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Sample records for rat pancreatic beta-cells

  1. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-yi; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-wei; Mei, Fang-chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment.

  2. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-yi; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-wei; Mei, Fang-chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment. PMID:27656209

  3. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Attenuates Pancreatic Beta-Cell Injury in Rats with Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu-Pu; Guo, Wen-Yi; Wang, Wei-Xing; Zhao, Liang; Xiang, Ming-Wei; Mei, Fang-Chao; Abliz, Ablikim; Hu, Peng; Deng, Wen-Hong; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a particular process with an imbalance of homeostasis, which plays an important role in pancreatitis, but little is known about how ER stress is implicated in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) induced pancreatic beta-cell injury. To investigate the effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) on the beta-cell injury following SAP and the underlying mechanism, twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operation (SO) group, SAP model group, and 4-PBA treatment group. SAP model was induced by infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. 4-PBA or normal saline was injected intraperitoneally for 3 days in respective group before successful modeling. Results showed that 4-PBA attenuated the following: (1) pancreas and islet pathological injuries, (2) serum TNF-α and IL-1β, (3) serum insulin and glucose, (4) beta-cell ultrastructural changes, (5) ER stress markers (BiP, ORP150, and CHOP), Caspase-3, and insulin expression in islet. These results suggested that 4-PBA mitigates pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP, presumably because of its role in inhibiting excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress. This may serve as a new therapeutic target for reducing pancreatic beta-cell injury and endocrine disorder in SAP upon 4-PBA treatment. PMID:27656209

  4. Reduced expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in glucose-insensitive pancreatic beta cells of diabetic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Thorens, B; Weir, G C; Leahy, J L; Lodish, H F; Bonner-Weir, S

    1990-01-01

    Rats injected with a single dose of streptozocin at 2 days of age develop non-insulin-dependent diabetes 6 weeks later. The pancreatic beta islet cells of these diabetic rats display a loss of glucose-induced insulin secretion while maintaining sensitivity to other secretagogues such as arginine. We analyzed the level of expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in diabetic islets by immunofluorescence staining of pancreas sections and by Western blotting of islet lysates. Islets from diabetic animals have a reduced expression of this beta-cell-specific glucose transporter isoform and the extent of reduction is correlated with the severity of hyperglycemia. In contrast, expression of this transporter isoform in liver is minimally modified by the diabetes. Thus a decreased expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in beta cells is associated with the impaired glucose sensing characteristic of diabetic islets; our data suggest that this glucose transporter may be part of the beta-cell glucose sensor. Images PMID:2204056

  5. Reduced Expression of the Liver/Beta-Cell Glucose Transporter Isoform in Glucose-Insensitive Pancreatic Beta Cells of Diabetic Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorens, Bernard; Weir, Gordon C.; Leahy, John L.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    1990-09-01

    Rats injected with a single dose of streptozocin at 2 days of age develop non-insulin-dependent diabetes 6 weeks later. The pancreatic beta islet cells of these diabetic rats display a loss of glucose-induced insulin secretion while maintaining sensitivity to other secretagogues such as arginine. We analyzed the level of expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in diabetic islets by immunofluorescence staining of pancreas sections and by Western blotting of islet lysates. Islets from diabetic animals have a reduced expression of this beta-cell-specific glucose transporter isoform and the extent of reduction is correlated with the severity of hyperglycemia. In contrast, expression of this transporter isoform in liver is minimally modified by the diabetes. Thus a decreased expression of the liver/beta-cell glucose transporter isoform in beta cells is associated with the impaired glucose sensing characteristic of diabetic islets; our data suggest that this glucose transporter may be part of the beta-cell glucose sensor.

  6. PARP-1 and YY1 Are Important Novel Regulators of CXCL12 Gene Transcription in Rat Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marković, Jelena; Grdović, Nevena; Dinić, Svetlana; Karan-Djurašević, Teodora; Uskoković, Aleksandra; Arambašić, Jelena; Mihailović, Mirjana; Pavlović, Sonja; Poznanović, Goran; Vidaković, Melita

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant progress, the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic beta cell depletion and development of diabetes remain poorly defined. At present, there is no preventive measure against diabetes. The positive impact of CXCL12 expression on the pancreatic beta cell prosurvival phenotype initiated this study. Our aim was to provide novel insight into the regulation of rat CXCL12 gene (Cxcl12) transcription. The roles of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in Cxcl12 transcription were studied by examining their in vitro and in vivo binding affinities for the Cxcl12 promoter in a pancreatic beta cell line by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. The regulatory activities of PARP-1 and YY1 were assessed in transfection experiments using a reporter vector with a Cxcl12 promoter sequence driving luciferase gene expression. Experimental evidence for PARP-1 and YY1 revealed their trans-acting potential, wherein PARP-1 displayed an inhibitory, and YY1 a strong activating effect on Cxcl12 transcription. Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced general toxicity in pancreatic beta cells was followed by changes in Cxcl12 promoter regulation. PARP-1 binding to the Cxcl12 promoter during basal and in STZ-compromised conditions led us to conclude that PARP-1 regulates constitutive Cxcl12 expression. During the early stage of oxidative stress, YY1 exhibited less affinity toward the Cxcl12 promoter while PARP-1 displayed strong binding. These interactions were accompanied by Cxcl12 downregulation. In the later stages of oxidative stress and intensive pancreatic beta cell injury, YY1 was highly expressed and firmly bound to Cxcl12 promoter in contrast to PARP-1. These interactions resulted in higher Cxcl12 expression. The observed ability of PARP-1 to downregulate, and of YY1 to upregulate Cxcl12 promoter activity anticipates corresponding effects in the natural context where the functional

  7. TIRF imaging of docking and fusion of single insulin granule motion in primary rat pancreatic beta-cells: different behaviour of granule motion between normal and Goto-Kakizaki diabetic rat beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Kikuta, Toshiteru; Nagai, Shintaro; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2004-07-01

    We imaged and analysed the motion of single insulin secretory granules near the plasma membrane in live pancreatic beta-cells, from normal and diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In normal rat primary beta-cells, the granules that were fusing during the first phase originate from previously docked granules, and those during the second phase originate from 'newcomers'. In diabetic GK rat beta-cells, the number of fusion events from previously docked granules were markedly reduced, and, in contrast, the fusion from newcomers was still preserved. The dynamic change in the number of docked insulin granules showed that, in GK rat beta-cells, the total number of docked insulin granules was markedly decreased to 35% of the initial number after glucose stimulation. Immunohistochemistry with anti-insulin antibody observed by TIRFM showed that GK rat beta-cells had a marked decline of endogenous insulin granules docked to the plasma membrane. Thus our results indicate that the decreased number of docked insulin granules accounts for the impaired insulin release during the first phase of insulin release in diabetic GK rat beta-cells.

  8. Properties of single potassium channels modulated by glucose in rat pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ashcroft, F M; Ashcroft, S J; Harrison, D E

    1988-01-01

    1. The patch clamp method has been used to examine the effect of glucose on single K+ channel currents recorded from cell-attached patches on dissociated rat pancreatic beta-cells. Patch pipettes contained a 140 mM-K+ solution. 2. In glucose-free solution three types of K+ channels were observed. Two of these, having conductances of around 50 pS (G-channel) and 20 pS when the external K+ concentration, [K+]0, was 140 mM, were active at the resting potential of the cell. The G-channel was observed in more patches and showed higher activity; it therefore appears to contribute the major fraction of the resting K+ permeability of the beta-cell. At membrane potentials positive to about +20 mV a third type of K+ channel, having a mean conductance of 120 pS, was activated. The open probability of this channel was strongly voltage dependent and increased with depolarization. 3. The reversal potential of the G-channel current was shifted 59 mV by a 10-fold change in external K+ (Na+ substitution) indicating the channel is highly K+ selective. The single-channel conductance varied with [K+]o as predicted from the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation; at physiological [K+]o (5 mM-K+) an inward conductance of around 10 pS is predicted. The amplitude of the single-channel current showed a tendency to saturate with increasing [K+]o. 4. Single G-channel currents show burst kinetics indicating at least two closed states. The open and closed (gap) times within the bursts were distributed exponentially with time constants of 2.5 ms (tau o) and 0.5 ms (tau c1) respectively at the resting potential of the cell. There was little change in tau c1 over the voltage range -40 to 60 mV (pipette potential) but tau o increased slightly with membrane depolarization. 5. The addition of glucose to the bath solution produced a reversible, dose-dependent decrease in G-channel activity. This decrease results principally from a reduction in the frequency and duration of the bursts of openings with

  9. Glucolipotoxicity of the Pancreatic Beta Cell

    PubMed Central

    Poitout, Vincent; Amyot, Julie; Semache, Meriem; Zarrouki, Bader; Hagman, Derek; Fontés, Ghislaine

    2009-01-01

    Summary The concept of glucolipotoxicity refers to the combined, deleterious effects of elevated glucose and fatty acid levels on pancreatic beta-cell function and survival. Significant progress has been made in recent years towards a better understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of glucolipotoxicity in the beta cell. The permissive effect of elevated glucose on the detrimental actions of fatty acids stems from the influence of glucose on intracellular fatty-acid metabolism, promoting the synthesis of cellular lipids. The combination of excessive levels of fatty acids and glucose therefore leads to decreased insulin secretion, impaired insulin gene expression, and beta-cell death by apoptosis, all of which probably have distinct underlying mechanisms. Recent studies from our laboratory have identified several pathways implicated in fatty-acid inhibition of insulin gene expression, including the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) pathway; the metabolic sensor Per-Arnt-Sim kinase (PASK); and the ATF6 branch of the unfolded protein response. We have also confirmed in vivo in rats that the decrease in insulin gene expression is an early defect which precedes any detectable abnormality in insulin secretion. While the role of glucolipotoxicity in humans is still debated, the inhibitory effects of chronically elevated fatty acid levels has been clearly demonstrated in several studies, at least in individuals genetically predisposed to developing type 2 diabetes. It is therefore likely that glucolipotoxicity contributes to beta-cell failure in type 2 diabetes as well as to the decline in beta-cell function observed after the onset of the disease. PMID:19715772

  10. Regulation of pancreatic beta-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Bouwens, Luc; Rooman, Ilse

    2005-10-01

    Beta-cell mass regulation represents a critical issue for understanding diabetes, a disease characterized by a near-absolute (type 1) or relative (type 2) deficiency in the number of pancreatic beta cells. The number of islet beta cells present at birth is mainly generated by the proliferation and differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells, a process called neogenesis. Shortly after birth, beta-cell neogenesis stops and a small proportion of cycling beta cells can still expand the cell number to compensate for increased insulin demands, albeit at a slow rate. The low capacity for self-replication in the adult is too limited to result in a significant regeneration following extensive tissue injury. Likewise, chronically increased metabolic demands can lead to beta-cell failure to compensate. Neogenesis from progenitor cells inside or outside islets represents a more potent mechanism leading to robust expansion of the beta-cell mass, but it may require external stimuli. For therapeutic purposes, advantage could be taken from the surprising differentiation plasticity of adult pancreatic cells and possibly also from stem cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that it is feasible to regenerate and expand the beta-cell mass by the application of hormones and growth factors like glucagon-like peptide-1, gastrin, epidermal growth factor, and others. Treatment with these external stimuli can restore a functional beta-cell mass in diabetic animals, but further studies are required before it can be applied to humans. PMID:16183912

  11. Effect of coriander seed (Coriandrum sativum L.) ethanol extract on insulin release from pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Eidi, Maryam; Eidi, Akram; Saeidi, Ali; Molanaei, Saadat; Sadeghipour, Alireza; Bahar, Massih; Bahar, Kamal

    2009-03-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is grown as a spice crop all over the world. The seeds have been used to treat indigestion, diabetes, rheumatism and pain in the joints. In the present study, an ethanol extract of the seeds was investigated for effects on insulin release from the pancreatic beta cells in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Blood samples were drawn from the retro-orbital sinus before and 1.5, 3 and 5 h after administration of the seed extract. Serum glucose levels were determined by the glucose oxidase method. To determine the insulin releasing activity, after extract treatment the animals were anaesthetized by diethyl ether, the pancreas was excised, fixed in 10% formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin for sectioning. Pancreatic sections of 5 microm were processed for examination of insulin-releasing activity using an immunocytochemistry kit. The results showed that administration of the ethanol extract (200 and 250 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited a significant reduction in serum glucose. Administration of streptozotocin decreased the number of beta cells with insulin secretory activity in comparison with intact rats, but treatment with the coriander seed extract (200 mg/kg) increased significantly the activity of the beta cells in comparison with the diabetic control rats. The extract decreased serum glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and increased insulin release from the beta cells of the pancreas.

  12. Cell type-specific activation of metabolism reveals that beta-cell secretion suppresses glucagon release from alpha-cells in rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Rui; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Tamura, Akira; Yamaguchi, Suguru; Yamada, Takahiro; Takei, Daisuke; Katagiri, Hideki; Endou, Hitoshi; Oka, Yoshitomo

    2006-02-01

    Abnormal glucagon secretion is often associated with diabetes mellitus. However, the mechanisms by which nutrients modulate glucagon secretion remain poorly understood. Paracrine modulation by beta- or delta-cells is among the postulated mechanisms. Herein we present further evidence of the paracrine mechanism. First, to activate cellular metabolism and thus hormone secretion in response to specific secretagogues, we engineered insulinoma INS-1E cells using an adenovirus-mediated expression system. Expression of the Na+-dependent dicarboxylate transporter (NaDC)-1 resulted in 2.5- to 4.6-fold (P < 0.01) increases in insulin secretion in response to various tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Similarly, expression of glycerol kinase (GlyK) increased insulin secretion 3.8- or 4.2-fold (P < 0.01) in response to glycerol or dihydroxyacetone, respectively. This cell engineering method was then modified, using the Cre-loxP switching system, to activate beta-cells and non-beta-cells separately in rat islets. NaDC-1 expression only in non-beta-cells, among which alpha-cells are predominant, caused an increase (by 1.8-fold, P < 0.05) in glucagon secretion in response to malate or succinate. However, the increase in glucagon release was prevented when NaDC-1 was expressed in whole islets, i.e., both beta-cells and non-beta-cells. Similarly, an increase in glucagon release with glycerol was observed when GlyK was expressed only in non-beta-cells but not when it was expressed in whole islets. Furthermore, dicarboxylates suppressed basal glucagon secretion by 30% (P < 0.05) when NaDC-1 was expressed only in beta-cells. These data demonstrate that glucagon secretion from rat alpha-cells depends on beta-cell activation and provide insights into the coordinated mechanisms underlying hormone secretion from pancreatic islets.

  13. Beneficial effects of Murraya koenigii leaves on antioxidant defense system and ultra structural changes of pancreatic beta-cells in experimental diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2007-01-30

    Oxidative stress and oxidative damage to tissues are common end points of chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Oxidative stress in diabetes coexists with a reduction in the antioxidant status, which can further increase the deleterious effects of free radicals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protective effects of Murraya koenigii leaves extract against beta-cell damage and antioxidant defense systems of plasma and pancreas in streptozotocin induced diabetes in rats. The levels of glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in blood and insulin, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathione and TBARS were estimated in plasma of control and experimental groups of rats. To assess the changes in the cellular antioxidant defense system such as the level of reduced glutathione and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were assayed in pancreatic tissue homogenate. The levels of glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin, TBARS, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants were altered in diabetic rats. These alterations were reverted back to near control levels after the treatment of M. koenigii leaves extract. Transmission electron microscopic studies also revealed the protective nature of M. koenigii leaves on pancreatic beta-cells. These findings suggest that M. koenigii treatment exerts a therapeutic protective nature in diabetes by decreasing oxidative stress and pancreatic beta-cell damage. The antioxidant effect of the M. koenigii extract was compared with glibenclamide, a well-known hypoglycemic drug. PMID:17188670

  14. Extracellular ATP stimulates exocytosis via localized Ca(2+) release from acidic stores in rat pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Wei; Wu, Zhengxing; Ding, Jiuping; Chen, Liangyi; Xu, Tao

    2006-04-01

    Three different methods, membrane capacitance (C(m)) measurement, amperometry and FM dye labeling were used to investigate the role of extracellular ATP in insulin secretion from rat pancreatic beta cells. We found that extracellular application of ATP mobilized intracellular Ca(2+) stores and synchronously triggered vigorous exocytosis. No influence of ATP on the readily releasable pool of vesicles was observed, which argues against a direct modulation of the secretory machinery at a level downstream of Ca(2+) elevation. The stimulatory effects of ATP were greatly reduced by intracellular perfusion of BAPTA but not EGTA, suggesting a close spatial association of fusion sites with intracellular Ca(2+) releasing sites. ATP-induced Ca(2+) transients and exocytosis were not blocked by thapsigargin (TG), by a ryanodine receptor antagonist or by dissipation of pH in acidic stores by monensin alone, but they were greatly attenuated by IP(3) receptor inhibition as well as ionomycin plus monensin, suggesting involvement of IP(3)-sensitive acidic Ca(2+) stores. Taken together, our data suggest that extracellular ATP triggers exocytosis by mobilizing spatially limited acidic Ca(2+) stores through IP(3) receptors. This mechanism may explain how insulin secretion from the pancreas is coordinated through diffusible ATP that is co-released with insulin. PMID:16536741

  15. Detailed transcriptome atlas of the pancreatic beta cell

    PubMed Central

    Kutlu, Burak; Burdick, David; Baxter, David; Rasschaert, Joanne; Flamez, Daisy; Eizirik, Decio L; Welsh, Nils; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene expression patterns provide a detailed view of cellular functions. Comparison of profiles in disease vs normal conditions provides insights into the processes underlying disease progression. However, availability and integration of public gene expression datasets remains a major challenge. The aim of the present study was to explore the transcriptome of pancreatic islets and, based on this information, to prepare a comprehensive and open access inventory of insulin-producing beta cell gene expression, the Beta Cell Gene Atlas (BCGA). Methods We performed Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) analysis of human pancreatic islet samples and microarray analyses of purified rat beta cells, alpha cells and INS-1 cells, and compared the information with available array data in the literature. Results MPSS analysis detected around 7600 mRNA transcripts, of which around a third were of low abundance. We identified 2000 and 1400 transcripts that are enriched/depleted in beta cells compared to alpha cells and INS-1 cells, respectively. Microarray analysis identified around 200 transcription factors that are differentially expressed in either beta or alpha cells. We reanalyzed publicly available gene expression data and integrated these results with the new data from this study to build the BCGA. The BCGA contains basal (untreated conditions) gene expression level estimates in beta cells as well as in different cell types in human, rat and mouse pancreas. Hierarchical clustering of expression profile estimates classify cell types based on species while beta cells were clustered together. Conclusion Our gene atlas is a valuable source for detailed information on the gene expression distribution in beta cells and pancreatic islets along with insulin producing cell lines. The BCGA tool, as well as the data and code used to generate the Atlas are available at the T1Dbase website (T1DBase.org). PMID:19146692

  16. Expression of adiponectin receptors in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Ilham; Rasschaert, Joanne; Eizirik, Décio L; Cnop, Miriam

    2003-12-26

    Pancreatic beta cell dysfunction is an early and crucial pathogenic factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. Free fatty acids (FFA) and adipokines released from adipose tissues lead to both the development of insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction. Adiponectin is a novel adipokine with antidiabetic properties. Its circulating concentrations are reduced in subjects with increased visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, or type 2 diabetes. Very recently, the cloning of two adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 was reported. AdipoR1 is abundantly expressed in muscle, while AdipoR2 is predominantly expressed in liver. Here we report the marked expression of mRNAs for the adiponectin receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 in human and rat pancreatic beta cells, at levels similar to liver and greater than muscle. Adiponectin receptor expression is increased by beta cell exposure to the unsaturated FFA oleate, and treatment of insulin-producing cells with globular adiponectin induces lipoprotein lipase expression. Regulated adiponectin receptor expression on pancreatic beta cells might be a novel mechanism modulating the effects of circulating adiponectin. PMID:14651988

  17. Activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat pancreatic beta-cells by linoleic acid through both intracellular metabolites and membrane receptor signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-Feng; Pei, Jianming; Chen, Chen

    2008-09-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP) channels) determine the excitability of pancreatic beta-cells and importantly regulate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Long-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) decrease GSIS after long-term exposure to beta-cells, but the effects of exogenous FFAs on K(ATP) channels are not yet well clarified. In this study, the effects of linoleic acid (LA) on membrane potential (MP) and K(ATP) channels were observed in primary cultured rat pancreatic beta-cells. LA (20 microM) induced hyperpolarization of MP and opening of K(ATP) channels, which was totally reversed and inhibited by tolbutamide, a K(ATP) channel blocker. Inhibition of LA metabolism by acyl-CoA synthetase inhibitor, triacsin C (10 microM), partially inhibited LA-induced opening of K(ATP) channels by 64%. The non-FFA G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 40 agonist, GW9508 (40 microM), induced an opening of K(ATP) channels, which was similar to that induced by LA under triacsin C treatment. Blockade of protein kinases A and C did not influence the opening of K(ATP) channels induced by LA and GW9508, indicating that these two protein kinase pathways are not involved in the action of LA on K(ATP) channels. The present study demonstrates that LA induces hyperpolarization of MP by activating K(ATP) channels via both intracellular metabolites and activation of GPR40. It indicates that not only intracellular metabolites of FFAs but also GPR40-mediated pathways take part in the inhibition of GSIS and beta-cell dysfunction induced by FFAs.

  18. Chlamydia pneumoniae Promotes Dysfunction of Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Annette R.; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Witt, Colleen M.; Yu, Jieh-Juen; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Chambers, James P.; Perry, George; Guentzel, M. Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogen Chlamydia pneumoniae has been implicated in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 2 diabetes. Therefore, we designed a study to evaluate pancreatic beta cells and mast cells during chlamydial infection. Our study revealed that C. pneumoniae infected mast cells significantly (p< 0.005) decreased beta cell ATP and insulin production, in contrast to uninfected mast cells co-cultured with beta cells. Infected mast cells exhibited pyknotic nuclei and active caspase-3 and caspase-1 expression. Additionally, ex vivo analyses of tissues collected from C. pneumoniae infected mice showed increased interleukin-1β production in splenocytes and pancreatic tissues as was observed with in vitro mast cell-beta cell co-cultures during C. pneumoniae infection. Notably, infected mast cells promoted beta cell destruction. Our findings reveal the negative effect of C. pneumoniae on mast cells, and the consequential impact on pancreatic beta cell function and viability. PMID:25863744

  19. Positron emission tomography study on pancreatic somatostatin receptors in normal and diabetic rats with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide: A potential PET tracer for beta cell mass measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Takeo; Hasegawa, Koki; Nishimura, Mie; Kanayama, Yousuke; Wada, Yasuhiro; Hayashinaka, Emi; Cui, Yilong; Kataoka, Yosky; Senda, Michio; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PET images showed high uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide in the normal pancreas. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide specifically binds to somatostatin receptors in the pancreas. •The pancreatic uptake of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide was decreased in the diabetic rats. •{sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a candidate PET probe to measure the beta cell mass. -- Abstract: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia, and the loss or dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells has been reported before the appearance of clinical symptoms and hyperglycemia. To evaluate beta cell mass (BCM) for improving the detection and treatment of DM at earlier stages, we focused on somatostatin receptors that are highly expressed in the pancreatic beta cells, and developed a positron emission tomography (PET) probe derived from octreotide, a metabolically stable somatostatin analog. Octreotide was conjugated with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), a chelating agent, and labeled with {sup 68}Gallium ({sup 68}Ga). After intravenous injection of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide, a 90-min emission scan of the abdomen was performed in normal and DM model rats. The PET studies showed that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide radioactivity was highly accumulated in the pancreas of normal rats and that the pancreatic accumulation was significantly reduced in the rats administered with an excess amount of unlabeled octreotide or after treatment with streptozotocin, which was used for the chemical induction of DM in rats. These results were in good agreement with the ex vivo biodistribution data. These results indicated that the pancreatic accumulation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide represented specific binding to the somatostatin receptors and reflected BCM. Therefore, PET imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-octreotide could be a potential tool for evaluating BCM.

  20. Glucolipotoxicity age-dependently impairs beta cell function in rats despite a marked increase in beta cell mass

    PubMed Central

    Fontés, G.; Zarrouki, B.; Hagman, D. K.; Latour, M. G.; Semache, M.; Roskens, V.; Moore, P. C.; Prentki, M.; Rhodes, C. J.; Jetton, T. L.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Prolonged exposure of pancreatic beta cells to excessive levels of glucose and fatty acids, referred to as glucolipotoxicity, is postulated to contribute to impaired glucose homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the relative contribution of defective beta cell function vs diminished beta cell mass under glucolipotoxic conditions in vivo remains a subject of debate. We therefore sought to determine whether glucolipotoxicity in rats is due to impaired beta cell function and/or reduced beta cell mass, and whether older animals are more susceptible to glucolipotoxic condition. Methods Wistar rats (2 and 6 months old) received a 72 h infusion of glucose + intravenous fat emulsion or saline control. In vivo insulin secretion and sensitivity were assessed by hyperglycaemic clamps. Ex vivo insulin secretion, insulin biosynthesis and gene expression were measured in isolated islets. Beta cell mass and proliferation were examined by immunohistochemistry. Results A 72 h infusion of glucose + intravenous fat emulsion in 2-month-old Wistar rats did not affect insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion or beta cell mass. In 6-month-old rats by contrast it led to insulin resistance and reduced insulin secretion in vivo, despite an increase in beta cell mass and proliferation. This was associated with: (1) diminished glucose-stimulated second-phase insulin secretion and proinsulin biosynthesis; (2) lower insulin content; and (3) reduced expression of beta cell genes in isolated islets. Conclusions/interpretation In this in vivo model, glucolipotoxicity is characterised by an age-dependent impairment of glucose-regulated beta cell function despite a marked increase in beta cell mass. PMID:20628728

  1. Arsenite reduces insulin secretion in rat pancreatic {beta}-cells by decreasing the calcium-dependent calpain-10 proteolysis of SNAP-25

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Villasenor, Andrea; Burns, Anna L.; Salazar, Ana Maria; Sordo, Monserrat; Hiriart, Marcia; Cebrian, Mariano E.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2008-09-15

    An increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been consistently observed among residents of high arsenic exposure areas. We have previously shown that in rat pancreatic {beta}-cells, low arsenite doses impair the secretion of insulin without altering its synthesis. To further study the mechanism by which arsenite reduces insulin secretion, we evaluated the effects of arsenite on the calcium-calpain pathway that triggers insulin exocytosis in RINm5F cells. Cell cycle and proliferation analysis were also performed to complement the characterization. Free [Ca{sup 2+}]i oscillations needed for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were abated in the presence of subchronic low arsenite doses (0.5-2 {mu}M). The global activity of calpains increased with 2 {mu}M arsenite. However, during the secretion of insulin stimulated with glucose (15.6 mM), 1 {mu}M arsenite decreased the activity of calpain-10, measured as SNAP-25 proteolysis. Both proteins are needed to fuse insulin granules with the membrane to produce insulin exocytosis. Arsenite also induced a slowdown in the {beta} cell line proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, reflected by a reduction of dividing cells and in their arrest in G2/M. Data obtained showed that one of the mechanisms by which arsenite impairs insulin secretion is by decreasing the oscillations of free [Ca{sup 2+}]i, thus reducing calcium-dependent calpain-10 partial proteolysis of SNAP-25. The effects in cell division and proliferation observed with arsenite exposure can be an indirect consequence of the decrease in insulin secretion.

  2. Human Fucci Pancreatic Beta Cell Lines: New Tools to Study Beta Cell Cycle and Terminal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Carlier, Géraldine; Maugein, Alicia; Cordier, Corinne; Pechberty, Séverine; Garfa-Traoré, Meriem; Martin, Patrick; Scharfmann, Raphaël; Albagli, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cell cycle in beta cells is poorly understood, especially in humans. We exploited here the recently described human pancreatic beta cell line EndoC-βH2 to set up experimental systems for cell cycle studies. We derived 2 populations from EndoC-βH2 cells that stably harbor the 2 genes encoding the Fucci fluorescent indicators of cell cycle, either from two vectors, or from a unique bicistronic vector. In proliferating non-synchronized cells, the 2 Fucci indicators revealed cells in the expected phases of cell cycle, with orange and green cells being in G1 and S/G2/M cells, respectively, and allowed the sorting of cells in different substeps of G1. The Fucci indicators also faithfully red out alterations in human beta cell proliferative activity since a mitogen-rich medium decreased the proportion of orange cells and inflated the green population, while reciprocal changes were observed when cells were induced to cease proliferation and increased expression of some beta cell genes. In the last situation, acquisition of a more differentiated beta cell phenotype correlates with an increased intensity in orange fluorescence. Hence Fucci beta cell lines provide new tools to address important questions regarding human beta cell cycle and differentiation. PMID:25259951

  3. Effects of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wen-Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Wei-Xing; Yu, Jia; Li, Jin-You; Liu, Lei

    2011-06-15

    Pancreatic beta cells produce and release insulin, which decreases the blood glucose level. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death in acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). The 150kD oxygen-regulated protein (ORP150) took part in the process of endoplasmic reticulum stress. This study investigated the effect of ORP150 on appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells in ANP. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The severity of ANP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A(2,) and pancreatic histopathology. The changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells were detected by light and electron microscopy and the levels of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide. ORP150 expression was studied using western blot and immunohistochemisty assay. The expression of ORP150 mainly appeared on pancreatic beta cells and decreased gradually during the pathogenesis of ANP. The results of light and electron microscopy indicated pancreatic beta cell dysfunction and death, concomitant with elevation of serum glucose, insulin, and C-peptide in ANP. These results imply a probable role of ORP150 in the changes in appearance and function of pancreatic beta cells following acute necrotizing pancreatitis, through the pathway of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  4. Uncovering Factors Related to Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Aoife M.; Ryan, Miriam F.; Drummond, Elaine; Gibney, Eileen R.; Gibney, Michael J.; Roche, Helen M.; Brennan, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Aim The incidence of type 2 diabetes has increased rapidly on a global scale. Beta-cell dysfunction contributes to the overall pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. However, factors contributing to beta-cell function are not clear. The aims of this study were (i) to identify factors related to pancreatic beta-cell function and (ii) to perform mechanistic studies in vitro. Methods Three specific measures of beta-cell function were assessed for 110 participants who completed an oral glucose tolerance test as part of the Metabolic Challenge Study. Anthropometric and biochemical parameters were assessed as potential modulators of beta-cell function. Subsequent in vitro experiments were performed using the BRIN-BD11 pancreatic beta-cell line. Validation of findings were performed in a second human cohort. Results Waist-to-hip ratio was the strongest anthropometric modulator of beta-cell function, with beta-coefficients of -0.33 (p = 0.001) and -0.30 (p = 0.002) for beta-cell function/homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and disposition index respectively. Additionally, the resistin-to-adiponectin ratio (RA index) emerged as being strongly associated with beta-cell function, with beta-coefficients of -0.24 (p = 0.038) and -0.25 (p = 0.028) for beta-cell function/HOMA-IR, and disposition index respectively. Similar results were obtained using a third measure for beta-cell function. In vitro experiments revealed that the RA index was a potent regulator of acute insulin secretion where a high RA index (20ng ml-1 resistin, 5nmol l-1 g-adiponectin) significantly decreased insulin secretion whereas a low RA index (10ng ml-1 resistin, 10nmol l-1 g-adiponectin) significantly increased insulin secretion. The RA index was successfully validated in a second human cohort with beta-coefficients of -0.40 (p = 0.006) and -0.38 (p = 0.008) for beta-cell function/ HOMA-IR, and disposition index respectively. Conclusions Waist-to-hip ratio and RA index were identified

  5. The effect of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies on pancreatic beta cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Woynillowicz, Amanda K.; Raha, Sandeep; Nicholson, Catherine J.; Holloway, Alison C.

    2012-11-15

    The goal of our study was to evaluate whether drugs currently used for smoking cessation (i.e., nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline [a partial agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR)] and bupropion [which acts in part as a nAChR antagonist]) can affect beta cell function and determine the mechanism(s) of this effect. INS-1E cells, a rat beta cell line, were treated with nicotine, varenicline and bupropion to determine their effects on beta cell function, mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity and cellular/oxidative stress. Treatment of INS-1E cells with equimolar concentrations (1 μM) of three test compounds resulted in an ablation of normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by the cells. This disruption of normal beta cell function was associated with mitochondrial dysfunction since all three compounds tested significantly decreased the activity of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activity. These results raise the possibility that the currently available smoking cessation pharmacotherapies may also have adverse effects on beta cell function and thus glycemic control in vivo. Therefore whether or not the use of nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline and bupropion can cause endocrine changes which are consistent with impaired pancreatic function warrants further investigation. -- Highlights: ► Smoking cessation drugs have the potential to disrupt beta cell function in vitro. ► The effects of nicotine, varenicline and bupropion are similar. ► The impaired beta cell function is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. ► If similar effects are seen in vivo, these drugs may increase the risk of diabetes.

  6. D-saccharic acid-1,4-lactone ameliorates alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus and oxidative stress in rats through inhibiting pancreatic beta-cells from apoptosis via mitochondrial dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C.

    2011-12-15

    Oxidative stress plays a vital role in diabetic complications. To suppress the oxidative stress mediated damage in diabetic pathophysiology, a special focus has been given on naturally occurring antioxidants present in normal diet. D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL), a derivative of D-glucaric acid, is present in many dietary plants and is known for its detoxifying and antioxidant properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the beneficial role of DSL against alloxan (ALX) induced diabetes in the pancreas tissue of Swiss albino rats. A dose-dependent study for DSL (20-120 mg/kg body weight) was carried out to find the effective dose of the compound in ALX-induced diabetic rats. ALX exposure elevated the blood glucose, glycosylated Hb, decreased the plasma insulin and disturbed the intra-cellular antioxidant machineries whereas oral administration of DSL at a dose of 80 mg/kg body weight restored these alterations close to normal. Investigating the mechanism of the protective activity of DSL we observed that it prevented the pancreatic {beta}-cell apoptosis via mitochondria-dependent pathway. Results showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced cytochrome c release in the cytosol and reciprocal regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins in the diabetic rats. These events were also found to be associated with increased level of Apaf-1, caspase 9, and caspase 3 that ultimately led to pancreatic {beta}-cell apoptosis. DSL treatment, however, counteracted these changes. In conclusion, DSL possesses the capability of ameliorating the oxidative stress in ALX-induced diabetes and thus could be a promising approach in lessening diabetic complications. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress is suggested as a key event in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D-saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL) reduces the alloxan-induced diabetes mellitus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DSL normalizes cellular antioxidant machineries

  7. In-vitro differentiation of pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Soria, B

    2001-10-01

    Stem cell biology is a new field that holds promise for in-vitro mass production of pancreatic beta-cells, which are responsible for insulin synthesis, storage, and release. Lack or defect of insulin produces diabetes mellitus, a devastating disease suffered by 150 million people in the world. Transplantation of insulin-producing cells could be a cure for type 1 and some cases of type 2 diabetes, however this procedure is limited by the scarcity of material. Obtaining pancreatic beta-cells from embryonic stem cells would overcome this problem. We have derived insulin-producing cells from mouse embryonic stem cells by a 3-step in-vitro differentiation method consisting of directed differentiation, cell-lineage selection, and maturation. These insulin-producing cells normalize blood glucose when transplanted into streptozotocin-diabetic mice. Strategies to increase islet precursor cells from embryonic stem cells include the expression of relevant transcription factors (Pdx1, Ngn3, Isl-1, etc), together with the use of extracellular factors. Once a high enough proportion of islet precursors has been obtained there is a need for cell-lineage selection in order to purify the desired cell population. For this purpose, we designed a cell-trapping method based on a chimeric gene that fuses the human insulin gene regulatory region with the structural gene that confers resistance to neomycin. When incorporated into embryonic stem cells, this fusion gene will generate neomycin resistance in those cells that initiate the synthesis of insulin. Not only embryonic, but also adult stem cells are potential sources for insulin-containing cells. Duct cells from the adult pancreas are committed to differentiate into the four islet cell types; other possibilities may include nestin-positive cells from islets and adult pluripotent stem cells from other origins. Whilst the former are committed to be islet cells but have a reduced capacity to expand, the latter are more pluripotent and

  8. Sodium arsenite impairs insulin secretion and transcription in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Villasenor, Andrea; Sanchez-Soto, M. Carmen; Cebrian, Mariano E.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Hiriart, Marcia . E-mail: mhiriart@ifc.unam.mx

    2006-07-01

    Human studies have shown that chronic inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure is associated with a high prevalence and incidence of type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanism(s) underlying this effect are not well understood, and practically, there is no information available on the effects of arsenic on pancreatic {beta}-cells functions. Thus, since insulin secreted by the pancreas plays a crucial role in maintaining glucose homeostasis, our aim was to determine if sodium arsenite impairs insulin secretion and mRNA expression in single adult rat pancreatic {beta}-cells. Cells were treated with 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 {mu}M sodium arsenite and incubated for 72 and 144 h. The highest dose tested (10 {mu}M) decreased {beta}-cell viability, by 33% and 83%, respectively. Insulin secretion and mRNA expression were evaluated in the presence of 1 and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite. Basal insulin secretion, in 5.6 mM glucose, was not significantly affected by 1 or 5 {mu}M treatment for 72 h, but basal secretion was reduced when cells were exposed to 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite for 144 h. On the other hand, insulin secretion in response to 15.6 mM glucose decreased with sodium arsenite in a dose-dependent manner in such a way that cells were no longer able to distinguish between different glucose concentrations. We also showed a significant decrease in insulin mRNA expression of cells exposed to 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite during 72 h. Our data suggest that arsenic may contribute to the development of diabetes mellitus by impairing pancreatic {beta}-cell functions, particularly insulin synthesis and secretion.

  9. New insights into fatty acid modulation of pancreatic beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Haber, Esther P; Procópio, Joaquim; Carvalho, Carla R O; Carpinelli, Angelo R; Newsholme, Philip; Curi, Rui

    2006-01-01

    Insulin resistance states as found in type 2 diabetes and obesity are frequently associated with hyperlipidemia. Both stimulatory and detrimental effects of free fatty acids (FFA) on pancreatic beta cells have long been recognized. Acute exposure of the pancreatic beta cell to both high glucose concentrations and saturated FFA results in a substantial increase of insulin release, whereas a chronic exposure results in desensitization and suppression of secretion. Reduction of plasma FFA levels in fasted rats or humans severely impairs glucose-induced insulin release but palmitate can augment insulin release in the presence of nonstimulatory concentrations of glucose. These results imply that changes in physiological plasma levels of FFA are important for regulation of beta-cell function. Although it is widely accepted that fatty acid (FA) metabolism (notably FA synthesis and/or formation of LC-acyl-CoA) is necessary for stimulation of insulin secretion, the key regulatory molecular mechanisms controlling the interplay between glucose and fatty acid metabolism and thus insulin secretion are not well understood but are now described in detail in this review. Indeed the correct control of switching between FA synthesis or oxidation may have critical implications for beta-cell function and integrity both in vivo and in vitro. LC-acyl-CoA (formed from either endogenously synthesized or exogenous FA) controls several aspects of beta-cell function including activation of certain types of PKC, modulation of ion channels, protein acylation, ceramide- and/or NO-mediated apoptosis, and binding to and activating nuclear transcriptional factors. The present review also describes the possible effects of FAs on insulin signaling. We have previously reported that acute exposure of islets to palmitate up-regulates some key components of the intracellular insulin signaling pathway in pancreatic islets. Another aspect considered in this review is the potential source of fatty acids

  10. Vanadyl Sulfate Treatment Stimulates Proliferation and Regeneration of Beta Cells in Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Missaoui, Samira; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Yacoubi, Mohamed-Tahar; Sakly, Mohsen; Tebourbi, Olfa

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of vanadium sulfate (VOSO4) treatment at 5 and 10 mg/kg for 30 days on endocrine pancreas activity and histology in nondiabetic and STZ-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic group, blood glucose levels significantly increased while insulinemia level markedly decreased. At the end of treatment, VOSO4 at a dose of 10 mg/Kg normalized blood glucose level in diabetic group, restored insulinemia, and significantly improved insulin sensitivity. VOSO4 also increased in a dose-dependent manner the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells in pancreatic islets of nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, in the STZ-diabetic group, the decrease in the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells was corrected to reach the control level mainly with the higher dose of vanadium. Therefore, VOSO4 treatment normalized plasma glucose and insulin levels and improved insulin sensitivity in STZ-experimental diabetes and induced beta cells proliferation and/or regeneration in normal or diabetic rats. PMID:25215302

  11. Vanadyl sulfate treatment stimulates proliferation and regeneration of beta cells in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Missaoui, Samira; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Yacoubi, Mohamed-Tahar; Sakly, Mohsen; Tebourbi, Olfa

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of vanadium sulfate (VOSO4) treatment at 5 and 10 mg/kg for 30 days on endocrine pancreas activity and histology in nondiabetic and STZ-induced diabetic rats. In diabetic group, blood glucose levels significantly increased while insulinemia level markedly decreased. At the end of treatment, VOSO4 at a dose of 10 mg/Kg normalized blood glucose level in diabetic group, restored insulinemia, and significantly improved insulin sensitivity. VOSO4 also increased in a dose-dependent manner the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells in pancreatic islets of nondiabetic rats. Furthermore, in the STZ-diabetic group, the decrease in the number of insulin immunopositive beta cells was corrected to reach the control level mainly with the higher dose of vanadium. Therefore, VOSO4 treatment normalized plasma glucose and insulin levels and improved insulin sensitivity in STZ-experimental diabetes and induced beta cells proliferation and/or regeneration in normal or diabetic rats.

  12. The role of autophagy in pancreatic beta-cell and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Yoshio; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Watada, Hirotaka

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells play a key role in glucose homeostasis in mammals. Although large-scale protein synthesis and degradation occur in pancreatic beta-cells, the mechanism underlying dynamic protein turnover in beta-cells remains largely unknown. We found low-level constitutive autophagy in beta-cells of C57BL/6 mice fed a standard diet; however, autophagy was markedly upregulated in mice fed a high-fat diet. beta-cells of diabetic db/db mice contained large numbers of autophagosomes, compared with nondiabetic db/misty controls. The functional importance of autophagy was analyzed using beta-cell-specific Atg7 knockout mice. Autophagy-deficient mice showed degeneration of beta-cells and impaired glucose tolerance with reduced insulin secretion. While a high-fat diet stimulated beta-cell autophagy in control mice, it induced a profound deterioration of glucose intolerance in beta-cell autophagy-deficient mutants, partly because of the lack of a compensatory increase in beta-cell mass. These results suggest that the degradation of unnecessary cellular components by autophagy is essential for maintenance of the architecture and function of beta-cells. Autophagy also serves as a crucial element of stress responses to protect beta-cells under insulin-resistant states. Impairment of autophagic machinery could thus predispose individuals to type 2 diabetes. PMID:19158492

  13. Pancreatic-derived factor (FAM3B), a novel islet cytokine, induces apoptosis of insulin-secreting beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaopei; Gao, Zhiyong; Robert, Claudia E; Greene, Scott; Xu, Gang; Xu, Weizhen; Bell, Ewan; Campbell, Don; Zhu, Yuan; Young, Robert; Trucco, Matteo; Markmann, James F; Naji, Ali; Wolf, Bryan A

    2003-09-01

    PANDER (PANcreatic DERived factor, FAM3B), a newly discovered secreted cytokine, is specifically expressed at high levels in the islets of Langerhans of the endocrine pancreas. To evaluate the role of PANDER in beta-cell function, we investigated the effects of PANDER on rat, mouse, and human pancreatic islets; the beta-TC3 cell line; and the alpha-TC cell line. PANDER protein was present in alpha- and beta-cells of pancreatic islets, insulin-secreting beta-TC3 cells, and glucagon-secreting alpha-TC cells. PANDER induced islet cell death in rat and human islets. Culture of beta-TC3 cells with recombinant PANDER had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell viability. This effect was also time-dependent. PANDER caused apoptosis of beta-cells as assessed by electron microscopy, annexin V fluorescent staining, and flow-cytometric terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay. PANDER did not affect cytosolic Ca(2+) levels or nitric oxide levels. However, PANDER activated caspase-3. Hence, PANDER may have a role in the process of pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis.

  14. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 signaling in pancreatic islet beta-cells is modulated by the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kilkenny, Dawn M; Rocheleau, Jonathan V

    2008-01-01

    Maintenance of pancreatic beta-cell mass depends on extracellular stimuli that promote survival and proliferation. In the islet, these stimuli come from the beta-cell microenvironment and include extracellular matrix deposited by associated vascular endothelial cells. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) has recently been implicated as a signaling pathway that is important for normal beta-cell function. We would like to understand how extracellular matrix and FGFR1 signaling interact to promote beta-cell survival and proliferation. To examine beta-cell-specific receptor responses, we created lentiviral vectors with rat insulin promoter-driven expression of Venus fluorescent protein-tagged full-length (R1betav) and kinase-deficient (KDR1betav) FGFR1. Significant FGF-1-dependent activation of ERK1/2 was observed in betaTC3 cells, dispersed beta-cells, and beta-cells in intact islets. This response was enhanced by R1betav expression and reduced by KDR1betav expression. Plating-dispersed beta-cells on collagen type IV resulted in enhanced expression of endogenous FGFR1 that was associated with sustained activation of ERK1/2. Conversely, plating cells on laminin reduced expression of FGFR1, and this reduction was associated with transient activation of ERK1/2. Addition of neutralizing antibodies to inhibit beta-cell attachment to laminin via alpha(6)-integrin increased high-affinity FGF-1-binding at the plasma membrane and resulted in sustained ERK1/2 activity similar to cells plated on collagen type IV. These data show that the FGF-stimulated beta-cell response is negatively affected by alpha(6)-integrin binding to laminin and suggest regulation associated with vascular endothelial cell remodeling. PMID:17916654

  15. Evidence for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling to activate ATP-sensitive potassium channels in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hye-Jung; Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Sung-Hee; Park, Jae-Hyung; Shin, Su-Kyung; Song, Seung Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Cho, Ho-Chan; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut peptide that promotes insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. GLP-1 has been shown to confer glucose-insensitive beta cells with glucose sensitivity by modulation of the activity of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel. The channel closing effect of GLP-1, interacting with corresponding G-protein-coupled receptors, has been well established; however, to our knowledge, no study has shown whether GLP-1 directly induces activation of beta-cell KATP channels. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether the activation of beta-cell KATP channels by GLP-1 exists and affects intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i). KATP channel activity was measured in isolated rat pancreatic beta cells by whole-cell perforated patch-clamp recordings with a diazoxide-containing pipette solution. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i and the subcellular localization of KATP channels were observed using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-4/AM and anti-Kir6.2 antibodies in INS-1 beta cells, respectively. To eliminate the well-known inhibitory effects of GLP-1 on KATP channel activity, channels were fully inhibited by pretreatment with methyl pyruvate and epigallocatechin-3-gallate. In the pretreated beta cells, GLP-1 and exendin-4 promptly activated the channels, reducing [Ca(2+)]i. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked the effects of GLP-1 on channel activity. Moreover, phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate mimicked the effects of GLP-1. These results suggested that beta-cell GLP-1 receptor signaling involved activation of KATP channels via a PI3K-dependent pathway. This alternative mechanism of GLP-1 function may act as a negative feedback pathway, modulating the glucose-dependent GLP-1 inhibition on KATP channel activity. PMID:26655814

  16. Cocoa phenolic extract protects pancreatic beta cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martín, María Angeles; Ramos, Sonia; Cordero-Herrero, Isabel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE) containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5-20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult. PMID:23912326

  17. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Martín, María Ángeles; Ramos, Sonia; Cordero-Herrero, Isabel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE) containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH) on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult. PMID:23912326

  18. Unraveling the contribution of pancreatic beta-cell suicide in autoimmune type 1 diabetes✩

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi-Douraki, Majid; Schnell, Santiago; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Khadra, Anmar

    2014-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease mediated by autoreactive T-cells that attack insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells, it has been suggested that disease progression may additionally require protective mechanisms in the target tissue to impede such auto-destructive mechanisms. We hypothesize that the autoimmune attack against beta-cells causes endoplasmic reticulum stress by forcing the remaining beta-cells to synthesize and secrete defective insulin. To rescue beta-cell from the endoplasmic reticulum stress, beta-cells activate the unfolded protein response to restore protein homeostasis and normal insulin synthesis. Here we investigate the compensatory role of unfolded protein response by developing a multi-state model of type 1 diabetes that takes into account beta-cell destruction caused by pathogenic autoreactive T-cells and apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum stress. We discuss the mechanism of unfolded protein response activation and how it counters beta-cell extinction caused by an autoimmune attack and/or irreversible damage by endoplasmic reticulum stress. Our results reveal important insights about the balance between beta-cell destruction by autoimmune attack (beta-cell homicide) and beta-cell apoptosis by endoplasmic reticulum stress (beta-cell suicide). It also provides an explanation as to why the unfolded protein response may not be a successful therapeutic target to treat type 1 diabetes. PMID:24831415

  19. Glucose activates prenyltransferases in pancreatic islet beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Goalstone, Marc; Kamath, Vasudeva; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates small G-proteins [e.g., Cdc42 and Rac1] in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] in the islet beta-cell. These signaling proteins undergo post-translational modifications [e.g., prenylation] at their C-terminal cysteine residue and appear to be essential for the transport and fusion of insulin-containing secretory granules with the plasma membrane and the exocytotic secretion of insulin. However, potential regulation of the prenylating enzymes by physiological insulin secretogues [e.g., glucose] has not been investigated thus far. Herein, we report immunological localization, sub-cellular distribution and regulation of farnesyltransferases [FTases] and geranylgeranyltransferase [GGTase] by glucose in insulin-secreting INS 832/13 beta-cells and normal rat islets. Our findings suggest that an insulinotropic concentration of glucose [20mM] markedly stimulated the expression of the alpha-subunits of FTase/GGTase-1, but not the beta-subunits of FTase or GGTase-1 without significantly affecting the predominantly cytosolic distribution of these holoenzymes in INS 832/13 cells and rodent islets. Under these conditions, glucose significantly stimulated [2.5- to 4.0-fold over basal] the activities of both FTase and GGTase-1 in both cell types. Together, these findings provide the first evidence to suggest that GSIS involves activation of the endogenous islet prenyltransferases by glucose, culminating in the activation of their respective G-protein substrates, which is necessary for cytoskeletal rearrangement, vesicular transport, fusion and secretion of insulin.

  20. Glucose activates prenyltransferases in pancreatic islet {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Goalstone, Marc; Kamath, Vasudeva; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates small G-proteins [e.g., Cdc42 and Rac1] in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] in the islet {beta}-cell. These signaling proteins undergo post-translational modifications [e.g., prenylation] at their C-terminal cysteine residue and appear to be essential for the transport and fusion of insulin-containing secretory granules with the plasma membrane and the exocytotic secretion of insulin. However, potential regulation of the prenylating enzymes by physiological insulin secretogues [e.g., glucose] has not been investigated thus far. Herein, we report immunological localization, sub-cellular distribution and regulation of farnesyltransferases [FTases] and geranylgeranyltransferase [GGTase] by glucose in insulin-secreting INS 832/13 {beta}-cells and normal rat islets. Our findings suggest that an insulinotropic concentration of glucose [20 mM] markedly stimulated the expression of the {alpha}-subunits of FTase/GGTase-1, but not the {beta}-subunits of FTase or GGTase-1 without significantly affecting the predominantly cytosolic distribution of these holoenzymes in INS 832/13 cells and rodent islets. Under these conditions, glucose significantly stimulated [2.5- to 4.0-fold over basal] the activities of both FTase and GGTase-1 in both cell types. Together, these findings provide the first evidence to suggest that GSIS involves activation of the endogenous islet prenyltransferases by glucose, culminating in the activation of their respective G-protein substrates, which is necessary for cytoskeletal rearrangement, vesicular transport, fusion and secretion of insulin.

  1. Cocoa-rich diet attenuates beta cell mass loss and function in young Zucker diabetic fatty rats by preventing oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, Elisa; Cordero-Herrera, Isabel; Ramos, Sonia; Escrivá, Fernando; Alvarez, Carmen; Goya, Luis; Martín, María Angeles

    2015-04-01

    We have recently shown that cocoa flavanols may have anti-diabetic potential by promoting survival and function of pancreatic beta-cells in vitro. In this work, we investigated if a cocoa-rich diet is able to preserve beta-cell mass and function in an animal model of type 2 diabetes and the mechanisms involved. Our results showed that cocoa feeding during the prediabetic state attenuates hyperglycaemia, reduces insulin resistant, and increases beta cell mass and function in obese Zucker diabetic rats. At the molecular level, cocoa-rich diet prevented beta-cell apoptosis by increasing the levels of Bcl-xL and decreasing Bax levels and caspase-3 activity. Cocoa diet enhanced the activity of endogenous antioxidant defenses, mainly glutathione peroxidase, preventing thus oxidative injury induced by the pre-diabetic condition and leading to apoptosis prevention. These findings provide the first in vivo evidence that a cocoa-rich diet may delay the loss of functional beta-cell mass and delay the progression of diabetes by preventing oxidative stress and beta-cell apoptosis.

  2. Cocoa-rich diet attenuates beta cell mass loss and function in young Zucker diabetic fatty rats by preventing oxidative stress and beta cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, Elisa; Cordero-Herrera, Isabel; Ramos, Sonia; Escrivá, Fernando; Alvarez, Carmen; Goya, Luis; Martín, María Angeles

    2015-04-01

    We have recently shown that cocoa flavanols may have anti-diabetic potential by promoting survival and function of pancreatic beta-cells in vitro. In this work, we investigated if a cocoa-rich diet is able to preserve beta-cell mass and function in an animal model of type 2 diabetes and the mechanisms involved. Our results showed that cocoa feeding during the prediabetic state attenuates hyperglycaemia, reduces insulin resistant, and increases beta cell mass and function in obese Zucker diabetic rats. At the molecular level, cocoa-rich diet prevented beta-cell apoptosis by increasing the levels of Bcl-xL and decreasing Bax levels and caspase-3 activity. Cocoa diet enhanced the activity of endogenous antioxidant defenses, mainly glutathione peroxidase, preventing thus oxidative injury induced by the pre-diabetic condition and leading to apoptosis prevention. These findings provide the first in vivo evidence that a cocoa-rich diet may delay the loss of functional beta-cell mass and delay the progression of diabetes by preventing oxidative stress and beta-cell apoptosis. PMID:25559866

  3. Pancreatic beta cells express a diverse set of homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, A; Ling, T Y; Odagiri, H; Rutter, W J; German, M S

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes, which are found in all eukaryotic organisms, encode transcriptional regulators involved in cell-type differentiation and development. Several homeobox genes encoding homeodomain proteins that bind and activate the insulin gene promoter have been described. In an attempt to identify additional beta-cell homeodomain proteins, we designed primers based on the sequences of beta-cell homeobox genes cdx3 and lmx1 and the Drosophila homeodomain protein Antennapedia and used these primers to amplify inserts by PCR from an insulinoma cDNA library. The resulting amplification products include sequences encoding 10 distinct homeodomain proteins; 3 of these proteins have not been described previously. In addition, an insert was obtained encoding a splice variant of engrailed-2, a homeodomain protein previously identified in the central nervous system. Northern analysis revealed a distinct pattern of expression for each homeobox gene. Interestingly, the PCR-derived clones do not represent a complete sampling of the beta-cell library because no inserts encoding cdx3 or lmx1 protein were obtained. Beta cells probably express additional homeobox genes. The abundance and diversity of homeodomain proteins found in beta cells illustrate the remarkable complexity and redundancy of the machinery controlling beta-cell development and differentiation. Images PMID:7991607

  4. Stem cells to pancreatic beta-cells: new sources for diabetes cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tingxia; Hebrok, Matthias

    2009-05-01

    The number of patients worldwide suffering from the chronic disease diabetes mellitus is growing at an alarming rate. Insulin-secreting beta-cells in the islet of Langerhans are damaged to different extents in diabetic patients, either through an autoimmune reaction present in type 1 diabetic patients or through inherent changes within beta-cells that affect their function in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. Cell replacement strategies via islet transplantation offer potential therapeutic options for diabetic patients. However, the discrepancy between the limited number of donor islets and the high number of patients who could benefit from such a treatment reflects the dire need for renewable sources of high-quality beta-cells. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are capable of self-renewal and can differentiate into components of all three germ layers, including all pancreatic lineages. The ability to differentiate hESCs into beta-cells highlights a promising strategy to meet the shortage of beta-cells. Here, we review the different approaches that have been used to direct differentiation of hESCs into pancreatic and beta-cells. We will focus on recent progress in the understanding of signaling pathways and transcription factors during embryonic pancreas development and how this knowledge has helped to improve the methodology for high-efficiency beta-cell differentiation in vitro.

  5. VAMP-2 and cellubrevin are expressed in pancreatic beta-cells and are essential for Ca(2+)-but not for GTP gamma S-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Regazzi, R; Wollheim, C B; Lang, J; Theler, J M; Rossetto, O; Montecucco, C; Sadoul, K; Weller, U; Palmer, M; Thorens, B

    1995-01-01

    VAMP proteins are important components of the machinery controlling docking and/or fusion of secretory vesicles with their target membrane. We investigated the expression of VAMP proteins in pancreatic beta-cells and their implication in the exocytosis of insulin. cDNA cloning revealed that VAMP-2 and cellubrevin, but not VAMP-1, are expressed in rat pancreatic islets and that their sequence is identical to that isolated from rat brain. Pancreatic beta-cells contain secretory granules that store and secrete insulin as well as synaptic-like microvesicles carrying gamma-aminobutyric acid. After subcellular fractionation on continuous sucrose gradients, VAMP-2 and cellubrevin were found to be associated with both types of secretory vesicle. The association of VAMP-2 with insulin-containing granules was confirmed by confocal microscopy of primary cultures of rat pancreatic beta-cells. Pretreatment of streptolysin-O permeabilized insulin-secreting cells with tetanus and botulinum B neurotoxins selectively cleaved VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and abolished Ca(2+)-induced insulin release (IC50 approximately 15 nM). By contrast, the pretreatment with tetanus and botulinum B neurotoxins did not prevent GTP gamma S-stimulated insulin secretion. Taken together, our results show that pancreatic beta-cells express VAMP-2 and cellubrevin and that one or both of these proteins selectively control Ca(2+)-mediated insulin secretion. Images PMID:7796801

  6. Plant-Derived Compounds Targeting Pancreatic Beta Cells for the Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yoon Sin

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a global health problem and a national economic burden. Although several antidiabetic drugs are available, the need for novel therapeutic agents with improved efficacy and few side effects remains. Drugs derived from natural compounds are more attractive than synthetic drugs because of their diversity and minimal side effects. This review summarizes the most relevant effects of various plant-derived natural compounds on the functionality of pancreatic beta cells. Published data suggest that natural compounds directly enhance insulin secretion, prevent pancreatic beta cell apoptosis, and modulate pancreatic beta cell differentiation and proliferation. It is essential to continuously investigate natural compounds as sources of novel pharmaceuticals. Therefore, more studies into these compounds' mechanisms of action are warranted for their development as potential anti-diabetics. PMID:26587047

  7. Regulation of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass by growth factor and hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao; Chang, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction and destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells is a hallmark of diabetes. Better understanding of cellular signals in beta cells will allow development of therapeutic strategies for diabetes, such as preservation and expansion of beta-cell mass and improvement of beta-cell function. During the past several decades, the number of studies analyzing the molecular mechanisms, including growth factor/hormone signaling pathways that impact islet beta-cell mass and function, has increased exponentially. Notably, somatolactogenic hormones including growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors (GHR, PRLR, and IGF-1R) are critically involved in beta-cell growth, survival, differentiation, and insulin secretion. In this chapter, we focus more narrowly on GH, PRL, and IGF-1 signaling, and GH-IGF-1 cross talk. We also discuss how these signaling aspects contribute to the regulation of beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In particular, our novel findings of GH-induced formation of GHR-JAK2-IGF-1R protein complex and synergistic effects of GH and IGF-1 on beta-cell signaling, proliferation, and antiapoptosis lead to a new concept that IGF-1R may serve as a proximal component of GH/GHR signaling.

  8. On the coherent behavior of pancreatic beta cell clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loppini, Alessandro; Capolupo, Antonio; Cherubini, Christian; Gizzi, Alessio; Bertolaso, Marta; Filippi, Simonetta; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Beta cells in pancreas represent an example of coupled biological oscillators which via communication pathways, are able to synchronize their electrical activity, giving rise to pulsatile insulin release. In this work we numerically analyze scale free self-similarity features of membrane voltage signal power density spectrum, through a stochastic dynamical model for beta cells in the islets of Langerhans fine tuned on mouse experimental data. Adopting the algebraic approach of coherent state formalism, we show how coherent molecular domains can arise from proper functional conditions leading to a parallelism with “phase transition” phenomena of field theory.

  9. Microbial phenolic metabolites improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and protect pancreatic beta cells against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced toxicity via ERKs and PKC pathways.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, Elisa; Ramos, Sonia; Alvarez, Carmen; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Martín, María Ángeles

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative stress is accepted as one of the causes of beta cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Therefore, identification of natural antioxidant agents that preserve beta cell mass and function is considered an interesting strategy to prevent or treat diabetes. Recent evidences indicated that colonic metabolites derived from flavonoids could possess beneficial effects on various tissues. The aim of this work was to establish the potential anti-diabetic properties of the microbial-derived flavonoid metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DHPAA), 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (HPPA). To this end, we tested their ability to influence beta cell function and to protect against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced beta cell toxicity. DHPAA and HPPA were able to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in a beta cell line INS-1E and in rat pancreatic islets. Moreover, pre-treatment of cells with both compounds protected against beta cell dysfunction and death induced by the pro-oxidant. Finally, experiments with pharmacological inhibitors indicate that these effects were mediated by the activation of protein kinase C and the extracellular regulated kinases pathways. Altogether, these findings strongly suggest that the microbial-derived flavonoid metabolites DHPAA and HPPA may have anti-diabetic potential by promoting survival and function of pancreatic beta cells. PMID:24491264

  10. PDX-1 and MafA play a crucial role in pancreatic beta-cell differentiation and maintenance of mature beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, Hideaki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Kawamori, Dan; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kato, Ken; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Katakami, Naoto; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Matsuoka, Taka-Aki

    2008-05-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX-1) plays a crucial role in pancreas development, beta-cell differentiation, and maintenance of mature beta-cell function. PDX-1 expression is maintained in pancreatic precursor cells during pancreas development but becomes restricted to beta-cells in mature pancreas. In mature beta-cells, PDX-1 transactivates the insulin and other genes involved in glucose sensing and metabolism such as GLUT2 and glucokinase. MafA is a recently isolated beta-cell-specific transcription factor which functions as a potent activator of insulin gene transcription. Furthermore, these transcription factors play an important role in induction of insulin-producing cells in various non-beta-cells and thus could be therapeutic targets for diabetes. On the other hand, under diabetic conditions, expression and/or activities of PDX-1 and MafA in beta-cells are reduced, which leads to suppression of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. It is likely that alteration of such transcription factors explains, at least in part, the molecular mechanism for beta-cell glucose toxicity found in diabetes.

  11. Disruption of Tsc2 in pancreatic beta cells induces beta cell mass expansion and improved glucose tolerance in a TORC1-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Rachdi, Latif; Balcazar, Norman; Osorio-Duque, Fernando; Elghazi, Lynda; Weiss, Aaron; Gould, Aaron; Chang-Chen, Karen J; Gambello, Michael J; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2008-07-01

    Regulation of pancreatic beta cell mass and function is a major determinant for the development of diabetes. Growth factors and nutrients are important regulators of beta cell mass and function. The signaling pathways by which these growth signals modulate these processes have not been completely elucidated. Tsc2 is an attractive candidate to modulate these processes, because it is a converging point for growth factor and nutrient signals. In these experiments, we generated mice with conditional deletion of Tsc2 in beta cells (betaTsc2(-/-)). These mice exhibited decreased glucose levels and hyperinsulinemia in the fasting and fed state. Improved glucose tolerance in these mice was observed as early as 4 weeks of age and was still present in 52-week-old mice. Deletion of Tsc2 in beta cells induced expansion of beta cell mass by increased proliferation and cell size. Rapamycin treatment reversed the metabolic changes in betaTsc2(-/-) mice by induction of insulin resistance and reduction of beta cell mass. The reduction of beta cell mass in betaTsc2(-/-) mice by inhibition of the mTOR/Raptor (TORC1) complex with rapamycin treatment suggests that TORC1 mediates proliferative and growth signals induced by deletion of Tsc2 in beta cells. These studies uncover a critical role for the Tsc2/mTOR pathway in regulation of beta cell mass and carbohydrate metabolism in vivo.

  12. Trefoil factor 3 stimulates human and rodent pancreatic islet beta-cell replication with retention of function.

    PubMed

    Fueger, Patrick T; Schisler, Jonathan C; Lu, Danhong; Babu, Daniella A; Mirmira, Raghavendra G; Newgard, Christopher B; Hohmeier, Hans E

    2008-05-01

    Both major forms of diabetes involve a decline in beta-cell mass, mediated by autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing cells in type 1 diabetes and by increased rates of apoptosis secondary to metabolic stress in type 2 diabetes. Methods for controlled expansion of beta-cell mass are currently not available but would have great potential utility for treatment of these diseases. In the current study, we demonstrate that overexpression of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) in rat pancreatic islets results in a 4- to 5-fold increase in [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, with full retention of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. This increase was almost exclusively due to stimulation of beta-cell replication, as demonstrated by studies of bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and co-immunofluorescence analysis with anti-bromodeoxyuridine and antiinsulin or antiglucagon antibodies. The proliferative effect of TFF3 required the presence of serum or 0.5 ng/ml epidermal growth factor. The ability of TFF3 overexpression to stimulate proliferation of rat islets in serum was abolished by the addition of epidermal growth factor receptor antagonist AG1478. Furthermore, TFF3-induced increases in [3H]thymidine incorporation in rat islets cultured in serum was blocked by overexpression of a dominant-negative Akt protein or treatment with triciribine, an Akt inhibitor. Finally, overexpression of TFF3 also caused a doubling of [3H]thymidine incorporation in human islets. In summary, our findings reveal a novel TFF3-mediated pathway for stimulation of beta-cell replication that could ultimately be exploited for expansion or preservation of islet beta-cell mass.

  13. ROS signaling, oxidative stress and Nrf2 in pancreatic beta-cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Pi Jingbo; Zhang Qiang; Fu Jingqi; Woods, Courtney G.; Hou Yongyong; Corkey, Barbara E.; Collins, Sheila; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2010-04-01

    This review focuses on the emerging evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from glucose metabolism, such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, act as metabolic signaling molecules for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in pancreatic beta-cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential inhibitory role of endogenous antioxidants, which rise in response to oxidative stress, in glucose-triggered ROS and GSIS. We propose that cellular adaptive response to oxidative stress challenge, such as nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant induction, plays paradoxical roles in pancreatic beta-cell function. On the one hand, induction of antioxidant enzymes protects beta-cells from oxidative damage and possible cell death, thus minimizing oxidative damage-related impairment of insulin secretion. On the other hand, the induction of antioxidant enzymes by Nrf2 activation blunts glucose-triggered ROS signaling, thus resulting in reduced GSIS. These two premises are potentially relevant to impairment of beta-cells occurring in the late and early stage of Type 2 diabetes, respectively. In addition, we summarized our recent findings that persistent oxidative stress due to absence of uncoupling protein 2 activates cellular adaptive response which is associated with impaired pancreatic beta-cell function.

  14. Coordinated regulation by Shp2 tyrosine phosphatase of signaling events controlling insulin biosynthesis in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sharon S; Hao, Ergeng; Yu, Jianxiu; Liu, Wen; Wang, Jing; Levine, Fred; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2009-05-01

    Intracellular signaling by which pancreatic beta-cells synthesize and secrete insulin in control of glucose homeostasis is not fully understood. Here we show that Shp2, a cytoplasmic tyrosine phosphatase possessing 2 SH2 domains, coordinates signaling events required for insulin biosynthesis in beta-cells. Mice with conditional ablation of the Shp2/Ptpn11 gene in the pancreas exhibited defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. Consistently, siRNA-mediated Shp2-knockdown in rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cells resulted in decreased insulin production and secretion despite an increase in cellular ATP. Shp2 modulates the strength of signals flowing through Akt/FoxO1 and Erk pathways, culminating in control of Pdx1 expression and activity on Ins1 and Ins2 promoters, and forced Pdx1 expression rescued insulin production in Shp2-knockdown beta-cells. Therefore, Shp2 acts as a signal coordinator in beta-cells, orchestrating multiple pathways controlling insulin biosynthesis to maintain glucose homeostasis.

  15. A red-shifted photochromic sulfonylurea for the remote control of pancreatic beta cell function.

    PubMed

    Broichhagen, J; Frank, J A; Johnston, N R; Mitchell, R K; Šmid, K; Marchetti, P; Bugliani, M; Rutter, G A; Trauner, D; Hodson, D J

    2015-04-01

    Azobenzene photoresponsive elements can be installed on sulfonylureas, yielding optical control over pancreatic beta cell function and insulin release. An obstacle to such photopharmacological approaches remains the use of ultraviolet-blue illumination. Herein, we synthesize and test a novel yellow light-activated sulfonylurea based on a heterocyclic azobenzene bearing a push-pull system. PMID:25744824

  16. Generating pancreatic beta-cells from embryonic stem cells by manipulating signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Champeris Tsaniras, Spyridon; Jones, Peter M

    2010-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from an insufficiency of insulin production as a result of autoimmune destruction of the insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells. It can be treated by transplantation of islets of Langerhans from human donors, but widespread application of this therapy is restricted by the scarcity of donor tissue. Generation of functional beta-cells from embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro could provide a source of an alternative graft material. Several ES cell differentiation protocols have reported the production of insulin-producing cells by mimicking the in vivo developmental stages of pancreatic organogenesis in which cells are transitioned through mesendoderm, definitive endoderm, foregut endoderm, pancreatic endoderm, and the endocrine precursor stage, until mature beta-cells are obtained. These studies provide proof of concept that recapitulating pancreatic development in vitro offers a useful strategy for generating beta-cells, but current differentiation protocols employ a bewildering variety of growth factors, mitogens, and pharmacological agents. In this review, we will attempt to clarify the functions of these agents in in vitro differentiation strategies by focusing on the intracellular signaling pathways through which they operate - phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, transforming growth factor beta, Wnt/beta-catenin, Hedgehog, and Notch. PMID:20385725

  17. Impaired beta-cell functions induced by chronic exposure of cultured human pancreatic islets to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Marshak, S; Leibowitz, G; Bertuzzi, F; Socci, C; Kaiser, N; Gross, D J; Cerasi, E; Melloul, D

    1999-06-01

    In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia has been suggested to be detrimental to beta-cell function, causing reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and disproportionately elevated proinsulin. In the present study, we investigated the effect on several beta-cell functions of prolonged in vitro exposure of human pancreatic islet cultures to high glucose concentrations. Islets exposed to high glucose levels (33 mmol/l) for 4 and 9 days showed dramatic decreases in glucose-induced insulin release and in islet insulin content, with increased proportion of proinsulin-like peptides relative to insulin. The depletion in insulin stores correlated with the reduction in insulin mRNA levels and human insulin promoter transcriptional activity. We also demonstrated that high glucose dramatically lowered the binding activity of pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (the glucose-sensitive transcription factor), whereas the transcription factor rat insulin promoter element 3b1 activator was less influenced and insulin enhancer factor 1 remained unaffected. Most of these beta-cell impairments were partially reversible when islets first incubated for 6 days in high glucose were transferred to normal glucose (5.5 mmol/l) concentrations for 3 days. We conclude that cultured human islets are sensitive to the deleterious effect of high glucose concentrations at multiple functional levels, and that such mechanisms may play an important role in the decreased insulin production and secretion of type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:10342809

  18. Species-specific vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression in mammalian pancreatic beta cells: implications for optimising radioligand-based human beta cell mass (BCM) imaging in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, N. R.; Kalmbach, N.; Klietz, M.; Anlauf, M.; Eiden, L. E.; Weihe, E.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Imaging of beta cell mass (BCM) is a major challenge in diabetes research. The vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is abundantly expressed in human beta cells. Radiolabelled analogues of tetrabenazine (TBZ; a low-molecular-weight, cell-permeant VMAT2-selective ligand) have been employed for pancreatic islet imaging in humans. Since reports on TBZ-based VMAT2 imaging in rodent pancreas have been fraught with confusion, we compared VMAT2 gene expression patterns in the mouse, rat, pig and human pancreas, to identify appropriate animal models with which to further validate and optimise TBZ imaging in humans. Methods We used a panel of highly sensitive VMAT2 antibodies developed against equivalently antigenic regions of the transporter from each species in combination with immunostaining for insulin and species-specific in situ hybridisation probes. Individual pancreatic islets were obtained by laser-capture microdissection and subjected to analysis of mRNA expression of VMAT2. Results The VMAT2 protein was not expressed in beta cells in the adult pancreas of common mouse or rat laboratory strains, in contrast to its expression in beta cells (but not other pancreatic endocrine cell types) in the pancreas of pigs and humans. VMAT2- and tyrosine hydroxylase co-positive (catecholaminergic) innervation was less abundant in humans than in rodents. VMAT2-positive mast cells were identified in the pancreas of all species. Conclusions/interpretation Primates and pigs are suitable models for TBZ imaging of beta cells. Rodents, because of a complete lack of VMAT2 expression in the endocrine pancreas, are a ‘null’ model for assessing interference with BCM measurements by VMAT2-positive mast cells and sympathetic innervation in the pancreas. PMID:23404442

  19. Regulation of Pancreatic Beta Cell Stimulus-Secretion Coupling by microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Esguerra, Jonathan L. S.; Mollet, Inês G.; Salunkhe, Vishal A.; Wendt, Anna; Eliasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Increased blood glucose after a meal is countered by the subsequent increased release of the hypoglycemic hormone insulin from the pancreatic beta cells. The cascade of molecular events encompassing the initial sensing and transport of glucose into the beta cell, culminating with the exocytosis of the insulin large dense core granules (LDCVs) is termed “stimulus-secretion coupling.” Impairment in any of the relevant processes leads to insufficient insulin release, which contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The fate of the beta cell, when exposed to environmental triggers of the disease, is determined by the possibility to adapt to the new situation by regulation of gene expression. As established factors of post-transcriptional regulation, microRNAs (miRNAs) are well-recognized mediators of beta cell plasticity and adaptation. Here, we put focus on the importance of comprehending the transcriptional regulation of miRNAs, and how miRNAs are implicated in stimulus-secretion coupling, specifically those influencing the late stages of insulin secretion. We suggest that efficient beta cell adaptation requires an optimal balance between transcriptional regulation of miRNAs themselves, and miRNA-dependent gene regulation. The increased knowledge of the beta cell transcriptional network inclusive of non-coding RNAs such as miRNAs is essential in identifying novel targets for the treatment of T2D. PMID:25383562

  20. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak; Weber, Gesine; Eberhard, Daniel; Mehana, Amir E; Eglinger, Jan; Welters, Alena; Bartosinska, Barbara; Jeruschke, Kay; Weiss, Jürgen; Päth, Günter; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Seufert, Jochen; Lammert, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflammatory beta cell stress and cell death. Subsequently, glucose tolerance tests were performed, and plasma insulin as well as fasting and random blood glucose concentrations were monitored. Mitochondrial morphology and number of insulin granules were quantified in beta cells. Moreover, islet cell damage was determined in vitro after streptozotocin and cytokine treatment of isolated wild type and DJ-1 KO islets using calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining and TUNEL staining. Compared to wild type mice, DJ-1 KO mice became diabetic following MLDS treatment. Insulin concentrations were substantially reduced, and fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly higher in MLDS-treated DJ-1 KO mice compared to equally treated wild type mice. Rates of beta cell apoptosis upon MLDS treatment were twofold higher in DJ-1 KO mice compared to wild type mice, and in vitro inflammatory cytokines led to twice as much beta cell death in pancreatic islets from DJ-1 KO mice versus those of wild type mice. In conclusion, this study identified the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 as being capable of protecting pancreatic islet cells from cell death induced by an inflammatory and cytotoxic setting. PMID:26422139

  1. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, Gary W.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L.

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  2. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kover, Karen; Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu; Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa; Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V.

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose

  3. Transcription factors involved in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of pancreatic beta cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Shiying; Fang, Zhong; Yu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Muxun

    2009-07-10

    GSIS, the most important function of pancreatic beta cell, is essential for maintaining the glucose homeostasis. Transcription factors are known to control different biological processes such as differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. In pancreas, some transcription factors are involved in regulating the function of beta cells. In this review, the role of these transcription factors including Pdx-1, FoxO1, SREBP-1c, and MafA in GSIS is highlighted. The related molecular mechanisms are analyzed as well. Furthermore, the association between the role of transcription factors in GSIS and the development of T2DM is discussed.

  4. Partial preservation of pancreatic beta-cells by vanadium: evidence for long-term amelioration of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cam, M C; Li, W M; McNeill, J H

    1997-07-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats treated with vanadium can remain euglycemic for up to 20 weeks following withdrawal from vanadium treatment. In this study, we examined the effects of short-term vanadium treatment in preventing or reversing the STZ-induced diabetic state. Male Wistar rats were untreated (D) or treated (DT) with vanadyl sulfate for 1 week before administering STZ. Treatment was subsequently maintained for 3 days (DT3) or 14 days (DT14) post-STZ, after which vanadium was withdrawn. At 4 to 5 weeks post-STZ and following long-term withdrawal from vanadium, DT14 rats demonstrated levels of food and fluid intake and glucose tolerance that were not significantly different from those of age-matched untreated nondiabetic rats, and had significantly reduced glycemic levels in the fed state compared with D and DT3 groups. The proportion of animals that were euglycemic (fed plasma glucose < 9.0 mmol/L) was significant in DT14 (five of 10) relative to D (one of 10) and DT3 (one of 10) (P = .01). All euglycemic animals had an improved pancreatic insulin content that, albeit low (12% of control), was strongly linked to euglycemia in the fed state (r = -.91, P < .0001). Moreover, the highly significant correlation persisted with the analysis of untreated STZ-rats alone (r = -.95, P < .0001). Similarly, improvements in glucose tolerance and insulin secretory function in euglycemic rats were strongly correlated with small changes in residual insulin content. Hence, as vanadium pretreatment did not prevent STZ-induced beta-cytotoxicity, the vanadium-induced amelioration of the diabetic state appears to be secondary to the preservation of a functional portion of pancreatic beta cells that initially survived STZ toxicity. The partial preservation of pancreatic beta cells, albeit small in proportion to the total insulin store, was both critical and sufficient for a long-term reversal of the diabetic state. These results suggest that apparently modest effects in

  5. The Microtubule-Associated Protein Tau and Its Relevance for Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Maj, Magdalena; Hoermann, Gregor; Rasul, Sazan; Base, Wolfgang; Wagner, Ludwig; Attems, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Structural and biochemical alterations of the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) are associated with degenerative disorders referred to as tauopathies. We have previously shown that MAPT is present in human islets of Langerhans, human insulinomas, and pancreatic beta-cell line models, with biophysical similarities to the pathological MAPT in the brain. Here, we further studied MAPT in pancreatic endocrine tissue to better understand the mechanisms that lead to functional dysregulation of pancreatic beta cells. We found upregulation of MAPT protein expression in human insulinomas when compared to human pancreatic islets of Langerhans and an imbalance between MAPT isoforms in insulinomas tissue. We cloned one 3-repeat domain MAPT and transduced this into a beta-cell derived rodent cell line Rin-5F. Proliferation experiments showed higher growth rates and metabolic activities of cells overexpressing MAPT protein. We observed that a MAPT overexpressing cell line demonstrates altered insulin transcription, translation, and insulin secretion rates. We found the relative insulin secretion rates were significantly decreased in a MAPT overexpressing cell line and these findings could be confirmed using partial MAPT knock-down cell lines. Our findings support that MAPT may play an important role in insulin granule trafficking and indicate the importance of balanced MAPT phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for adequate insulin release.

  6. The Microtubule-Associated Protein Tau and Its Relevance for Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maj, Magdalena; Hoermann, Gregor; Rasul, Sazan; Base, Wolfgang; Wagner, Ludwig; Attems, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Structural and biochemical alterations of the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) are associated with degenerative disorders referred to as tauopathies. We have previously shown that MAPT is present in human islets of Langerhans, human insulinomas, and pancreatic beta-cell line models, with biophysical similarities to the pathological MAPT in the brain. Here, we further studied MAPT in pancreatic endocrine tissue to better understand the mechanisms that lead to functional dysregulation of pancreatic beta cells. We found upregulation of MAPT protein expression in human insulinomas when compared to human pancreatic islets of Langerhans and an imbalance between MAPT isoforms in insulinomas tissue. We cloned one 3-repeat domain MAPT and transduced this into a beta-cell derived rodent cell line Rin-5F. Proliferation experiments showed higher growth rates and metabolic activities of cells overexpressing MAPT protein. We observed that a MAPT overexpressing cell line demonstrates altered insulin transcription, translation, and insulin secretion rates. We found the relative insulin secretion rates were significantly decreased in a MAPT overexpressing cell line and these findings could be confirmed using partial MAPT knock-down cell lines. Our findings support that MAPT may play an important role in insulin granule trafficking and indicate the importance of balanced MAPT phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for adequate insulin release. PMID:26824039

  7. Conversion of embryonic stem cells into pancreatic beta-cell surrogates guided by ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Tuch, Bernard E

    2006-05-01

    Cellular therapies to treat Type 1 diabetes are being devised and the use of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offers a solution to the issue of supply, because hESCs can be maintained in a pluripotent state indefinitely. Furthermore, hESCs have advantages in terms of their plasticity and reduced immunogenicity. Several strategies that have so far been investigated indicate that hESCs are capable of differentiating into insulin producing beta-cell surrogates. However the efficiency of the differentiation procedures used is generally quite low and the cell populations derived are often highly heterogenous. A strategy that appears to have long term potential is to design differentiation procedures based on the ontogeny of the beta-cell. The focus of this strategy is to replicate signaling processes that are known to be involved in the maturation of a beta-cell. The earliest pancreatic progenitors found in the developing vertebrate fetus are produced via a process known as gastrulation and form part of the definitive endoderm germ layer. hESCs have recently been differentiated into definitive endoderm with high efficiency using a differentiation procedure that mimics the signaling that occurs during gastrulation and the formation of the definitive endoderm. Subsequent events during pancreas development involve a section of the definitive endoderm forming into pancreatic epithelium, which then branches into the pancreatic mesenchyme to form islet clusters of endocrine cells. A proportion of the endocrine precursor cells within islets develop into insulin producing beta-cells. The challenge currently is to design hESC differentiation procedures that mimic the combined events of these stages of beta-cell development.

  8. Ataxin-10 interacts with O-GlcNAc transferase OGT in pancreatic {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Andrali, Sreenath S.; Maerz, Pia; Oezcan, Sabire . E-mail: sozcan@uky.edu

    2005-11-11

    Several nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in metazoans are modified by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). This modification is dynamic and reversible similar to phosphorylation and is catalyzed by the O-linked GlcNAc transferase (OGT). Hyperglycemia has been shown to increase O-GlcNAc levels in pancreatic {beta} cells, which appears to interfere with {beta}-cell function. To obtain a better understanding of the role of O-linked GlcNAc modification in {beta} cells, we have isolated OGT interacting proteins from a cDNA library made from the mouse insulinoma MIN6 cell line. We describe here the identification of Ataxin-10, encoded by the SCA10 (spinocerebellar ataxia type 10) gene as an OGT interacting protein. Mutations in the SCA10 gene cause progressive cerebellar ataxias and seizures. We demonstrate that SCA10 interacts with OGT in vivo and is modified by O-linked glycosylation in MIN6 cells, suggesting a novel role for the Ataxin-10 protein in pancreatic {beta} cells.

  9. [New aspects of pancreatic beta cell functions and their possible therapeutic applications].

    PubMed

    Tiedge, M

    2006-12-01

    Using the metabolic stimulus-secretion coupling of pancreatic beta cells as an example, this review illustrates how new strategies in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus can be developed from the results of basic research. Metabolic stimulus-secretion coupling presupposes the metabolizing of those stimuli of insulin secretion that have the properties of nutritional substances. Changes in the ATP/ADP ratio within the beta cells will then trigger the release of insulin granules from them. Glucokinase, a glucose phosphorylating enzyme, functions as a metabolic glucose sensor, which couples changes in physiological glucose concentration in the pancreatic beta cells and in the liver to the intermediary metabolism, i.e. glycolysis, the citrate cycle and respiratory-chain phosphorylation. In this way insulin secretion and hepatic metabolism are positively influenced. Several pharmaceutical companies (Roche, Merck, Astra-Zeneca, Lilly) have recently developed first examples of glucokinase-activating compounds and demonstrated in animal models their efficacy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. These glucokinase activators prevent glucokinase from changing into a catalytically inactive structure. They also increase glucose affinity of the enzyme and stabilize a catalytically active form of glucokinase proteins. In this way glucokinase activators increase glucose-induced insulin secretion and inhibit hepatic glucogenesis. Glucokinase activators are an interesting innovation in the future treatment of type 2 diabetes, because their action on beta cells and the liver is caused by changes in blood glucose concentration.

  10. The Glucotoxicity Protecting Effect of Ezetimibe in Pancreatic Beta Cells via Inhibition of CD36

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of CD36, a fatty acid transporter, has been reported to prevent glucotoxicity and ameliorate high glucose induced beta cell dysfunction. Ezetimibe is a selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor that blocks Niemann Pick C1-like 1 protein, but may exert its effect through suppression of CD36. We attempted to clarify the beneficial effect of ezetimibe on insulin secreting cells and to determine whether this effect is related to change of CD36 expression. mRNA expression of insulin and CD36, intracellular peroxide level and glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) under normal (5.6 mM) or high glucose (30 mM) condition in INS-1 cells and primary rat islet cells were compared. Changes of the aforementioned factors with treatment with ezetimibe (20 μM) under normal or high glucose condition were also assessed. mRNA expression of insulin was decreased with high glucose, which was reversed by ezetimibe in both INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. CD36 mRNA expression was increased with high glucose, but decreased by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. Three-day treatment with high glucose resulted in an increase in intracellular peroxide level; however, it was decreased by treatment with ezetimibe. Decrease in GSIS by three-day treatment with high glucose was reversed by ezetimibe. Palmitate uptake following exposure to high glucose conditions for three days was significantly elevated, which was reversed by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells. Ezetimibe may prevent glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells through a decrease in fatty acid influx via inhibition of CD36. PMID:27051238

  11. TRPM4 impacts on Ca2+ signals during agonist-induced insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Marigo, V; Courville, K; Hsu, W H; Feng, J M; Cheng, H

    2009-02-27

    TRPM4 is a Ca(2+)-activated non-selective cation (CAN) channel that functions in cell depolarization, which is important for Ca(2+) influx and insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells. We investigated TRPM4 expression and function in the beta-cell lines HIT-T15 (hamster), RINm5F (rat), beta-TC3 (mouse), MIN-6 (mouse) and the alpha-cell line INR1G9 (hamster). By RT-PCR, we identified TRPM4 transcripts in alpha- and beta-cells. Patch-clamp recordings with increasing Ca(2+) concentrations resulted in a dose-dependent activation of TRPM4 with the greatest depolarizing currents recorded from hamster-derived cells. Further, Ca(2+) imaging experiments revealed that inhibition of TRPM4 by a dominant-negative effect significantly decreased the magnitude of the Ca(2+) signals generated by agonist stimulation compared to control cells. The decrease in the [Ca(2+)](i) resulted in reduced insulin secretion. Our data suggest that depolarizing currents generated by TRPM4 are an important component in the control of intracellular Ca(2+) signals necessary for insulin secretion and perhaps glucagon from alpha-cells.

  12. Effect of Exendin-4 on Autophagy Clearance in Beta Cell of Rats with Tacrolimus-induced Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Woo; Jin, Long; Jin, Jian; Yang, Chul Woo

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that GLP-1 protects beta cells against various cellular injuries by modulating autophagy. In this study, we examined whether exendin-4 (Ex-4), a GLP-1 analog, had preventive effects on tacrolimus (Tac)-induced beta cell injury by improving autophagy clearance. Rats with Tac-induced diabetes mellitus exhibited increased autophagy-associated protein expression, light chain 3B levels, and autophagic vacuole numbers in pancreatic beta cells. Additionally, Tac increased autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro, and inhibition of autophagosome using 3-methyladenine reduced Tac-induced islet cell injury by decreasing reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis. Ex-4 treatment decreased Tac-induced hyperglycaemia, oxidative stress, and apoptosis, accompanied by decreased autophagy-associated protein expression and autophagosome numbers. In vivo and in vitro studies showed that Tac treatment impaired lysosomal function and autophagosome-lysosome fusion; these processes were improve by Ex-4 treatment. Moreover, addition of bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of lysosomal function, abolished the protective effects of Ex-4. Our findings reveal that Tac-induced diabetes mellitus was a state of excessive burden of autophagosomes and impairment of autophagy clearance and that Ex-4 protected against Tac-induced pancreatic islet injury by reducing the burden of autophagosomes via activation of autophagosome clearance. Thus, Ex-4 had therapeutic effects on Tac-induced pancreatic beta cell injury. PMID:27436514

  13. Effects of amino acids on membrane potential and 86Rb+ fluxes in pancreatic beta-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Henquin, J.C.; Meissner, H.P.

    1981-03-01

    The membrane potential of beta-cells was studied with microelectrodes in mouse islets and their potassium permeability was evaluated by measuring 86Rb+ fluxes in rat islets. In the absence of glucose, L-leucine, its metabolite ketoisocaproate, and its nonmetabolized analogue 2-aminonorbornane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) depolarized beta-cells and triggered bursts of electrical activity like glucose. The effect of leucine was weak, but was potentiated by a low concentration of glucose or by theophylline; the effect of ketoisocaproate was stronger and faster than that of an equimolar concentration of glucose. Arginine alone produced only a fast depolarization of beta-cells, insufficient to trigger electrical activity. Leucine and arginine potentiated the activity induced by glucose. In a glucose-free medium, alanine only slightly depolarized beta cells, whereas isoleucine and phenylalanie had no effect. Leucine, ketoisocaproate, and BCH reversibly decreased 86Rb+ efflux from islets perifused in the absence of glucose and increased 86Rb+ uptake. By contrast, both in the absence or presence of glucose, arginine increased 86Rb+ efflux and decreased 86Rb+ uptake. It is proposed that leucine, ketoisocaproate, and BCH, as glucose, deplolarize beta-cells by decreasing their potassium permeability, whereas arginine acts differently. The appearance of bursts of electrical activity with secretagogues unrelated to glucose suggests that they reflect an intrinsic property of the beta-cell membrane.

  14. GLP-1 receptor antagonist as a potential probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Eri; Toyoda, Kentaro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Masashi; Temma, Takashi; Hirao, Konomu; Nagakawa, Kenji; Saji, Hideo; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2009-11-20

    We examined exendin(9-39), an antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), as a potential probe for imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cells. To evaluate in vitro receptor specificity, binding assay was performed using dispersed mouse islet cells. Binding assay showed competitive inhibition of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) binding by non-radioactive exendin(9-39). To assess in vivo selectivity, the biodistribution was evaluated by intravenous administration of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) to mice. Radioactivity of harvested pancreas reached highest levels at 60 and 120 min among organs examined except lung. Pre-administration of excess non-radioactive exendin(9-39) remarkably and specifically blocked the radioactivity of pancreas. After [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) injection into transgenic mice with pancreatic {beta}-cells expressing GFP, fluorescent and radioactive signals of sections of pancreas were evaluated with an image analyzer. Imaging analysis showed that the fluorescent GFP signals and the radioactive signals were correspondingly located. Thus, the GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) may serve as a useful probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging.

  15. Islet Autoimmunity Identifies a Unique Pattern of Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function, Markedly Reduced Pancreatic Beta Cell Mass and Insulin Resistance in Clinically Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Subauste, Angela; Gianani, Roberto; Chang, Annette M.; Plunkett, Cynthia; Pietropaolo, Susan L.; Zhang, Ying-Jian; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Kuller, Lewis H.; Galecki, Andrzej; Halter, Jeffrey B.; Pietropaolo, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature describing metabolic and histological data in adult-onset autoimmune diabetes. This subgroup of diabetes mellitus affects at least 5% of clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients (T2DM) and it is termed Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA). We evaluated indexes of insulin secretion, metabolic assessment, and pancreatic pathology in clinically diagnosed T2DM patients with and without the presence of humoral islet autoimmunity (Ab). A total of 18 patients with at least 5-year duration of clinically diagnosed T2DM were evaluated in this study. In those subjects we assessed acute insulin responses to arginine, a glucose clamp study, whole-body fat mass and fat-free mass. We have also analyzed the pancreatic pathology of 15 T2DM and 43 control cadaveric donors, using pancreatic tissue obtained from all the T2DM organ donors available from the nPOD network through December 31, 2013. The presence of islet Ab correlated with severely impaired β-cell function as demonstrated by remarkably low acute insulin response to arginine (AIR) when compared to that of the Ab negative group. Glucose clamp studies indicated that both Ab positive and Ab negative patients exhibited peripheral insulin resistance in a similar fashion. Pathology data from T2DM donors with Ab or the autoimmune diabetes associated DR3/DR4 allelic class II combination showed reduction in beta cell mass as well as presence of autoimmune-associated pattern A pathology in subjects with either islet autoantibodies or the DR3/DR4 genotype. In conclusion, we provide compelling evidence indicating that islet Ab positive long-term T2DM patients exhibit profound impairment of insulin secretion as well as reduced beta cell mass seemingly determined by an immune-mediated injury of pancreatic β-cells. Deciphering the mechanisms underlying beta cell destruction in this subset of diabetic patients may lead to the development of novel immunologic therapies aimed at halting the

  16. Glucose sensing in the pancreatic beta cell: a computational systems analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pancreatic beta-cells respond to rising blood glucose by increasing oxidative metabolism, leading to an increased ATP/ADP ratio in the cytoplasm. This leads to a closure of KATP channels, depolarization of the plasma membrane, influx of calcium and the eventual secretion of insulin. Such mechanism suggests that beta-cell metabolism should have a functional regulation specific to secretion, as opposed to coupling to contraction. The goal of this work is to uncover contributions of the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial processes in this secretory coupling mechanism using mathematical modeling in a systems biology approach. Methods We describe a mathematical model of beta-cell sensitivity to glucose. The cytoplasmic part of the model includes equations describing glucokinase, glycolysis, pyruvate reduction, NADH and ATP production and consumption. The mitochondrial part begins with production of NADH, which is regulated by pyruvate dehydrogenase. NADH is used in the electron transport chain to establish a proton motive force, driving the F1F0 ATPase. Redox shuttles and mitochondrial Ca2+ handling were also modeled. Results The model correctly predicts changes in the ATP/ADP ratio, Ca2+ and other metabolic parameters in response to changes in substrate delivery at steady-state and during cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations. Our analysis of the model simulations suggests that the mitochondrial membrane potential should be relatively lower in beta cells compared with other cell types to permit precise mitochondrial regulation of the cytoplasmic ATP/ADP ratio. This key difference may follow from a relative reduction in respiratory activity. The model demonstrates how activity of lactate dehydrogenase, uncoupling proteins and the redox shuttles can regulate beta-cell function in concert; that independent oscillations of cytoplasmic Ca2+ can lead to slow coupled metabolic oscillations; and that the relatively low production rate of reactive oxygen species in beta-cells

  17. Age-Related Impairment of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function: Pathophysiological and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    De Tata, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes significantly increases with age. The relevance of this association is dramatically magnified by the concomitant global aging of the population, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, some recent advances in this field are reviewed at the level of both the pathophysiology of glucose homeostasis and the cellular senescence of pancreatic islets. Overall, recent results highlight the crucial role of beta-cell dysfunction in the age-related impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and delineate the possibility of new original therapeutic interventions. PMID:25232350

  18. Zip4 Mediated Zinc Influx Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Alexandre B.; Prentice, Kacey J.; Froese, Sean; Liu, Ying; Andrews, Glen K.; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc has an important role in normal pancreatic beta cell physiology as it regulates gene transcription, insulin crystallization and secretion, and cell survival. Nevertheless, little is known about how zinc is transported through the plasma membrane of beta cells and which of the class of zinc influx transporters (Zip) is involved. Zip4 was previously shown to be expressed in human and mouse beta cells; however, its function there is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to define the zinc transport role of Zip4 in beta cells. To investigate this, Zip4 was over-expressed in MIN6 beta cells using a pCMV6-Zip4GFP plasmid. Organelle staining combined with confocal microscopy showed that Zip4 exhibits a widespread localization in MIN6 cells. Time-lapse zinc imaging experiments showed that Zip4 increases cytoplasmic zinc levels. This resulted in increased granular zinc content and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, it is unlikely that the increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion was triggered by a modulation of mitochondrial function, as mitochondrial membrane potential remained unchanged. To define the role of Zip4 in-vivo, we generated a beta cell-specific knockout mouse model (Zip4BKO). Deletion of the Zip4 gene was confirmed in Zip4BKO islets by PCR, RT-PCR, and immuno-histochemistry. Zip4BKO mice showed slightly improved glucose homeostasis but no change in insulin secretion during an oral glucose tolerance test. While Zip4 was not found to be essential for proper glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in vivo in mice, this study also found that Zip4 mediates increases in cytoplasmic and granular zinc pools and stimulates glucose dependant insulin secretion in-vitro. PMID:25806541

  19. Age-related differences in the pancreatic beta-cell response to hyperglycemia after eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, R K; Hernandez, J M; Williamson, D L; O'Gorman, D J; Evans, W J; Kirwan, J P

    1998-09-01

    Eccentric exercise (ECC) causes muscle damage, insulin resistance, and increased pancreatic beta-cell secretion in young individuals. However, the effects of age on the pancreatic beta-cell response to glucose after ECC are unknown. Hyperglycemic clamps (180 min, 10.0 mM) were performed on eight young (age 22 +/- 1 yr) and eight older (age 66 +/- 2 yr) healthy sedentary males without exercise (CONT) and 48 h after ECC. ECC increased (P < 0.02) muscle soreness ratings and plasma creatine kinase concentrations in both groups. Insulin and C-peptide secretions were similar between young and older subjects during CONT clamps. ECC increased (P < 0.05) first-phase (0-10 min) C-peptide area under the curve in young (4.2 +/- 0.4 vs. 3.7 +/- 0.6 nM . min; ECC vs. CONT, respectively) but not in older subjects (3.2 +/- 0.7 vs. 3.5 +/- 0.7 nM . min; ECC vs. CONT), with significant group differences (P < 0.02). Indeed, ECC repressed (P < 0.05) first-phase peak C-peptide concentrations in older subjects (0. 93 +/- 0.16 vs. 1.12 +/- 0.11 nM; ECC vs. CONT). Moreover, first-phase C-peptide-to-insulin molar ratios suggest age-related differences (P < 0.05) in insulin/C-peptide clearance after ECC. Furthermore, the observed C-peptide response after ECC was related to abdominal adiposity [r = -0.62, P < 0.02, and r = -0.66, P < 0. 006, for first and second (10-180 min) phases, respectively]. In conclusion, older individuals did not exhibit the compensatory increase in beta-cell secretion observed among young individuals after ECC. Thus, with increasing age, the pancreatic beta-cell may be less responsive to the physiological stress associated with ECC. PMID:9725813

  20. Pancreatic beta cells are highly susceptible to oxidative and ER stresses during the development of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gorasia, Dhana G; Dudek, Nadine L; Veith, Paul D; Shankar, Renu; Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Williamson, Nicholas A; Reynolds, Eric C; Hubbard, Michael J; Purcell, Anthony W

    2015-02-01

    The complex interplay of many cell types and the temporal heterogeneity of pancreatic islet composition obscure the direct role of resident alpha and beta cells in the development of Type 1 diabetes. Therefore, in addition to studying islets isolated from non-obese diabetic mice, we analyzed homogeneous cell populations of murine alpha (αTC-1) and beta (NIT-1) cell lines to understand the role and differential survival of these two predominant islet cell populations. A total of 56 proteins in NIT-1 cells and 50 in αTC-1 cells were differentially expressed when exposed to proinflammatory cytokines. The major difference in the protein expression between cytokine-treated NIT-1 and αTC-1 cells was free radical scavenging enzymes. A similar observation was made in cytokine-treated whole islets, where a comprehensive analysis of subcellular fractions revealed that 438 unique proteins were differentially expressed under inflammatory conditions. Our data indicate that beta cells are relatively susceptible to ER and oxidative stress and reveal key pathways that are dysregulated in beta cells during cytokine exposure. Additionally, in the islets, inflammation also leads to enhanced antigen presentation, which completes a three-way insult on beta cells, rendering them targets of infiltrating T lymphocytes.

  1. Nuclear SREBP-1a causes loss of pancreatic {beta}-cells and impaired insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Yuko; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Yatoh, Shigeru; Ishikawa, Mayumi; Kato, Toyonori; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Yahagi, Naoya; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2009-01-16

    Transgenic mice expressing nuclear sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a under the control of the insulin promoter were generated to determine the role of SREBP-1a in pancreatic {beta}-cells. Only low expressors could be established, which exhibited mild hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and reduced plasma insulin levels compared to C57BL/6 controls. The islets isolated from the transgenic mice were fewer and smaller, and had decreased insulin content and unaltered glucagon staining. Both glucose- and potassium-stimulated insulin secretions were decreased. The transgenic islets consistently expressed genes for fatty acids and cholesterol synthesis, resulting in accumulation of triglycerides but not cholesterol. PDX-1, {beta}{epsilon}{tau}{alpha}2, MafA, and IRS-2 were suppressed, partially explaining the loss and dysfunction of {beta}-cell mass. The transgenic mice on a high fat/high sucrose diet still exhibited impaired insulin secretion and continuous {beta}-cell growth defect. Therefore, nuclear SREBP-1a, even at a low level, strongly disrupts {beta}-cell mass and function.

  2. Nitric oxide stimulates insulin gene transcription in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.C. . E-mail: s.c.campbell@ncl.ac.uk; Richardson, H.; Ferris, W.F.; Butler, C.S.; Macfarlane, W.M.

    2007-02-23

    Recent studies have identified a positive role for nitric oxide (NO) in the regulation of pancreatic {beta}-cell function. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of short-term exposure to NO on {beta}-cell gene expression and the activity of the transcription factor PDX-1. NO stimulated the activity of the insulin gene promoter in Min6 {beta}-cells and endogenous insulin mRNA levels in both Min6 and isolated islets of Langerhans. Addition of wortmannin prior to NO stimulation blocked the observed increases in insulin gene promoter activity. Although NO addition stimulated the phosphorylation of p38, inhibition by SB203580 did not block the effect of NO on the insulin gene promoter. NO addition also stimulated both the nuclear accumulation and the DNA binding activity of PDX-1. This study has shown that over 24 h, NO stimulates insulin gene expression, PI-3-kinase activity and the activity of the critical {beta}-cell transcription factor PDX-1.

  3. Rapid regulation of pancreatic alpha- and beta- cell signalling systems by estrogens.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Cristina; Ropero, Ana B; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Quesada, Ivan; Fuentes, Esther; Nadal, Angel

    2008-03-01

    Rapid estrogen actions are triggered after estrogens are bound to a variety of proteins in organelles other than the nucleus. Those include classic estrogen receptors ERalpha and ERbeta, novel membrane proteins that behave as estrogen receptors such as GPR30, ion channels, and other ligand receptors. In pancreatic alpha and beta-cells, estrogens binding to a non-classical membrane estrogen receptors at physiological concentrations regulate ion channels and [Ca(2+)](i) signals, provoking important physiological responses. In beta-cells, 17beta-estradiol regulates K(ATP) channel activity and glucose-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations, eliciting changes in insulin release and the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent transcription factors. In alpha-cells, 17beta-estradiol abolishes low glucose-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations.

  4. ER stress in pancreatic beta cells: the thin red line between adaptation and failure.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, Decio L; Cnop, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Secretory cells, such as pancreatic beta cells, face the challenge of increasing protein synthesis severalfold during acute or chronic stimulation. This poses a burden on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the organelle where proinsulin synthesis and folding takes place. Thus, beta cells use various adaptive mechanisms to adjust the functional capacity of the ER to the prevailing demand. These check-and-balance mechanisms are collectively known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). It remains unclear how UPR signaling is ultimately regulated and what delineates the boundaries between a physiological and a pathological response. New discoveries point to the divergent effects of acute and chronic metabolic fluxes and chemical ER stressors on the formation of complexes among UPR transducers, scaffold proteins, and phosphatases. These and other findings provide a first glimpse on how different signals trigger diverging UPR outcomes. PMID:20179270

  5. Selective deletion of Pten in pancreatic beta cells leads to increased islet mass and resistance to STZ-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Bangyan L; Kuralwalla-Martinez, Christine; Guo, Wei; Gregorian, Caroline; Wang, Ying; Tian, Jide; Magnuson, Mark A; Wu, Hong

    2006-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase. PTEN inhibits the action of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and reduces the levels of phosphatidylinositol triphosphate, a crucial second messenger for cell proliferation and survival, as well as insulin signaling. In this study, we deleted Pten specifically in the insulin producing beta cells during murine pancreatic development. Pten deletion leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased cell death, without significant alteration of beta-cell differentiation. Consequently, the mutant pancreas generates more and larger islets, with a significant increase in total beta-cell mass. PTEN loss also protects animals from developing streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Our data demonstrate that PTEN loss in beta cells is not tumorigenic but beneficial. This suggests that modulating the PTEN-controlled signaling pathway is a potential approach for beta-cell protection and regeneration therapies. PMID:16537919

  6. Selective deletion of Pten in pancreatic beta cells leads to increased islet mass and resistance to STZ-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Bangyan L; Kuralwalla-Martinez, Christine; Guo, Wei; Gregorian, Caroline; Wang, Ying; Tian, Jide; Magnuson, Mark A; Wu, Hong

    2006-04-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a lipid phosphatase. PTEN inhibits the action of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and reduces the levels of phosphatidylinositol triphosphate, a crucial second messenger for cell proliferation and survival, as well as insulin signaling. In this study, we deleted Pten specifically in the insulin producing beta cells during murine pancreatic development. Pten deletion leads to increased cell proliferation and decreased cell death, without significant alteration of beta-cell differentiation. Consequently, the mutant pancreas generates more and larger islets, with a significant increase in total beta-cell mass. PTEN loss also protects animals from developing streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Our data demonstrate that PTEN loss in beta cells is not tumorigenic but beneficial. This suggests that modulating the PTEN-controlled signaling pathway is a potential approach for beta-cell protection and regeneration therapies.

  7. Calcium co-regulates oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-03-28

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio.

  8. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Hasni Ebou, Moina; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Tronche, François; Ferré, Pascal; Gautier, Jean-François; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Bréant, Bernadette; Blondeau, Bertrand; Riveline, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs) treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synthesis was evaluated in vitro after treatment with GCs of either islets from CD1 mice or MIN6 cells, a beta-cell line. We also explored the effect of GCs on the stimulation of serotonin synthesis by several hormones such as prolactin and GLP 1. We finally studied this regulation in islet in two in vivo models: mice treated with GCs and with liraglutide, a GLP1 analog, and mice deleted for the glucocorticoid receptor in the pancreas. We showed in isolated islets and MIN6 cells that GCs decreased expression and activity of the two key enzymes of serotonin synthesis, Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and 2 (Tph2), leading to reduced serotonin contents. GCs also blocked the induction of serotonin synthesis by prolactin or by a previously unknown serotonin activator, the GLP-1 analog exendin-4. In vivo, activation of the Glucagon-like-Peptide-1 receptor with liraglutide during 4 weeks increased islet serotonin contents and GCs treatment prevented this increase. Finally, islets from mice deleted for the GR in the pancreas displayed an increased expression of Tph1 and Tph2 and a strong increased serotonin content per islet. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an original inhibition of serotonin synthesis by GCs, both in basal condition and after stimulation by prolactin or activators of the GLP-1 receptor. This regulation may contribute to the deleterious effects of GCs on beta cells.

  9. Glucocorticoids Inhibit Basal and Hormone-Induced Serotonin Synthesis in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasni Ebou, Moina; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Tronche, François; Ferré, Pascal; Gautier, Jean-François; Guillemain, Ghislaine; Bréant, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a major complication of chronic Glucocorticoids (GCs) treatment. GCs induce insulin resistance and also inhibit insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. Yet, a full understanding of this negative regulation remains to be deciphered. In the present study, we investigated whether GCs could inhibit serotonin synthesis in beta cell since this neurotransmitter has been shown to be involved in the regulation of insulin secretion. To this aim, serotonin synthesis was evaluated in vitro after treatment with GCs of either islets from CD1 mice or MIN6 cells, a beta-cell line. We also explored the effect of GCs on the stimulation of serotonin synthesis by several hormones such as prolactin and GLP 1. We finally studied this regulation in islet in two in vivo models: mice treated with GCs and with liraglutide, a GLP1 analog, and mice deleted for the glucocorticoid receptor in the pancreas. We showed in isolated islets and MIN6 cells that GCs decreased expression and activity of the two key enzymes of serotonin synthesis, Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) and 2 (Tph2), leading to reduced serotonin contents. GCs also blocked the induction of serotonin synthesis by prolactin or by a previously unknown serotonin activator, the GLP-1 analog exendin-4. In vivo, activation of the Glucagon-like-Peptide-1 receptor with liraglutide during 4 weeks increased islet serotonin contents and GCs treatment prevented this increase. Finally, islets from mice deleted for the GR in the pancreas displayed an increased expression of Tph1 and Tph2 and a strong increased serotonin content per islet. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an original inhibition of serotonin synthesis by GCs, both in basal condition and after stimulation by prolactin or activators of the GLP-1 receptor. This regulation may contribute to the deleterious effects of GCs on beta cells. PMID:26901633

  10. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Grider, John R.; Murthy, Karnam S.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  11. Modulation of the bursting properties of single mouse pancreatic beta-cells by artificial conductances.

    PubMed Central

    Kinard, T A; de Vries, G; Sherman, A; Satin, L S

    1999-01-01

    Glucose triggers bursting activity in pancreatic islets, which mediates the Ca2+ uptake that triggers insulin secretion. Aside from the channel mechanism responsible for bursting, which remains unsettled, it is not clear whether bursting is an endogenous property of individual beta-cells or requires an electrically coupled islet. While many workers report stochastic firing or quasibursting in single cells, a few reports describe single-cell bursts much longer (minutes) than those of islets (15-60 s). We studied the behavior of single cells systematically to help resolve this issue. Perforated patch recordings were made from single mouse beta-cells or hamster insulinoma tumor cells in current clamp at 30-35 degrees C, using standard K+-rich pipette solution and external solutions containing 11.1 mM glucose. Dynamic clamp was used to apply artificial KATP and Ca2+ channel conductances to cells in current clamp to assess the role of Ca2+ and KATP channels in single cell firing. The electrical activity we observed in mouse beta-cells was heterogeneous, with three basic patterns encountered: 1) repetitive fast spiking; 2) fast spikes superimposed on brief (<5 s) plateaus; or 3) periodic plateaus of longer duration (10-20 s) with small spikes. Pattern 2 was most similar to islet bursting but was significantly faster. Burst plateaus lasting on the order of minutes were only observed when recordings were made from cell clusters. Adding gCa to cells increased the depolarizing drive of bursting and lengthened the plateaus, whereas adding gKATP hyperpolarized the cells and lengthened the silent phases. Adding gCa and gKATP together did not cancel out their individual effects but could induce robust bursts that resembled those of islets, and with increased period. These added currents had no slow components, indicating that the mechanisms of physiological bursting are likely to be endogenous to single beta-cells. It is unlikely that the fast bursting (class 2) was due to

  12. Preptin derived from proinsulin-like growth factor II (proIGF-II) is secreted from pancreatic islet beta-cells and enhances insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, C M; Phillips, A R; Cooper, G J

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic islet beta-cells secrete the hormones insulin, amylin and pancreastatin. To search for further beta-cell hormones, we purified peptides from secretory granules isolated from cultured murine beta TC6-F7 beta-cells. We identified a 34-amino-acid peptide (3948 Da), corresponding to Asp(69)-Leu(102) of the proinsulin-like growth factor II E-peptide, which we have termed 'preptin'. Preptin, is present in islet beta-cells and undergoes glucose-mediated co-secretion with insulin. Synthetic preptin increases insulin secretion from glucose-stimulated beta TC6-F7 cells in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner. Preptin infusion into the isolated, perfused rat pancreas increases the second phase of glucose-mediated insulin secretion by 30%, while anti-preptin immunoglobulin infusion decreases the first and second phases of insulin secretion by 29 and 26% respectively. These findings suggest that preptin is a physiological amplifier of glucose-mediated insulin secretion. PMID:11716772

  13. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of beta-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense core in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zin...

  14. Autoregulation of free radicals via uncoupling protein control in pancreatic beta-cell mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heuett, William J; Periwal, Vipul

    2010-01-20

    Pancreatic beta-cells sense the ambient blood-glucose concentration and secrete insulin to signal other tissues to take up glucose. Mitochondria play a key role in this response as they metabolize nutrients to produce ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), both of which are involved in insulin secretion signaling. Based on data available in the literature and previously developed mathematical models, we present a model of glucose-stimulated mitochondrial respiration, ATP synthesis, and ROS production and control in beta-cells. The model is consistent with a number of experimental observations reported in the literature. Most notably, it captures the nonlinear rise in the proton leak rate at high membrane potential and the increase in this leak due to uncoupling protein (UCP) activation by ROS. The functional forms used to model ROS production and UCP regulation yield insight into these mechanisms, as many details have not yet been unraveled in the experimental literature. We examine short- and long-term effects of UCP activation inhibition and changes in the mitochondrial density on mitochondrial responses to glucose. Results suggest increasing mitochondrial density while decreasing UCP activity may be an effective way to increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while decreasing oxidative stress.

  15. The pancreatic beta cell as a paradigm for advances in inositide research.

    PubMed

    Barker, Christopher J; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2012-09-01

    In a previous review for Advances in Enzyme Research (Berggren and Barker, 2008) we outlined the history of our involvement in discovering important roles for inositides in the insulin secreting pancreatic beta cell. In this current appraisal we bring the work up to date and project how we believe this field will continue to develop in the future. Recently, we have seen an important synergism between the growth in our understanding of inositide function and our knowledge of beta cell stimulus-secretion coupling in both physiological and pathophysiological contexts. Important advances have been made in three areas. 1. The classic regulation of cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](i) by Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P(3)) and its receptor, 2. A novel role of the inositol pyrophosphates, especially 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5-PP-InsP(5)), in exocytosis, and 3. The unique signaling roles of PI3K pathways instituted by the engagement of the insulin receptor in an autocrine, positive feed-back loop. We examine each of these in turn and close with an assessment of the likely future directions the research will take.

  16. Early peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma regulated genes involved in expansion of pancreatic beta cell mass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The progression towards type 2 diabetes depends on the allostatic response of pancreatic beta cells to synthesise and secrete enough insulin to compensate for insulin resistance. The endocrine pancreas is a plastic tissue able to expand or regress in response to the requirements imposed by physiological and pathophysiological states associated to insulin resistance such as pregnancy, obesity or ageing, but the mechanisms mediating beta cell mass expansion in these scenarios are not well defined. We have recently shown that ob/ob mice with genetic ablation of PPARγ2, a mouse model known as the POKO mouse failed to expand its beta cell mass. This phenotype contrasted with the appropriate expansion of the beta cell mass observed in their obese littermate ob/ob mice. Thus, comparison of these models islets particularly at early ages could provide some new insights on early PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses involved in the process of beta cell mass expansion Results Here we have investigated PPARγ dependent transcriptional responses occurring during the early stages of beta cell adaptation to insulin resistance in wild type, ob/ob, PPARγ2 KO and POKO mice. We have identified genes known to regulate both the rate of proliferation and the survival signals of beta cells. Moreover we have also identified new pathways induced in ob/ob islets that remained unchanged in POKO islets, suggesting an important role for PPARγ in maintenance/activation of mechanisms essential for the continued function of the beta cell. Conclusions Our data suggest that the expansion of beta cell mass observed in ob/ob islets is associated with the activation of an immune response that fails to occur in POKO islets. We have also indentified other PPARγ dependent differentially regulated pathways including cholesterol biosynthesis, apoptosis through TGF-β signaling and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:22208362

  17. UCP-2 and UCP-3 Proteins Are Differentially Regulated in Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Maedler, Kathrin; Shu, Luan; Haataja, Leena

    2008-01-01

    Background Increased uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) expression has been associated with impaired insulin secretion, whereas UCP-3 protein levels are decreased in the skeleton muscle of type-2 diabetic subjects. In the present studies we hypothesize an opposing effect of glucose on the regulation of UCP-2 and UCP-3 in pancreatic islets. Methodology Dominant negative UCP-2 and wild type UCP-3 adenoviruses were generated, and insulin release by transduced human islets was measured. UCP-2 and UCP-3 mRNA levels were determined using quantitative PCR. UCP-2 and UCP-3 protein expression was investigated in human islets cultured in the presence of different glucose concentrations. Human pancreatic sections were analyzed for subcellular localization of UCP-3 using immunohistochemistry. Principal Findings Dominant negative UCP-2 expression in human islets increased insulin secretion compared to control islets (p<0.05). UCP-3 mRNA is expressed in human islets, but the relative abundance of UCP-2 mRNA was 8.1-fold higher (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed co-localization of UCP-3 protein with mitochondria in human beta-cells. UCP-2 protein expression in human islets was increased ∼2-fold after high glucose exposure, whereas UCP-3 protein expression was decreased by ∼40% (p<0.05). UCP-3 overexpression improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Conclusions UCP-2 and UCP-3 may have distinct roles in regulating beta-cell function. Increased expression of UCP-2 and decreased expression of UCP-3 in humans with chronic hyperglycemia may contribute to impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These data imply that mechanisms that suppress UCP-2 or mechanisms that increase UCP-3 expression and/or function are potential therapeutic targets to offset defects of insulin secretion in humans with type-2 diabetes. PMID:18167556

  18. Serpine1 Mediates Porphyromonas gingivalis Induced Insulin Secretion in the Pancreatic Beta Cell Line MIN6

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Uppoor G.; Watanabe, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease resulting in destruction of gingiva and alveolar bone caused by an exuberant host immunological response to periodontal pathogens. Results from a number of epidemiological studies indicate a close association between diabetes and periodontitis. Results from cross-sectional studies indicate that subjects with periodontitis have a higher odds ratio of developing insulin resistance (IR). However, the mechanisms by which periodontitis influences the development of diabetes are not known. Results from our previous studies using an animal model of periodontitis suggest that periodontitis accelerates the onset of hyperinsulinemia and IR. In addition, LPS from a periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), stimulates Serpine1 expression in the pancreatic beta cell line MIN6. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that a periodontal pathogen induces hyperinsulinemia and Serpine1 may be involved in this process. To test this hypothesis, we co-incubated Pg with the pancreatic beta cell line MIN6 and measured the effect on insulin secretion by MIN6 cells. We further determined the involvement of Serpine1 in insulin secretion by downregulating Serpine1 expression. Our results indicated that Pg stimulated insulin secretion by approximately 3.0 fold under normoglycemic conditions. In a hyperglycemic state, Pg increased insulin secretion by 1.5 fold. Pg significantly upregulated expression of the Serpine1 gene and this was associated with increased secretion of insulin by MIN6 cells. However, cells with downregulated Serpine1 expression were resistant to Pg stimulated insulin secretion under normoglycemic conditions. We conclude that the periodontal pathogen, Pg, induced insulin secretion by MIN6 cells and this induction was, in part, Serpine1 dependent. Thus, Serpine1 may play a pivotal role in insulin secretion during the accelerated development of hyperinsulinemia and the resulting IR in the setting of periodontitis. PMID

  19. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE.

  20. The quest to make fully functional human pancreatic beta cells from embryonic stem cells: climbing a mountain in the clouds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James D

    2016-10-01

    The production of fully functional insulin-secreting cells to treat diabetes is a major goal of regenerative medicine. In this article, I review progress towards this goal over the last 15 years from the perspective of a beta cell biologist. I describe the current state-of-the-art, and speculate on the general approaches that will be required to identify and achieve our ultimate goal of producing functional beta cells. The need for deeper phenotyping of heterogeneous cultures of stem cell derived islet-like cells in parallel with a better understanding of the heterogeneity of the target cell type(s) is emphasised. This deep phenotyping should include high-throughput single-cell analysis, as well as comprehensive 'omics technologies to provide unbiased characterisation of cell products and human beta cells. There are justified calls for more detailed and well-powered studies of primary human pancreatic beta cell physiology, and I propose online databases of standardised human beta cell responses to physiological stimuli, including both functional and metabolomic/proteomic/transcriptomic profiles. With a concerted, community-wide effort, including both basic and applied scientists, beta cell replacement will become a clinical reality for patients with diabetes. PMID:27473069

  1. The quest to make fully functional human pancreatic beta cells from embryonic stem cells: climbing a mountain in the clouds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James D

    2016-10-01

    The production of fully functional insulin-secreting cells to treat diabetes is a major goal of regenerative medicine. In this article, I review progress towards this goal over the last 15 years from the perspective of a beta cell biologist. I describe the current state-of-the-art, and speculate on the general approaches that will be required to identify and achieve our ultimate goal of producing functional beta cells. The need for deeper phenotyping of heterogeneous cultures of stem cell derived islet-like cells in parallel with a better understanding of the heterogeneity of the target cell type(s) is emphasised. This deep phenotyping should include high-throughput single-cell analysis, as well as comprehensive 'omics technologies to provide unbiased characterisation of cell products and human beta cells. There are justified calls for more detailed and well-powered studies of primary human pancreatic beta cell physiology, and I propose online databases of standardised human beta cell responses to physiological stimuli, including both functional and metabolomic/proteomic/transcriptomic profiles. With a concerted, community-wide effort, including both basic and applied scientists, beta cell replacement will become a clinical reality for patients with diabetes.

  2. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 3beta is involved in pancreatic beta-cell-specific transcription of the pdx-1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K L; Gannon, M; Peshavaria, M; Offield, M F; Henderson, E; Ray, M; Marks, A; Gamer, L W; Wright, C V; Stein, R

    1997-01-01

    The mammalian homeobox gene pdx-1 is expressed in pluripotent precursor cells in the dorsal and ventral pancreatic bud and duodenal endoderm, which will produce the pancreas and the rostral duodenum. In the adult, pdr-1 is expressed principally within insulin-secreting pancreatic islet beta cells and cells of the duodenal epithelium. Our objective in this study was to localize sequences within the mouse pdx-1 gene mediating selective expression within the islet. Studies of transgenic mice in which a genomic fragment of the mouse pdx-1 gene from kb -4.5 to +8.2 was used to drive a beta-galactosidase reporter showed that the control sequences sufficient for appropriate developmental and adult specific expression were contained within this region. Three nuclease-hypersensitive sites, located between bp -2560 and -1880 (site 1), bp -1330 and -800 (site 2), and bp -260 and +180 (site 3), were identified within the 5'-flanking region of the endogenous pdx-1 gene. Pancreatic beta-cell-specific expression was shown to be controlled by sequences within site 1 from an analysis of the expression pattern of various pdr-1-herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter expression constructs in transfected beta-cell and non-beta-cell lines. Furthermore, we also established that this region was important in vivo by demonstrating that expression from a site 1-driven beta-galactosidase reporter construct was directed to islet beta-cells in transgenic mice. The activity of the site 1-driven constructs was reduced substantially in beta-cell lines by mutating a hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 (HNF3)-like site located between nucleotides -2007 and -1996. Gel shift analysis indicated that HNF3beta present in islet beta cells binds to this element. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that HNF3beta was present within the nuclei of almost all islet beta cells and subsets of pancreatic acinar cells. Together, these results suggest that HNF3beta, a key regulator of endodermal cell lineage

  3. Molecular targets of a human HNF1 alpha mutation responsible for pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Antinozzi, P A; Hagenfeldt, K A; Maechler, P; Wollheim, C B

    2000-08-15

    The reverse tetracycline-dependent transactivator system was employed in insulinoma INS-1 cells to achieve controlled inducible expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 alpha (HNF1 alpha)-P291fsinsC, the most common mutation associated with subtype 3 of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY3). Nuclear localized HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC protein exerts its dominant-negative effects by competing with endogenous HNF1 alpha for the cognate DNA-binding site. HNF1 alpha controls multiple genes implicated in pancreatic beta-cell function and notably in metabolism- secretion coupling. In addition to reduced expression of the genes encoding insulin, glucose transporter-2, L-pyruvate kinase, aldolase B and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, induction of HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC also significantly inhibits expression of mitochondrial 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (OGDH) E1 subunit mRNA and protein. OGDH enzyme activity and [(14)C]pyruvate oxidation were also reduced. In contrast, the mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 were dramatically increased by HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC induction. As predicted from this altered gene expression profile, HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC also inhibits insulin secretory responses to glucose and leucine, correlated with impaired nutrient-evoked mitochondrial ATP production and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. These unprecedented results suggest the molecular mechanism of HNF1 alpha-P291fsinsC causing beta-cell dysfunction. PMID:10944108

  4. Pancreatic beta-cells expressing GLP-1 are resistant to the toxic effects of immunosuppressive drugs.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Eugenio; Hui, Hongxiang; Khoury, Nasif; Di Mario, Umberto; Perfetti, Riccardo

    2005-04-01

    Glucose intolerance is often observed after pancreatic islet cell transplantation. The administration of immunosuppressive agents (ISD), necessary to avoid tissue rejection, is in part responsible for hyperglycemia. To investigate whether mouse insulinoma (MIN6) cells transfected with the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) fragment of the proglucagon gene (RIP/GLP-1 MIN6 cells) are resistant to the toxicity derived from the administration of ISD. RIP/GLP-1 MIN6 cells, as well as parental MIN6 cells, were exposed to a cocktail of ISD. The secretion of insulin and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins were investigated by RIA and western blot analysis. Cell apoptosis was quantified by FACS analysis. Finally, to study whether the antiapoptotic action of GLP-1 was a function of its effect on insulin secretion, or rather it was a direct effect of GLP-1, cells were cultured with or without diazoxide or exendin-9. GLP-1 improved the functional activity and the viability of cells exposed to ISD. The insulin secretion of RIP/GLP-1 MIN6 cells after exposure to ISD was preserved. The expression of GLP-1 by beta-cells reduced the number of apoptotic cells and increased the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. GLP-1 also decreased the abundance of the proapoptotic markers PARP-p85 and Smac/Diablo. Treatment of cells with the diazoxide did not abolish the protective advantage that cells transfected with GLP-1 had; conversely the exposure of cells to exendin-9 was associated with a restored susceptibility to apoptosis. This report demonstrates that GLP-1 is capable of preserving beta-cell function and protecting cells from apoptotic cell death.

  5. Symmetric Fold/Super-Hopf Bursting, Chaos and Mixed-Mode Oscillations in Pernarowski Model of Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Haniyeh

    Pancreatic beta-cells produce insulin to regularize the blood glucose level. Bursting is important in beta cells due to its relation to the release of insulin. Pernarowski model is a simple polynomial model of beta-cell activities indicating bursting oscillations in these cells. This paper presents bursting behaviors of symmetric type in this model. In addition, it is shown that the current system exhibits the phenomenon of period doubling cascades of canards which is a route to chaos. Canards are also observed symmetrically near folds of slow manifold which results in a chaotic transition between n and n + 1 spikes symmetric bursting. Furthermore, mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) and combination of symmetric bursting together with MMOs are illustrated during the transition between symmetric bursting and continuous spiking.

  6. Beta-cell metabolic alterations under chronic nutrient overload in rat and human islets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to assess multifactorial Beta-cell responses to metabolic perturbations in primary rat and human islets. Treatment of dispersed rat islet cells with elevated glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs, oleate:palmitate = 1:1 v/v) resulted in increases in the size and the number of ...

  7. Expression of calbindin-D(28k) in a pancreatic islet beta-cell line protects against cytokine-induced apoptosis and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitch, A; Suarez-Pinzon, W L; Sooy, K; Strynadka, K; Christakos, S

    2001-08-01

    Cytokines produced by immune system cells that infiltrate pancreatic islets are candidate mediators of islet beta-cell destruction in autoimmune (type 1) diabetes mellitus. Because the calcium binding protein, calbindin-D(28k), can prevent apoptotic cell death in different cell types, we investigated the possibility that calbindin-D(28k) may prevent cytokine-mediated islet beta-cell destruction. Using the expression vector BSRalpha, rat calbindin-D(28k) was stably expressed in the pancreatic islet beta-cell line, betaTC-3. Calbindin-D(28k) expression resulted in increased cell survival in the presence of the cytotoxic combination of the cytokines IL-1beta (30 U/ml), TNFalpha (10(3) U/ml), and interferon gamma (10(3) U/ml). The greatest protection was observed in the betaTC-3 cell clone expressing the highest concentration of calbindin-D(28k). Apoptotic cell death was detected by annexin V staining and by the TdT-mediated dUTP-X nick end labeling assay in vector-transfected betaTC-3 cells incubated with cytokines (14-15% apoptotic cells). The number of apoptotic cells was significantly decreased in calbindin-D(28k)-overexpressing betaTC-3 cells incubated with cytokines (5-6% apoptotic cells). To address the mechanism of the antiapoptotic effects of calbindin, studies were done to examine whether calbindin inhibits free radical formation. The stimulatory effects of the cytokines on lipid hydroperoxide, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite production were significantly decreased in the calbindin-D(28k)-expressing betaTC-3 cells. Our findings indicate that calbindin-D(28k), by inhibiting free radical formation, can protect against cytokine-mediated apoptosis and destruction of beta-cells. These findings suggest that calbindin-D(28k) may be an important regulator of cell death that can protect pancreatic islet beta-cells from autoimmune destruction in type 1 diabetes.

  8. Induction of beta-cell resistance to hypoxia and technologies for oxygen delivery to transplanted pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Lazard, Daniel; Vardi, Pnina; Bloch, Konstantin

    2012-09-01

    Hypoxia is believed to be a crucial factor involved in cell adaptation to environmental stress. Islet transplantation, especially with immunoisolated islets, interrupts vascular connections, resulting in the substantially decreased delivery of oxygen and nutrients to islet cells. Insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells are known to be highly susceptible to oxygen deficiency. Such susceptibility to hypoxia is believed to be one of the main causes of beta-cell death in the post-transplantation period. Different strategies have been developed for the protection of beta cells against hypoxic injury and for oxygen delivery to transplanted islets. The enhancement of beta-cell defense properties against hypoxia has been achieved using various techniques such as gene transfection, drug supplementation, co-culturing with stem cells and cell selection. Technologies for oxygen delivery to transplanted islets include local neovascularization of subcutaneous sites, electrochemical and photosynthetic oxygen generation, oxygen refuelling of bio-artificial pancreas and whole body oxygenation by using hyperbaric therapy. Progress in the field of oxygen technologies for islet transplantation requires a multidisciplinary approach to explore and optimize the interaction between components of the biological system and different technological processes. This review article focuses mainly on the recently developed strategies for oxygenation and protection from hypoxic injury - to achieve stable and long-term normoglycaemia in diabetic patients with transplanted pancreatic islets. PMID:22389124

  9. Evidence that an isoform of calpain-10 is a regulator of exocytosis in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Catriona; Hitman, Graham A; Partridge, Christopher J; Clark, Anne; Ma, Hong; Shearer, Thomas R; Turner, Mark D

    2005-01-01

    Calpain-10 (CAPN10) is the first type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene to be identified through a genome scan, with polymorphisms being associated with altered CAPN10 expression. Functional data have been hitherto elusive, but we report here a corresponding increase between CAPN10 expression level and regulated insulin secretion. Pancreatic beta-cell secretory granule exocytosis is mediated by the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment receptor protein complex of synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), syntaxin 1, and vesicle-associated membrane protein 2. We report, for the first time, direct binding of a calpain-10 isoform with members of this complex. Furthermore, SNAP-25 undergoes a Ca2+-dependent partial proteolysis during exocytosis, with calpain protease inhibitor similarly suppressing both insulin secretion and SNAP-25 proteolysis. Based upon these findings, we postulate that an isoform of calpain-10 is a Ca2+-sensor that functions to trigger exocytosis in pancreatic beta-cells.

  10. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels. PMID:19160674

  11. Measuring phospholipase D activity in insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and insulin-responsive muscle cells and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Cazzolli, Rosanna; Huang, Ping; Teng, Shuzhi; Hughes, William E

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is an enzyme producing phosphatidic acid and choline through hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine. The enzyme has been identified as a member of a variety of signal transduction cascades and as a key regulator of numerous intracellular vesicle trafficking processes. A role for PLD in regulating glucose homeostasis is emerging as the enzyme has recently been identified in events regulating exocytosis of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells and also in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake through controlling GLUT4 vesicle exocytosis in muscle and adipose tissue. We present methodologies for assessing cellular PLD activity in secretagogue-stimulated insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells and also insulin-stimulated adipocyte and muscle cells, two of the principal insulin-responsive cell types controlling blood glucose levels.

  12. GTP- and GDP-Dependent Rab27a Effectors in Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2015-01-01

    Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) participate in a wide variety of cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and intracellular transport. Conventionally, only the guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-bound small GTPase interacts with effector proteins, and the resulting downstream signals control specific cellular functions. Therefore, the GTP-bound form is regarded as active, and the focus has been on searching for proteins that bind the GTP form to look for their effectors. The Rab family small GTPase Rab27a is highly expressed in some secretory cells and is involved in the control of membrane traffic. The present study reviews recent progress in our understanding of the roles of Rab27a and its effectors in pancreatic beta-cells. In the basal state, GTP-bound Rab27a controls insulin secretion at pre-exocytic stages via its GTP-dependent effectors. We previously identified novel guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-bound Rab27-interacting proteins. Interestingly, GDP-bound Rab27a controls endocytosis of the secretory membrane via its interaction with these proteins. We also demonstrated that the insulin secretagogue glucose converts Rab27a from its GTP- to GDP-bound forms. Thus, GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate pre-exocytic and endocytic stages in membrane traffic, respectively. Since the physiological importance of GDP-bound GTPases has been largely overlooked, we consider that the investigation of GDP-dependent effectors for other GTPases is necessary for further understanding of cellular function.

  13. A high-throughput chemical screen reveals that harmine-mediated inhibition of DYRK1A increases human pancreatic beta cell replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F

    2015-04-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both ultimately result from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with a peak percentage (∼2%) engaged in the cell cycle in the first year of life. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication is barely detectable. Whereas beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts. Hence, there remains an urgent need for antidiabetic therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, using a high-throughput small-molecule screen (HTS), we find that analogs of the small molecule harmine function as a new class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds. We also define dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine and the nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation and differentiation. Using three different mouse and human islet in vivo-based models, we show that harmine is able to induce beta cell proliferation, increase islet mass and improve glycemic control. These observations suggest that harmine analogs may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing the potency and beta cell specificity of these compounds are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  14. Overexpression of IRS2 in isolated pancreatic islets causes proliferation and protects human {beta}-cells from hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, S.; Spinas, G.A.; Maedler, K.; Zuellig, R.A.; Lehmann, R.; Donath, M.Y.; Trueb, T.; Niessen, M. . E-mail: markus.niessen@usz.ch

    2005-02-01

    Studies in vivo indicate that IRS2 plays an important role in maintaining functional {beta}-cell mass. To investigate if IRS2 autonomously affects {beta}-cells, we have studied proliferation, apoptosis, and {beta}-cell function in isolated rat and human islets after overexpression of IRS2 or IRS1. We found that {beta}-cell proliferation was significantly increased in rat islets overexpressing IRS2 while IRS1 was less effective. Moreover, proliferation of a {beta}-cell line, INS-1, was decreased after repression of Irs2 expression using RNA oligonucleotides. Overexpression of IRS2 in human islets significantly decreased apoptosis of {beta}-cells, induced by 33.3 mM D-glucose. However, IRS2 did not protect cultured rat islets against apoptosis in the presence of 0.5 mM palmitic acid. Overexpression of IRS2 in isolated rat islets significantly increased basal and D-glucose-stimulated insulin secretion as determined in perifusion experiments. Therefore, IRS2 is sufficient to induce proliferation in rat islets and to protect human {beta}-cells from D-glucose-induced apoptosis. In addition, IRS2 can improve {beta}-cell function. Our results indicate that IRS2 acts autonomously in {beta}-cells in maintenance and expansion of functional {beta}-cell mass in vivo.

  15. Transforming growth factor-beta/Smad3 signaling regulates insulin gene transcription and pancreatic islet beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Min; Lee, Ji-Hyeon; Yadav, Hariom; Kamaraju, Anil K; Liu, Eric; Zhigang, Duan; Vieira, Anthony; Kim, Seong-Jin; Collins, Heather; Matschinsky, Franz; Harlan, David M; Roberts, Anita B; Rane, Sushil G

    2009-05-01

    Pancreatic islet beta-cell dysfunction is a signature feature of Type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. Consequently, knowledge of signals that regulate beta-cell function is of immense clinical relevance. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling plays a critical role in pancreatic development although the role of this pathway in the adult pancreas is obscure. Here, we define an important role of the TGF-beta pathway in regulation of insulin gene transcription and beta-cell function. We identify insulin as a TGF-beta target gene and show that the TGF-beta signaling effector Smad3 occupies the insulin gene promoter and represses insulin gene transcription. In contrast, Smad3 small interfering RNAs relieve insulin transcriptional repression and enhance insulin levels. Transduction of adenoviral Smad3 into primary human and non-human primate islets suppresses insulin content, whereas, dominant-negative Smad3 enhances insulin levels. Consistent with this, Smad3-deficient mice exhibit moderate hyperinsulinemia and mild hypoglycemia. Moreover, Smad3 deficiency results in improved glucose tolerance and enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo. In ex vivo perifusion assays, Smad3-deficient islets exhibit improved glucose-stimulated insulin release. Interestingly, Smad3-deficient islets harbor an activated insulin-receptor signaling pathway and TGF-beta signaling regulates expression of genes involved in beta-cell function. Together, these studies emphasize TGF-beta/Smad3 signaling as an important regulator of insulin gene transcription and beta-cell function and suggest that components of the TGF-beta signaling pathway may be dysregulated in diabetes.

  16. MicroRNA Expression in Alpha and Beta Cells of Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Nancy; Rosero, Samuel; Piroso, Julieta; Ichii, Hirohito; Umland, Oliver; Zhijie, Jiang; Tsinoremas, Nicholas; Ricordi, Camillo; Inverardi, Luca; Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Pastori, Ricardo L.

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in pancreatic development and adult β-cell physiology. Our hypothesis is based on the assumption that each islet cell type has a specific pattern of miRNA expression. We sought to determine the profile of miRNA expression in α-and β-cells, the main components of pancreatic islets, because this analysis may lead to a better understanding of islet gene regulatory pathways. Highly enriched (>98%) subsets of human α-and β-cells were obtained by flow cytometric sorting after intracellular staining with c-peptide and glucagon antibody. The method of sorting based on intracellular staining is possible because miRNAs are stable after fixation. MiRNA expression levels were determined by quantitative high throughput PCR-based miRNA array platform screening. Most of the miRNAs were preferentially expressed in β-cells. From the total of 667 miRNAs screened, the Significant Analysis of Microarray identified 141 miRNAs, of which only 7 were expressed more in α-cells (α-miRNAs) and 134 were expressed more in β-cells (β-miRNAs). Bioinformatic analysis identified potential targets of β-miRNAs analyzing the Beta Cell Gene Atlas, described in the T1Dbase, the web platform, supporting the type 1 diabetes (T1D) community. cMaf, a transcription factor regulating glucagon expression expressed selectively in α-cells (TFα) is targeted by β-miRNAs; miR-200c, miR-125b and miR-182. Min6 cells treated with inhibitors of these miRNAs show an increased expression of cMaf RNA. Conversely, over expression of miR-200c, miR-125b or miR-182 in the mouse alpha cell line αTC6 decreases the level of cMAF mRNA and protein. MiR-200c also inhibits the expression of Zfpm2, a TFα that inhibits the PI3K signaling pathway, at both RNA and protein levels. In conclusion, we identified miRNAs differentially expressed in pancreatic α- and β-cells and their potential transcription factor targets that could add new insights into different aspects of islet

  17. Whole organism high content screening identifies stimulators of pancreatic beta-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Naoki; Ninov, Nikolay; Delawary, Mina; Osman, Sahar; Roh, Alex S; Gut, Philipp; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2014-01-01

    Inducing beta-cell mass expansion in diabetic patients with the aim to restore glucose homeostasis is a promising therapeutic strategy. Although several in vitro studies have been carried out to identify modulators of beta-cell mass expansion, restoring endogenous beta-cell mass in vivo has yet to be achieved. To identify potential stimulators of beta-cell replication in vivo, we established transgenic zebrafish lines that monitor and allow the quantification of cell proliferation by using the fluorescent ubiquitylation-based cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) technology. Using these new reagents, we performed an unbiased chemical screen, and identified 20 small molecules that markedly increased beta-cell proliferation in vivo. Importantly, these structurally distinct molecules, which include clinically-approved drugs, modulate three specific signaling pathways: serotonin, retinoic acid and glucocorticoids, showing the high sensitivity and robustness of our screen. Notably, two drug classes, retinoic acid and glucocorticoids, also promoted beta-cell regeneration after beta-cell ablation. Thus, this study establishes a proof of principle for a high-throughput small molecule-screen for beta-cell proliferation in vivo, and identified compounds that stimulate beta-cell proliferation and regeneration.

  18. MST1 is a novel regulator of apoptosis in pancreatic beta-cells

    PubMed Central

    Ardestani, Amin; Khobragade, Vrushali; Yuan, Ting; Frogne, Thomas; Tao, Wufan; Oberholzer, Jose; Pattou, Francois; Conte, Julie Kerr; Maedler, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is a hallmark of the loss of insulin producing beta-cells in all forms of diabetes mellitus. Current treatment fails to halt the decline in functional beta-cell mass. Strategies to prevent beta-cell apoptosis and dysfunction are urgently needed. Here, we identified Mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) as a critical regulator of apoptotic beta-cell death and function. MST1 was strongly activated in beta-cells under diabetogenic conditions and correlated with beta-cell apoptosis. MST1 specifically induced the mitochondrial-dependent pathway of apoptosis in beta-cells through up-regulation of the BH3-only protein Bim. MST1 directly phosphorylated PDX1 at Thr11, resulting in its ubiquitination, degradation and impaired insulin secretion. Mst1 deficiency completely restored normoglycemia, beta-cell function and survival in vitro and in vivo. We show MST1 as novel pro-apoptotic kinase and key mediator of apoptotic signaling and beta-cell dysfunction, which may serve as target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. PMID:24633305

  19. Nkx6.1 is essential for maintaining the functional state of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brandon L; Liu, Fen-Fen; Sander, Maike

    2013-09-26

    Recently, loss of beta-cell-specific traits has been proposed as an early cause of beta cell failure in diabetes. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the loss of beta cell features remain unclear. Here, we identify an Nkx6.1-controlled gene regulatory network as essential for maintaining the functional and molecular traits of mature beta cells. Conditional Nkx6.1 inactivation in adult mice caused rapid-onset diabetes and hypoinsulinemia. Genome-wide analysis of Nkx6.1-regulated genes and functional assays further revealed a critical role for Nkx6.1 in the control of insulin biosynthesis, insulin secretion, and beta cell proliferation. Over time, Nkx6.1-deficient beta cells acquired molecular characteristics of delta cells, revealing a molecular link between impaired beta cell functional properties and loss of cell identity. Given that Nkx6.1 levels are reduced in human type 2 diabetic beta cells, our study lends support to the concept that loss of beta cell features could contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes. PMID:24035389

  20. Inorganic mercury causes pancreatic beta-cell death via the oxidative stress-induced apoptotic and necrotic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yawen; Huang Chunfa; Yang Chingyao; Yen Chengchieh; Tsai Kehsung; Liu Shinghwa

    2010-03-15

    Mercury is a well-known highly toxic metal. In this study, we characterize and investigate the cytotoxicity and its possible mechanisms of inorganic mercury in pancreatic beta-cells. Mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) dose-dependently decreased the function of insulin secretion and cell viability in pancreatic beta-cell-derived HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. HgCl{sub 2} significantly increased ROS formation in HIT-T15 cells. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine effectively reversed HgCl{sub 2}-induced insulin secretion dysfunction in HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. Moreover, HgCl{sub 2} increased sub-G1 hypodiploids and annexin-V binding in HIT-T15 cells, indicating that HgCl{sub 2} possessed ability in apoptosis induction. HgCl{sub 2} also displayed several features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals including disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increase of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and activations of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. Exposure of HIT-T15 cells to HgCl{sub 2} could significantly increase both apoptotic and necrotic cell populations by acridine orange/ethidium bromide dual staining. Meanwhile, HgCl{sub 2} could also trigger the depletion of intracellular ATP levels and increase the LDH release from HIT-T15 cells. These HgCl{sub 2}-induced cell death-related signals could be significantly reversed by N-acetylcysteine. The intracellular mercury levels were markedly elevated in HgCl{sub 2}-treated HIT-T15 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that HgCl{sub 2}-induced oxidative stress causes pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and cytotoxicity involved the co-existence of apoptotic and necrotic cell death.

  1. Treatment with CNX-011-67, a novel GPR40 agonist, delays onset and progression of diabetes and improves beta cell preservation and function in male ZDF rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of G protein-coupled receptor (GPR40), which is highly expressed in pancreatic beta cells, has been studied extensively in the amelioration of beta cell dysfunction in T2D using rat and mouse islets, beta cell lines and in animal models of diabetes. But its potential as a therapeutic target has not been fully explored. This aim of the study is to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CNX-011-67, a highly selective, potent and orally bioavailable GPR40 agonist, in controlling diabetes and other metabolic parameters. Methods Seven week old male ZDF rats were treated with either vehicle or CNX-011-67, 5 mg/kg twice daily, for seven weeks. The animals were subjected to oral glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance tests. Plasma glucose, insulin, triglyceride, HbA1c, fructosamine and free fatty acids were measured at selected time points. Pancreas from control and treated animals were subjected to insulin and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) immunohistochemistry and were also evaluated by electron microscopy. Also the potential impact of CNX-011-67 on islet insulin secretion, content, ATP levels and markers of both glucose oxidation, beta cell health in rat islets under chronic glucolipotoxic conditions was evaluated. Results Treatment of male ZDF rats with CNX-011-67 for 7 weeks significantly enhanced insulin secretion in response to oral glucose load, delayed the onset of fasting hyperglycemia by 3 weeks, reduced nonfasting glucose excursions, fasting free fatty acids and triglyceride levels. A significant increase in PDX1 expression and insulin content and reduction in plasma fructosamine, HOMA-IR, and beta cell apoptosis were observed. CNX-011-67 improves glucose mediated insulin secretion, insulin gene transcription and islet insulin content in cultured rat islets under chronic glucolipotoxic condition. Also enhanced glucose oxidation in the form of increased islet ATP content and overall improvement in beta cell health in the form of

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Links Oxidative Stress to Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function Caused by Human Oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Valérie; Brajkovic, Saška; Tenenbaum, Mathie; Favre, Dimitri; Ezanno, Hélène; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonner, Caroline; Gmyr, Valéry; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gauthier, Benoit R; Widmann, Christian; Waeber, Gérard; Pattou, François; Froguel, Philippe; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of the pro-atherogenic oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) triggers adverse effects in pancreatic beta-cells and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key player coupling oxidative stress to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by human oxidized LDL. We found that human oxidized LDL activates ER stress as evidenced by the activation of the inositol requiring 1α, and the elevated expression of both DDIT3 (also called CHOP) and DNAJC3 (also called P58IPK) ER stress markers in isolated human islets and the mouse insulin secreting MIN6 cells. Silencing of Chop and inhibition of ER stress markers by the chemical chaperone phenyl butyric acid (PBA) prevented cell death caused by oxidized LDL. Finally, we found that oxidative stress accounts for activation of ER stress markers induced by oxidized LDL. Induction of Chop/CHOP and p58IPK/P58IPK by oxidized LDL was mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and was blocked by co-treatment with the N-acetylcystein antioxidant. As a conclusion, the harmful effects of oxidized LDL in beta-cells requires ER stress activation in a manner that involves oxidative stress. This mechanism may account for impaired beta-cell function in diabetes and can be reversed by antioxidant treatment. PMID:27636901

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Links Oxidative Stress to Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function Caused by Human Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Dimitri; Ezanno, Hélène; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonner, Caroline; Gmyr, Valéry; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Widmann, Christian; Waeber, Gérard; Pattou, François; Froguel, Philippe; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of the pro-atherogenic oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) triggers adverse effects in pancreatic beta-cells and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key player coupling oxidative stress to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by human oxidized LDL. We found that human oxidized LDL activates ER stress as evidenced by the activation of the inositol requiring 1α, and the elevated expression of both DDIT3 (also called CHOP) and DNAJC3 (also called P58IPK) ER stress markers in isolated human islets and the mouse insulin secreting MIN6 cells. Silencing of Chop and inhibition of ER stress markers by the chemical chaperone phenyl butyric acid (PBA) prevented cell death caused by oxidized LDL. Finally, we found that oxidative stress accounts for activation of ER stress markers induced by oxidized LDL. Induction of Chop/CHOP and p58IPK/P58IPK by oxidized LDL was mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and was blocked by co-treatment with the N-acetylcystein antioxidant. As a conclusion, the harmful effects of oxidized LDL in beta-cells requires ER stress activation in a manner that involves oxidative stress. This mechanism may account for impaired beta-cell function in diabetes and can be reversed by antioxidant treatment. PMID:27636901

  4. Loss of TRB3 alters dynamics of MLK3-JNK signaling and inhibits cytokine-activated pancreatic beta cell death.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Rohan K; Ray, Anamika; Gonuguntla, Sumati; Hao, Ergeng; Jhala, Ulupi S

    2014-10-24

    Disabling cellular defense mechanisms is essential for induction of apoptosis. We have previously shown that cytokine-mediated activation of the MAP3K MLK3 stabilizes TRB3 protein levels to inhibit AKT and compromise beta cell survival. Here, we show that genetic deletion of TRB3 results in basal activation of AKT, preserves mitochondrial integrity, and confers resistance against cytokine-induced pancreatic beta cell death. Mechanistically, we find that TRB3 stabilizes MLK3, most likely by suppressing AKT-directed phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation of MLK3. Accordingly, TRB3(-/-) islets show a decrease in both the amplitude and duration of cytokine-stimulated MLK3 induction and JNK activation. It is well known that JNK signaling is facilitated by a feed forward loop of sequential kinase phosphorylation and is reinforced by a mutual stabilization of the module components. The failure of TRB3(-/-) islets to mount an optimal JNK activation response, coupled with the ability of TRB3 to engage and maintain steady state levels of MLK3, recasts TRB3 as an integral functional component of the JNK module in pancreatic beta cells. PMID:25204656

  5. A survival Kit for pancreatic beta cells: stem cell factor and c-Kit receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhi-Chao; Riopel, Matthew; Popell, Alex; Wang, Rennian

    2015-04-01

    The interactions between c-Kit and its ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), play an important role in haematopoiesis, pigmentation and gametogenesis. c-Kit is also found in the pancreas, and recent studies have revealed that c-Kit marks a subpopulation of highly proliferative pancreatic endocrine cells that may harbour islet precursors. c-Kit governs and maintains pancreatic endocrine cell maturation and function via multiple signalling pathways. In this review we address the importance of c-Kit signalling within the pancreas, including its profound role in islet morphogenesis, islet vascularisation, and beta cell survival and function. We also discuss the impact of c-Kit signalling in pancreatic disease and the use of c-Kit as a potential target for the development of cell-based and novel drug therapies in the treatment of diabetes.

  6. Long-term pancreatic beta cell exposure to high levels of glucose but not palmitate induces DNA methylation within the insulin gene promoter and represses transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kota; Tsunekawa, Shin; Ikeniwa, Makoto; Izumoto, Takako; Iida, Atsushi; Ogata, Hidetada; Uenishi, Eita; Seino, Yusuke; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Hamada, Yoji; Kuroda, Akio; Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated epigenetics in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Furthermore, DNA methylation, which irreversibly deactivates gene transcription, of the insulin promoter, particularly the cAMP response element, is increased in diabetes patients. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to investigate insulin promoter DNA methylation in an over-nutrition state. INS-1 cells, the rat pancreatic beta cell line, were cultured under normal-culture-glucose (11.2 mmol/l) or experimental-high-glucose (22.4 mmol/l) conditions for 14 days, with or without 0.4 mmol/l palmitate. DNA methylation of the rat insulin 1 gene (Ins1) promoter was investigated using bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing analysis. Experimental-high-glucose conditions significantly suppressed insulin mRNA and increased DNA methylation at all five CpG sites within the Ins1 promoter, including the cAMP response element, in a time-dependent and glucose concentration-dependent manner. DNA methylation under experimental-high-glucose conditions was unique to the Ins1 promoter; however, palmitate did not affect DNA methylation. Artificial methylation of Ins1 promoter significantly suppressed promoter-driven luciferase activity, and a DNA methylation inhibitor significantly improved insulin mRNA suppression by experimental-high-glucose conditions. Experimental-high-glucose conditions significantly increased DNA methyltransferase activity and decreased ten-eleven-translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase activity. Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress did not affect DNA methylation of the Ins1 promoter. High glucose but not palmitate increased ectopic triacylglycerol accumulation parallel to DNA methylation. Metformin upregulated insulin gene expression and suppressed DNA methylation and ectopic triacylglycerol accumulation. Finally, DNA methylation of the Ins1 promoter increased in isolated islets from Zucker diabetic fatty rats. This study helps to clarify the

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensitizes pancreatic beta cells to interleukin-1β-induced apoptosis via Bim/A1 imbalance.

    PubMed

    Miani, M; Barthson, J; Colli, M L; Brozzi, F; Cnop, M; Eizirik, D L

    2013-01-01

    We have recently shown that the crosstalk between mild endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and low concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β exacerbates beta cell inflammatory responses via the IRE1α/XBP1 pathway. We presently investigated whether mild ER stress also sensitizes beta cells to cytokine-induced apoptosis. Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced ER stress enhanced the IL-1β apoptosis in INS-1E and primary rat beta cells. This was not prevented by XBP1 knockdown (KD), indicating the dissociation between the pathways leading to inflammation and cell death. Analysis of the role of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in cytokine-induced apoptosis indicated a central role for the pro-apoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3)-only protein Bim (Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death), which was counteracted by four anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma-2) proteins, namely Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Mcl-1 and A1. CPA+IL-1β-induced beta cell apoptosis was accompanied by increased expression of Bim, particularly the most pro-apoptotic variant, small isoform of Bim (BimS), and decreased expression of A1. Bim silencing protected against CPA+IL-1β-induced apoptosis, whereas A1 KD aggravated cell death. Bim inhibition protected against cell death caused by A1 silencing under all conditions studied. In conclusion, mild ER stress predisposes beta cells to the pro-apoptotic effects of IL-1β by disrupting the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. These findings link ER stress to exacerbated apoptosis during islet inflammation and provide potential mechanistic targets for beta cell protection, namely downregulation of Bim and upregulation of A1. PMID:23828564

  8. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in pancreatic beta cells during the compensatory islet hyperplasia in prediabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Maschio, D A; Oliveira, R B; Santos, M R; Carvalho, C P F; Barbosa-Sampaio, H C L; Collares-Buzato, C B

    2016-09-30

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, also known as the canonical Wnt pathway, plays a role in cell proliferation and differentiation in several tissues/organs. It has been recently described in humans a relationship between type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and mutation in the gene encoding the transcription factor TCF7L2 associated to the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In the present study, we demonstrated that hyperplastic pancreatic islets from prediabetic mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 60 d displayed nuclear translocation of active β-catenin associated with significant increases in protein content and gene expression of β-catenin as well as of cyclins D1, D2 and c-Myc (target genes of the Wnt pathway) but not of Tcf7l2 (the transcription factor). Meanwhile, these alterations were not observed in pancreatic islets from 30 d HFD-fed mice, that do not display significant beta cell hyperplasia. These data suggest that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is activated in pancreatic islets during prediabetes and may play a role in the induction of the compensatory beta cell hyperplasia observed at early phase of T2DM. PMID:27576200

  9. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, S; Kushner, J A; Buchholz, B A; Meeker, A K; Stein, G M; Hsieh, M; Kirby, M; Pechhold, S; Liu, E H; Harlan, D M; Tisdale, J F

    2010-03-15

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). {sup 14}C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA {sup 14}C content relative to a well-established {sup 14}C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA {sup 14}C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  10. Inter-domain tagging implicates caveolin-1 in insulin receptor trafficking and Erk signaling bias in pancreatic beta-cells

    PubMed Central

    Boothe, Tobias; Lim, Gareth E.; Cen, Haoning; Skovsø, Søs; Piske, Micah; Li, Shu Nan; Nabi, Ivan R.; Gilon, Patrick; Johnson, James D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role and mechanisms of insulin receptor internalization remain incompletely understood. Previous trafficking studies of insulin receptors involved fluorescent protein tagging at their termini, manipulations that may be expected to result in dysfunctional receptors. Our objective was to determine the trafficking route and molecular mechanisms of functional tagged insulin receptors and endogenous insulin receptors in pancreatic beta-cells. Methods We generated functional insulin receptors tagged with pH-resistant fluorescent proteins between domains. Confocal, TIRF and STED imaging revealed a trafficking pattern of inter-domain tagged insulin receptors and endogenous insulin receptors detected with antibodies. Results Surprisingly, interdomain-tagged and endogenous insulin receptors in beta-cells bypassed classical Rab5a- or Rab7-mediated endocytic routes. Instead, we found that removal of insulin receptors from the plasma membrane involved tyrosine-phosphorylated caveolin-1, prior to trafficking within flotillin-1-positive structures to lysosomes. Multiple methods of inhibiting caveolin-1 significantly reduced Erk activation in vitro or in vivo, while leaving Akt signaling mostly intact. Conclusions We conclude that phosphorylated caveolin-1 plays a role in insulin receptor internalization towards lysosomes through flotillin-1-positive structures and that caveolin-1 helps bias physiological beta-cell insulin signaling towards Erk activation. PMID:27110488

  11. Neogenesis and proliferation of {beta}-cells induced by human betacellulin gene transduction via retrograde pancreatic duct injection of an adenovirus vector

    SciTech Connect

    Tokui, Yae . E-mail: ytokui@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kozawa, Junji; Yamagata, Kazuya; Zhang, Jun; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Okita, Kohei; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Namba, Mitsuyoshi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro |

    2006-12-01

    Betacellulin (BTC) has been shown to have a role in the differentiation and proliferation of {beta}-cells both in vitro and in vivo. We administered a human betacellulin (hBTC) adenovirus vector to male ICR mice via retrograde pancreatic duct injection. As a control, we administered a {beta}-galactosidase adenovirus vector. In the mice, hBTC protein was mainly overexpressed by pancreatic duct cells. On immunohistochemical analysis, we observed features of {beta}-cell neogenesis as newly formed insulin-positive cells in the duct cell lining or islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) closely associated with the ducts. The BrdU labeling index of {beta}-cells was also increased by the betacellulin vector compared with that of control mice. These results indicate that hBTC gene transduction into adult pancreatic duct cells promoted {beta}-cell differentiation (mainly from duct cells) and proliferation of pre-existing {beta}-cells, resulting in an increase of the {beta}-cell mass that improved glucose tolerance in diabetic mice.

  12. ER stress and the decline and fall of pancreatic beta cells in type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Brozzi, Flora

    2016-01-01

    Components of the unfolded protein response (UPR) modulate beta cell inflammation and death in early type 1 diabetes (T1D). The UPR is a mechanism by which cells react to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It aims to restore cellular homeostasis, but in case of chronic or overwhelming ER stress the persistent activation of the UPR triggers apoptosis, contributing to the loss of beta cells in both T1D and type 2 diabetes. It remains to be determined how and why the transition from ‘physiological’ to ‘pathological’ UPR takes place. A key component of the UPR is the ER transmembrane protein IRE1α (inositol-requiring enzyme 1α). IRE1α activity is modulated by both intra-ER signals and by the formation of protein complexes at its cytosolic domain. The amplitude and duration of IRE1α signaling is critical for the transition between the adaptive and cell death programs, with particular relevance for the activation of the pro-apoptotic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in beta cells. In the present review we discuss the available information on IRE1α-regulating proteins in beta cells and their downstream targets, and the important differences observed between cytokine-induced UPR in human and rodent beta cells. PMID:26899404

  13. Beneficial effect of 17{beta}-estradiol on hyperglycemia and islet {beta}-cell functions in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Yamabe, Noriko; Kang, Ki Sung; Zhu Baoting

    2010-11-15

    The modulating effect of estrogen on glucose homeostasis remains a controversial issue at present. In this study, we sought to determine the beneficial effect of 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) on hyperglycemia and islet {beta}-cell functions in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.p. with STZ to induce a relatively mild diabetic condition. The rats were then treated with E{sub 2} orally at 500 {mu}g/kg body weight/day for 15 days to evaluate the modulating effect on hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, and islet {beta}-cell proliferation. E{sub 2} administration for 10 days significantly lowered plasma glucose levels, increased plasma insulin levels, and improved glucose tolerance by attenuating insulin response to oral glucose loading. These beneficial effects of E{sub 2} were accompanied by increases in islet number and volume, rate of islet cell proliferation, and the amount of insulin secreted. The growth-stimulatory effect of E{sub 2} on islet cells was linked to the functions of the estrogen receptor {alpha}. Notably, these protective effects of E{sub 2} on diabetic conditions were basically not observed when the STZ-treated rats had a more severe degree of islet damage and hyperglycemia. Taken together, we conclude that E{sub 2} can promote the regeneration of damaged pancreatic islets by stimulating {beta}-cell proliferation in diabetic rats, and this effect is accompanied by improvements in glucose tolerance and a decrease in plasma glucose levels. These findings suggest that oral administration of E{sub 2} may be beneficial in diabetic patients with an accelerated loss of islet {beta}-cells.

  14. Baculovirus p35 increases pancreatic {beta}-cell resistance to apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollander, Kenneth; Bar-Chen, Michal; Efrat, Shimon . E-mail: sefrat@post.tau.ac.il

    2005-07-01

    {beta}-cells die by apoptosis in type 1 diabetes as a result of autoimmune attack mediated by cytokines, and in type 2 diabetes by various perpetrators including human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP). The cascade of apoptotic events induced by cytokines and hIAPP is mediated through caspases and reactive oxygen species. The baculovirus p35 protein is a potent anti-apoptotic agent shown to be effective in a variety of species and able to inhibit a number of apoptotic pathways. Here, we aimed at determining the protective potential of p35 in {beta}-cells exposed to cytokines and hIAPP, as well as the effects of p35 on {beta}-cell function. The p35 gene was introduced into {beta}TC-tet cells, a differentiated murine {beta}-cell line capable of undergoing inducible growth-arrest. Both proliferating and growth-arrested cells expressing p35 manifested increased resistance to cytokines and hIAPP, compared with control cells, as judged by cell viability, DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3 activity assays. p35 was significantly more protective in growth-arrested, compared with proliferating, cells. No significant differences were observed in proliferation and insulin content between cells expressing p35 and control cells. In contrast, p35 manifested a perturbing effect on glucose-induced insulin secretion. These findings suggest that p35 could be incorporated as part of a multi-pronged approach of immunoprotective strategies to provide protection from recurring autoimmunity for transplanted {beta}-cells, as well as in preventive gene therapy in type 1 diabetes. p35 may also be protective from {beta}-cell damage caused by hIAPP in type 2 diabetes.

  15. Restoring Mitochondrial Function: A Small Molecule-mediated Approach to Enhance Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Cholesterol Accumulated Pancreatic beta cells

    PubMed Central

    Asalla, Suman; Girada, Shravan Babu; Kuna, Ramya S.; Chowdhury, Debabrata; Kandagatla, Bhaskar; Oruganti, Srinivas; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Kalivendi, Shasi Vardhan; Rao, Swetha Pavani; Row, Anupama; Ibrahim, A; Ghosh, Partha Pratim; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2016-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, particularly the elevated serum cholesterol levels, aggravate the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. In the present study we explored the relationship between fasting blood sugar and serum lipid parameters in human volunteers which revealed a significant linear effect of serum cholesterol on fasting blood glucose. Short term feeding of cholesterol enriched diet to rodent model resulted in elevated serum cholesterol levels, cholesterol accumulation in pancreatic islets and hyperinsulinemia with modest increase in plasma glucose level. To explore the mechanism, we treated cultured BRIN-BD11 pancreatic beta cells with soluble cholesterol. Our data shows that cholesterol treatment of cultured pancreatic beta cells enhances total cellular cholesterol. While one hour cholesterol exposure enhances insulin exocytosis, overnight cholesterol accumulation in cultured pancreatic beta cells affects cellular respiration, and inhibits Glucose stimulated insulin secretion. We further report that (E)-4-Chloro-2-(1-(2-(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) hydrazono) ethyl) phenol (small molecule M1) prevents the cholesterol mediated blunting of cellular respiration and potentiates Glucose stimulated insulin secretion which was abolished in pancreatic beta cells on cholesterol accumulation. PMID:27282931

  16. Trophic effects of vanadium on beta-cells of STZ-induced insulin dependent diabetic rats & evidence for long-term relief of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, G A; Sotoodeh, M; Omrani, G R

    1999-08-01

    The effects of one year combined vanadium and insulin treatment (VIT) on blood glucose levels of insulin dependent diabetic (IDD) rats were studied. Rats made diabetic by an i.v. injection of 55-60 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ), divided into two groups and treated with a low dose of NPH insulin (2-4 U/rat) for two months to survive from hyperglycaemic shock. In group A, hyperglycaemia ameliorated during one year by increasing the daily dose of insulin to 8.2 +/- 0.4 U/100 g (IT) and in group B by switching over to hydrated vanadium solution (1 mg/ml vanadyl oxide sulphate pentahydrate in drinking water; VIT). The results of the study indicated that one year VIT regenerated new beta-cells, and relieved diabetes both during treatment and after withdrawal. However, one year IT showed no trophic effects on the destroyed beta-cells, hence no improvement in the glycaemic status of the animal was seen after withdrawal. The action of VIT was such that in group B normoglycaemeia persisted in 90 per cent of diabetic rats two weeks after insulin withdrawal. But in the same group, 45 days after combined vanadium and insulin withdrawal blood glucose was normal in 60 per cent of the rats, it was between 250-300 mg/dl in 18 per cent and between 350-400 mg/dl in 24 per cent of the rats. In conclusion it appears that long term VIT regenerates pancreatic beta-cells of IDD rats and possibly by improving their secretory functions it relieves diabetes mellitus.

  17. JunB Inhibits ER Stress and Apoptosis in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gurzov, Esteban N.; Ortis, Fernanda; Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F.; Eizirik, Decio L.

    2008-01-01

    Cytokines contribute to pancreatic β-cell apoptosis in type 1 diabetes (T1D) by modulation of β-cell gene expression networks. The transcription factor Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) is a key regulator of inflammation and apoptosis. We presently evaluated the function of the AP-1 subunit JunB in cytokine-mediated β-cell dysfunction and death. The cytokines IL-1β+IFN-γ induced an early and transitory upregulation of JunB by NF-κB activation. Knockdown of JunB by RNA interference increased cytokine-mediated expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, leading to increased apoptosis in an insulin-producing cell line (INS-1E) and in purified rat primary β-cells. JunB knockdown β-cells and junB−/− fibroblasts were also more sensitive to the chemical ER stressor cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). Conversely, adenoviral-mediated overexpression of JunB diminished iNOS and ER markers expression and protected β-cells from cytokine-induced cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel and unexpected role for JunB as a regulator of defense mechanisms against cytokine- and ER stress-mediated apoptosis. PMID:18716665

  18. LGR5 and Nanog identify stem cell signature of pancreas beta cells which initiate pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Polin, Nava; Givol, David

    2013-04-01

    Pancreas cancer, is the fourth leading cause of cancer death but its cell of origin is controversial. We compared the localization of stem cells in normal and cancerous pancreas using antibodies to the stem cell markers Nanog and LGR5. Here we show, for the first time, that LGR5 is expressed in normal pancreas, exclusively in the islets of Langerhans and it is co-localized, surprisingly, with Nanog and insulin in clusters of beta cells. In cancerous pancreas Nanog and LGR5 are expressed in the remaining islets and in all ductal cancer cells. We observed insulin staining among the ductal cancer cells, but not in metastases. This indicates that the islet's beta cells, expressing LGR5 and Nanog markers are the initiating cells of pancreas cancer, which migrated from the islets to form the ductal cancerous tissue, probably after mutation and de-differentiation. This discovery may facilitate treatment of this devastating cancer.

  19. Dynamics of glucose-induced membrane recruitment of protein kinase C beta II in living pancreatic islet beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Paolo; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ainscow, Edward K; Pozzan, Tullio; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms by which glucose may affect protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the pancreatic islet beta-cell are presently unclear. By developing adenovirally expressed chimeras encoding fusion proteins between green fluorescent protein and conventional (betaII), novel (delta), or atypical (zeta) PKCs, we show that glucose selectively alters the subcellular localization of these enzymes dynamically in primary islet and MIN6 beta-cells. Examined by laser scanning confocal or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, elevated glucose concentrations induced oscillatory translocations of PKCbetaII to spatially confined regions of the plasma membrane. Suggesting that increases in free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](c)) were primarily responsible, prevention of [Ca(2+)](c) increases with EGTA or diazoxide completely eliminated membrane recruitment, whereas elevation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)](c) with KCl or tolbutamide was highly effective in redistributing PKCbetaII both to the plasma membrane and to the surface of dense core secretory vesicles. By contrast, the distribution of PKCdelta.EGFP, which binds diacylglycerol but not Ca(2+), was unaffected by glucose. Measurement of [Ca(2+)](c) immediately beneath the plasma membrane with a ratiometric "pericam," fused to synaptic vesicle-associated protein-25, revealed that depolarization induced significantly larger increases in [Ca(2+)](c) in this domain. These data demonstrate that nutrient stimulation of beta-cells causes spatially and temporally complex changes in the subcellular localization of PKCbetaII, possibly resulting from the generation of Ca(2+) microdomains. Localized changes in PKCbetaII activity may thus have a role in the spatial control of insulin exocytosis.

  20. Over-expression of ZnT7 increases insulin synthesis and secretion in pancreatic beta-cells by promoting insulin gene transcription

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mechanism by which zinc regulates insulin synthesis and secretion in pancreatic beta-cells is still unclear. Cellular zinc homeostasis is largely maintained by zinc transporters and intracellular zinc binding proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that zinc transporter 7 (ZnT7, Slc30a7) was co...

  1. Glucose metabolism and glutamate analog acutely alkalinize pH of insulin secretory vesicles of pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Eto, Kazuhiro; Yamashita, Tokuyuki; Hirose, Kenzo; Tsubamoto, Yoshiharu; Ainscow, Edward K; Rutter, Guy A; Kimura, Satoshi; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Iino, Masamitsu; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    We studied acute changes of secretory vesicle pH in pancreatic beta-cells with a fluorescent pH indicator, lysosensor green DND-189. Fluorescence was decreased by 0.66 +/- 0.10% at 149 +/- 16 s with 22.2 mM glucose stimulation, indicating that vesicular pH was alkalinized by approximately 0.016 unit. Glucose-responsive pH increase was observed when cytosolic Ca2+ influx was blocked but disappeared when an inhibitor of glycolysis or mitochondrial ATP synthase was present. Glutamate dimethyl ester (GME), a plasma membrane-permeable analog of glutamate, potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion at 5 mM without changing cellular ATP content or cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]). Application of GME at basal glucose concentration decreased DND-189 fluorescence by 0.83 +/- 0.19% at 38 +/- 2 s. These results indicated that the acutely alkalinizing effect of glucose on beta-cell secretory vesicle pH was dependent on glucose metabolism but independent of modulations of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Moreover, glutamate derived from glucose may be one of the mediators of this alkalinizing effect of glucose, which may have potential relevance to the alteration of secretory function by glutamate.

  2. Expression of neurexin, neuroligin, and their cytoplasmic binding partners in the pancreatic beta-cells and the involvement of neuroligin in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Arthur T; Comoletti, Davide; Waldrop, Megan A; Mosedale, Merrie; Egodage, Sonya; Taylor, Palmer; Chessler, Steven D

    2008-12-01

    The composition of the beta-cell exocytic machinery is very similar to that of neuronal synapses, and the developmental pathway of beta-cells and neurons substantially overlap. beta-Cells secrete gamma-aminobutyric acid and express proteins that, in the brain, are specific markers of inhibitory synapses. Recently, neuronal coculture experiments have identified three families of synaptic cell-surface molecules (neurexins, neuroligins, and SynCAM) that drive synapse formation in vitro and that control the differentiation of nascent synapses into either excitatory or inhibitory fully mature nerve terminals. The inhibitory synapse-like character of the beta-cells led us to hypothesize that members of these families of synapse-inducing adhesion molecules would be expressed in beta-cells and that the pattern of expression would resemble that associated with neuronal inhibitory synaptogenesis. Here, we describe beta-cell expression of the neuroligins, neurexins, and SynCAM, and show that neuroligin expression affects insulin secretion in INS-1 beta-cells and rat islet cells. Our findings demonstrate that neuroligins and neurexins are expressed outside the central nervous system and help confer an inhibitory synaptic-like phenotype onto the beta-cell surface. Analogous to their role in synaptic neurotransmission, neurexin-neuroligin interactions may play a role in the formation of the submembrane insulin secretory apparatus.

  3. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fridlyand, Leonid E; Philipson, Louis H

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA) (that act through the FFA receptors) on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of second messenger

  4. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA) (that act through the FFA receptors) on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of second messenger

  5. Glucose tolerance normalization following transplantation of pig pancreatic primordia into non-immunosuppressed diabetic ZDF rats.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sharon A; Chen, Feng; Talcott, Mike; Liapis, Helen; Hammerman, Marc R

    2006-11-01

    Pancreas or pancreatic islet transplantation in humans is limited by organ availability, and success of the latter is negatively impacted upon by tissue loss post-transplantation and limited potential for expansion of beta cells. A way to overcome the supply and expansion problems is to xenotransplant embryonic tissue. Previously, we have shown that beta cells originating from embryonic day (E) 28 (E28) pig pancreatic primordia transplanted into the mesentery of streptozotocin-diabetic (type 1) Lewis rats engraft without the need for host immune-suppression and normalize glucose tolerance. Here we show long-term engraftment of pig beta cells within liver, pancreas and mesenteric lymph nodes post-transplantation of E28 pig pancreatic primordia into diabetic ZDF rats, a model for type 2 diabetes. Porcine insulin is present in circulation after an oral glucose load. Glucose tolerance is normalized in transplanted ZDF hosts and insulin sensitivity restored in formerly diabetic ZDF males. Release of porcine insulin in vitro from tissue originating in transplanted rats occurs within 1 min of glucose stimulation characteristic of first-phase secretion from beta cells. Of potential importance for application of this transplantation technology to treatment of type 2 diabetes in humans and confirmatory of our previous findings in Lewis rats, no host immunosuppression is required for engraftment of E28 pig pancreatic primordia. PMID:17138051

  6. Regulatory roles for Tiam1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1, in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Veluthakal, Rajakrishnan; Madathilparambil, Suresh Vasu; McDonald, Phillip; Olson, Lawrence Karl; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2009-01-01

    Using various biochemical, pharmacological and molecular biological approaches, we have recently reported regulatory roles for Rac1, a small G-protein, in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, little is understood with respect to localization of, and regulation by, specific regulatory factors of Rac1 in GSIS. Herein, we investigated regulatory roles for Tiam1, a specific nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rac1, in GSIS in pancreatic beta-cells. Western blot analysis indicated that Tiam1 is predominantly cytosolic in distribution. NSC23766, a specific inhibitor of Tiam1-mediated activation of Rac1, markedly attenuated glucose-induced, but not KCl-induced insulin secretion in INS 832/13 cells and normal rat islets. Further, NSC23766 significantly reduced glucose-induced activation (i.e. GTP-bound form) and membrane association of Rac1 in INS 832/13 cells and rat islets. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knock-down of Tiam1 markedly inhibited glucose-induced membrane trafficking and activation of Rac1 in INS 832/13 cells. Interestingly, however, in contrast to the inhibitory effects of NSC23766, Tiam1 gene depletion potentiated GSIS in these cells; such a potentiation of GSIS was sensitive to extracellular calcium. Together, our studies present the first evidence for a regulatory role for Tiam1/Rac1-sensitive signaling step in GSIS. They also provide evidence for the existence of a potential Rac1/Tiam1-independent, but calcium-sensitive component for GSIS in these cells.

  7. The transcription factors Nkx6.1 and Nkx6.2 possess equivalent activities in promoting beta-cell fate specification in Pdx1+ pancreatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Shelley B; Schaffer, Ashleigh E; Sander, Maike

    2007-07-01

    Despite much progress in identifying transcriptional regulators that control the specification of the different pancreatic endocrine cell types, the spatiotemporal aspects of endocrine subtype specification have remained largely elusive. Here, we address the mechanism by which the transcription factors Nkx6.1 (Nkx6-1) and Nkx6.2 (Nkx6-2) orchestrate development of the endocrine alpha- and beta-cell lineages. Specifically, we assayed for the rescue of insulin-producing beta-cells in Nkx6.1 mutant mice upon restoring Nkx6 activity in select progenitor cell populations with different Nkx6-expressing transgenes. Beta-cell formation and maturation was restored when Nkx6.1 was expressed in multipotential Pdx1(+) pancreatic progenitors, whereas no rescue was observed upon expression in committed Ngn3(+) (Neurog3(+)) endocrine progenitors. Although not excluding additional roles downstream of Ngn3, this finding suggests a first requirement for Nkx6.1 in specifying beta-cell progenitors prior to Ngn3 activation. Surprisingly, although Nkx6.2 only compensates for Nkx6.1 in alpha-but not in beta-cell development in Nkx6.1(-/-) mice, a Pdx1-promoter-driven Nkx6.2 transgene had the same ability to rescue beta-cells as the Pdx1-Nkx6.1 transgene. This demonstrates that the distinct requirements for Nkx6.1 and Nkx6.2 in endocrine differentiation are a consequence of their divergent spatiotemporal expression domains rather than their biochemical activities and implies that both Nkx6.1 and Nkx6.2 possess alpha- and beta-cell-specifying activities. PMID:17537793

  8. The protective activity of Urtica dioica leaves on blood glucose concentration and beta-cells in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Golalipour, Mohammad Jafar; Khori, Vahid

    2007-04-15

    This study was done to determine the protective activity of the hydroalcholic extract of Urtica dioica leaves on Hyperglycemia and beta-cells in hyperglycemic rats. Thirty Wistar rats were allocated in groups of normal, Diabetic and treatment. Hyperglycemia in Rats induced by 80 mg kg(-1) streptozotocin. In treatment group, animals received hydroalcholic extract of Urtica dioica 100 mg kg(-1) day(-1) for five days, intraperitoneally and then hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin. The blood glucose concentration was measured by using a Glucometer in 1st, 3rd and 5th weeks. In the end of 5th weeks the animals in each group were sacrificed by anesthesia and whole pancreas in three groups extracted and fixed in bouin's fluid and stained by chromealum hematoxiline-phloxine and beta cells were counted in three groups by Olympus microscope. Mean +/- SE of blood glucose concentrations in the end of fifth weeks were 99.4 +/-5.0, 454.7 +/- 34.5 and 303.6 +/- 100.6 in control, diabetic and treatment groups, respectively (p < 0.05). The percentages of beta-cells in control, diabetic and treatment groups were 73.6, 1.9 and 22.9%, respectively. The percentage of beta-cells in treatment group comparing with diabetic group was significant (p < 0.05). This study showed that the protective administration of hydroalcholic extract of Urtica dioica has hypoglycemic effect and protective activity of beta-cells of langerhans in hyperglycemic rats. PMID:19069917

  9. Is Transforming Stem Cells to Pancreatic Beta Cells Still the Holy Grail for Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Sevim; Okawa, Erin R; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes is a progressive disease affecting millions of people worldwide. There are several medications and treatment options to improve the life quality of people with diabetes. One of the strategies for the treatment of diabetes could be the use of human pluripotent stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells. The recent advances in differentiation of stem cells into insulin-secreting beta-like cells in vitro make the transplantation of the stem cell-derived beta-like cells an attractive approach for treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While stem cell-derived beta-like cells provide an unlimited cell source for beta cell replacement therapies, these cells can also be used as a platform for drug screening or modeling diseases.

  10. A nanocarrier system for the delivery of nucleic acids targeted to a pancreatic beta cell line.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuma; Tabata, Mai; Yasuzaki, Yukari; Nomura, Masatoshi; Shibata, Atsushi; Ibayashi, Yuta; Taniguchi, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shigeki; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in response to glucose levels and thus are involved in controlling blood glucose levels. A line of pancreatic β cells "MIN6" has been used in studies related to the function of β cells and diabetes therapy. Regulating gene expression in MIN6 cells could accelerate these studies, but an efficient method for the transfection of nucleic acids targeted to MIN6 cells is required. We report here on a liposome-based carrier targeted to pancreatic β cells (Multifunctional envelope-type nano device for pancreatic β cells, β-MEND). We identified a lipid composition for use in preparing the β-MEND, which permits the particles to be efficiently internalized into MIN6, as evidenced by flow cytometry analyses. Intracellular observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the β-MEND efficiently delivered the oligo nucleic acids to the cytosol of MIN6 cells. Moreover, using a β-MEND encapsulating a 2'-O-Methyl RNA complementary to a microRNA that suppresses insulin secretion, the knockdown of the targeted microRNA and an up-regulation of insulin secretion were observed in MIN6. Thus, the β-MEND holds promise as an efficient system for delivering nucleic acids targeted to MIN6 and can contribute to research and therapy aimed at diabetes.

  11. Characterization of Stimulus-Secretion Coupling in the Human Pancreatic EndoC-βH1 Beta Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Lotta E.; Valtat, Bérengère; Bagge, Annika; Sharoyko, Vladimir V.; Nicholls, David G.; Ravassard, Philippe; Scharfmann, Raphael; Spégel, Peter; Mulder, Hindrik

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Studies on beta cell metabolism are often conducted in rodent beta cell lines due to the lack of stable human beta cell lines. Recently, a human cell line, EndoC-βH1, was generated. Here we investigate stimulus-secretion coupling in this cell line, and compare it with that in the rat beta cell line, INS-1 832/13, and human islets. Methods Cells were exposed to glucose and pyruvate. Insulin secretion and content (radioimmunoassay), gene expression (Gene Chip array), metabolite levels (GC/MS), respiration (Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer), glucose utilization (radiometric), lactate release (enzymatic colorimetric), ATP levels (enzymatic bioluminescence) and plasma membrane potential and cytoplasmic Ca2+ responses (microfluorometry) were measured. Metabolite levels, respiration and insulin secretion were examined in human islets. Results Glucose increased insulin release, glucose utilization, raised ATP production and respiratory rates in both lines, and pyruvate increased insulin secretion and respiration. EndoC-βH1 cells exhibited higher insulin secretion, while plasma membrane depolarization was attenuated, and neither glucose nor pyruvate induced oscillations in intracellular calcium concentration or plasma membrane potential. Metabolite profiling revealed that glycolytic and TCA-cycle intermediate levels increased in response to glucose in both cell lines, but responses were weaker in EndoC-βH1 cells, similar to those observed in human islets. Respiration in EndoC-βH1 cells was more similar to that in human islets than in INS-1 832/13 cells. Conclusions/Interpretation Functions associated with early stimulus-secretion coupling, with the exception of plasma membrane potential and Ca2+ oscillations, were similar in the two cell lines; insulin secretion, respiration and metabolite responses were similar in EndoC-βH1 cells and human islets. While both cell lines are suitable in vitro models, with the caveat of replicating key findings

  12. Remodelling sympathetic innervation in rat pancreatic islets ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Vásquez, Siraam; Navarro-Tableros, Víctor; Sánchez-Soto, Carmen; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Hiriart, Marcia

    2009-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islets are not fully developed at birth and it is not clear how they are vascularised and innervated. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is required to guide sympathetic neurons that innervate peripheral organs and also in cardiovascular system and ovary angiogenesis. Pancreatic beta cells of a transgenic mouse that over-expressed NGF in attracts sympathetic hyper-innervation towards them. Moreover, we have previously demonstrated that adult beta cells synthesize and secrete NGF; however, we do not know how is NGF secreted during development, nor if it might be trophic for sympathetic innervation and survival in the pancreas. We analyzed sympathetic innervation and vasculature development in rat pancreatic islets at different developmental stages; foetal (F19), early postnatal (P1), weaning period (P20) and adults. We temporarily correlated these events to NGF secretion by islet cells. Results Sympathetic fibres reached pancreatic islets in the early postnatal period, apparently following blood vessels. The maximal number of sympathetic fibres (TH immunopositive) in the periphery of the islets was observed at P20, and then fibres entered the islets and reached the core where beta cells are mainly located. The number of fibres decreased from that stage to adulthood. At all stages studied, islet cells secreted NGF and also expressed the high affinity receptor TrkA. Foetal and neonatal isolated islet cells secreted more NGF than adults. TrkA receptors were expressed at all stages in pancreatic sympathetic fibres and blood vessels. These last structures were NGF–immunoreactive only at early stages (foetal and P0). Conclusion The results suggest that NGF signalling play an important role in the guidance of blood vessels and sympathetic fibres toward the islets during foetal and neonatal stages and could also preserve innervation at later stages of life. PMID:19534767

  13. Effects of intracellular pH on ATP-sensitive K+ channels in mouse pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Proks, P; Takano, M; Ashcroft, F M

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of intracellular pH (pHi) on the ATP-sensitive K+ channel (K+ATP channel) from mouse pancreatic beta-cells were examined in inside-out patches exposed to symmetrical 140 mM K+ solutions. 2. The relationship between channel activity and pHi was described by the Hill equation with half-maximal inhibition (Ki) at pHi 6.25 and a Hill coefficient of 3.7. 3. Following exposure to pHi < 6.8, channel activity did not recover to its original level. Subsequent application of trypsin to the intracellular membrane surface restored channel activity to its initial level or above. 4. At -60 mV the relationship between pHi and the single-channel current amplitude was described by a modified Hill equation with a Hill coefficient of 2.1, half-maximal inhibition at pHi 6.48 and a maximum inhibition of 18.5%. 5. A decrease in pHi reduced the extent of channel inhibition by ATP: Ki was 18 microM at pH 7.2 and 33 microM at pH 6.4. The Hill coefficient was also reduced, being 1.65 at pH 7.2 and 1.17 at pH 6.4. 6. When channel activity was plotted as a function of ATP4- (rather than total ATP) there was no effect of pHi on the relationship. This suggests that ATP4- is the inhibitory ion species and that the effects of reducing pHi are due to the lowered concentration of ATP4-. 7. Changes in external pH had little effect on either single-channel or whole-cell K+ATP currents. 8. The effects of pHi do not support a role for H+ in linking glucose metabolism to K+ATP channel inhibition in pancreatic beta-cells. PMID:8189391

  14. Exendin-4 Protects Mitochondria from Reactive Oxygen Species Induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhou, Zhiguang; Huang, Gan; Hu, Fang; Xiang, Yufei; He, Lining

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial oxidative stress is the basis for pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and a common pathway for numerous types of damage, including glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. We cultivated mice pancreatic β-cell tumor Min6 cell lines in vitro and observed pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and changes in mitochondrial function before and after the addition of Exendin-4. Based on these observations, we discuss the protective role of Exendin-4 against mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relationship with Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2. Methods We established a pancreatic β-cell oxidative stress damage model using Min6 cell lines cultured in vitro with tert-buty1 hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide. We then added Exendin-4 to observe changes in the rate of cell apoptosis (Annexin-V-FITC-PI staining flow cytometry and DNA ladder). We detected the activity of the caspase 3 and 8 apoptotic factors, measured the mitochondrial membrane potential losses and reactive oxygen species production levels, and detected the expression of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO in the cytosol and mitochondria, mitochondrial Ca2-independent phospholipase A2 and Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 mRNA. Results The time-concentration curve showed that different percentages of apoptosis occurred at different time-concentrations in tert-buty1 hydroperoxide- and hydrogen peroxide-induced Min6 cells. Incubation with 100 µmol/l of Exendin-4 for 48 hours reduced the Min6 cell apoptosis rate (p<0.05). The mitochondrial membrane potential loss and total reactive oxygen species levels decreased (p<0.05), and the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO from the mitochondria was reduced. The study also showed that Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity was positively related to Exendin-4 activity. Conclusion Exendin-4 reduces Min6 cell oxidative damage and the cell apoptosis rate, which may be related to Ca2-independent phospholipase A2. PMID:24204601

  15. The Cytotoxic Role of Intermittent High Glucose on Apoptosis and Cell Viability in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Jing; Yang, Lei; Chen, Rongping; Yang, Rui; Zhang, Hua; Cai, Dehong; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Glucose fluctuations are both strong predictor of diabetic complications and crucial factor for beta cell damages. Here we investigated the effect of intermittent high glucose (IHG) on both cell apoptosis and proliferation activity in INS-1 cells and the potential mechanisms. Methods. Cells were treated with normal glucose (5.5 mmol/L), constant high glucose (CHG) (25 mmol/L), and IHG (rotation per 24 h in 11.1 or 25 mmol/L) for 7 days. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), xanthine oxidase (XOD) level, apoptosis, cell viability, cell cycle, and expression of cyclinD1, p21, p27, and Skp2 were determined. Results. We found that IHG induced more significant apoptosis than CHG and normal glucose; intracellular ROS and XOD levels were more markedly increased in cells exposed to IHG. Cells treated with IHG showed significant decreased cell viability and increased cell proportion in G0/G1 phase. Cell cycle related proteins such as cyclinD1 and Skp2 were decreased significantly, but expressions of p27 and p21 were increased markedly. Conclusions. This study suggested that IHG plays a more toxic effect including both apoptosis-inducing and antiproliferative effects on INS-1 cells. Excessive activation of cellular stress and regulation of cyclins might be potential mechanism of impairment in INS-1 cells induced by IHG. PMID:24772447

  16. Enhanced glucose-induced intracellular signaling promotes insulin hypersecretion: pancreatic beta-cell functional adaptations in a model of genetic obesity and prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Irles, Esperanza; Ñeco, Patricia; Lluesma, Mónica; Villar-Pazos, Sabrina; Santos-Silva, Junia Carolina; Vettorazzi, Jean F; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Nadal, Ángel; Quesada, Ivan

    2015-03-15

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and is known to be a risk factor for type-2 diabetes. In obese individuals, pancreatic beta-cells try to compensate for the increased insulin demand in order to maintain euglycemia. Most studies have reported that this adaptation is due to morphological changes. However, the involvement of beta-cell functional adaptations in this process needs to be clarified. For this purpose, we evaluated different key steps in the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in intact islets from female ob/ob obese mice and lean controls. Obese mice showed increased body weight, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance and fed hyperglycemia. Islets from ob/ob mice exhibited increased glucose-induced mitochondrial activity, reflected by enhanced NAD(P)H production and mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization. Perforated patch-clamp examination of beta-cells within intact islets revealed several alterations in the electrical activity such as increased firing frequency and higher sensitivity to low glucose concentrations. A higher intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in response to glucose was also found in ob/ob islets. Additionally, they displayed a change in the oscillatory pattern and Ca(2+) signals at low glucose levels. Capacitance experiments in intact islets revealed increased exocytosis in individual ob/ob beta-cells. All these up-regulated processes led to increased GSIS. In contrast, we found a lack of beta-cell Ca(2+) signal coupling, which could be a manifestation of early defects that lead to beta-cell malfunction in the progression to diabetes. These findings indicate that beta-cell functional adaptations are an important process in the compensatory response to obesity.

  17. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells recruits trophic macrophages to induce pancreatic beta cell regeneration in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaocang; Han, Zhi-Bo; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    Alleviation of hyperglycemia in chemical-induced diabetic mice has been reported after bone marrow transplantation. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, we transplanted genetically labeled primary mouse mesenchymal stem cells into the pancreas of the streptozotocin-treated hyperglycemic isogeneic mice, resulting in a decrease in blood glucose due to a recovery in beta cell mass. Further analysis revealed that the increase in beta cell mass was predominantly attributable to beta cell replication. The grafted mesenchymal stem cells did not transdifferentiate into beta cells themselves but recruited and polarized macrophages in a Stromal cell-derived factor 1-dependent manner, which in turn promoted beta cell replication. Our finding thus suggests that transplantation of autogenic mesenchymal stem cells may increase functional beta cell mass by boosting beta cell replication in diabetes. PMID:24915493

  18. Pattern of rise in subplasma membrane Ca2+ concentration determines type of fusing insulin granules in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Sakurai, Takashi; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-07-31

    We simultaneously analyzed insulin granule fusion with insulin fused to green fluorescent protein and the subplasma membrane Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+](PM)) with the Ca2+ indicator Fura Red in rat beta cells by dual-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We found that rapid and marked elevation in [Ca2+](PM) caused insulin granule fusion mostly from previously docked granules during the high KCl-evoked release and high glucose-evoked first phase release. In contrast, the slow and sustained elevation in [Ca2+](PM) induced fusion from newcomers translocated from the internal pool during the low KCl-evoked release and glucose-evoked second phase release. These data suggest that the pattern of the [Ca2+](PM) rise directly determines the types of fusing granules.

  19. Activation of NF-kappaB by extracellular matrix is involved in spreading and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion of pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Hammar, Eva B; Irminger, Jean-Claude; Rickenbach, Katharina; Parnaud, Géraldine; Ribaux, Pascale; Bosco, Domenico; Rouiller, Dominique G; Halban, Philippe A

    2005-08-26

    Laminin-5-rich extracellular matrix derived from 804G cells (804G-ECM) engages beta1 integrins to induce spreading, improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), and increase survival of pancreatic beta cells. The present study examines whether 804G-ECM activates the transcriptional activity of NF-kappaB and the involvement of NF-kappaB in those effects of 804G-ECM on pancreatic beta cells. 804G-ECM induces nuclear translocation and the DNA binding activity of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB. 804G-ECM-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB was weak as compared with that induced by interleukin-1beta. Transient 804G-ECM-induced DNA binding activity of NF-kappaB (peak at 2 h) and overexpression of NF-kappaB target genes IkappaB alpha and NF-kappaB1(p105) (peak at 4 h) were observed. When NF-kappaB was inhibited by an inhibitor of IkappaB alpha phosphorylation (Bay 11-7082) or by a recombinant adenovirus expressing the nonphosphorylatable form of IkappaB alpha, 804G-ECM-induced cell spreading and actin cytoskeleton organization were reduced. GSIS from cells on 804G-ECM was inhibited 5-fold, whereas cell survival was not affected. In summary, the results indicate that 804G-ECM induces a transient and moderate NF-kappaB activity. This study shows for the first time that ECM-induced NF-kappaB activity is necessary in maintaining GSIS, although it does not affect survival of pancreatic beta cells. The effects of ECM-induced NF-kappaB activity contrast with the deleterious effects of cytokine-induced NF-kappaB activity. It is proposed that transient and moderate NF-kappaB activity is essential for proper function of the pancreatic beta cell.

  20. The MODY1 gene for hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha and a feedback loop control COUP-TFII expression in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Perilhou, Anaïs; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Zhang, Pili; Kharroubi, Ilham; Wang, Haiyan; Fauveau, Véronique; Scott, Donald K; Wollheim, Claes B; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille

    2008-07-01

    Pancreatic islet beta cell differentiation and function are dependent upon a group of transcription factors that maintain the expression of key genes and suppress others. Knockout mice with the heterozygous deletion of the gene for chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) or the complete disruption of the gene for hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha) in pancreatic beta cells have similar insulin secretion defects, leading us to hypothesize that there is transcriptional cross talk between these two nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrate specific HNF4alpha activation of a reporter plasmid containing the COUP-TFII gene promoter region in transfected pancreatic beta cells. The stable association of the endogenous HNF4alpha with a region of the COUP-TFII gene promoter that contains a direct repeat 1 (DR-1) binding site was revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Mutation experiments showed that this DR-1 site is essential for HNF4alpha transactivation of COUP-TFII. The dominant negative suppression of HNF4alpha function decreased endogenous COUP-TFII expression, and the specific inactivation of COUP-TFII by small interfering RNA caused HNF4alpha mRNA levels in 832/13 INS-1 cells to decrease. This positive regulation of HNF4alpha by COUP-TFII was confirmed by the adenovirus-mediated overexpression of human COUP-TFII (hCOUP-TFII), which increased HNF4alpha mRNA levels in 832/13 INS-1 cells and in mouse pancreatic islets. Finally, hCOUP-TFII overexpression showed that there is direct COUP-TFII autorepression, as COUP-TFII occupies the proximal DR-1 binding site of its own gene in vivo. Therefore, COUP-TFII may contribute to the control of insulin secretion through the complex HNF4alpha/maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1 (MODY1) transcription factor network operating in beta cells. PMID:18474611

  1. Pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 protein is a novel beta-cell-specific autoantigen for type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Wu; Koya, Vijay; Li, Yi; Donelan, William; Lin, Peng; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) protein is a key transcription factor involved in the regulation of insulin gene expression that is expressed at high levels in the beta-cells of the pancreatic islets. We asked whether Pdx1 is a target of anti-islet autoimmunity in type I diabetes (T1D). Pdx1 autoantibodies (PAAs) were detected in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice using ELISA, western blotting, and radioimmunoprecipitation of [(35)S]-labeled insulinoma cell line-derived Pdx1 protein. PAAs were detected as early as at 5 weeks of age, and generally peaked before the onset of clinically overt diabetes in diabetes-prone female NOD mice. Levels declined substantially after the onset of diabetes. PAAs were not detected in the sera of NOD-scid, C57BL/6, or BALB/c mice. The titers of PAAs in NOD mouse sera were as high as 1/93 750 by ELISA. The fine specificity of PAAs was determined by western blotting using a series of truncated recombinant Pdx1 proteins. The immunodominant epitopes were located to the C-terminus of the Pdx1 (p200-283) in NOD mice. PAAs also were detected in sera from human T1D patients, but the major epitopes were localized to amino acids 159-200 as well as the same region (p200-283) recognized by PAAs from NOD mice. Using [(3)H]thymidine incorporation, the p83 fragment of Pdx1 specifically stimulated proliferation of splenic T cells from recent-onset diabetic NOD mice. The presence of PAAs in prediabetic NOD mice and human T1D patients, and Pdx1-specific T-cell proliferation in NOD mice provide a strong rationale for further investigation of the pathogenic role of immune responses against Pdx1 in T1D.

  2. Targeted genetic inactivation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa impairs insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells and evokes type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    The biological significance of protein N-glycosylation has been elucidated using a mouse model bearing a genetic mutation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases (GnTs), which initiate the formation of specific branch structures on the mannose core of N-glycans. These glycosylation defects evoked a variety of abnormalities and disorders in specific cell types, tissues, and the whole body, reflecting functional requirements. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase-IVa (GnT-IVa) initiates the GlcNAcbeta1-4 branch synthesis on the Manalpha1-3 arm of the N-glycan core thereby increasing N-glycan branch complexity. To investigate the physiological function of GnT-IVa, we engineered and characterized GnT-IVa-deficient mice. GnT-IVa-deficient mice showed a metabolic disorder subsequently diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. In this chapter, methods for characterizing GnT-IVa-deficient mice by physiological analyses to detect metabolic alterations and biochemical analyses using primary isolated pancreatic beta cells are summarized and discussed.

  3. Effects of low intensity laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Guoxin; Xiong, Leilei; Li, Xinzhong

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effects of low intensity semiconductor laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes, a method using a high-fat diet and low-dose intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin established a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model. Model rats were randomly divided into a laser acupoint irradiation group, rosiglitazone control group, and placebo group; each group had 10 rats. In addition, 10 normal male rats were selected for the normal control group. The Housanli, Neiting and Yishu acupoints of the rats in the laser acupoint irradiation group were irradiated with a 10 mW semiconductor laser; each point was irradiated for 15 min, once every 2 d over 28 d, for a total of 14 episodes of irradiation. The rosiglitazone group rats were given rosiglitazone (0.2 mg kg-1) intragastrically; the placebo group rats were given 0.9% brine (0.2 mg kg-1) intragastrically, once daily, for four consecutive weeks. The change of fasting blood glucose was determined before and after each treatment. The islet beta-cell apoptosis was determined. The islet beta-cell apoptosis rates of the laser acupoint irradiation group and the rosiglitazone group were significantly lower than the rate of the placebo group. Even though the rate was lower in the laser acupoint irradiation group than in the rosiglitazone group, there was no significant difference between them. It is shown that acupoint irradiation with a semiconductor laser can effectively inhibit islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Effects of low intensity laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Guoxin; Xiong, Leilei; Li, Xinzhong

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effects of low intensity semiconductor laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes, a method using a high-fat diet and low-dose intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin established a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model. Model rats were randomly divided into a laser acupoint irradiation group, rosiglitazone control group, and placebo group; each group had 10 rats. In addition, 10 normal male rats were selected for the normal control group. The Housanli, Neiting and Yishu acupoints of the rats in the laser acupoint irradiation group were irradiated with a 10 mW semiconductor laser; each point was irradiated for 15 min, once every 2 d over 28 d, for a total of 14 episodes of irradiation. The rosiglitazone group rats were given rosiglitazone (0.2 mg kg‑1) intragastrically; the placebo group rats were given 0.9% brine (0.2 mg kg‑1) intragastrically, once daily, for four consecutive weeks. The change of fasting blood glucose was determined before and after each treatment. The islet beta-cell apoptosis was determined. The islet beta-cell apoptosis rates of the laser acupoint irradiation group and the rosiglitazone group were significantly lower than the rate of the placebo group. Even though the rate was lower in the laser acupoint irradiation group than in the rosiglitazone group, there was no significant difference between them. It is shown that acupoint irradiation with a semiconductor laser can effectively inhibit islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes.

  5. B7-H4 as a protective shield for pancreatic islet beta cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Annika C; Ou, Dawei; Luciani, Dan S; Warnock, Garth L

    2014-01-01

    Auto- and alloreactive T cells are major culprits that damage β-cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and islet transplantation. Current immunosuppressive drugs can alleviate immune-mediated attacks on islets. T cell co-stimulation blockade has shown great promise in autoimmunity and transplantation as it solely targets activated T cells, and therefore avoids toxicity of current immunosuppressive drugs. An attractive approach is offered by the newly-identified negative T cell co-signaling molecule B7-H4 which is expressed in normal human islets, and its expression co-localizes with insulin. A concomitant decrease in B7-H4/insulin co-localization is observed in human type 1 diabetic islets. B7-H4 may play protective roles in the pancreatic islets, preserving their function and survival. In this review we outline the protective effect of B7-H4 in the contexts of T1D, islet cell transplantation, and potentially type 2 diabetes. Current evidence offers encouraging data regarding the role of B7-H4 in reversal of autoimmune diabetes and donor-specific islet allograft tolerance. Additionally, unique expression of B7-H4 may serve as a potential biomarker for the development of T1D. Future studies should continue to focus on the islet-specific effects of B7-H4 with emphasis on mechanistic pathways in order to promote B7-H4 as a potential therapy and cure for T1D. PMID:25512776

  6. Immune Intervention and Preservation of Pancreatic Beta Cell Function in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Kimber M; Gottlieb, Peter A; Michels, Aaron W

    2016-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the immune-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β cells located within the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. The autoimmune process leads to a deficiency in insulin production and resultant hyperglycemia requiring lifelong treatment with insulin administration. T1D continues to dramatically increase in incidence, especially in young children. Substantial knowledge surrounding human disease pathogenesis exists, such that T1D is now predictable with the measurement of antibodies in the peripheral blood directed against insulin and other β cell proteins. With the ability to predict, it naturally follows that T1D should be preventable. As such, over the last two decades, numerous well-controlled clinical trials have been completed attempting to prevent diabetes onset or maintain residual β cell function after clinical onset, all providing relatively disappointing results. Here, we review the T1D prevention efforts, the current landscape of clinical therapies, and end with a discussion regarding the future outlook for preventing T1D. PMID:27558810

  7. Npas4 Transcription Factor Expression Is Regulated by Calcium Signaling Pathways and Prevents Tacrolimus-induced Cytotoxicity in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Speckmann, Thilo; Sabatini, Paul V; Nian, Cuilan; Smith, Riley G; Lynn, Francis C

    2016-02-01

    Cytosolic calcium influx activates signaling pathways known to support pancreatic beta cell function and survival by modulating gene expression. Impaired calcium signaling leads to decreased beta cell mass and diabetes. To appreciate the causes of these cytotoxic perturbations, a more detailed understanding of the relevant signaling pathways and their respective gene targets is required. In this study, we examined the calcium-induced expression of the cytoprotective beta cell transcription factor Npas4. Pharmacological inhibition implicated the calcineurin, Akt/protein kinase B, and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase signaling pathways in the regulation of Npas4 transcription and translation. Both Npas4 mRNA and protein had high turnover rates, and, at the protein level, degradation was mediated via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Finally, beta cell cytotoxicity of the calcineurin inhibitor and immunosuppressant tacrolimus (FK-506) was prevented by Npas4 overexpression. These results delineate the pathways regulating Npas4 expression and stability and demonstrate its importance in clinical settings such as islet transplantation.

  8. Cdk5 inhibitory peptide (CIP) inhibits Cdk5/p25 activity induced by high glucose in pancreatic beta cells and recovers insulin secretion from p25 damage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ya-Li; Li, Congyu; Hu, Ya-Fang; Cao, Li; Wang, Hui; Li, Bo; Lu, Xiao-Hua; Bao, Li; Luo, Hong-Yan; Shukla, Varsha; Amin, Niranjana D; Pant, Harish C

    2013-01-01

    Cdk5/p25 hyperactivity has been demonstrated to lead to neuron apoptosis and degenerations. Chronic exposure to high glucose (HG) results in hyperactivity of Cdk5 and reduced insulin secretion. Here, we set out to determine whether abnormal upregulation of Cdk5/p25 activity may be induced in a pancreatic beta cell line, Min6 cells. We first confirmed that p25 were induced in overexpressed p35 cells treated with HG and increased time course dependence. Next, we showed that no p25 was detected under short time HG stimulation (4-12 hrs), however was detectable in the long exposure in HG cells (24 hrs and 48 hrs). Cdk5 activity in the above cells was much higher than low glucose treated cells and resulted in more than 50% inhibition of insulin secretion. We confirmed these results by overexpression of p25 in Min6 cells. As in cortical neurons, CIP, a small peptide, inhibited Cdk5/p25 activity and restored insulin secretion. The same results were detected in co-infection of dominant negative Cdk5 (DNCdk5) with p25. CIP also reduced beta cells apoptosis induced by Cdk5/p25. These studies indicate that Cdk5/p25 hyperactivation deregulates insulin secretion and induces cell death in pancreatic beta cells and suggests that CIP may serve as a therapeutic agent for type 2 diabetes. PMID:24039692

  9. Activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulates fatty acid oxidation and energy uncoupling genes of mitochondria and reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Jun; Jiang, Li; Lue, Qingguo; Ke, Linqiu; Li, Xiaoyu; Tong, Nanwei

    2010-01-15

    Recent evidence indicates that decreased oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial aberrations contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) activation on lipid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta}-cells. After HIT-T15 cells (a {beta}-cell line) were exposed to high concentrations of palmitate and GW501516 (GW; a selective agonist of PPAR{delta}), we found that administration of GW increased the expression of PPAR{delta} mRNA. GW-induced activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulated carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2); alleviated mitochondrial swelling; attenuated apoptosis; and reduced basal insulin secretion induced by increased palmitate in HIT cells. These results suggest that activation of PPAR{delta} plays an important role in protecting pancreatic {beta}-cells against aberrations caused by lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

  10. Free fatty acids and cytokines induce pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis by different mechanisms: role of nuclear factor-kappaB and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Kharroubi, Ilham; Ladrière, Laurence; Cardozo, Alessandra K; Dogusan, Zeynep; Cnop, Miriam; Eizirik, Décio L

    2004-11-01

    Apoptosis is probably the main form of beta-cell death in both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and T2DM. In T1DM, cytokines contribute to beta-cell destruction through nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. Previous studies suggested that in T2DM high glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs) are beta-cell toxic also via NF-kappaB activation. The aims of this study were to clarify whether common mechanisms are involved in FFA- and cytokine-induced beta-cell apoptosis and determine whether TNFalpha, an adipocyte-derived cytokine, potentiates FFA toxicity through enhanced NF-kappaB activation. Apoptosis was induced in insulinoma (INS)-1E cells, rat islets, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting-purified beta-cells by oleate, palmitate, and/or cytokines (IL-1beta, interferon-gamma, TNFalpha). Palmitate and IL-1beta induced a similar percentage of apoptosis in INS-1E cells, whereas oleate was less toxic. TNFalpha did not potentiate FFA toxicity in primary beta-cells. The NF-kappaB-dependent genes inducible nitric oxide synthase and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were induced by IL-1beta but not by FFAs. Cytokines activated NF-kappaB in INS-1E and beta-cells, but FFAs did not. Moreover, FFAs did not enhance NF-kappaB activation by TNFalpha. Palmitate and oleate induced C/EBP homologous protein, activating transcription factor-4, and immunoglobulin heavy chain binding protein mRNAs, X-box binding protein-1 alternative splicing, and activation of the activating transcription factor-6 promoter in INS-1E cells, suggesting that FFAs trigger an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. We conclude that apoptosis is the main mode of FFA- and cytokine-induced beta-cell death but the mechanisms involved are different. Whereas cytokines induce NF-kappaB activation and ER stress (secondary to nitric oxide formation), FFAs activate an ER stress response via an NF-kappaB- and nitric oxide-independent mechanism. Our results argue against a unifying hypothesis for the

  11. Distinct roles for insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors in pancreatic beta-cell glucose sensing revealed by RNA silencing.

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Qian, Qingwen; Cullen, Peter J; Rutter, Guy A

    2004-01-01

    The importance of the insulin receptor (IR) and the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) for glucose-regulated insulin secretion and gene expression in pancreatic islet beta-cells is at present unresolved. Here, we have used small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to silence the expression of each receptor selectively in clonal MIN6 beta-cells. Reduction of IR levels by >90% completely inhibited glucose (30 mM compared with 3 mM)-induced insulin secretion, but had no effect on depolarization-stimulated secretion. IR depletion also blocked the accumulation of preproinsulin (PPI), pancreatic duodenum homoeobox-1 (PDX-1) and glucokinase (GK) mRNAs at elevated glucose concentrations, as assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis (TaqMan). Similarly, depletion of IGF-1R inhibited glucose-induced insulin secretion but, in contrast with the effects of IR silencing, had little impact on the regulation of gene expression by glucose. Moreover, loss of IGF-1R, but not IR, markedly inhibited glucose-stimulated increases in cytosolic and mitochondrial ATP, suggesting a role for IGF-1R in the maintenance of oxidative metabolism and in the generation of mitochondrial coupling factors. RNA silencing thus represents a useful tool for the efficient and selective inactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases in isolated beta-cells. By inhibiting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion through the inactivation of IGF-1R, this approach also demonstrates the existence of insulin-independent mechanisms whereby elevated glucose concentrations regulate PPI, PDX-1 and GK gene expression in beta-cells. PMID:14563207

  12. A new approach for pancreatic tissue engineering: human endometrial stem cells encapsulated in fibrin gel can differentiate to pancreatic islet beta-cell.

    PubMed

    Niknamasl, Azadeh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Soleimani, Mansoureh; Azami, Mahmoud; Salmani, Maryam Kabir; Lotfibakhshaiesh, Nasrin; Ebrahimi-Barough, Somayeh; Karimi, Roya; Roozafzoon, Reza; Ai, Jafar

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic diabetes mellitus as the most serious and prevalent metabolic disease in the world has various complications. The most effective treatment of type I diabetes seems to be islet cell transplantation. Shortage of donors and difficult procedures and high rate of rejection have always restricted this approach. Tissue engineering is a novel effective solution to many medical problems such as diabetes. Endometrial mesenchymal stem cells as a lineage which have the potential to differentiate to mesodermal and endodermal tissues seem to be suitable for this purpose. Fibrin hydrogel with a high degree of biocompatibility and specific properties making it similar to normal pancreas seems to be an ideal scaffold. After successfully isolating stem cells (hEnSCs) from human endometrium, a three-step protocol was used to differentiate them into pancreatic beta cells. Fibrin was used as 3D scaffold. After 2 weeks, cells formed clusters like islets cells, and secretion of insulin was measured by chemiluminescence. PDX1, proinsulin, and c-peptide as special markers of β cells were detected by immunofluorescence. Expression of glucagon, PDX1, and insulin genes in mRNA level was detected by Real time PCR and gel electrophoresis. The former showed higher levels of gene expression in 3D cultures. SEM analysis showed good integrity between cells and scaffold. No toxicity was detected with fibrin scaffold by MTT assay.

  13. Islet Stellate Cells Isolated from Fibrotic Islet of Goto-Kakizaki Rats Affect Biological Behavior of Beta-Cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng-Fei; Chen, Bi-Jun; Li, Wei; Li, Ling; Zha, Min; Zhou, S; Bachem, M G; Sun, Zi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We previously isolated islet stellate cells (ISCs) from healthy Wistar rat islets. In the present study, we isolated "already primed by diabetic environment" ISCs from islets of Goto-Kakizaki rats, determined the gene profile of these cells, and assessed the effects of these ISCs on beta-cell function and survival. We detected gene expression of ISCs by digital gene expression. INS-1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, and insulin production were measured after being treated with ISCs supernatant (SN). We observed the similar expression pattern of ISCs and PSCs, but 1067 differentially expressed genes. Insulin production in INS-1 cells cultured with ISC-SN was significantly reduced. The 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-positive INS-1 cells treated with ISC-SN were decreased. Propidium iodide- (PI-) positive INS-1 cells were 2.6-fold higher than those in control groups. Caspase-3 activity was increased. In conclusion, ISCs presented in fibrotic islet of GK rats might be special PSCs, which impaired beta-cell function and proliferation and increased beta-cell apoptosis.

  14. Islet Stellate Cells Isolated from Fibrotic Islet of Goto-Kakizaki Rats Affect Biological Behavior of Beta-Cell

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng-Fei; Chen, Bi-Jun; Li, Wei; Li, Ling; Zha, Min; Zhou, S.; Bachem, M. G.; Sun, Zi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    We previously isolated islet stellate cells (ISCs) from healthy Wistar rat islets. In the present study, we isolated “already primed by diabetic environment” ISCs from islets of Goto-Kakizaki rats, determined the gene profile of these cells, and assessed the effects of these ISCs on beta-cell function and survival. We detected gene expression of ISCs by digital gene expression. INS-1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, and insulin production were measured after being treated with ISCs supernatant (SN). We observed the similar expression pattern of ISCs and PSCs, but 1067 differentially expressed genes. Insulin production in INS-1 cells cultured with ISC-SN was significantly reduced. The 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine-positive INS-1 cells treated with ISC-SN were decreased. Propidium iodide- (PI-) positive INS-1 cells were 2.6-fold higher than those in control groups. Caspase-3 activity was increased. In conclusion, ISCs presented in fibrotic islet of GK rats might be special PSCs, which impaired beta-cell function and proliferation and increased beta-cell apoptosis. PMID:26697502

  15. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha isoforms originated from the P1 promoter are expressed in human pancreatic beta-cells and exhibit stronger transcriptional potentials than P2 promoter-driven isoforms.

    PubMed

    Eeckhoute, J; Moerman, E; Bouckenooghe, T; Lukoviak, B; Pattou, F; Formstecher, P; Kerr-Conte, J; Vandewalle, B; Laine, B

    2003-05-01

    The nuclear receptor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) 4 alpha is involved in a transcriptional network and plays an important role in pancreatic beta-cells. Mutations in the HNF4 alpha gene are correlated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1. HNF4 alpha isoforms result from both alternative splicing and alternate usage of promoters P1 and P2. It has recently been reported that HNF4 alpha transcription is driven almost exclusively by the P2 promoter in pancreatic islets. We observed that transcripts from both P1 and P2 promoters were expressed in human pancreatic beta-cells and in the pancreatic beta-cell lines RIN m5F and HIT-T15. Expression of HNF4 alpha proteins originating from the P1 promoter was confirmed by immunodetection. Due to the presence of the activation function module AF-1, HNF4 alpha isoforms originating from the P1 promoter exhibit stronger transcriptional activities and recruit coactivators more efficiently than isoforms driven by the P2 promoter. Conversely, activities of isoforms produced by both promoters were similarly repressed by the corepressor small heterodimer partner. These behaviors were observed on the promoter of HNF1 alpha that is required for beta-cell function. Our results highlight that expression of P1 promoter-driven isoforms is important in the control of pancreatic beta-cell function.

  16. O-Linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Acts as a Glucose Sensor to Epigenetically Regulate the Insulin Gene in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Durning, Sean P; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Prasad, Nripesh; Wells, Lance

    2016-01-29

    The post-translational protein modification O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is a proposed nutrient sensor that has been shown to regulate multiple biological pathways. This dynamic and inducible enzymatic modification to intracellular proteins utilizes the end product of the nutrient sensing hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, UDP-GlcNAc, as its substrate donor. Type II diabetic patients have elevated O-GlcNAc-modified proteins within pancreatic beta cells due to chronic hyperglycemia-induced glucose overload, but a molecular role for O-GlcNAc within beta cells remains unclear. Using directed pharmacological approaches in the mouse insulinoma-6 (Min6) cell line, we demonstrate that elevating nuclear O-GlcNAc increases intracellular insulin levels and preserves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion during chronic hyperglycemia. The molecular mechanism for these observed changes appears to be, at least in part, due to elevated O-GlcNAc-dependent increases in Ins1 and Ins2 mRNA levels via elevations in histone H3 transcriptional activation marks. Furthermore, RNA deep sequencing reveals that this mechanism of altered gene transcription is restricted and that the majority of genes regulated by elevated O-GlcNAc levels are similarly regulated by a shift from euglycemic to hyperglycemic conditions. These findings implicate the O-GlcNAc modification as a potential mechanism for hyperglycemic-regulated gene expression in the beta cell.

  17. Delayed-rectifier (KV2.1) regulation of pancreatic beta-cell calcium responses to glucose: inhibitor specificity and modeling.

    PubMed

    Tamarina, Natalia A; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Fridlyand, Leonid E; Philipson, Louis H

    2005-10-01

    The delayed-rectifier (voltage-activated) K(+) conductance (K(V)) in pancreatic islet beta-cells has been proposed to regulate plasma membrane repolarization during responses to glucose, thereby determining bursting and Ca(2+) oscillations. Here, we verified the expression of K(V)2.1 channel protein in mouse and human islets of Langerhans. We then probed the function of K(V)2.1 channels in islet glucose responses by comparing the effect of hanatoxin (HaTx), a specific blocker of K(V)2.1 channels, with a nonspecific K(+) channel blocker, tetraethylammonium (TEA). Application of HaTx (1 microM) blocked delayed-rectifier currents in mouse beta-cells, resulting in a 40-mV rightward shift in threshold of activation of the voltage-dependent outward current. In the presence of HaTx, there was negligible voltage-activated outward current below 0 mV, suggesting that K(V)2.1 channels form the predominant part of this current in the physiologically relevant range. We then employed HaTx to study the role of K(V)2.1 in the beta-cell Ca(2+) responses to elevated glucose in comparison with TEA. Only HaTx was able to induce slow intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) oscillations in cells stimulated with 20 mM glucose, whereas TEA induced an immediate rise in [Ca(2+)](i) followed by rapid oscillations. In human islets, HaTx acted in a similar fashion. The data were analyzed using a detailed mathematical model of ionic flux and Ca(2+) regulation in beta-cells. The results can be explained by a specific HaTx effect on the K(V) current, whereas TEA affects multiple K(+) conductances. The results underscore the importance of K(V)2.1 channel in repolarization of the pancreatic beta-cell plasma membrane and its role in regulating insulin secretion. PMID:16014354

  18. Profound defects in pancreatic beta-cell function in mice with combined heterozygous mutations in Pdx-1, Hnf-1alpha, and Hnf-3beta.

    PubMed

    Shih, David Q; Heimesaat, Markus; Kuwajima, Satoru; Stein, Roland; Wright, Christopher V E; Stoffel, Markus

    2002-03-19

    Defects in pancreatic beta-cell function contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes, a polygenic disease that is characterized by insulin resistance and compromised insulin secretion. Hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNFs) -1alpha, -3beta, -4alpha, and Pdx-1 contribute in the complex transcriptional circuits within the pancreas that are involved in beta-cell development and function. In mice, a heterozygous mutation in Pdx-1 alone, but not Hnf-1alpha(+/-), Hnf-3beta(+/-), or Hnf-4alpha(+/-), causes impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mice. To investigate the possible functional relationships between these transcription factors on beta-cell activity in vivo, we generated mice with the following combined heterozygous mutations: Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-), Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-), Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-4alpha(+/-), Hnf-1alpha(+/-)/Hnf-4alpha(+/-), and Hnf-3beta(+/-)/Hnf-4alpha(+/-). The greatest loss in function was in combined heterozygous null alleles of Pdx-1 and Hnf-1alpha (Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-)), or Pdx-1 and Hnf-3beta (Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-)). Both double mutants develop progressively impaired glucose tolerance and acquire a compromised first- and second-phase insulin secretion profile in response to glucose compared with Pdx-1(+/-) mice alone. The loss in beta-cell function in Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-) mice was associated with decreased expression of Nkx-6.1, glucokinase (Gck), aldolase B (aldo-B), and insulin, whereas Nkx2.2, Nkx-6.1, Glut-2, Gck, aldo-B, the liver isoform of pyruvate kinase, and insulin expression was reduced in Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-) mice. The islet cell architecture was also abnormal in Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-3beta(+/-) and Pdx-1(+/-)/Hnf-1alpha(+/-) mice, with glucagon-expressing cells scattered throughout the islet, a defect that may be connected to decreased E-cadherin expression. Our data suggest that functional interactions between key islet regulatory factors play an important role in maintaining islet architecture and

  19. Increased secretion of insulin and proliferation of islet {beta}-cells in rats with mesenteric lymph duct ligation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagino, Ko; Yokozawa, Junji; Sasaki, Yu; Matsuda, Akiko; Takeda, Hiroaki; Kawata, Sumio

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was increased during the OGTT or IVGTT in mesenteric lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proliferation of islet {beta}-cells was upregulated in lymph duct-ligated rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesenteric lymph duct flow has a role in glucose metabolism. -- Abstract: Background and aims: It has been suggested that intestinal lymph flow plays an important role in insulin secretion and glucose metabolism after meals. In this study, we investigated the influence of ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct on glucose metabolism and islet {beta}-cells in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats (10 weeks old) were divided into two groups: one underwent ligation of the mesenteric lymph duct above the cistern (ligation group), and the other underwent a sham operation (sham group). After 1 and 2 weeks, fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and the active form of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured. At 2 weeks after the operation, the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) were performed. After the rats had been sacrificed, the insulin content of the pancreas was measured and the proliferation of {beta}-cells was assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies against insulin and Ki-67. Results: During the OGTT, the ligation group showed a significant decrease in the plasma glucose concentration at 120 min (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in the plasma insulin concentration by more than 2-fold at 15 min (p < 0.01). On the other hand, the plasma GIP concentration was significantly decreased at 60 min (p < 0.01) in the ligated group, while the active form of GLP-1 showed a significantly higher level at 90 min (1.7-fold; p < 0.05) and 120 min (2.5-fold; p < 0.01). During the IVGTT, the plasma insulin concentration in the ligation group was significantly higher at 2

  20. Differentiation and transplantation of functional pancreatic beta cells generated from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a type 1 diabetes mouse model.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kilsoo; Lim, Hyejin; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Thuan, Nguyen Van; Park, Seung Hwa; Lim, Yu-Mi; Choi, Hye-Yeon; Lee, Eung-Ryoung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Lee, Myung-Shik; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2012-09-20

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a classical animal model for autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D), closely mimicking features of human T1D. Thus, the NOD mouse presents an opportunity to test the effectiveness of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as a therapeutic modality for T1D. Here, we demonstrate a proof of concept for cellular therapy using NOD mouse-derived iPSCs (NOD-iPSCs). We generated iPSCs from NOD mouse embryonic fibroblasts or NOD mouse pancreas-derived epithelial cells (NPEs), and applied directed differentiation protocols to differentiate the NOD-iPSCs toward functional pancreatic beta cells. Finally, we investigated whether the NPE-iPSC-derived insulin-producing cells could normalize hyperglycemia in transplanted diabetic mice. The NOD-iPSCs showed typical embryonic stem cell-like characteristics such as expression of markers for pluripotency, in vitro differentiation, teratoma formation, and generation of chimeric mice. We developed a method for stepwise differentiation of NOD-iPSCs into insulin-producing cells, and found that NPE-iPSCs differentiate more readily into insulin-producing cells. The differentiated NPE-iPSCs expressed diverse pancreatic beta cell markers and released insulin in response to glucose and KCl stimulation. Transplantation of the differentiated NPE-iPSCs into diabetic mice resulted in kidney engraftment. The engrafted cells responded to glucose by secreting insulin, thereby normalizing blood glucose levels. We propose that NOD-iPSCs will provide a useful tool for investigating genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases and generating a cellular interaction model of T1D, paving the way for the potential application of patient-derived iPSCs in autologous beta cell transplantation for treating diabetes. PMID:22512788

  1. PED/PEA-15 Inhibits Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Ins-1E Pancreatic Beta-Cells via PLD-1

    PubMed Central

    Raciti, Gregory Alexander; Zatterale, Federica; Nigro, Cecilia; Mirra, Paola; Falco, Roberta; Ulianich, Luca; Di Jeso, Bruno; Formisano, Pietro; Miele, Claudia; Beguinot, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The small scaffold protein PED/PEA-15 is involved in several different physiologic and pathologic processes, such as cell proliferation and survival, diabetes and cancer. PED/PEA-15 exerts an anti-apoptotic function due to its ability to interfere with both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in different cell types. Recent evidence shows that mice overexpressing PED/PEA-15 present larger pancreatic islets and increased beta-cells mass. In the present work we investigated PED/PEA-15 role in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E beta-cells. In pancreatic islets isolated from TgPED/PEA-15 mice hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA fragmentation was lower compared to WT islets. TUNEL analysis showed that PED/PEA-15 overexpression increases the viability of Ins-1E beta-cells and enhances their resistance to apoptosis induced by hydrogen peroxide exposure. The activity of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP-1 were markedly reduced in Ins-1E cells overexpressing PED/PEA-15 (Ins-1EPED/PEA-15). In parallel, we observed a decrease of the mRNA levels of pro-apoptotic genes Bcl-xS and Bad. In contrast, the expression of the anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xL was enhanced. Accordingly, DNA fragmentation was higher in control cells compared to Ins-1EPED/PEA-15 cells. Interestingly, the preincubation with propranolol, an inhibitor of the pathway of PLD-1, a known interactor of PED/PEA-15, responsible for its deleterious effects on glucose tolerance, abolishes the antiapoptotic effects of PED/PEA-15 overexpression in Ins-1E beta-cells. The same results have been obtained by inhibiting PED/PEA-15 interaction with PLD-1 in Ins-1EPED/PEA-15. These results show that PED/PEA-15 overexpression is sufficient to block hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Ins-1E cells through a PLD-1 mediated mechanism. PMID:25489735

  2. High glucose induces suppression of insulin signalling and apoptosis via upregulation of endogenous IL-1beta and suppressor of cytokine signalling-1 in mouse pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Venieratos, Panagiotis D; Drossopoulou, Garyfalia I; Kapodistria, Katerina D; Tsilibary, Effie C; Kitsiou, Paraskevi V

    2010-05-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and inflammatory cytokines disrupt and/or attenuate signal transduction pathways that promote normal beta-cell survival, leading to the destruction of endocrine pancreas in type 2 diabetes. There is convincing evidence that autocrine insulin signalling exerts protective anti-apoptotic effects on beta cells. Suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) were induced by several cytokines and inhibit insulin-initiated signal transduction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether high glucose can influence endogenous interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and SOCS expression thus affecting insulin signalling and survival in insulin-producing mouse pancreatic beta cells (betaTC-6). Results showed that prolonged exposure of betaTC-6 cells to increased glucose concentrations resulted in significant inhibition of insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), and insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) as well as PI3-kinase activation. These changes were accompanied by impaired activation of the anti-apoptotic signalling protein Akt and annulment of Akt-mediated suppression of the Forkhead family of transcription factors (FoxO) activation. Glucose-induced attenuation of IRS-2/Akt-mediated signalling was associated with increased IL-1beta expression. Enhanced endogenous IL-1beta specifically induced mRNA and protein expression of SOCS-1 in betaTC-6 cells. Inhibition of SOCS-1 expression by SOCS-1-specific small interfering RNA restored IRS-2/PI3K-mediated Akt phosphorylation suppressed by high glucose. The upregulation of endogenous cytokine signalling and FoxO activation were accompanied by enhanced caspase-3 activation and increased susceptibility of cells to apoptosis. These results indicated that glucose-induced endogenous IL-1beta expression increased betaTC-6 cells apoptosis by inhibiting, at least in part, IRS-2/Akt-mediated signalling through SOCS-1 upregulation.

  3. Histomorphological and morphometric studies of the pancreatic islet cells of diabetic rats treated with extracts of Annona muricata.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, D O; Komolafe, O A; Adewole, O S; Obuotor, E M; Abiodun, A A; Adenowo, T K

    2010-05-01

    Microanatomical changes in the pancreatic islet cells of streptozotocin induced diabetic Wistar rats were studied after treatment with methanolic extracts of Annona muricata leaves. Thirty adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups (control, untreated diabetic group, and A. muricata-treated diabetic group) of ten rats each. Diabetes mellitus was experimentally induced in groups B and C by a single intra-peritoneal injection of 80 mg/kg streptozotocin dissolved in 0.1 M citrate buffer. The control rats were intraperitoneally injected with an equivalent volume of citrate buffer. Daily intra peritoneal injections of 100 mg/kg A. muricata were administered to group C rats for two weeks. Post sacrifice the pancreases of the rats were excised and fixed in Bouin's fluid. The tissues were processed for paraffin embedding and sections of 5 mum thickness were produced and stained with H & E, Gomori aldehyde fuchsin, and chrome alum haematoxylin-phloxine for demonstration of the beta-cells of islets of pancreatic islets. Histomorphological and morphometric examination of the stained pancreatic sections showed a significant increase in the number, diameter, and volume of the beta-cells of pancreatic islets of the A. muricata-treated group (5.67 +/- 0.184 N/1000 mum(2), 5.38 +/- 0.093 mum and 85.12 +/- 4.24 mum(3), respectively) when compared to that of the untreated diabetic group of rats (2.85 +/- 0.361 N/1000 mum(2), 2.85 +/- 0.362 mum and 69.56 +/- 5.216 mum(3), respectively). The results revealed regeneration of the beta-cells of islets of pancreatic islet of rats treated with extract of A. muricata.

  4. The relationship between node degree and dissipation rate in networks of diffusively coupled oscillators and its significance for pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Gosak, Marko; Stožer, Andraž; Markovič, Rene; Dolenšek, Jurij; Marhl, Marko; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-07-01

    Self-sustained oscillatory dynamics is a motion along a stable limit cycle in the phase space, and it arises in a wide variety of mechanical, electrical, and biological systems. Typically, oscillations are due to a balance between energy dissipation and generation. Their stability depends on the properties of the attractor, in particular, its dissipative characteristics, which in turn determine the flexibility of a given dynamical system. In a network of oscillators, the coupling additionally contributes to the dissipation, and hence affects the robustness of the oscillatory solution. Here, we therefore investigate how a heterogeneous network structure affects the dissipation rate of individual oscillators. First, we show that in a network of diffusively coupled oscillators, the dissipation is a linearly decreasing function of the node degree, and we demonstrate this numerically by calculating the average divergence of coupled Hopf oscillators. Subsequently, we use recordings of intracellular calcium dynamics in pancreatic beta cells in mouse acute tissue slices and the corresponding functional connectivity networks for an experimental verification of the presented theory. We use methods of nonlinear time series analysis to reconstruct the phase space and calculate the sum of Lyapunov exponents. Our analysis reveals a clear tendency of cells with a higher degree, that is, more interconnected cells, having more negative values of divergence, thus confirming our theoretical predictions. We discuss these findings in the context of energetic aspects of signaling in beta cells and potential risks for pathological changes in the tissue. PMID:26232966

  5. The relationship between node degree and dissipation rate in networks of diffusively coupled oscillators and its significance for pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Gosak, Marko; Stožer, Andraž; Markovič, Rene; Dolenšek, Jurij; Marhl, Marko; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-07-01

    Self-sustained oscillatory dynamics is a motion along a stable limit cycle in the phase space, and it arises in a wide variety of mechanical, electrical, and biological systems. Typically, oscillations are due to a balance between energy dissipation and generation. Their stability depends on the properties of the attractor, in particular, its dissipative characteristics, which in turn determine the flexibility of a given dynamical system. In a network of oscillators, the coupling additionally contributes to the dissipation, and hence affects the robustness of the oscillatory solution. Here, we therefore investigate how a heterogeneous network structure affects the dissipation rate of individual oscillators. First, we show that in a network of diffusively coupled oscillators, the dissipation is a linearly decreasing function of the node degree, and we demonstrate this numerically by calculating the average divergence of coupled Hopf oscillators. Subsequently, we use recordings of intracellular calcium dynamics in pancreatic beta cells in mouse acute tissue slices and the corresponding functional connectivity networks for an experimental verification of the presented theory. We use methods of nonlinear time series analysis to reconstruct the phase space and calculate the sum of Lyapunov exponents. Our analysis reveals a clear tendency of cells with a higher degree, that is, more interconnected cells, having more negative values of divergence, thus confirming our theoretical predictions. We discuss these findings in the context of energetic aspects of signaling in beta cells and potential risks for pathological changes in the tissue.

  6. The Incretins and Pancreatic beta-Cells: Use of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Glucose-Dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide to Cure Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2010-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The complications associated with T2DM result in increased mortality and financial cost for those affected. T2DM has long been known to be associated with insulin resistance in peripheral tissues and a relative degree of insulin deficiency. However, the concept that insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are not linked through a hyperbolic relationship in T2DM has continuously been demonstrated in many clinical trials. Thus, in order to prevent and treat T2DM, it is necessary to identify the substance(s) that will improve the function and survival of the pancreatic beta-cells in both normal and pathologic conditions, so that production and secretion of insulin can be enhanced. Incretin hormones, such as glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), have been shown to lower the postprandial and fasting glucose and the glycated hemoglobin levels, suppress the elevated glucagon level, and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin synthesis and secretion. In this report, we will review the biological actions and mechanisms associated with the actions of incretin hormones, GLP-1 and GIP, on beta-cell health and compare the differences between GLP-1 and GIP.

  7. Pancreatic beta cell function following liraglutide-augmented weight loss in individuals with prediabetes: analysis of a randomised, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Alice; Ariel, Danit; Abbasi, Fahim; Lamendola, Cindy; Grove, Kaylene; Tomasso, Vanessa; Reaven, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Liraglutide can modulate insulin secretion by directly stimulating beta cells or indirectly through weight loss and enhanced insulin sensitivity. Recently, we showed that liraglutide treatment in overweight individuals with prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) led to greater weight loss (−7.7% vs −3.9%) and improvement in insulin resistance compared with placebo. The current study evaluates the effects on beta cell function of weight loss augmented by liraglutide compared with weight loss alone. Methods This was a parallel, randomised study conducted in a single academic centre. Both participants and study administrators were blinded to treatment assignment. Individuals who were 40–70 years old, overweight (BMI 27–40 kg/m2) and with prediabetes were randomised (via a computerised system) to receive liraglutide (n = 35) or matching placebo (n = 33), and 49 participants were analysed. All were instructed to follow an energy-restricted diet. Primary outcome was insulin secretory function, which was evaluated in response to graded infusions of glucose and day-long mixed meals. Results Liraglutide treatment (n = 24) significantly (p ≤0.03) increased the insulin secretion rate (% mean change [95% CI]; 21% [12, 31] vs −4% [−11, 3]) and pancreatic beta cell sensitivity to intravenous glucose (229% [161, 276] vs −0.5% (−15, 14]), and decreased insulin clearance rate (−3.5% [−11, 4] vs 8.2 [0.2, 16]) as compared with placebo (n = 25). The liraglutide-treated group also had significantly (p ≤0.03) lower day-long glucose (−8.2% [−11, −6] vs −0.1 [−3, 2]) and NEFA concentrations (−14 [−20, −8] vs −2.1 [−10, 6]) following mixed meals, whereas day-long insulin concentrations did not significantly differ as compared with placebo. In a multivariate regression analysis, weight loss was associated with a decrease in insulin secretion rate and day-long glucose and insulin concentrations in

  8. Regulation of gene expression by glucose in pancreatic beta -cells (MIN6) via insulin secretion and activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase.

    PubMed

    da Silva Xavier, G; Varadi, A; Ainscow, E K; Rutter, G A

    2000-11-17

    Increases in glucose concentration control the transcription of the preproinsulin (PPI) gene and several other genes in the pancreatic islet beta-cell. Although recent data have demonstrated that secreted insulin may regulate the PPI gene (Leibiger, I. B., Leibiger, B., Moede, T., and Berggren, P. O. (1998) Mol. Cell 1, 933-938), the role of insulin in the control of other beta-cell genes is unexplored. To study the importance of insulin secretion in the regulation of the PPI and liver-type pyruvate kinase (L-PK) genes by glucose, we have used intranuclear microinjection of promoter-luciferase constructs into MIN6 beta-cells and photon-counting imaging. The activity of each promoter was increased either by 30 (versus 3) mm glucose or by 1-20 nm insulin. These effects of insulin were not due to enhanced glucose metabolism since culture with the hormone had no impact on the stimulation of increases in intracellular ATP concentration caused by 30 mm glucose. Furthermore, the islet-specific glucokinase promoter and cellular glucokinase immunoreactivity were unaffected by 30 mm glucose or 20 nm insulin. Inhibition of insulin secretion with the Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil, the ATP-sensitive K(+) channel opener diazoxide, or the alpha(2)-adrenergic agonist clonidine blocked the effects of glucose on L-PK gene transcription. Similarly, 30 mm glucose failed to induce the promoter after inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase activity with LY294002 and the expression of dominant negative-acting phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (Deltap85) or the phosphoinositide 3'-phosphatase PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue). LY294002 also diminished the activation of the L-PK gene caused by inhibition of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase with anti-5'-AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2 antibodies. Conversely, stimulation of insulin secretion with 13 mm KCl or 10 microm tolbutamide strongly activated the PPI and L-PK promoters. These data indicate that, in MIN6 beta-cells

  9. Involvement of conventional kinesin in glucose-stimulated secretory granule movements and exocytosis in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Varadi, Aniko; Ainscow, Edward K; Allan, Victoria J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-11-01

    Recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface is essential for the sustained secretion of insulin in response to glucose. At present, the molecular motors involved in this movement, and the mechanisms whereby they may be regulated, are undefined. To investigate the role of kinesin family members, we labelled densecore vesicles in clonal beta-cells using an adenovirally expressed, vesicle-targeted green fluorescent protein (phogrin.EGFP), and employed immunoadsorption to obtain highly purified insulin-containing vesicles. Whereas several kinesin family members were expressed in this cell type, only conventional kinesin heavy chain (KHC) was detected in vesicle preparations. Expression of a dominant-negative KHC motor domain (KHC(mut)) blocked all vesicular movements with velocity >0.4 micro m second(-1), which demonstrates that kinesin activity was essential for vesicle motility in live beta-cells. Moreover, expression of KHC(mut) strongly inhibited the sustained, but not acute, stimulation of secretion by glucose. Finally, vesicle movement was stimulated by ATP dose-dependently in permeabilized cells, which suggests that glucose-induced increases in cytosolic [ATP] mediate the effects of the sugar in vivo, by enhancing kinesin activity. These data therefore provide evidence for a novel mechanism whereby glucose may enhance insulin release.

  10. UPR in palmitate-treated pancreatic beta-cells is not affected by altering oxidation of the fatty acid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Elevated levels of lipids are detrimental for beta-cell function and mass. One of the mechanisms of how fatty acids induce apoptosis is development of the unfolded protein response (UPR). It is still far from understood how fatty acids activate the UPR, however. Methods We examined how palmitate-induced activation of the UPR was affected by altering the metabolism of the fatty acid in insulin-secreting INS-1E and MIN6 cell lines and intact human islets. To increase oxidation, we used low glucose (5.5 mM) or AICAR; and to reduce oxidation, we used high glucose (25 mM) or etomoxir. UPR was measured after 3, 24 and 48 hours of palmitate treatment. Results Modulation of palmitate oxidation by either glucose or the pharmacological agents did not affect palmitate-induced UPR activation. Conclusion Our finding suggests that other factors than oxidation of palmitate play a role in the activation of UPR in fatty acid-treated beta-cells. PMID:21978671

  11. Knowledge Gaps in Rodent Pancreas Biology: Taking Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Beta Cells into Our Own Hands

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Munirah Mohamad; Low, Blaise Su Jun; Pek, Nicole Min Qian; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong

    2016-01-01

    In the field of stem cell biology and diabetes, we and others seek to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells for disease modeling and cell replacement therapy. Traditionally, knowledge gathered from rodents is extended to human pancreas developmental biology research involving human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). While much has been learnt from rodent pancreas biology in the early steps toward Pdx1+ pancreatic progenitors, much less is known about the transition toward Ngn3+ pancreatic endocrine progenitors. Essentially, the later steps of pancreatic β cell development and maturation remain elusive to date. As a result, the most recent advances in the stem cell and diabetes field have relied upon combinatorial testing of numerous growth factors and chemical compounds in an arbitrary trial-and-error fashion to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells from hPSCs. Although this hit-or-miss approach appears to have made some headway in maturing human pancreatic β cells in vitro, its underlying biology is vaguely understood. Therefore, in this mini-review, we discuss some of these late-stage signaling pathways that are involved in human pancreatic β cell differentiation and highlight our current understanding of their relevance in rodent pancreas biology. Our efforts here unravel several novel signaling pathways that can be further studied to shed light on unexplored aspects of rodent pancreas biology. New investigations into these signaling pathways are expected to advance our knowledge in human pancreas developmental biology and to aid in the translation of stem cell biology in the context of diabetes treatments. PMID:26834702

  12. Glucose- and GTP-dependent stimulation of the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in rodent and human pancreatic islets and pure beta cells. Evidence for an essential role of GTP-binding proteins in nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, A; Seavey, S E; Li, G; Sorenson, R L; Weinhaus, A J; Nesher, R; Rabaglia, M E; Vadakekalam, J; Metz, S A

    1996-01-01

    Several GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins) undergo post-translational modifications (isoprenylation and carboxyl methylation) in pancreatic beta cells. Herein, two of these were identified as CDC42 and rap 1, using Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Confocal microscopic data indicated that CDC42 is localized only in islet endocrine cells but not in acinar cells of the pancreas. CDC42 undergoes a guanine nucleotide-specific membrane association and carboxyl methylation in normal rat islets, human islets, and pure beta (HIT or INS-1) cells. GTPgammaS-dependent carboxyl methylation of a 23-kD protein was also demonstrable in secretory granule fractions from normal islets or beta cells. AFC (a specific inhibitor of prenyl-cysteine carboxyl methyl transferases) blocked the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in five types of insulin-secreting cells, without blocking GTPgammaS-induced translocation, implying that methylation is a consequence (not a cause) of transfer to membrane sites. High glucose (but not a depolarizing concentration of K+) induced the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in intact cells, as assessed after specific immunoprecipitation. This effect was abrogated by GTP depletion using mycophenolic acid and was restored upon GTP repletion by coprovision of guanosine. In contrast, although rap 1 was also carboxyl methylated, it was not translocated to the particulate fraction by GTPgammaS; furthermore, its methylation was also stimulated by 40 mM K+ (suggesting a role which is not specific to nutrient stimulation). AFC also impeded nutrient-induced (but not K+-induced) insulin secretion from islets and beta cells under static or perifusion conditions, whereas an inactive structural analogue of AFC failed to inhibit insulin release. These effects were reproduced not only by S-adenosylhomocysteine (another methylation inhibitor), but also by GTP depletion. Thus, the glucose- and GTP-dependent carboxyl methylation of G-proteins such as CDC42 is an obligate step in

  13. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of ß-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense cores in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zinc ...

  14. Ryanodine receptor type I and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptors mediate Ca2+ release from insulin-containing vesicles in living pancreatic beta-cells (MIN6).

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Kathryn J; Lai, F Anthony; Rutter, Guy A

    2003-03-28

    We have demonstrated recently (Mitchell, K. J., Pinton, P., Varadi, A., Tacchetti, C., Ainscow, E. K., Pozzan, T., Rizzuto, R., and Rutter, G. A. (2001) J. Cell Biol. 155, 41-51) that ryanodine receptors (RyR) are present on insulin-containing secretory vesicles. Here we show that pancreatic islets and derived beta-cell lines express type I and II, but not type III, RyRs. Purified by subcellular fractionation and membrane immuno-isolation, dense core secretory vesicles were found to possess a similar level of type I RyR immunoreactivity as Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes but substantially less RyR II than the latter. Monitored in cells expressing appropriately targeted aequorins, dantrolene, an inhibitor of RyR I channels, elevated free Ca(2+) concentrations in the secretory vesicle compartment from 40.1 +/- 6.7 to 90.4 +/- 14.8 microm (n = 4, p < 0.01), while having no effect on ER Ca(2+) concentrations. Furthermore, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), a novel Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent, decreased dense core secretory vesicle but not ER free Ca(2+) concentrations in permeabilized MIN6 beta-cells, and flash photolysis of caged NAADP released Ca(2+) from a thapsigargin-insensitive Ca(2+) store in single MIN6 cells. Because dantrolene strongly inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (from 3.07 +/- 0.51-fold stimulation to no significant glucose effect; n = 3, p < 0.01), we conclude that RyR I-mediated Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from secretory vesicles, possibly potentiated by NAADP, is essential for the activation of insulin secretion.

  15. Cooperation between HMGA1, PDX-1, and MafA is Essential for Glucose-Induced Insulin Transcription in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, Biagio; Iiritano, Stefania; Chiefari, Eusebio; Brunetti, Francesco S; Gu, Guoqiang; Foti, Daniela Patrizia; Brunetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The high-mobility group AT-hook 1 (HMGA1) protein is a nuclear architectural factor that can organize chromatin structures. It regulates gene expression by controlling the formation of stereospecific multiprotein complexes called "enhanceosomes" on the AT-rich regions of target gene promoters. Previously, we reported that defects in HMGA1 caused decreased insulin receptor expression and increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans and mice. Interestingly, mice with disrupted HMGA1 gene had significantly smaller islets and decreased insulin content in their pancreata, suggesting that HMGA1 may have a direct role in insulin transcription and secretion. Herein, we investigate the regulatory roles of HMGA1 in insulin transcription. We provide evidence that HMGA1 physically interacts with PDX-1 and MafA, two critical transcription factors for insulin gene expression and beta-cell function, both in vitro and in vivo. We then show that the overexpression of HMGA1 significantly improves the transactivating activity of PDX-1 and MafA on human and mouse insulin promoters, while HMGA1 knockdown considerably decreased this transactivating activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that high glucose stimulus significantly increases the binding of HMGA1 to the insulin (INS) gene promoter, suggesting that HMGA1 may act as a glucose-sensitive element controlling the transcription of the INS gene. Together, our findings provide evidence that HMGA1, by regulating PDX-1- and MafA-induced transactivation of the INS gene promoter, plays a critical role in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin production.

  16. 3,5,3'-Triiodo-L-thyronine enhances the differentiation of a human pancreatic duct cell line (hPANC-1) towards a beta-cell-Like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Silvia; Anastasi, Emanuela; Sciacchitano, Salvatore; Verga Falzacappa, Cecilia; Panacchia, Laura; Bucci, Barbara; Khouri, Daniele; D'Acquarica, Ilaria; Brunetti, Ercole; Di Mario, Umberto; Toscano, Vincenzo; Perfetti, Riccardo

    2005-07-01

    The thyroid hormone, 3,5,3'-Triiodo-L-thyronine (T3), is essential for growth, differentiation, and regulation of metabolic functions in multicellular organisms, although the specific mechanisms of this control are still unknown. In this study, treatment of a human pancreatic duct cell line (hPANC-1) with T3 blocks cell growth by an increase of cells in G(0)/G(1) cell cycle phase and enhances morphological and functional changes as indicated by the marked increase in the synthesis of insulin and the parallel decrease of the ductal differentiation marker cytokeratin19. Expression analysis of some of the genes regulating pancreatic beta-cell differentiation revealed a time-dependent increase in insulin and glut2 mRNA levels in response to T3. As last step of the acquisition of a beta-cell-like phenotype, we present evidence that thyroid hormones are able to increase the release of insulin into the culture medium. In conclusion, our results suggest, for the first time, that thyroid hormones induce cell cycle perturbations and play an important role in the process of transdifferentiation of a human pancreatic duct line (hPANC-1) into pancreatic-beta-cell-like cells. These findings have important implications in cell-therapy based treatment of diabetes and may provide important insights in the designing of novel therapeutic agents to restore normal glycemia in subjects with diabetes.

  17. Determinants of glucose toxicity and its reversibility in the pancreatic islet beta-cell line, HIT-T15.

    PubMed

    Gleason, C E; Gonzalez, M; Harmon, J S; Robertson, R P

    2000-11-01

    HIT-T15 cells, a clonal beta-cell line, were cultured and passaged weekly for 6 mo in RPMI 1640 media containing various concentrations of glucose. Insulin content decreased in the intermediate- and late-passage cells as a continuous rather than a threshold glucose concentration effect. In a second series of experiments, cells were grown in media containing either 0.8 or 16.0 mM glucose from passages 76 through 105. Subcultures of passages 86, 92, and 99 that had been grown in media containing 16.0 mM glucose were switched to media containing 0.8 mM glucose and also carried forward to passage 105. Dramatic increases in insulin content and secretion and insulin gene expression were observed when the switches were made at passages 86 and 92 but not when the switch was made at passage 99. These findings suggest that glucose toxicity of insulin-secreting cells is a continuous rather than a threshold function of glucose concentration and that the shorter the period of antecedent glucose toxicity, the more likely that full recovery of cell function will occur. PMID:11052953

  18. Determinants of glucose toxicity and its reversibility in the pancreatic islet beta-cell line, HIT-T15.

    PubMed

    Gleason, C E; Gonzalez, M; Harmon, J S; Robertson, R P

    2000-11-01

    HIT-T15 cells, a clonal beta-cell line, were cultured and passaged weekly for 6 mo in RPMI 1640 media containing various concentrations of glucose. Insulin content decreased in the intermediate- and late-passage cells as a continuous rather than a threshold glucose concentration effect. In a second series of experiments, cells were grown in media containing either 0.8 or 16.0 mM glucose from passages 76 through 105. Subcultures of passages 86, 92, and 99 that had been grown in media containing 16.0 mM glucose were switched to media containing 0.8 mM glucose and also carried forward to passage 105. Dramatic increases in insulin content and secretion and insulin gene expression were observed when the switches were made at passages 86 and 92 but not when the switch was made at passage 99. These findings suggest that glucose toxicity of insulin-secreting cells is a continuous rather than a threshold function of glucose concentration and that the shorter the period of antecedent glucose toxicity, the more likely that full recovery of cell function will occur.

  19. Pattern of rise in subplasma membrane Ca{sup 2+} concentration determines type of fusing insulin granules in pancreatic {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Aoyagi, Kyota; Nakamichi, Yoko; Nishiwaki, Chiyono; Sakurai, Takashi; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2009-07-31

    We simultaneously analyzed insulin granule fusion with insulin fused to green fluorescent protein and the subplasma membrane Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub PM}) with the Ca{sup 2+} indicator Fura Red in rat {beta} cells by dual-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We found that rapid and marked elevation in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub PM} caused insulin granule fusion mostly from previously docked granules during the high KCl-evoked release and high glucose-evoked first phase release. In contrast, the slow and sustained elevation in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub PM} induced fusion from newcomers translocated from the internal pool during the low KCl-evoked release and glucose-evoked second phase release. These data suggest that the pattern of the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub PM} rise directly determines the types of fusing granules.

  20. Deletion of Apoptosis Signal-Regulating Kinase 1 (ASK1) Protects Pancreatic Beta-Cells from Stress-Induced Death but Not from Glucose Homeostasis Alterations under Pro-Inflammatory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Emilie; Higa, Arisa; Schuster-Klein, Carole; Bernard, Catherine; Sulpice, Thierry; Guardiola, Beatrice; Chevet, Eric; Alquier, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is characterized by pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and is associated with low-grade inflammation. Recent observations suggest that apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is involved in beta-cell death in response to different stressors. In this study, we tested whether ASK1 deficiency protects beta-cells from glucolipotoxic conditions and cytokines treatment or from glucose homeostasis alteration induced by endotoxemia. Methodology/Principal Findings Insulin secretion was neither affected upon shRNA-mediated downregulation of ASK1 in MIN6 cells nor in islets from ASK1-deficient mice. ASK1 silencing in MIN6 cells and deletion in islets did not prevent the deleterious effect of glucolipotoxic conditions or cytokines on insulin secretion. However, it protected MIN6 cells from death induced by ER stress or palmitate and islets from short term caspase activation in response to cytokines. Moreover, endotoxemia induced by LPS infusion increased insulin secretion during hyperglycemic clamps but the response was similar in wild-type and ASK1-deficient mice. Finally, insulin sensitivity in the presence of LPS was not affected by ASK1-deficiency. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrates that ASK1 is not involved in beta-cell function and dysfunction but controls stress-induced beta-cell death. PMID:25383781

  1. In vivo synchronous membrane potential oscillations in mouse pancreatic beta-cells: lack of co-ordination between islets.

    PubMed Central

    Valdeolmillos, M; Gomis, A; Sánchez-Andrés, J V

    1996-01-01

    1. The properties of the oscillations in electrical activity of different beta-cells within the same islet of Langerhans, and of different islets within the same pancreas, recorded in vivo, are described. 2. Simultaneous recordings of two cells within the same islet showed that the oscillations were synchronous. A rapid increase in blood glucose led to the simultaneous appearance of a transitory phase of continuous electrical activity in both cells. These results indicate that under physiological conditions, the islets operate as a functional syncytium. 3. Simultaneous recordings of cells from two different islets within the same pancreas showed that the oscillations in the electrical activity were not synchronous, which suggests that each islet is a functionally independent unit. Rapid changes in blood glucose led to the appearance of a transitory phase of increased electrical activity in both islets, although of different duration. These results suggest that the endocrine pancreas lacks a pacemaker driving the electrical activity of all the islets. 4. The comparison of the degree of activation of different islets, simultaneously recorded at different glucose concentrations, indicated that all the islets had a similar sensitivity to glucose. Furthermore, when the glucose concentration was increased, the electrical activity in both islets increased in parallel, suggesting that the amount of insulin released due to the increase in glycaemia was produced by the simultaneous response of all the islets and not by the recruitment of islets with different sensitivities to glucose. 5. Our results predict that the synchronous electrical activity of all the cells within an islet will result in widespread intracellular calcium oscillations and pulsatile insulin secretion. The periodicity of the pulses of insulin secretion in different islets is suggested to be of slightly different length and asynchronous. PMID:8735691

  2. Canine Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Ameliorates Hyperglycemia Associated with Inhibiting Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Improving Pancreatic Beta-Cell Survival in Diabetic Mice and Dogs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Yingjie; Jiang, Xinghao; Li, Junyan; Song, Liying; Khoso, Mir Hasson; Liu, Yunye; Wu, Qiang; Ren, Guiping; Li, Deshan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrinopathy in dog. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF-21) is a secreted protein, which is involved in glucose homeostasis. We speculate that the recombinant canine FGF-21 (cFGF-21) has the potential to become a powerful therapeutics to treat canine diabetes. The cFGF-21 gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3). After purification, a cFGF-21 protein with the purity exceeding 95% was obtained. Mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes and type 1 diabetic mice/dogs induced by STZ were used to examine the biological activity of cFGF-21 in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Results showed that cFGF-21 stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes significantly in a dose-dependent manner, and reduced plasma glucose significantly in diabetic mice/dogs. After treatment with cFGF-21, the serum insulin level, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level and the expressions of the hepatic gluconeogenesis genes (glucose-6-phosphatase, G6Pase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, PCK) of the diabetic mice/dogs were attenuated significantly. In the mouse experiment, we also found that the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) were up-regulated significantly in the livers after treatment. Histopathological and immunohistochemical results showed that treatment with cFGF-21 promoted recovery of pancreatic islets from STZ-induced apoptosis. Besides, we also found that treatment with cFGF-21 protected liver against STZ or hyperglycemia induced damage and the mechanism of this action associated with inhibiting oxidative stress. In conclusion, cFGF-21 represents a promising candidate for canine diabetes therapeutics. The mechanism of cFGF-21 ameliorates hyperglycemia associated with inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis by regulation of STAT3 signal pathway and improving pancreatic beta-cell survival. PMID:27203422

  3. Canine Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Ameliorates Hyperglycemia Associated with Inhibiting Hepatic Gluconeogenesis and Improving Pancreatic Beta-Cell Survival in Diabetic Mice and Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Yingjie; Jiang, Xinghao; Li, Junyan; Song, Liying; Khoso, Mir Hasson; Liu, Yunye; Wu, Qiang; Ren, Guiping; Li, Deshan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrinopathy in dog. Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF-21) is a secreted protein, which is involved in glucose homeostasis. We speculate that the recombinant canine FGF-21 (cFGF-21) has the potential to become a powerful therapeutics to treat canine diabetes. The cFGF-21 gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli Rosetta (DE3). After purification, a cFGF-21 protein with the purity exceeding 95% was obtained. Mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes and type 1 diabetic mice/dogs induced by STZ were used to examine the biological activity of cFGF-21 in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Results showed that cFGF-21 stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes significantly in a dose-dependent manner, and reduced plasma glucose significantly in diabetic mice/dogs. After treatment with cFGF-21, the serum insulin level, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level and the expressions of the hepatic gluconeogenesis genes (glucose-6-phosphatase, G6Pase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, PCK) of the diabetic mice/dogs were attenuated significantly. In the mouse experiment, we also found that the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and the expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) were up-regulated significantly in the livers after treatment. Histopathological and immunohistochemical results showed that treatment with cFGF-21 promoted recovery of pancreatic islets from STZ-induced apoptosis. Besides, we also found that treatment with cFGF-21 protected liver against STZ or hyperglycemia induced damage and the mechanism of this action associated with inhibiting oxidative stress. In conclusion, cFGF-21 represents a promising candidate for canine diabetes therapeutics. The mechanism of cFGF-21 ameliorates hyperglycemia associated with inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis by regulation of STAT3 signal pathway and improving pancreatic beta-cell survival. PMID:27203422

  4. Low dose monoethyl phthalate (MEP) exposure triggers proliferation by activating PDX-1 at 1.1B4 human pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Güven, Celal; Dal, Fulya; Aydoğan Ahbab, Müfide; Taskin, Eylem; Ahbab, Süleyman; Adin Çinar, Suzan; Sırma Ekmekçi, Sema; Güleç, Çağrı; Abacı, Neslihan; Akçakaya, Handan

    2016-07-01

    Phthalate plasticizers used in a wide range of common plastic products are released into the environment and may pose a risk of increased incidence of type 2 diabetes. In this work, we studied the effects of monoethyl phthalate (MEP), the metabolite of diethyl phthalate, exposure on 1.1B4 human pancreatic beta cells at low doses (1-1000 nM). We showed that MEP treatment induced proliferation in 1.1B4 cells. Also PCNA protein expression levels were increased related to proliferation induction. It has been noted that phthalates can exert estrogen mediated response by interacting with ER. In our study 24 h MEP treatment decreased ERα protein expression level conversely it increased the same protein expression level after 72 h treatment. Also MEP treatment decreased ERβ expression after 72 h at 1.1B4 cells. Our results further show that insulin content of 1.1B4 cells were increased with low dose MEP treatment. Along with our insulin content results, PDX- 1 expression levels were also increased at 1.1B4 cells with MEP treatment. These findings suggest that MEP acts as an estrogenic compound and PPARγ agonist at lower concentrations. Also it should be noted that PDX-1 may be a critical regulator of 1.1B4 cells treated with MEP.

  5. Effect of aging on islet beta-cell function and its mechanisms in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhaoyan; Du, Yingzhen; Liu, Yu; Ma, Lichao; Li, Lin; Gong, Yanping; Tian, Hui; Li, Chunlin

    2012-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by islet β-cell dysfunction and its incidence increases with age. However, the mechanisms underlying the effect of aging on islet β-cell function are not fully understood. We characterized β-cell function in 4-month-old (young), 14-month-old (adult), and 24-month-old (old) male Wistar rats, and found that islet β-cell function decreased gradually with age. Old rats displayed oral glucose intolerance and exhibited a decrease in glucose-stimulated insulin release (GSIR) and palmitic acid-stimulated insulin release (PSIR). Furthermore, total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity decreased, whereas serum malondialdehyde (MDA) levels increased in the older rats. Moreover, we detected a significant reduction in β-cell proliferation and an increase in the frequency of apoptotic β-cells in the islets of rats in the old group. Finally, Anxa1 expression in the islets of old rats was significantly upregulated. These data provide new insights into the development of age-related β-cell dysfunction in rats.

  6. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of [18F]Exendin (9-39) as a potential biomarker to measure pancreatic beta-cell mass

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lim, Keunpoong; Normandin, Marc; Zhao, Xiaojian; Cline, Gary W.; Ding, Yu-Shin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is released in response to food intake and plays an important role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis. Exendin (9-39), a potent GLP-1R antagonist, has been labeled with In-111 for SPECT imaging. We report here the first radiosynthesis of [18F]exendin (9-39) ([18F]Ex(9-39)) and an evaluation of its potential as a biomarker for in vivo PET imaging of pancreatic β-cell mass (BCM) in rats. Methods F-18 label was introduced by conjugation of [18F]4-fluorobenzaldehyde with an Ex(9-39) derivative containing a 6-hydrazinonicotinyl group on the -amine of Lys27. PET imaging was carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats (5 control, 5 streptozotocin-induced diabetic) and BioBreeding-Diabetes Prone rats (3 at 7 wks, 3 at 12 wks) using HRRT following 0.187±0.084 mCi [18F]Ex(9-39) administration. Time activity curves were obtained from pancreas, liver and kidney. Pancreases were assayed for insulin content after the imaging study. Results Site-specifically labeled [18F]Ex(9-39) was purified on a G15 open column with radiochemical and chemical purities >98%. PET imaging showed pancreatic SUV peaked at 10 min, and plateaued by 50 min to the end of scan (240 min). No correlations of pancreatic SUV with post-mortem measures of insulin content were seen. Conclusions [18F]Ex(9-39) was successfully prepared and used for PET imaging for the first time to measure pancreatic BCM. The results suggest that derivatization of the Lys27 residue might reduce binding affinity, as evidenced by the absence of specific binding. Exendin analogs radiolabeled at other sites may elucidate the active site required for binding. PMID:22033026

  8. Foodborne Cereulide Causes Beta-Cell Dysfunction and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vangoitsenhoven, Roman; Rondas, Dieter; Crèvecoeur, Inne; D'Hertog, Wannes; Baatsen, Pieter; Masini, Matilde; Andjelkovic, Mirjana; Van Loco, Joris; Matthys, Christophe; Mathieu, Chantal; Overbergh, Lut; Van der Schueren, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis To study the effects of cereulide, a food toxin often found at low concentrations in take-away meals, on beta-cell survival and function. Methods Cell death was quantified by Hoechst/Propidium Iodide in mouse (MIN6) and rat (INS-1E) beta-cell lines, whole mouse islets and control cell lines (HepG2 and COS-1). Beta-cell function was studied by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Mechanisms of toxicity were evaluated in MIN6 cells by mRNA profiling, electron microscopy and mitochondrial function tests. Results 24 h exposure to 5 ng/ml cereulide rendered almost all MIN6, INS-1E and pancreatic islets apoptotic, whereas cell death did not increase in the control cell lines. In MIN6 cells and murine islets, GSIS capacity was lost following 24 h exposure to 0.5 ng/ml cereulide (P<0.05). Cereulide exposure induced markers of mitochondrial stress including Puma (p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis, P<0.05) and general pro-apoptotic signals as Chop (CCAAT/-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein). Mitochondria appeared swollen upon transmission electron microscopy, basal respiration rate was reduced by 52% (P<0.05) and reactive oxygen species increased by more than twofold (P<0.05) following 24 h exposure to 0.25 and 0.50 ng/ml cereulide, respectively. Conclusions/Interpretation Cereulide causes apoptotic beta-cell death at low concentrations and impairs beta-cell function at even lower concentrations, with mitochondrial dysfunction underlying these defects. Thus, exposure to cereulide even at concentrations too low to cause systemic effects appears deleterious to the beta-cell. PMID:25119564

  9. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells.

    PubMed

    Gerencser, Akos A; Mookerjee, Shona A; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions. PMID:27404273

  10. Measurement of the Absolute Magnitude and Time Courses of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Primary and Clonal Pancreatic Beta-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerencser, Akos A.; Mookerjee, Shona A.; Jastroch, Martin; Brand, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to simplify, improve and validate quantitative measurement of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) in pancreatic β-cells. This built on our previously introduced calculation of the absolute magnitude of ΔψM in intact cells, using time-lapse imaging of the non-quench mode fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester and a bis-oxonol plasma membrane potential (ΔψP) indicator. ΔψM is a central mediator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. ΔψM is at the crossroads of cellular energy production and demand, therefore precise assay of its magnitude is a valuable tool to study how these processes interplay in insulin secretion. Dispersed islet cell cultures allowed cell type-specific, single-cell observations of cell-to-cell heterogeneity of ΔψM and ΔψP. Glucose addition caused hyperpolarization of ΔψM and depolarization of ΔψP. The hyperpolarization was a monophasic step increase, even in cells where the ΔψP depolarization was biphasic. The biphasic response of ΔψP was associated with a larger hyperpolarization of ΔψM than the monophasic response. Analysis of the relationships between ΔψP and ΔψM revealed that primary dispersed β-cells responded to glucose heterogeneously, driven by variable activation of energy metabolism. Sensitivity analysis of the calibration was consistent with β-cells having substantial cell-to-cell variations in amounts of mitochondria, and this was predicted not to impair the accuracy of determinations of relative changes in ΔψM and ΔψP. Finally, we demonstrate a significant problem with using an alternative ΔψM probe, rhodamine 123. In glucose-stimulated and oligomycin-inhibited β-cells the principles of the rhodamine 123 assay were breached, resulting in misleading conclusions. PMID:27404273

  11. Antibody Response to Serpin B13 Induces Adaptive Changes in Mouse Pancreatic Islets and Slows Down the Decline in the Residual Beta Cell Function in Children with Recent Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kryvalap, Yury; Lo, Chi-Wen; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Baldzizhar, Raman; Jospe, Nicholas; Czyzyk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is characterized by a heightened antibody (Ab) response to pancreatic islet self-antigens, which is a biomarker of progressive islet pathology. We recently identified a novel antibody to clade B serpin that reduces islet-associated T cell accumulation and is linked to the delayed onset of T1D. As natural immunity to clade B arises early in life, we hypothesized that it may influence islet development during that time. To test this possibility healthy young Balb/c male mice were injected with serpin B13 mAb or IgG control and examined for the number and cellularity of pancreatic islets by immunofluorescence and FACS. Beta cell proliferation was assessed by measuring nucleotide analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-EdU) incorporation into the DNA and islet Reg gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Human studies involved measuring anti-serpin B13 autoantibodies by Luminex. We found that injecting anti-serpin B13 monoclonal Ab enhanced beta cell proliferation and Reg gene expression, induced the generation of ∼80 pancreatic islets per animal, and ultimately led to increase in the beta cell mass. These findings are relevant to human T1D because our analysis of subjects just diagnosed with T1D revealed an association between baseline anti-serpin activity and slower residual beta cell function decline in the first year after the onset of diabetes. Our findings reveal a new role for the anti-serpin immunological response in promoting adaptive changes in the endocrine pancreas and suggests that enhancement of this response could potentially help impede the progression of T1D in humans.

  12. Antibody Response to Serpin B13 Induces Adaptive Changes in Mouse Pancreatic Islets and Slows Down the Decline in the Residual Beta Cell Function in Children with Recent Onset of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kryvalap, Yury; Lo, Chi-Wen; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Baldzizhar, Raman; Jospe, Nicholas; Czyzyk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) is characterized by a heightened antibody (Ab) response to pancreatic islet self-antigens, which is a biomarker of progressive islet pathology. We recently identified a novel antibody to clade B serpin that reduces islet-associated T cell accumulation and is linked to the delayed onset of T1D. As natural immunity to clade B arises early in life, we hypothesized that it may influence islet development during that time. To test this possibility healthy young Balb/c male mice were injected with serpin B13 mAb or IgG control and examined for the number and cellularity of pancreatic islets by immunofluorescence and FACS. Beta cell proliferation was assessed by measuring nucleotide analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-EdU) incorporation into the DNA and islet Reg gene expression was measured by real time PCR. Human studies involved measuring anti-serpin B13 autoantibodies by Luminex. We found that injecting anti-serpin B13 monoclonal Ab enhanced beta cell proliferation and Reg gene expression, induced the generation of ∼80 pancreatic islets per animal, and ultimately led to increase in the beta cell mass. These findings are relevant to human T1D because our analysis of subjects just diagnosed with T1D revealed an association between baseline anti-serpin activity and slower residual beta cell function decline in the first year after the onset of diabetes. Our findings reveal a new role for the anti-serpin immunological response in promoting adaptive changes in the endocrine pancreas and suggests that enhancement of this response could potentially help impede the progression of T1D in humans. PMID:26578518

  13. KAT2B Is Required for Pancreatic Beta Cell Adaptation to Metabolic Stress by Controlling the Unfolded Protein Response.

    PubMed

    Rabhi, Nabil; Denechaud, Pierre-Damien; Gromada, Xavier; Hannou, Sarah Anissa; Zhang, Hongbo; Rashid, Talha; Salas, Elisabet; Durand, Emmanuelle; Sand, Olivier; Bonnefond, Amélie; Yengo, Loic; Chavey, Carine; Bonner, Caroline; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Abderrahmani, Amar; Auwerx, Johan; Fajas, Lluis; Froguel, Philippe; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-05-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR(er)) pathway plays an important role in helping pancreatic β cells to adapt their cellular responses to environmental cues and metabolic stress. Although altered UPR(er) gene expression appears in rodent and human type 2 diabetic (T2D) islets, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We show here that germline and β cell-specific disruption of the lysine acetyltransferase 2B (Kat2b) gene in mice leads to impaired insulin secretion and glucose intolerance. Genome-wide analysis of Kat2b-regulated genes and functional assays reveal a critical role for Kat2b in maintaining UPR(er) gene expression and subsequent β cell function. Importantly, Kat2b expression is decreased in mouse and human diabetic β cells and correlates with UPR(er) gene expression in normal human islets. In conclusion, Kat2b is a crucial transcriptional regulator for adaptive β cell function during metabolic stress by controlling UPR(er) and represents a promising target for T2D prevention and treatment. PMID:27117420

  14. Accurate measurement of pancreatic islet beta-cell mass using a second-generation fluorescent exendin-4 analog.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Thomas; Thurber, Greg; Gaglia, Jason; Vinegoni, Claudio; Liew, Chong Wee; Upadhyay, Rabi; Kohler, Rainer H; Li, Li; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    The hallmark of type 1 diabetes is autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreatic islets. Autoimmune diabetes has been difficult to study or treat because it is not usually diagnosed until substantial β-cell loss has already occurred. Imaging agents that permit noninvasive visualization of changes in β-cell mass remain a high-priority goal. We report on the development and testing of a near-infrared fluorescent β-cell imaging agent. Based on the amino acid sequence of exendin-4, we created a neopeptide via introduction of an unnatural amino acid at the K(12) position, which could subsequently be conjugated to fluorophores via bioorthogonal copper-catalyzed click-chemistry. Cell assays confirmed that the resulting fluorescent probe (E4(×12)-VT750) had a high binding affinity (~3 nM). Its in vivo properties were evaluated using high-resolution intravital imaging, histology, whole-pancreas visualization, and endoscopic imaging. According to intravital microscopy, the probe rapidly bound to β-cells and, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, it was internalized. Histology of the whole pancreas showed a close correspondence between fluorescence and insulin staining, and there was an excellent correlation between imaging signals and β-cell mass in mice treated with streptozotocin, a β-cell toxin. Individual islets could also be visualized by endoscopic imaging. In short, E4(×12)-VT750 showed strong and selective binding to glucose-like peptide-1 receptors and permitted accurate measurement of β-cell mass in both diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This near-infrared imaging probe, as well as future radioisotope-labeled versions of it, should prove to be important tools for monitoring diabetes, progression, and treatment in both experimental and clinical contexts. PMID:21768367

  15. Role of glucose in IRS signaling in rat pancreatic islets: specific effects and interplay with insulin.

    PubMed

    Paris, Maryline; Bernard-Kargar, Catherine; Vilar, José; Kassis, Nadim; Ktorza, Alain

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the possible interplay between insulin and glucose signaling pathways in rat pancreatic beta-cell with a special focus on the role of glucose in IRS signaling in vivo. Three groups of rats were constituted by combining simultaneous infusion during 48 h either of glucose and/or insulin, or glucose+diazoxide: Hyperglycemic-Hyperinsulinemic (HGHI), euglycemic-Hyperinsulinemic (eGHI), Hyperglycemic-euinsulinemic (HGeI). Control rats were infused with 0,9%NaCl. In HGHI and HGeI rats plasma glucose levels were maintained at 20-22 mmol/l. In eGHI rats, plasma glucose was not different from that of controls, whereas plasma insulin was much higher than in controls. In HGHI rats, IRS-2 mRNA expression, total protein and phosphorylated protein amounts were increased compared to controls. In HGeI rats, only IRS-2 mRNA expression was increased. No change was observed in eGHI rats whatever the parameter considered. In all groups, mRNA concentration of IRS-1 was similar to that of controls. The quantity of total and phosphorylated IRS-1 protein was dramatically increased in HGHI rats and to a lesser extent in eGHI rats. Neither mRNA nor IRS-1 protein expression were modified in HGeI rats. The data suggest that glucose and insulin play at once a specific and a complementary role in islet IRSs signaling. Especially, glucose stimulates IRS-2 mRNA expression whatever the insulin status and independently of the secretory process. The differential regulation of IRS-1 and IRS-2 expressions is in agreement with their supposed different involvement in the control of beta-cell growth and function.

  16. Pharmacological attenuation of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis induced hypersensitivity in rats

    PubMed Central

    McIlwrath, Sabrina L; Westlund, Karin N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize an alcohol and high fat diet induced chronic pancreatitis rat model that mimics poor human dietary choices. METHODS: Experimental rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli alcohol (6%) and high-fat (65%) diet (AHF) for 10 wk while control animals received a regular rodent chow diet. Weekly behavioral tests determined mechanical and heat sensitivity. In week 10 a fasting glucose tolerance test was performed, measuring blood glucose levels before and after a 2 g/kg bodyweight intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of glucose. Post mortem histological analysis was performed by staining pancreas and liver tissue sections with hematoxylin and eosin. Pancreas sections were also stained with Sirius red and fast green to quantify collagen content. Insulin-expressing cells were identified immunohistochemically in separate sections. Tissue staining density was quantified using Image J software. After mechanical and heat sensitivity became stable (weeks 6-10) in the AHF-fed animals, three different drugs were tested for their efficacy in attenuating pancreatitis associated hypersensitivity: a Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor specific agonist (2R,4R)-4-Aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (APDC, 3 mg/kg, ip; Tocris, Bristol, United Kingdom), nociceptin (20, 60, 200 nmol/kg, ip; Tocris), and morphine sulfate (3 mg/kg, μ-opioid receptor agonist; Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL, United States). RESULTS: Histological analysis of pancreas and liver determined that unlike control rats, AHF fed animals had pancreatic fibrosis, acinar and beta cell atrophy, with steatosis in both organs. Fat vacuolization was significantly increased in AHF fed rats (6.4% ± 1.1% in controls vs 23.8% ± 4.2%, P < 0.05). Rats fed the AHF diet had reduced fasting glucose tolerance in week 10 when peak blood glucose levels reached significantly higher concentrations than controls (127.4 ± 9.2 mg/dL in controls vs 161.0 ± 8.6 mg/dL, P < 0.05). This concurred with a 3.5 fold higher

  17. T cells cooperate with palmitic acid in induction of beta cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Cvjetićanin, Tamara; Stojanović, Ivana; Timotijević, Gordana; Stošić-Grujičić, Stanislava; Miljković, Djordje

    2009-01-01

    Background Diabetes is characterized by progressive failure of insulin producing beta cells. It is well known that both saturated fatty acids and various products of immune cells can contribute to the reduction of beta cell viability and functionality during diabetes pathogenesis. However, their joint action on beta cells has not been investigated, so far. Therefore, we explored the possibility that leukocytes and saturated fatty acids cooperate in beta cell destruction. Results Rat pancreatic islets or insulinoma cells (RIN) were co-cultivated with concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated rat lymph node cells (LNC), or they were treated with cell-free supernatants (Sn) obtained from ConA-stimulated spleen cells or from activated CD3+ cells, in the absence or presence of palmitic acid (PA). ConA-stimulated LNC or Sn and PA cooperated in inducing caspase-3-dependent RIN cell apoptosis. The observed effect of PA and Sn on RIN cell viability was mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-signaling and was achieved through auto-destructive nitric oxide (NO) production. The cooperative effect of Sn was mimicked with the combination of interleukin-1β, interleukin-2, interleukin-6, interleukin-17, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Conclusion These results imply that stimulated T cells produce cytokines that cooperate with saturated free fatty acids in beta cell destruction during diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:19463182

  18. Arsenic Exposure and Calpain-10 Polymorphisms Impair the Function of Pancreatic Beta-Cells in Humans: A Pilot Study of Risk Factors for T2DM

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Cruz, Laura; Cebrián, Arturo; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U.; Hiriart, Marcia; García-Vargas, Gonzálo; Bassol, Susana; Sordo, Monserrat; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Klimecki, Walter T.; López-Carillo, Lizbeth; Cebrián, Mariano E.; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing worldwide and diverse environmental and genetic risk factors are well recognized. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the calpain-10 gene (CAPN-10), which encodes a protein involved in the secretion and action of insulin, and chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water have been independently associated with an increase in the risk for T2DM. In the present work we evaluated if CAPN-10 SNPs and iAs exposure jointly contribute to the outcome of T2DM. Insulin secretion (beta-cell function) and insulin sensitivity were evaluated indirectly through validated indexes (HOMA2) in subjects with and without T2DM who have been exposed to a gradient of iAs in their drinking water in northern Mexico. The results were analyzed taking into account the presence of the risk factor SNPs SNP-43 and -44 in CAPN-10. Subjects with T2DM had significantly lower beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity. An inverse association was found between beta-cell function and iAs exposure, the association being more pronounced in subjects with T2DM. Subjects without T2DM who were carriers of the at-risk genotype SNP-43 or -44, also had significantly lower beta-cell function. The association of SNP-43 with beta-cell function was dependent on iAs exposure, age, gender and BMI, whereas the association with SNP-44 was independent of all of these factors. Chronic exposure to iAs seems to be a risk factor for T2DM in humans through the reduction of beta-cell function, with an enhanced effect seen in the presence of the at-risk genotype of SNP-43 in CAPN-10. Carriers of CAPN-10 SNP-44 have also shown reduced beta-cell function. PMID:23349674

  19. On the origin of the beta cell.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Krasinski, Jennifer M; Stoffers, Doris A

    2008-08-01

    The major forms of diabetes are characterized by pancreatic islet beta-cell dysfunction and decreased beta-cell numbers, raising hope for cell replacement therapy. Although human islet transplantation is a cell-based therapy under clinical investigation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, the limited availability of human cadaveric islets for transplantation will preclude its widespread therapeutic application. The result has been an intense focus on the development of alternate sources of beta cells, such as through the guided differentiation of stem or precursor cell populations or the transdifferentiation of more plentiful mature cell populations. Realizing the potential for cell-based therapies, however, requires a thorough understanding of pancreas development and beta-cell formation. Pancreas development is coordinated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways and transcription factors that determine early pancreatic specification as well as the later differentiation of exocrine and endocrine lineages. This review describes the current knowledge of these factors as they relate specifically to the emergence of endocrine beta cells from pancreatic endoderm. Current therapeutic efforts to generate insulin-producing beta-like cells from embryonic stem cells have already capitalized on recent advances in our understanding of the embryonic signals and transcription factors that dictate lineage specification and will most certainly be further enhanced by a continuing emphasis on the identification of novel factors and regulatory relationships. PMID:18676806

  20. Total Parenteral Nutrition Attenuates Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Koopmann, Matthew C.; Baumler, Megan D.; Boehler, Christopher J.; Chang, Faye L.; Ney, Denise M.; Groblewski, Guy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to determine if total parenteral nutrition (TPN)–induced pancreatic atrophy and Hsp70 expression attenuates cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. Methods Rats were randomized to a 7-day course of saline infusion plus a semipurified diet or TPN, with or without an intravenous cerulein injection or vehicle on day 7, and killed 1 or 6 hours after the injection. Based on a pilot study, 1 hour was the primary time point. Pancreatic atrophy was determined by mass, protein, and DNA contents. Pancreatic heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) expression was measured by Western analysis. Histological examination of the pancreas assessed for edema, inflammation, vacuolization, and apoptosis. Serum amylase activity was measured using the Phadebas assay. Pancreatic trypsinogen activation was measured using a fluorometric substrate assay. Results The saline-infused rats fed orally gained significantly more weight than TPN rats. The TPN decreased the pancreatic mass and protein content and the protein-DNA ratio and increased the pancreatic DNA content compared with the saline. The TPN increased the pancreatic Hsp70 expression by 91% compared with the saline. The TPN reduced the cerulein-induced pancreatic histological edema, the vacuolization, and the inflammation compared with the saline. The increase in the serum amylase level after cerulein injection was significantly attenuated, and trypsinogen activation was reduced in TPN animals compared with the saline group. Conclusions Lack of luminal nutrients with a 7-day course of TPN provides moderate protection against cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. PMID:19904225

  1. The cytokine interleukin-1beta reduces the docking and fusion of insulin granules in pancreatic beta-cells, preferentially decreasing the first phase of exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ohara-Imaizumi, Mica; Cardozo, Alessandra K; Kikuta, Toshiteru; Eizirik, Decio L; Nagamatsu, Shinya

    2004-10-01

    The prediabetic period in type I diabetes mellitus is characterized by the loss of first phase insulin release. This might be due to islet infiltration mediated by mononuclear cells and local release of cytokines, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. To determine the role of cytokines in insulin exocytosis, we have presently utilized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) to image and analyze the dynamic motion of single insulin secretory granules near the plasma membrane in live beta-cells exposed for 24 h to interleukin (IL)-1beta or interferon (IFN)-gamma. Immunohistochemistry observed via TIRFM showed that the number of docked insulin granules was decreased by 60% in beta-cells treated with IL-1beta, while it was not affected by exposure to IFN-gamma. This effect of IL-1beta was paralleled by a 50% reduction in the mRNA and the number of clusters of SNAP-25 in the plasma membrane. TIRF images of single insulin granule motion during a 15-min stimulation by 22 mm glucose in IL-1beta-treated beta-cells showed a marked reduction in the fusion events from previously docked granules during the first phase insulin release. Fusion from newcomers, however, was well preserved during the second phase of insulin release of IL-1beta-treated beta-cells. The present observations indicate that IL-1beta, but not IFN-gamma, has a preferential inhibitory effect on the first phase of glucose-induced insulin release, mostly via an action on previously docked granules. This suggests that beta-cell exposure to immune mediators during the course of insulitis might be responsible for the loss of first phase insulin release.

  2. The diabetogenic effects of excessive ethanol: reducing beta-cell mass, decreasing phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and GLUT-4 expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Na; Hao, Li-Ping; Yang, Xue-Feng; Ying, Chen-Jiang; Yu, Dong; Sun, Xiu-Fa

    2009-05-01

    The diabetogenic impact of ethanol remains as a focal point of basic and clinical investigations. In this study, Wistar rats were subjected to daily intragastric ethanol administration (10 ml/kg body weight injection with 0 (control), 10, 20 and 33 % (v/v) ethanol in the injections, respectively) for 19 weeks. At the end of the administration, we found that the fasting plasma glucose level of the 33 % (v/v) ethanol-loaded group was 18 % higher than the control. Insulin sensitivity was decreased in a dose-dependent manner in all the ethanol-loaded groups (r - 0.842, P < 0.001) during intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test. Necrotic/haemorrhagic injury was detected in the pancreas and islet beta-cell mass was significantly reduced in the 33 % (v/v) ethanol-loaded rats by immunohistochemical and morphometric analysis. At the molecular level, we detected a dose-dependent attenuation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity (r - 0.956, P < 0.001) and GLUT-4 expression (GLUT-4 mRNA, r - 0.899, P < 0.001; GLUT-4 protein, r - 0.964, P < 0.001) in skeletal muscle. These results demonstrated that drinking is a conditional aetiological factor for diabetes and excessive ethanol intake is negatively associated with both insulin sensitivity and beta-cell mass. The whole-body insulin resistance might result from the ethanol-induced insulin signalling defects in muscle.

  3. Cyproheptadine metabolites inhibit proinsulin and insulin biosynthesis and insulin release in isolated rat pancreatic islets

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, S.A.; Falany, J.L.; Fischer, L.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The contribution of drug metabolites to cyproheptadine (CPH)-induced alterations in endocrine pancreatic beta-cells was investigated by examining the inhibitory activity of CPH and its biotransformation products, desmethylcyproheptadine (DMCPH), CPH-epoxide and DMCPH-epoxide, on hormone biosynthesis and secretion in pancreatic islets isolated from 50-day-old rats. Measurement of (pro)insulin (proinsulin and insulin) synthesis using incorporation of 3H-leucine showed that DMCPH-epoxide, DMCPH and CPH-epoxide were 22, 10 and 4 times, respectively, more potent than CPH in inhibiting hormone synthesis. The biosynthesis of (pro)insulin was also inhibited by CPH and DMCPH-epoxide in islets isolated from 21-day-old rat fetuses. The inhibitory action of CPH and its metabolites was apparently specific for (pro)insulin, and the synthesis of other islet proteins was not affected. Other experiments showed the metabolites of CPH were active in inhibiting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion but were less potent than the parent drug in producing this effect. CPH and its structurally related metabolites, therefore, have differential inhibitory activities on insulin synthesis and release. The observation that CPH metabolites have higher potency than CPH to inhibit (pro)insulin synthesis, when considered with published reports on the disposition of the drug in rats, indicate that CPH metabolites, particularly DMCPH-epoxide, are primarily responsible for the insulin depletion observed when the parent compound is given to fetal and adult animals.

  4. Efflux of 86Rb from rat and mouse pancreatic islets: the role of membrane depolarization.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, E. K.; Shotton, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    The efflux of 86Rb from rat or mouse perifused islets preloaded with the isotope has been used as an index of the potassium permeability of the islet beta-cell membrane. Cellular transmembrane potentials were altered by changing [K]O or by direct electrical stimulation and the effects on potassium permeability examined. Omission of KCl from the medium perifusing rat islets induced a biphasic change in 86Rb efflux, a brief decline being superseded by a pronounced increase in efflux. Re-introduction of KCl, 4.7 mM, caused a further increase in 86Rb efflux preceding a return to control values. Increasing [K]O from 4.7 mM to 10 mM, 20 mM or 47 mM caused a phasic increase in 86Rb efflux with the magnitude of both the peak and average rate of efflux being dependent upon the extent of the change in [K]O. The increase in 86Rb efflux produced by [K]O, 47 mM, was attenuated by Co2+, 2.56 mM (51% inhibition) or quinine, 10 microM (47% inhibition), but efflux remained significantly (P less than 0.001) above control values. Electrical stimulation of single microdissected mouse pancreatic islets by currents of 0.1 to 0.5 mA evoked a rapid, phasic increase in 86Rb efflux. The magnitude of the response was unaffected by EGTA, 2 mM, or nupercaine, 100 microM. These observations are discussed in relation to the mechanisms controlling the potassium permeability, membrane potential and insulin secretion of the pancreatic islet beta-cell.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6391599

  5. A stereological study of effects of aqueous extract of Tamarindus indica seeds on pancreatic islets in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hamidreza, Hamidreza; Heidari, Zahra; Shahraki, Mohammadreza; Moudi, Bita

    2010-10-01

    Tamarindus indica Linn was used as a traditional medicine for the management of diabetes mellitus in human and experimental animals. This study investigated effects of aqueous extract of Tamarindus indica seeds (AETIS) against STZ-induced damages in pancreatic islands by means of stereological methods. sixty matured normoglycemic male Wistar rats, weighing 200-250 gr, were selected and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10). Control, STZ-induced diabetic; by intraperitoneal injection of 55 mg/Kg streptozotocin, Treated control group (TC); received AETIS at a dose of 200mg/kg/day, and AETIS treated diabetic groups (TD1-3); received respectively AETIS at the dose of 50, 100,and 200 mg/kg/day by gavage from one week after induction of diabetes by STZ. After 8 weeks of experiment, stereological estimation of volume density and total volume of islets and beta cells, volume weighted mean islets volume, mass of beta cells, islets, and pancreas and total number of islets were done. Volume density and total volume of islets, volume weighted mean islets volume, volume density islets/pancreas, volume density beta cells/islet, mass of islets and pancreas of treated diabetic groups (TD1-3) were significantly higher than untreated diabetic group (P<0.001), and in TD3 group these values were comparable to controls. Although total volume and mass of beta cells in TD1-3 were significantly higher than D group but they were significantly lower than control group (P>0.05). Total number of islets, pancreas wet weight and volume did not show any significant changes between control and experimental groups (P>0.05). Results suggested that AETIS partially restores pancreatic beta cells and repairs STZ-induced damages in rats.

  6. Evidence that down-regulation of. beta. -cell glucose transporters in non-insulin-dependent diabetes may be the cause of diabetic hyperglycemia

    SciTech Connect

    Orci, L.; Ravazzola, M.; Baetens, D.; Amherdt, M. ); Inman, L.; Johnson, J.H.; Unger, R.H. Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX ); Peterson, R.G. ); Newgard, C.B. )

    1990-12-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is attributed to a failure of pancreatic {beta} cells to maintain insulin secretion at a level sufficient to compensate for underlying insulin resistance. In the ZDF rat, a model of NIDDM that closely resembles the human syndrome, the authors have previously reported profound underexpression of GLUT-2, the high-K{sub m} facilitative glucose transporter expressed by {beta} cells of normal animals. Here they report that islets of diabetic rats exhibit a marked decrease in the volume density of GLUT-2-positive {beta} cells and a reduction at the electron-microscopic level in the number of GLUT-2-immunoreactive sites per unit of {beta}-cell plasma membrane. The deficiency of GLUT-2 cannot be induced in normal {beta} cells by in vivo or in vitro exposure to high levels of glucose nor can it be prevented in {beta} cells of prediabetic ZDF rats by elimination of hyperglycemia. They conclude that this dearth of immunodetectable GLUT-2 in NIDDM is not secondary to hyperglycemia and therefore that it may well play a causal role in the development of hyperglycemia.

  7. In vivo regeneration of insulin-producing beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hee-Sook

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are considered to be caused by defective control of blood glucose resulting from a reduced beta-cell mass. Thus, the restoration of a functional beta-cell mass by replacing the damaged beta-cells or stimulating beta-cell regeneration is a logical approach for the treatment of diabetes. Strategies for increasing the beta-cell mass include stimulating beta-cell replication and differentiation and inhibiting beta-cell death. Treatment with various growth factors such as GLP-1, BTC, HGF, and EGF and forced expression of beta-cell transcription factors such as Pdx-1, NeuroD, and MafA resulted in the regeneration of beta-cells in vivo. Another approach is the administration of stem/progenitor cells, which can differentiate into insulin-producing cells. However, there are no satisfactory methods yet for clinical application. Understanding the mechanisms of the regenerative process of pancreatic beta-cells will pave the way for the development of regenerative medicine for treatment of diabetes. PMID:20217517

  8. Prolonged L-alanine exposure induces changes in metabolism, Ca(2+) handling and desensitization of insulin secretion in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    McClenaghan, Neville H; Scullion, Siobhan M; Mion, Brian; Hewage, Chandralal; Malthouse, J Paul G; Flatt, Peter R; Newsholme, Philip; Brennan, Lorraine

    2009-02-01

    Acute insulin-releasing actions of amino acids have been studied in detail, but comparatively little is known about the beta-cell effects of long-term exposure to amino acids. The present study examined the effects of prolonged exposure of beta-cells to the metabolizable amino acid L-alanine. Basal insulin release or cellular insulin content were not significantly altered by alanine culture, but acute alanine-induced insulin secretion was suppressed by 74% (P<0.001). Acute stimulation of insulin secretion with glucose, KCl or KIC (2-oxoisocaproic acid) following alanine culture was not affected. Acute alanine exposure evoked strong cellular depolarization after control culture, whereas AUC (area under the curve) analysis revealed significant (P<0.01) suppression of this action after culture with alanine. Compared with control cells, prior exposure to alanine also markedly decreased (P<0.01) the acute elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) (intracellular [Ca(2+)]) induced by acute alanine exposure. These diminished stimulatory responses were partially restored after 18 h of culture in the absence of alanine, indicating reversible amino-acid-induced desensitization. (13)C NMR spectra revealed that alanine culture increased glutamate labelling at position C4 (by 60%; P<0.01), as a result of an increase in the singlet peak, indicating increased flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase. Consistent with this, protein expression of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases PDK2 and PDK4 was significantly reduced. This was accompanied by a decrease in cellular ATP (P<0.05), consistent with diminished insulin-releasing actions of this amino acid. Collectively, these results illustrate the phenomenon of beta-cell desensitization by amino acids, indicating that prolonged exposure to alanine can induce reversible alterations to metabolic flux, Ca(2+) handling and insulin secretion. PMID:18702613

  9. MicroRNA-29a is up-regulated in beta-cells by glucose and decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge, Annika; Clausen, Trine R.; Larsen, Sylvester; Ladefoged, Mette; Rosenstierne, Maiken W.; Larsen, Louise; Vang, Ole; Nielsen, Jens H.; Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased by glucose in human and rat islets and INS-1E cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29a increases proliferation of INS-1E beta-cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Forced expression of miR-29a decreases glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of beta-cell miR-29a improves GSIS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29a may be a mediator of glucose toxicity in beta-cells. -- Abstract: Chronically elevated levels of glucose impair pancreatic beta-cell function while inducing beta-cell proliferation. MicroRNA-29a (miR-29a) levels are increased in several tissues in diabetic animals and mediate decreased insulin-stimulated glucose-transport of adipocytes. The aim was to investigate the impact of glucose on miR-29a levels in INS-1E beta-cells and in human islets of Langerhans and furthermore to evaluate the impact of miR-29a on beta-cell function and proliferation. Increased glucose levels up-regulated miR-29a in beta-cells and human and rat islets of Langerhans. Glucose-stimulated insulin-secretion (GSIS) of INS-1E beta-cells was decreased by forced expression of miR-29a, while depletion of endogenous miR-29a improved GSIS. Over-expression of miR-29a increased INS-1E proliferation. Thus, miR-29a up-regulation is involved in glucose-induced proliferation of beta-cells. Furthermore, as depletion of miR-29a improves beta-cell function, miR-29a is a mediator of glucose-induced beta-cell dysfunction. Glucose-induced up-regulation of miR-29a in beta-cells could be implicated in progression from impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes.

  10. Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylation of kinesin heavy chain on beta-granules in pancreatic beta-cells. Implications for regulated beta-granule transport and insulin exocytosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donelan, Matthew J.; Morfini, Gerardo; Julyan, Richard; Sommers, Scott; Hays, Lori; Kajio, Hiroshi; Briaud, Isabelle; Easom, Richard A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Brady, Scott T.; Rhodes, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    The specific biochemical steps required for glucose-regulated insulin exocytosis from beta-cells are not well defined. Elevation of glucose leads to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]i and biphasic release of insulin from both a readily releasable and a storage pool of beta-granules. The effect of elevated [Ca2+]i on phosphorylation of isolated beta-granule membrane proteins was evaluated, and the phosphorylation of four proteins was found to be altered by [Ca2+]i. One (a 18/20-kDa doublet) was a Ca2+-dependent increase in phosphorylation, and, surprisingly, three others (138, 42, and 36 kDa) were Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylations. The 138-kDa beta-granule phosphoprotein was found to be kinesin heavy chain (KHC). At low levels of [Ca2+]i KHC was phosphorylated by casein kinase 2, but KHC was rapidly dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2B beta (PP2Bbeta) as [Ca2+]i increased. Inhibitors of PP2B specifically reduced the second, microtubule-dependent, phase of insulin secretion, suggesting that dephosphorylation of KHC was required for transport of beta-granules from the storage pool to replenish the readily releasable pool of beta-granules. This is distinct from synaptic vesicle exocytosis, because neurotransmitter release from synaptosomes did not require a Ca2+-dependent KHC dephosphorylation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulating KHC function and beta-granule transport in beta-cells that is mediated by casein kinase 2 and PP2B. They also implicate a novel regulatory role for PP2B/calcineurin in the control of insulin secretion downstream of a rise in [Ca2+]i.

  11. Proteasome Dysfunction Mediates High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Rodent Beta Cells and Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Broca, Christophe; Varin, Elodie; Armanet, Mathieu; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Bosco, Domenico; Dalle, Stéphane; Wojtusciszyn, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS), a major cellular protein degradation machinery, plays key roles in the regulation of many cell functions. Glucotoxicity mediated by chronic hyperglycaemia is detrimental to the function and survival of pancreatic beta cells. The aim of our study was to determine whether proteasome dysfunction could be involved in beta cell apoptosis in glucotoxic conditions, and to evaluate whether such a dysfunction might be pharmacologically corrected. Therefore, UPS activity was measured in GK rats islets, INS-1E beta cells or human islets after high glucose and/or UPS inhibitor exposure. Immunoblotting was used to quantify polyubiquitinated proteins, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through CHOP expression, and apoptosis through the cleavage of PARP and caspase-3, whereas total cell death was detected through histone-associated DNA fragments measurement. In vitro, we found that chronic exposure of INS-1E cells to high glucose concentrations significantly decreases the three proteasome activities by 20% and leads to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. We showed that pharmacological blockade of UPS activity by 20% leads to apoptosis in a same way. Indeed, ER stress was involved in both conditions. These results were confirmed in human islets, and proteasome activities were also decreased in hyperglycemic GK rats islets. Moreover, we observed that a high glucose treatment hypersensitized beta cells to the apoptotic effect of proteasome inhibitors. Noteworthily, the decreased proteasome activity can be corrected with Exendin-4, which also protected against glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings reveal an important role of proteasome activity in high glucose-induced beta cell apoptosis, potentially linking ER stress and glucotoxicity. These proteasome dysfunctions can be reversed by a GLP-1 analog. Thus, UPS may be a potent target to treat deleterious metabolic conditions leading to type 2 diabetes. PMID:24642635

  12. Danaparoid sodium prevents cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Satoshi; Iwasaka, Hideo; Uchida, Tomohisa; Hasegawa, Akira; Asai, Nobuhiko; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2009-07-01

    Systemic inflammatory mediators, including the protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), play an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis. Anticoagulants such as danaparoid sodium (DA) may be able to inhibit sepsis-induced inflammation, but the mechanism of action is not well understood. We hypothesized that DA would act as an inhibitor of inflammation and prevent cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Male Wistar rats were used as subjects in this study. Each received a bolus of 50 U/kg of DA or saline-injected into the tail vein, followed by 4 injections of 50 mg/kg cerulean (i.p.) at 1-h intervals. Cytokine (IL-6), NO, and HMGB1 levels in serum and pancreatic tissue were measured after the cerulein injection. Pancreas histopathology and wet-dry ratio significantly improved in the DA-injected (50 U/kg) animals compared with saline-injected rats. Serum and pancreatic HMGB1 levels decreased over time in DA-treated animals. Danaparoid sodium also decreased cytokine, NO, and HMGB1 levels during cerulein-induced inflammation. As a result, DA ameliorated pancreas pathology in the rat model of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. This study demonstrates that DA treatment prevents cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in a rat model. This effect may be mediated through inhibition of cytokines, NO, and HMGB1. PMID:18948846

  13. Crucial role of PDX-1 in pancreas development, beta-cell differentiation, and induction of surrogate beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, Hideaki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kato, Ken; Fujitani, Yoshio; Matsuoka, Taka-aki

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX-1) plays a crucial role in pancreas development, beta-cell differentiation, and maintaining mature beta-cell function. At an early stage of embryonic development, PDX-1 is initially expressed in the gut region when the foregut endoderm becomes committed to common pancreatic precursor cells. During pancreas development, PDX-1 expression is maintained in precursor cells, and later it becomes restricted to beta-cells. In mature beta-cells, PDX-1 transactivates the insulin gene and other genes involved in glucose sensing and metabolism, such as GLUT2 and glucokinase. MafA is a recently isolated beta-cell-specific transcription factor which functions as a potent activator of insulin gene transcription. During pancreas development, MafA expression is first detected at the beginning of the principal phase of insulin-producing cell production. Furthermore, these transcription factors play a crucial role in inducing surrogate beta-cells from non-beta-cells and thus could be therapeutic targets for diabetes.

  14. Genome-wide identification of palmitate-regulated immediate early genes and target genes in pancreatic beta-cells reveals a central role of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Jin; Hwang, Seungwoo; Lee, Se-Hee; Lee, You Ri; Shin, Jiyon; Park, Kyong Soo; Cho, Young Min

    2012-06-01

    Free fatty acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. We conducted gene expression microarray analysis to comprehensively investigate the transcription machinery of palmitate-regulated genes in pancreatic β-cells in vitro. In particular, mouse pancreatic βTC3 cells were treated with palmitate in the presence or absence of cycloheximide (CHX), which blocks protein synthesis and thereby allows us to distinguish immediate early genes (IEGs) from their target genes. The microarray experiments identified 34 palmitate-regulated IEGs and 74 palmitate-regulated target genes. In silico promoter analysis revealed that transcription factor binding sites for NF-κB were over-represented, regulating approximately one-third of the palmitate-regulated target genes. In cells treated with CHX, nfkb1 showed an up-regulation by palmitate, suggesting that NF-κB could be an IEG. Functional enrichment analysis of 27 palmitate-regulated genes with NF-κB binding sites showed an over-representation of genes involved in immune response, inflammatory response, defense response, taxis, regulation of cell proliferation, and regulation of cell death pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that palmitate stimulates NF-κB activity both in the presence and absence of CHX. In conclusion, by identifying IEGs and target genes, the present study depicted a comprehensive view of transcription machinery underlying palmitate-induced inflammation and cell proliferation/death in pancreatic β-cells and our data demonstrated the central role of NF-κB.

  15. Glucagon-like peptide-1 mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ and stimulates mitochondrial ATP synthesis in pancreatic MIN6 beta-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Takashi; da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Holz, George G; Jouaville, Laurence S; Thomas, Andrew P; Rutter, Guy A

    2003-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a potent regulator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion whose mechanisms of action are only partly understood. In the present paper, we show that at low (3 mM) glucose concentrations, GLP-1 increases the free intramitochondrial concentrations of both Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](m)), and ATP ([ATP](m)) in clonal MIN6 beta-cells. Suggesting that cAMP-mediated release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores is responsible for these effects, increases in [ATP](m) that were induced by GLP-1 were completely blocked by the Rp isomer of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate (Rp-cAMPS), or by chelation of intracellular Ca(2+). Furthermore, inhibition of Ins(1,4,5) P (3) (IP(3)) receptors with xestospongin C, or application of ryanodine, partially inhibited GLP-1-induced [ATP](m) increases, and the simultaneous blockade of both IP(3) and ryanodine receptors (RyR) completely eliminated the rise in [ATP](m). GLP-1 appeared to prompt Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release through IP(3) receptors via a protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation event, since ryanodine-insensitive [ATP](m) increases were abrogated with the PKA inhibitor, H89. In contrast, the effects of GLP-1 on RyR-mediated [ATP](m) increases were apparently mediated by the cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor cAMP-GEFII, since xestospongin C-insensitive [ATP](m) increases were blocked by a dominant-negative form of cAMP-GEFII (G114E,G422D). Taken together, these results demonstrate that GLP-1 potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin release in part via the mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), and the stimulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. PMID:12410638

  16. Bile-pancreatic juice-independent increases in pancreatic proteases and intestinal cholecystokinin by dietary protein in rats.

    PubMed

    Hara, H; Ochi, Y; Kasai, T

    1998-02-01

    Luminal bile-pancreatic juice (BPJ) is involved in the induction of pancreatic proteases in rats fed a high-protein diet. Recently, we have demonstrated that a BPJ-independent mechanism is responsible for enhancement of pancreatic secretion after feeding of a dietary protein in chronic BPJ-diverted rats. The aim of the present study was to explore the existence of a BPJ-independent mechanism during adaptation of the exocrine pancreas to dietary protein. Rats, whose BPJ was diverted into the ileum through a common bile-pancreatic duct catheter for 5 days (PBD rat), were fed a fat-free diet containing 25% or 60% casein for 3 days. Messenger RNA levels for pancreatic enzymes, cholecystokinin, and secretin in the jejunal mucosa were evaluated by northern blotting method. Pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin activities and mRNA levels of their zymogens were higher in PBD rats than in rats whose diverted BPJ was returned into the duodenum (PBD returned rat). In the PBD groups, pancreatic protease activities were further increased by 3-day feeding of a high-protein diet without changes in mRNA levels of these proteases. Cholecystokinin mRNA was increased after feeding of a high-protein diet in the PBD rats. These results indicate that pancreatic proteases are induced by feeding a high-protein diet by a mechanism independent of luminal BPJ, which is associated with an increase in intestinal cholecystokinin mRNA level.

  17. Intravenous contrast medium aggravates the impairment of pancreatic microcirculation in necrotizing pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J; Hotz, H G; Foitzik, T; Ryschich, E; Buhr, H J; Warshaw, A L; Herfarth, C; Klar, E

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous reports demonstrated that radiographic contrast medium, as used in contrast-enhanced computed tomography, increases acinar necrosis and mortality in experimental pancreatitis. The authors studied the possibility that these changes may be related to an additional impairment of pancreatic microcirculation. METHODS: Fifty Wistar rats had acute pancreatitis induced by intraductal glycodeoxycholic acid (10 mmol/L for 10 min) and intravenous cerulein (5 micrograms/kg/hr for 6 hrs). After rehydration (16 mL/kg), pancreatic capillary perfusion was quantified by means of intravital microscopy at baseline before intravenous infusion of contrast medium (n = 25) or saline (n = 25), and 30 and 60 minutes thereafter. In addition to total capillary flow, capillaries were categorized as high- or low-flow (> or < 1.6 nL/min). RESULTS: Pancreatic capillary flow did not change in either high- or low-flow capillaries after saline infusion. However, contrast medium infusion induced a significant decrease of total capillary flow (p < 0.001). Analysis according to the relative flow rate revealed that this was primarily because of a significant additional reduction of perfusion in low-flow capillaries (p < 0.0001). Furthermore, complete capillary stasis was observed in 15.9 +/- 3.4% after contrast medium as compared with 3.2 +/- 1.2% after saline infusion (p < 0.006). CONCLUSION: Radiographic contrast medium aggravates the impairment of pancreatic microcirculation in experimental necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:7717779

  18. Proteomic analysis of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and pancreatic carcinoma in rat models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Hai-Lin; Li, Ya; Yuan, Ping

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect the proteomic variabilities of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and pancreatic carcinoma (PC) induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in rat models and to identify potential biomarkers. METHODS: Sixty adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized into three groups. The rats had DMBA implanted into their pancreas for one (n = 20) or two months (n = 20) or assigned to the normal group (n = 20). The rats were killed after one or two months, and were evaluated histopathologically. Three tissue samples from each group of rats with either normal pancreas, PanIN (PanIN-2) or PC were examined by 2D-DIGE. The different expression spot features were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight/time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) tandem mass spectrometry. The expression of enolase 1, a differentially expressed protein, was identified by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: There was significant difference in the proportions of neoplastic changes between the 1- and 2-mogroups (P = 0.0488). There was an increase in the frequency of adenocarcinomas in the 2-mo group compared with the 1-mo group (P = 0.0309). No neoplastic changes were observed in any of the animals in the normal group. Enolase 1, pancreatic ELA3B, necdin, Hbp23, CHD3, hnRNP A2/B1, Rap80, and Gnb2l1 were up-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues, and CEL, TPT1, NME2, PCK2, an unnamed protein product, and glycine C-acetyltransferase were down-regulated in the PanIN and PC tissues. The immunohistochemical results showed that enolase 1 expression was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer tissues of rats and humans. CONCLUSION: The pancreatic protein expression changes induced by DMBA suggest potential molecular targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of PC. PMID:21472101

  19. Genetic analysis of type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptor signaling through insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Shouhong; Szabolcs, Matthias; Cinti, Francesca; Perincheri, Suhdir; Accili, Domenico; Efstratiadis, Argiris

    2010-12-24

    Signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases regulates pancreatic β cell function. Inactivation of insulin receptor (InsR), IGF1 receptor (Igf1r), or Irs1 in β cells impairs insulin secretion. Conversely, Irs2 ablation impairs β cell replication. In this study, we examined aspects of the Igf1r regulatory signaling cascade in β cells. To examine genetically the involvement of Irs1 and Irs2 in Igf1r signaling, we generated double mutant mice lacking Igf1r specifically in pancreatic β cells in an Irs1- or Irs2-null background. We show that Igf1r/Irs1 double mutants do not differ phenotypically from Irs1 single mutants and exhibit hyperinsulinemia, while maintaining normal β cell mass and glucose tolerance. In contrast, lack of Igf1r function in β cells aggravates the consequences of Irs2 ablation in double mutants and results in lethal diabetes by 6 weeks of age. This additivity of phenotypic manifestations indicates that Irs2 serves a pathway that is largely independent of Igf1r signaling. Consistent with the view that the latter is the InsR pathway, we show that combined β cell-specific knock-out of both Insr and Igf1r results in a phenocopy of double mutants lacking Igf1r and Irs2. We conclude that Igf1r signals primarily through Irs1 and affects insulin secretion, whereas β cell proliferation is mainly regulated by InsR using Irs2 as a downstream signaling effector. The insulin and IGF pathways appear to control β cell functions independently and selectively.

  20. Curcumin enhances recovery of pancreatic islets from cellular stress induced inflammation and apoptosis in diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sil, Parames C.

    2015-02-01

    The phytochemical, curcumin, has been reported to play many beneficial roles. However, under diabetic conditions, the detail mechanism of its beneficial action in the glucose homeostasis regulatory organ, pancreas, is poorly understood. The present study has been designed and carried out to explore the role of curcumin in the pancreatic tissue of STZ induced and cellular stress mediated diabetes in eight weeks old male Wistar rats. Diabetes was induced with a single intraperitoneal dose of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Post to diabetes induction, animals were treated with curcumin at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight for eight weeks. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanism was determined using various biochemical assays, DNA fragmentation, FACS, histology, immunoblotting and ELISA. Treatment with curcumin reduced blood glucose level, increased plasma insulin and mitigated oxidative stress related markers. In vivo and in vitro experimental results revealed increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL1-β and IFN-γ), reduced level of cellular defense proteins (Nrf-2 and HO-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-2) along with enhanced levels of signaling molecules of ER stress dependent and independent apoptosis (cleaved Caspase-12/9/8/3) in STZ administered group. Treatment with curcumin ameliorated all the adverse changes and helps the organ back to its normal physiology. Results suggest that curcumin protects pancreatic beta-cells by attenuating inflammatory responses, and inhibiting ER/mitochondrial dependent and independent pathways of apoptosis and crosstalk between them. This uniqueness and absence of any detectable adverse effect proposes the possibility of using this molecule as an effective protector in the cellular stress mediated diabetes mellitus. - Highlights: • STZ induced cellular stress plays a vital role in pancreatic dysfunction. • Cellular stress causes inflammation, pancreatic islet cell death and diabetes. • Deregulation of Nrf-2

  1. Muscarinic receptors and amylase secretion of rat pancreatic acini during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Morisset, J; Wood, J; Solomon, T E; Larose, L

    1987-08-01

    This study examines the effects of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis on the secretory response of rat pancreatic acini to carbamylcholine and concentration of acinar muscarinic receptors. Rats were injected subcutaneously every 8 hr with cerulein, 12 micrograms/kg, for two days. They were sacrificed 2 and 4 hr after the first injection, 4 hr after the second and third, and 8 hr after the sixth. By 2 hr after the first injection, carbamylcholine showed decreased potency for stimulating amylase release; decreased potency becomes maximal after the second injection. Four hours after the first injection, carbamylcholine also showed decreased efficacy for causing maximal amylase release. In the course of development of pancreatitis, progressive reductions in muscarinic receptor concentrations were evident from 4 hr after the second injection. Following the complete treatment (8 hr after the sixth injection), no alteration could be observed in the affinity or proportions of each agonist class of muscarinic receptors. These studies indicate that the pancreatic acinar cells still remain functional after acute cerulein-induced pancreatitis, although significant reductions in potency and efficacy of carbamylcholine to cause amylase release and reduced muscarinic receptor concentration occur. PMID:2440647

  2. Maturation of stem cell-derived beta-cells guided by the expression of urocortin 3.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Huising, Mark O

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a devastating disease precipitated by an autoimmune response directed at the insulin-producing beta-cells of the pancreas for which no cure exists. Stem cell-derived beta-cells show great promise for a cure as they have the potential to supply unlimited numbers of cells that could be derived from a patient's own cells, thus eliminating the need for immunosuppression. Current in vitro protocols for the differentiation of stem cell-derived beta-cells can successfully generate pancreatic endoderm cells. In diabetic rodents, such cells can differentiate further along the beta-cell lineage until they are eventually capable of restoring normoglycemia. While these observations demonstrate that stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm has the potential to differentiate into mature, glucose-responsive beta-cells, the signals that direct differentiation and maturation from pancreatic endoderm onwards remain poorly understood. In this review, we analyze the sequence of events that culminates in the formation of beta-cells during embryonic development. and summarize how current protocols to generate beta-cells have sought to capitalize on this ontogenic template. We place particular emphasis on the current challenges and opportunities which occur in the later stages of beta-cell differentiation and maturation of transplantable stem cell-derived beta-cells. Another focus is on the question how the use of recently identified maturation markers such as urocortin 3 can be instrumental in guiding these efforts. PMID:25148370

  3. Structure-function studies of PANDER, an islet specific cytokine inducing cell death of insulin-secreting beta cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jichun; Gao, Zhiyong; Robert, Claudia E; Burkhardt, Brant R; Gaweska, Helena; Wagner, Amary; Wu, Jianmei; Greene, Scott R; Young, Robert A; Wolf, Bryan A

    2005-08-30

    PANDER (pancreatic derived factor, FAM3B) is a novel cytokine, present in insulin secretory granules, that induces apoptosis of alpha and beta cells of mouse, rat, and human islets in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and may be implicated in diabetes. PANDER has the predicted secondary structure of 4 alpha-helical bundles with an up-up-down-down topology, and two disulfide bonds. Eleven mutated PANDERs were constructed and expressed in beta-TC3 cells to identify the essential region of PANDER involved in beta-cell death. Beta-cell function was assessed by assays of cell viability and insulin secretion. Based on quantitative real-time RT-PCR all mutant PANDERs had similar mRNA expression levels in beta-TC3 cells. Immunoblotting showed that ten of eleven mutant PANDER proteins were synthesized and detected in beta-TC3 cells. A mutant PANDER with no signal peptide, however, was not expressed. Truncation of helix D alone caused a 40-50% decrease in PANDER's activity, while truncation of both helices C and D resulted in a 75% loss of activity. In contrast, truncation of the N-terminus of PANDER (helix A, the loop between helices A and B, and the first two cysteines) had no effect on PANDER-induced beta-cell death. The third and fourth cysteines of PANDER, C91 and C229, were shown to form one disulfide bond and be functionally important. Finally, the region between Cys91 and Phe152 constitutes the active part of PANDER, based on the demonstration that mutants with truncation of helix B or C caused decreased beta-cell death and did not inhibit insulin secretion, as compared to wild-type PANDER. Hence, helices B and C and the second disulfide bond of PANDER are essential for PANDER-induced beta-cell death.

  4. Profound duodenogastric reflux causes pancreatic growth in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gasslander, T; Mukaida, H; Herrington, M K; Hinder, R A; Adrian, T E

    1995-01-01

    Although duodenogastric reflux is a physiological event, excessive reflux may be a pathogenetic factor in several diseases of the foregut, including cancer. Long term profound duodenogastric reflux produces pancreatic and gastric tumours in rats. The trophic effect of surgically induced duodenogastric reflux on the pancreas was investigated and the mechanisms involved were examined. Rats with profound reflux from a split gastroenterostomy were compared with sham operated and unoperated controls after two and six weeks. In the six week experiment, one reflux and one sham group were given the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonist devazepide (25 nmol/kg/h). Duodenogastric reflux caused a significant increase in pancreatic weight, DNA, and plasma CCK and gastrin concentrations at both two and six weeks. Devazepide substantially reduced the pancreatic weight increase after six weeks but did not abolish it completely. CCK and gastrin were not affected by devazepide. These results suggest that CCK is largely responsible for the pancreatic growth induced by reflux but another factor may also be involved. The trophic effect of duodenogastric reflux may contribute to the increased incidence of pancreatic cancer reported after gastric surgery. PMID:7890218

  5. BPC 157 therapy to detriment sphincters failure-esophagitis-pancreatitis in rat and acute pancreatitis patients low sphincters pressure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, I; Dobric, I; Drmic, D; Sever, M; Klicek, R; Radic, B; Brcic, L; Kolenc, D; Zlatar, M; Kunjko, K; Jurcic, D; Martinac, M; Rasic, Z; Boban Blagaic, A; Romic, Z; Seiwerth, S; Sikiric, P

    2011-10-01

    Possibly, acute esophagitis and pancreatitis cause each other, and we focused on sphincteric failure as the common causative key able to induce either esophagitis and acute pancreatitis or both of them, and thereby investigate the presence of a common therapy nominator. This may be an anti-ulcer pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (tested for inflammatory bowel disease, wound treatment) affecting esophagitis, lower esophageal and pyloric sphincters failure and acute pancreatitis (10 μg/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally or in drinking water). The esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure (i.e., insertion of the tubes into the sphincters, lower esophageal and pyloric) and acute pancreatitis procedure (i.e., bile duct ligation) were combined in rats. Esophageal manometry was done in acute pancreatitis patients. In rats acute pancreatitis procedure produced also esophagitis and both sphincter failure, decreased pressure 24 h post-surgery. Furthermore, bile duct ligation alone immediately declines the pressure in both sphincters. Vice versa, the esophagitis-sphincter failure procedure alone produced acute pancreatitis. What's more, these lesions (esophagitis, sphincter failure, acute pancreatitis when combined) aggravate each other (tubes into sphincters and ligated bile duct). Counteraction occurred by BPC 157 therapies. In acute pancreatitis patients lower pressure at rest was in both esophageal sphincters in acute pancreatitis patients. We conclude that BPC 157 could cure esophagitis/sphincter/acute pancreatitis healing failure. PMID:22204800

  6. Partial regeneration of beta-cells in the islets of Langerhans by Nymphayol a sterol isolated from Nymphaea stellata (Willd.) flowers.

    PubMed

    Subash-Babu, P; Ignacimuthu, S; Agastian, P; Varghese, Babu

    2009-04-01

    Reduction of the beta-cell mass is critical in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. The discovery of agents which induce regeneration of pancreatic beta-cells would be useful to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat diabetes. The present study was aimed at identifying a new agent for the control of diabetes through regeneration of pancreatic beta cells and insulin secretory potential. Nymphaea stellata flower chloroform extract (NSFCExt) showed significant plasma glucose lowering effect. Further NSFCExt was utilized to isolate and identify the lead compound based on bioassay guided fractionation; we found Nymphayol (25,26-dinorcholest-5-en-3beta-ol) a new crystal [space group P2(1) (No. 4), a=9.618(5), b=7.518(5), c=37.491(5)]. It was purified by repeat column. The structure was determined on the basis of X-ray crystallography and spectral data. Oral administration of Nymphayol for 45 days significantly (p<0.05) lowered the blood glucose level and more importantly it effectively increased the insulin content in diabetic rats. In addition, Nymphayol increased the number of beta cell mass enormously. Islet-like cell clusters in the islets of Langerhans were clearly observed based on histochemical and immunohistochemical study. PMID:19272781

  7. Restitution of defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in diabetic GK rat by acetylcholine uncovers paradoxical stimulatory effect of beta-cell muscarinic receptor activation on cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Dolz, Manuel; Bailbé, Danielle; Giroix, Marie-Hélène; Calderari, Sophie; Gangnerau, Marie-Noelle; Serradas, Patricia; Rickenbach, Katharina; Irminger, Jean-Claude; Portha, Bernard

    2005-11-01

    Because acetylcholine (ACh) is a recognized potentiator of glucose-stimulated insulin release in the normal beta-cell, we have studied ACh's effect on islets of the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes. We first verified that ACh was able to restore the insulin secretory glucose competence of the GK beta-cell. Then, we demonstrated that in GK islets 1) ACh elicited a first-phase insulin release at low glucose, whereas it had no effect in Wistar; 2) total phospholipase C activity, ACh-induced inositol phosphate production, and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation were normal; 3) ACh triggered insulin release, even in the presence of thapsigargin, which induced a reduction of the ACh-induced [Ca2+]i response (suggesting that ACh produces amplification signals that augment the efficacy of elevated [Ca2+]i on GK exocytosis); 4) inhibition of protein kinase C did not affect [Ca2+]i nor the insulin release responses to ACh; and 5) inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKAs), adenylyl cyclases, or cAMP generation, while not affecting the [Ca2+]i response, significantly lowered the insulinotropic response to ACh (at low and high glucose). In conclusion, ACh acts mainly through activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway to potently enhance Ca2+-stimulated insulin release in the GK beta-cell and, in doing so, normalizes its defective glucose responsiveness.

  8. Pancreatic and Pancreatic-Like Microbial Proteases Accelerate Gut Maturation in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prykhodko, Olena; Pierzynowski, Stefan G.; Nikpey, Elham; Arevalo Sureda, Ester; Fedkiv, Olexandr; Weström, Björn R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Postnatal gut maturation in neonatal mammals, either at natural weaning or after precocious inducement, is coinciding with enhanced enzymes production by exocrine pancreas. Since the involvement of enzymes in gut functional maturation was overlooked, the present study aimed to investigate the role of enzymes in gut functional maturation using neonatal rats. Methods Suckling rats (Rattus norvegicus) were instagastrically gavaged with porcine pancreatic enzymes (Creon), microbial-derived amylase, protease, lipase and mixture thereof, while controls received α-lactalbumin or water once per day during 14–16 d of age. At 17 d of age the animals were euthanized and visceral organs were dissected, weighed and analyzed for structural and functional properties. For some of the rats, gavage with the macromolecular markers such as bovine serum albumin and bovine IgG was performed 3 hours prior to blood collection to assess the intestinal permeability. Results Gavage with the pancreatic or pancreatic-like enzymes resulted in stimulated gut growth, increased gastric acid secretion and switched intestinal disaccharidases, with decreased lactase and increased maltase and sucrase activities. The fetal-type vacuolated enterocytes were replaced by the adult-type in the distal intestine, and macromolecular transfer to the blood was declined. Enzyme exposure also promoted pancreas growth with increased amylase and trypsin production. These effects were confined to the proteases in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Feeding exogenous enzymes, containing proteases, induced precocious gut maturation in suckling rats. This suggests that luminal exposure to proteases by oral loading or, possibly, via enhanced pancreatic secretion involves in the gut maturation of young mammals. PMID:25658606

  9. Quantitative-Proteomic Comparison of Alpha and Beta Cells to Uncover Novel Targets for Lineage Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Mertins, Philipp; Udeshi, Namrata D.; Dančík, Vlado; Fomina-Yadlin, Dina; Kubicek, Stefan; Clemons, Paul A.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Carr, Steven A.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2014-01-01

    Type-1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells are destroyed by the immune system. An emerging strategy to regenerate beta-cell mass is through transdifferentiation of pancreatic alpha cells to beta cells. We previously reported two small molecules, BRD7389 and GW8510, that induce insulin expression in a mouse alpha cell line and provide a glimpse into potential intermediate cell states in beta-cell reprogramming from alpha cells. These small-molecule studies suggested that inhibition of kinases in particular may induce the expression of several beta-cell markers in alpha cells. To identify potential lineage reprogramming protein targets, we compared the transcriptome, proteome, and phosphoproteome of alpha cells, beta cells, and compound-treated alpha cells. Our phosphoproteomic analysis indicated that two kinases, BRSK1 and CAMKK2, exhibit decreased phosphorylation in beta cells compared to alpha cells, and in compound-treated alpha cells compared to DMSO-treated alpha cells. Knock-down of these kinases in alpha cells resulted in expression of key beta-cell markers. These results provide evidence that perturbation of the kinome may be important for lineage reprogramming of alpha cells to beta cells. PMID:24759943

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Proliferative Effects of Oral Vanadium on Pancreatic Islet Volumes and Beta Cell Numbers of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pirmoradi, Leila; Noorafshan, Ali; Safaee, Akbar; Dehghani, Gholam Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral vanadyl sulfate (vanadium) induces normoglycemia, proliferates beta cells and prevents pancreatic islet atrophy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Soteriological method is used to quantitate the proliferative effects of vanadium on beta-cell numbers and islet volumes of normal and diabetic rats. Methods: Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were made diabetic with intravenous streptozotocin injection (40 mg/kg). Normal and diabetic rats were divided into four groups. While control normal and diabetic (CD) groups used water, vanadium-treated normal (VTN) and diabetic (VTD) groups used solutions containing vanadyl sulfate (0.5-1 mg/mL, VOSO4+5H2O). Tail blood samples were used to measure blood glucose (BG) and plasma insulin. Two months after treatment, rats were sacrificed, pancreata prepared, and stereology method was used to quantitatively evaluate total beta cell numbers (TBCN) and total islet volumes (TISVOL). Results: Normoglycemia persisted in VTN with significantly decreased plasma insulin (0.190.08 vs. 0.970.27 ng/dL, P<0.002). The respective high BG (53249 vs. 14446 mg/dL, P<0.0001) and reduced plasma insulin (0.260.15 vs. 0.540.19 ng/dL, P<0.002) seen in CD were reversed in VTD during vanadium treatment or withdrawal. While the induction of diabetes, compared to their control, significantly decreased TISVOL (1.90.2 vs. 3.030.6 mm3, P<0.003) and TBCN (0.990.1 vs. 3.20.2 x 106, P<0.003), vanadium treatment significantly increased TISVOL (2.90.8 and 4.071.0 mm3, P<0.003) and TBCN (1.50.3 and 3.80.6 x 106, P<0.03). Conclusion: Two-month oral vanadium therapy in STZ-diabetic rats ameliorated hyperglycemia by partially restoring plasma insulin. This action was through proliferative actions of vanadium in preventing islet atrophy by increasing beta-cell numbers. PMID:26459400

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonist, rosiglitazone, protects against nephropathy and pancreatic islet abnormalities in Zucker fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, R E; Al-Barazanji, K A; Toseland, C D; Slaughter, M; Connor, S C; West, A; Bond, B; Turner, N C; Clapham, J C

    1998-08-01

    Rosiglitazone (BRL 49653), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonist and potent insulin action-enhancing agent, was given in the diet (50 micromol/kg of diet) to male Zucker rats ages 6-7 weeks for 9 months (prevention group). In this treatment mode, rosiglitazone prolonged the time to onset of proteinuria from 3 to 6 months and markedly reduced the rate of its subsequent progression. Progression was also retarded when treatment was commenced (intervention group) after proteinuria had become established (4 months; ages 24-25 weeks). In either treatment mode, rosiglitazone normalized urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase activity, a marker for renal proximal tubular damage, and ameliorated the rise in systolic blood pressure that occurred coincidentally with the development of proteinuria in Zucker fatty control rats. The renal protective action of rosiglitazone was verified morphologically. Thus in the prevention group there was an absence of the various indexes of chronic nephropathy that were prominent in the Zucker fatty control group, namely, glomerulosclerosis, dilated tubules containing proteinaceous casts, a loss of functional microvilli on the tubular epithelium, and varying degrees of chronic interstitial nephritis. An intermediate pathology was observed in the intervention group. Also, pancreatic islet hyperplasia, ultrastructural evidence of beta-cell work hypertrophy, and derangement of alpha-cell distribution within the islet were prominent features of Zucker fatty control rats, but these adaptive changes were ameliorated (intervention group) or prevented (prevention group) by rosiglitazone treatment. These data demonstrate that treatment of Zucker fatty rats with rosiglitazone produced substantial protection over a prolonged period against the development and progression of renal injury and the adaptive changes to pancreatic islet morphology caused by sustained hyperinsulinemia. PMID:9703335

  12. Distinct glucose lowering and beta cell protective effects of vanadium and food restriction in streptozotocin-diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cam, M C; Rodrigues, B; McNeill, J H

    1999-11-01

    Vanadium is an oral insulin-mimetic agent that diminishes hyperglycemia, improves beta-cell insulin store and secretory function, and can reverse the diabetic state chronically after withdrawal from treatment. As food restriction has been reported to enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin demand, we assessed the contribution of a reduced food intake to the glucose lowering and beta-cell protective effects of vanadium. Streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats were untreated (D) or administered vanadyl sulfate in the drinking water (DT) at one week prior to and for 5 weeks following the administration of STZ. An additional group was pair-fed (DP) with an equal amount of food as that consumed by the DT group. Shortly after the induction of diabetes, hyperglycemic D rats demonstrated a significant rise in plasma insulin to levels that initially exceeded that of the controls. This was followed by a steady reduction over several weeks, suggesting a gradual depletion of functional beta-cells. Both vanadium treatment and pair-feeding abolished the insulin hypersecretory response following STZ administration. Glucose lowering was enhanced in DT animals when administered higher concentrations of vanadium, despite no further reduction in food intake, and all DT animals (10/10) were normoglycemic by 5 weeks. Mean pancreatic insulin content in DT rats was improved fourfold and was associated with a greater number of granulated beta-cells. Conversely, food restriction only modestly improved glycemia and the pancreatic insulin store and, unlike DT, DP rats remained highly glucose-intolerant. At 5 weeks of diabetes, fed circulating glucose and insulin levels were strongly correlated (P=0.0002) in the D and DP groups, supporting the notion that glucose lowering with food restriction is dependent on improved plasma insulin levels. A separate correlation was observed in DT animals within a lower range of plasma insulin, suggesting that vanadium, unlike food restriction, reduced

  13. Role of MicroRNAs in Islet Beta-Cell Compensation and Failure during Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Plaisance, Valérie; Waeber, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell function and mass are markedly adaptive to compensate for the changes in insulin requirement observed during several situations such as pregnancy, obesity, glucocorticoids excess, or administration. This requires a beta-cell compensation which is achieved through a gain of beta-cell mass and function. Elucidating the physiological mechanisms that promote functional beta-cell mass expansion and that protect cells against death, is a key therapeutic target for diabetes. In this respect, several recent studies have emphasized the instrumental role of microRNAs in the control of beta-cell function. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression, and are pivotal for the control of beta-cell proliferation, function, and survival. On the one hand, changes in specific microRNA levels have been associated with beta-cell compensation and are triggered by hormones or bioactive peptides that promote beta-cell survival and function. Conversely, modifications in the expression of other specific microRNAs contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by diabetogenic factors including, cytokines, chronic hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and oxidized LDL. This review underlines the importance of targeting the microRNA network for future innovative therapies aiming at preventing the beta-cell decline in diabetes. PMID:24734255

  14. Mechanisms of Beta Cell Dysfunction Associated With Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Antje; Solimena, Michele; Knoch, Klaus-Peter

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from genetic predisposition and environmental factors leading to the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Recently, a rapid increase in the incidence of childhood T1D has been observed worldwide; this is too fast to be explained by genetic factors alone, pointing to the spreading of environmental factors linked to the disease. Enteroviruses (EVs) are perhaps the most investigated environmental agents in relationship to the pathogenesis of T1D. While several studies point to the likelihood of such correlation, epidemiological evidence in its support is inconclusive or in some instances even against it. Hence, it is still unknown if and how EVs are involved in the development of T1D. Here we review recent findings concerning the biology of EV in beta cells and the potential implications of this knowledge for the understanding of beta cell dysfunction and autoimmune destruction in T1D.

  15. Effects of Local Pancreatic Renin-Angiotensin System on the Microcirculation of Rat with Severe Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhijian; Feng, Ling; Long, Haocheng; Wang, Hui; Feng, Jiarui; Chen, Feixiang

    2015-07-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is normally related to multiorgan dysfunction and local complications. Studies have found that local pancreatic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) was significantly upregulated in drug-induced SAP. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of angiotensin II receptors inhibitor valsartan on dual role of RAS in SAP in a rat model and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. 3.8% sodium taurocholate (1 ml/kg) was injected to the pancreatic capsule in order for pancreatitis induction. Rats in the sham group were injected with normal saline in identical locations. We also investigated the regulation of experimentally induced SAP on local RAS expression in the pancreas through determination of the activities of serum amylase, lipase and myeloperoxidase, histological and biochemical analysis, radioimmunoassay, fluorescence quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis. The results indicated that valsartan could effectively suppress the local RAS to protect against experimental acute pancreatitis through inhibition of microcirculation disturbances and inflammation. The results suggest that pancreatic RAS plays a critical role in the regulation of pancreatic functions and demonstrates application potential as AT1 receptor antagonists. Moreover, other RAS inhibitors could be a new therapeutic target in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26170733

  16. Secondary prevention of type 1 diabetes mellitus: stopping immune destruction and promoting beta-cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Couri, C E B; Foss, M C; Voltarelli, J C

    2006-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus results from a cell-mediated autoimmune attack against pancreatic beta-cells. Traditional treatments involve numerous daily insulin dosages/injections and rigorous glucose control. Many efforts toward the identification of beta-cell precursors have been made not only with the aim of understanding the physiology of islet regeneration, but also as an alternative way to produce beta-cells to be used in protocols of islet transplantation. In this review, we summarize the most recent studies related to precursor cells implicated in the regeneration process. These include embryonic stem cells, pancreas-derived multipotent precursors, pancreatic ductal cells, hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hepatic oval cells, and mature beta-cells. There is controversial evidence of the potential of these cell sources to regenerate beta-cell mass in diabetic patients. However, clinical trials using embryonic stem cells, umbilical cord blood or adult bone marrow stem cells are under way. The results of various immunosuppressive regimens aiming at blocking autoimmunity against pancreatic beta-cells and promoting beta-cell preservation are also analyzed. Most of these regimens provide transient and partial effect on insulin requirements, but new regimens are beginning to be tested. Our own clinical trial combines a high dose immunosuppression with mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Effect of modafinil on pancreatic exocrine secretion in rats. A comparison with adrafinil and related drugs.

    PubMed

    Chariot, J; Appia, F; Vaille, C; Rozé, C

    1987-01-01

    The effects of modafinil and adrafinil, 2 drugs that induce locomotor hyperactivity, and those of the parent compounds CRL 40467 and CRL 40385, were studied on the external pancreatic secretion of anaesthetized and conscious rats. In anaesthetized rats modafinil, adrafinil, and CRL 40385 antagonized the central vagal stimulation of protein output induced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose in the pancreatic juice. In conscious rats, modafinil and adrafinil inhibited the output of protein in the basal interdigestive pancreatic secretion. Modafinil was more active than adrafinil as an inhibitor of pancreatic secretion. The effects of modafinil and adrafinil were different from those of sympathetic amines and dopamine: they did not stimulate the output of bicarbonate in anaesthetized rats, and pancreatic inhibition observed in conscious rats was not inhibited by either yohimbine or prazosin. PMID:2893764

  18. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in pancreatic acinar carcinoma of rat.

    PubMed

    Taton, G; Delhaye, M; Swillens, S; Morisset, J; Larose, L; Longnecker, D S; Poirier, G G

    1985-04-15

    The active enantiomer of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H(-)QNB) was used as a ligand to evaluate the muscarinic receptors. The 3H(-)QNB binding characteristics of muscarinic cholinergic receptors obtained from normal and neoplastic tissues were studied to determine changes in receptor properties during neoplastic transformation. Saturable and stereospecific binding sites for 3H(-)QNB are present in homogenates of rat pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The proportions of high- and low-affinity agonist binding sites are similar for neoplastic and normal tissues. The density of muscarinic receptors is higher in neoplastic (200 femtomoles/mg protein) than in normal pancreatic homogenates (80 femtomoles/mg protein). The muscarinic binding sites of the neoplastic and fetal pancreas show similar KD values which are higher than those observed for normal pancreas. PMID:2580801

  19. Mesobiliverdin IXα Enhances Rat Pancreatic Islet Yield and Function.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taihei; Chen, Dong; Chang, Cheng-Wei Tom; Kenmochi, Takashi; Saito, Tomonori; Suzuki, Satoshi; Takemoto, Jon Y

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to produce mesobiliverdin IXα, an analog of anti-inflammatory biliverdin IXα, and to test its ability to enhance rat pancreatic islet yield for allograft transplantation into diabetic recipients. Mesobiliverdin IXα was synthesized from phycocyanobilin derived from cyanobacteria, and its identity and purity were analyzed by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Mesobiliverdin IXα was a substrate for human NADPH biliverdin reductase. Excised Lewis rat pancreata infused with mesobiliverdin IXα and biliverdin IXα-HCl (1-100 μM) yielded islet equivalents as high as 86.7 and 36.5%, respectively, above those from non-treated controls, and the islets showed a high degree of viability based on dithizone staining. When transplanted into livers of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, islets from pancreata infused with mesobiliverdin IXα lowered non-fasting blood glucose (BG) levels in 55.6% of the recipients and in 22.2% of control recipients. In intravenous glucose tolerance tests, fasting BG levels of 56 post-operative day recipients with islets from mesobiliverdin IXα infused pancreata were lower than those for controls and showed responses that indicate recovery of insulin-dependent function. In conclusion, mesobiliverdin IXα infusion of pancreata enhanced yields of functional islets capable of reversing insulin dysfunction in diabetic recipients. Since its production is scalable, mesobiliverdin IXα has clinical potential as a protectant of pancreatic islets for allograft transplantation. PMID:23630498

  20. Time course and cellular source of pancreatic regeneration following acute pancreatitis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaesser, H.P.A.; Adler, G.; Kern, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the different cell types in the rat exocrine pancreas has been studied in a model of hormone-induced acute pancreatitis in which pancreatic edema, inflammation, and acinar cell destruction were induced within 12 h of infusion of supramaximal concentrations of cerulein (5 micrograms/kg/h). A sequential biochemical and structural analysis of the pancreas in daily intervals was combined with the autoradiographic quantitation of labeling indices of five cell populations following /sup 3/H-thymidine injection at days 1-7 after induction of pancreatitis. Desquamation of acinar cell apical cytoplasm and release of cytoplasmic segments into the acinar lumen on the first day following induction of pancreatitis led to formation of duct-like tubular complexes. Enzyme content in the pancreas decreased progressively following the formation of the edema to levels 15-20% of controls and remained reduced during the initial 5 days. Thymidine incorporation into total DNA showed a biphasic pattern with a distinct peak at day 1 and a second broader peak between days 4 and 7. Autoradiographic quantitation of labeling indices demonstrated the exclusive incorporation into intercalated duct cells and interstitial cells during the initial 24 h, while the second peak was predominantly due to labeling of acinar cells. Larger interlobular ducts and islets did not show changes in labeling index. In vivo labeling with /sup 3/H-thymidine during the first day and analysis of labeling indices 14 days later showed the persistence of label in intercalated duct cells and interstitial cells and argued against the stem cell hypothesis and against transformation of duct cells into acinar cells.

  1. Increased L-CPT-1 activity and altered gene expression in pancreatic islets of malnourished adult rats: a possible relationship between elevated free fatty acid levels and impaired insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    de Barros Reis, Marise Auxiliadora; Arantes, Vanessa Cristina; Cunha, Daniel Andrade; Latorraca, Márcia Queiroz; Toyama, Marcos Hikari; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Boschero, Antonio Carlos

    2008-02-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with chronically elevated levels of serum fatty acids and reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Lipid metabolism in pancreatic beta cells is critical for the regulation of insulin secretion, and the chronic exposure to fatty acids results in higher palmitate oxidation rates and an altered insulin response to glucose. Using a rat model of isocaloric protein restriction, we examined whether pre- and postnatal protein malnutrition influences the properties of pancreatic islet carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (liver isoform, L-CPT-1), a rate-limiting enzyme that regulates fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria. The activity of L-CPT-1 in pancreatic islets increased in the low protein (LP), although the L-CPT-1 mRNA levels were unaffected by malnutrition. The susceptibility of enzyme to inhibition by malonyl-CoA was unaltered and the content of malonyl-CoA was reduced in LP cells. Because the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids is related to the altered expression of a number of genes encoding proteins involved in insulin secretion, the levels of expression of insulin and GLUT-2 mRNA were assessed. A reduced expression of both genes was observed in malnourished rats. These results provide further evidence that increased L-CPT-1 activity and changes in gene expression in pancreatic islets may be involved in the reduced insulin secretion seen in malnourished rats. PMID:17531461

  2. Comparative effects of Citrullus colocynthis, sunflower and olive oil-enriched diet in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats.

    PubMed

    Sebbagh, N; Cruciani-Guglielmacci, C; Ouali, F; Berthault, M-F; Rouch, C; Sari, D Chabane; Magnan, C

    2009-06-01

    Citrullus colocynthis (colocynth) seeds are traditionally used as antidiabetic medication in Mediterranean countries. The present study evaluated the differential effects of diets enriched with C. colocynthis, sunflower or olive oils on the pancreatic beta-cell mass in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats. STZ injection induced rapid hyperglycaemia in all animals. However, 2 months later, hyperglycaemia was significantly less pronounced in the rats fed a C. colocynthis oil-enriched diet compared with other rat groups (7.9mM versus 12mM and 16mM with colocynth versus olive and sunflower oils, respectively). Assessment of insulin sensitivity using the homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA) method also indicated less insulin resistance in the rats fed a C. colocynthis oil-enriched diet versus the other rats. Finally, 2 months after STZ injection, the pancreatic beta-cell mass was similar in both the STZ-treated rats fed the colocynth oil-enriched diet and their controls fed the same diet. In contrast, the pancreatic beta-cell mass remained lower in the STZ-induced diabetic rats fed with olive oil- and sunflower oil-enriched diets compared with the C. colocynthis group. We conclude that C. colocynthis oil supplementation may have a beneficial effect by partly preserving or restoring pancreatic beta-cell mass in the STZ-induced diabetes rat model.

  3. Metabonomic changes from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in tissues from rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shi; Li, Zhishui; Feng, Jianghua; Bai, Jianxi; Lin, Xianchao; Huang, Heguang

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most malignant tumors and is difficult to diagnose in the early phase. This study was aimed at obtaining the metabolic profiles and characteristic metabolites of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and PDAC tissues from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats to establish metabonomic methods used in the early diagnosis of PDAC. In the present study, the animal models were established by embedding 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in the pancreas of SD rats to obtain PanIN and PDAC tissues. After the preprocessing of tissues, (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy combined with multivariate and univariate statistical analysis was applied to identify the potential metabolic signatures and the corresponding metabolic pathways. Pattern recognition models were successfully established and differential metabolites, including glucose, amino acids, carboxylic acids and coenzymes, were screened out. Compared with the control, the trends in the variation of several metabolites were similar in both PanIN and PDAC. Kynurenate and methionine levels were elevated in PanIN but decreased in PDAC, thus, could served as biomarkers to distinguish PanIN from PDAC. Our results suggest that NMR-based techniques combined with multivariate statistical analysis can distinguish the metabolic differences among PanIN, PDAC and normal tissues, and, therefore, present a promising approach for physiopathologic metabolism investigations and early diagnoses of PDAC. PMID:27019331

  4. Minireview: beta-cell replacement therapy for diabetes in the 21st century: manipulation of cell fate by directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yechoor, Vijay; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell failure underlies type 1 diabetes; it also contributes in an essential way to type 2 diabetes. beta-Cell replacement is an important component of any cure for diabetes. The current options of islet and pancreas transplantation are not satisfactory as definitive forms of therapy. Here, we review strategies for induced de novo pancreatic beta-cell formation, which depend on the targeted differentiation of cells into pancreatic beta-cells. With this objective in mind, one can manipulate the fate of three different types of cells: 1) from terminally differentiated cells, e.g. exocrine pancreatic cells, into beta-cells; 2) from multipotent adult stem cells, e.g. hepatic oval cells, into pancreatic islets; and 3) from pluripotent stem cells, e.g. embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, into beta-cells. We will examine the pros and cons of each strategy as well as the hurdles that must be overcome before these approaches to generate new beta-cells will be ready for clinical application. PMID:20219891

  5. Minireview: beta-cell replacement therapy for diabetes in the 21st century: manipulation of cell fate by directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yechoor, Vijay; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell failure underlies type 1 diabetes; it also contributes in an essential way to type 2 diabetes. beta-Cell replacement is an important component of any cure for diabetes. The current options of islet and pancreas transplantation are not satisfactory as definitive forms of therapy. Here, we review strategies for induced de novo pancreatic beta-cell formation, which depend on the targeted differentiation of cells into pancreatic beta-cells. With this objective in mind, one can manipulate the fate of three different types of cells: 1) from terminally differentiated cells, e.g. exocrine pancreatic cells, into beta-cells; 2) from multipotent adult stem cells, e.g. hepatic oval cells, into pancreatic islets; and 3) from pluripotent stem cells, e.g. embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, into beta-cells. We will examine the pros and cons of each strategy as well as the hurdles that must be overcome before these approaches to generate new beta-cells will be ready for clinical application.

  6. Enzyme studies in the articular cartilage of diabetic rats and of rats bearing transplanted pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, R; Hirshberg, G E; Lesker, P

    1977-08-01

    The articular cartilage of normal rats, of rats made diabetic with streptozotocin, and of rats made diabetic with streptozotocin and subsequently transplanted with isologous pancreatic islets was examined for the activities of enzymes engaged in the synthesis and degradation of glycosaminoglycans (mucopolysaccharides). The activities assayed were those of the degrading enzymes B-glucuronidase, B-acetyglucosaminidase, B-acetylgalactosaminidase, B-galactosidase, and those active in synthesis: uridine diphosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehyrogenase, and phosphofructokinase. In the diabetic animals all enzyme activities were increased, thos of the degrading enzymes more than those of the others. Implantation of pancreatic islets reversed the changes produced by diabetes, enzyme activities returning to near-normal levels. PMID:142034

  7. Chronic stress sensitizes rats to pancreatitis induced by cerulein: Role of TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Binker, Marcelo G; Binker-Cosen, Andres A; Richards, Daniel; Gaisano, Herbert Y; de Cosen, Rodica H; Cosen-Binker, Laura I

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate chronic stress as a susceptibility factor for developing pancreatitis, as well as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as a putative sensitizer. METHODS: Rat pancreatic acini were used to analyze the influence of TNF-α on submaximal (50 pmol/L) cholecystokinin (CCK) stimulation. Chronic restraint (4 h every day for 21 d) was used to evaluate the effects of submaximal (0.2 μg/kg per hour) cerulein stimulation on chronically stressed rats. RESULTS: In vitro exposure of pancreatic acini to TNF-α disorganized the actin cytoskeleton. This was further increased by TNF-α/CCK treatment, which additionally reduced amylase secretion, and increased trypsin and nuclear factor-κB activities in a protein-kinase-C δ and ε-dependent manner. TNF-α/CCK also enhanced caspases’ activity and lactate dehydrogenase release, induced ATP loss, and augmented the ADP/ATP ratio. In vivo, rats under chronic restraint exhibited elevated serum and pancreatic TNF-α levels. Serum, pancreatic, and lung inflammatory parameters, as well as caspases’activity in pancreatic and lung tissue, were substantially enhanced in stressed/cerulein-treated rats, which also experienced tissues’ ATP loss and greater ADP/ATP ratios. Histological examination revealed that stressed/cerulein-treated animals developed abundant pancreatic and lung edema, hemorrhage and leukocyte infiltrate, and pancreatic necrosis. Pancreatitis severity was greatly decreased by treating animals with an anti-TNF-α-antibody, which diminished all inflammatory parameters, histopathological scores, and apoptotic/necrotic markers in stressed/cerulein-treated rats. CONCLUSION: In rats, chronic stress increases susceptibility for developing pancreatitis, which involves TNF-α sensitization of pancreatic acinar cells to undergo injury by physiological cerulein stimulation. PMID:21105189

  8. Developmental patterns for pancreatic opioids in the rat.

    PubMed

    Powell, A M; Voyles, N R; Wilkins, S D; Zalenski, C M; Timmers, K I; Recant, L

    1989-01-01

    Developmental patterns for rat pancreatic opioid peptides and islet hormones were studied from gestational day 20 through adulthood. Fetal tissue was obtained as well as pancreas at birth (day 0), and postnatal days 3, 7, 14, and 21, and 7 weeks. The hormones measured included insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. The opioids measured were beta-endorphin, Met- and Leu-enkephalins, and the high molecular weight enkephalin precursors. Pancreata were pooled as necessary and extracted (acid alcohol, or hot acetic acid), and opioids were further purified on reversed-phase C-18 (Sep-pak) cartridges. In all instances measurements were made by radioimmunoassays. Precursor peptides were first digested (with trypsin and carboxypeptidase B) prior to immunoassay. All opioids and hormones except the precursors for enkephalins showed a well-defined surge in pancreatic concentration during the first postnatal week. In contrast, the precursors had the highest concentration in the fetus, and by the seventh day of life had decreased by greater than 50%. This progressive decrease may represent maturation of the enkephalin convertase and trypsin-like enzymes in the islets. The opioid and hormonal surges that we have described are similar to the surge in islet concentration of thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH) previously described in neonatal rat islets. It is suggested that these postnatal alterations in opioid and hormone concentration relate to a specific function in the development of the endocrine pancreas. PMID:2530576

  9. Small-molecule suppressors of cytokine-induced beta-cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Danny Hung-Chieh; Bodycombe, Nicole E.; Carrinski, Hyman A.; Lewis, Timothy A.; Clemons, Paul A.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis is a critical event during the development of type-1 diabetes. The identification of small molecules capable of preventing cytokine-induced apoptosis could lead to avenues for therapeutic intervention. We developed a set of phenotypic cell-based assays designed to identify such small-molecule suppressors. Rat INS-1E cells were simultaneously treated with a cocktail of inflammatory cytokines and a collection of 2,240 diverse small molecules, and screened using an assay for cellular ATP levels. Forty-nine top-scoring compounds included glucocorticoids, several pyrazole derivatives, and known inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Two compounds were able to increase cellular ATP levels, reduce caspase-3 activity and nitrite production, and increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the presence of cytokines. These results indicate that small molecules identified by this screening approach may protect beta cells from autoimmune attack, and may be good candidates for therapeutic intervention in early stages of type-1 diabetes. PMID:20550176

  10. Cholecystokinin acts as an essential factor in the exacerbation of pancreatic bile duct ligation-induced rat pancreatitis model under non-fasting condition.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, K; Washizuka, M; Segawa, Y

    2000-09-01

    We examined the influence of 2 gut hormones involved in the enhancement of pancreatic exocrine secretion, secretin and cholecystokinin (CCK), in the exacerbation of pancreatitis. We also examined the role of the vagal system, which was considered to be a transmission route for these hormones. Our model of pancreatitis in the rat was prepared by pancreatic bile duct ligation (PBDL), which simultaneously ligated the pancreatic duct and the common bile duct. Serum amylase activity and histopathological changes in the pancreas were used as indices of pancreatitis. We also measured the volume of pancreatic juice, as well as the amylase activity and protein level of the pancreatic juice, as indices of increased pancreatic exocrine secretion. Two gut hormones were given 6 times at 1-h intervals. Administration of secretin (1-3 microg/kg, s.c.) did not influence serum amylase activity in rats with PBDL-induced pancreatitis. However, food stimulation and administration of CCK-8 (1 microg/kg, s.c.) increased serum amylase activity and promoted vacuolation of the pancreatic acinar cells in rats with PBDL-induced pancreatitis. Administration of atropine (3 mg/kg, s.c.) or a CCK1-receptor antagonist, Z-203 (0.1 mg/kg, i.v.), inhibited food-stimulated or CCK-8-induced (1 microg/kg, s.c.) enhancement of pancreatic exocrine secretion and exacerbation after the development of PBDL-induced pancreatitis. These results suggest that not secretin, which regulates the volume of pancreatic juice, but CCK, which regulates the secretion of pancreatic enzymes via the vagal system, plays an essential role in food-stimulated exacerbation after the development of pancreatitis.

  11. Cardioprotective effects of the novel Na+/H+ exchanger-1 inhibitor KR-32560 in a perfused rat heart model of global ischemia and reperfusion: Involvement of the Akt-GSK-3beta cell survival pathway and antioxidant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Jung, In-Sang; Lee, Sung-Hun; Yang, Min-Kyu; Park, Jung-Woo; Yi, Kyu-Yang; Yoo, Sung-Eun; Kwon, Suk-Hyung; Chung, Hun-Jong; Choi, Wahn-Soo; Shin, Hwa-Sup

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the cardioprotective effects and mechanism of action of KR-32560 {[5-(2-methoxy-5-fluorophenyl)furan-2-ylcarbonyl]guanidine}, a newly synthesized NHE-1 inhibitor, we evaluated the effects of KR-32560 on cardiac function in a rat model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced heart injury as well as the role antioxidant enzymes and pro-survival proteins play these observed effects. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 25 min of global ischemia followed by 30 min of reperfusion, KR-32560 (3 and 10 microM) significantly reversed the I/Rinduced decrease in left ventricular developed pressure and increase in left ventricular enddiastolic pressure. In rat hearts reperfused for 30 min, KR-32560 (10 microM) significantly decreased the malondialdehyde content while increasing the activities of both glutathione peroxidase and catalase, two important antioxidant enzymes. Western blotting analysis of left ventricles subjected to I/R showed that KR-32560 significantly increased phosphorylation of both Akt and GSK-3beta in a dose-dependent manner, with no effect on the phosphorylation of eNOS. These results suggest that KR-32560 exerts potent cardioprotective effects against I/Rinduced rat heart injury and that its mechanism involves antioxidant enzymes and the Akt-GSK-3beta cell survival pathway.

  12. Impaired pancreatic duct-cell growth in focal areas of regeneration after partial pancreatectomy in the adult Goto-Kakizaki rat, a spontaneous model of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Plachot, C; Portha, B

    2001-03-01

    The Paris colony of adult Goto-Kakizaki (GK/Par) rat, a genetic model of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, is characterized by a restriction of the beta-cell mass and reduced beta-cell regeneration capacity. In order to have a better understanding of the impaired mechanism(s) leading to reduced beta-cell plasticity in the GK/Par rat, we have investigated duct-cell growth capacity following 90% pancreatectomy, a well-defined procedure leading in non-diabetic rats, to sequential duct proliferation and subsequent differentiation. To this aim, we have performed pancreatectomy in 8-10-week-old male normoglycaemic Wistar and diabetic GK rats. Duct-cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated at different time points: day 0 (D0), day 2 (D2), day 7 (D7) and day 14 (D14) after pancreatectomy. A transient wave of duct-cell proliferation was observed on D2 in both small and main ducts in the pancreatectomized Wistar rats. A similar increase occurred in the similarly treated GK rats, but to a higher extent as compared to the Wistar rats. Thereafter, duct-cell proliferation from main or small ducts returned to non-pancreatectomized values on D7 and remained at this level on D14 in both the Wistar and GK pancreatectomized groups. In the common pancreatic duct, the number of proliferative duct-cells was higher in GK rats compared to Wistar on D0. In both the operated Wistar and GK rats, duct-cell proliferation from the common pancreatic duct similarly decreased on D2. On D7 and D14, the same parameter returned to non-pancreatectomized values in the Wistar rats, while it was maintained lower in the GK rats as compared to the GK values on D0. In focal areas of regeneration, duct-cell proliferation was significantly lower in the pancreatectomized GK group compared to the age-related Wistar group on D7 (Wistar: 5.85+/-0.98%, GK: 3.02+/-0.69%; p < 0.01) and D14 (Wistar: 3.82+/-0.29%, GK: 2.62+/-0.27%; ns). Only a few apoptotic duct-cells were observed, with no difference

  13. Surviving native beta-cells determine outcome of syngeneic intraportal islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S J; Powis, S H; Press, M

    2001-01-01

    In moderately diabetic rats (plasma glucose 20-30 mmol/L), where there is some residual pancreatic islet function, normoglycemia can be restored by transplantation of pancreatic islets into the liver via the portal vein. To examine whether normoglycemia can also be achieved in more severely diabetic animals (which more closely resemble human type I diabetes), we have compared the effect of transplanting 1000 islets intraportally in Lewis rats made moderately diabetic (55 mg/kg streptozotocin injected IP while nonfasting) or severely diabetic (65 mg/kg streptozotocin injected IP while fasting). In the moderately diabetic rats in which residual pancreatic insulin was 128 +/- 40 mU insulin (2.0% of control), plasma glucose stabilized (32 +/- 2.8 mmol/L at 1 week, 34 +/- 2 mmol/L at 3 weeks) as did body weight (falling from 290 +/- 5 to 265 +/- 5 g at 1 week and 253 +/- 6 g at 3 weeks). In contrast, in severely diabetic rats in which residual pancreatic insulin was only 13.5 +/- 4.2 mU insulin (0.21% of control), there was a progressive rise in plasma glucose (30 +/- 1.3 mmol/L at 1 week, 49 +/- 4 mmol/L at 2 weeks, and 67 +/- 7 mmol/L at 3 weeks) and a progressive fall in body weight (from 304 +/- 10 to 260 +/- 5 g by week 1 and to 209 +/- 6 g by week 3). Following islet transplantation, nonfasting plasma glucose normalized in moderately diabetic rats (10.5 +/- 0.6 vs. 9.1 +/- 0.6 mmol/L in nondiabetic controls, NS) after 23 +/- 5 days. In contrast, in the severely diabetic rats plasma glucose stabilized at 32 +/- 5 mmol/L (p < 0.05 compared to moderately diabetic group) but did not normalize. This difference was not attributable to different plasma glucose levels at the time of transplantation (35.1 +/- 1.8 in moderately diabetic vs. 32.5 +/- 2.5 mmol/L in severely diabetic rats). These observations demonstrate that residual native beta-cells (equivalent to only 60-80 islets) contribute to the survival or function of intraportally transplanted islets. PMID:11332628

  14. Effect of endogenous cholecystokinin on the course of acute pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Dongmei; Yamamoto, Mitsuyoshi; Otsuki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of pancreatic rest, stimulation and rest/stimulation on the natural course of recovery after acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis (AP) was induced in male rats by intraductal infusion of 40 μL/100 g body weight of 3% sodium taurocholate. All rats took food ad libitum. At 24 h after induction of AP, rats were divided into four groups: control (AP-C), pancreas rest (AP-R), stimulation (AP-S), and rest/stimulation (AP-R/S). Rats in the AP-C, AP-R and AP-S groups received oral administration of 2 mL/kg body weight saline, cholecystokinin (CCK)-1 receptor antagonist, and endogenous CCK release stimulant, respectively, twice daily for 10 d, while those in the AP-R/S group received twice daily CCK-1 receptor antagonist for the first 5 d followed by twice daily CCK release stimulant for 5 d. Rats without any treatment were used as control group (Control). Biochemical and histological changes in the pancreas, and secretory function were evaluated on day 12 at 24 h after the last treatment. RESULTS: Feeding ad libitum (AP-C) delayed biochemical, histological and functional recovery from AP. In AP-C rats, bombesin-stimulated pancreatic secretory function and HOMA-β-cell score were significantly lower than those in other groups of rats. In AP-R rats, protein per DNA ratio and pancreatic exocrine secretory function were significantly low compared with those in Control rats. In AP-S and AP-R/S rats, the above parameters recovered to the Control levels. Bombesin-stimulated pancreatic exocrine response in AP-R/S rats was higher than in AP-S rats and almost returned to control levels. In the pancreas of AP-C rats, destruction of pancreatic acini, marked infiltration of inflammatory cells, and strong expression of α-smooth muscle actin, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were seen. Pancreatic rest reversed these histological alterations, but not atrophy of pancreatic acini and mild infiltration of inflammatory cells. In

  15. Oxidative stress increases the risk of pancreatic β cell damage in chronic renal hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Park, Byung M; Cha, Seung A; Bae, Ui J; Park, Byung H; Park, Woo H; Kim, Suhn H

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension often occurs in conjunction with insulin resistance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether sustained renal hypertension increases the risk of diabetes mellitus in rats, and to define the underlying mechanisms. Two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive (2K1C) rats received captopril (50 mg/kg/day), α-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg/day), or vehicle treatment for 3 months after surgery. Blood pressure was measured by tail cuff plethysmography. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), immunohistochemistry, and western blotting were performed. In addition, insulin secretion from islet cells was measured. OGTT yielded abnormal results, and the number of islet cells and the size of pancreatic β/α cells were decreased in 2K1C rats. Basal insulin levels were also reduced in the plasma. Insulin secretion from pancreatic islet cells in response to high glucose was also attenuated in 2K1C rats compared with sham rats. The levels of oxidative stress markers, including 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and NADPH oxidase-4, were increased in pancreatic tissue and pancreatic islets in 2K1C rats. The abnormalities observed in 2K1C rats were improved by captopril or α-lipoic acid treatment. These findings indicate that sustained renal hypertension may lead to pancreatic dysfunction, increasing oxidative stress in pancreatic islets. PMID:27535482

  16. Regulation of. beta. -cell glucose transporter gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ling; Alam, Tausif; Johnson, J.H.; Unger, R.H. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX ); Hughes, S.; Newgard, C.B. )

    1990-06-01

    It has been postulated that a glucose transporter of {beta} cells (GLUT-2) may be important in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. To determine whether this transporter is constitutively expressed or regulated, the authors subjected conscious unrestrained Wistar rats to perturbations in glucose homeostasis and quantitated {beta}-cell GLUT-2 mRNA by in situ hybridization. After 3 hr of hypoglycemia, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA signal densities were reduced by 25% of the level in control rats. After 4 days, GLUT-2 and proinsulin mRNA densities were reduced by 85% and 65%, respectively. After 12 days of hypoglycemia, the K{sub m} for 3-O-methyl-D-glucose transport in isolated rat islets, normally 18-20 mM, was 2.5 mM. This provides functional evidence of a profound reduction of high K{sub m} glucose transporter in {beta} cells. In contrast, GLUT-2 was only slightly reduced by hypoglycemia in liver. To determine the effect of prolonged hyperglycemia, they also infused animals with 50% (wt/vol) glucose for 5 days. Hyperglycemic clamping increased GLUT-2 mRNA by 46% whereas proinsulin mRNA doubled. They conclude that GLUT-2 expression in {beta} cells, but not liver, is subject to regulation by certain perturbations in blood glucose homeostasis.

  17. Androgen regulated expression of the alpha 2u-globulin gene in pancreatic hepatocytes of rat

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Under a copper-deficient regimen, pancreatic cells in the adult rat can be found to undergo differentiation into hepatocytes. Pancreatic hepatocytes induced in male and female rats were examined for the expression of the androgen-inducible hepatic protein, alpha 2u- globulin. Alpha 2u-Globulin protein was demonstrable by immunoperoxidase method in all the pancreatic hepatocytes of male rats. Northern blot analysis confirmed the presence of 1.3 kb alpha 2u- globulin mRNA transcript in the pancreas of male rats with hepatocytes. Orchiectomy resulted in marked decrease of alpha 2u-globulin protein and its mRNA. Administration of dihydrotestosterone to castrated rats resulted in increased levels of alpha 2u-globulin mRNA and the amount of alpha 2u-globulin protein in the pancreatic hepatocytes. Unlike normal males, in intact and ovariectomized females alpha 2u-globulin was not detectable in pancreatic hepatocytes. These results indicate that similar to hepatic parenchymal cells pancreatic hepatocytes synthesize alpha 2u-globulin under androgenic regulation. Furthermore, unlike in liver where it is expressed predominantly in perivenular and midlobular hepatocytes, there is no localized difference in the expression of this gene in the transdifferentiated pancreatic hepatocytes. PMID:1688854

  18. Weight loss in rats following intraventricular transplants of pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Richardson, R D; Ramsay, D S; Lernmark, A; Scheurink, A J; Baskin, D G; Woods, S C

    1994-01-01

    Because of the body's resistance to permanent weight change, obesity remains a major health problem in modern society. It is hypothesized that the regulatory system defending body weight utilizes pancreatic insulin as an indicator of adiposity to the brain. To take advantage of this negative feedback system, we transplanted neonatal (experiment 1) or adult (experiment 2) pancreatic islets containing insulin-secreting cells into the 3rd ventricle of syngeneic Lewis rats. This resulted in an elevation of the insulin signal within the brain and a significant long-term reduction of body weight. Changes in food intake were consistent with the changes of body weight. The implantation of more islets resulted in a greater reduction of body weight, and changes in weight were inversely correlated with the level of insulin achieved in the cerebrospinal fluid. After the two studies were completed, histological examination revealed the presence of insulin-containing cells within the 3rd ventricle and adjacent hypothalamus. These studies suggest that transplanted insulin-secreting cells may provide a potential therapeutic strategy for maintenance of weight loss.

  19. Quantitative morphometric studies of pancreatic islets obtained from tolbutamide-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Yorde, D E; Kalkhoff, R K

    1986-09-01

    We have developed a computerized system for quantitative morphometric analysis of the number and position of secretory granules and organelles in pancreatic islet beta cells following tolbutamide treatment. Data from animals injected with tolbutamide for 1, 2, and 3 days were compared to tissues obtained from untreated control animals. Pancreatic islets removed by a collagenase technique were perfused with an appropriate medium to restore a basal state. After fixation and embedding, thick sections of beta cells were viewed by electron microscopy. Morphometric studies of randomly selected or serially cut cells were performed with computer programs for digitization, quantify, rotational, and perspective display. Tolbutamide treatment resulted in graded granule depletion which was maximal at 72 hr relative to control animals. Reduced granule density was associated with significant reduction in total cell area or cytoplasmic area, but was without effect on nuclear size. Since granule depletion improved visualization of subcellular structures, this will enable us to pursue studies of exocytosis under a variety of physiological conditions. PMID:3525667

  20. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Peptide (1-36) Enhances Beta Cell Regeneration and Increases Beta Cell Mass in a Mouse Model of Partial Pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mozar, Anaïs; Lin, Hugo; Williams, Katoura; Chin, Connie; Li, Rosemary; Kondegowda, Nagesha Guthalu; Stewart, Andrew F.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Vasavada, Rupangi Chhaya

    2016-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Finding ways to stimulate the regeneration of endogenous pancreatic beta cells is an important goal in the treatment of diabetes. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), the full-length (1–139) and amino-terminal (1–36) peptides, enhance beta cell function, proliferation, and survival. Therefore, we hypothesize that PTHrP(1–36) has the potential to regenerate endogenous beta cells. Methods The partial pancreatectomy (PPx) mouse model of beta cell injury was used to test this hypothesis. Male Balb/c mice underwent either sham-operation or PPx, and were subsequently injected with PTHrP(1–36) (160μg/kg) or vehicle (veh), for 7, 30, or 90 days. The four groups of mice, sham-veh, sham-PTHrP, PPx-veh, and PPx-PTHrP were assessed for PTHrP and receptor expression, and glucose and beta cell homeostasis. Results PTHrP-receptor, but not the ligand, was significantly up-regulated in islets from mice that underwent PPx compared to sham-operated mice. This suggests that exogenous PTHrP could further enhance beta cell regeneration after PPx. PTHrP did not significantly affect body weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin, or insulin sensitivity, in either sham or PPx mice. Glucose tolerance improved in the PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice only in the early stages of treatment. As hypothesized, there was a significant increase in beta cell proliferation in PPx-PTHrP mice at days 7 and 30; however, this was normalized by day 90, compared to PPx-veh mice. Enhanced beta cell proliferation translated to a marked increase in beta cell mass at day 90, in PPx-PTHrP versus PPx-veh mice. Conclusions PTHrP(1–36) significantly enhances beta cell regeneration through increased beta cell proliferation and beta cell mass after PPx. Future studies will determine the potential of PTHrP to enhance functional beta cell mass in the setting of diabetes. PMID:27391423

  1. Antimuscarinic effects of chloroquine in rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Habara, Y.; Williams, J.A.; Hootman, S.R.

    1986-06-13

    Chloroquine inhibited carbachol-induced amylase release in a dose-dependent fashion in rat pancreatic acini; cholecystokinin- and bombesin-induced secretory responses were almost unchanged by the antimalarial drug. The inhibition of carbachol-induced amylase release by chloroquine was competitive in nature with a K/sub i/ of 11.7 ..mu..M. Chloroquine also inhibited (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding to acinar muscarinic receptors. The IC/sub 50/ for chloroquine inhibition of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding was lower than that for carbachol or the other antimalarial drugs, quinine and quinidine. These results demonstrate that chloroquine is a muscarinic receptor antagonist in the exocrine pancreas.

  2. Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R M S; Byrne, M F; Baillie, J

    2003-04-26

    In the past decade, our understanding of the genetic basis, pathogenesis, and natural history of pancreatitis has grown strikingly. In severe acute pancreatitis, intensive medical support and non-surgical intervention for complications keeps patients alive; surgical drainage (necrosectomy) is reserved for patients with infected necrosis for whom supportive measures have failed. Enteral feeding has largely replaced the parenteral route; controversy remains with respect to use of prophylactic antibiotics. Although gene therapy for chronic pancreatitis is years away, our understanding of the roles of gene mutations in hereditary and sporadic pancreatitis offers tantalising clues about the disorder's pathogenesis. The division between acute and chronic pancreatitis has always been blurred: now, genetics of the disorder suggest a continuous range of disease rather than two separate entities. With recognition of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, we see that chronic pancreatitis is a premalignant disorder in some patients. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound are destined to replace endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for many diagnostic indications in pancreatic disease.

  3. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  4. Changes in messenger RNA of pancreatic enzymes and intestinal cholecystokinin after a 7-day bile-pancreatic juice diversion from the proximal small intestine in rats.

    PubMed

    Hara, H; Ochi, Y; Kasai, T

    1997-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated the bile-pancreatic juice (BPJ)-independent stimulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion in chronic BPJ-diverted rats. Pancreatic and intestinal adaptation to 7-day BPJ diversion was next examined. Pancreatic enzyme mRNA and cholecystokinin mRNA in the jejunal mucosa were measured in rats with BPJ diverted into the ileum (PBD rats) in comparison with the figures for rats with BPJ returned to the duodenum (normal rats) or laparotomized (Intact) rats under well-nourished conditions. Amylase mRNA in the pancreas was lower and trypsinogen plus chymotrypsinogen mRNA was higher in the PBD rats than in the intact rats. The change in pancreatic mRNA was similar to that in the specific activities of the enzymes after a chronic BPJ diversion. This finding suggests that these pancreatic enzymes were regulated by the mRNA level. The portal concentration of cholecystokinin in the postabsorptive period (exogenously non-stimulated status) was 4-fold higher in the PBD group than in the normal and intact groups. Cholecystokinin mRNA in the jejunal mucosa of PBD rats was somewhat higher than that of intact rats. These results suggest that intestinal cholecystokinin was predominantly increased at the translational or later stage by chronic BPJ diversion.

  5. Circadian Transcription from Beta Cell Function to Diabetes Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Perelis, Mark; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian circadian clock plays a central role in the temporal coordination of physiology across the 24-h light-dark cycle. A major function of the clock is to maintain energy constancy in anticipation of alternating periods of fasting and feeding that correspond with sleep and wakefulness. While it has long been recognized that humans exhibit robust variation in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity across the sleep-wake cycle, experimental genetic analysis has now revealed that the clock transcription cycle plays an essential role in insulin secretion and metabolic function within pancreatic beta cells. This review addresses how studies of the beta cell clock may elucidate the etiology of subtypes of diabetes associated with circadian and sleep cycle disruption, in addition to more general forms of the disease. PMID:27440914

  6. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Omer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Büyükcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Oztürk, Gülfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yüksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-α levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study. PMID:24995088

  7. Effects of urtica dioica extract on experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Baris; Basar, Ömer; Aktas, Bora; Altinbas, Akif; Ekiz, Fuat; Büyükcam, Fatih; Albayrak, Aynur; Ginis, Zeynep; Öztürk, Gülfer; Coban, Sahin; Ucar, Engin; Kaya, Oskay; Yüksel, Osman; Caner, Sedat; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the acute inflammation of pancreas and peripancreatic tissues, and distant organs are also affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Urtica dioica extract (UDE) treatment on cerulein induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-one Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Control, Pancreatitis, and UDE treatment group. In the control group no procedures were performed. In the pancreatitis and treatment groups, pancreatitis was induced with intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, followed by intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml saline (pancreatitis group) and 1 ml 5.2% UDE (treatment group). Pancreatic tissues were examined histopathologically. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α), amylase and markers of apoptosis (M30, M65) were also measured in blood samples. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with Caspase-3 antibody. Histopathological findings in the UDE treatment group were less severe than in the pancreatitis group (5.7 vs 11.7, p = 0.010). TNF-α levels were not statistically different between treated and control groups (63.3 vs. 57.2, p = 0.141). UDE treatment was associated with less apoptosis [determined by M30, caspase-3 index (%)], (1.769 vs. 0.288, p = 0.056; 3% vs. 2.2%, p = 0.224; respectively). UDE treatment of pancreatitis merits further study. PMID:24995088

  8. A new pathological scoring method for adrenal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenhong; Hui, Yuanjian; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Chen; Xiong, Xincheng

    2014-12-01

    These studies investigated the appearance and function of adrenal glands in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and established a new histopathological score to evaluate adrenal histopathological changes. Severe acute pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The damage of SAP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A2 and pancreatic histopathology. Light and electron microscopy of adrenal gland, and the levels of serum corticosterone were investigated. These results showed that the generally ascending trend of adrenal pathological score was inversely proportional to the generally descending trend of serum corticosterone levels, but parallel with the changes of pancreatic histopathology. Herein, the new adrenal histopathological score was effective in the evaluation of adrenal injury following SAP. It may indirectly reflect the variation of serum cortisol levels and the severity of pancreatitis to a certain extent.

  9. Quantification of the relationship between glycemia and beta-cell mass adaptation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Laura L; Topp, Brian G; Au, Jenny; Vinerian, Horatiu V; Dhatt, Narinder; Finegood, Diane T

    2009-08-01

    Beta-cell mass dynamics play an important role in the adaptation to obesity, as well as in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. Here we used a 24-hour modified hyperglycemic clamp protocol to investigate the effect of increasing glucose concentrations (15, 20, 25, or 35 mmol/L) on beta-cell mass and rates of beta-cell replication, death, and neogenesis in 6-week-old Sprague Dawley rats (n = 40). During the first 4 h of glucose infusion, plasma insulin levels rose to an approximate steady state in each group, but by the end of 24 h, there was no difference in insulin levels between any of the groups. There was also no difference in beta-cell mass between groups. Mean beta-cell replication rates displayed a linear relationship to mean plasma glucose levels in all hyperglycemic animals (r(2) = 0.98, p < 0.05). Relative to the uninfused basal control animals, replication rates were significantly reduced in the 15 mmol/L glucose group. The percentage of TUNEL-positive beta-cells was not different between groups. There was also no significant difference in markers of neogenesis. Thus, these data demonstrate that hyperglycemia for 24 h had no effect on beta-cell mass, death, or neogenesis in 6-week-old Sprague Dawley rats. We demonstrate a linear relationship, however, between hyperglycemia and beta-cell replication rates in vivo.

  10. Role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted azaserine-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Appel, M. J.; Meijers, M.; Van Garderen-Hoetmer, A.; Lamers, C. B.; Rovati, L. C.; Sprij-Mooij, D.; Jansen, J. B.; Woutersen, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    The role of cholecystokinin in dietary fat-promoted pancreatic carcinogenesis was investigated in azaserine-treated rats, using lorglumide, a highly specific cholecystokinin-receptor antagonist. The animals were killed 8 months after the start of treatment. Cholecystokinin, but not dietary unsaturated fat, increased pancreatic weight. Rats treated with cholecystokinin developed more acidophilic atypical acinar cell nodules, adenomas and adenocarcinomas than control animals. Rats maintained on the high-fat diet developed significantly more adenomas and adenocarcinomas than controls given a diet low in unsaturated fat. Lorglumide largely inhibited the enhancing effect of cholecystokinin, but not of dietary fat, on pancreatic carcinogenesis indicating that it is unlikely that the promoting effect of dietary unsaturated fat on pancreatic carcinogenesis is mediated via cholecystokinin. PMID:1637675

  11. Altered synthesis of some secretory proteins in pancreatic lobules isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, R.D.; Erlanson-Albertsson, C. )

    1990-03-01

    The in vitro incorporation of (35S)cysteine into lipase, colipase, amylase, procarboxypeptidase A and B, and the serine proteases and total proteins was studied in pancreatic lobules isolated from normal and diabetic rats with or without insulin treatment. The incorporation of (35S)cysteine into total proteins was 65% greater in pancreatic lobules from diabetic animals than from normal rats. The increased incorporation was partly reversed by insulin treatment (2 U/100 g/day for 5 days) of diabetic rats. The relative rates of biosynthesis for amylase and the procarboxypeptidases in diabetic pancreatic lobules were decreased by 75 and 25%, respectively, after 1 h of incubation, while those for lipase, colipase, and the serine proteases were increased by 90, 85, and 35%, respectively. The absolute rates of synthesis for these enzymes changed in the same direction as the relative rates in diabetic lobules, except that for the procarboxypeptidases, which did not change. The changed rates of biosynthesis for the pancreatic enzymes were reversed by insulin treatment of the diabetic rats. Kinetic studies showed that the incorporation of (35S)cysteine into amylase, lipase, and colipase was linear until up to 2 h of incubation in normal pancreatic lobules, while in the diabetic lobules the incorporation into lipase and colipase was accelerated, reaching a plateau level already after 1 h of incubation. It is concluded that the biosynthesis of pancreatic secretory proteins in diabetic rats is greatly changed both in terms of quantity and kinetics.

  12. Pancreatic and extrapancreatic effects of GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Valverde, I; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, M L; Malaisse, W J

    2002-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an incretin hormone which helps to regulate plasma glucose levels, is considered a potential agent for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus, because of its insulinotropic capacity and insulinomimetic actions. In normal conditions, the beta-cell secretory response to GLP-1 is modulated by the extracellular concentration of D-glucose; however, the recognition of D-glucose by the beta-cell is often impaired in type-2 diabetes, and this could impede the full GLP-1 insulinotropic action. Non-glucidic substrates, such as the dimethyl ester of succinic acid, restore the effect of GLP-1 in the isolated perfused rat pancreas of normal or diabetic rats, in the absence of any other exogenous nutrient; likewise, the dimethyl ester of succinic or L-glutamic acid, and the monomethyl ester of pyruvic acid, potentiate the in vivo beta-cell secretory response to GLP-1 in normal and diabetic rats. Therefore, it was proposed that nutrients susceptible to bypass the site-specific defects of the diabetic beta-cell, could be used to potentiate and/or prolong the insulinotropic action of antidiabetic agents such as GLP-1. In vitro, GLP-1 insulin-like effects on glucose metabolism have been documented in normal and diabetic rat liver, and in rat and human skeletal muscle. In rat and human adipocytes, GLP-1 is lipolytic and/or lipogenic, and also stimulates parameters involved in the glucose metabolism. In liver, muscle and fat, GLP-1 seems to act through specific receptors, apparently different--at least in liver and muscle--in structure or signaling pathway from the pancreatic one. It is proposed that an inositolphosphoglycan might be a second messenger of GLP-1 action in extrapancreatic tissues.

  13. Over-expression of sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein-1c (SREBP1c) in rat pancreatic islets induces lipogenesis and decreases glucose-stimulated insulin release: modulation by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR).

    PubMed Central

    Diraison, Frédérique; Parton, Laura; Ferré, Pascal; Foufelle, Fabienne; Briscoe, Celia P; Leclerc, Isabelle; Rutter, Guy A

    2004-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular lipid by pancreatic islet beta-cells has been proposed to inhibit normal glucose-regulated insulin secretion ('glucolipotoxicity'). In the present study, we determine whether over-expression in rat islets of the lipogenic transcription factor SREBP1c (sterol-regulatory-element-binding protein-1c) affects insulin release, and whether changes in islet lipid content may be reversed by activation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). Infection with an adenovirus encoding the constitutively active nuclear fragment of SREBP1c resulted in expression of the protein in approx. 20% of islet cell nuclei, with a preference for beta-cells at the islet periphery. Real-time PCR (TaqMan) analysis showed that SREBP1c up-regulated the expression of FAS (fatty acid synthase; 6-fold), acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 (2-fold), as well as peroxisomal-proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (7-fold), uncoupling protein-2 (1.4-fold) and Bcl2 (B-cell lymphocytic-leukaemia proto-oncogene 2; 1.3-fold). By contrast, levels of pre-proinsulin, pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1, glucokinase and GLUT2 (glucose transporter isoform-2) mRNAs were unaltered. SREBP1c-transduced islets displayed a 3-fold increase in triacylglycerol content, decreased glucose oxidation and ATP levels, and a profound inhibition of glucose-, but not depolarisation-, induced insulin secretion. Culture of islets with the AMPK activator 5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside decreased the expression of the endogenous SREBP1c and FAS genes, and reversed the effect of over-expressing active SREBP1c on FAS mRNA levels and cellular triacylglycerol content. We conclude that SREBP1c over-expression, even when confined to a subset of beta-cells, leads to defective insulin secretion from islets and may contribute to some forms of Type II diabetes. PMID:14690455

  14. Long-term high-fat diet induces pancreatic injuries via pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress in rats with hyperlipidemia

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Mingxian; Li Yanqing . E-mail: mx8902@163.com; Meng Min; Ren Hongbo; Kou Yi

    2006-08-18

    Relations between hyperlipidemia and chronic pancreatitis remain unclear. Microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress are involved in pathogeneses of a high numbers of diseases. The objective of this study was to induce hyperlipidemia in rats by long-term high-fat diet intake, then investigate the biochemical, microcirculatory, and histological alterations in blood and pancreatic tissues of these animals, and discuss their potential significances. Pancreatic blood flow was detected by intravital microscope; malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured in pancreatic tissues for assessment of oxidative stress and {alpha}-smooth muscle actin ({alpha}-SMA) expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. The results showed that the velocity of pancreatic microvascular blood flow of rats with hyperlipidemia decreased significantly as compared to control value (p = 0.008). Pancreatic MDA content increased whereas SOD activity decreased in these rats (p = 0.022; p = 0.039, respectively). Histologically, microvesicles in acinar and islet cells, dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondrion and modified vascular endothelial cells were observed under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. In addition, {alpha}-SMA expression was up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05). These results suggest that long-term high-fat diet can induce chronic pancreatic injuries which could be considered as 'nonalcoholic fatty pancreatic disease', and pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress may play an important part in the underlying pathogenesis.

  15. Hormone-sensitive lipase, the rate-limiting enzyme in triglyceride hydrolysis, is expressed and active in beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Mulder, H; Holst, L S; Svensson, H; Degerman, E; Sundler, F; Ahrén, B; Rorsman, P; Holm, C

    1999-01-01

    Triglycerides in the beta-cell may be important for stimulus-secretion coupling, through provision of a lipid-derived signal, and for pathogenetic events in NIDDM, where lipids may adversely affect beta-cell function. In adipose tissues, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) is rate-limiting in triglyceride hydrolysis. Here, we investigated whether this enzyme is also expressed and active in beta-cells. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that HSL is expressed in rat islets and in the clonal beta-cell lines INS-1, RINm5F, and HIT-T15. Western blot analysis identified HSL in mouse and rat islets and the clonal beta-cells. In mouse and rat, immunocytochemistry showed a predominant occurrence of HSL in beta-cells, with a presumed cytoplasmic localization. Lipase activity in homogenates of the rodent islets and clonal beta-cells constituted 2.1 +/- 0.6% of that in adipocytes; this activity was immunoinhibited by use of antibodies to HSL. The established HSL expression and activity in beta-cells offer a mechanism whereby lipids are mobilized from intracellular stores. Because HSL in adipocytes is activated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), PKA-regulated triglyceride hydrolysis in beta-cells may participate in the regulation of insulin secretion, possibly by providing a lipid-derived signal, e.g., long-chain acyl-CoA and diacylglycerol.

  16. Transcriptional control of pancreatic endocrine cell development.

    PubMed

    Gasa, Rosa

    2005-11-01

    In diabetes mellitus, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are lost (type 1) or dysfunctional (type 2). Cell replacement therapy has emerged as a promising alternative to insulin injection for treatment of diabetic patients. Given the scarcity and difficulty in obtaining pancreatic beta cells from cadaveric donors, current research is aiming at the generation of functional beta cells from non-beta-cell sources or from pluripotent progenitors such as adult or embryonic stem cells. However, to achieve this, we first need to understand how beta cells are formed during normal development. Knowledge of the molecular and genetic pathways that direct cells along their differentiation pathway will be instrumental if we aim to engineer new beta cells for clinical use. This article reviews pancreatic development from a gene expression point of view and discusses our current understanding of the transcription factors that rule pancreatic morphogenesis during ontogeny.

  17. [Protective effect of ranitidine in acute experimental pancreatitis in the rat].

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C; Bertaccini, G; Sarli, L; Lupi, M; Gafà, M

    1983-02-01

    Acute experimental pancreatitis was induced in rats, with a polyethylene splint placed into the duodenum, by the closed duodenal loop technique. Ranitidine (20 mg . kg-1) or saline were administered intraperitoneally every 8 hrs, beginning 15 min prior to surgery. The degree of pancreatitis and the amylase to creatinine clearance ratio (ACCR) were evaluated in all the animals after sacrifice. Ranitidine-treated animals showed significant by reduced pancreatic damage and ACCR values in comparison with non-treated rats. These data confirm the efficacy of ranitidine as a preventive agent in the development of acute pancreatitis and suggest that controlled trials should be performed with this H2-antagonist in the human subyects with this disease. PMID:6188631

  18. Beta Cell Formation in vivo Through Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) in Wild Type Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Bruno; Hu, Wenchao; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Insulin replacement therapy is essential in type 1 diabetic individuals and is required in ~40- 50% of type 2 diabetics during their lifetime. Prior attempts at beta cell regeneration have relied upon pancreatic injury to induce beta cell proliferation, dedifferentiation and activation of the embryonic pathway, or stem cell replacement. We report an alternative method to transform adult non-stem (somatic) cells into pancreatic beta cells. The Cellular Networking, Integration and Processing (CNIP) approach targets cellular mechanisms involved in pancreatic function in the organ's adult state and utilizes a synergistic mechanism that integrates three important levels of cellular regulation to induce beta cell formation: (i) glucose metabolism, (ii) membrane receptor function, and (iii) gene transcription. The aim of the present study was to induce pancreatic beta cell formation in vivo in adult animals without stem cells and without dedifferentiating cells to recapitulate the embryonic pathway as previously published (1-3). Our results employing CNIP demonstrate that: (i) insulin secreting cells can be generated in adult pancreatic tissue in vivo and circumvent the problem of generating endocrine (glucagon and somatostatin) cells that exert deleterious effects on glucose homeostasis, and (ii) longterm normalization of glucose tolerance and insulin secretion can be achieved in a wild type diabetic mouse model. The CNIP cocktail has the potential to be used as a preventative or therapeutic treatment or cure for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26696016

  19. Sclerocarya birrea (Anacardiaceae) stem-bark extract corrects glycaemia in diabetic rats and acts on beta-cells by enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Makom Ndifossap, Ivonne Gisèle; Frigerio, Francesca; Casimir, Marina; Ngueguim Tsofack, Florence; Dongo, Etienne; Kamtchouing, Pierre; Dimo, Théophile; Maechler, Pierre

    2010-04-01

    Sclerocarya birrea is a plant widely used as traditional medication for the treatment of diabetes in sub-Saharan regions. However, the mechanism of action is unknown and only hypoglycaemic effects of S. birrea extract (SBE) in diabetic rats have been reported to date. Here, we tested aqueous extracts of S. birrea on insulin-secreting INS-1E cells and isolated rat islets. Following 24 h of treatment at 5 microg/ml, the extract markedly potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Neither basal insulin release nor non-nutrient stimulation was affected. The potentiation of the secretory response at stimulatory glucose appeared after 12 h of treatment. No acute effects were observed and, at the effective concentration, SBE was safe regarding cell integrity and differentiation. The mechanism of action of the SBE was related to glucose metabolism as both ATP generation and glucose oxidation were enhanced following the 24-h treatment. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, SBE administration corrected glycaemia and restored plasma insulin levels after 2 weeks of treatment. These data show direct action of S. birrea on insulin-secreting cells and favour further delineation for use of the plant in the management of diabetes.

  20. Functional Characterization of HCN Channels in Rat Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yunfeng; Qu, Jihong; Hardy, Alexandre; Zhang, Nina; Diao, Jingyu; Strijbos, Paul J.; Tsushima, Robert; Robinson, Richard B.; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Wang, Qinghua; Wheeler, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels regulate pacemaker activity in some cardiac cells and neurons. In the present study, we have identified the presence of HCN channels in pancreatic β-cells. We then examined the functional characterization of these channels in β-cells via modulating HCN channel activity genetically and pharmacologically. Voltage-clamp experiments showed that over-expression of HCN2 in rat β-cells significantly increased HCN current (Ih), whereas expression of dominant-negative HCN2 (HCN2-AYA) completely suppressed endogenous Ih. Compared to control β-cells, over-expression of Ih increased insulin secretion at 2.8 mmol/l glucose. However, suppression of Ih did not affect insulin secretion at both 2.8 mmol/l and 11.1 mmol/l glucose. Current-clamp measurements revealed that HCN2 over-expression significantly reduced β-cell membrane input resistance (Rin), and resulted in a less hyperpolarizing membrane response to the currents injected into the cell. Conversely, dominant negative HCN2-AYA expression led to a substantial increase of Rin, which was associated with a more hyperpolarizing membrane response to the currents injected. Remarkably, under low extracellular potassium conditions (2.5mmol/l K+), suppression of Ih resulted in increased membrane hyperpolarization and decreased insulin secretion. We conclude that Ih in β-cells possess the potential to modulate β-cell membrane potential and insulin secretion under hypokalemic conditions. PMID:19654142

  1. Pancreatic exocrine enzymes during the neonatal period in postmature rats.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Z; Jiang, L X; Lebenthal, E; Lee, P C

    1987-01-01

    Pancreatic content of exocrine enzymes in newborn rat pups shows a sharp decline soon after birth. To investigate if this decline is a preprogrammed and, therefore, inherently controlled phenomenon, or a result of external stimulus, prolonged gestation, or postmaturity (2 extra days in utero) in pregnant dams was induced by daily subcutaneous injection of progesterone from the 20th to 22nd days of gestation. Postmature pups showed the same high levels of lipase, trypsin(ogen), and amylase as control pups at birth. They also exhibited the same decline in these enzymes as control pups by the 2nd day after birth, suggesting that it is a response to external stimulus. Pups prevented from suckling retained the high levels of lipase, amylase, and trypsin(ogen) by the 2nd day. The stimulus, therefore, appeared to be the initiation of suckling. Pups prevented from suckling but given 5% glucose water orally every 4 h starting from birth for 24 h showed a sharp decline in amylase with only slight decreases in lipase and trypsin(ogen) by the 2nd day. The components in the feed, therefore, also seem to be an important determinant for selective enzyme release from the pancreas of the neonates. Electron microscopic studies revealed a sharp decrease in the number of zymogen granules in the continuously-suckled pups as compared to age-matched non-suckled counterparts. The reduction in enzyme content thus is the result of secretion in response to suckling.

  2. The role of apelin in the modulation of gastric and pancreatic enzymes activity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Antuschevich, H; Kapica, M; Krawczynska, A; Herman, A; Kato, I; Kuwahara, A; Zabielski, R

    2016-06-01

    Apelin is considered as important gut regulatory peptide ligand of APJ receptor with a potential physiological role in gastrointestinal cytoprotection, regulation of food intake and drinking behavior. Circulating apelin inhibits secretion of pancreatic juice through vagal- cholecystokinin-dependent mechanism and reduces local blood flow. Our study was aimed to determine the effect of fundectomy and intraperitoneal or intragastric administration of apelin-13 on pancreatic and gastric enzymes activities in adult rats. Fundectomy is a surgical removal of stomach fundus - maine site apelin synthesis. Three independent experiments were carried out on Wistar rats. In the first and second experiment apelin-13 was given by intragastric or intraperitoneal way twice a day for 10 days (100 nmol/kg b.w.). Control groups received the physiological saline respectively. In the third experiment the group of rats after fundectomy were used. Fundectomized rats did not receive apelin and the rats from control group were 'sham operated'. At the end of experiment rats were sacrificed and blood from rats was withdrawn for apelin and CCK (cholecystokinin) radioimmunoassay analysis and pancreas and stomach tissues were collected for enzyme activity analyses. Intragastric and intraperitoneal administrations of apelin-13 increased basal plasma CCK level and stimulated gastric and pancreatic enzymes activity in rats. In animals after fundectomy decreased activity of studied enzymes was observed, as well as basal plasma apelin and CCK levels. In conclusion, apelin can effects on CCK release and stimulates some gastric and pancreatic enzymes activity in adult rats while fudectomy suppresses those processes. Changes in the level of pancreatic lipase activity point out that apelin may occurs as a regulator of lipase secretion.

  3. The role of apelin in the modulation of gastric and pancreatic enzymes activity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Antuschevich, H; Kapica, M; Krawczynska, A; Herman, A; Kato, I; Kuwahara, A; Zabielski, R

    2016-06-01

    Apelin is considered as important gut regulatory peptide ligand of APJ receptor with a potential physiological role in gastrointestinal cytoprotection, regulation of food intake and drinking behavior. Circulating apelin inhibits secretion of pancreatic juice through vagal- cholecystokinin-dependent mechanism and reduces local blood flow. Our study was aimed to determine the effect of fundectomy and intraperitoneal or intragastric administration of apelin-13 on pancreatic and gastric enzymes activities in adult rats. Fundectomy is a surgical removal of stomach fundus - maine site apelin synthesis. Three independent experiments were carried out on Wistar rats. In the first and second experiment apelin-13 was given by intragastric or intraperitoneal way twice a day for 10 days (100 nmol/kg b.w.). Control groups received the physiological saline respectively. In the third experiment the group of rats after fundectomy were used. Fundectomized rats did not receive apelin and the rats from control group were 'sham operated'. At the end of experiment rats were sacrificed and blood from rats was withdrawn for apelin and CCK (cholecystokinin) radioimmunoassay analysis and pancreas and stomach tissues were collected for enzyme activity analyses. Intragastric and intraperitoneal administrations of apelin-13 increased basal plasma CCK level and stimulated gastric and pancreatic enzymes activity in rats. In animals after fundectomy decreased activity of studied enzymes was observed, as well as basal plasma apelin and CCK levels. In conclusion, apelin can effects on CCK release and stimulates some gastric and pancreatic enzymes activity in adult rats while fudectomy suppresses those processes. Changes in the level of pancreatic lipase activity point out that apelin may occurs as a regulator of lipase secretion. PMID:27512001

  4. Sulforaphane protects against cytokine- and streptozotocin-induced {beta}-cell damage by suppressing the NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Woo-Sung; Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Hyung-Jin; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil; Kwon, Kang-Beom Park, Byung-Hyun

    2009-02-15

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an indirect antioxidant that protects animal tissues from chemical or biological insults by stimulating the expression of several NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2)-regulated phase 2 enzymes. Treatment of RINm5F insulinoma cells with SFN increases Nrf2 nuclear translocation and expression of phase 2 enzymes. In this study, we investigated whether the activation of Nrf2 by SFN treatment or ectopic overexpression of Nrf2 inhibited cytokine-induced {beta}-cell damage. Treatment of RIN cells with IL-1{beta} and IFN-{gamma} induced {beta}-cell damage through a NF-{kappa}B-dependent signaling pathway. Activation of Nrf2 by treatment with SFN and induction of Nrf2 overexpression by transfection with Nrf2 prevented cytokine toxicity. The mechanism by which Nrf2 activation inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent cell death signals appeared to involve the reduction of oxidative stress, as demonstrated by the inhibition of cytokine-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production. The protective effect of SFN was further demonstrated by the restoration of normal insulin secreting responses to glucose in cytokine-treated rat pancreatic islets. Furthermore, pretreatment with SFN blocked the development of type 1 diabetes in streptozotocin-treated mice.

  5. Role of bone marrow cells in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a rat model of pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented diet

    SciTech Connect

    Akita, Shingo; Kubota, Koji; Kobayashi, Akira; Misawa, Ryosuke; Shimizu, Akira; Nakata, Takenari; Yokoyama, Takahide; Takahashi, Masafumi; Miyagawa, Shinichi

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs play a role in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived PSCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BMC-derived activated PSCs can produce PDGF and TGF {beta}1. -- Abstract: Bone marrow cell (BMC)-derived myofibroblast-like cells have been reported in various organs, including the pancreas. However, the contribution of these cells to pancreatic fibrosis has not been fully discussed. The present study examined the possible involvement of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) originating from BMCs in the development of pancreatic fibrosis in a clinically relevant rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by a choline-deficient/ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet. BMCs from female transgenic mice ubiquitously expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) were transplanted into lethally irradiated male rats. Once chimerism was established, acute pancreatitis was induced by a CDE diet. Chronological changes in the number of PSCs originating from the donor BMCs were examined using double immunofluorescence for GFP and markers for PSCs, such as desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin ({alpha}SMA), 1, 3 and 8 weeks after the initiation of CDE feeding. We also used immunohistochemical staining to evaluate whether the PSCs from the BMCs produce growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and transforming growth factor (TGF) {beta}1. The percentage of BMC-derived activated PSCs increased significantly, peaking after 1 week of CDE treatment (accounting for 23.3 {+-} 0.9% of the total population of activated PSCs) and then decreasing. These cells produced both PDGF and TGF{beta}1 during the early stage of pancreatic fibrosis. Our results suggest that PSCs originating from BMCs contribute mainly to the early stage of pancreatic injury, at least in part, by producing growth factors in a rat CDE diet-induced pancreatitis model.

  6. Precise expression of Fis1 is important for glucose responsiveness of beta cells.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Julia; Waterstradt, Rica; Kantowski, Tobias; Rickmann, Annekatrin; Reinhardt, Florian; Sharoyko, Vladimir; Mulder, Hindrik; Tiedge, Markus; Baltrusch, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial network functionality is vital for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. Altered mitochondrial dynamics in pancreatic beta cells are thought to trigger the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fission protein 1 (Fis1) might be a key player in this process. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate mitochondrial morphology in dependence of beta cell function, after knockdown and overexpression of Fis1. We demonstrate that glucose-unresponsive cells with impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (INS1-832/2) showed decreased mitochondrial dynamics compared with glucose-responsive cells (INS1-832/13). Accordingly, mitochondrial morphology visualised using MitoTracker staining differed between the two cell lines. INS1-832/2 cells formed elongated and clustered mitochondria, whereas INS1-832/13 cells showed a homogenous mitochondrial network. Fis1 overexpression using lentiviral transduction significantly improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mitochondrial network homogeneity in glucose-unresponsive cells. Conversely, Fis1 downregulation by shRNA, both in primary mouse beta cells and glucose-responsive INS1-832/13 cells, caused unresponsiveness and significantly greater numbers of elongated mitochondria. Overexpression of FIS1 in primary mouse beta cells indicated an upper limit at which higher FIS1 expression reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Thus, FIS1 was overexpressed stepwise up to a high concentration in RINm5F cells using the RheoSwitch system. Moderate FIS1 expression improved glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, whereas high expression resulted in loss of glucose responsiveness and in mitochondrial artificial loop structures and clustering. Our data confirm that FIS1 is a key regulator in pancreatic beta cells, because both glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mitochondrial dynamics were clearly adapted to precise expression levels of this fission protein. PMID:27179109

  7. Translation attenuation through eIF2α phosphorylation prevents oxidative stress and maintains the differentiated state in beta cells

    PubMed Central

    Back, Sung Hoon; Scheuner, Donalyn; Han, JaeSeok; Song, Benbo; Ribick, Mark; Wang, Junying; Gildersleeve, Robert D.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Accumulation of unfolded protein within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen attenuates mRNA translation through activation of the protein kinase PERK and subsequent phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 on Ser51 of the alpha subunit (eIF2α). Genetic disruption of the PERK/eIF2α pathway in humans and mice produces severe pancreatic beta cell deficiency and post-natal lethality. To elucidate the role of eIF2α phosphorylation in beta cells, we have rescued the lethality of homozygous eIF2α Ser51Ala mice by expression of a loxP-flanked wild-type eIF2α transgene. Beta cell-specific transgene deletion to prevent eIF2α phosphorylation caused a severe diabetic phenotype due to heightened, unregulated proinsulin translation, defective intracellular trafficking of secretory and plasma membrane proteins, increased oxidative damage, reduced expression of stress response and beta cell-specific genes, and apoptosis. However, glucose intolerance and beta cell death in these mice were attenuated by antioxidant treatment. We conclude that phosphorylation of eIF2α coordinately attenuates mRNA translation, prevents oxidative stress, and optimizes ER protein folding to support insulin production in the beta cell. These findings that show increased proinsulin synthesis causes oxidative stress leading to beta cell failure may reflect events in the beta cell loss associated with insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. PMID:19583950

  8. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) induces the differentiation of an adult human pancreatic ductal cell line into insulin-expressing cells through stepwise activation of key transcription factors for embryonic beta cell development.

    PubMed

    Assouline-Thomas, Béatrice; Ellis, Daniel; Petropavlovskaia, Maria; Makhlin, Julia; Ding, Jieping; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of β-cells in diabetic patients is an important goal of diabetes research. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) was discovered in the partially duct-obstructed hamster pancreas. Its bioactive fragment, pentadecapeptide 104-118 (INGAP-P), has been shown to reverse diabetes in animal models and to improve glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes in clinical trials. Further development of INGAP as a therapy for diabetes requires identification of target cells in the pancreas and characterization of the mechanisms of action. We hypothesized that adult human pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and can be induced by INGAP to undergo endocrine differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we treated the normal human pancreatic ductal cell line (HPDE) with either INGAP-P or full-length recombinant protein (rINGAP) for short-term periods. Our data show that this single drug treatment induces both proliferation and transdifferentiation of HPDE cells, the latter being characterized by the rapid sequential activation of endocrine developmental transcription factors Pdx-1, Ngn3, NeuroD, IA-1, and MafA and subsequently the expression of insulin at both the mRNA and the protein levels. After 7 days, C-peptide was detected in the supernatant of INGAP-treated cells, reflecting their ability to secrete insulin. The magnitude of differentiation was enhanced by embedding the cells in Matrigel, which led to islet-like cluster formation. The islet-like clusters cells stained positive for nuclear Pdx-1 and Glut 2 proteins, and were expressing Insulin mRNA. These new data suggest that human adult pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and demonstrate that a short exposure to INGAP triggers their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells in vitro. In the context of the urgent search for a regenerative and/or cellular therapy for diabetes, these results make INGAP a promising therapeutic candidate.

  9. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) induces the differentiation of an adult human pancreatic ductal cell line into insulin-expressing cells through stepwise activation of key transcription factors for embryonic beta cell development.

    PubMed

    Assouline-Thomas, Béatrice; Ellis, Daniel; Petropavlovskaia, Maria; Makhlin, Julia; Ding, Jieping; Rosenberg, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of β-cells in diabetic patients is an important goal of diabetes research. Islet Neogenesis Associated Protein (INGAP) was discovered in the partially duct-obstructed hamster pancreas. Its bioactive fragment, pentadecapeptide 104-118 (INGAP-P), has been shown to reverse diabetes in animal models and to improve glucose homeostasis in patients with diabetes in clinical trials. Further development of INGAP as a therapy for diabetes requires identification of target cells in the pancreas and characterization of the mechanisms of action. We hypothesized that adult human pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and can be induced by INGAP to undergo endocrine differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we treated the normal human pancreatic ductal cell line (HPDE) with either INGAP-P or full-length recombinant protein (rINGAP) for short-term periods. Our data show that this single drug treatment induces both proliferation and transdifferentiation of HPDE cells, the latter being characterized by the rapid sequential activation of endocrine developmental transcription factors Pdx-1, Ngn3, NeuroD, IA-1, and MafA and subsequently the expression of insulin at both the mRNA and the protein levels. After 7 days, C-peptide was detected in the supernatant of INGAP-treated cells, reflecting their ability to secrete insulin. The magnitude of differentiation was enhanced by embedding the cells in Matrigel, which led to islet-like cluster formation. The islet-like clusters cells stained positive for nuclear Pdx-1 and Glut 2 proteins, and were expressing Insulin mRNA. These new data suggest that human adult pancreatic ductal cells retain morphogenetic plasticity and demonstrate that a short exposure to INGAP triggers their differentiation into insulin-expressing cells in vitro. In the context of the urgent search for a regenerative and/or cellular therapy for diabetes, these results make INGAP a promising therapeutic candidate. PMID:26558987

  10. Decreased basal insulin secretion from pancreatic islets of pups in a rat model of maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Elena; Sosa-Larios, Tonantzin; Calzada, Lizbeth; Ibáñez, Carlos A; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Carmen A; Morales, Angélica; Morimoto, Sumiko

    2016-10-01

    Maternal obesity (MO) is a deleterious condition that enhances susceptibility of adult offspring to metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. The objective is to study the effect of MO on in vitro insulin secretion and pancreatic cellular population in offspring. We hypothesize that a harmful antenatal metabolic environment due to MO diminishes the basal glucose-responsive secretory function of pancreatic beta cells in offspring. Mothers were fed a control (C) or high-fat diet from weaning through pregnancy (120 days) and lactation. At postnatal days (PNDs) 36 and 110, pups were killed, peripheral blood was collected and pancreatic islets were isolated. Basal insulin secretion was measured in vitro in islets for 60 min. It was found that blood insulin, glucose and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index were unaffected by maternal diet and age in females. However, male MO offspring at PND 110 showed hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance compared with C. Body weight was not modified by MO, but fat content was higher in MO pups compared with C pups. Triglycerides and leptin concentrations were higher in MO than in C offspring in all groups except in females at PND 36. Pancreatic islet cytoarchitecture was unaffected by MO. At PND 36, islets of male and female C and MO offspring responded similarly to glucose, but at PND 110, male and female MO offspring islets showed a 50% decrease in insulin secretion. It was concluded that MO impairs basal insulin secretion of offspring with a greater impact on males than females, and this effect mainly manifests in adulthood. PMID:27496224

  11. A serial histologic study of the development and progression of acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, S. S.; Watt, I. A.; Donaldson, L. A.; Crocket, A.; Joffe, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    This study was undertaken for the purpose of a serial investigation of the development and progression of the light-microscopic changes of acute pancreatitis and histologic criteria for evaluating pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis, similar to that found in man, was induced in rats with the use of a closed duodenal loop technique (n = 36). Control rats underwent a laparotomy with mobilization of the duodenum (n = 12). Animals were killed every 2 hours for 24 hours, and a detailed and independent histologic evaluation was made of each. Focal acinar necrosis proceeding to a vasculitis appeared within 2--4 hours before the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Thereafter, the extent of acinar necrosis closely reflected the vasculitis with the later development of the acute inflammation. By the sixteenth hour, these changes were graded as moderate pancreatitis, and by 24 hours the process represented severe hemorrhagic pancreatitis. Vascular changes and acinar necrosis preceded the inflammatory cell infiltrate. The pancreatitis has been quantitated into minimal, moderate, or severe by assessing the severity of edema, acute inflammatory infiltrate, and changes in the vessels, ducts, and acini. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7223862

  12. Dihydro-Resveratrol Ameliorates Lung Injury in Rats with Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ze-Si; Ku, Chuen Fai; Guan, Yi-Fu; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Shi, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Hong-Qi; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Tsang, Siu Wai; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process originated in the pancreas; however, it often leads to systemic complications that affect distant organs. Acute respiratory distress syndrome is indeed the predominant cause of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. In this study, we aimed to delineate the ameliorative effect of dihydro-resveratrol, a prominent analog of trans-resveratrol, against acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury and the underlying molecular actions. Acute pancreatitis was induced in rats with repetitive injections of cerulein (50 µg/kg/h) and a shot of lipopolysaccharide (7.5 mg/kg). By means of histological examination and biochemical assays, the severity of lung injury was assessed in the aspects of tissue damages, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. When treated with dihydro-resveratrol, pulmonary architectural distortion, hemorrhage, interstitial edema, and alveolar thickening were significantly reduced in rats with acute pancreatitis. In addition, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the activity of myeloperoxidase in pulmonary tissues were notably repressed. Importantly, nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation was attenuated. This study is the first to report the oral administration of dihydro-resveratrol ameliorated acute pancreatitis-associated lung injury via an inhibitory modulation of pro-inflammatory response, which was associated with a suppression of the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  13. Impact of caffeic acid phenethyl ester treatment on vancomycin-induced pancreatic damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Koyu, Ahmet; Gokalp, Osman; Gumral, Nurhan; Oktem, Faruk; Karahan, Nermin; Yilmaz, Nigar; Saygin, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the preventive effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on pancreatic damage induced by vancomycin (VCM) in rats. Rats were equally divided into three groups: group I (control), group II (only VCM-treated group) and group III (VCM + CAPE-treated groups). VCM was intraperitoneally administered at a dose of 200 mg kg(-1)twice daily for 7 days. CAPE was administered orally at 10 µM mL(-1) kg(-1) dose once daily for 7 days. The first dose of CAPE administration was performed 24 h prior to VCM injection. Blood and pancreas tissue samples were removed and collected after the study. Serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), amylase, γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lipase activities were determined. Pancreas tissue samples were evaluated with the light microscope. Group II significantly increased serum ALP, amylase, GGT and lipase activities when compared with the control group. Group III significantly decreased serum ALP, amylase, GGT and lipase activities when compared with group II. In histopathological examination, it has been observed that there was a significant pancreatic damage in group II. CAPE exerted prominent structural protection against VCM-induced pancreatic damage and this effect was statistically significant. CAPE caused a marked reduction in the extent of pancreatic damage. We have concluded that it may play an important role in the VCM-induced pancreatic damage and reduce the pancreatic damage both at the biochemical and histopathological aspects.

  14. Stronger control of ATP/ADP by proton leak in pancreatic β-cells than skeletal muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Affourtit, Charles; Brand, Martin D.

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells respond to rising blood glucose concentrations by increasing their oxidative metabolism, which leads to an increased ATP/ADP ratio, closure of KATP channels, depolarization of the plasma membrane potential, influx of calcium and the eventual secretion of insulin. Such a signalling mechanism implies that the ATP/ADP ratio is flexible in beta cells (β-cells), which is in contrast with other cell types (e.g. muscle and liver) that maintain a stable ATP/ADP poise while respiring at widely varying rates. To determine whether this difference in flexibility is accounted for by mitochondrial peculiarities, we performed a top-down metabolic control analysis to quantitatively assess how ATP/ADP is controlled in mitochondria isolated from rat skeletal muscle and cultured beta cells. We show that the ATP/ADP ratio is more strongly controlled (approx. 7.5-fold) by proton leak in beta cells than in muscle. The comparatively high importance of proton leak in beta cell mitochondria (relative to phosphorylation) is evidenced furthermore by its relatively high level of control over membrane potential and overall respiratory activity. Modular-kinetic analysis of oxidative phosphorylation reveals that these control differences can be fully explained by a higher relative leak activity in beta cell mitochondria, which results in a comparatively high contribution of proton leak to the overall respiratory activity in this system. PMID:16137248

  15. Hormonal and cholinergic influences on pancreatic lysosomal and digestive enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Evander, A; Ihse, I; Lundquist, I

    1983-01-01

    Hormonal and cholinergic influences on lysosomal and digestive enzyme activities in pancreatic tissue were studied in normal adult rats. Hormonal stimulation by the cholecystokinin analogue, caerulein, induced a marked enhancement of the activities of cathepsin D and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in pancreatic tissue, whereas the activities of amylase and lipase tended to decrease. Acid phosphatase activity was not affected. Further, caerulein was found to induce a significant increase of cathepsin D output in bile-pancreatic juice. This output largely parallelled that of amylase. Cholinergic stimulation by the muscarinic agonist carbachol, at a dose level giving the same output of amylase as caerulein, did not affect pancreatic activities of cathepsin D and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Further, cholinergic stimulation induced an increase of amylase activity and a slight decrease of acid phosphatase activity in pancreatic tissue. Lipase activity was not affected. No apparent effect on cathepsin D output in bile-pancreatic juice was encountered after cholinergic stimulation. The activities of neither the digestive nor the lysosomal enzymes were influenced by the administration of secretin. The results suggest a possible lysosomal involvement in caerulein-induced secretion and/or inactivation of pancreatic digestive enzymes, whereas cholinergic stimulation seems to act through different mechanisms.

  16. Action of a new cholinergic agonist, aclatonium napadisilate, on isolated rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, M.; Okabayashi, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Tani, S.; Fujisawa, T.; Otsuki, M. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of aclatonium napadisilate, a newly synthesized choline ester, on pancreatic exocrine function was compared with that of the muscarinic agonist carbamylcholine in isolated rat pancreatic acini. Both compounds increased amylase release and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux in a dose-dependent fashion, and similarly decreased the binding of (N-methyl-{sup 3}H)scopolamine to isolated rat pancreatic acini. While aclatonium napadisilate was 20-30 times less potent than carbamylcholine in stimulations of amylase release and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux, the potency of aclatonium napadisilate in inhibiting (N-methyl-{sup 3}H)scopolamine binding was nearly the same as that of carbamylcholine. These results indicate that aclatonium napadisilate stimulates pancreatic exocrine secretion via muscarinic receptors and Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, and its intrinsic activity is less than carbamylcholine in the isolated rat pancreatic acini. Since aclatonium napadisilate is known to increase motility and peristalsis of the gastrointestinal tract, stimulatory effects of aclatonium napadisilate, shown in the present study, on digestive enzyme secretion from the pancreas may provide additional benefit of aclatonium napadisilate in the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders.

  17. Maturation of adult beta-cells revealed using a Pdx1/insulin dual-reporter lentivirus.

    PubMed

    Szabat, Marta; Luciani, Dan S; Piret, James M; Johnson, James D

    2009-04-01

    The enigmatic process of beta-cell maturation has significant implications for diabetes pathogenesis, and potential diabetes therapies. This study examined the dynamics and heterogeneity of insulin and pancreatic duodenal homeobox (Pdx)-1 gene expression in adult beta-cells. Insulin and Pdx1 expression were monitored in human and mouse islet cells and MIN6 cells using a Pdx1-monomeric red fluorescent protein/insulin-enhanced green fluorescent protein dual-reporter lentivirus. The majority of fluorescent cells were highly positive for both Pdx1 and insulin. Cells expressing Pdx1 but little or no insulin (Pdx1(+)/Ins(low)) comprised 15-25% of the total population. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that Pdx1(+)/Ins(low) primary beta-cells and MIN6 cells could convert to Pdx1(+)/Ins(+) cells without cell division. Genes involved in the mature beta-cell phenotype (Glut2, MafA) were expressed at higher levels in Pdx1(+)/Ins(+) cells relative to Pdx1(+)/Ins(low) cells. Conversely, genes implicated in early beta-cell development (MafB, Nkx2.2) were enriched in Pdx1(+)/Ins(low) cells. Sorted Pdx1(+)/Ins(low) MIN6 cells had a higher replication rate and secreted less insulin relative to double-positive cells. Long-term phenotype tracking of Pdx1(+)/Ins(low) cells showed two groups, one that matured into Pdx1(+)/Ins(+) cells and one that remained immature. These results demonstrate that adult beta-cells pass through distinct maturation states, which is consistent with previously observed heterogeneity in insulin and Pdx1 expression in adult beta-cells. At a given time, a proportion of adult beta-cells share similar characteristics to functionally immature embryonic beta-cell progenitors. The maturation of adult beta-cells recapitulates development in that Pdx1 expression precedes the robust expression of insulin and other mature beta-cell genes. These results have implications for harnessing the maturation process for therapeutic purposes. PMID:19095744

  18. Copper deficiency in rats increases pancreatic enkephalin-containing peptides and insulin.

    PubMed

    Recant, L; Voyles, N R; Timmers, K I; Zalenski, C; Fields, M; Bhathena, S J

    1986-01-01

    Free enkephalins (enk) and higher molecular weight enkephalin-containing peptides (enk-c-p) are present in the endocrine pancreas of rats, presumably in B cells. To determine whether these opioid peptides show dynamic alterations as insulin content of pancreas changes, we utilized a copper deficient rat model, in which the exocrine pancreas atrophies and the endocrine pancreas is "intact" and insulin (IRI) content increases. Dietary copper deficiency (-C) was produced in weanling male rats for 4 and 7 weeks. The deficient and copper supplemented (+C) groups were further subdivided to receive all dietary carbohydrate as either 62% fructose (F) or 62% starch (S). -CF rats showed the most severe deficiency. After 7 weeks, total units of pancreatic IRI in -CF were 7.5 +CF 2.1, -CS 7.9 and in +CS 2.8 (p less than 0.001). Pancreatic content of Met5- and Leu5-enk was measured in extracts which were purified on C-18 Seppaks with and without prior treatment with trypsin and carboxypeptidase B. -C animals showed progressive, significant increases in pancreatic content of Leu-enk-c-p, with a decrease in free Leu- and Met-enk (p less than 0.02-0.01). The pancreatic findings are compatible with a co-localization of enkephalins and insulin in the endocrine pancreas and are suggestive of co-regulation. PMID:3550724

  19. Extract of grapefruit-seed reduces acute pancreatitis induced by ischemia/reperfusion in rats: possible implication of tissue antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, A; Warzecha, Z; Konturek, S J; Ceranowicz, P; Dembinski, M; Pawlik, W W; Kusnierz-Cabala, B; Naskalski, J W

    2004-12-01

    Grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been shown to exert antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity possibly due to the presence of naringenin, the flavonoid with cytoprotective action on the gastric mucosa. No study so far has been undertaken to determine whether this GSE is also capable of preventing acute pancreatic damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), which is known to result from reduction of anti-oxidative capability of pancreatic tissue, and whether its possible preventive effect involves an antioxidative action of this biocomponent. In this study carried out on rats with acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis induced by 30 min partial pancreatic ischemia followed by 6 h of reperfusion, the GSE or vehicle (vegetable glycerin) was applied intragastrically in gradually increasing amounts (50-500 microl) 30 min before I/R. Pretreatment with GSE decreased the extent of pancreatitis with maximal protective effect of GSE at the dose 250 microl. GSE reduced the pancreatitis-evoked increase in serum lipase and poly-C specific ribonuclease activity, and attenuated the marked fall in pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis. GSE administered alone increased significantly pancreatic tissue content of lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalkens, and when administered before I/R, GSE reduced the pancreatitis-induced lipid peroxidation. We conclude that GSE exerts protective activity against I/R-induced pancreatitis probably due to the activation of antioxidative mechanisms in the pancreas and the improvement of pancreatic blood flow.

  20. Triphenyltin impairs a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent increase of cytosolic Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} and PKA-independent increase of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} associated with insulin secretion in hamster pancreatic {beta}-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, Yoshikazu . E-mail: y-miura@dokkyomed.ac.jp; Matsui, Hisao

    2006-11-01

    Oral administration of triphenyltin chloride (TPT) (60 mg/kg body weight) inhibits the insulin secretion by decreasing the cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i}) induced by glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) in pancreatic {beta}-cells of the hamster. To test the possibility that the abnormal level of [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} induced by TPT administration could be due to a defect in the cAMP-dependent cytoplasmic Na{sup +} concentration ([Na{sup +}] {sub i}) in the {beta}-cells, we investigated the effects of TPT administration on the changes of [Na{sup +}] {sub i} induced by GIP, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), or forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, and on the changes of [Na{sup +}] {sub i} or [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} induced by 6-Bnz-cAMP, an activator of protein kinase A (PKA), and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, an activator of Epac. The [Na{sup +}] {sub i} and [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} were measured in islet cells loaded with sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI) and fura-2, respectively. In the presence of 135 mM Na{sup +}, TPT administration significantly reduced the rise in [Na{sup +}] {sub i} by 10 nM GLP-1, 10 {mu}M forskolin, and 50 {mu}M 6-Bnz-cAMP, but had not effect in a Na{sup +}-free medium. In the presence of 135 mM Na{sup +}, TPT administration also reduced the rise in [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP plus10 {mu}M H-89, a inhibitor of PKA, and 6-Bnz-cAMP. Moreover, TPT administration significantly reduced the insulin secretion by 2 mM db-cAMP, GLP-1, GIP, and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP with and without H-89, and that by 6-Bnz-cAMP and forskolin. Our study suggested that TPT has inhibitory effects on the cellular Ca{sup 2+} response due to a reduced Na{sup +} permeability through PKA-dependent mechanisms in hamster islet cells. Also TPT has the reduction of [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub i} related to Na{sup +}-dependent insulin secretion after an activation of Epac.

  1. A synopsis of factors regulating beta cell development and beta cell mass.

    PubMed

    Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Xiangwei, Xiao; Ricks, David; Fusco, Joseph; Gittes, George

    2016-10-01

    The insulin-secreting beta cells in the endocrine pancreas regulate blood glucose levels, and loss of functional beta cells leads to insulin deficiency, hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) and diabetes mellitus. Current treatment strategies for type-1 (autoimmune) diabetes are islet transplantation, which has significant risks and limitations, or normalization of blood glucose with insulin injections, which is clearly not ideal. The type-1 patients can lack insulin counter-regulatory mechanism; therefore, hypoglycemia is a potential risk. Hence, a cell-based therapy offers a better alternative for the treatment of diabetes. Past research was focused on attempting to generate replacement beta cells from stem cells; however, recently there has been an increasing interest in identifying mechanisms that will lead to the conversion of pre-existing differentiated endocrine cells into beta cells. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of several of the key factors that regulate new beta cell formation (neogenesis) and beta cell proliferation. PMID:27105622

  2. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  3. Intercellular calcium waves in rat pancreatic acini: mechanism of transmission.

    PubMed

    Yule, D I; Stuenkel, E; Williams, J A

    1996-10-01

    Digital-imaging microfluorimetry, together with microinjection of marker/messenger molecules, was utilized to investigate intercellular Ca2+ signaling in rat pancreatic acinar cells. Stimulation of acini with low concentrations of secretagogues [< 100 pM cholecystokinin (CCK), < 1 microM carbachol (CCh)] resulted in asynchronous but coordinated increases in Ca2+ that appeared to pass in a "wavelike" fashion between cells. In contrast, at higher supermaximal concentrations of agonists (> 300 pM CCK, > 1 microM CCh), which induce a large "peak-and-plateau" intracellular Ca2+ signal, all cells in the acinus appeared to increase Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) in synchrony. Microinjection of lissarhodamine, a marker of gap-junctional permeability, into cells previously loaded with fura 2 allowed the simultaneous measurement of gap-junctional coupling and [Ca2+]. Stimulation with supermaximal concentrations of agonists resulted in the attenuation of junctional permeability, whereas, during stimulation with physiological concentrations of agonist, junctional communication remained operable. Injection of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] into one cell of an acinar cluster resulted in the generation of a Ca2+ signal in the injected cell and adjacent cells. In contrast, injection of CaCl2 itself did not result in propagation of the signal. When CaCl2 was injected into cells that had been previously stimulated with a threshold concentration of CCK, propagation of a signal was observed between cells. On the basis of these data, a model is proposed in which Ca2+ acts as coagonist with Ins(1,4,5)P3 to potentiate the Ca(2+)-releasing action of Ins(1,4,5)P3 and, by diffusion of the two molecules through gap junctions, underlies intercellular signaling in acinar cells. Gap-junctional communication may be an important factor in amplifying a threshold signal produced in one cell throughout the acinus, resulting in enhanced stimulated secretion in acinar preparations compared

  4. Somatostatin receptor expression and biological functions in endocrine pancreatic cells: review based on a doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is resulting from the selective destruction of insulin-producing betacells within the pancreatic islets. Somatostatin acts as an inhibitor of hormone secretion through specific receptors (sst1-5). All ssts were expressed in normal rat and mouse pancreatic islets, although the expression intensity and the co-expression pattern varied between ssts as well as between species. This may reflect a difference in response to somatostatin in islet cells of the two species. The Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model is an experimental model of type 1 diabetes, with insulitis accompanied by spontaneous hyperglycaemia. Pancreatic specimens from NOD mice at different age and stage of disease were stained for ssts. The islet cells of diabetic NOD mice showed increased islet expression of sst2-5 compared to normoglycemic NOD mice. The increase in sst2-5 expression in the islets cells may suggest either a contributing factor in the process leading to diabetes, or a defense response against ongoing beta-cell destruction. Somatostatin analogues were tested on a human endocrine pancreatic tumour cell line and cultured pancreatic islets. Somatostatin analogues had an effect on cAMP accumulation, chromogranin A secretion and MAP kinase activity in the cell line. Treatment of rat pancreatic islets with somatostatin analogues with selective receptor affinity was not sufficient to induce an inhibition of insulin and glucagon secretion. However, a combination of selective analogues or non-selective analogues via costimulation of receptors can cause inhibition of hormone production. For insulin and glucagon, combinations of sst2 + sst5 and sst1 + sst2, respectively, showed a biological effect. In summary, knowledge of islet cell ssts expression and the effect of somatostatin analogues with high affinity to ssts may be valuable in the future attempts to influence beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes mellitus, since down-regulation of beta-cell function may promote survival of

  5. Decreased pancreatic exocrine function in the mutant Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rat (EHBR).

    PubMed

    Inagaki, T; Hoshino, M; Ohara, H; Yamada, T; Ogasawara, T; Shimizu, H; Itoh, M

    1999-03-01

    The Eisai hyperbilirubinemic rat (EHBR) is a Sprague-Dawley rat (SDR) mutant with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia as an autosomal recessive trait. EHBRs manifest jaundice from birth, which is permanent except for a transient decrease at 6-8 weeks of age. To investigate whether the hyperbilirubinemia affects pancreatic exocrine function and acinar cell growth, EHBRs at 6 (without jaundice) and 12 weeks (with jaundice) of age were compared, along with SDRs as controls. Pancreatic wet weights did not significantly differ, but amylase content of acini was lower in EHBRs than SDRs. No correlation was found between pancreatic wet weight and serum bilirubin levels in EHBRs. In vitro amylase release in response to 1-100 pM cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), 1 microM 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, and 2.5 microM calcium ionophore A23187, and in vivo pancreatic secretion stimulated by CCK-8 (0.08 microg/kg body weight/h) were significantly lower in the EHBR cases than in the SDRs. At the electron microscopic level, many acinar cell nuclei were pyknotic, most elements of their Golgi complexes were atrophied, some mitochondria demonstrated fusion, and the rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum (RER) was dilated in EHBRs. These findings are indicative of a hypofunctional state. However, no differences between EHBRs at 6 and 12 weeks of age were evident, suggesting that the hyperbilirubinemia does not exert any pronounced influence on acinar cell growth or pancreatic exocrine function.

  6. Toward beta cell replacement for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Johannesson, Bjarki; Sui, Lina; Freytes, Donald O; Creusot, Remi J; Egli, Dieter

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of insulin more than 90 years ago introduced a life-saving treatment for patients with type 1 diabetes, and since then, significant progress has been made in clinical care for all forms of diabetes. However, no method of insulin delivery matches the ability of the human pancreas to reliably and automatically maintain glucose levels within a tight range. Transplantation of human islets or of an intact pancreas can in principle cure diabetes, but this approach is generally reserved for cases with simultaneous transplantation of a kidney, where immunosuppression is already a requirement. Recent advances in cell reprogramming and beta cell differentiation now allow the generation of personalized stem cells, providing an unlimited source of beta cells for research and for developing autologous cell therapies. In this review, we will discuss the utility of stem cell-derived beta cells to investigate the mechanisms of beta cell failure in diabetes, and the challenges to develop beta cell replacement therapies. These challenges include appropriate quality controls of the cells being used, the ability to generate beta cell grafts of stable cellular composition, and in the case of type 1 diabetes, protecting implanted cells from autoimmune destruction without compromising other aspects of the immune system or the functionality of the graft. Such novel treatments will need to match or exceed the relative safety and efficacy of available care for diabetes.

  7. Changes in gene expression of pancreatitis-associated protein and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors in experimental pancreatitis produced by pancreatic duct occlusion in rats: comparison with gene expression of cholecystokinin and secretin.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Miyasaka, K; Jimi, A; Nakamura, E; Teraoka, H

    1995-08-01

    Pancreatic duct occlusion is known to produce a sustained increase in the plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) concentration and to affect the tissue content of CCK in the rat. The tissue content of CCK is correlated with regenerative changes in the pancreas after pancreatic duct occlusion. In the present study, we examined the changes in mRNA levels of pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors (PSTIs), pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP), and amylase in the pancreas in comparison with changes in CCK and secretin mRNA levels in the intestine and the histological changes produced by pancreatic duct ligation. Rats with an internal bile fistula and with obstruction of pancreatic flow were prepared and were sacrificed 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, and 28 days later. Then mRNA levels of CCK, secretin, PSTIs, PAP, and amylase were determined by slot-blot analysis. The CCK mRNA level gradually increased to a peak on day 10, was slightly lower on day 14, and returned to the control level on day 28. The level of secretin mRNA did not change. The mRNA levels of PSTIs increased significantly on day 3 after occlusion. PAP mRNA was detectable on days 1 and 3, being maximal on day 1. The mRNA level of amylase was markedly decreased on days 1 and 3, then remained lower than the control level. Histological examination showed acute inflammatory changes in the pancreas on days 1 and 3 and regenerative changes from day 7. These results suggest that a change in gene expression of PAP reflects acute inflammatory changes in the pancreas most sensitively.

  8. Assessment of benzene induced oxidative impairment in rat isolated pancreatic islets and effect on insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Benzene (C6H6) is an organic compound used in petrochemicals and numerous other industries. It is abundantly released to our environment as a chemical pollutant causing widespread human exposure. This study mainly focused on benzene induced toxicity on rat pancreatic islets with respect to oxidative damage, insulin secretion and glucokinase (GK) activity. Benzene was dissolved in corn oil and administered orally at doses 200, 400 and 800mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. In rats, benzene significantly raised the concentration of plasma insulin. Also the effect of benzene on the release of glucose-induced insulin was pronounced in isolated islets. Benzene caused oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, and also reduced the cell viability and total thiols groups, in the islets of exposed rats. In conclusion, the current study revealed that pancreatic glucose metabolism is susceptible to benzene toxicity and the resultant oxidative stress could lead to functional abnormalities in the pancreas.

  9. Merocytic dendritic cells break T cell tolerance to beta cell antigens in NOD mouse diabetes1

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Jonathan D; Ondr, Jennifer K; Opoka, Robert J; Garcia, Zacharias; Janssen, Edith M

    2010-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the breach of central and peripheral tolerance results in autoreactive T cells destroying insulin-producing, pancreatic beta cells. Herein, we identify a critical sub-population of dendritic cells responsible for mediating both the cross-presentation of islet antigen to CD8+ T cells and the direct presentation of beta cell antigen to CD4+ T cells. These cells, termed merocytic dendritic cells (mcDC), are more numerous in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, and when antigen-loaded rescue CD8+ T cells from peripheral anergy and deletion, while stimulating islet-reactive CD4+ T cells. When purified from the pancreatic lymph nodes of overtly diabetic NOD mice, mcDC break peripheral T cell tolerance to beta cells in vivo and induce rapid onset T1D in young NOD mouse. Thus, the mcDC subset appears to represent the long-sought APC responsible for breaking peripheral tolerance to beta cell antigen in vivo. PMID:20644171

  10. Insulin receptor alternative splicing is regulated by insulin signaling and modulates beta cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Malakar, Pushkar; Chartarifsky, Lital; Hija, Ayat; Leibowitz, Gil; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval; Karni, Rotem

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM) affects more than 300 million people worldwide. One of the hallmarks of T2DM is peripheral insulin resistance, in part due to unproductive insulin signaling through the insulin receptor. The insulin receptor (INSR) exists as two isoforms, INSR-A and INSR-B, which results from skipping or inclusion of exon 11 respectively. What determines the relative abundance of the different insulin receptor splice variants is unknown. Moreover, it is not yet clear what the physiological roles of each of the isoforms are in normal and diseased beta cells. In this study, we show that insulin induces INSR exon 11 inclusion in pancreatic beta cells in both human and mouse. This occurs through activation of the Ras-MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and up-regulation of the splicing factor SRSF1. Induction of exon 11 skipping by a splice-site competitive antisense oligonucleotide inhibited the MAPK-ERK signaling pathway downstream of the insulin receptor, sensitizing the pancreatic β-cell line MIN6 to stress-induced apoptosis and lipotoxicity. These results assign to insulin a regulatory role in INSR alternative splicing through the Ras-MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. We suggest that in beta cells, INSR-B has a protective role, while INSR-A expression sensitizes beta cells to programmed cell death. PMID:27526875

  11. Islet beta-cell secretion determines glucagon release from neighbouring alpha-cells.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Maechler, Pierre; Gjinovci, Asllan; Herrera, Pedro-Luis; Wollheim, Claes B

    2003-04-01

    Homeostasis of blood glucose is maintained by hormone secretion from the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Glucose stimulates insulin secretion from beta-cells but suppresses the release of glucagon, a hormone that raises blood glucose, from alpha-cells. The mechanism by which nutrients stimulate insulin secretion has been studied extensively: ATP has been identified as the main messenger and the ATP-sensitive potassium channel as an essential transducer in this process. By contrast, much less is known about the mechanisms by which nutrients modulate glucagon secretion. Here we use conventional pancreas perfusion and a transcriptional targeting strategy to analyse cell-type-specific signal transduction and the relationship between islet alpha- and beta-cells. We find that pyruvate, a glycolytic intermediate and principal substrate of mitochondria, stimulates glucagon secretion. Our analyses indicate that, although alpha-cells, like beta-cells, possess the inherent capacity to respond to nutrients, secretion from alpha-cells is normally suppressed by the simultaneous activation of beta-cells. Zinc released from beta-cells may be implicated in this suppression. Our results define the fundamental mechanisms of differential responses to identical stimuli between cells in a microorgan.

  12. Alpha cells secrete acetylcholine as a non-neuronal paracrine signal priming human beta cell function

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Jacques-Silva, M. Caroline; Fachado, Alberto; Molina, Judith; Abdulreda, Midhat; Ricordi, Camillo; Roper, Stephen D.; Berggren, Per-Olof; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that plays a major role in the function of the insulin secreting pancreatic beta cell1,2. Parasympathetic innervation of the endocrine pancreas, the islets of Langerhans, has been shown to provide cholinergic input to the beta cell in several species1,3,4, but the role of autonomic innervation in human beta cell function is at present unclear. Here we show that, in contrast to mouse islets, cholinergic innervation of human islets is sparse. Instead, we find that the alpha cells of the human islet provide paracrine cholinergic input to surrounding endocrine cells. Human alpha cells express the vesicular acetylcholine transporter and release acetylcholine when stimulated with kainate or a lowering in glucose concentration. Acetylcholine secretion by alpha cells in turn sensitizes the beta cell response to increases in glucose concentration. Our results demonstrate that in human islets acetylcholine is a paracrine signal that primes the beta cell to respond optimally to subsequent increases in glucose concentration. We anticipate these results to revise models about neural input and cholinergic signaling in the endocrine pancreas. Cholinergic signaling within the islet represents a potential therapeutic target in diabetes5, highlighting the relevance of this advance to future drug development. PMID:21685896

  13. Nutrient regulation of insulin secretion and beta-cell functional integrity.

    PubMed

    Newsholme, Philip; Gaudel, Celine; McClenaghan, Neville H

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic beta-cells are often referred to as "fuel sensors" as they continually monitor and respond to dietary nutrients, under the modulation of additional neurohormonal signals, in order to secrete insulin to best meet the needs of the organism. beta-cell nutrient sensing requires metabolic activation, resulting in production of stimulus-secretion coupling signals that promote insulin biosynthesis and release. The primary stimulus for insulin secretion is glucose, and islet beta-cells are particularly responsive to this important nutrient secretagogue, It is important to consider individual effects of different classes of nutrient or other physiological or pharmacological agents on metabolism and insulin secretion. However, given that beta-cells are continually exposed to a complex milieu of nutrients and other circulating factors, it is important to also acknowledge and examine the interplay between glucose metabolism and that of the two other primary nutrient classes, the amino acids and fatty acids. It is the mixed nutrient sensing and outputs of glucose, amino and fatty acid metabolism that generate the metabolic coupling factors (MCFs) involved in signaling for insulin exocytosis. Primary MCFs in the beta-cell include ATP, NADPH, glutamate, long chain acyl-CoA and diacylglycerol and are discussed in detail in this article.

  14. Role of Periductal and Ductular Epithelial Cells of the Adult Rat Pancreas in Pancreatic Hepatocyte Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M. Sambasiva; Dwivedi, Rama S.; Yeldandi, Anjana V.; Subbarao, V.; Tan, Xiaodi; Usman, Mohammed I.; Thangada, Shobha; Nemali, Mohan R.; Kumar, Sujata; Scarpelli, Dante G.; Reddy, Janardan K.

    1989-01-01

    Development of pancreatic hepatocytes in adult rats maintained on copper dificient diet containing 0.6% trien (CuDT) has been reported recently. To elucidate the histogenesis of hepatocytes a sequential study was undertaken using morphologic, histochemical, immunochemical, in situ hybridization, and Northern blot analysis. Male F-344 rats weighing 80 to 90 g were fed CuDT for 8 weeks and returned to normal rat chow. Beginning from 4 weeks of copper depletion, there was a progressive loss of acinar cells and by 8 weeks more than 90% of the acinar tissue was lost. During this period, there was an increase in the number of adipocytes in the interstitium, and in the number of interstitial and ductular cells. Morphologic observations were confirmed by immunoblot and Northern blot analysis, in which the amount of pancreatic proteins and their mRNAs decreased between 5 and 8 weeks. During this period, a progressive increase in the level of albumin mRNA was observed. In situ hybridization, performed at 7 weeks of copper deficiency, showed localization of albumin mRNA over interstitial and ductular cells. Pancreatic hepatocytes were identified immediately after the rats were returned to a normal diet and gradually increased in number. The hepatocytes occupied almost 60% of the pancreatic volume by 8 weeks. During the early recovery phase, hepatocytes were identified in ductules as well as in the interstitium. Based on these studies, it is concluded that both the ductular cells and interstitial cells, which resemble oval cells of liver, are capable of transforming into pancreatic hepatocytes and these cells may be considered stem-cell equivalent. ImagesFigure 9Figure 10Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15Figure 16 PMID:2470253

  15. Lithospermic acid B protects beta-cells from cytokine-induced apoptosis by alleviating apoptotic pathways and activating anti-apoptotic pathways of Nrf2-HO-1 and Sirt1

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung-Wan; Chun, Sung Wan; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Yongho; Kang, Eun Seok; Cha, Bong-Soo; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2011-04-01

    Lithospermic acid B (LAB) has been reported to protect OLETF rats, an established type 2 diabetic animal model, from the development of diabetes-related vascular complications. We investigated whether magnesium lithospermate B (LAB) has a protective role under cytokine-induced apoptosis in INS-1 cells in vitro and whether it slows the development of diabetes in OLETF rats in vivo. Pretreatment with 50 {mu}M LAB significantly reduced the 1000 U/mL INF-{gamma} and 100 U/mL IL-1{beta}-induced INS-1 cell death. LAB significantly alleviated cytokine-induced phosphorylations of p38 and JNK in accordance with a decrease in cleaved caspase-3 activity in beta-cells. LAB also protected against the cytokine-induced caspase-3 apoptotic pathway via significant activation of Nrf2-HO (heme-oxigenase)-1 and Sirt1 expression. OLETF rats treated with 40 mg/kg/day LAB showed a significant improvement in glucose tolerance compared to untreated OLETF control rats in vivo. Our results suggest that the cytoprotective effects of LAB on pancreatic {beta}-cells are related with both alleviating apoptotic pathways and activating anti-apoptotic pathways of Nrf2-HO-1 and Sirt1.

  16. Effect of drugs on the pulmonary changes in experimental acute pancreatitis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, A R; Taylor, T V

    1982-01-01

    Respiratory complications of acute pancreatitis are well recognised and are closely related to a poor prognosis. Using an experimental model in the rat, a decrease in lung compliance and an increase in lung weight were produced in acute pancreatitis. The effects of dexamethasone, heparin, and aspirin on these changes were studied. The mean specific lung compliance was reduced by 16% in the pancreatitis group compared with the control group (p less than 0.05) and this change was abolished by dexamethasone (p less than 0.02), heparin (p less than 0.01), and aspirin (p less than 0.001). Percentage lung weight (as percentage of total body weight) was raised by 22% in the pancreatitis group compared with the sham operation group (p less than 0.01) and this change was abolished by heparin (p less than 0.01) and aspirin (p less than 0.05), but not affected by dexamethasone (p less than 0.5). The results indicate that 'stiff' and heavy lungs occur in experimental acute pancreatitis. The fact that these changes are abolished by heparin and improved by aspirin suggests that intrapulmonary fibrin deposition is a factor in the pathogenesis of the important respiratory complications of this condition. PMID:7076022

  17. Protective effect of antithrombin III in acute experimental pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, W K; Agterberg, J; Rigter, G; Hack, C E; Gool, J V

    1992-02-01

    In the present study we investigated the therapeutic action of antithrombin III (AT III) in taurocholate-induced experimental pancreatitis with high lethality in rats. High-dose AT III treatment greatly improved the survival rate not only when given as pretreatment but also when given 2 hr after induction. No favorable effect on survival rate was observed on administration after 5 hr. Both intravascular and intraperitoneal AT III administration locally restored decreased AT III levels in the peritoneal cavity and increased plasma AT III to supranormal levels. The primary pancreatic insult seemed to be unaffected by the treatment, because neither the rise in plasma lipase nor the development of ascites or the extension of the pancreatic necrosis were diminished. Because heparin pretreatment of the rats was also effective, the mechanism of the beneficial action was probably mediated by inhibition of the proteases of the coagulation cascade, thereby preventing intravascular coagulation in the pancreas and distant organs and subsequent systemic complications. The high efficacy of AT III treatment in this experimental model may stimulate clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of AT III treatment in an early stage of acute pancreatitis.

  18. Activity of cathepsins in rat's spleen due to experimentally induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, R; Burdan, F; Madej, B; Kiś, G; Szkodziak, P; Burski, K

    The aim of this study was to establish and quantify the changes of the level of cathepsin B, D and L in the spleen during experimental pancreatitis. The experiment was carried out in 115 male Wistar rats, randomly divided into three groups: intact (n = 15), injected with 0.9% NaCl solution into the common bile pancreatic duct (n = 50) and injected with 5% sodium taurocholate into this duct to induce acute pancreatitis (n = 50). After 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours rats were anaesthetised, and blood was taken for amylase determination from the heart, and the spleen was removed. Alpha-amylase level in the blood serum samples was measured by enzymatic method. Cathepsin activity was established by spectrophotometric methods using substrates which form coloured complexes when they react with these proteases. The specific free fraction activity of cathepsin B, D and L in the spleen changed during the course of experiment, but there was no correlation between their activity and the intensity of pancreatitis established by serum amylase level.

  19. Pancreatic growth and cell turnover in the rat fed raw soya flour

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, P.S.; Morgan, R.G. )

    1982-08-01

    Growth and differentiation of the pancreatic acinar cell was studied in rats fed raw soya flour (RSF) for up to a year. A second group of rats were fed a control diet. After 1 week of RSF feeding there was a 200% increase in tissue RNA and weight, indicating initial hypertrophy, which was maintained for the 1-year study period. By the second week and over the remainder of the period studied there was also a marked increase in total DNA, suggesting hyperplasia. Cell turnover, as measured by the rate of incorporation of 3H-thymidine into pancreatic DNA, was significantly higher in RSF-fed animals only from the second to fourth weeks; it then returned to control values. Autoradiography showed an 18-fold increase in duct cell labeling at the end of the first week and an 11-fold increase by the end of the second week. Acinar cell labeling doubled from the second to the twelfth week. These studies confirm previous reports that RSF produces pancreatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia. They furthermore show that there is initially marked stimulation of DNA synthesis in the duct cell compartment. The results suggest that cells with the morphologic characteristics of duct cells may be the precursors of acinar cells in hyperplastic pancreatic tissue.

  20. Antioxidant potential and protection of pancreatic β- cells by Calotropis gigantea in streptozocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Naveen Kumar; Sharma, Swapnil; Jha, A K; Karchuli, Manvendra Singh; Dwivedi, Jaya

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the antioxidant defense by chloroform extract of Calotropis gigantea on streptozotocin-(40mg/kg, intraperitonial, single-injection) induced diabetes in wistar albino rats. The extract significantly (P < .05) decreased the pancreatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) levels and significantly (P < .05) increased the superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione levels as compared to above levels in pancreatic tissue of pathogenic diabetic rats. The results of test drug were comparable to Glibenclamide (5mg/kg, daily), a standard antihyperglycemic agent. The study concludes that Calotropis gigantea enhances the antioxidant defense against reactive oxygen species produced under hyperglycemic condition and this protects β-cells against loss, and exhibit antidiabetic property.

  1. Drug CRL 40 028-induced inhibition of pancreatic secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Rozé, C; Chariot, J; Vaille, C

    1983-09-01

    The drug CRL 40 028 increases spontaneous motility through an action on central adrenergic receptors. The effects of this drug have been tested in rats on the external pancreatic secretion induced by secretin, CCK, acetylcholine, vagal electrical stimulation or 2 deoxy-D-glucose. CRL 40 028 had no effect on basal secretion nor on secretion stimulated by agents acting directly on pancreatic secretory cells (secretin, CCK, acetylcholine), but decreased significantly secretion induced by central or peripheral stimulation of the vagus nerves. CRL 40 028-induced inhibition of 2 DG effect was reduced by yohimbine, suggesting a participation of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the action of CRL 40 028 on the exocrine pancreas secretion of rats. PMID:6139981

  2. Effects of pancreatic polypeptide on insulin action in exocrine secretion of isolated rat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Park, H J; Lee, Y L; Kwon, H Y

    1993-01-01

    1. Effects of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) on insulin action in pancreatic exocrine secretion was investigated by using an isolated rat pancreas that was perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution containing 2.5 mM glucose, 0.1% bovine serum albumin and 3% Dextran T-70 at a vascular flow rate of 1.2 ml min-1. 2. Cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) at a concentration of 14 pM stimulated basal flow rate and amylase output of the isolated pancreas. Twenty-five millimolar glucose not only increased the basal flow rate and amylase output but also potentiated the CCK-stimulated flow rate and amylase output. 3. Porcine insulin, administered intra-arterially at a concentration of 100 nM, also increased the basal flow rate and amylase output, and also potentiated the CCK-stimulated flow rate and amylase output. 4. Rat PP, given intra-arterially at a concentration of 10 pM, completely abolished the potentiation effects of both the 25 mM glucose and the exogenous insulin on the CCK-stimulated flow rate and amylase output. Rat PP also inhibited the flow rate and amylase output increased by either 25 mM glucose alone or exogenous insulin alone. However, rat PP did not change the flow rate and amylase output stimulated by CCK-8 alone. 5. These results indicate that insulin is an important stimulatory hormone of pancreatic exocrine secretion, and that PP exerts the inhibitory role in pancreatic exocrine secretion by modulating the insulin action. PMID:7504106

  3. Beta cell mass in diabetes: a realistic therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Meier, J J

    2008-05-01

    Beta cell deficiency underlies both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and restoration or replacement of beta cell function is therefore the logical long-term solution to therapy. This review sets out to describe the defects in beta cell mass and function in both forms of diabetes, summarises current understanding of the underlying causes of beta cell death, and the methodological limitations of determining beta cell mass in vivo. Finally, the potential effects of current and future treatment regimens on beta cell mass and turnover are considered.

  4. IL-1beta-induced nitric oxide release from insulin-secreting beta-cells: further evidence for the involvement of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Tannous, M; Veluthakal, R; Amin, R; Kowluru, A

    2002-12-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated regulatory roles for G-proteins (e.g., H-Ras) in IL-1beta induced NO release from HIT-T15 cells. Herein, we report a similar regulatory mechanism for IL-1beta induced NO release from RIN5F and INS-1 cells. Our data indicate that functional inactivation of Ras, either by Clostridial toxins or by specific inhibitors of Ras function, results in a significant inhibition in IL-1beta induced NO release, suggesting that activation of specific G-proteins is essential for IL-1beta induced NO release. In the present study, we report possible loci where IL-1beta treatment might result in functional activation of these G-proteins. For example, IL-1beta treatment resulted in significant reduction in (high-and low-affinity) GTPase activities in lysates derived from normal rat islets; such a scenario might lead to retention of candidate G-proteins in GTP-bound, active conformation. Further, IL-1beta treatment increased the G-protein carboxyl methyl transferase activity as well as carboxyl methylation of endogenous beta-cell proteins; such a modification has been shown to increase the membrane association and interaction of these G-proteins with their respective effector proteins. Also, we report immunologic localization of H-Ras regulatory proteins including its nucleotide exchange factor (GRF-1) and its effector protein (eg., Raf-1) in isolated beta-cells. Together, our data indicate localization, and regulation by IL-1beta, of specific enzymes that are critical to activation of G-proteins. Based on these preliminary findings, we propose a model for the involvement of G-proteins in IL-1beta induced NO release and subsequent demise of the pancreatic beta-cell. PMID:12688637

  5. Intestinal morphology and cytokinetics in pancreatic insufficiency. An experimental study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Hauer-Jensen, M; Skjonsberg, G; Moen, E; Clausen, O P

    1995-10-01

    Intraluminal pancreatic enzymes influence intestinal function, adaptation, and susceptibility to injury. These effects may be mediated partly through changes in the rate of epithelial cell turnover. We assessed intestinal morphology and cytokinetics in a rat model of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency that does not alter anatomic relationships or animal growth. Pancreatic duct occlusion was performed by applying metal clips on both sides along the common bile duct. Control animals underwent sham-operation with exposure and manipulation of the pancreas without duct occlusion. Twelve days later, pulse labeling with tritiated thymidine was performed, and mitotic arrest was induced with colcemid. Groups of animals were sacrificed at 0 and 2 hr after colcemid injection. Specimens for histopathology, morphometry, and autoradiography were obtained from duodenum, proximal jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum. Labeling index, grain counts, mitoses per crypt, cells per crypt, cells per villus, crypt depth, villus height, and number of goblet cells per villus were used as end points. Pancreatic duct occlusion resulted in increased labeling index across intestinal segments relative to sham-operated controls (P < 0.01) and increased labeling index and mitotic rate in distal compared to proximal intestine (P < 0.05). Grain-count histograms were similar in the two experimental groups. There were no significant morphologic differences between pancreatic duct-occluded animals and controls. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency increases crypt cell proliferation in distal small intestine but does not alter the duration of S phase. These changes are most likely due to an increase in the size of the proliferative compartment and may be partly responsible for changes in small bowel function and response to injury.

  6. When BAD is good for beta cells.

    PubMed

    Philipson, Louis H; Roe, Michael W

    2008-04-01

    BAD, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, is regulated by phosphorylation. A recent study (Danial et al., 2008) suggests a phosphorylation-state-dependent bifunctional role of BAD in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and beta cell mass. PMID:18396130

  7. Blockade of bradykinin B(2) receptor suppresses acute pancreatitis induced by obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary duct in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Izumi; Yoshimura, Kuniko; Ishii, Ken-ichiro; Soma, Kazui; Ohwada, Takashi; Kakita, Akira; Majima, Masataka

    2002-01-01

    1. The involvement of bradykinin (BK) B(2) receptor in acute pancreatitis induced by pancreaticobiliary duct ligation was investigated in rats. 2. The activities of amylase and lipase in the serum, the water content of the pancreas, and vacuolization of the acinar cells were significantly increased 2 h after obstruction of the duct in Sprague-Dawley rats. 3. Elevated serum amylase activity, increased pancreatic oedema, and damage of the pancreatic tissue were significantly less marked in plasma kininogen-deficient, B/N-Katholiek rats than in the normal strain, B/N-Kitasato rats 2 h after the ligation. 4. Obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary duct augmented the level of (1-5)-BK (Arg(1)-Pro(2)-Pro(3)-Gly(4)-Phe(5)), a stable BK metabolite, in the blood from 73.0+/-21.7 pg ml(-1) at 0 h to 149.8+/-38.0 pg ml(-1) at 2 h after the induction of pancreatitis in SD rats. 5. Administration of a BK B(2) receptor antagonist, FR173657 (100 mg kg(-1), p.o.) or Hoe140 (100 nmol kg(-1), s.c.), reduced the elevation of amylase and lipase activities in the serum and of pancreatic water content in a dose-dependent manner. The effective attenuation of oedema formation and vacuolization by the antagonists was also confirmed light-microscopically. In contrast, treatment with gabexate mesilate or indomethacin did not cause significant suppression of the pancreatitis. 6. These findings suggest a possible involvement of kinin B(2) receptor in the present pancreatitis model. Furthermore, they point to the potential usefulness of the B(2) receptor in clinical acute pancreatitis.

  8. Damage to pancreatic acinar cells and preservation of islets of Langerhans in a rat model of acute pancreatitis induced by Karwinskia humboldtiana (buckthorn).

    PubMed

    Carcano-Diaz, Katya; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely; Segoviano-Ramirez, Juan Carlos; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Loera-Arias, Maria de Jesus; Garcia-Juarez, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Karwinskia humboldtiana (Kh) is a poisonous plant that grows in some regions of the American continent. Consuming large amounts of Kh fruit results in acute intoxication leading to respiratory failure, culminating in death within days. There is evidence of histological damage to the lungs, liver, and kidneys following accidental and experimental Kh intoxication. To date, the microscopic effect of Kh consumption on the pancreas has not been described. We examined the early effects of Kh fruit on pancreatic tissue at different stages of acute intoxication in the Wistar rat. We found progressive damage confined to the exocrine pancreas, starting with a reduction in the number of zymogen granules, loss of acinar architecture, the presence of autophagy-like vesicles, apoptosis and inflammatory infiltrate. The pancreatic pathology culminated in damaged acini characterized by necrosis and edema, with a complete loss of lobular architecture. Interestingly, the morphology of the islets of Langerhans was conserved throughout our evaluations. Taken together, our results indicate the damage induced by a high dose of Kh fruit in the Wistar rat is consistent with an early acute necrotizing pancreatitis that exclusively affects the exocrine pancreas. Therefore, this system might be useful as an animal model to study the treatment of pancreatic diseases. More importantly, as the islets of Langerhans were preserved, the active compounds of Kh fruit could be utilized for the treatment of acinar pancreatic cancer. Further studies might provide insight into the severity of acute Kh intoxication in humans and influence the design of treatments for pancreatic diseases and acinar pancreatic cancer. PMID:26877198

  9. Exercise at anaerobic threshold intensity and insulin secretion by isolated pancreatic islets of rats

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; Paiva, Mauricio Ferreira; Mota, Clécia Alencar Soares; Ribeiro, Carla; de Almeida Leme, José Alexandre Curiacos; Luciano, Eliete

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acute exercise and exercise training at the anaerobic threshold (AT) intensity on aerobic conditioning and insulin secretion by pancreatic islets, adult male Wistar rats were submitted to the lactate minimum test (LMT) for AT determination. Half of the animals were submitted to swimming exercise training (trained), 1 h/day, 5 days/week during 8 weeks, with an overload equivalent to the AT. The other half was kept sedentary. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were submitted to an oral glucose tolerance test and to another LMT. Then, the animals were sacrificed at rest or immediately after 20 minutes of swimming exercise at the AT intensity for pancreatic islets isolation. At the end of the experiment mean workload (% bw) at AT was higher and blood lactate concentration (mmol/L) was lower in the trained than in the control group. Rats trained at the AT intensity showed no alteration in the areas under blood glucose and insulin during OGTT test. Islet insulin content of trained rats was higher than in the sedentary rats while islet glucose uptake did not differ among the groups. The static insulin secretion in response to the high glucose concentration (16.7 mM) of the sedentary group at rest was lower than the sedentary group submitted to the acute exercise and the inverse was observed in relation to the trained groups. Physical training at the AT intensity improved the aerobic condition and altered insulin secretory pattern by pancreatic islets. PMID:21099318

  10. Molecular mechanisms of tungstate-induced pancreatic plasticity: a transcriptomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Altirriba, Jordi; Barbera, Albert; Del Zotto, Héctor; Nadal, Belen; Piquer, Sandra; Sánchez-Pla, Alex; Gagliardino, Juan J; Gomis, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    Background Sodium tungstate is known to be an effective anti-diabetic agent, able to increase beta cell mass in animal models of diabetes, although the molecular mechanisms of this treatment and the genes that control pancreas plasticity are yet to be identified. Using a transcriptomics approach, the aim of the study is to unravel the molecular mechanisms which participate in the recovery of exocrine and endocrine function of streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats treated with tungstate, determining the hyperglycemia contribution and the direct effect of tungstate. Results Streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats were treated orally with tungstate for five weeks. Treated (STZ)-diabetic rats showed a partial recovery of exocrine and endocrine function, with lower glycemia, increased insulinemia and amylasemia, and increased beta cell mass achieved by reducing beta cell apoptosis and raising beta cell proliferation. The microarray analysis of the pancreases led to the identification of three groups of differentially expressed genes: genes altered due to diabetes, genes restored by the treatment, and genes specifically induced by tungstate in the diabetic animals. The results were corroborated by quantitative PCR. A detailed description of the pathways involved in the pancreatic effects of tungstate is provided in this paper. Hyperglycemia contribution was studied in STZ-diabetic rats treated with phloridzin, and the direct effect of tungstate was determined in INS-1E cells treated with tungstate or serum from untreated or treated STZ-rats, observing that tungstate action in the pancreas takes places via hyperglycemia-independent pathways and via a combination of tungstate direct and indirect (through the serum profile modification) effects. Finally, the MAPK pathway was evaluated, observing that it has a key role in the tungstate-induced increase of beta cell proliferation as tungstate activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway directly by increasing p42/p44

  11. Palmitic acid increase levels of pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 and p38/stress-activated protein kinase in islets from rats maintained on a low protein diet.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Vanessa C; Reis, Marise A B; Latorraca, Márcia Q; Ferreira, Fabiano; Stoppiglia, Luiz Fabrízio; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C

    2006-12-01

    A severe reduction in insulin release in response to glucose is consistently noticed in protein-deprived rats and is attributed partly to the chronic exposure to elevated levels of NEFA. Since the pancreatic and duodenal transcription factor homeobox 1 (PDX-1) is important for the maintenance of beta-cell physiology, and since PDX-1 expression is altered in the islets of rats fed a low protein (LP) diet and that rats show high NEFA levels, we assessed PDX-1 and insulin mRNA expression, as well as PDX-1 and p38/stress activated protein kinase 2 (SAPK2) protein expression, in islets from young rats fed low (6%) or normal (17%; control) protein diets and maintained for 48 h in culture medium containing 5.6 mmol/l glucose, with or without 0.6 mmol/l palmitic acid. We also measured glucose-induced insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. Insulin secretion by isolated islets in response to 16.7 mmol/l glucose was reduced in LP compared with control rats. In the presence of NEFA, there was an increase in insulin secretion in both groups. At 2.8 mmol/l glucose, the metabolism of this sugar was reduced in LP islets, regardless of the presence of this fatty acid. However, when challenged with 16.7 mmol/l glucose, LP and control islets showed a severe reduction in glucose oxidation in the presence of NEFA. The PDX-1 and insulin mRNA were significantly higher when NEFA was added to the culture medium in both groups of islets. The effect of palmitic acid on PDX-1 and p38/SAPK2 protein levels was similar in LP and control islets, but the increase was much more evident in LP islets. These results demonstrate the complex interrelationship between nutrients in the control of insulin release and support the view that fatty acids play an important role in glucose homeostasis by affecting molecular mechanisms and stimulus/secretion coupling pathways. PMID:17181874

  12. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = −0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis. PMID:26634430

  13. Coating nanofiber scaffolds with beta cell membrane to promote cell proliferation and function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wansong; Zhang, Qiangzhe; Luk, Brian T; Fang, Ronnie H; Liu, Younian; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2016-05-21

    The cell membrane cloaking technique has emerged as an intriguing strategy in nanomaterial functionalization. Coating synthetic nanostructures with natural cell membranes bestows the nanostructures with unique cell surface antigens and functions. Previous studies have focused primarily on development of cell membrane-coated spherical nanoparticles and the uses thereof. Herein, we attempt to extend the cell membrane cloaking technique to nanofibers, a class of functional nanomaterials that are drastically different from nanoparticles in terms of dimensional and mechanophysical characteristics. Using pancreatic beta cells as a model cell line, we demonstrate successful preparation of cell membrane-coated nanofibers and validate that the modified nanofibers possess an antigenic exterior closely resembling that of the source beta cells. When such nanofiber scaffolds are used to culture beta cells, both cell proliferation rate and function are significantly enhanced. Specifically, glucose-dependent insulin secretion from the cells is increased by near five-fold compared with the same beta cells cultured in regular, unmodified nanofiber scaffolds. Overall, coating cell membranes onto nanofibers could add another dimension of flexibility and controllability in harnessing cell membrane functions and offer new opportunities for innovative applications. PMID:27139582

  14. Coating nanofiber scaffolds with beta cell membrane to promote cell proliferation and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wansong; Zhang, Qiangzhe; Luk, Brian T.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Liu, Younian; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Liangfang

    2016-05-01

    The cell membrane cloaking technique has emerged as an intriguing strategy in nanomaterial functionalization. Coating synthetic nanostructures with natural cell membranes bestows the nanostructures with unique cell surface antigens and functions. Previous studies have focused primarily on development of cell membrane-coated spherical nanoparticles and the uses thereof. Herein, we attempt to extend the cell membrane cloaking technique to nanofibers, a class of functional nanomaterials that are drastically different from nanoparticles in terms of dimensional and mechanophysical characteristics. Using pancreatic beta cells as a model cell line, we demonstrate successful preparation of cell membrane-coated nanofibers and validate that the modified nanofibers possess an antigenic exterior closely resembling that of the source beta cells. When such nanofiber scaffolds are used to culture beta cells, both cell proliferation rate and function are significantly enhanced. Specifically, glucose-dependent insulin secretion from the cells is increased by near five-fold compared with the same beta cells cultured in regular, unmodified nanofiber scaffolds. Overall, coating cell membranes onto nanofibers could add another dimension of flexibility and controllability in harnessing cell membrane functions and offer new opportunities for innovative applications.

  15. Infusion of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuates Experimental Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dandan; Gao, Jun; Gong, Yanfang; Wu, Hongyu; Xu, Aifang

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims. Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) remains a high-mortality disease. Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to have plasticity of transdifferentiation and to have immunomodulatory functions. In the present study, we assessed the roles of MSCs in SAP and the therapeutic effects of MSC on SAP after transplantation. Methods. A pancreatitis rat model was induced by the injection of taurocholic acid (TCA) into the pancreatic duct. After isolation and characterization of MSC from BM, MSC transplantation was conducted 24 hrs after SAP induction by tail vein injection. The survival rate was observed and MSCs were traced after transplantation. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA in the transplantation group was also analyzed. Results. The survival rate of the transplantation group was significantly higher compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Infused MSCs were detected in the pancreas and BM 3 days after transplantation. The expression of TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA in the transplantation group was significantly lower than in the control group in both the pancreas and the lungs (p < 0.05). Conclusions. MSC transplantation could improve the prognosis of SAP rats. Engrafted MSCs have the capacity of homing, migration, and planting during the treatment of SAP. PMID:27721836

  16. Zinc and its transporters, pancreatic beta cells, and insulin metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is an essential trace metal for life. Two families of zinc transporters, SLC30A (ZnT) and SLC39A (ZIP) are required for maintaining cellular zinc homeostasis. ZnTs function to decrease cytoplasmic zinc concentrations whereas ZIPs do the opposite. Expression of zinc transporters can be tissue/ce...

  17. The effect of TRAIL molecule on cell viability in in vitro beta cell culture.

    PubMed

    Tekmen, I; Ozyurt, D; Pekçetin, C; Buldan, Z

    2007-06-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is an organ-specific autoimmune disorder triggered by autoreactive T cells directed to pancreas beta-cell antigens. In this disorder, more than 90% of beta cells are destroyed. Cell death may be mediated via soluble or membrane-bound cell death ligands. One of these ligands may be tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a member of the TNF-alpha superfamily. In the present study, we examined whether TRAIL had cytotoxic effects on adult rat pancreas beta cell cultures and INS1-E rat insulinoma cell line cultures or not. In this study, cell destruction models were built with TRAIL concentrations of 10, 100 and 1000 ng. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test was used for evaluating cell viability. It was detected that cell cultures with TRAIL added showed no differences statistically when compared with control cultures containing no toxic additions. These results showed that TRAIL did not have significant cytotoxic effects on pancreas beta cell culture and INS-1E rat insulinoma cell line cultures. Detection of the expression of TRAIL receptors and natural apoptosis inhibitor proteins will be favourable to investigate the resistance mechanisms to TRAIL-induced cell death in this cell culture system.

  18. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) reverses hyperglycemia in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Luguang Luo, John Z.Q. Jackson, Ivor M.D.

    2008-09-12

    Hyperglycemia in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) null mice indicates that TRH is involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Further, TRH levels in the pancreas peak during the stages of late embryonic and early neonatal {beta} cell development. These observations are consistent in linking TRH to islet cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we examined the effect of TRH administration in damaged pancreatic rat (streptozotocin, STZ) to determine whether TRH could improve damaged pancreatic {beta} cells function. We hypothesize that TRH is able to reverse STZ-induced hyperglycemia by increasing pancreatic islet insulin content, preventing apoptosis, and potentially induce islet regeneration. It was found that following intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, TRH (10 {mu}g/kg body weight (bwt)) reverses STZ (65 mg/kg bwt)-induced hyperglycemia (TRH given 3 days after STZ injection). Increased circulating insulin levels and insulin content in extracted pancreas suggests that TRH reversed STZ-induced hyperglycemia through improving pancreatic islet {beta} cell function. Further studies show a significantly lower level of apoptosis in islets treated with TRH as well as the presence of proliferation marker nestin and Brdu, suggesting that the TRH has the potential to prevent apoptosis and stimulate islet proliferation.

  19. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ankita; Prasad, Shilpi Kumari; Pal, Swagata; Maji, Bithin; Syamal, Alak Kumar; Banerjee, Arnab; Mukherjee, Sandip

    2015-06-01

    Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/ day) with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day) or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day) alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat. PMID:27486368

  20. Protective efficacy of folic acid and vitamin B12 against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Ankita; Prasad, Shilpi Kumari; Pal, Swagata; Maji, Bithin; Syamal, Alak Kumar; Banerjee, Arnab

    2015-01-01

    Although cigarette smoking is associated with insulin resistance and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, few studies have examined the effect of nicotine on the adult endocrine pancreas. In this study, male Wister rats were treated with nicotine (3 mg/kg body weight/ day) with or without supplementation of folic acid (36 μg/kg body weight/day) or vitamin B12 (0.63 μg/kg body weight/day) alone or in combination. Fasting blood glucose, insulin and HBA1C level and different oxidative and anti-oxidative stress parameters were measured and pancreatic tissue sections were stained with eosin-haematoxylene. Data were analysed by nonparametric statistics. The results revealed that nicotine induced prediabetes condition with subsequent damage to pancreatic islets in rats. Nicotine also caused oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue as evidenced by increased nitric oxide and malondialdehyde level and decreased superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione level. Compared to vitamin B12 supplementation, folic acid blunted the nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets with higher efficacy. Further, folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination were able to confer significant protection on pancreatic islets against nicotine induced toxicity. These results suggest that supplementation of folic acid and vitamin B12 in combination may be a possible strategy of detoxification against nicotine-induced toxicity in pancreatic islets of the rat. PMID:27486368

  1. Influence of secretagogues on asynchronous secretion of newly synthesized pancreatic proteins in the conscious rat

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, V.; Rohr, G.

    1987-01-01

    The secretion of newly synthesized pancreatic enzymes was studied in pancreatic duct cannulated rats after intravenous injection of 100 microCi of (/sup 35/S)methionine. Secretion rate was stimulated by intravenous infusion of either cerulein (0.2 microgram/kg h) or carbachol (10 nmol/kg h) starting simultaneously with or 180 min before the injection of the labeled methionine. Secretory proteins were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis or by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis followed by determination of the radioactivity associated with the individual proteins. Similar to unstimulated controls in all experiments, an early secretion of newly synthesized trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen was found, whereas amylase and lipase were secreted only after a certain lag period. The results suggest that the intracellular transit of endoproteases is faster than that of other enzymes, irrespective of whether or not secretagogues were applied.

  2. Protective effect of Mimosa pudica L. in an L-arginine model of acute necrotising pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Sidhu, Shabir; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Khan, M U

    2016-07-01

    Mimosa pudica is used in traditional medicine for treating various disorders such as inflammatory conditions, diarrhoea, insomnia, alopecia, urogenital infections and wounds. The present study investigated the effect of M. pudica extract (MPE) on L-arginine-induced acute necrotising pancreatitis in rats. The ethanolic extract of M. pudica leaves was studied for the presence of quercetin and gallic acid using high-performance liquid chromatography. Four groups were employed-normal control rats, L-arginine control rats (two intraperitoneal [i.p.] injections of 2 g/kg at an interval of 1 h), MPE-treated rats (400 mg/kg orally) and melatonin-treated rats (positive control 10 mg/kg i.p.), which were further divided into subgroups according to time points (24 h, 3 days and 14 days). Serum amylase, lipase, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), pancreatic amylase, nucleic acid content, protein, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), thiobarbituric reactive substances, glutathione, nitrite/nitrate, collagen content and histopathological examination were carried out. MPE significantly improved acute necrotising pancreatitis by modulating diagnostic markers of pancreatitis such as serum lipase and pancreatic amylase, inflammation (TNF-α), and oxidative and nitrosative stress. Moreover, MPE administration induced regenerative changes in the pancreas evidenced by increased levels of pancreatic proteins, nucleic acid content and histopathology report. In addition, MPE improved TGF-β1 and collagen levels thereby preventing fibrosis. The current investigation indicates the novel role of MPE in reducing the severity of acute necrotising pancreatitis by plausible mechanisms such as anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activity and by promoting repair and regeneration of the pancreas. PMID:27164910

  3. Protective effects of sivelestat in a caerulein-induced rat acute pancreatitis model.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Liu, Quanyan

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of sivelestat on acute pancreatitis (AP) in a rat model. Sivelestat is a specific neutrophil elastase inhibitor, which has been developed in Japan in 1991. Varying doses of sivelestat in normal saline were infused continuously in sivelestat-treated groups through osmotic pumps. Blood and pancreas samples were collected for serological and histopathological studies, and ten rats in each group were taken for survival observation. Increasing doses of sivelestat inhibits the expression of lipase, amylase, corticosterone, IL-1β, TNF-α, and nuclear factor-κB. Furthermore, sivelestat reduces the inflammatory cells infiltration, histological damage, and mortality rate. Meanwhile, the total antioxidant power and serum level of IL-4 in high-dose sivelestat-treated groups were increased. Our findings suggest that the increasing doses of sivelestat protect against caerulein-induced AP in rats, and this protection is possibly associated with the anti-inflammatory ability of sivelestat. PMID:23794035

  4. Caspase-1 inhibition alleviates acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Li, Min-Li; Wang, Bin; Guo, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Ren-Min

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of inhibition of caspase-1 on acute renal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). METHODS: Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: healthy controls (HC, n = 6), SAP rats treated with saline (SAP-S, n = 18), or SAP rats treated with a caspase-1/interleukin (IL)-1β-converting-enzyme (ICE) inhibitor (SAP-I-ICE, n = 18). SAP was induced by retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. HC rats were subjected to identical treatment and surgical procedures without sodium taurocholate. Rats received an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline (SAP-S) or the inhibitor (SAP-ICE-I) at 2 and 12 h after induction of acute pancreatitis. Surviving rats were sacrificed at different time points after SAP induction; all samples were obtained and stored for subsequent analyses. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) were measured using automatic methods, and serum IL-1β concentrations were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intrarenal expression of IL-1β, IL-18 and caspase-1 mRNAs was detected by RT-PCR. IL-1β protein expression and the pathologic changes in kidney tissues were observed by microscopy after immunohistochemical or hematoxylin and eosin staining, respectively. RESULTS: The serum levels of BUN and Cr in the SAP-S group were 12.48 ± 2.30 mmol/L and 82.83 ± 13.89 μmol/L at 6 h, 23.53 ± 2.58 mmol/L and 123.67 ± 17.67 μmol/L at 12 h, and 23.60 ± 3.33 mmol/L and 125.33 ± 21.09 μmol/L at 18 h, respectively. All were significantly increased compared to HC rats (P < 0.01 for all). Levels in SAP-ICE-I rats were significantly decreased compared to SAP-S rats both at 12 and 18 h (P < 0.01 for all). Serum IL-1β levels in the SAP-S group were 276.77 ± 44.92 pg/mL at 6 h, 308.99 ± 34.95 pg/mL at 12 h, and 311.60 ± 46.51 pg/mL at 18 h; all significantly higher than those in the HC and SAP-ICE-I groups (P < 0.01 for all

  5. Rapamycin impairs metabolism-secretion coupling in rat pancreatic islets by suppressing carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shimodahira, Makiko; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Mukai, Eri; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Nishi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Mayumi; Sato, Yuichi; Sato, Hiroki; Hosokawa, Masaya; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2010-01-01

    Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant used in human transplantation, impairs beta-cell function, but the mechanism is unclear. Chronic (24 h) exposure to rapamycin concentration dependently suppressed 16.7 mM glucose-induced insulin release from islets (1.65+/-0.06, 30 nM rapamycin versus 2.35+/-0.11 ng/islet per 30 min, control, n=30, P<0.01) without affecting insulin and DNA contents. Rapamycin also decreased alpha-ketoisocaproate-induced insulin release, suggesting reduced mitochondrial carbohydrate metabolism. ATP content in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose was significantly reduced in rapamycin-treated islets (13.42+/-0.47, rapamycin versus 16.04+/-0.46 pmol/islet, control, n=30, P<0.01). Glucose oxidation, which indicates the velocity of metabolism in the Krebs cycle, was decreased by rapamycin in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose (30.1+/-2.7, rapamycin versus 42.2+/-3.3 pmol/islet per 90 min, control, n=9, P<0.01). Immunoblotting revealed that the expression of complex I, III, IV, and V was not affected by rapamycin. Mitochondrial ATP production indicated that the respiratory chain downstream of complex II was not affected, but that carbohydrate metabolism in the Krebs cycle was reduced by rapamycin. Analysis of enzymes in the Krebs cycle revealed that activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH), which catalyzes one of the slowest reactions in the Krebs cycle, was reduced by rapamycin (10.08+/-0.82, rapamycin versus 13.82+/-0.84 nmol/mg mitochondrial protein per min, control, n=5, P<0.01). Considered together, these findings indicate that rapamycin suppresses high glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets by reducing mitochondrial ATP production through suppression of carbohydrate metabolism in the Krebs cycle, together with reduced KGDH activity. PMID:19812126

  6. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; López-Acosta, José Francisco; Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Muñoz-Barrera, Jennifer; Fernández-Luis, Sara; Heras-Pozas, Blanca; Perdomo, Germán; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover functional β-cell mass. We used isolated rat and human islets transduced with adenovirus expressing cyclin C. We measured multiple markers of proliferation: [3H]thymidine incorporation, BrdU incorporation and staining, and Ki67 staining. Furthermore, we detected β-cell death by TUNEL, β-cell differentiation by RT-PCR, and β-cell function by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, we have found that cyclin C increases rat and human β-cell proliferation. This augmented proliferation did not induce β-cell death, dedifferentiation, or dysfunction in rat or human islets. Our results indicate that cyclin C is a potential target for inducing β-cell regeneration. PMID:25564474

  7. Phosphorylation events implicating p38 and PI3K mediate tungstate-effects in MIN6 beta cells

    SciTech Connect

    Piquer, Sandra; Gomis, Ramon . E-mail: rgomis@clinic.ub.es

    2007-06-29

    Oral administration of sodium tungstate is an effective treatment for diabetes in animal models. Several lines of evidence indicate the pancreatic beta cell as one of the targets of tungstate action. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism by which this compound exerts its effects on the beta cell line MIN6. Tungstate treatment induced phosphorylation and subsequent activation of p38 and PI3K which in turn are implicated in tungstate PDX-1 nuclear localization and activation. Although no effect was observed in glucose-induced insulin secretion we found that tungstate activates basal insulin release, a process driven, at least in part, by activation of p38. These results show a direct involvement of p38 and PI3K phosphorylation in the mechanism of action of tungstate in the beta cell.

  8. Restructuring of Pancreatic Islets and Insulin Secretion in a Postnatal Critical Window

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Sanchez-Soto, Carmen; Godinez-Puig, Victoria; Gutiérrez-Ospina, Gabriel; Hiriart, Marcia

    2006-01-01

    Function and structure of adult pancreatic islets are determined by early postnatal development, which in rats corresponds to the first month of life. We analyzed changes in blood glucose and hormones during this stage and their association with morphological and functional changes of alpha and beta cell populations during this period. At day 20 (d20), insulin and glucose plasma levels were two- and six-fold higher, respectively, as compared to d6. Interestingly, this period is characterized by physiological hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, where peripheral insulin resistance and a high plasmatic concentration of glucagon are also observed. These functional changes were paralleled by reorganization of islet structure, cell mass and aggregate size of alpha and beta cells. Cultured beta cells from d20 secreted the same amount of insulin in 15.6 mM than in 5.6 mM glucose (basal conditions), and were characterized by a high basal insulin secretion. However, beta cells from d28 were already glucose sensitive. Understanding and establishing morphophysiological relationships in the developing endocrine pancreas may explain how events in early life are important in determining adult islet physiology and metabolism. PMID:17183663

  9. Protective and curative effects of Cocos nucifera inflorescence on alloxan-induced pancreatic cytotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Renjith, Raveendran S.; Rajamohan, Thankappan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study was planned to investigate the effects of pre and post-treatment of young inflorescence of Cocos nucifera (CnI) on alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Male albino Sprague Dawely rats were divided into five groups of six animals each. Group I was normal control, Group II was diabetic control, Cocos nucifera Inflorescence (CnI) was fed along with diet [20% (w/w)] orally (Group III) for a period of 11 days prior to alloxan injection (150 mg/kg i.p.). The curative effect of CnI was evaluated at the same feeding levels in alloxan-induced diabetic rats (Group IV) for a period of 30 days. The effects of both pretreatment and post-treatment (Group V) were also evaluated. Biochemical parameters such serum glucose, hepatic glycogen, and enzymes involving carbohydrate metabolism (hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose 1, 6-diphosphatase, glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase, and glycogen phosphorylase) were assayed along with pancreatic histopathology. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance followed by Duncan's post hoc multiple variance test. P < 0.05 was considered statistical significant. Results: Diabetic control rats showed significant increase in serum glucose (P < 0.05) and decrease in hepatic glycogen levels (P < 0.05) compared to normal rats, which was reversed to near normal in both CnI pretreated and post-treated rats. Treatment with CnI resulted in significant decrease (P < 0.05) in activities of gluconeogenic enzymes in Group III and IV on compared to the diabetic control group, while glycolytic enzyme activities were improved in these groups. The cytotoxicity of pancreatic islets also ameliorated by treatment with CnI on histopathological examination. Conclusion: The results obtained in the study indicate the protective and curative effects of CnI on alloxan-induced pancreatic cytotoxicity, which is mediated through the regulation of carbohydrate metabolic enzyme

  10. Short-term cholinergic desensitization of rat pancreatic secretory response

    SciTech Connect

    Asselin, J.; Larose, L.; Morisset, J.

    1987-03-01

    Dispersed pancreatic acini were first exposed to carbamylcholine (10/sup -7/-10/sup -4/ M) for 60 min, washed, and reexposed to this same agonist (10/sup -8/-10/sup -3/ M) for 15 min. During this second incubation, the functional secretory capacity of these acini was evaluated by measuring amylase release. Acini preexposed to concentrations of carbamylcholine of 10/sup -6/ M or greater showed shifts to the right in the subsequent carbamylcholine dose-response curves of amylase release. A 3-h recovery period (without carbamylcholine) did not restore the altered carbamylcholine dose-response curve. Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations of 10/sup -7/ M or 2.5 x 10/sup -3/ M instead of 0.5 x 10/sup -3/ M during the 60-min preincubation did not affect the desensitization process. With use of N-(/sup 3/H)methylscopolamine to evaluate muscarinic receptors, the only changes observed after desensitization were a significant decrease in the high-affinity and an equivalent increase in that of the low-affinity receptors. After cholinergic exposure amylase release stimulated by caerulein was only slightly modified, whereas amylase release in response to a phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and to the ionophore A23187 was not altered. These data indicate that short-term desensitization with a cholinergic agent is relatively specific to muscarinic agonists, causes changes in the muscarinic receptor high-and low-affinity concentration but does not alter intracellular steps after calcium mobilization or protein kinase C activation known to be involved in the secretion process.

  11. Effect of tiron on remote organ injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis induced by L-arginine.

    PubMed

    Ateyya, Hayam; Wagih, Heba M; El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory disorder of the pancreas that can be complicated by involvement of other remote organs. Oxidative stress is known to have a crucial role in the development of pancreatic acinar damage and one of the main causes in multisystem organ failure in experimental AP. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of tiron on pancreas and remote organ damage in L-arginine (L-Arg) induced AP rat model. Thirty-two male rats were divided in random into four groups: control, tiron, L-Arg, and tiron with L-Arg. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were withdrawn for biochemical analysis. The pancreas, lung, kidney, and liver were collected for histopathological examination. Estimation of pancreatic water content was done. Analysis of pulmonary, hepatic, renal, and pancreatic lipid peroxide levels (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH) were carried out. Finally, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression in pancreatic tissue was determined. Results indicated that treatment with tiron significantly decreased lipid peroxide levels and markedly increased both SOD activity and GSH level. Moreover, histopathological analysis further confirmed that administration of tiron relatively ameliorates pancreatic acinar cells and remote organ damage. Increased immunoreactivity of NF-κB and TGF-β1 were reduced also by tiron treatment. These findings pointed out the protective role of the mitochondrial antioxidant, tiron against AP induced by L-Arg. PMID:27118662

  12. Transport of ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid by pancreatic islet cells from neonatal rats.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, A; Nielsen, J H; Farver, O; Thorn, N A

    1991-01-01

    Several amidated biologically active peptides such as pancreastatin, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, pancreatic polypeptide and amylin are produced in endocrine pancreatic tissue which contains the enzyme necessary for their final processing, i.e. peptidylglycine alpha-amidating mono-oxygenase (EC 1.14.17.3). The enzyme needs ascorbic acid for activity as well as copper and molecular oxygen. The present work shows that pancreatic islet cells prepared from overnight cultures of isolated islets from 5-7-day-old rats accumulate 14C-labelled ascorbic acid by a Na(+)-dependent active transport mechanism which involves a saturable process (estimated Km 17.6 microM). Transport was inhibited by ouabain, phloridzin, cytochalasin B, amiloride and probenecid. Glucose inhibited or stimulated uptake, depending on the length of incubation time of the cells. The uptake of dehydroascorbic acid was linearly dependent on concentration. Dehydroascorbic acid was converted to ascorbic acid by an unknown mechanism after uptake. The uptake of both ascorbic acid and dehydroascorbic acid was inhibited by tri-iodothyronine, and uptake of ascorbic acid, but not of dehydroascorbic acid, was inhibited by glucocorticoids. Isolated secretory granules contained a fairly low concentration of iron but a high concentration of copper. Images Fig. 6. PMID:2012602

  13. Bioluminescence imaging reveals dynamics of beta cell loss in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Virostko, John; Radhika, Armandla; Poffenberger, Greg; Dula, Adrienne N; Moore, Daniel J; Powers, Alvin C

    2013-01-01

    We generated a mouse model (MIP-Luc-VU-NOD) that enables non-invasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of beta cell loss during the progression of autoimmune diabetes and determined the relationship between BLI and disease progression. MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice displayed insulitis and a decline in bioluminescence with age which correlated with beta cell mass, plasma insulin, and pancreatic insulin content. Bioluminescence declined gradually in female MIP-Luc-VU-NOD mice, reaching less than 50% of the initial BLI at 10 weeks of age, whereas hyperglycemia did not ensue until mice were at least 16 weeks old. Mice that did not become diabetic maintained insulin secretion and had less of a decline in bioluminescence than mice that became diabetic. Bioluminescence measurements predicted a decline in beta cell mass prior to the onset of hyperglycemia and tracked beta cell loss. This model should be useful for investigating the fundamental processes underlying autoimmune diabetes and developing new therapies targeting beta cell protection and regeneration.

  14. Alpha cells secrete acetylcholine as a non-neuronal paracrine signal priming beta cell function in humans.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Dando, Robin; Jacques-Silva, M Caroline; Fachado, Alberto; Molina, Judith; Abdulreda, Midhat H; Ricordi, Camillo; Roper, Stephen D; Berggren, Per-Olof; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2011-06-19

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that has a major role in the function of the insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cell. Parasympathetic innervation of the endocrine pancreas, the islets of Langerhans, has been shown to provide cholinergic input to the beta cell in several species, but the role of autonomic innervation in human beta cell function is at present unclear. Here we show that, in contrast to the case in mouse islets, cholinergic innervation of human islets is sparse. Instead, we find that the alpha cells of human islets provide paracrine cholinergic input to surrounding endocrine cells. Human alpha cells express the vesicular acetylcholine transporter and release acetylcholine when stimulated with kainate or a lowering in glucose concentration. Acetylcholine secretion by alpha cells in turn sensitizes the beta cell response to increases in glucose concentration. Our results demonstrate that in human islets acetylcholine is a paracrine signal that primes the beta cell to respond optimally to subsequent increases in glucose concentration. Cholinergic signaling within islets represents a potential therapeutic target in diabetes, highlighting the relevance of this advance to future drug development.

  15. Gallic acid protects RINm5F beta-cells from glucolipotoxicity by its antiapoptotic and insulin-secretagogue actions.

    PubMed

    Sameermahmood, Zaheer; Raji, Lenin; Saravanan, Thangavel; Vaidya, Ashok; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy

    2010-01-01

    Gallic acid is claimed to possess antioxidant, antiinflammatory and cytoprotective effects. Since pancreatic islets from Type 2 diabetic patients have functional defects, it was hypothesized that glucolipotoxicity might induce apoptosis in beta-cells and gallic acid could offer protection. To test this, RINm5F beta-cells were exposed to high glucose (25 microM) or palmitate (500 microM) or a combination of both for 24 h in the presence and absence of gallic acid. Cells subjected to glucolipotoxicity in the absence and presence of gallic acid were assessed for DNA damage by comet assay. Apoptosis was inferred by caspase-3 protein expression and caspase-3 activity and changes in Bcl-2 mRNA. RT-PCR was used to analyse PDX-1, insulin and UCP-2 mRNA expression in RINm5F beta-cells and insulin levels were quantified from the cell culture supernatant. NFkappaB signal was studied by EMSA, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. While RINm5F beta-cells subjected to glucolipotoxicity exhibited increased DNA damage, apoptotic markers and NFkappaB signals, all these apoptotic perturbations were resisted by gallic acid. Gallic acid dose-dependently increased insulin secretion in RINm5F beta-cells and upregulated mRNA of PDX-1 and insulin. It is suggested that the insulin-secretagogue and transcriptional regulatory action of gallic acid is a newly identified mechanism in our study.

  16. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with l,10-PT + ethanol and ~1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I—III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24281792

  17. Hydrogen-rich saline ameliorates the severity of L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Han; Sun, Yan Ping; Li, Yang; Liu, Wen Wu; Xiang, Hong Gang; Fan, Lie Ying; Sun, Qiang; Xu, Xin Yun; Cai, Jian Mei; Ruan, Can Ping; Su, Ning; Yan, Rong Lin; Sun, Xue Jun; Wang, Qiang

    2010-03-05

    Molecular hydrogen, which reacts with the hydroxyl radical, has been considered as a novel antioxidant. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of hydrogen-rich saline on the L-arginine (L-Arg)-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by giving two intraperitoneal injections of L-Arg, each at concentrations of 250 mg/100 g body weight, with an interval of 1 h. Hydrogen-rich saline (>0.6 mM, 6 ml/kg) or saline (6 ml/kg) was administered, respectively, via tail vein 15 min after each L-Arg administration. Severity of AP was assessed by analysis of serum amylase activity, pancreatic water content and histology. Samples of pancreas were taken for measuring malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase. Apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cell was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling technique (TUNEL). Expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) were detected with immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen-rich saline treatment significantly attenuated the severity of L-Arg-induced AP by ameliorating the increased serum amylase activity, inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, lipid oxidation and pancreatic tissue edema. Moreover, hydrogen-rich saline treatment could promote acinar cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and NF-{kappa}B activation. These results indicate that hydrogen treatment has a protective effect against AP, and the effect is possibly due to its ability to inhibit oxidative stress, apoptosis, NF-{kappa}B activation and to promote acinar cell proliferation.

  18. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    PubMed

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  19. Pancreatic B-cell behaviour after changing the natural environment of sand rats (Psammomys obesus.

    PubMed

    Hahn, H J; Jutzi, E; Köhler, E; Schäfer, H

    1976-01-01

    On the basis of the blood glucose increase during the capitivity sand rats born in the desert were classified as normals, protodiabetics and diabetics, indicating a different adaptation to the new environment within a definite period. Isolated islets of animals, which did not develop a hyperglycemia, enhanced their insulin content during the adaptation period. The absolute insulin secretion rates in response to 16.5 mM glucose were rather similar between the three investigated groups and not modified by the insulin as well as glucagon content of pancreatic islets. But, since islets of hyperglycemic sand rats could not increase the insulin content, a significantly enhanced fractional secretion (as % of the content) could be observed. The results let us assume that the B-cell reaction during the adaptation period can be modified by further factors additionally to the changed environment. PMID:795642

  20. Excessive Food Intake, Obesity and Inflammation Process in Zucker fa/fa Rat Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Chentouf, Myriam; Dubois, Gregor; Jahannaut, Céline; Castex, Françoise; Lajoix, Anne Dominique; Gross, René; Peraldi-Roux, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Inappropriate food intake-related obesity and more importantly, visceral adiposity, are major risk factors for the onset of type 2 diabetes. Evidence is emerging that nutriment-induced β-cell dysfunction could be related to indirect induction of a state of low grade inflammation. Our aim was to study whether hyperphagia associated obesity could promote an inflammatory response in pancreatic islets leading to ß-cell dysfunction. In the hyperphagic obese insulin resistant male Zucker rat, we measured the level of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and estimated their production as well as the expression of their receptors in pancreatic tissue and β-cells. Our main findings concern intra-islet pro-inflammatory cytokines from fa/fa rats: IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα expressions were increased; IL-1R1 was also over-expressed with a cellular redistribution also observed for IL-6R. To get insight into the mechanisms involved in phenotypic alterations, abArrays were used to determine the expression profile of proteins implicated in different membrane receptors signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle pathways. Despite JNK overexpression, cell viability was unaffected probably because of decreases in cleaved caspase3 as well as in SMAC/DIABLO and APP, involved in the induction and amplification of apoptosis. Concerning β-cell proliferation, decreases in important cell cycle regulators (Cyclin D1, p35) and increased expression of SMAD4 probably contribute to counteract and restrain hyperplasia in fa/fa rat islets. Finally and probably as a result of IL-1β and IL-1R1 increased expressions with sub-cellular redistribution of the receptor, islets from fa/fa rats were found more sensitive to both stimulating and inhibitory concentrations of the cytokine; this confers some physiopathological relevance to a possible autocrine regulation of β-cell function by IL-1β. These results support the hypothesis that pancreatic islets from prediabetic fa/fa rats undergo an inflammatory

  1. The effect of octreotide (SMS 201-995) on experimentally induced pancreatitis with 50% ethyl alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Korun, N; Yilmazlar, T; Kaya, E; Kutlay, B

    1994-01-01

    Brattle-Boro type rats with average weight of 200 gms were used for the experiment. We established 5 groups with 10 rats in each. Group I was the control group, Group II pancreatic trauma group and Group III rats were the pancreatitis group induced by 50% alcohol. Groups IV and V were the groups in which Octreotide was injected in different time intervals after induction of pancreatitis by 50% alcohol. Amylase values were statistically significant between the control group in which Octreotide was injected in different time intervals after induction of pancreatitis by 50% alcohol. The amylase values were statistically significant between the control group and the experiments (t2 = 4.69 p < 0.001, t3 = 8.06 p < 0.00001, t4 = 4.23 p < 0.002, t5 = 4.3 p < 0.002), and it was also significant between Group III and Groups II, IV, V (t2 = 9.62 p < 0.0001, t4 = 10.26 p < 0.0001, t5 = 3.69 p < 0.005), but it was not found significant between Groups II and IV, V (t4 = 0.52 p < 0.6, t5 = 1.69 p < 0.1). Histopathologic examination of the trauma group showed congestion, minimal lymphomonocyte infiltration. Patchy necrosis and shrinkage of the acinar cells with ductal dilatation were seen in the SMS 201-995 injection groups which were more pronounced in Group V. As a conclusion SMS 201-995 is not effective to prevent the ongoing pathology of pancreatitis but the increasing values of amylase were limited on the level of simply induced traumatic pancreatitis. It may be useful in the suppression of the enzymatic production during the course of pancreatitis.

  2. Basolateral anion transport mechanisms underlying fluid secretion by mouse, rat and guinea-pig pancreatic ducts

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Salazar, M Paz; Pascua, Patricia; Calvo, José Julián; López, María A; Case, R Maynard; Steward, Martin C; San Román, José I

    2004-01-01

    Fluid secretion by interlobular pancreatic ducts was determined by using video microscopy to measure the rate of swelling of isolated duct segments that had sealed following overnight culture. The aim was to compare the HCO3− requirement for secretin-evoked secretion in mouse, rat and guinea-pig pancreas. In mouse and rat ducts, fluid secretion could be evoked by 10 nm secretin and 5 μm forskolin in the absence of extracellular HCO3−. In guinea-pig ducts, however, fluid secretion was totally dependent on HCO3−. Forskolin-stimulated fluid secretion by mouse and rat ducts in the absence of HCO3− was dependent on extracellular Cl− and was completely inhibited by bumetanide (30 μm). It was therefore probably mediated by a basolateral Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter. In the presence of HCO3−, forskolin-stimulated fluid secretion was reduced ∼40% by bumetanide, ∼50% by inhibitors of basolateral HCO3− uptake (3 μm EIPA and 500 μm H2DIDS), and was totally abolished by simultaneous application of all three inhibitors. We conclude that the driving force for secretin-evoked fluid secretion by mouse and rat ducts is provided by parallel basolateral mechanisms: Na+–H+ exchange and Na+–HCO3− cotransport mediating HCO3− uptake, and Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransport mediating Cl− uptake. The absence or inactivity of the Cl− uptake pathway in the guinea-pig pancreatic ducts may help to account for the much higher concentrations of HCO3− secreted in this species. PMID:14978209

  3. Beta cell device using icosahedral boride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Aselage, Terrence L.; Emin, David

    2002-01-01

    A beta cell for converting beta-particle energies into electrical energy having a semiconductor junction that incorporates an icosahedral boride compound selected from B.sub.12 As.sub.2, B.sub.12 P.sub.2, elemental boron having an .alpha.-rhombohedral structure, elemental boron having a .beta.-rhombohedral structure, and boron carbides of the chemical formula B.sub.12-x C.sub.3-x, where 0.15

  4. Expansion of beta-cell mass in response to pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rieck, Sebastian; Kaestner, Klaus H

    2010-03-01

    Inadequate beta-cell mass can lead to insulin insufficiency and diabetes. During times of prolonged metabolic demand for insulin, the endocrine pancreas can respond by increasing beta-cell mass, both by increasing cell size and by changing the balance between beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In this paper, we review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that control the adaptive expansion of beta-cell mass, focusing on the islet's response to pregnancy, a physiological state of insulin resistance. Functional characterization of factors controlling both beta-cell proliferation and survival might not only lead to the development of successful therapeutic strategies to enhance the response of the beta-cell to increased metabolic loads, but also improve islet transplantation regimens.

  5. Apoptosis of beta cells in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, Rachakatla; Saraswati, Mudigonda; Kumar, Kishore G; Rani, Surekha H

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multifactorial metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia. Apoptosis in beta cells has been observed in response to diverse stimuli, such as glucose, cytokines, free fatty acids, leptin, and sulfonylureas, leading to the activation of polyol, hexosamine, and diacylglycerol/protein kinase-C (DAG/PKC) pathways that mediate oxidative and nitrosative stress causing the release of different cytokines. Cytokines induce the expression of Fas and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) by activating the transcription factor, nuclear factor-κb, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT-1) in the β cells in the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Cytokines produced in beta cells also induce proapoptotic members of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The genetic alterations in apoptosis signaling machinery and the pathogenesis of diabetes include Fas, FasL, Akt, caspases, calpain-10, and phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten). The other gene products that are involved in diabetes are nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS2), small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), and Kruppel-like zinc finger protein Gli-similar 3 (GLIS3). The gene products having antiapoptotic nature are Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. Epigenetic mechanisms play an important role in type I and type II diabetes. Further studies on the apoptotic genes and gene products in diabetics may be helpful in pharmacogenomics and individualized treatment along with antioxidants targeting apoptosis in diabetes. PMID:25093391

  6. Nanomaterial Solutions for the Protection of Insulin Producing Beta Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, Nicole Ann

    Islet transplantation is a promising treatment for type 1 diabetes. However, even with the many successes, islet transplantation has yet to reach its full potential. Limited islet sources, loss of cell viability during isolation and culture, and post-transplant graft loss are a few of the issues preventing extensive use of islet transplantation. The application of biomaterial systems to alleviate some of the stresses affecting islet viability has led to improvements in isolation and transplantation outcomes, but problems persist. In this work we approach two distinct issues affecting islet viability; ischemic conditions and immunological attack post-transplant. Ischemic conditions have been linked to a loss of islet graft function and occur during organ preservation, islet isolation and culture, and after islets are transplanted. We show that liposomal delivery of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to beta cells can limit cell death and loss of function in ischemic conditions. We demonstrate that by functionalizing liposomes with the fibronectin-mimetic peptide PR_b, delivery of liposomes to porcine islets and rat beta cells is increased compared to nontargeted controls. Additionally, liposomes are shown to protect by providing both ATP and lipids to the ischemic cells. The delivery of ATP was investigated here but application of PR_b functionalized liposomes could be extended to other interesting cargos as well. The second area of investigation involves encapsulation of islets with silica nanoparticles to create a permselective barrier. Silica nanoparticles are an interesting material for encapsulation given their ability to be fine-tuned and further functionalized. We demonstrate that size-tunable, fluorescent silica nanoparticles can be assembled layer-by-layer on the surface of cells and that silica nanoparticle encapsulated islets are able to secrete insulin in response to a glucose challenge.

  7. Ulinastatin promotes T lymphocyte apoptosis in rats with severe acute pancreatitis via mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, C L; Li, N; Ma, T; Zhang, P; You, S Y

    2015-05-25

    We explored the influence of ulinastatin on apoptosis of T lymphocytes in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effect of ulinastatin on mitochondrial apoptosis pathways in spleen lymphocytes. Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups (N = 12): a sham operated group, a SAP group, and an ulinastatin-treated SAP group. The SAP model was established by injecting 5% sodium taurocholate into the intrapancreatobiliary duct. Study rats were sacrificed after 24 h, and splenic lymphocytes were then collected. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were labeled by direct immune fluorescence assays; the percentage of apoptotic cells, mitochondrial membrane potential levels, and mitochondria permeability transition pore opening levels were measured by flow cytometry. In the ulinastatin-treated SAP group, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T lymphocytes was significantly higher than that in the SAP group, and the apoptosis percentage of CD4(+) T lymphocytes was significantly decreased. The percentage of lymphocytes with an abnormal opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and lymphocytes with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in the ulinastatin-treated SAP group were significantly lower than that in the SAP group. Ulinastatin can directly enhance immunological function and attenuate immune suppression in SAP rats through inhibiting the apoptosis of CD4(+) T lymphocytes. These study findings demonstrate that therapeutic effects may occur through inhibiting the apoptosis induced by mitochondrial signaling pathways.

  8. GeneSpeed Beta Cell: An Online Genomics Data Repository and Analysis Resource Tailored for the Islet Cell Biologist

    PubMed Central

    Quayum, Nayeem; Kutchma, Alecksandr; Sarkar, Suparna A.; Juhl, Kirstine; Gradwohl, Gerard; Mellitzer, Georg; Hutton, John C.; Jensen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Objective. We here describe the development of a freely available online database resource, GeneSpeed Beta Cell, which has been created for the pancreatic islet and pancreatic developmental biology investigator community. Research Design and Methods. We have developed GeneSpeed Beta Cell as a separate component of the GeneSpeed database, providing a genomics-type data repository of pancreas and islet-relevant datasets interlinked with the domain-oriented GeneSpeed database. Results. GeneSpeed Beta Cell allows the query of multiple published and unpublished select genomics datasets in a simultaneous fashion (multiexperiment viewing) and is capable of defining intersection results from precomputed analysis of such datasets (multidimensional querying). Combined with the protein-domain categorization/assembly toolbox provided by the GeneSpeed database, the user is able to define spatial expression constraints of select gene lists in a relatively rigid fashion within the pancreatic expression space. We provide several demonstration case studies of relevance to islet cell biology and development of the pancreas that provide novel insight into islet biology. Conclusions. The combination of an exhaustive domain-based compilation of the transcriptome with gene array data of interest to the islet biologist affords novel methods for multidimensional querying between individual datasets in a rapid fashion, presently not available elsewhere. PMID:18795106

  9. Rosmarinic Acid Attenuates Sodium Taurocholate-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats by Inhibiting Nuclear Factor-κB Activation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Ting; Yin, Guo-Jian; Xiao, Wen-Qin; Qiu, Lei; Yu, Ge; Hu, Yan-Ling; Xing, Miao; Wu, De-Qing; Cang, Xiao-Feng; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xing-Peng; Hu, Guo-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinic Acid (RA), a caffeic acid ester, has been shown to exert anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant and antiallergic effects. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of RA in sodium taurocholate ( NaTC )-induced acute pancreatitis, both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, RA (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 2 h before sodium taurocholate injection. Rats were sacrificed 12 h, 24 h or 48 h after sodium taurocholate injection. Pretreatment with RA significantly ameliorated pancreas histopathological changes, decreased amylase and lipase activities in serum, lowered myeloperoxidase activity in the pancreas, reduced systematic and pancreatic interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and inhibited NF-κB translocation in pancreas. In vitro, pretreating the fresh rat pancreatic acinar cells with 80 μ mol/L RA 2 h before 3750 nmol/L sodium taurocholate or 10 ng/L TNF-α administration significantly attenuated the reduction of isolated pancreatic acinar cell viability and inhibited the nuclear activation and translocation of NF-κB. Based on our findings, RA appears to attenuate damage in sodium taurocholate-induced acute pancreatitis and reduce the release of inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB. These findings might provide a basis for investigating the therapeutic role of RA in managing acute pancreatits. PMID:26364660

  10. Angiopoietin-1 gene-modified human mesenchymal stem cells promote angiogenesis and reduce acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jie; He, Zhi-Gang; Qian, Dao-Hai; Lin, Sheng-Ping; Gong, Jian; Meng, Hong-Bo; Yang, Ting-Song; Sun, Wei; Xu, Bin; Zhou, Bo; Song, Zhen-Shun

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can serve as a vehicle for gene therapy. Angiopoietin-1 (ANGPT1) plays an important role in the regulation of endothelial cell survival, vascular stabilization, and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that ANGPT1 gene-modified MSCs might be a potential therapeutic approach for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. Human umbilical cord-derived MSCs with or without transfection with lentiviral vectors containing the ANGPT1 gene were delivered through the tail vein of rats 12 h after induction of SAP. Administration of MSCs alone significantly reduced pancreatic injury and inflammation, as reflected by reductions in pancreatitis severity scores and serum amylase and lipase levels as well as reducing the serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-6). Furthermore, administration of ANGPT1-transfected MSCs resulted in not only further reductions in pancreatic injury and serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, but also promotion of pancreatic angiogenesis. These results suggest that MSCs and ANGPT1 have a synergistic role in the treatment of SAP. ANGPT1 gene-modified MSCs may be developed as a potential novel therapy strategy for the treatment of SAP. PMID:25120736

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is essential for physiological Beta cell function and islet vascularization in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Christoffersson, Gustaf; Waldén, Tomas; Sandberg, Monica; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Phillipson, Mia

    2015-04-01

    The availability of paracrine factors in the islets of Langerhans, and the constitution of the beta cell basement membrane can both be affected by proteolytic enzymes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of the extracellular matrix-degrading enzyme gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp-9) on islet function in mice. Islet function of Mmp9-deficient (Mmp9(-/-)) mice and their wild-type littermates was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro. The pancreata of Mmp9(-/-) mice did not differ from wild type in islet mass or distribution. However, Mmp9(-/-) mice had an impaired response to a glucose load in vivo, with lower serum insulin levels. The glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was reduced also in vitro in isolated Mmp9(-/-) islets. The vascular density of Mmp9(-/-) islets was lower, and the capillaries had fewer fenestrations, whereas the islet blood flow was threefold higher. These alterations could partly be explained by compensatory changes in the expression of matrix-related proteins. This in-depth investigation of the effects of the loss of MMP-9 function on pancreatic islets uncovers a deteriorated beta cell function that is primarily due to a shift in the beta cell phenotype, but also due to islet vascular aberrations. This likely reflects the importance of a normal islet matrix turnover exerted by MMP-9, and concomitant release of paracrine factors sequestered on the matrix.

  12. Impact of fetal and neonatal environment on beta cell function and development of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens H; Haase, Tobias N; Jaksch, Caroline; Nalla, Amarnadh; Søstrup, Birgitte; Nalla, Anjana A; Larsen, Louise; Rasmussen, Morten; Dalgaard, Louise T; Gaarn, Louise W; Thams, Peter; Kofod, Hans; Billestrup, Nils

    2014-11-01

    The global epidemic of diabetes is a serious threat against health and healthcare expenses. Although genetics is important it does not explain the dramatic increase in incidence, which must involve environmental factors. Two decades ago the concept of the thrifty phenotype was introduced, stating that the intrauterine environment during pregnancy has an impact on the gene expression that may persist until adulthood and cause metabolic diseases like obesity and type 2 diabetes. As the pancreatic beta cells are crucial in the regulation of metabolism this article will describe the influence of normal pregnancy on the beta cells in both the mother and the fetus and how various conditions like diabetes, obesity, overnutrition and undernutrition during and after pregnancy may influence the ability of the offspring to adapt to changes in insulin demand later in life. The influence of environmental factors including nutrients and gut microbiota on appetite regulation, mitochondrial activity and the immune system that may affect beta cell growth and function directly and indirectly is discussed. The possible role of epigenetic changes in the transgenerational transmission of the adverse programming may be the most threatening aspect with regard to the global diabetes epidemics. Finally, some suggestions for intervention are presented.

  13. Generation of Beta Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: Potential for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nostro, Maria Cristina; Keller, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    The loss of beta cells in Type I Diabetes ultimately leads to insulin dependence and major complications that are difficult to manage by insulin injections. Given the complications associated with long-term administration of insulin, cell-replacement therapy is now under consideration as an alternative treatment that may someday provide a cure for this disease. Over the past 10 years, islet transplantation trials have demonstrated that it is possible to replenish beta cell function in Type I Diabetes patients and, at least temporarily, eliminate their dependency on insulin. While not yet optimal, the success of these trials has provided proof-of-principle that cell replacement therapy is a viable option for treating diabetes. Limited access to donor islets has launched a search for alternative source of beta cells for cell therapy purposes and focused the efforts of many investigators on the challenge of deriving such cells from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. Over the past five years, significant advances have been made in understanding the signaling pathways that control lineage development from hPSCs and as a consequence, it is now possible to routinely generate human insulin producing cells from both hESCs and hiPSCs. While these achievements are impressive, significant challenges do still exist, as the majority of insulin producing cells generated under these conditions are polyhormonal and non functional, likely reflecting the emergence of the polyhormonal population that is known to arise in the early embryo during the phase of pancreatic development known as the ‘first transition’. Functional beta cells, which arise during the second phase or transition of pancreatic development have been generated from hPSCs, however they are detected only following transplantation of progenitor stage cells into immunocompromised mice. With this success, our challenge now is to define the pathways that control the development and maturation of this

  14. Chronic effect of oral cholestyramine, a bile salt sequestrant, and exogenous cholecystokinin on insulin release in rats.

    PubMed

    Kogire, M; Gomez, G; Uchida, T; Ishizuka, J; Greeley, G H; Thompson, J C

    1992-01-01

    Oral cholestyramine, a bile salt sequestrant, stimulates pancreatic exocrine secretion and growth chiefly by increasing cholecystokinin (CCK) release. In this report, we examine pancreatic insulin content and insulin release from the isolated perfused pancreas in rats given oral cholestyramine (4%, wt/wt) or subcutaneous CCK-8 (1 micrograms/kg every 8 h) for 2 weeks. Cholestyramine significantly increased pancreatic weight by 32%. CCK administration significantly increased pancreatic weight by 15%. Total pancreatic content of protein and DNA were also increased significantly by cholestyramine and pancreatic protein content was increased significantly by CCK administration. Total pancreatic insulin content was not affected by cholestyramine or CCK. Both cholestyramine and CCK significantly increased the first phase of glucose (8.4 mM)-stimulated release of insulin [mean insulin output (ng/min): control, 2.0 +/- 0.1; cholestyramine, 2.7 +/- 0.2; CCK, 2.6 +/- 0.2]. Cholestyramine also significantly enhanced the second phase of glucose-stimulated release of insulin. Insulin release stimulated by CCK-8 (10(-10) M) was not affected by oral cholestyramine or CCK treatment. These findings indicate that oral cholestyramine and exogenous CCK have a stimulatory effect on beta cell function. Since pancreatic insulin content was not affected by cholestyramine and CCK treatment, cholestyramine and CCK may increase the sensitivity of beta cells to glucose. The absence of a stimulatory effect of cholestyramine and CCK administration on insulin release in response to CCK-8 may be related to a down-regulation of CCK receptors on beta cells.

  15. Wortmannin, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor, attenuates thyroid injury associated with severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Abliz, Ablikim; Deng, Wenhong; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Weixing

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that PI3K/AKT pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis. However, the exact effect of PI3K/AKT on thyroid injury associated with acute pancreatitis has not been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of wortmannin, PI3K/AKT inhibitor, on thyroid injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operating group (SO), SAP group, wortmannin treatment (WOR) group and drug control (WOR-CON) group. Serum amylase (AMY), lipase (LIP) and thyroid hormone levels were evaluated. The morphological change of thyroid tissue was analyzed under the light and transmission electron microscopy. AKT, P38MAPK and NF-κB expression in the thyroid tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were detected. Results showed that wortmannin attenuated the following: (1) serum AMY, LIP and thyroid hormone (2) pancreatic and thyroid pathological injuries (3) thyroid MDA, (4) thyroid ultrastructural change, (5) serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β (6) AKT, MAPKP38 and NF-κB expression in thyroid tissues. These results suggested that wortmannin attenuates thyroid injury in SAP rats, presumably because of its role on prevent ROS generation and inhibits the activation of P38MAPK, NF-κB pathway. Our findings provide new therapeutic targets for thyroid injury associated with SAP. PMID:26823696

  16. Wortmannin, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor, attenuates thyroid injury associated with severe acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Abliz, Ablikim; Deng, Wenhong; Sun, Rongze; Guo, Wenyi; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Weixing

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidences suggest that PI3K/AKT pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis. However, the exact effect of PI3K/AKT on thyroid injury associated with acute pancreatitis has not been investigated. This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of wortmannin, PI3K/AKT inhibitor, on thyroid injury in a rat model of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). Sixty male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham operating group (SO), SAP group, wortmannin treatment (WOR) group and drug control (WOR-CON) group. Serum amylase (AMY), lipase (LIP) and thyroid hormone levels were evaluated. The morphological change of thyroid tissue was analyzed under the light and transmission electron microscopy. AKT, P38MAPK and NF-κB expression in the thyroid tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were detected. Results showed that wortmannin attenuated the following: (1) serum AMY, LIP and thyroid hormone (2) pancreatic and thyroid pathological injuries (3) thyroid MDA, (4) thyroid ultrastructural change, (5) serum TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β (6) AKT, MAPKP38 and NF-κB expression in thyroid tissues. These results suggested that wortmannin attenuates thyroid injury in SAP rats, presumably because of its role on prevent ROS generation and inhibits the activation of P38MAPK, NF-κB pathway. Our findings provide new therapeutic targets for thyroid injury associated with SAP.

  17. G protein in stimulation of PI hydrolysis by CCK (cholecystokinin) in isolated rat pancreatic acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matozaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Choitsu; Nagao, Munehiko; Nishizaki, Hogara; Baba, Shigeaki )

    1988-11-01

    To clarify the possible role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) in the signal transducing system activated by cholecystokinin (CCK), actions of CCK on rat pancreatic acini were compared with those of fluoride, a well-known activator of stimulatory (G{sub s}) or inhibitory (G{sub i}) G protein. When acini were incubated with increasing concentrations of either CCK-octapeptide (CCK8) or NaF, a maximal stimulation of amylase release from acini occurred at 100 pM CCK8 or 10 mM NaF, respectively; this secretory rate decreased as CCK8 or NaF concentration was increased. NaF caused an increase in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} concentration from the internal Ca{sup 2+} store and stimulated accumulation of inositol phosphates in acini, as observed with CCK. Guanylimidodiphosphate activated the generation of inositol phosphates in the ({sup 3}H)inositol-labeled pancreatic acinar cell membrane preparation, with half-maximal and maximal stimulation at 1 and 10 {mu}M, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of submaximal CCK concentrations on inositol phosphate accumulation in membranes were markedly potentiated in the presence of 100 {mu}M GTP, which alone was ineffective. Combined findings of the present study strongly suggest that pancreatic CCK receptors are probably coupled to the activation of polyphosphoinositide (PI) breakdown by a G protein, which appears to be fluoride sensitive but is other than G{sub s}- or G{sub i}-like protein.

  18. Prolonged stimulation of pancreatic serous secretions by bile and sodium taurocholate in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Morrison, James D

    2012-12-01

    There have been numerous reports that infusion of either natural bile or bile salts into the duodenum evokes a rapid increase in pancreatic secretion through the release of the hormone secretin from the duodenal mucosa. We have extended this observation by the demonstration of an additional late increase in secretion which persisted for many hours and have sought to identify the processes underlying this increase. In anaesthetised rats, infusion of 20 mM taurocholate into the duodenum caused a staircase-like increase in the weight of pancreatic secretion which extended over many hours during which, the HCO[Formula: see text] and protein output of the secretion showed only minimal changes. This effect was also reproduced with intra-duodenal infusion of natural bile which was inferred to act though its taurocholate content. Since the stimulatory action was also obtained with superfusion of taurocholate or natural bile onto the small intestine and by intravenous injection of taurocholate, it was concluded that taurocholate acted by being absorbed into the bloodstream and then by exerting a stimulatory action on the exocrine pancreas. This action was inhibited by puromycin (a protein synthesis inhibitor), by furosemide (a Na( + )/K( + )/2Cl(-) cotransporter inhibitor), though not by SITS (an inhibitor of Cl(-)/HCO[Formula: see text] exchange). The long lasting increase in pancreatic serous secretion would be consistent with the possible activation of gene transcription by taurocholate leading to increased activity of the Na( + )/K( + )/2Cl(-) cotransporter through which the acinar cells increased their secretions. PMID:22538870

  19. Antiapoptotic effects of cerium oxide and yttrium oxide nanoparticles in isolated rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, A; Baeeri, M; Rahimifard, M; Navaei-Nigjeh, M; Mohammadirad, A; Pourkhalili, N; Hassani, S; Kamali, M; Abdollahi, M

    2013-05-01

    Type I diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease caused by the impairment of pancreatic β-cells mainly mediated through oxidative stress and related apoptosis. Islets transplantation seems a promising treatment for these patients, but during islets transplant, various types of stresses related to the isolation and transplantation procedure compromise the function and viability of islets. We recently hypothesized that the combination of cerium oxide (CeO2) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) nanoparticles with a potential free radical scavenger behavior should be useful to make isolated islets survive until transplanted. In the present study, oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in isolated rat pancreatic islets exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the protective effects of CeO2 and Y2O3 nanoparticles were investigated. Exposure of islets to H2O2 (50 µm, 2 h) increased intracellular oxidant formation such as reactive oxygen species and subsequently apoptosis and decreased viability, glucose-induced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Pretreatment with CeO2 and/or Y2O3 nanoparticles reduced the oxidant formation and apoptosis and increased viability, glucose-induced ATP production and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These results suggest that this combination may protect β-cell apoptosis by improving the oxidative stress-mediated apoptotic pathway.

  20. Musa sapientum with exercises attenuates hyperglycemia and pancreatic islet cells degeneration in alloxan-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Akinlolu, Adelaja Abdulazeez; Salau, Bamidele A.; Ekor, Martins; Otulana, Jubril

    2015-01-01

    Aim: We tested the hypothesis that administrations of methanolic extracts of Musa sapientum sucker (MEMS) with exercises attenuated hyperglycemia in alloxan-diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 adult male rats were divided into equal eight groups. Normoglycemic Group A was Control. Alloxan (180 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered to rats in Groups B - H to induce diabetes. Group B (diabetic control) received physiological saline. Groups C - H received MEMS (5 mg/kg), MEMS (10 mg/kg), Glibenclamide (5 mg/kg), MEMS (5 mg/kg) + exercises, MEMS (10 mg/kg) + exercises and Exercises only, respectively. Changes in body weight, blood glucose levels (BGL) and pancreatic histology were evaluated during or at the end of experiment. Body weights and BGL of rats were expressed as mean ± standard deviation and analyzed using the statistical software program SPSS 15. Statistical comparisons were done using the Student’s t-test for unpaired samples. Differences between groups were determined as significant at P ≤ 0.05. Results: Significantly (P < 0.05) decreased bodyweight was observed in B and H compared to A and C - G. Treatment with MEMS significantly (P < 0.05) decreased elevated BGL in C and D. Hypoglycemic effect of MEMS appeared enhanced with exercises in F and G. Exercises regimen alone (H) resulted in percentage reduction in BGL lower than those of C - G. Histopathological examinations revealed normal pancreas (A), atrophied islet cells (B), hyperplasia with adequate population of islet cells (C - G), and reduced hyperplasia of islet cells (H). Conclusion: MEMS with exercises attenuated hyperglycemia in alloxan-diabetic rats. PMID:26401408

  1. Pancreatic Histology and Associated Biochemical Changes in Rats on Hind-Limb Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulsby, Michael; Johnson, Emily; Akel, Nisreen; Agarwal, Rakhee; Gaddy, Dana; Dobretsov, Maxim; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2011-06-01

    The pancreas plays an important role in regulating many of the key endocrine hormones and digestive enzymes that are required for nutrition and survival of the organism. This study examines the pancreatic histology and associated biochemical changes in rats on hind limb suspension (HLS) after exposure to simulated microgravity. Results show that MDA and glutathione levels were significantly increased in the suspended (HLS) groups as compared to the control group. Plasma insulin levels averaged 2.43±0.32 ng/ml in the control animals and decreased significantly to 1.47±0.24 ng/ml in the suspended group. Histopathology revealed increased vacuolation, pyknosis, membrane thickening, increase of zymogen granules and increase in islets (both in size and number) in the suspended group as compared to the control group.

  2. Central and peripheral effects of sculpin pancreatic polypeptide and anglerfish peptide Y in rats.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, A; Rigel, D F; Chance, W T; Fischer, J E

    1992-01-01

    Sculpin pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and anglerfish peptide Y (aPY-amide) are 36-residue peptide amides isolated from the pancreas of the respective species of fish. They are 86% homologous, and exhibit about 65% homology to porcine neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY). This homology to mammalian peptides suggests that the fish peptides may constitute a good model system for structure-activity investigations. We therefore synthesized sculpin PP and aPY-amide by the solid phase method and investigated their central and peripheral effects on feeding and blood pressure, respectively. These investigations revealed that both peptides, like NPY, increased blood pressure and induced feeding in rats, presumably by interacting with receptors of NPY. Although there were comparable responses to both peptides on feeding, aPY-amide exhibited a more potent pressor effect than sculpin PP. These observations suggest that the central and peripheral effects of NPY may be mediated by different subclasses of NPY receptors. PMID:1581637

  3. Blockade of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins Aggravates Acute Pancreatitis and Blunts Atrial Natriuretic Factor’s Beneficial Effect in Rats: Role of MRP4 (ABCC4)

    PubMed Central

    Ventimiglia, María Silvia; Najenson, Ana Clara; Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Carozzo, Alejandro; Vatta, Marcelo S; Davio, Carlos A; Bianciotti, Liliana G

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) stimulates secretin-evoked cAMP efflux through multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) in the exocrine pancreas. Here we sought to establish in vivo whether this mechanism was involved in acute pancreatitis onset in the rat. Rats pretreated with or without probenecid (MRPs general inhibitor) were infused with secretin alone or with ANF. A set of these animals were given repetitive cerulein injections to induce acute pancreatitis. Plasma amylase and intrapancreatic trypsin activities were measured and histological examination of the pancreas performed. Secretin alone activated trypsinogen but induced no pancreatic histological changes. Blockade by probenecid in secretin-treated rats increased trypsin and also induced vacuolization, a hallmark of acute pancreatitis. ANF prevented the secretin response but in the absence of probenecid. In rats with acute pancreatitis, pretreatment with secretin aggravated the disease, but ANF prevented secretin-induced changes. Blockade of MRPs in rats with acute pancreatitis induced trypsinogen activation and larger cytoplasmic vacuoles as well as larger areas of necrosis and edema that were aggravated by secretin but not prevented by ANF. The temporal resolution of intracellular cAMP levels seems critical in the onset of acute pancreatitis, since secretin-evoked cAMP in a context of MRP inhibition makes the pancreas prone to injury in normal rats and aggravates the onset of acute pancreatitis. Present findings support a protective role for ANF mediated by cAMP extrusion through MRP4 and further suggest that the regulation of MRP4 by ANF would be relevant to maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis. PMID:25569802

  4. Blockade of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins Aggravates Acute Pancreatitis and Blunts Atrial Natriuretic Factor's Beneficial Effect in Rats: Role of MRP4 (ABCC4).

    PubMed

    Ventimiglia, María Silvia; Najenson, Ana Clara; Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Carozzo, Alejandro; Vatta, Marcelo S; Davio, Carlos A; Bianciotti, Liliana G

    2015-01-06

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) stimulates secretin-evoked cAMP efflux through multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) in the exocrine pancreas. Here we sought to establish in vivo whether this mechanism was involved in acute pancreatitis onset in the rat. Rats pretreated with or without probenecid (MRPs general inhibitor) were infused with secretin alone or with ANF. A set of these animals were given repetitive cerulein injections to induce acute pancreatitis. Plasma amylase and intrapancreatic trypsin activities were measured and histological examination of the pancreas performed. Secretin alone activated trypsinogen but induced no pancreatic histological changes. Blockade by probenecid in secretin-treated rats increased trypsin and also induced vacuolization, a hallmark of acute pancreatitis. ANF prevented the secretin response but in the absence of probenecid. In rats with acute pancreatitis, pretreatment with secretin aggravated the disease, but ANF prevented secretin-induced changes. Blockade of MRPs in rats with acute pancreatitis induced trypsinogen activation and larger cytoplasmic vacuoles as well as larger areas of necrosis and edema that were aggravated by secretin but not prevented by ANF. The temporal resolution of intracellular cAMP levels seems critical in the onset of acute pancreatitis, since secretin-evoked cAMP in a context of MRP inhibition makes the pancreas prone to injury in normal rats and aggravates the onset of acute pancreatitis. Present findings support a protective role for ANF mediated by cAMP extrusion through MRP4 and further suggest that the regulation of MRP4 by ANF would be relevant to maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis.

  5. Beta-cell function and mass in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Marianne O

    2009-08-01

    and reduced ability to entrain pulses with glucose. However, the role of reduced BCM and/or obesity in the development of these defects in humans is unknown. Therefore, the investigations were extended to include lean NIA/STZ minipigs where it was shown that a primary reduction of BCM leads to reduced insulin pulse mass but does not change periodicity of the pulses or the ability of glucose to entrain pulses. In contrast, obesity was found to be associated with reduced pulsatile insulin secretion and improved orderliness of glucose entrained pulses in the minipig. Furthermore obesity was associated with pancreatic lipid accumulation and increased beta-cell volume, although BCM relative to body weight was not changed. Finally, a combination of obesity and reduced BCM resulted in severely disturbed insulin secretion and severe morphological changes. Thus, results from NIA/STZ minipigs suggest that not all of the defects of rapid pulsatile insulin secretion seen in human T2DM can be explained by a primary reduction of BCM mass or up to 2 weeks of mild hyperglycemia. Furthermore, based on the results from obese minipigs, obesity in itself induces small defects in rapid pulsatile insulin secretion and the combination of obesity and reduced BCM leads to further deterioration of BCF. Another major characteristic of human diabetes is thought to be reduction of BCM and the ability to follow this parameter over time would greatly improve our understanding of disease progression and allow evaluation of pharmacological methods to increase BCM. BCM cannot, at present, be measured in vivo in humans. We therefore set out to further validate data from smaller studies in lean non-human primates and minipigs showing a correlation between measures of BCF in vivo and BCM. In a large study in lean minipigs with a range of BCM, we found that a strong stimulation of insulin secretion with a combination of glucose and arginine resulted in the best correlation to BCM, as determined using

  6. Beta-cell function and mass in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Marianne O

    2009-08-01

    and reduced ability to entrain pulses with glucose. However, the role of reduced BCM and/or obesity in the development of these defects in humans is unknown. Therefore, the investigations were extended to include lean NIA/STZ minipigs where it was shown that a primary reduction of BCM leads to reduced insulin pulse mass but does not change periodicity of the pulses or the ability of glucose to entrain pulses. In contrast, obesity was found to be associated with reduced pulsatile insulin secretion and improved orderliness of glucose entrained pulses in the minipig. Furthermore obesity was associated with pancreatic lipid accumulation and increased beta-cell volume, although BCM relative to body weight was not changed. Finally, a combination of obesity and reduced BCM resulted in severely disturbed insulin secretion and severe morphological changes. Thus, results from NIA/STZ minipigs suggest that not all of the defects of rapid pulsatile insulin secretion seen in human T2DM can be explained by a primary reduction of BCM mass or up to 2 weeks of mild hyperglycemia. Furthermore, based on the results from obese minipigs, obesity in itself induces small defects in rapid pulsatile insulin secretion and the combination of obesity and reduced BCM leads to further deterioration of BCF. Another major characteristic of human diabetes is thought to be reduction of BCM and the ability to follow this parameter over time would greatly improve our understanding of disease progression and allow evaluation of pharmacological methods to increase BCM. BCM cannot, at present, be measured in vivo in humans. We therefore set out to further validate data from smaller studies in lean non-human primates and minipigs showing a correlation between measures of BCF in vivo and BCM. In a large study in lean minipigs with a range of BCM, we found that a strong stimulation of insulin secretion with a combination of glucose and arginine resulted in the best correlation to BCM, as determined using

  7. Fisetin averts oxidative stress in pancreatic tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Prasath, Gopalan Sriram; Sundaram, Chinnakrishnan Shanmuga; Subramanian, Sorimuthu Pillai

    2013-10-01

    Persistent hyperglycemia is associated with chronic oxidative stress which contributes to the development and progression of diabetes-associated complications. The sensitivity of pancreatic β-cells to oxidative stress has been attributed to their low content of antioxidants compared with other tissues. Bioactive compounds with potent antidiabetic properties have been shown to ameliorate hyperglycemia mediated oxidative stress. Recently, we have reported that oral administration of fisetin (10 mg/Kg b.w.), a bioflavonoid found to be present in strawberries, persimmon, to STZ-induced experimental diabetic rats significantly improved normoglycemia. The present study was aimed to evaluate the antioxidant potential of fisetin in both in vitro and in vivo. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight). Fisetin was administered orally for 30 days. At the end of the study, all animals were killed. Blood samples were collected for the biochemical estimations. The antioxidant status was evaluated. Histological examinations were performed on pancreatic tissues. Fisetin treatment showed a significant decline in the levels of blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), NF-kB p65 unit (in pancreas) and IL-1β (plasma), serum nitric oxide (NO) with an elevation in plasma insulin. The treatment also improved the antioxidant status in pancreas as well as plasma of diabetic rats indicating the antioxidant potential of fisetin. In addition, the results of DPPH and ABTS assays substantiate the free radical scavenging activity of fisetin. Histological studies of the pancreas also evidenced the tissue protective nature of fisetin. It is concluded that, fisetin possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory property and may be considered as an adjunct for the treatment of diabetes.

  8. Reduced insulin secretion in protein malnourished mice is associated with multiple changes in the beta-cell stimulus-secretion coupling.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Sergi; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Marroquí, Laura; Tudurí, Eva; Vieira, Elaine; Amaral, Andressa G; Batista, Thiago M; Rafacho, Alex; Boschero, Antonio C; Nadal, Angel; Carneiro, Everardo M; Quesada, Ivan

    2010-08-01

    The mechanism by which protein malnutrition impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the pancreatic beta-cell is not completely known but may be related to alterations in the signaling events involved in insulin release. Here, we aimed to study the stimulus-secretion coupling of beta-cells from mice fed with low-protein (LP) diet or normal-protein (NP) diet for 8 wk after weaning. Patch-clamp measurements in isolated cells showed that beta-cells from LP mice had a resting membrane potential that was more hyperpolarized than controls. Additionally, depolarization and generation of action potentials in response to stimulatory glucose concentrations were also impaired in beta-cells of LP mice. All these alterations in the LP group were most likely attributed to higher ATP-dependent K(+) (K(ATP)) channel activity in resting conditions and lower efficiency of glucose to induce the closure of these channels. Moreover, a Western blot analysis revealed higher protein levels of the sulphonylurea receptor of the K(ATP) channel in islets of LP mice. Because beta-cell Ca(2+) signals depend on electrical activity, intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations were measured by fluorescence microscopy in intact islets, indicating a lower response to glucose in the LP group. Finally, cell-to-cell synchrony of Ca(2+) signals was analyzed by confocal microscopy. Islets from LP mice exhibited a decreased level of coupling among beta-cells, which was probably due to the low expression levels of connexin 36. Therefore, low-protein diet leads to several alterations in the stimulus-secretion coupling of pancreatic beta-cells that might explain the diminished insulin secretion in response to glucose in this malnutrition state.

  9. Protective Effect of Thalidomide on Liver Injury in Rats with Acute Pancreatitis via Inhibition of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peng; Fan, Li-Juan; Li, Hong-Yun; Meng, Qing-Shun; Liu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the preventive effect of thalidomide on acute pancreatitis-associated liver injury in the rat and analyze its relationship with oxidative stress. The acute pancreatitis of rats was induced by the retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. Thalidomide (100 mg/kg) was given daily via the intragastric route for 8 days before this injection. The levels of oxidative stress parameters including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the liver were detected by biochemical assay. Nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κBp65), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein and mRNA levels in the liver were detected using western blots and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Compared with the untreated model group, liver histopathology, SOD, GSHpx, MDA levels, NF-κBp65, TNF-α, ICAM-1 protein, and mRNA levels in the liver of rats given thalidomide were improved significantly. Results demonstrate that thalidomide may exert its effects on oxidative stress to attenuate the progression of acute pancreatitis-associated liver injury in rats.

  10. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on L-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mirmalek, Seyed Abbas; Gholamrezaei Boushehrinejad, Ala; Yavari, Hassan; Kardeh, Bahareh; Parsa, Yekta; Salimi-Tabatabaee, Seyed Alireza; Yadollah-Damavandi, Soheila; Parsa, Tina; Shahverdi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 on L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats regarding biomarkers and morphologic changes. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 equal groups. Control group received intraperitoneal normal saline, while in sham and experimental groups 1 and 2 pancreatitis was induced with L-arginine. E1 and E2 groups were treated with a single dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg Q10, respectively. Serum lipase and amylase, along with pancreas IL-10, IL-1β, and TNF-α, were measured. For evaluation of oxidative stress, pancreatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were assessed. Histopathological examination for morphologic investigation was conducted. Serum amylase and lipase, as well as TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines, reverted with administration of Q10 in consistence with dosage. In contrast, Q10 assisted in boosting of IL-10 with higher dosage (200 mg/kg). A similar pattern for oxidative stress markers was noticed. Both MDA and MPO levels declined with increased dosage, contrary to elevation of SOD and GSH. Histopathology was in favor of protective effects of Q10. Our findings proved the amelioration of pancreatic injury by Q10, which suggest the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant property of Q10 and its potential therapeutic role. PMID:27190575

  11. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on L-Arginine-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rat.

    PubMed

    Mirmalek, Seyed Abbas; Gholamrezaei Boushehrinejad, Ala; Yavari, Hassan; Kardeh, Bahareh; Parsa, Yekta; Salimi-Tabatabaee, Seyed Alireza; Yadollah-Damavandi, Soheila; Parsa, Tina; Shahverdi, Ehsan; Jangholi, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 on L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in rats regarding biomarkers and morphologic changes. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 equal groups. Control group received intraperitoneal normal saline, while in sham and experimental groups 1 and 2 pancreatitis was induced with L-arginine. E1 and E2 groups were treated with a single dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg Q10, respectively. Serum lipase and amylase, along with pancreas IL-10, IL-1β, and TNF-α, were measured. For evaluation of oxidative stress, pancreatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were assessed. Histopathological examination for morphologic investigation was conducted. Serum amylase and lipase, as well as TNF-α and IL-1β cytokines, reverted with administration of Q10 in consistence with dosage. In contrast, Q10 assisted in boosting of IL-10 with higher dosage (200 mg/kg). A similar pattern for oxidative stress markers was noticed. Both MDA and MPO levels declined with increased dosage, contrary to elevation of SOD and GSH. Histopathology was in favor of protective effects of Q10. Our findings proved the amelioration of pancreatic injury by Q10, which suggest the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant property of Q10 and its potential therapeutic role.

  12. Beta Cells Secrete Significant and Regulated Levels of Insulin for Long Periods when Seeded onto Acellular Micro-Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sionov, Ronit Vogt; Finesilver, Gershon; Sapozhnikov, Lena; Soroker, Avigail; Zlotkin-Rivkin, Efrat; Saad, Yocheved; Kahana, Meygal; Bodaker, Matan; Alpert, Evgenia; Mitrani, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain significant and regulated insulin secretion from human beta cells ex vivo. Long-term culture of human pancreatic islets and attempts at expanding human islet cells normally result in loss of beta-cell phenotype. We propose that to obtain proper ex vivo beta cell function, there is a need to develop three-dimensional structures that mimic the natural islet tissue microenvironment. We here describe the preparation of endocrine micro-pancreata (EMPs) that are made up of acellular organ-derived micro-scaffolds seeded with human intact or enzymatically dissociated islets. We show that EMPs constructed by seeding whole islets, freshly enzymatically-dissociated islets or even dissociated islets grown first in standard monolayer cultures express high levels of key beta-cell specific genes and secrete quantities of insulin per cell similar to freshly isolated human islets in a glucose-regulated manner for more than 3 months in vitro. PMID:26416226

  13. Amelioration of pancreatic and renal derangements in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by polyphenol extracts of Ginger (Zingiber officinale) rhizome.

    PubMed

    Kazeem, Mutiu Idowu; Akanji, Musbau Adewunmi; Yakubu, Musa Toyin

    2015-12-01

    Free and bound polyphenol extracts of Zingiber officinale rhizome were investigated for their antidiabetic potential in the pancreatic and renal tissues of diabetic rats at a dose of 500mg/kg body weight. Forty Wistar rats were completely randomized into five groups: A-E consisting of eight animals each. Group A (control) comprises normal healthy animals and were orally administered 1.0mL distilled water on a daily basis for 42 days while group B-E were made up of 50mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Group C and D received 1.0mL 500mg/kg body weight free and bound polyphenol extracts respectively while group E received 1.0mL 0.6mg/kg of glibenclamide. Administration of the extracts to the diabetic rats significantly reduced (p<0.05) serum glucose and urea concentrations, increased (p<0.05) serum insulin and Homeostatic Model Assessment for β-cell dysfunction (HOMA-β) while the level of creatinine and Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) were not affected. Histological examination of the pancreas and kidney revealed restoration of the structural derangements caused by streptozotocin in the polyphenol extracts treated diabetic rats compared to the control groups. Therefore, polyphenols from Zingiber officinale could ameliorate diabetes-induced pancreatic and renal derangements in rats.

  14. Islet distribution of Peptide YY and its regulatory role in primary mouse islets and immortalised rodent and human beta-cell function and survival.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dawood; Vasu, Srividya; Moffett, R Charlotte; Irwin, Nigel; Flatt, Peter R

    2016-11-15

    Recent evidence suggests that the classic gut peptide, Peptide YY (PYY), could play a fundamental role in endocrine pancreatic function. In the present study expression of PYY and its NPY receptors on mouse islets and immortalised rodent and human beta-cells was examined together with the effects of both major circulating forms of PYY, namely PYY(1-36) and PYY(3-36), on beta-cell function, murine islet adaptions to insulin deficiency/resistance, as well as direct effects on cultured beta-cell proliferation and apoptosis. In vivo administration of PYY(3-36), but not PYY(1-36), markedly (p < 0.05) decreased food intake in overnight fasted mice. Neither form of PYY affected glucose disposal or insulin secretion following an i.p. glucose challenge. However, in vitro, PYY(1-36) and PYY(3-36) inhibited (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001) glucose, alanine and GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion from immortalised rodent and human beta-cells, as well as isolated mouse islets, by impeding alterations in membrane potential, [Ca(2+)]i and elevations of cAMP. Mice treated with multiple low dose streptozotocin presented with severe (p < 0.01) loss of beta-cell mass accompanied by notable increases (p < 0.001) in alpha and PP cell numbers. In contrast, hydrocortisone-induced insulin resistance increased islet number (p < 0.01) and beta-cell mass (p < 0.001). PYY expression was consistently observed in alpha-, PP- and delta-, but not beta-cells. Streptozotocin decreased islet PYY co-localisation with PP (p < 0.05) and somatostatin (p < 0.001), whilst hydrocortisone increased PYY co-localisation with glucagon (p < 0.05) in mice. More detailed in vitro investigations revealed that both forms of PYY augmented (p < 0.05 to p < 0.01) immortalised human and rodent beta-cell proliferation and protected against streptozotocin-induced cytotoxicity, to a similar or superior extent as the well characterised beta-cell proliferative and anti-apoptotic agent GLP-1. Taken together

  15. Normal pancreatic and intestinal enzymes in hypophagic growth-retarded rats that received dorsomedial hypothalamic lesions shortly after weaning.

    PubMed

    Bernardis, L L; Lee, P C; Brooks, S; Lebenthal, E

    1984-08-01

    Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral electrolytic lesions in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nuclei (DMNL rats). Sham-operated rats served as controls. After being fed lab chow for two postoperative weeks, the animals were divided into four groups. One group of DMNL rats and controls received a high-caloric diet (high-fat diet, chocolate chip cookies, 32% sucrose solution, potato chips and marshmallows), whereas another group of DMNL rats and controls continued to receive lab chow. The experiment was terminated on the 185th postoperative day. In accordance with previous findings, DMNL rats, irrespective of diet, were lighter and shorter than controls. In addition, DMNL rats fed junk food were lighter than DMNL rats fed lab chow, and junk-fed controls weighed as much as chow-fed controls. Both DMNL rats and controls fed junk food were also shorter and showed higher carcass fat than their chow-fed counterparts. Also, DMNL rats fed junk food had less carcass fat than junk-fed sham-operated controls, whereas in accordance with previous findings, there was no difference between chow-fed DMNL rats and chow-fed sham-operated controls. Irrespective of diet, DMNL rats ate less calories than their respective sham-operated controls. Both absolute and percent pancreas weight and protein/pancreas were unaffected in DMNL rats but were reduced in both junk-fed groups in comparison with their chow-fed counterparts. Both concentrations and contents of pancreatic trypsinogen, amylase and lipase were unaffected in DMNL rats but total activities of all three enzymes were dramatically reduced in the junk-fed compared with the chow-fed DMNL rats.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Effect of urinary trypsin inhibitor on pancreatic cellular and lysosomal fragility in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hirano, T; Manabe, T; Tobe, T

    1993-04-01

    We evaluated the protective effect and the mechanism of action of the trypsin inhibitor, urinastatin, extracted from human urine, in experimental acute pancreatitis induced by a supramaximal dose of cerulein (5 micrograms/kg/hr for 3.5 hr). Urinastatin in a dose of 10,000 units/kg/hr was given by three different methods of continuous infusion: (1) 2 hr before and during cerulein infusion, (2) only during cerulein infusion, and (3) starting 1 hr after the beginning of cerulein infusion and continued for 3.5 hr. In protocol 1 and 2 urinastatin was significantly more protective than in 3. In protocol 1 urinastatin was very protective in all parameters tested (serum amylase level, pancreatic water and amylase content, distribution of lysosomal enzymes, cellular and lysosomal fragility). These results suggest that the administration of urinastatin before and during cerulein infusion may suppress the pathogenesis and evolution of pancreatitis by inhibiting the chain reaction of pancreatic enzyme activation closely related to redistribution of lysosomal enzyme and lysosomal fragility.

  17. Calbindin-D(28k) controls [Ca(2+)](i) and insulin release. Evidence obtained from calbindin-d(28k) knockout mice and beta cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sooy, K.; Schermerhorn, T.; Noda, M.; Surana, M.; Rhoten, W. B.; Meyer, M.; Fleischer, N.; Sharp, G. W.; Christakos, S.

    1999-01-01

    The role of the calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D(28k) in potassium/depolarization-stimulated increases in the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and insulin release was investigated in pancreatic islets from calbindin-D(28k) nullmutant mice (knockouts; KO) or wild type mice and beta cell lines stably transfected and overexpressing calbindin. Using single islets from KO mice and stimulation with 45 mM KCl, the peak of [Ca(2+)](i) was 3.5-fold greater in islets from KO mice compared with wild type islets (p < 0.01) and [Ca(2+)](i) remained higher during the plateau phase. In addition to the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in response to KCl there was also a significant increase in insulin release in islets isolated from KO mice. Evidence for modulation by calbindin of [Ca(2+)](i) and insulin release was also noted using beta cell lines. Rat calbindin was stably expressed in betaTC-3 and betaHC-13 cells. In response to depolarizing concentrations of K(+), insulin release was decreased by 45-47% in calbindin expressing betaTC cells and was decreased by 70-80% in calbindin expressing betaHC cells compared with insulin release from vector transfected betaTC or betaHC cells (p < 0.01). In addition, the K(+)-stimulated intracellular calcium peak was markedly inhibited in calbindin expressing betaHC cells compared with vector transfected cells (225 nM versus 1,100 nM, respectively). Buffering of the depolarization-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](i) was also observed in calbindin expressing betaTC cells. In summary, our findings, using both isolated islets from calbindin-D(28k) KO mice and beta cell lines, establish a role for calbindin in the modulation of depolarization-stimulated insulin release and suggest that calbindin can control the rate of insulin release via regulation of [Ca(2+)](i).

  18. Induced ICER I{gamma} down-regulates cyclin A expression and cell proliferation in insulin-producing {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Akari; Weir, Gordon C.; Bonner-Weir, Susan . E-mail: susan.bonner-weir@joslin.harvard.edu

    2005-04-15

    We have previously found that cyclin A expression is markedly reduced in pancreatic {beta}-cells by cell-specific overexpression of repressor inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER I{gamma}) in transgenic mice. Here we further examined regulatory effects of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A gene expression using Min6 cells, an insulin-producing cell line. The cyclin A promoter luciferase assay showed that ICER I{gamma} directly repressed cyclin A gene transcription. In addition, upon ICER I{gamma} overexpression, cyclin A mRNA levels markedly decreased, thereby confirming an inhibitory effect of ICER I{gamma} on cyclin A expression. Suppression of cyclin A results in inhibition of BrdU incorporation. Under normal culture conditions endogenous cyclin A is abundant in these cells, whereas ICER is hardly detectable. However, serum starvation of Min6 cells induces ICER I{gamma} expression with a concomitant very low expression level of cyclin A. Cyclin A protein is not expressed unless the cells are in active DNA replication. These results indicate a potentially important anti-proliferative effect of ICER I{gamma} in pancreatic {beta} cells. Since ICER I{gamma} is greatly increased in diabetes as well as in FFA- or high glucose-treated islets, this effect may in part exacerbate diabetes by limiting {beta}-cell proliferation.

  19. Sources of beta cells inside the pancreas.

    PubMed

    De Groef, Sofie; Staels, Willem; Van Gassen, Naomi; Lemper, Marie; Yuchi, Yixing; Sojoodi, Mozhdeh; Bussche, Leen; Heremans, Yves; Leuckx, Gunter; De Leu, Nico; Van de Casteele, Mark; Baeyens, Luc; Heimberg, Harry

    2016-09-01

    The generation of beta(-like) cells to compensate for their absolute or relative shortage in type 1 and type 2 diabetes is an obvious therapeutic strategy. Patients first received grafts of donor islet cells over 25 years ago, but this procedure has not become routine in clinical practice because of a donor cell shortage and (auto)immune problems. Transplantation of differentiated embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells may overcome some but not all the current limitations. Reprogramming exocrine cells towards functional beta(-like) cells would offer an alternative abundant and autologous source of beta(-like) cells. This review focuses on work by our research group towards achieving such a source of cells. It summarises a presentation given at the 'Can we make a better beta cell?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Amin Ardestani and Kathrin Maedler, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3892-9 , and by Heiko Lickert and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3949-9 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Shanta Persaud (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3870-2 ). PMID:27053238

  20. Efficacy of thymosin α1 and interferon α for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIAOQIN; ZENG, XIAOYAN; YANG, BO; ZHAO, SHAN; CHEN, WEI; GUO, XUAN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of treatment with thymosin α1 (TA1) or interferon α (IFNα) following the establishment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. A total of 144 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. The rats in all four groups were celiotomized, and the rats in the control group were administered with an intravenous injection of saline. The three other groups were administered with 5% 1 ml/kg sodium taurocholate via the cholangiopancreatic duct. SAP group rats were administered with an intravenous injection of saline; TA1 group rats received 26.7 µg/kg TA1; and interferon α (INFα) group rats received 4.0×105 U/kg IFNα. The rats were anesthetized and blood samples were collected from the animals 3, 12 and 24 h after surgery. The levels of T cell subsets, serum enzyme indicators, cytokines and procalcitonin (PCT) were measured. The general conditions of the rats were observed until sacrifice, and pancreatic and lung tissue samples were sampled for hematoxylin and eosin staining and histological scoring. The expression levels of aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, α-amylase (AMY), P-type-amylase, lipase, PCT, tumor-necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-18 in the TA1 and IFNα-treated rats were significantly lower, compared with those of the SAP rats within the first 24 h of model establishment (P<0.05). The TA1 and IFNα-treated rats exhibited significantly increased levels of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and an increased ratio of CD4+/CD8+ cells, compared with SAP rats. Histological analysis revealed that the TA1 and IFNα-treated rats exhibited significantly ameliorated pancreas and lung damage, and mortality rates were reduced from 50.0% (6/12) to 25.0% (3/12) and 33.3% (4/12), respectively. The immunomodulatory agents TA1 and IFNα reduced acute inflammation, decreasing cell damage and enhancing immune function and survival rates in the SAP rats. PMID:26330363

  1. Efficacy of thymosin α1 and interferon α for the treatment of severe acute pancreatitis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Shan; Chen, Wei; Guo, Xuan

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of treatment with thymosin α1 (TA1) or interferon α (IFNα) following the establishment of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) in rats. A total of 144 Sprague‑Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. The rats in all four groups were celiotomized, and the rats in the control group were administered with an intravenous injection of saline. The three other groups were administered with 5% 1 ml/kg sodium taurocholate via the cholangiopancreatic duct. SAP group rats were administered with an intravenous injection of saline; TA1 group rats received 26.7 µg/kg TA1; and interferon α (INFα) group rats received 4.0x105 U/kg IFNα. The rats were anesthetized and blood samples were collected from the animals 3, 12 and 24 h after surgery. The levels of T cell subsets, serum enzyme indicators, cytokines and procalcitonin (PCT) were measured. The general conditions of the rats were observed until sacrifice, and pancreatic and lung tissue samples were sampled for hematoxylin and eosin staining and histological scoring. The expression levels of aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, α‑amylase (AMY), P‑type‑amylase, lipase, PCT, tumor‑necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)‑4, IL‑5, and IL‑18 in the TA1 and IFNα‑treated rats were significantly lower, compared with those of the SAP rats within the first 24 h of model establishment (P<0.05). The TA1 and IFNα‑treated rats exhibited significantly increased levels of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and an increased ratio of CD4+/CD8+ cells, compared with SAP rats. Histological analysis revealed that the TA1 and IFNα‑treated rats exhibited significantly ameliorated pancreas and lung damage, and mortality rates were reduced from 50.0% (6/12) to 25.0% (3/12) and 33.3% (4/12), respectively. The immunomodulatory agents TA1 and IFNα reduced acute inflammation, decreasing cell damage and enhancing immune function and survival rates in the SAP rats.

  2. Sulfasalazine inhibits inflammation and fibrogenesis in pancreas via NF-κB signaling pathway in rats with oxidative stress-induced pancreatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Ru; Tian, Fei-Long; Yan, Ming-Xian; Fan, Jin-Hua; Wang, Li-Yun; Kuang, Rong-Guang; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background Pathogenesis and effective therapeutics of chronic pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis remain uncertain. Purpose To investigate the effects of sulfasalazine (SF) on pancreatic inflammation and fibrogenesis. Methods Chronic pancreatic injury in rats was induced by diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and interfered by SF through intraperitoneal injection. The rats were divided into five groups: group N, normal control group, rats were treated with dilated water only; group DS1, rats received SF (10 mg/kg) 2 hours before DDC treatment; group DS2, rats were treated with DDC and then SF (100 mg/kg, twice a week); group DS3, rats were treated with DDC, then SF (100 mg/kg, thrice a week); and group DDC, rats were treated with DDC only. Pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis were determined by hematoxylin and eosin staining and Sirius red staining. The genes and proteins related to NF-κB pathway and fibrogenesis including NF-κB/p65, TNF-α, ICAM-1, α-SMA, and Con 1 were detected by immunohistochemical staining, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. Results Rats in the DDC and DS1 groups showed the highest histological scores after DDC treatment, but the scores of DS2 and DS3 groups decreased significantly when compared with the DDC group. Sirius red staining showed collagen formation clearly in DDC and DS1 rats rather than in DS2 and DS3 rats. NF-κB/p65, ICAM-1, and α-SMA were strongly expressed in DDC and DS1 rats, while DS2 and DS3 rats showed mild to moderate expression by immunohistochemistry. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed increased levels of NF-κB/p65, ICAM-1, TNF-α, α-SMA, and Con 1 mRNA in DDC and DS1 rats in comparison to normal controls. The mRNA levels of these molecules in DS2 and DS3 rats were significantly lower than those in DS1 and DDC rats. Western blotting demonstrated that the NF-κB/p65, ICAM-1, and α-SMA expressions in pancreatic tissues of the rats of the DDC group were more clear

  3. Salutary and prophylactic effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on acute pancreatitis and concomitant gastroduodenal lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Sikirić, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarević, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagić, V; Turković, B; Rotkvić, I; Mise, S; Zoricić, I; Jurina, L; Konjevoda, P; Hanzevacki, M; Ljubanović, D; Separović, J; Gjurasin, M; Bratulić, M; Artuković, B; Jelovac, N; Buljat, G

    1996-07-01

    The superior effectiveness of a new pentadecapeptide, BPC 157, on gastrointestinal and liver lesions, in conjunction with an antiinflammatory and analgetic activity was recently noted. In the present study, BPC 157 was tested as either a protective or healing agent in bile duct ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in rats. In addition, the positive influence of BPC 157 on concomitantly developed gastric and duodenal lesions was simultaneously investigated. BPC 157 (10 microg, 10 ng/kg body wt, intraperitoneally or intragastrically) was given prophylactically 1 hr before ligation, whereas the therapy was given once daily beginning with the 24 hr following ligation (last application 24 hr before killing). The effect was investigated at daily intervals until the end of the fifth day after ligation. In the pretreatment regimen, a strong pancreas protection was obtained. When applied in the condition of already established severe acute pancreatitis, an obvious salutory effect was consistently noted. Assessing the appearance of the necrosis, edema, neutrophils, and mononuclears, consistently less necrosis, edema, and neutrophils, but more mononuclears, were found in BPC-treated rats. Likewise, in studies of the serum amylase values, relative to control data, a markedly lower rise (BPC pretreatment regimen) as well as a worsening of the already raised values (BPC therapy regimen) was noted. Along with its beneficial effect on pancreatitis, a positive influence of BPC 157 on the gastric and duodenal lesion course in bile duct-ligated rats was noted in both the pre- and posttreatment regimen. Taken together, in further studies of acute pancreatitis therapy, BPC could be an interesting and useful agent with an additional positive impact on concomitant gastroduodenal pathology. PMID:8689934

  4. Serotonin competence of mouse beta cells during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Goyvaerts, Lotte; Schraenen, Anica; Schuit, Frans

    2016-07-01

    Pregnancy is a key mammalian reproductive event in which growth and differentiation of the fetus imposes extra metabolic and hormonal demands on the mother. Its successful outcome depends on major changes in maternal blood circulation, metabolism and endocrine function. One example is the endocrine pancreas, where beta cells undergo a number of changes in pregnancy that result in enhanced functional beta cell mass in order to compensate for the rising metabolic needs for maternal insulin. During the last 5 years, a series of studies have increased our understanding of the molecular events involved in this functional adaptation. In the mouse, a prominent functional change during pregnancy is the capacity of some beta cells to produce serotonin. In this review we will discuss the mechanism and potential effects of pregnancy-related serotonin production in beta cells, considering functional consequences at the local intra-islet and systemic level. PMID:27056372

  5. Selective destruction of mouse islet beta cells by human T lymphocytes in a newly-established humanized type 1 diabetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yong; Guo, Chengshan; Hwang, David; Lin, Brian; Dingeldein, Michael; Mihailescu, Dan; Sam, Susan; Sidhwani, Seema; Zhang, Yongkang; Jain, Sumit; Skidgel, Randal A.; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Mazzone, Theodore; Holterman, Mark J.

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Establish a human immune-mediated type 1 diabetic model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. {yields} Using the irradiated diabetic NOD mouse spleen mononuclear cells as trigger. {yields} The islet {beta} cells were selectively destroyed by infiltrated human T cells. {yields} The model can facilitate translational research to find a cure for type 1 diabetes. -- Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by a T cell-mediated autoimmune response that leads to the loss of insulin-producing {beta} cells. The optimal preclinical testing of promising therapies would be aided by a humanized immune-mediated T1D model. We develop this model in NOD-scid IL2r{gamma}{sup null} mice. The selective destruction of pancreatic islet {beta} cells was mediated by human T lymphocytes after an initial trigger was supplied by the injection of irradiated spleen mononuclear cells (SMC) from diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. This resulted in severe insulitis, a marked loss of total {beta}-cell mass, and other related phenotypes of T1D. The migration of human T cells to pancreatic islets was controlled by the {beta} cell-produced highly conserved chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and its receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4, as demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments using antibody to CXCR4. The specificity of humanized T cell-mediated immune responses against islet {beta} cells was generated by the local inflammatory microenvironment in pancreatic islets including human CD4{sup +} T cell infiltration and clonal expansion, and the mouse islet {beta}-cell-derived CD1d-mediated human iNKT activation. The selective destruction of mouse islet {beta} cells by a human T cell-mediated immune response in this humanized T1D model can mimic those observed in T1D patients. This model can provide a valuable tool for translational research into T1D.

  6. Adenoviral infection or deferoxamine? Two approaches to overexpress VEGF in beta-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Allan; Bietiger, William; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Maillard, Elisa; Pinget, Michel; Kessler, Laurence; Sigrist, Severine

    2009-07-01

    Rapid and adequate revascularization of transplanted islets is important for their survival and function during transplantation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could play a critical role with respect to islet revascularization. The aim of this study was to compare two strategies that are used to overexpress VEGF in beta-cells: (1) gene therapy through adenoviral infection and (2) a pharmacological approach using deferoxamine (DFO). beta-Cell lines from rat insulinoma (RINm5F) were either infected using an adenovirus encoding the gene of human VEGF 165 or incubated with DFO. One day after treatment, the viability of RINm5F cells was preserved with 10 micromol/L of DFO (103.95 +/- 5.66% toward control; n = 4). In addition, adenoviral infection maintained the viability of cells for all the concentrations used. In both treatments, overexpression of VEGF was in a comparable level. Finally, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 indicated that the apoptosis increased in infected beta-cells whereas treatment with DFO seems to be antiapoptotic. Our results suggest that the use of DFO could be a realistic approach to improve the vascularization of islets during transplantation. PMID:19527112

  7. Early-life origins of type 2 diabetes: fetal programming of the beta-cell mass.

    PubMed

    Portha, Bernard; Chavey, Audrey; Movassat, Jamileh

    2011-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests that an abnormal intrauterine milieu elicited by maternal metabolic disturbances as diverse as undernutrition, placental insufficiency, diabetes or obesity, may program susceptibility in the fetus to later develop chronic degenerative diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. This paper examines the developmental programming of glucose intolerance/diabetes by disturbed intrauterine metabolic condition experimentally obtained in various rodent models of maternal protein restriction, caloric restriction, overnutrition or diabetes, with a focus on the alteration of the developing beta-cell mass. In most of the cases, whatever the type of initial maternal metabolic stress, the beta-cell adaptive growth which normally occurs during gestation, does not take place in the pregnant offspring and this results in the development of gestational diabetes. Therefore gestational diabetes turns to be the ultimate insult targeting the offspring beta-cell mass and propagates diabetes risk to the next generation again. The aetiology and the transmission of spontaneous diabetes as encountered in the GK/Par rat model of type 2 diabetes, are discussed in such a perspective. This review also discusses the non-genomic mechanisms involved in the installation of the programmed effect as well as in its intergenerational transmission.

  8. Pancreatic metaplasia in the gastro-achlorhydria in WTC-dfk rat, a potassium channel Kcnq1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Kuwamura, M; Okajima, R; Yamate, J; Kotani, T; Kuramoto, T; Serikawa, T

    2008-07-01

    The WTC-deafness Kyoto (dfk) rat is a new mutant characterized by deafness and abnormal, imbalanced behavior. WTC-dfk rats carry an intragenic deletion at the Kcnq1 gene; KCNQ1 plays an important role in K(+) homeostasis, and the mutation of Kcnq1 causes a cardiac long QT syndrome in humans. Here, we studied stomach lesions in these WTC-dfk rats. The most characteristic pathologic feature in the stomach was the appearance of hypertrophic gastric glands in the stomach body. The hypertrophic cells had many eosinophilic granules in their cytoplasm, and these granules were stained red with Azan stain; stained positively for trypsinogen, amylase, and chymotrypsin; and did not stain positively for pepsinogen when using immunohistochemical analysis. These staining results suggested a metaplasia toward a pancreatic acinar cells. Extensive fibrosis was found in the bottom part of the mucosa of 34-week-old WTC-dfk rats, suggesting a progression of stomach lesions with aging. Although cells that were positive for proliferating cell nuclear antigen were restricted in the area of the glandular neck in WTC control rats, positive cells in WTC-dfk rats were scattered throughout the mucosa. The parietal cells in WTC-dfk rats were negative for KCNQ1 immunohistochemical analysis. These findings indicate that a deficiency in rat Kcnq1 provokes an abnormal proliferation and differentiation of gastric glandular cells.

  9. MCP-1 but not CINC synthesis is increased in rat pancreatic acini in response to cerulein hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Madhav; Brady, Mark; Kang, Yun Kyung; Costello, Eithne; Newton, Darren J; Christmas, Stephen E; Neoptolemos, John P; Slavin, John

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators including chemokines play a critical role in acute pancreatitis. The precise nature of early inflammatory signals within the pancreas remains, however, unclear. We examined the ability of isolated pancreatic acini to synthesize CC chemokine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and CXC chemokine cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC) and the response to the secretagogue cerulein at physiological and supraphysiological concentrations. Isolated rat pancreatic acini maintained in short-term (< or =48 h) primary culture constitutively synthesized MCP-1 and CINC. Cerulein (10(-7) M; supramaximal dose) increased production of MCP-1 but not CINC. Cerulein-induced increase in MCP-1 synthesis was accompanied by increase in nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation shown by EMSA. Pretreatment with NF-kappaB inhibitors N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and N-tosylphenyalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) blocked cerulein-induced NF-kappaB activation and abolished cerulein's effect on MCP-1 synthesis. Pretreatment with calcium antagonist BAPTA-AM also blocked cerulein's effect on MCP-1 synthesis. These results indicate that isolated acini synthesize MCP-1 and CINC and support the idea of acinar-derived chemokines as early mediators of inflammatory response in acute pancreatitis. Although cerulein hyperstimulation increased MCP-1 synthesis by a calcium-dependent mechanism involving NF-kappaB activation, CINC synthesis was not affected. This suggests that regulation of CC and CXC chemokines within acinar cells may be quite different.

  10. Insulin release and insulin mRNA levels in rat islets of Langerhans cultured on extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, R; Henderson, T E; Wang, Y; Montrose-Rafizadeh, C; Egan, J M

    1996-07-01

    Primary culture of rat islets of Langerhans lose glucose responsiveness and eventually die when cultured for a long period of time. In this study we evaluated the effect of matrigel, a basement membrane extract, on (i) islet cell survival, (ii) cell responsiveness following a glucose challenge, and (iii) mRNA levels for insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. Pancreatic islets were isolated by collagenase digestion and plated in culture dishes either coated or not with a matrigel layer. Using the reverse hemolytic plaque assay, we determined the total number of insulin-secreting cells and the amount of insulin secreted by individual beta cells. After 1 h of exposure to 5 mM glucose, beta cells from 6-month-old rat islets cultured for 6 weeks on matrigel showed an equal number of insulin-secreting cells c