrafusal muscle fibres. After the experimental elimination of occlusal contact, GAP-43 immunoreactivity reappeared in some nerve endings of muscle spindles by 3 days, and persisted for at least 28 days. During this period, the afferent-terminals exhibited various fine structural abnormalities such as irregular outlines and invaginated neuromuscular interfaces. Some sensory-terminal (ST) profiles were completely engulfed by intrafusal-fibres. However, GAP-43 expression and ultrastructural alterations became undetectable within a week of the end of incisal cutting and the recovery of incisal-contact. These data indicate that remodelling of nerve terminals in muscle spindles, as assessed by GAP-43 expression and ultrastructural changes, occurs soon after a loss of occlusion, and ceases if incisal-contact is restored. It is concluded that possible changes in jaw muscle function

  15. The effects of Creatine Long-Term Supplementation on Muscle Morphology and Swimming Performance in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ahmet; Ozdemir, Ercan; Gulturk, Sefa; Erdal, Sena

    2009-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) has been shown to increase the total muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Cr supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance, using an animal model. Each rat was subjected to exercise 15-minute period daily for the 12 weeks. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: no Cr supplementation (CON), no Cr supplementation and incomplete food intake (lacking lysine and methionine in diet for rats) (INCO), Cr supplementation 1 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) (CREAT-I) and Cr supplementation 2 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) (CREAT-II). Three months later, all groups adult rats exercised in swimming pool chambers. Swimming time was recorded as minute for each rat. Following swimming performance period, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation and the gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles were dissected. Serial slices of 5-7 μm were allocated paraffin wax and histochemical staining procedure of cross-sections was carried out with heamatoxylin-eosin technics. All groups gained body weight at the end of 12 weeks but there was no statistical difference among them. Swimming time values were statistical difference between CREAT-II and CON group as well as between CREAT-I and CON group (p < 0.05). In the INCO group was determined increased connective tissue cell of the muscle sample. In contrast, in the CREAT-I and CREAT-II group, the basic histological changes were large-scale muscle fibers and hypertrophic muscle cells. These results suggest that long-term creatine supplementation increased the number of muscle fibers and enhanced endurance swimming performance in rats. Key pointsThere is no study about the effects of creatine long-term supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance in rats.Long-term creatine supplementation increase muscle hypertrophy (but not body weight) and enhance endurance swimming performance in rats.The quantitative analysis indicated that the number of muscle fibers per defined area

  16. Bee (Apis mellifera) venom produced toxic effects of higher amplitude in rat thoracic aorta than in skeletal muscle--an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Florea, Adrian; Crăciun, Constantin

    2012-04-01

    In this study, changes produced in aorta and triceps surae muscle of Wistar rats as response to bee venom (BV) envenomation were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and morphometry. A subchronic treatment of 30 days with daily doses of 700 μg BV/kg and an acute-lethal treatment with a single dose of 62 mg BV/kg were performed. The subchronic treatment resulted in endothelial cell retraction, a thicker subendothelial layer, and thinner elastic laminae and musculoelastic layers in aorta, and thicker endothelium and basal laminae in skeletal muscle. In both tissues polymorphous, swollen mitochondria with disrupted cristae were observed. The acute treatment produced extensive endothelial lesions, breakdown of the collagen layer and migration of muscle cells toward the intima in the aorta, and dilatation of endoplasmic reticulum in the skeletal muscle cells. Mitochondria were almost devoid of cristae or with few circular cristae in the smooth muscle cells while most of the mitochondria presented abnormal circular cristae in the skeletal muscle cells. Degenerative alterations in the aorta were of higher intensity in our experiments-both the intima and media strongly responded to BV, in contrast to those found at the level of the skeletal muscle cells where a moderate degenerative myopathy was recorded.

  17. The muscle contraction mode determines lymphangiogenesis differentially in rat skeletal and cardiac muscles by modifying local lymphatic extracellular matrix microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Greiwe, L; Vinck, M; Suhr, F

    2016-05-01

    Lymphatic vessels are of special importance for tissue homeostasis, and increases of their density may foster tissue regeneration. Exercise could be a relevant tool to increase lymphatic vessel density (LVD); however, a significant lack of knowledge remains to understand lymphangiogenesis in skeletal muscles upon training. Interestingly, training-induced lymphangiogenesis has never been studied in the heart. We studied lymphangiogenesis and LVD upon chronic concentric and chronic eccentric muscle contractions in both rat skeletal (Mm. Edl and Sol) and cardiac muscles. We found that LVD decreased in both skeletal muscles specifically upon eccentric training, while this contraction increased LVD in cardiac tissue. These observations were supported by opposing local remodelling of lymphatic vessel-specific extracellular matrix components in skeletal and cardiac muscles and protein levels of lymphatic markers (Lyve-1, Pdpn, Vegf-C/D). Confocal microscopy further revealed transformations of lymphatic vessels into vessels expressing both blood (Cav-1) and lymphatic (Vegfr-3) markers upon eccentric training specifically in skeletal muscles. In addition and phenotype supportive, we found increased inflammation (NF-κB/p65, Il-1β, Ifn-γ, Tnf-α and MPO(+) cells) in eccentrically stressed skeletal, but decreased levels in cardiac muscles. Our data provide novel mechanistic insights into lymphangiogenic processes in skeletal and cardiac muscles upon chronic muscle contraction modes and demonstrate that both tissues adapt in opposing manners specifically to eccentric training. These data are highly relevant for clinical applications, because eccentric training serves as a sufficient strategy to increase LVD and to decrease inflammation in cardiac tissue, for example in order to reduce tissue abortion in transplantation settings. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Effects of antioxidant on reduction of hindlimb muscle atrophy induced by cisplatin in rats].

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin il; Choe, Myoung-Ae

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of Cu/Zn SOD on reduction of hindlimb muscular atrophy induced by cisplatin in rats. Forty-two rats were assigned to three groups; control group, Cisplatin (CDDP) group and cisplatin with Cu/Zn SOD (CDDP-SOD) group. At day 35 hindlimb muscles were dissected. Food intake, activity, withdrawal threshold, muscle weight, and Type I, II fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of dissected muscles were measured. Relative SOD activity and expression of MHC and phosphorylated Akt, ERK were measured after dissection. Muscle weight and Type I, II fiber CSA of hindlimb muscles in the CDDP group were significantly less than the control group. Muscle weight and Type I, II fiber CSA of hindlimb muscles, food intake, activity, and withdrawal thresholds of the CDDP-SOD group were significantly greater than the CDDP group. There were no significant differences in relative SOD activities of hindlimb muscles between the CDDP-SOD and CDDP groups. MHC expression and phosphorylated Akt, ERK of hindlimb muscles in the CDDP-SOD group were significantly greater than the CDDP group. Cu/Zn SOD attenuates hindlimb muscular atrophy induced by cisplatin through increased food intake and activity. Increment of phosphorylated Akt, ERK may relate to attenuation of hindlimb muscular atrophy.

  19. Effective therapy of transected quadriceps muscle in rat: Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157.

    PubMed

    Staresinic, Mario; Petrovic, Igor; Novinscak, Tomislav; Jukic, Ivana; Pevec, Damira; Suknaic, Slaven; Kokic, Neven; Batelja, Lovorka; Brcic, Luka; Boban-Blagaic, Alenka; Zoric, Zdenka; Ivanovic, Domagoj; Ajduk, Marko; Sebecic, Bozidar; Patrlj, Leonardo; Sosa, Tomislav; Buljat, Gojko; Anic, Tomislav; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2006-05-01

    We report complete transection of major muscle and the systemic peptide treatment that induces healing of quadriceps muscle promptly and then maintains the healing with functional restoration. Initially, stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419, PL-10, PLD-116, PL 14736 Pliva, Croatia; in trials for inflammatory bowel disease; wound treatment; no toxicity reported; effective alone without carrier) also superiorly accelerates the healing of transected Achilles tendon. Regularly, quadriceps muscle completely transected transversely 1.0 cm proximal to patella presents a definitive defect that cannot be compensated in rat. BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng, 10 pg/kg) is given intraperitoneally, once daily; the first application 30 min posttransection, the final 24 h before sacrifice. It consistently improves muscle healing throughout the whole 72-day period. Improved are: (i) biomechanic (load of failure increased); (ii) function (walking recovery and extensor postural thrust/motor function index returned toward normal healthy values); (iii) microscopy/immunochemistry [i.e., mostly muscle fibers connect muscle segments; absent gap; significant desmin positivity for ongoing regeneration of muscle; larger myofibril diameters on both sides, distal and proximal (normal healthy rat-values reached)]; (iv) macroscopic presentation (stumps connected; subsequently, atrophy markedly attenuated; finally, presentation close to normal noninjured muscle, no postsurgery leg contracture). Thus, posttransection healing-consistently improved-may suggest this peptide therapeutic application in muscle disorders.

  20. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle.

  1. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E.; Hernandez, Jessica Soto; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle. PMID:26415224

  2. Changes of masseter muscle activity following injection of botulinum toxin type A in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C Y; Lei, Y Y; Yang, L Y; Chiu, W C

    2015-11-01

    To investigate changes in masseter muscle function following intramuscular injection of different dose-dependent botulinum toxin type A (BTXA). Department of Orthodontics at Taipei Medical University. Fifty-two, 70-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups. Group I received 7.5 U of BTXA (0.3 ml), Group II received 5.0 U, and Group III received 2.5 U in the right masseter muscle, respectively. Group IV is the control and received no BTXA injection. A wire electrode device was implanted to record muscle activity. One week after implantation, the rats were fed every 2 h and EMG signals were recorded during the first hour. All signals were recorded for 12 weeks. Thereafter, EMG data were analyzed for statistical calculation and weights of masseter muscles were measured. Masseter muscle activity decreased 99% during the first week after BTXA injection and gradually recovered from the 3rd week on in Groups I-III. By the 12th week, muscle activity recovered to 41% in Groups I and II and 56.26% in Group III. No significant changes of muscle activity were observed in Group IV. BTXA induced a reduction in masseter muscle activity and an increased toxin dose resulted in greater depression of muscle activity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clenbuterol in the prevention of muscle atrophy: a study of hindlimb-unweighted rats.

    PubMed

    Herrera, N M; Zimmerman, A N; Dykstra, D D; Thompson, L V

    2001-07-01

    To determine whether the administration of clenbuterol, a beta2-adrenergic agonist, prevents loss of muscle mass during a period of imposed inactivity. Randomized trial. Basic laboratory research. Thirty Fischer 344 Brown Norway F1 Hybrid rats, 12 and 30 months of age. The rats were randomly assigned to a control group, or to 1 of 2 experimental groups: hindlimb unweighted for 2 weeks (HU-2), or hindlimb unweighted with daily injections of clenbuterol for 2 weeks (HU-2Cl). Muscle mass weighed in milligrams and single fiber cross-sectional area histochemically evaluated. In both age groups, the HU-2 animals had greater muscle atrophy (decrease in muscle mass) in the soleus muscle than the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. In the HU-2Cl groups, the decline in muscle mass of both the soleus and EDL muscles was attenuated by about 4% to 20%. In the HU-2 group, single fiber cross-sectional area decreased for both fiber types (type I, 20%-40%; type II, 37%-50%) in both age groups. Clenbuterol retarded the inactivity-induced decline in single fiber cross-sectional area by 12% to 50%. In the EDL muscles of the HU-2Cl group, we found hypertrophy in both fiber types in the 30-month-old animals and in type I fibers in the 12-month-old animals. Clenbuterol attenuated the decrease in muscle mass and single fiber cross-sectional area in both age groups. By preventing the loss of muscle mass, clenbuterol administered early in rehabilitation may benefit severely debilitated patients imposed by inactivity. The attenuated muscle atrophy found with clenbuterol in the present study provides cellular evidence for the reported change in muscle strength after its administration after knee surgery. Thus, the administration of clenbuterol may lead to a more rapid rate of rehabilitation. Copyright 2001 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

  4. Spaceflight effects on adult rat muscle protein, nucleic acids, and amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1986-01-01

    Exposure to conditions of weightlessness has been associated with decrements in muscle mass and strength. The present studies were undertaken to determine muscle responses at the cellular level. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (360-410 g) were exposed to 7 days of weightlessness during the Spacelab-3 shuttle flight (May 1985). Animals were killed 12 h postflight, and soleus (S), gastrocnemius (G), and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were excised. Muscle protein, RNA, and DNA were extracted and quantified. Differential muscle atrophy was accompanied by a significant (P less than 0.05) reduction in total protein only in S muscles. There were no significant changes in protein concentration (mg/g) in the muscles examined. In S muscles from flight animals, sarcoplasmic protein accounted for a significantly greater proportion of total protein that in ground controls (37.5 vs. 32.5%). Tissue concentrations (nmol/g) of asparagine-aspartate, glutamine-glutamate, glycine, histidine, and lysine were significantly reduced (from 17 to 63%) in S muscles from flight animals, but only glutamine-glutamate levels were decreased in the G and EDL. Muscle DNA content (microgram) was unchanged in the tissues examined, but S muscle DNA concentration (micrograms/mg) increased 27%. RNA content (micrograms) was significantly (P less than 0.025) reduced in S (-28%) and G(-22%) muscles following spaceflight. These results identify specific alterations in rat skeletal muscle during short term (7-day) exposure to weightlessness and compare favorably with observations previously obtained from ground-based suspension simulations.

  5. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves plantaris muscle recovery after disuse in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Alway, Stephen E; Bennett, Brian T; Wilson, Joseph C; Edens, Neile K; Pereira, Suzette L

    2014-02-01

    Aging exacerbates muscle loss and slows the recovery of muscle mass and function after disuse. In this study we investigated the potential that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), an abundant catechin in green tea, would reduce signaling for apoptosis and promote skeletal muscle recovery in the fast plantaris muscle and the slow soleus muscle after hindlimb suspension (HLS) in senescent animals. Fischer 344 × Brown Norway inbred rats (age 34 months) received either EGCg (50 mg/kg body weight), or water daily by gavage. One group of animals received HLS for 14 days and a second group of rats received 14 days of HLS, then the HLS was removed and they recovered from this forced disuse for 2 weeks. Animals that received EGCg over the HLS followed by 14 days of recovery, had a 14% greater plantaris muscle weight (p<0.05) as compared to the animals treated with the vehicle over this same period. Plantaris fiber area was greater after recovery in EGCg (2715.2±113.8 μm(2)) vs. vehicle treated animals (1953.0±41.9 μm(2)). In addition, activation of myogenic progenitor cells was improved with EGCg over vehicle treatment (7.5% vs. 6.2%) in the recovery animals. Compared to vehicle treatment, the apoptotic index was lower (0.24% vs. 0.52%), and the abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax (-22%), and FADD (-77%) was lower in EGCg treated plantaris muscles after recovery. While EGCg did not prevent unloading-induced atrophy, it improved muscle recovery after the atrophic stimulus in fast plantaris muscles. However, this effect was muscle specific because EGCg had no major impact in reversing HLS-induced atrophy in the slow soleus muscle of old rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate improves plantaris muscle recovery after disuse in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Alway, Stephen E.; Bennett, Brian T.; Wilson, Joseph C.; Edens, Neile K.; Pereira, Suzette L.

    2014-01-01

    Aging exacerbates muscle loss and slows the recovery of muscle mass and function after disuse. In this study we investigated the potential that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), an abundant catechin in green tea, would reduce signaling for apoptosis and promote skeletal muscle recovery in the fast plantaris muscle and the slow soleus muscle after hindlimb unloading (HLS) in senescent animals. Fischer 344 × Brown Norway inbred rats (age 34 mo.) received either EGCg (50 mg/kg body weight), or water daily by gavage. One group of animals received HLS for 14 days and a second group of rats received 14 days of HLS, then the HLS was removed and they recovered from this forced disuse for 2 weeks. Animals that received EGCg over the HLS followed by 14 days of recovery, had a 14% greater plantaris muscle weight (p <0.05) as compared to the animals treated with the vehicle over this same period. Plantaris fiber area was greater after recovery in EGCg (2715.2 ± 113.8 μm2) vs. vehicle treated animals (1953.0 ± 41.9 μm2). In addition, activation of myogenic progenitor cells was improved with EGCg over vehicle treatment (7.5% vs. 6.2%) in the recovery animals. Compared to vehicle treatment, the apoptotic index was lower (0.24% vs. 0.52%), and the abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax (−22%), and FADD (−77%) were lower in EGCg treated plantaris muscles after recovery. While EGCg did not prevent unloading-induced atrophy, it improved muscle recovery after the atrophic stimulus in fast plantaris muscles. However, this effect was muscle specific because EGCg had no major impact in reversing HLS-induced atrophy in the slow soleus muscle of old rats. PMID:24316035

  7. Muscle Is a Target for Preservation in a Rat Limb Replantation Model

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Yuki; Teratani, Takumi; Hoshino, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ischemia exceeding 6 hours makes clinical limb replantation difficult and places the patient at risk of functional deficit or limb loss. We investigated the preservation of muscle function and morphology with solutions in rat hindlimb in vivo and in vitro. Methods: Quadriceps femoris muscles from luciferase transgenic rats were preserved for 24 hours at 4°C in extracellular-type trehalose containing Kyoto (ETK), University of Wisconsin (UW), or lactated Ringer’s (LR) solution (control). Muscle luminescence was measured with a bioimaging system. Amputated limbs of Lewis rats preserved with ETK, UW, or LR for 6 or 24 hours at 4°C were transplanted orthotopically. At week 8, terminal latency and amplitude were measured in the tibialis anterior muscle. The muscles were also analyzed histologically. Results: Isolated muscles preserved in ETK or UW had significantly higher luminescence than did muscles immersed in LR (P < 0.05). In the 6-hour-preserved limb transplantation model, although the 3 groups had almost the same terminal latency, electrical amplitude was significantly lower in the LR group. Histologically, muscles preserved with LR showed the most atrophic changes. In the 24-hour-preserved model, the survival rate of the LR group was 37.5% in contrast to 80% in the ETK and UW groups. Electrical signals were not detected in the LR group owing to severe muscle atrophy and fibrosis. The ETK and UW groups showed good muscle function electrophysiologically. Conclusions: Preservation solutions can protect muscle function and morphology in ischemia–reperfusion limbs and improve recipient survival rates after transplantation of long-term-preserved limbs. PMID:25289265

  8. Gene response of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles to an acute aerobic run in rats.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Michael J; Goldfarb, Allan H; Kump, David S

    2011-01-01

    Genes can be activated or inhibited by signals within the tissues in response to an acute bout of exercise. It is unclear how a particular aerobic exercise bout may influence two muscles with similar actions to the activity. Therefore, the purposes of this investigation was to determine the gene response of selected genes involved in the "stress" response of the gastrocnemius (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles to a single two hour aerobic exercise bout in female Sprague-Dawley Rats at the 1 hour time point after the exercise. Exercised rats were run (n=8) for 2 hours at 20 m.min(-1) and one hour after the completion of the bout had their soleus (S) and gastrocnemius (G) muscles removed. Age and timed matched sedentary control rats had both S and G muscles removed also. RNA was isolated from all muscles. Real-time PCR analysis was performed on the following genes: NFκB, TNFα, and Atf3. GAPDH was used as the housekeeping gene for both muscles. S muscle showed more genes altered (n = 52) vs G (n = 26). NFκB gene expression was 0.83 ± 0.14 in the exercised S but was + 1.36 ± 0.58 in the exercised G and was not significantly different between the muscles. TNFα was altered 1.30 ± 0. 34 in the exercised S and 1.36 ± 0.71 in the exercised G and was not significantly different between the muscles. The gene Atf3 was significantly altered at 4.97 ± 1.01 in the exercised S, while it was not significantly altered in the exercised G (0.70 ± 0.55). This study demonstrates that an acute bout of aerobic exercise can alter gene expression to a different extent in both the S and G muscles. It is highly likely that muscle recruitment was a factor which influenced the gene expression in theses muscles. It is interesting to note that some genes were similarly activated in these two muscles but other genes may demonstrate a varied response to the same exercise bout depending on the type of muscle. Key pointsThe soleus (primarily slow twitch) and the gastrocnemius

  9. Gestational lead exposure induces developmental abnormalities and up-regulates apoptosis of fetal cerebellar cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Alyaa M; Al-Fadhli, Ameera S; Rao, Muddanna S; Kilarkaje, Narayana

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb), a known environmental toxicant, adversely affects almost all organ systems. In this study, we investigated the effects of maternal lead exposure on fetal rat cerebellum. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were given lead nitrate in drinking water (0, 0.5, and 1%) for two weeks before conception, and during pregnancy. Fetuses were collected by caesarian section on gestational day 21 and observed for developmental abnormalities. The fetal cerebellar sections from control and 1% lead group were stained with cresyl violet. Immunohistochemical expressions of p53, Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase 3 were quantified by AnalySIS image analyzer (Life Science, Germany). Lead exposure induced developmental abnormalities of eyes, ear, limbs, neck and ventral abdominal wall; however, these abnormalities were commonly seen in the 1% lead-treated group. In addition, lead also caused fetal mortality and reduced body growth in both dose groups and reduced brain weight in the 1% lead-treated group. The fetal cerebella from the 1% lead-treated group showed unorganized cerebellar cortical layers, and degenerative changes in granule and Purkinje cells such as the formation of clumps of Nissl granules. An increase in Bax and caspase 3, and a decrease in Bcl-2 (p < 0.05), but not in p53, showed apoptosis of the neurons. In conclusion, gestational lead exposure in rats induces fetal toxicity and developmental abnormalities. The lead exposure also impairs development of cerebellar layers, induces structural changes, and apoptosis in the fetal cerebellar cortex. These results suggest that lead exposure during gestation is extremely toxic to developing cerebellum in rats.

  10. Heat stress attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy of extensor digitorum longus in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, K; Une, S; Akiyama, J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether heat stress attenuates skeletal muscle atrophy of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, 12-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 6 per group): control (Con), heat stress (HS), diabetes mellitus (DM), and diabetes mellitus/heat stress (DM + HS). Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Heat stress was induced in the HS and DM + HS groups by immersion of the lower half of the body in hot water at 42 °C for 30 min; it was initiated 7 days after injection of streptozotocin, and was performed once a day, five times a week for 3 weeks. The muscle fiber cross-sectional area of EDL muscles from diabetic and non-diabetic rats was determined; heat stress protein (HSP) 72 and HSP25 expression levels were also analyzed by western blotting. Diabetes-induced muscle fiber atrophy was attenuated upon heat stress treatment in diabetic rats. HSP72 and HSP25 expression was upregulated in the DM + HS group compared with the DM group. Our findings suggest that heat stress attenuates atrophy of the EDL muscle by upregulating HSP72 and HSP25 expression.

  11. Effect of cigarette smoke exposure in vivo on bronchial smooth muscle contractility in vitro in rats.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoshihiko; Murata, Masahiko; Ushikubo, Hiroko; Yoshikawa, Yuji; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Kamei, Junzo; Misawa, Miwa

    2005-12-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Little is known concerning the effect of cigarette smoking on the contractility of airway smooth muscle. The current study was performed to determine the responsiveness of bronchial smooth muscles isolated from rats that were subacutely exposed to mainstream cigarette smoke in vivo. Male Wistar rats were exposed to diluted mainstream cigarette smoke for 2 h/d every day for 2 wk. Twenty-four hours after the last cigarette smoke exposure, a marked airway inflammation (i.e., increases in numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and peribronchial tissues) was observed. In these subacutely cigarette smoke-exposed animals, the responsiveness of isolated intact (nonpermeabilized) bronchial smooth muscle to acetylcholine, but not to high K+ -depolarization, was significantly augmented when compared with the air-exposed control group. In alpha-toxin-permeabilized bronchial smooth muscle strips, the acetylcholine-induced Ca2+ sensitization of contraction was significantly augmented in rats exposed to cigarette smoke, although the contraction induced by Ca2+ was control level. Immunoblot analyses revealed an increased expression of RhoA protein in the bronchial smooth muscle of rats that were exposed to cigarette smoke. Taken together, these findings suggest that the augmented agonist-induced, RhoA-mediated Ca2+ sensitization may be responsible for the enhanced bronchial smooth muscle contraction induced by cigarette smoking, which has relevance to airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  12. Molecular and functional evidence for Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter expression in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wong, J A; Fu, L; Schneider, E G; Thomason, D B

    1999-07-01

    Doubt has been raised about the expression of a functional Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter in rat skeletal muscle. In this study we present molecular and functional evidence for expression of a protein having the characteristics of a cotransporter. RT-PCR of RNA isolated from rat soleus muscle with primers to a conserved putative membrane-spanning domain resulted in a single product of predicted size. Sequencing of the product showed that it bears >90% homology with known rodent NKCC1 (BSC2) cotransporters. RNase protection assay of RNA isolated from the rat soleus muscle also identified this sequence. Immunologic detection of the cotransporter with two different antibodies indicated the presence of cotransporter protein, perhaps more than one, in blots of total muscle protein. Immunohistochemical detection by confocal microscopy localized the majority of expression of the protein to the muscle fibers. Functional studies of cotransport activity also indicate the appropriate sensitivity to inhibitors and ion dependence. Taken together, these data support the presence and function of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter activity in the soleus muscle of the rat.

  13. [Forskolin inhibits spontaneous contraction of gastric antral smooth muscle in rats].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing-Zhi; Sun, Qian; Xu, Dong-Yuan; Zhang, Mo-Han; Piao, Li-Hua; Cai, Ying-Lan; Jin, Zheng

    2013-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) on rat gastric antral circular smooth muscle function. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC), was used to observe the influences of cAMP. Multi-channel physiological recorder was used to record spontaneous contraction activity of gastric antral circular muscle from Wistar rats. And ELISA method was used to detect the change of cAMP production in perfusate. The results showed that forskolin concentration-dependently suppressed the amplitude and frequency of the spontaneous contraction of the gastric antral muscle, and lowered the baseline of contraction movement significantly. Forskolin concentration-dependently increased the production of cAMP in the perfusate, which showed a significant negative correlation with the contraction amplitude of gastric antral ring muscle. The inhibitory effect of forskolin on spontaneous contraction activity of rat gastric antral circular muscle could be blocked by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor H-89. These results suggest forskolin increases cAMP production and then activates PKA pathway, resulting in the inhibition of the spontaneous contraction activity of rat gastric antral circular smooth muscle.

  14. Role of afferent input and mechanical load for size regulation of rat soleus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Fuminori; Matsuka, Yoshikazu; Oke, Yoshihiko; Higo, Yoko; Terada, Masahiro; Umemoto, Shiori; Kawabe, Naoko; Wang, Xiao Dong; Shinoda, Yo; Lan, Yong Bo; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Ohmi, Shinobu; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2005-08-01

    Effects of deafferentation on the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (S6), 27 kDa heat shock protein (HSP27) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 were studied in rat soleus muscle. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly separated into the pre- and post- experimental control, functionally overloaded (FO), sham-operated, deafferentated (DA), FO+DA, and hindlimb-unloaded (U) groups. The distal tendons of left plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles were transected in the FO rats. The left dorsal roots of the spinal cord at the L4-5 segmental levels were transected in the DA rats. The rats in U were tail-suspended. The sampling of the soleus muscle was performed 2 weeks after the treatments shown above. The cytoplasmic fraction of the soleus muscle homogenate was used for the quantitative analyses of the phosphorylation levels of S6, HSP27, and ERK 1/2. The phosphorylation levels of these proteins were up-regulated by FO. On the contrary, the phosphorylation of all of these proteins was down-regulated by U and DA. Further, the FO-related increase of the protein phosphorylation was inhibited by additional treatment with DA. These results indicated that the afferent feedback plays crucial roles in the intramuscular regulation of the soleus muscle mass.

  15. Impaired Exercise Performance and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Rats with Secondary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bouitbir, Jamal; Haegler, Patrizia; Singh, François; Joerin, Lorenz; Felser, Andrea; Duthaler, Urs; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of carnitine depletion upon exercise performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function remain largely unexplored. We therefore investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP), a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal carnitine reabsorption, on physical performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated daily with water (control rats; n = 12) or with 20 mg/100 g body weight THP (n = 12) via oral gavage for 3 weeks. Following treatment, half of the animals of each group performed an exercise test until exhaustion. Results: Distance covered and exercise performance were lower in THP-treated compared to control rats. In the oxidative soleus muscle, carnitine depletion caused atrophy (–24%) and impaired function of complex II and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The free radical leak (ROS production relative to oxygen consumption) was increased and the cellular glutathione pool decreased. Moreover, mRNA expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA were decreased in THP-treated compared to control rats. In comparison, in the glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with impaired function of complex IV and increased free radical leak, whilst muscle weight and cellular glutathione pool were maintained. Markers of mitochondrial proliferation and mitochondrial DNA were unaffected. Conclusions: Carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired exercise capacity in rats treated with THP. THP-induced carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired function of the electron transport chain in oxidative and glycolytic muscle as well as with atrophy and decreased mitochondrial DNA in oxidative muscle. PMID:27559315

  16. Glucose transport and cell surface GLUT-4 protein in skeletal muscle of the obese Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Etgen, G J; Wilson, C M; Jensen, J; Cushman, S W; Ivy, J L

    1996-08-01

    The relationship between 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport and 2-N-4-(1-azi-2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-benzoyl-1, 3-bis-(D-mannos-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA)-labeled cell surface GLUT-4 protein was assessed in fast-twitch (epitrochlearis) and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles of lean and obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats. In the absence of insulin, glucose transport as well as cell surface GLUT-4 protein was similar in both epitrochlearis and soleus muscles of lean and obese rats. In contrast, insulin-stimulated glucose transport rates were significantly higher for lean than obese rats in both soleus (0.74 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.40 +/- 0.02 mumol.g-1.10 min-1) and epitrochlearis (0.51 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.17 +/- 0.02 mumol.g-1.10 min-1) muscles. The ability of insulin to enhance glucose transport in fast- and slow-twitch muscles from both lean and obese rats corresponded directly with changes in cell surface GLUT-4 protein. Muscle contraction elicited similar increases in glucose transport in lean and obese rats, with the effect being more pronounced in fast-twitch (0.70 +/- 0.07 and 0.77 +/- 0.04 mumol.g-1.10 min-1 for obese and lean, respectively) than in slow-twitch muscle (0.36 +/- 0.03 and 0.40 +/- 0.02 mumol.g-1.10 min-1 for obese and lean, respectively). The contraction-induced changes in glucose transport directly corresponded with the observed changes in cell surface GLUT-4 protein. Thus the reduced glucose transport response to insulin in skeletal muscle of the obese Zucker rat appears to result directly from an inability to effectively enhance cell surface GLUT-4 protein.

  17. Slow- and fast-twitch hindlimb skeletal muscle phenotypes 12 wk after ⅚ nephrectomy in Wistar rats of both sexes.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Luz M; Peralta-Ramírez, Alan; López, Ignacio; Chamizo, Verónica E; Pineda, Carmen; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Rodríguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2015-10-01

    This study describes fiber-type adaptations in hindlimb muscles, the interaction of sex, and the role of hypoxia on this response in 12-wk ⅚ nephrectomized rats (Nx). Contractile, metabolic, and morphological features of muscle fiber types were assessed in the slow-twitch soleus and the fast-twitch tibialis cranialis muscles of Nx rats, and compared with sham-operated controls. Rats of both sexes were considered in both groups. A slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation occurred in the tibialis cranialis of Nx rats, particularly in males. This adaptation was accomplished by impaired oxidative capacity and capillarity, increased glycolytic capacity, and no changes in size and nuclear density of muscle fiber types. An oxidative-to-glycolytic metabolic transformation was also found in the soleus muscle of Nx rats. However, a modest fast-to-slow fiber-type transformation, fiber hypertrophy, and nuclear proliferation were observed in soleus muscle fibers of male, but not of female, Nx rats. Serum testosterone levels decreased by 50% in male but not in female Nx rats. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α protein level decreased by 42% in the tibialis cranialis muscle of male Nx rats. These data demonstrate that 12 wk of Nx induces a muscle-specific adaptive response in which myofibers do not change (or enlarge minimally) in size and nuclear density, but acquire markedly different contractile and metabolic characteristics, which are accompanied by capillary rarefaction. Muscle function and sex play relevant roles in these adaptations.

  18. Changes in skeletal muscle and tendon structure and function following genetic inactivation of myostatin in rats.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Lynch, Evan B; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Flood, Michael D; Rittman, Danielle S; Van Pelt, Douglas W; Roche, Stuart M; Davis, Carol S

    2015-04-15

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle and tendon mass. Myostatin deficiency has been well studied in mice, but limited data are available on how myostatin regulates the structure and function of muscles and tendons of larger animals. We hypothesized that, in comparison to wild-type (MSTN(+/+) ) rats, rats in which zinc finger nucleases were used to genetically inactivate myostatin (MSTN(Δ/Δ) ) would exhibit an increase in muscle mass and total force production, a reduction in specific force, an accumulation of type II fibres and a decrease and stiffening of connective tissue. Overall, the muscle and tendon phenotype of myostatin-deficient rats was markedly different from that of myostatin-deficient mice, which have impaired contractility and pathological changes to fibres and their extracellular matrix. Extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of MSTN(Δ/Δ) rats demonstrated 20-33% increases in mass, 35-45% increases in fibre number, 20-57% increases in isometric force and no differences in specific force. The insulin-like growth factor-1 pathway was activated to a greater extent in MSTN(Δ/Δ) muscles, but no substantial differences in atrophy-related genes were observed. Tendons of MSTN(Δ/Δ) rats had a 20% reduction in peak strain, with no differenc